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Sample records for brachytherapy catheter patterns

  1. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

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    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  2. Brachytherapy catheter spacing and stabilization technique.

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    Demanes, D Jeffrey; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Park, Sang-June; Steinberg, Michael L; Hayes, John K; Kamrava, Mitchell R

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate catheter spacing, implant stability, and patient comfort during multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy. Uniform and consistent spacing of multiple interstitial implant catheters can be difficult because individual catheters may become displaced during the course of treatment. The authors have developed a brachytherapy catheter fixation method using Jackson-Pratt (JP) drains that can be used within wounds to maintain catheter spacing or on the skin surface for applicator fixation. JP drains are threaded over the implant needles to space and stabilize the implant geometry. The needles are then replaced with the usual brachytherapy catheters. Surgically directed ("open") placement of implant catheters is less prone to displacement when a drain connects and spaces the catheters in the wound. Fixation on the skin surface can also be achieved with the JP drains, which make the friction buttons optional. The soft drain material helps avoid discomfort and pressure injury sometimes associated with hard plastic buttons. Small (10 French) round JP drains are suitable for breast, and head and neck sites and larger 7×10-mm flat JP drains for extremity sarcomas, abdominal, or thoracic tumors. The complex brachytherapy devices fashioned from widely available surgical drains effectively guide and maintain geometry for multicatheter interstitial implants. Stable implant geometry leads to more reliable implementation of brachytherapy dosimetry. Patient comfort is improved and soft tissue injury from hard-edged buttons is avoided. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accurate model-based segmentation of gynecologic brachytherapy catheter collections in MRI-images.

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    Mastmeyer, Andre; Pernelle, Guillaume; Ma, Ruibin; Barber, Lauren; Kapur, Tina

    2017-12-01

    The gynecological cancer mortality rate, including cervical, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, is more than 20,000 annually in the US alone. In many countries, including the US, external-beam radiotherapy followed by high dose rate brachytherapy is the standard-of-care. The superior ability of MR to visualize soft tissue has led to an increase in its usage in planning and delivering brachytherapy treatment. A technical challenge associated with the use of MRI imaging for brachytherapy, in contrast to that of CT imaging, is the visualization of catheters that are used to place radiation sources into cancerous tissue. We describe here a precise, accurate method for achieving catheter segmentation and visualization. The algorithm, with the assistance of manually provided tip locations, performs segmentation using image-features, and is guided by a catheter-specific, estimated mechanical model. A final quality control step removes outliers or conflicting catheter trajectories. The mean Hausdorff error on a 54 patient, 760 catheter reference database was 1.49  mm; 51 of the outliers deviated more than two catheter widths (3.4  mm) from the gold standard, corresponding to catheter identification accuracy of 93% in a Syed-Neblett template. In a multi-user simulation experiment for evaluating RMS precision by simulating varying manually-provided superior tip positions, 3σ maximum errors were 2.44  mm. The average segmentation time for a single catheter was 3 s on a standard PC. The segmentation time, accuracy and precision, are promising indicators of the value of this method for clinical translation of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachytherapy and other catheter-based interventional procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

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    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  5. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

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    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  6. Dummy source digitization algorithm for reconstruction of flexible brachytherapy catheters with biplane images.

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    Pálvölgyi, Jenö

    2014-03-01

    The traditional brachytherapy catheter reconstruction with biplane images is based on digitizing radio-opaque markers with a pointing device on a film or on a screen. An algorithm to automate digitization of radio-opaque marker coordinates on biplane images is presented. To obtain the marker coordinates in a proper sequence, instead of usual pair of reconstruction images, series of images were taken with insertion of radio-opaque markers consecutively into the catheters. The images were pre-processed to suppress the shield of anatomic structures. The determination of the marker coordinates is based on the detection of characteristic high gradient variation in pre-processed image profiles. The method was tested with six endometrial insertions performed with Simon-Norman catheters using our version of Heyman packing. 28 catheters of six treatment fractions were digitized, typically 10 markers per catheter. To obtain the marker coordinates, adjustment of two threshold levels on the pre-processed images were needed. The coordinates of the radio-opaque markers on the biplane projection images were obtained without positive or negative artefact. THE DUMMY SOURCE COORDINATES ON THE BIPLANE IMAGES WERE DIGITIZED IN A PROPER SEQUENCE: from the catheters' tip towards the end of the catheters. After the three-dimensional reconstruction of the catheters from the digitized coordinates, the geometry file was imported by the brachytherapy planning system for dose calculation. The method has the advantage to eliminate manual digitization of the dummy sources.

  7. 3D vision on robot assisted brachytherapy catheter implantation in bladder cancer

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    Smits, G.A.H.J.; Steen-Banasik, E. van der; Wieringa F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Using strict criteria, solitary muscle invasive bladder cancer can be managed favorably in a bladder sparing manner with brachytherapy. Hollow catheters for afterloading radiotherapy are placed in the bladder wall. Until now, this is performed by open surgery. We replaced open surgery by laparoscopy

  8. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

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    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  9. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the prostate and cervix

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    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-03-01

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed and is being evaluated in a clinical pilot study for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy in the treatment of cervix and prostate. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length × 180 deg and 3-4 cm × 360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers × dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and six prostate implants. 100 % of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target

  10. TU-AB-201-03: A Robot for the Automated Delivery of An Electromagnetic Tracking Sensor for the Localization of Brachytherapy Catheters

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    Don, S; Cormack, R; Viswanathan, A; Damato, A [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a programmable robotic system for the accurate and fast deployment of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor for brachytherapy catheter localization. Methods: A robotic system for deployment of an EM sensor was designed and built. The system was programmed to increment the sensor position at specified time and space intervals. Sensor delivery accuracy was measured in a phantom using the localization of the EM sensor and tested in different environmental conditions. Accuracy was tested by measuring the distance between the physical locations reached by the sensor (measured by the EM tracker) and the intended programmed locations. Results: The system consisted of a stepper motor connected to drive wheels (that grip the cable to move the sensor) and a series of guides to connect to a brachytherapy transfer tube, all controlled by a programmable Arduino microprocessor. The total cost for parts was <$300. The positional accuracy of the sensor location was within 1 mm of the expected position provided by the motorized guide system. Acquisition speed to localize a brachytherapy catheter with 20 cm of active length was 10 seconds. The current design showed some cable slip and warping depending on environment temperature. Conclusion: The use of EM tracking for the localization of brachytherapy catheters has been previously demonstrated. Efficient data acquisition and artifact reduction requires fast and accurate deployment of an EM sensor in consistent, repeatable patterns, which cannot practically be achieved manually. The design of an inexpensive, programmable robot allowing for the precise deployment of stepping patterns was presented, and a prototype was built. Further engineering is necessary to ensure that the device provides efficient independent localization of brachytherapy catheters. This research was funded by the Kaye Family Award.

  11. In vivo dose verification method in catheter based high dose rate brachytherapy.

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    Jaselskė, Evelina; Adlienė, Diana; Rudžianskas, Viktoras; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis; Inčiūra, Arturas

    2017-12-01

    In vivo dosimetry is a powerful tool for dose verification in radiotherapy. Its application in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is usually limited to the estimation of gross errors, due to inability of the dosimetry system/ method to record non-uniform dose distribution in steep dose gradient fields close to the radioactive source. In vivo dose verification in interstitial catheter based HDR brachytherapy is crucial since the treatment is performed inserting radioactive source at the certain positions within the catheters that are pre-implanted into the tumour. We propose in vivo dose verification method for this type of brachytherapy treatment which is based on the comparison between experimentally measured and theoretical dose values calculated at well-defined locations corresponding dosemeter positions in the catheter. Dose measurements were performed using TLD 100-H rods (6 mm long, 1 mm diameter) inserted in a certain sequences into additionally pre-implanted dosimetry catheter. The adjustment of dosemeter positioning in the catheter was performed using reconstructed CT scans of patient with pre-implanted catheters. Doses to three Head&Neck and one Breast cancer patient have been measured during several randomly selected treatment fractions. It was found that the average experimental dose error varied from 4.02% to 12.93% during independent in vivo dosimetry control measurements for selected Head&Neck cancer patients and from 7.17% to 8.63% - for Breast cancer patient. Average experimental dose error was below the AAPM recommended margin of 20% and did not exceed the measurement uncertainty of 17.87% estimated for this type of dosemeters. Tendency of slightly increasing average dose error was observed in every following treatment fraction of the same patient. It was linked to the changes of theoretically estimated dosemeter positions due to the possible patient's organ movement between different treatment fractions, since catheter reconstruction was

  12. Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy

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    Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Létourneau, Mélanie [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the

  13. Electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction in ultrasound-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of the prostate.

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    Bharat, Shyam; Kung, Cynthia; Dehghan, Ehsan; Ravi, Ananth; Venugopal, Niranjan; Bonillas, Antonio; Stanton, Doug; Kruecker, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The accurate delivery of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is dependent on the correct identification of the position and shape of the treatment catheters. In many brachytherapy clinics, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is used to identify the catheters. However, manual catheter identification on TRUS images can be time consuming, subjective, and operator dependent because of calcifications and distal shadowing artifacts. We report the use of electromagnetic (EM) tracking technology to map the position and shape of catheters inserted in a tissue-mimicking phantom. The accuracy of the EM system was comprehensively quantified using a three-axis robotic system. In addition, EM tracks acquired from catheters in a phantom were compared with catheter positions determined from TRUS and CT images to compare EM system performance to standard clinical imaging modalities. The tracking experiments were performed in a controlled laboratory environment and also in a typical brachytherapy operating room to test for potential EM distortions. The robotic validation of the EM system yielded a mean accuracy of brachytherapy operating room. The achievable accuracy depends to a large extent on the calibration of the TRUS probe, geometry of the tracked devices relative to the EM field generator, and locations of surrounding clinical equipment. To address the issue of variable accuracy, a robust calibration algorithm has been developed and integrated into the workflow. The proposed mapping technique was also found to improve the workflow efficiency of catheter identification. The high baseline accuracy of the EM system, the consistent agreement between EM-tracked, TRUS- and CT-identified catheters, and the improved workflow efficiency illustrate the potential value of using EM tracking for catheter mapping in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

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    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O' Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  15. A system to use electromagnetic tracking for the quality assurance of brachytherapy catheter digitization.

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    Damato, Antonio L; Viswanathan, Akila N; Don, Sarah M; Hansen, Jorgen L; Cormack, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the use of a system using electromagnetic tracking (EMT), post-processing and an error-detection algorithm for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter digitization for treatment planning. EMT was used to localize 15 catheters inserted into a phantom using a stepwise acquisition technique. Five distinct acquisition experiments were performed. Noise associated with the acquisition was calculated. The dwell location configuration was extracted from the EMT data. A CT scan of the phantom was performed, and five distinct catheter digitization sessions were performed. No a priori registration of the CT scan coordinate system with the EMT coordinate system was performed. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT), and rigid registration was performed between EMT and CT dwell positions. EMT registration error was characterized in terms of the mean and maximum distance between corresponding EMT and CT dwell positions per catheter. An algorithm for error detection and identification was presented. Three types of errors were systematically simulated: swap of two catheter numbers, partial swap of catheter number identification for parts of the catheters (mix), and catheter-tip shift. Error-detection sensitivity (number of simulated scenarios correctly identified as containing an error/number of simulated scenarios containing an error) and specificity (number of scenarios correctly identified as not containing errors/number of correct scenarios) were calculated. Catheter identification sensitivity (number of catheters correctly identified as erroneous across all scenarios/number of erroneous catheters across all scenarios) and specificity (number of catheters correctly identified as correct across all scenarios/number of correct catheters across all scenarios) were calculated. The mean detected and identified shift was calculated. The maximum noise ±1 standard

  16. Comparison of dose and catheter optimization algorithms in prostate high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

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    Poulin, Eric; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Aubin, Sylviane; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the hybrid inverse treatment planning optimization (HIPO), inverse dose-volume histogram-based optimization (DVHO), and fast simulated annealing stochastic algorithm (IPSA). The catheter optimization algorithm HIPO was also compared with the Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) algorithm. In this study, eight high-dose-rate prostate cases were randomly selected from an anonymized bank of patients. Oncentra Prostate v4.1 was used to run DVHO and the HIPO catheter optimization (HIPO_cat), whereas Oncentra Brachy v4.3 was used for the remaining. For fixed catheter configurations, DVHO plans were compared with IPSA and HIPO. For catheter positions optimization, CVT and HIPO_cat algorithms were compared with standard clinical template plans. CVT catheters were further restrained to the template grid (CVT_grid) and compared with HIPO_cat. For dose optimization, IPSA and HIPO were not different from each other. The urethra D10 and the computation time were found significantly better with IPSA and HIPO compared with DVHO (p 0.05). For catheter placement, CVT plans were better, whereas HIPO_cat plans were significantly worse (p HIPO_cat plans do not for all catheter numbers. The CVT algorithm run time was significantly faster than HIPO_cat (p HIPO give similar dosimetric results. The CVT approach was found to be better than HIPO_cat and was able to reduce the number of catheters significantly. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dosimetric impact of interfraction catheter movement in high-dose rate prostate brachytherapy.

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    Foster, William; Cunha, J Adam M; Hsu, I-Chow; Weinberg, Vivan; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Pouliot, Jean

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of interfraction catheter movement on dosimetry in prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Fifteen patients were treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy. Implants were performed on day 1 under transrectal ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed. Inverse planning simulated annealing was used for treatment planning. The first fraction was delivered on day 1. A cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed on day 2 before the second fraction was given. A fusion of the CBCT and CT was performed using intraprostatic gold markers as landmarks. Initial prostate and urethra contours were transferred to the CBCT images. Bladder and rectum contours were drawn, and catheters were digitized on the CBCT. The planned treatment was applied to the CBCT dataset, and dosimetry was analyzed and compared to the initial dose distribution. This process was repeated after a reoptimization was performed, using the same constraints used on day 1. Mean interfraction catheter displacement was 5.1 mm. When we used the initial plan on day 2, the mean prostate V100 (volume receiving 100 Gy or more) decreased from 93.8% to 76.2% (p < 0.01). Rectal V75 went from 0.75 cm(3) to 1.49 cm(3) (p < 0.01). A reoptimization resulted in a mean prostate V100 of 88.1%, closer to the initial plan (p = 0.05). Mean rectal V75 was also improved with a value of 0.59 cm(3). There was no significant change in bladder and urethra dose on day 2. A mean interfraction catheter displacement of 5.1 mm results in a significant decrease in prostate V100 and an increase in rectum dose. A reoptimization before the second treatment improves dose distribution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

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    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  19. Evaluation of minimally invasive excisional brain biopsy and intracranial brachytherapy catheter placement in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rebecca A; Freeman, Lynetta J; Miller, Margaret A; Fauber, Amy E; Morrison, Wallace B

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate a technique for minimally invasive excisional brain biopsy and intracranial brachytherapy catheter placement in dogs. 5 healthy adult female dogs. Computed tomographic guidance was used to plan a biopsy trajectory to a selected area of brain with reference to a localizer grid. The procedure was performed through a 1-cm skin incision and 6-mm burr hole by use of a 9-gauge biopsy device. Five cylindrical samples (3 to 4 mm in diameter and 7 to 12 mm in length) were removed over 5 cycles of the vacuum-assisted tissue excision system, leaving approximately a 2-cm³ resection cavity. A balloon-tipped intracranial brachytherapy catheter was placed through the burr hole into the resection cavity, expanded with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, and explanted 7 days later. 4 of 5 dogs survived the procedure. The fifth died because of iatrogenic brain damage. Neurologic deficits were unilateral and focal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all surviving dogs were ambulatory, 2 dogs exhibited ipsiversive circling, 4 had contralateral proprioceptive deficits, 3 had contralateral menace response deficits, 2 had a reduced contralateral response to noxious nasal stimulation, and 1 had dull mentation with intermittent horizontal nystagmus and ventrolateral strabismus. Neurologic status improved throughout the study period. Histologic quality of biopsy specimens was excellent. This technique enabled histologic diagnosis from high-quality biopsy specimens obtained through a minimally invasive technique and has potential applications for multimodal treatment of deep brain tumors in dogs.

  20. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-09-01

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length×180 deg and 3-4 cm×360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  1. Development and evaluation of an automatic interstitial catheter digitization tool for adaptive high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dise, Joseph; Liang, Xing; Scheuermann, Joshua; Anamalayil, Shibu; Mesina, Carmen; Lin, Lilie L; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To develop and evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm for use in adaptive high-dose-rate brachytherapy for gynecologic cancers using the Syed-Neblett template. We developed an automatic catheter digitization tool, which uses a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. Seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The region growing was constrained by a spline model of the catheters, which prevents intercatheter crossover or incorrect digitization due to air pockets. Plan reoptimization was performed on successive day computed tomography scans using dwell positions for the Day 1 computed tomography. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in five fractions, twice daily, and more than 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatically and manually digitized plans. The region growing algorithm was able to successfully digitize all catheters. The mean difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. No significant difference was found in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. The mean D90% of the clinical target volume over all 3 days of treatment of the manual vs. reoptimized automatic plans was 94.3 ± 6.58% and 92.32 ± 8.34%, respectively (p = 0.50). The algorithm discussed in this article is the first developed for adaptive interstitial brachytherapy for a large number of catheters (14 on average). The algorithm has future potential in digitization quality assurance. A region growing algorithm was developed to automatically digitize interstitial catheters in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This automatic digitization tool was shown to be accurate compared with manual digitization. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society

  2. Skin surface brachytherapy: A survey of contemporary practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhacheva, Anna O; Devlin, Phillip M; Shirvani, Shervin M; Barker, Christopher A; Beron, Phillip; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Doggett, Stephen W; Hochman, Lawrence; Hsu, Charles; Kasper, Michael; Keisch, Martin; Mutyala, Subhakar; Prestidge, Bradley; Rodriguez Villalba, Silvia; Shukla, Vershalee; Sundararaman, Srinath; Kamrava, Mitchell

    The aim of this study was to define current patterns of care among radiation oncologists who use skin surface brachytherapy for the treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in academic and community settings. A 30-question electronic survey was administered to clinician members of the American Brachytherapy Society. The respondents were asked to provide details regarding their clinical practice and their approach to skin surface brachytherapy. A total of 16 surveys were returned. Among the respondents, aggregate experience varied from 8 to 1800 cases. Most preferred brachytherapy over external beam radiation because of shorter treatment course, conformality of treatment for irregular or curved targets, and shallow dose deposition. Of the total, 60% of respondents routinely estimated lesion depth via ultrasound before initiating treatment. Treatment margin on gross disease varied widely (range, 3-15 mm; median, 5 mm). Hypofractionation was the preferred dose schedule. Prescribed doses ranged from 30 Gy in five fractions to 64 Gy in 32 fractions (EQD2, 40 Gy-65 Gy). There was a tendency to increase the number of fractions for larger targets, although some used the same fractionation regardless of anatomic location or lesion size. There was no consensus on dosimetric constraints, and some respondents reported cases of severe toxicity, particularly when treating the pretibial skin. This pattern of care study suggests that skin brachytherapy can be a convenient and safe tool for treatment of BCC and cSCC. Prospective trials and the development of expert consensus guidelines would be beneficial for optimizing skin surface brachytherapy and reducing practice variation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Implantation of Brachytherapy Catheters in Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschieter, Judith; Vis, André N; van der Poel, Henk G; Moonen, Luc M; Horenblas, Simon; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Pieters, Bradley R; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A; Hendricksen, Kees

    2017-06-12

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) implantation of brachytherapy catheters (BTCs) can be a minimally invasive alternative to open retropubic implantation. Descriptions of the surgical technique and outcomes are sparse. To describe our technique and perioperative outcomes for RAL BTC implantation in urothelial carcinoma (UC) and urachal carcinoma (UraC). Between June 2011 and May 2016, 26 patients with cN0M0 solitary T1G3 or T2G1-3 UC of ≤5cm or cN0M0 UraC were scheduled for external beam radiotherapy (20×2Gy), RAL BTC implantation, and pulsed-dose (29×1.04Gy) or high-dose rate brachytherapy (10×2.50Gy). Median follow-up was 12 mo (interquartile range 4-20). RAL BTC implantation with or without pelvic lymph node dissection and/or partial cystectomy. Perioperative data, complications, disease-free-survival (DFS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and cystectomy-free survival (CFS) were evaluated as well as the feasibility of the technique. BTC implantation was successful in 92% of the patients. Median hospitalisation was 5 d (interquartile range 4-7) and blood loss 50ml in all cases. DFS was 74% at 1 yr and 63% at 2 yr. LRFS was 80% at 1 and 2 yr, and CFS was 87% at 1 and 2 yr. Early (≤30 d) high-grade complications (Clavien-Dindo ≥3) occurred in 8% of the patients. The study is limited by the small sample size and short follow-up time. RAL BTC implantation is technically feasible and could serve as safe, minimally invasive alternative to open surgery in selected patients. The results of this study should be confirmed in larger studies. Brachytherapy catheter (BTC) implantation is traditionally carried out via open retropubic surgery. We describe robot-assisted laparoscopic BTC implantation as a minimally invasive alternative. Perioperative outcomes are described and confirm the safety and feasibility of this procedure. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Douglas W., E-mail: darthur@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas B. [Allegheny General Hospital, Temple University School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  5. Feasibility and full-course dosimetry of an intraoperatively placed multichannel brachytherapy catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stish, Bradley J; Pafundi, Deanna H; Hieken, Tina J; Whitaker, Thomas J; Furutani, Keith M; Jakub, James W; Boughey, Judy C; Degnim, Amy C; McLemore, Luke B; Mou, Benjamin; Mutter, Robert W; Park, Sean S

    Determine feasibility and resultant dosimetry of an intraoperatively placed multichannel intracavitary brachytherapy catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Patients with breast cancer underwent intraoperative brachytherapy catheter placement based on frozen section analysis with immediate postoperative APBI. The planning target volume evaluation (PTVEval) and organs at risk were contoured on daily pretreatment CT scans for each patient, and the original treatment plan was applied to assess full-course dosimetry. Of the first 21 patients consented for intraoperative catheter placement, 20 (95%) were able to proceed with treatment as planned. The mean volume of PTVEval receiving 90% of prescription dose (V90%) and mean percentage of prescription dose to 90% of the PTVEval (D90%) on initial planning were 96.7 (±1.1%) and 100.2 (±2.1%), respectively. Full-course dose coverage remained excellent with a mean PTVEval V90% and D90% of 95.0 (±4.4%) and 100.2 (±9.6%), respectively. Mean full-course maximum dose constraints for chest wall and skin were met by 70% and 95% of patients, respectively. Air accumulation >1 cc during treatment increased the risk of a daily fraction with PTVEval coverage below goal (odds ratio, 9.8; p = 0.05), whereas those with applicators Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental dosimetry of a 32P catheter-based endovascular brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, A.; Fidanzio, A.; Perrone, F.; Azario, L.; Grimaldi, L.; Viola, P.; Capote, R.

    2003-08-01

    The experimental dosimetry in a water phantom of a 32P linear source, 20 mm in length, used for the brachytherapy of coronary vessels is reported. The source content activity, A, was determined by means of a calibrated well ion-chamber and the value was compared with the contained activity reported in the manufacturer's certification. In this field of brachytherapy dosimetry, radiochromic film supplies a high enough spatial resolution. A highly sensitive radiochromic film, that presents only one active layer, was used in this work for the source dosimetry in a water phantom. The radiochromic film was characterized by electron beams produced by a clinical linac. A Monte Carlo calculation of beta spectra in water at different distances along the source transverse bisector axis allowed to take into account the low dependence of film response from the electron beam energy. The adopted experimental set-up, with the source in its catheter positioned on the film plane inside the water phantom, supplies accurate dosimetric information. The measured dose rate to water per unit of source activity at reference distance, dot D(r0, theta0)/A, in units of cGy s-1 GBq-1, was in agreement with the value reported in the manufacturer's certification within the experimental uncertainty. The radial dose function, g(r), is in good agreement with the literature data. The anisotropy function F(r, theta) is also reported. The analysis of the dose profile obtained at 2 mm from the source longitudinal axis shows that the uniformity is within 10% along 75% of the 20 mm treatment length. The adopted experimental set-up seems to be adequate for the quality control procedure of the dose homogeneity distribution in the water medium.

  7. Accelerated partial breast irradiation via brachytherapy: a patterns-of-care analysis with ASTRO consensus statement groupings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zain A; Mahmood, Usama; Hanlon, Alexandra; Neuner, Geoffrey; Buras, Robert; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    The 2002 Food and Drug Administration approval of the MammoSite catheter (Hologic, Inc., Beford, MA) led to a surge of interest in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Until recently, guidelines as to the optimal candidates for this treatment were unavailable. We performed a patterns-of-care analysis for patients undergoing breast brachytherapy and compared these results with the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was used to examine female breast cancer patients treated with brachytherapy between 2002 and 2007. The patients were then categorized into suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups based on the ASTRO guidelines. We identified 4172 female breast cancer patients treated within the stated years. The number of brachytherapy cases increased nearly 10-fold over the time period studied from 163 in 2002 to 1427 in 2007 (pASTRO cautionary or unsuitable groupings. This is the largest patterns-of-care analysis for APBI patients and serves as a baseline for future comparison. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial clinical experience with multilumen brachytherapy catheters for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chirag; Ghilezan, Mihai; Arthur, Douglas; Wilkinson, John B; Keisch, Martin; Chen, Peter; Vicini, Frank A

    2012-01-01

    To review the initial experience of three institutions using multilumen catheters to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and evaluate dosimetric improvements. Patients were eligible for this analysis if they met criteria for accelerated partial breast irradiation at their respective institution and were not enrolled on the national Phase III trial. Minimum guidelines for treatment planning from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 protocol were followed. Toxicities were coded using common toxicity criteria version 3.0 criteria. Sixty-two patients were analyzed as part of this study. Median skin spacing was 11mm with a median skin dose of 86.9% (% of prescription dose [PD]). Median rib dose was 76.1% of the PD (range, 4.3-155.7%). The V(90), V(95), and V(100) of the PD for the planning target volume evaluation was 95.4%, 95.2%, and 80.3%, respectively. Seven patients had both skin and rib spacing skin dose and rib dose being 113.4% and 130.9% of the PD. For these cases, the median V(90), V(95), and V(100) of the PD was 99.2%, 94.3%, and 81.1%, respectively, whereas the median V(150) and V(200) were 22.5cc and 7.4cc. Overall, Grade I and II radiation dermatitis were noted in 41.9% and 6.5% of patients. The multilumen device led to improvements in target coverage and normal structure doses compared with traditionally accepted guidelines. Similar toxicities were seen compared with single-lumen devices, even in patients with skin and rib spacing Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimal application of the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter vacuum port to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Kenneth M; Cuttino, Laurie W; Vicini, Frank A; Arthur, Douglas W; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Lyden, Maureen R

    2011-01-01

    The impact of using the Contura multilumen balloon (MLB) (SenoRx, Inc., Irvine, CA) breast brachytherapy catheter's vacuum port in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) was analyzed. Data from 32 patients at two sites were reviewed. Variables analyzed included the seroma fluid (SF):air volume around the MLB before and after vacuum port use and on its ability to improve (1) the eligibility of patients for APBI and (2) dose coverage of the planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) in eligible patients. The median SF/air volume before vacuum removal was 6.8 cc vs. 0.8 cc after vacuum removal (median reduction in SF/air volume was 90.5%). Before vacuum port use, the median SF/air volume expressed as percentage of the PTV_EVAL was 7.8% (range, 1.9-26.6) in all patients. After application of the vacuum, this was reduced to 1.2%. Before vacuum port use, 10 (31.3%) patients were not considered acceptable candidates for APBI because the SF/air volume:PTV_EVAL ratio (SF:PTV) was greater than 10% (range, 10.1-26.6%; median, 15.2%). After vacuum port use, the median SF:PTV ratio was 1.6% for a median reduction of 91.5%. In addition, the percentage of the prescribed dose covering greater than or equal to 90% of the PTV_EVAL proportionally increased a median of 8% (range, 3-10%) in eligible patients. Use of the Contura MLB vacuum port significantly improved the conformity of the target tissue to the balloon surface, leading to reproducible dose delivery and increased target volume coverage. In addition, application of the vacuum allowed the safe treatment of unacceptable patients with APBI. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A fast inverse treatment planning strategy facilitating optimized catheter selection in image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, Christian V; Damato, Antonio L; Hesser, Juergen W; Viswanathan, Akila N; Cormack, Robert A

    2017-12-01

    Interstitial high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of locally advanced gynecologic (GYN) cancers. The outcome of this therapy is determined by the quality of dose distribution achieved. This paper focuses on a novel yet simple heuristic for catheter selection for GYN HDR brachytherapy and their comparison against state of the art optimization strategies. The proposed technique is intended to act as a decision-supporting tool to select a favorable needle configuration. The presented heuristic for catheter optimization is based on a shrinkage-type algorithm (SACO). It is compared against state of the art planning in a retrospective study of 20 patients who previously received image-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy using a Syed Neblett template. From those plans, template orientation and position are estimated via a rigid registration of the template with the actual catheter trajectories. All potential straight trajectories intersecting the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) are considered for catheter optimization. Retrospectively generated plans and clinical plans are compared with respect to dosimetric performance and optimization time. All plans were generated with one single run of the optimizer lasting 0.6-97.4 s. Compared to manual optimization, SACO yields a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) improved target coverage while at the same time fulfilling all dosimetric constraints for organs at risk (OARs). Comparing inverse planning strategies, dosimetric evaluation for SACO and "hybrid inverse planning and optimization" (HIPO), as gold standard, shows no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). However, SACO provides the potential to reduce the number of used catheters without compromising plan quality. The proposed heuristic for needle selection provides fast catheter selection with optimization times suited for intraoperative treatment planning. Compared to manual optimization, the

  11. SU-F-BRA-01: A Procedure for the Fast Semi-Automatic Localization of Catheters Using An Electromagnetic Tracker (EMT) for Image-Guided Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of brachytherapy catheter localization through use of an EMT and 3D image set. Methods: A 15-catheter phantom mimicking an interstitial implantation was built and CT-scanned. Baseline catheter reconstruction was performed manually. An EMT was used to acquire the catheter coordinates in the EMT frame of reference. N user-identified catheter tips, without catheter number associations, were used to establish registration with the CT frame of reference. Two algorithms were investigated: brute-force registration (BFR), in which all possible permutation of N identified tips with the EMT tips were evaluated; and signature-based registration (SBR), in which a distance matrix was used to generate a list of matching signatures describing possible N-point matches with the registration points. Digitization error (average of the distance between corresponding EMT and baseline dwell positions; average, standard deviation, and worst-case scenario over all possible registration-point selections) and algorithm inefficiency (maximum number of rigid registrations required to find the matching fusion for all possible selections of registration points) were calculated. Results: Digitization errors on average <2 mm were observed for N ≥5, with standard deviation <2 mm for N ≥6, and worst-case scenario error <2 mm for N ≥11. Algorithm inefficiencies were: N = 5, 32,760 (BFR) and 9900 (SBR); N = 6, 360,360 (BFR) and 21,660 (SBR); N = 11, 5.45*1010 (BFR) and 12 (SBR). Conclusion: A procedure was proposed for catheter reconstruction using EMT and only requiring user identification of catheter tips without catheter localization. Digitization errors <2 mm were observed on average with 5 or more registration points, and in any scenario with 11 or more points. Inefficiency for N = 11 was 9 orders of magnitude lower for SBR than for BFR. Funding: Kaye Family Award.

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using the strut-adjusted volume implant single-entry hybrid catheter in brachytherapy for breast cancer in the setting of breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Elizabeth S; Kirsner, Steve; Mason, Bryan E; Nelson, Chris L; Hunt, Kelly K; Baumann, Donald P; Gifford, Kent A

    2011-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has gained popularity as an alternative to adjuvant whole breast irradiation; however, owing to limitations of delivery devices for brachytherapy, APBI has not been a suitable option for all the patients. This report evaluates APBI using the strut-adjusted volume implant (SAVI) single-entry catheter to deliver brachytherapy for breast cancer in the setting of an augmented breast. The patient previously had placed bilateral subpectoral saline implants; stereotactic core biopsy revealed estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive ductal carcinoma in situ of intermediate nuclear grade. The patient underwent needle-localized segmental mastectomy of her left breast; pathologic specimen revealed no residual malignancy. An SAVI 8-1 device was placed within the segmental resection cavity. Treatment consisted of 3.4 Gy delivered twice a day for 5 days for a total dose of 34 Gy. Treatments were delivered with a high-dose-rate (192)Ir remote afterloader. Conformance of the device to the lumpectomy cavity was excellent at 99.2%. Dosimetric values of percentage of the planning target volume for evaluation receiving 90% of the prescribed dose, percentage of the planning target volume for evaluation receiving 95% of the prescribed dose, volume receiving 150% of the prescribed dose, and volume receiving 200% of the prescribed dose were 97.1%, 94.6%, 22.7 cc, and 11.6 cc, respectively. Maximum skin dose was 115% of the prescribed dose. The patient tolerated treatment well with excellent cosmetic results, and limited acute and late toxicity at 8 weeks and 6 months, respectively. Breast augmentation should not be an exclusion criterion for the option of APBI. The SAVI single-entry catheter is another option to successfully complete APBI using brachytherapy for breast cancer in the setting of an augmented breast. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patterns of Use and Short-Term Complications of Breast Brachytherapy in the National Medicare Population From 2008–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Herrin, Jeph; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yu, James B.; Killelea, Brigid; Lesnikoski, Beth-Ann; Long, Jessica B.; Gross, Cary P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy has disseminated into clinical practice as an alternative to whole-breast irradiation (WBI) for early-stage breast cancer; however, current national treatment patterns and associated complications remain unknown. Patients and Methods We constructed a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries ages 66 to 94 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery from 2008 to 2009 and were treated with brachytherapy or WBI. We used hospital referral regions (HRRs) to assess national treatment variation and an instrumental variable analysis to compare complication rates between treatment groups, adjusting for patient and clinical characteristics. We compared overall, wound and skin, and deep-tissue and bone complications between brachytherapy and WBI at 1 year of follow-up. Results Of 29,648 women in our sample, 4,671 (15.8%) received brachytherapy. The percent of patients receiving brachytherapy varied substantially across HRRs, ranging from 0% to over 70% (interquartile range, 7.5% to 23.3%). Of women treated with brachytherapy, 34.3% had a complication compared with 27.3% of women undergoing WBI (P brachytherapy (95% CI, 28.6 to 41.9) had a complication compared with 18.4% treated with WBI (95% CI, 15.5 to 21.3; P value for difference, Brachytherapy was associated with a 16.9% higher rate of wound and skin complications compared with WBI (95% CI, 10.0 to 23.9; P Brachytherapy is commonly used among Medicare beneficiaries and varies substantially across regions. After 1 year, wound and skin complications were significantly higher among women receiving brachytherapy compared with those receiving WBI. PMID:23091103

  14. Patterns of use and short-term complications of breast brachytherapy in the national medicare population from 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Soulos, Pamela R; Herrin, Jeph; Roberts, Kenneth B; Yu, James B; Killelea, Brigid; Lesnikoski, Beth-Ann; Long, Jessica B; Gross, Cary P

    2012-12-10

    Brachytherapy has disseminated into clinical practice as an alternative to whole-breast irradiation (WBI) for early-stage breast cancer; however, current national treatment patterns and associated complications remain unknown. We constructed a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries ages 66 to 94 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery from 2008 to 2009 and were treated with brachytherapy or WBI. We used hospital referral regions (HRRs) to assess national treatment variation and an instrumental variable analysis to compare complication rates between treatment groups, adjusting for patient and clinical characteristics. We compared overall, wound and skin, and deep-tissue and bone complications between brachytherapy and WBI at 1 year of follow-up. Of 29,648 women in our sample, 4,671 (15.8%) received brachytherapy. The percent of patients receiving brachytherapy varied substantially across HRRs, ranging from 0% to over 70% (interquartile range, 7.5% to 23.3%). Of women treated with brachytherapy, 34.3% had a complication compared with 27.3% of women undergoing WBI (P brachytherapy (95% CI, 28.6 to 41.9) had a complication compared with 18.4% treated with WBI (95% CI, 15.5 to 21.3; P value for difference, Brachytherapy was associated with a 16.9% higher rate of wound and skin complications compared with WBI (95% CI, 10.0 to 23.9; P Brachytherapy is commonly used among Medicare beneficiaries and varies substantially across regions. After 1 year, wound and skin complications were significantly higher among women receiving brachytherapy compared with those receiving WBI.

  15. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Craighead, Peter; McCormack, Mary; Toita, Takafumi; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nicholas; Long, Harry; Kim, Hak-Jae; Marth, Christian; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Cerrotta, Annmarie; Small, William; Trimble, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E) and North America (NAm). Materials and Methods A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) utilized HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for 5 fractions (18%), 6 Gy × 4 (15%), 7 Gy × 3 (11%), and for Stage IIB-IVA patients were 6 Gy for 5 fractions (19%), 7 Gy × 4 (8%), and 7 Gy × 3 (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD], 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD, 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD, 11.2) (p=0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD, 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD, 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD, 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p=0.02 for Asia vs. other regions). The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p=0.0002). Conclusion Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean dose administered for cervical cancer is similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials. PMID:21183288

  16. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Creutzberg, Carien L. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Craighead, Peter [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McCormack, Mary [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Reed, Nicholas [Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Long, Harry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Kim, Hak-Jae [Department of Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Marth, Christian [Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Cerrotta, Annmarie [Department of Radiation Therapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Trimble, Edward [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB-IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  17. WE-A-17A-06: Evaluation of An Automatic Interstitial Catheter Digitization Algorithm That Reduces Treatment Planning Time and Provide Means for Adaptive Re-Planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dise, J [Philadelphia, PA (United States); Liang, X; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Teo, B [University of Pennsylvania, Wayne, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm that reduces treatment planning time and provide means for adaptive re-planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers. Methods: The semi-automatic catheter digitization tool utilizes a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. The CT images were first pre-processed to enhance the contrast between the catheters and soft tissue. Several seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The spline model of the catheters assisted in the region growing by preventing inter-catheter cross-over caused by air or metal artifacts. Source dwell positions from day one CT scans were applied to subsequent CTs and forward calculated using the automatically digitized catheter positions. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received HDR interstitial brachytherapy on an IRB approved image-guided radiation therapy protocol. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in 5 fractions, twice daily, over 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatic and manual digitization on day two CTs. Results: The region growing algorithm, assisted by the spline model of the catheters, was able to digitize all catheters. The difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.8±0.3 mm. The digitization time ranged from 34 minutes to 43 minutes with a mean digitization time of 37 minutes. The bulk of the time was spent on manual selection of initial seed positions and spline parameter adjustments. There was no significance difference in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. D90% to the CTV was 91.5±4.4% for the manual digitization versus 91.4±4.4% for the automatic digitization (p=0.56). Conclusion: A region growing algorithm was developed to semi-automatically digitize interstitial catheters in HDR brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. This automatic

  18. Dosimetric Improvements in Balloon Based Brachytherapy Using the Contura® Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB Catheter to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Julian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Preliminary dosimetric findings in patients managed with the Contura® Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI on a multi-institutional phase IV registry trial were reviewed. Material and methods: CT-based 3D planning with dose optimization was performed for all patients. For the study, new ideal dosimetric goals were developed: 1 ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose (PD covering ≥ 90% of the target volume (TV, 2 a maximum skin dose ≤ 125% of the PD, 3 maximum rib dose ≤ 145% of the PD, and 4 the V150 ≤ 50 cc and V200 ≤ 10 cc. The frequency of concurrently achieving these dosimetric goals using the Contura® MLB was investigated.Results: 194 cases were evaluable. Employing the MLB, all ideal dosimetric criteria were achieved in 76% of cases.Evaluating dosimetric criteria separately, 90% and 89% of cases met the new ideal skin and rib dose criteria, respectively. In 96%, ideal TV coverage goals were achieved and in 96%, dose homogeneity criteria (V150 and V200 were met. For skin spacing ≥ 5-7 mm, the median skin dose was 121% of the PD and when < 5 mm, the median skin dose was 124.4%. For rib distancees < 5 mm, the median rib dose was reduced to 136.4% of the PD. For skin spacing < 7 mm and distance to rib < 5 mm, the median skin and rib doses were concurrently limited to 121% and 142.8% of thePD, respectively. Conclusions: The Contura® MLB catheter provides potential improvements in dosimetric capabilities (i.e., reduced skin and rib doses and improved TV coverage in many clinical scenarios.

  19. Three-year clinical outcome using the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI): improving radiation standards for the optimal application of APBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Philip Z; Robbins, Angela; Shroff, Paulomi; Brown, Sheree; McLaughlin, Mark; Pope, Keith

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed our institution's 3-year clinical experience in treating patients with the Contura multilumen balloon (SenoRx, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Forty-six patients treated with breast-conserving therapy received adjuvant radiation using the Contura catheter (34Gy in 3.4Gy fractions). Fourteen patients had Stage 0, 24 had Stage I, and 8 had Stage II breast cancer. Median follow-up was 36 months (range, 1-44 months). Only one local recurrence developed (2%). The rate of persistent seroma formation at latest reported follow-up was 4.3% (2 patients) and the incidence of any clinically detectable telengiectasias was 2.2%. No major toxicities (0% Grade III) have occurred. The median skin dose (% of the prescribed dose) was 99.7. The median dose to 95% of the planning target volume for evaluation was 98.8%. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results at 24 (n=23) and 36 (n=22) months was 100% and 97%, respectively. Adjuvant APBI using the Contura multilumen balloon catheter exhibited similar locoregional control, cosmesis, and toxicities to other forms of APBI with similar lengths of follow-up. In addition, improved radiation standards for the delivery of APBI were demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Pigge, F. Christopher [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  1. TU-AB-201-04: Optimizing the Number of Catheter Implants and Their Tracks for Prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riofrio, D; Luan, S [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Zhou, J [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ma, L [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In prostate HDR brachytherapy, interstitial implants are placed manually on the fly. The aim for this research is to develop a computer algorithm to find optimal and reliable implant trajectories using minimal number of implants. Methods: Our new algorithm mainly uses these key ideas: (1) positive charged static particles are uniformly placed on the surface of prostate and critical structures such as urethra, bladder, and rectum. (2) Positive charged kinetic particles are placed at a cross-section of the prostate with an initial velocity parallel to the principal implant direction. (3) The kinetic particles move through the prostate, interacting with each other, spreading out, while staying away from the prostate surface and critical structures. The initial velocity ensures that the trajectories observe the curvature constraints of typical implant procedures. (4) The finial trajectories of kinetic particles are smoothed using a third-degree polynomial regression, which become the implant trajectories. (5) The dwelling times and final dose distribution are calculated using least-distance programming. Results: (1) We experimented with previously treated cases. Our plan achieves all prescription goals while reducing the number of implants by 41%! Our plan also has less uniform target dose, which implies a higher dose is delivered to the prostate. (2) We expect future implant procedures will be performed under the guidance of such pre-calculated trajectories. To assess the applicability, we randomly perturb the tracks to mimic the manual implant errors. Our studies showed the impact of these perturbations are negligible, which is compensated by the least distance programming. Conclusions: We developed a new inverse planning system for prostate HDR therapy that can find optimal implant trajectories while minimizing the number of implants. For future work, we plan to integrate our new inverse planning system with an existing needle tracking system.

  2. Patterns of care study for brachytherapy: results of the questionnaire for the years 2002 and 2007 in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Londres

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of the ESTRO Patterns of Care study for Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE 2002 was to develop an aid to analyse brachytherapy practices. A 2nd version of the PCB questionnaire was created for 2007. Data over 2007 were collected at the radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and compared with those from 2002. The aim of this study is to describe national brachytherapy practices, to demonstrate trends, and to provide data for rational health care planning.Material and methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire. For each centre, a local coordinator, responsible for coordinating the questionnaires and support of the further analysis was assigned. Data from the national cancer incidence registry was used for comparison with the data from the 21 Dutch departments.Results: There was a decrease in low-dose rate equipment in parallel to an increase in both pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate equipment. The use of 3D CT and MR based imaging techniques showed a slow rise. The most common clinical procedures were for prostate, gynaecological, and oesophageal tumours. A large increase (146% in permanent implant prostate applications using 125I seeds was observed. The numbers of oesophageal and gynaecological treatmentsremained stable. There is concern on the low numbers of cases treated in some institutions for a few complex treatment sites. For head and neck, anal canal, paediatrics, bladder and eye interventions it ranged from 3-20 patients per year per institution.Conclusions: The increase in number of patient treated with brachytherapy is in accordance with the increases in cancer incidence. The percentage of all radiotherapy patients treated with brachytherapy (approximately 5% remained stable. The survey identified certain trends in resources and techniques, as well as areas of expected improvement and possible gain in clinical outcome. Data reported from this survey can be used for further planning of resources

  3. Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters Do Not Change Antibiotic Resistance Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Isaiah R; Buckman, Sara A; Horn, Christopher B; Bochicchio, Grant V; Mazuski, John E

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) decrease the incidence of infection in high-risk patients. However, use of these catheters carries the hypothetical risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. We hypothesized that routine use of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated catheters (MR-CVC) in a single intensive care unit (ICU) would change the resistance profile for Staphylococcus aureus. We reviewed antibiotic susceptibilities of S. aureus isolates obtained from blood cultures in a large urban teaching hospital from 2002-2015. Resistance patterns were compared before and after implementation of MR-CVC use in the surgical ICU (SICU) in August 2006. We also compared resistance patterns of S. aureus obtained in other ICUs and in non-ICU patients, in whom MR-CVCs were not used. Data for rifampin, oxacillin, and clindamycin were available for 9,703 cultures; tetracycline resistance data were available for 4,627 cultures. After implementation of MR-CVC use in the SICU, rifampin resistance remained unchanged, with rates the same as in other ICU and non-ICU populations (3%). After six years of use of MR-CVCs in the SICU, the rate of tetracycline resistance was unchanged in all facilities (1%-3%). The use of MR-CVCs was not associated with any change in S. aureus oxacillin-resistance rates in the SICU (66% vs. 60%). However, there was a significant decrease in S. aureus clindamycin resistance (59% vs. 34%; p resistance of S. aureus isolates to rifampin or tetracyclines.

  4. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  5. A dosimetric comparison of the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter vs. the single-lumen MammoSite balloon device in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sheree; McLaughlin, Mark; Pope, Doyle Keith; Haile, Kenneth; Hughes, Lorie; Israel, Philip Z; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of dosimetric findings in 33 patients treated with the Contura multilumen balloon (SenoRx Inc., Irvine, CA) (C-MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter vs. 33 patients treated with the MammoSite (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) (MS) at a single institution to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) was performed. CT-based 3-dimensional planning with dose optimization was completed. APBI treatment of 34Gy in 3.4Gy fractions was delivered. Endpoints analyzed included: (1) The percentage of the prescribed dose (PD) covering the planning target volume (PTV), (2) the maximum skin dose as a percentage of the PD, (3) the maximum rib dose as a percentage of the PD, and (4) the V150 and V200. The C-MLB was placed more frequently in patients with closer skin spacing (skin spacing, the overall median skin dose was significantly lower in C-MLB patients (112% of the PD vs. 134%, p=0.0282). No statistically significant differences in the V150 or V200 were observed. In patients with very limited rib spacing (skin and rib doses and improved PTV coverage) in most clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe...... the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy...

  7. Migration patterns of peripherally inserted central venous catheters at 24 hours postinsertion in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Hari B; Tjin-A-Tam, Ansel; Galang, Rupernina; Hecht, Alan; Srinivasan, Gopal

    2013-11-01

    Migration of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) is known to happen in neonates with changes in position of the upper limb. The aim of this study is to document the migration pattern of PICCs at 24 hours postinsertion, while controlling for arm position. This was a single-centered prospective study of 100 consecutively placed PICCs in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). All PICCs were inserted by one of two certified NICU nurses in either upper or lower limb. An X-ray was obtained immediately after insertion and again at 24 hours postinsertion; both were reviewed by a single pediatric radiologist. Of the PICCs placed in basilic veins, 35.5% migrated toward the heart, 14.5% migrated away from the heart, and 50% did not change in position. Of the PICCs placed in cephalic veins, 21% migrated toward the heart, 15.7% migrated away from the heart, and 63.3% did not change in position. None of the PICCs placed in the saphenous veins migrated. After controlling for arm position, 47% of PICCs placed in the upper limb migrated at 24 hours postinsertion with 32.6% migrating toward the heart. We recommend a follow-up X-ray at 24 hours postinsertion for all catheters placed in the upper limb. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging ... the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that ...

  9. Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from indwelling Foley catheters following tube cystostomy in goats with obstructive urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Mavangira, Vengai; Byrne, Barbara A; Angelos, John A

    2017-05-01

    Tube cystostomy is a surgical method used for managing obstructive urolithiasis and involves placement of a Foley catheter into the urinary bladder. We identified and evaluated the antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from indwelling Foley catheters following tube cystostomy in goats with obstructive urolithiasis. Urine samples collected over a 10-y period from catheter tips at the time of removal were submitted for bacteriologic culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Resistance patterns to antibiotics, trends in the resistance patterns over the study period, and the probability of a bacterial isolate being resistant as a function of the identity of the isolate and antibiotic tested were determined. A total of 103 urine samples from 103 male goats with obstructive urolithiasis managed surgically with tube cystostomy were included in the study. Aerococcus (36.9%) and Enterococcus (30.1%) were isolated most frequently. The susceptibility patterns of all bacteria isolated did not change over the study period ( p > 0.05). Proportions of isolates resistant to 1, 2, and ≥3 antibiotics were 36.9%, 18.5%, and 23.3%, respectively. Thus, 41.8% of bacterial isolates were resistant to 2 or more antibiotics tested. The probability of Aerococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to be resistant to ampicillin, ceftiofur, erythromycin, penicillin, or tetracycline ranged from 0.59 to 0.76.

  10. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Stephen R., E-mail: stephen.thompson@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gabriel, Gabriel S. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Barton, Michael B. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)-the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)-to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  11. Surface mold brachytherapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer: Canadian patterns of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jim N; McLaughlin, Pierre-Yves; Hanna, Timothy P; D'Souza, David; Sur, Ranjan; Falkson, Conrad B

    2014-01-01

    We sought to describe the use of surface mold brachytherapy (SMBT) for nonmelanoma skin cancer in Canada. A list of Canadian Association of Radiation Oncologists membership and provincial registries were used for a preliminary survey to identify radiation oncologists and physicists involved in the practice of SMBT. A detailed survey was sent electronically to individuals involved in treating with SMBT. Of 41 centers in Canada, 39 responded, with 7 centers indicating use of SMBT. Seven radiation oncologists and 5 physicists from 6 of 7 treating centers responded to the detailed survey, with an overall 75% individual response rate (12/16). General agreement was found regarding indications for SMBT which included irregular or curved surfaces, avoidance of deep structures, and requirement for small fields. There was consensus regarding some contraindications for SMBT such as tumor depth and size. Hypofractionated schedules were used in 5 of 6 centers and doses ranged from 50 Gy in 5 fractions once per week to 30 Gy in 10 fractions twice a day over 5 days. The most common dosimetric parameters for plan evaluation included D90, D95, D100, and maximum skin dose. A minority of Canadian centers practice SMBT. In centers practicing SMBT, general agreement exists on general indications for its use. Given the wide variation in dose and fractionation used and the rarity of the indication a phase 2 Canadian protocol would be invaluable.

  12. Brachytherapy in breast cancer: an effective alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicheł, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) with following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast has become widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of EBRT after BCS is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 42.5 to 50 Gy. An additional dose is given to treated volume as a boost to a portion of the breast. In the early stage of breast cancer, research has shown that the area requiring radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from local recurrence is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an approach that treats only the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin rather than the whole breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose in four to five days. There has been a growing interest for APBI and various approaches have been developed under phase I-III clinical studies; these include multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy, balloon catheter brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-EBRT) and intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). Balloon-based brachytherapy approaches include MammoSite, Axxent electronic brachytherapy, Contura, hybrid brachytherapy devices. Another indication for breast brachytherapy is reirradiation of local recurrence after mastectomy. Published results of brachytherapy are very promising. We discuss the current status, indications, and technical aspects of breast cancer brachytherapy. PMID:26327829

  13. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-21

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an artery. The catheter is ... need for surgery. If surgery remains necessary, it can be performed more accurately. Catheter angiography presents a ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to examine ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive ... of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  1. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy

  2. Extended (5-year) outcomes of accelerated partial breast irradiation using MammoSite balloon brachytherapy: patterns of failure, patient selection, and dosimetric correlates for late toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, John A; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-02-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate (192)Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer-specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, PSkin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and a more rigorous skin dose constraint of ≤100%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  4. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed; DeWees, Todd A; Tanderup, Kari; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2016-01-01

    High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation therapy. Cumulative incidence of failures was estimated and prognostic variables were identified Mean follow up was 29.7 months. Median BMI was 50.2 kg/m(2) (range: 25.1-104 kg/m(2)). The two-year overall survival was 65.2%. The two-year cumulative incidence of pelvic and distant failures was 8.3% and 13.5%, respectively. Grade 3 disease was associated with a higher risk of all-failures (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 4.67, 95% CI: 1.04-20.9, p=0.044). The incidence of acute Grade 3 GI/GU toxicities was 4.6%. Pelvic failure at two years was less than 10%. Patients with grade 3 disease were more likely to experience disease failure and may warrant closer follow up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Long-term control and toxicity with brachytherapy for localized breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitelman, Simona F; Amendola, Beatriz; Khan, Atif; Beriwal, Sushil; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Kim, Leonard H; Cuttino, Laurie

    There has been significant controversy regarding the equivalency of accelerated partial breast irradiation to whole-breast irradiation. With the recent publication of a large, randomized trial comparing these two treatment modalities, an update on the current state of knowledge of brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation, with respect to local control and toxicities, would be useful to practitioners and patients. A systematic literature review was conducted examining articles published between January 2000 and April 2016 on the topics "brachytherapy" and "breast." A total of 67 articles met inclusion criteria, providing outcomes on local tumor control and/or toxicity for breast brachytherapy. Reported 5-year local failure rates were 1.4-6.1% for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) and 0-5.7% for single-entry brachytherapy catheters when delivered to patients with standard selection criteria. Toxicity profiles are acceptable, with cosmetic outcomes comparable to whole-breast irradiation. The reported rates of infection were 0-12%. Symptomatic fat necrosis was found in 0-12% and 0-3.2% of patients treated with MIB and single-entry brachytherapy catheters, respectively. Late Grade ≥3 telangiectasias and fibrosis were reported in 0-8% and 0-9.1% of patients treated with MIB, respectively. These side effects were less common with single-entry brachytherapy catheters (0-2.0% and 0%, respectively). Breast brachytherapy is a treatment technique that provides acceptable rates of local control in select patients, as demonstrated by Level I evidence. The side effect profile of this treatment is well documented and should be shared with patients when considering this treatment modality. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... a tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical ... them appear bright white. top of page How is the procedure performed? This examination is usually done ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area ... small incision (usually a few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into ... through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... most cases, the kidneys will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an artery ... examined, a contrast material is injected through the tube and images are captured using a small dose ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... most cases, the kidneys will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter ... limitations of Catheter Angiography? Patients with impaired kidney function, especially those who also have diabetes, are not ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ... nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the catheter entered the ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography produces very ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding ...

  15. Tandem-ring dwell time ratio in Nigeria: dose comparisons of two loading patterns in standard high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibhade, Obed Rachel; Oyeyemi, Oyekunle Emmanuel; Idayat, Akinlade Bidemi; Atara I, Ntekim

    2015-04-01

    In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT), the source dwell times and dwell positions are essential treatment planning parameters. An optimal choice of these factors is fundamental to obtain the desired target coverage with the lowest achievable dose to the organs at risk (OARs). This study evaluates relevant dose parameters in cervix brachytherapy in order to assess existing tandem-ring dwell time ratio used at the first HDR BT center in Nigeria, and compare it with an alternative source loading pattern. At the Radiotherapy Department, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, a total of 370 standard treatment plans in two alternative sets were generated with HDR basic 2.6 software for one hundred and eighty five cervical cancer patients. The initial 185 individual plans were created for clinical treatment using the tandem-ring dwell time ratio of 1 : 1. Modifying the initial applicator loading ratio, the second set of plans with related dose data were also obtained for study purposes only. Total reference air kerma (TRAK), total time index (TTI), ICRU volume, treatment time, point B dose, ICRU bladder dose, and rectal points dose were evaluated for both sets of plans. The means of all evaluated dose parameters decreased when the existing tandem-ring dwell time ratio (1 : 1) was modified to other dwell weightings (1 : 1 - 3 : 1). These reductions were 13.43% (ICRU volume), 9.83% (rectal dose), 6.68% (point B dose), 6.08% (treatment time), 5.90% (TRAK), 5.88% (TTI), and 1.08% (bladder dose). Correspondingly, coefficients of variation changed by -7.98%, -5.02%, -5.23%, -4.20%, -3.93%, 8.65%, and 3.96% from the existing pattern to the alternative one. Tandem-ring dwell time ratio has significant influence on dosimetric parameters. This study has indicated the need to modify the existing planning approach at UCH.

  16. Ex-vivo and simulation comparison of multi-angular ablation patterns using catheter-based ultrasound transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Wooton, Jeffrey; Williams, Emery; Neubauer, Paul; Frith, Lance; Komadina, Bruce; Diederich, Chris; Burdette, E. Clif

    2013-02-01

    Catheter based ultrasound ablation devices have been suggested as the least minimally invasive procedure for thermal therapy. The success of such procedures depends on accurately delivering the thermal dose to the tissue. One of the main challenges of such therapy is to deliver thermal therapy at the target location without damaging the surrounding tissue or major vessels and veins. To achieve such multi-directional capability, a multi-angular beam pattern is required. The purpose of this study was to build a multi-sectored tubular ultrasonic transducer and control the directionality of the acoustic power delivered to the tissue by each sector simultaneously. Multi-zoned tubular ultrasonic transducer arrays with three active sectors were constructed. Using these transducer configurations, a multi-angular ablation pattern was created in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. Experiments were conducted by activating two and three zones separately to investigate the ablation pattern of each case. Simulations results were presented by solving the Penne bio-heat equation using finite element method. The simulation results were compared with ex vivo results with respect to temperature and dose distribution in the tissue. Thermocouples located at 15 mm radially from the applicator indicated a peak temperature of greater than 52-55° C and thermal dose of 103-104 EQ mins at 43°C. It was observed through visual inspection that the proposed technology could ablate a specific tissue region or multiple regions selectively while not damaging the desired surrounding tissue. Good agreement between experimental and simulation results was obtained.

  17. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Tejinder; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Shikha; Bisht, Shyam Singh; Basu, Trinanjan; Abhishek, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D) USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT). The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites. PMID:28533803

  18. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susovan Banerjee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT. The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites.

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... that blood will form a clot around the tip of the catheter, blocking the artery and making it necessary to operate to reopen the vessel. If you have diabetes or kidney disease, the kidneys may be injured due to the ... that the catheter tip will separate material from the inner lining of ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  3. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  4. Tumor hypoxia - A confounding or exploitable factor in interstitial brachytherapy? Effects of tissue trauma in an experimental rat tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP; van Geel, CAJF; van Hooije, CMC; van der Kleij, AJ; Visser, AG

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential effects of tumor hypoxia induced by afterloading catheter implantation on the effectiveness of brachytherapy in a rat tumor model. Methods and Materials: Afterloading catheters (4) Here implanted in subcutaneously growing R1M rhabdomyosarcoma in female Wag/Rij

  5. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to ... pelvis legs and feet arms and hands Physicians use the procedure to: identify abnormalities, such as aneurysms, ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... is suspended over a table on which the patient lies. The catheter used in angiography is a ... other noninvasive procedures. No radiation remains in a patient's body after an x-ray examination. X-rays ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such ... to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... catheter angiography to lessen the risk of allergic reaction. Another option is to undergo a different exam ... and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is extremely ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... injured due to the contrast material. In most cases, the kidneys will regain their normal function within ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material to examine blood vessels in ... technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels ...

  12. Umbilical catheters

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    ... baby is very premature. The baby has bowel problems that prevent feeding. The baby needs very strong medicines. The baby needs exchange transfusion. HOW ARE UMBILICAL CATHETERS PLACED? There are normally ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... basis. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line into a small vein in your ... all the necessary images have been obtained. Your intravenous line will be removed. A catheter angiogram may ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking and allergies, especially ... is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic ... By selecting the arteries through which the catheter passes, it is possible to assess vessels in several ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... disease). evaluate obstructions of vessels. top of page How should I prepare? You should inform your physician ... as a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    ... 24 hours before catheter angiography to lessen the risk of allergic reaction. Another option is to undergo a different ... Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... contrast material to examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms ... skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material is injected through ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a ... the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches. show the extent and severity of ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to examine blood ... obstructions of vessels. top of page How should I prepare? You should inform your physician of any ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... and x-rays. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Catheter angiography produces very detailed, clear and accurate pictures of the blood vessels and may eliminate the ... a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... heart chest abdomen (such as the kidneys and liver) pelvis legs and feet arms and hands Physicians ... Angiography (CTA) X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... a feeling of warmth or a slight burning sensation. The most difficult part of the procedure may ... the kidneys will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ... will be drawn before starting the procedure to make sure that your kidneys are working and that ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... before catheter angiography to lessen the risk of allergic reaction. Another option is to undergo a different exam ... Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is extremely ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Interventional radiologist performing an angiography exam View ... ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored by Please note ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible ... and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery of the neck, ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... than an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used ... a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the aorta in ... small incision (usually a few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... far outweighs the risk. If you have a history of allergy to x-ray contrast material, your ... Angiography (CTA) X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to examine blood ... an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  13. High-dose-rate brachytherapy of rhabdomyosarcoma limited to the external auditory canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Martin T; Voros, Laszlo; Cohen, Gil'ad N; Lanning, Ryan M; Ganly, Ian; O'Suoji, Chibuzo C; Wolden, Suzanne L

    To report on the single-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of a 21-month-old girl child with an embryonal, botryoid-type, rhabdomyosarcoma limited to the external auditory canal (EAC). A 2.4-mm diameter catheter was inserted into the right EAC and placed against the tympanic membrane. A computed tomography simulation scan was acquired. A brachytherapy treatment plan, in which 21 Gy in seven fractions was prescribed to a 1-mm depth along the distal 2 cm of the catheter, was generated. Treatments were delivered under anesthesia without complication. A dosimetric comparison between this plan and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan was then conducted. A clinical target volume (CTV), which encompassed a 1-mm margin along the distal 2 cm of the catheter, was delineated for both plans. Given positioning uncertainty under image guidance, a planning target volume (PTV = CTV + 3-mm margin) was defined for the IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was optimized for maximal CTV coverage but subsequently normalized to the same CTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100) of the brachytherapy plan. The IMRT plan was normalized to the brachytherapy CTV V100 of 82.0%. The PTV V100 of this plan was 34.1%. The PTV exhibited dosimetric undercoverage within the middle ear and toward the external ear. Mean cochlea doses for the IMRT and brachytherapy plans were 26.7% and 10.5% of prescription, respectively. For rhabdomyosarcomas limited to the EAC, a standard brachytherapy catheter can deliver a highly conformal radiation plan that can spare the nearby cochlea from excess radiation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...... in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications....

  15. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  16. Peripheral nerve catheters in children: an analysis of safety and practice patterns from the pediatric regional anesthesia network (PRAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B J; Long, J B; De Oliveira, G S; Szmuk, P; Setiawan, C; Polaner, D M; Suresh, S

    2015-09-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) are used with increasing frequency in children. Although adult studies have demonstrated safety with this technique, there have been few safety studies in children. The main objective of the current investigation was to examine the incidence of PNC complications in children undergoing surgery. This is an observational, multi-institutional study using the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network (PRAN) database. Data pertaining to PNCs were entered prospectively into a secure, online database by each participating centre. Patient characteristics, anatomic location, localization techniques, medications used, and complications were recorded for each catheter. All complications and any sequelae were followed until resolution. There were 2074 PNCs included in the study. 251 adverse events and complications were recorded, resulting in an overall incidence (95% CI) of complications of 12.1% (10.7-13.5%). The most common complications were catheter malfunction, block failure, infection, and vascular puncture. There were no reports of persistent neurologic problems, serious infection, or local anaesthetic systemic toxicity, resulting in an estimated incidence (95% CI) of 0.04% (0.001-0.2%). Patients who developed an infection had used the catheters for a greater number of days, median (IQR) of 4.5 (3-7) days compared with 3 (1-3) days in the patients who did not develop an infection, PCatheter problems are common, yet minor, in severity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This ... are not making much urine. Babies can have low urine output ...

  18. Patterns of Recurrence After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: A Population-Based Study of 2223 Consecutive Low- and Intermediate-Risk Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Andrea C.; Morris, W. James, E-mail: JMorris@bccancer.bc.ca; Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; McKenzie, Michael; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Objectives: This study examined patterns of recurrence after low–dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB), estimated local recurrence rate and compared that rate to the estimated local recurrence rate after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A prospective database was maintained with clinical, dosimetric, and outcome data for all LDR-PB implantation procedures performed at our institution. From 1998 to 2008, 2223 patients with prostate cancer received LDR-PB without supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Patients who developed Phoenix-defined biochemical failure were reviewed for sites of relapse and investigations completed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5 years, 108 of 2223 patients (4.8%) developed biochemical relapse. In 1 additional patient, local relapse was found on transurethral prostate resection, but his prostate-specific antigen concentration was well short of triggering Phoenix-defined failure. Of the 109 patients with disease relapse, 18 of 2223 (0.8%) had a proven local recurrence, and 30 of 2223 (1.3%) had a proven distant recurrence. The remaining 61 of 2223 patients (2.7%) had unidentified sites of recurrence; of these, 57 patients (93%) had digital rectal examinations (DREs), 18 (30%) had post-treatment biopsies, 45 (74%) had bone scans, and 34 (56%) had computed tomography imaging of the abdomen and pelvis. If every biochemical failure were local, the local recurrence rate would be as high as 4.9%; however, by excluding those with proven distant failure and those with both a negative DRE and biopsy, we estimate that the local recurrence rate is 2.7% or less. Conclusions: In the context of limitations of the study design, our population-based analysis indicates that the local recurrence rate after LDR-PB is as low or lower than that after RP in our jurisdiction.

  19. American Brachytherapy Society consensus report for accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Arthur, Douglas; Shaitelman, Simona; Polgár, Csaba; Todor, Dorin; Zoberi, Imran; Kamrava, Mitchell; Major, Tibor; Yashar, Catheryn; Wazer, David E

    To develop a consensus report for the quality practice of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB). The American Brachytherapy Society Board appointed an expert panel with clinical and research experience with breast brachytherapy to provide guidance for the current practice of IMB. This report is based on a comprehensive literature review with emphasis on randomized data and expertise of the panel. Randomized trials have demonstrated equivalent efficacy of APBI using IMB compared with whole breast irradiation for select patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several techniques for placement of interstitial catheters are described, and importance of three-dimensional planning with appropriate optimization is reviewed. Optimal target definition is outlined. Commonly used dosing schemas include 50 Gy delivered in pulses of 0.6-0.8 Gy/h using pulsed-dose-rate technique and 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 32 Gy in eight fractions, or 30 Gy in seven fractions using high-dose-rate technique. Potential toxicities and strategies for toxicity avoidance are described in detail. Dosimetric constraints include limiting whole breast volume that receives ≥50% of prescription dose to skin dose to ≤100% of prescription dose (≤60-70% preferred), chest wall dose to ≤125% of prescription dose, Dose Homogeneity Index to >0.75 (>0.85 preferred), V150 Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Advancements in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherapy makes it attractive for boosting limited size target volumes to very high doses while sparing normal tissues. Significant developments over the last decades have increased the use of 3D image guided procedures with the utilization of CT, MRI, US and PET. This has taken brachytherapy to a new level in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reopen the vessel. If you have diabetes or kidney disease, the kidneys may be injured due to the contrast material. ... the limitations of Catheter Angiography? Patients with impaired kidney function, especially those who also ... be used for any purpose other than this referral.

  4. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a regular x-ray ... material injection, you should immediately inform the technologist. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 24 hours before catheter angiography to lessen the risk of allergic reaction. Another option is to undergo a different ... Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a regular x-ray ... any possibility that they are pregnant. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x- ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography to lessen the risk of allergic reaction. Another option is to undergo a different exam that does not call for contrast material injection. If a large amount of x-ray contrast ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ... the artery, causing a block downstream in the blood vessel. top of page What are the ... information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. ...

  9. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  10. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J, E-mail: CDiederich@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue {>=}41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T{sub max} {<=} 47 deg. C, T{sub rectum} {<=} 41.5 deg. C, and T{sub bladder} {<=} 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360{sup 0} or 2 x 180{sup 0} output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180{sup 0}, 270{sup 0}, or 360{sup 0} output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1}) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm{sup 3}) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T{sub 90} in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM{sub 43deg.C}) at 1 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1} with 10/14 patients {>=}41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T{sub 90} {>=} 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant

  11. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwang21@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion [Department of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Pan, Li [Siemens Healthcare USA, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seethamraju, Ravi T. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Dumoulin, Charles L. [Radiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  12. An Active Mammosite For Breast Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that uses radioactive sources inside or in close proximity to cancerous tumors, thus minimizing exposure to neighboring healthy cells. This radiation oncology treatment unlike many others is localized and precise. The latest involvement of the Brachytherapy research group of the medical physics program at Hampton University is in the development of a scintillator fiber based detector for the breast cancer specific Mammosite (balloon device) from Cytyc Inc. Radioactive sources are inserted into a small plastic catheter (shaft) and pushed at the end of the tube. At that location, a water filled balloon surrounds the source and allow uniform gamma emission into cancer tumors. There is presently no capability for this device to provide measurements of the location of the source, as well as the radiation emitted from the source. Recent data were acquired to evaluate the possibility of measuring the dose distribution during breast Brachytherapy cancer treatments with this device. A high activity ^192Ir radioactive source and a 0.5 and 1 mm^2 scintillating fibers were used. Results will be presented and discussed.

  13. Brachytherapy in lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovirosa-Casino, Angeles; Planas-Toledano, Isabel; Ferre-Jorge, Jorge; Oliva-Díez, José María; Conill-Llobet, Carlos; Arenas-Prat, Meritxell

    2006-05-01

    Lip cancer is one of the most prevalent skin tumours of the head and neck. The characteristics of the tumour relate to their exophyitic growth in an area of easy visual acces which allows their diagnosis in early stages. As a result, there is a better prognosis with the present treatments. In early stages the treatment can be performed by surgery or by brachytherapy, and the results are similar on local control; nevertheless brachytherapy offers the best functional and esthetic results. We are reporting on a review of the literature in relation to indications, techniques and results of brachytherapy for lip cancer.

  14. Introduction of novel 3D-printed superficial applicators for high-dose-rate skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emma-Louise; Tonino Baldion, Anna; Thomas, Christopher; Burrows, Tom; Byrne, Nick; Newton, Victoria; Aldridge, Sarah

    Custom-made surface mold applicators often allow more flexibility when carrying out skin brachytherapy, particularly for small treatment areas with high surface obliquity. They can, however, be difficult to manufacture, particularly if there is a lack of experience in superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy techniques or with limited resources. We present a novel method of manufacturing superficial brachytherapy applicators utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-printing techniques. We describe the treatment planning process and the process of applicator manufacture. The treatment planning process, with the introduction of a pre-plan, allows for an "ideal" catheter arrangement within an applicator to be determined, exploiting varying catheter orientations, heights, and curvatures if required. The pre-plan arrangement is then 3D printed to the exact specifications of the pre-plan applicator design. This results in improved target volume coverage and improved sparing of organs at risk. Using a pre-plan technique for ideal catheter placement followed by automated 3D-printed applicator manufacture has greatly improved the entire process of superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment. We are able to design and manufacture flexible, well-fitting, superior quality applicators resulting in a more efficient and improved patient pathway and patient experience. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  16. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, B.L.; den Hertog, D.; Hoffmann, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or

  17. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balvert, M.; Gorissen, B.L.; den Hertog, D.; Hoffmann, A.L.

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell

  18. SU-E-T-09: A Clinical Implementation and Optimized Dosimetry Study of Freiberg Flap Skin Surface Treatment in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Wu, H; Durci, M [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This case study was designated to confirm the optimized plan was used to treat skin surface of left leg in three stages. 1. To evaluate dose distribution and plan quality by alternating of the source loading catheters pattern in flexible Freiberg Flap skin surface (FFSS) applicator. 2. To investigate any impact on Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) of large superficial surface target volume coverage. 3. To compare the dose distribution if it was treated with electron beam. Methods: The Freiburg Flap is a flexible mesh style surface mold for skin radiation or intraoperative surface treatments. The Freiburg Flap consists of multiple spheres that are attached to each other, holding and guiding up to 18 treatment catheters. The Freiburg Flap also ensures a constant distance of 5mm from the treatment catheter to the surface. Three treatment trials with individual planning optimization were employed: 18 channels, 9 channels of FF and 6 MeV electron beam. The comparisons were highlighted in target coverage, dose conformity and dose sparing of surrounding tissues. Results: The first 18 channels brachytherapy plan was generated with 18 catheters inside the skin-wrapped up flap (Figure 1A). A second 9 catheters plan was generated associated with the same calculation points which were assigned to match prescription for target coverage as 18 catheters plan (Figure 1B). The optimized inverse plan was employed to reduce the dose to adjacent structures such as tibia or fibula. The comparison of DVH’s was depicted on Figure 2. External beam of electron RT plan was depicted in Figure 3. Overcall comparisons among these three were illustrated in Conclusion: The 9-channel Freiburg flap flexible skin applicator offers a reasonably acceptable plan without compromising the coverage. Electron beam was discouraged to use to treat curved skin surface because of low target coverage and high dose in adjacent tissues.

  19. MO-E-BRD-03: Intra-Operative Breast Brachytherapy: Is One Stop Shopping Best? [Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, B. [University of Virginia (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  20. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-05-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  1. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  2. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  3. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  4. Catheter associated urinary tract infection: Aetiologic agents and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to identify microbial pathogens associated with bacteriuria and UTI in patients with indwelling urethral catheters and determine their susceptibility patterns to commonly used antimicrobial agents in our institution. Catheter urine and catheter tip specimens of all the patients were analyzed by ...

  5. MO-E-BRD-00: Breast Brachytherapy: The Phoenix of Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  6. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  7. SU-F-E-13: Design and Fabrication of Gynacological Brachytherapy Shielding & Non Shielding Applicators Using Indigenously Developed 3D Printing Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this innovative work we have developed Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & Non Shielding Applicators and compared with the commercially available applicators by using the indigenously developed 3D Printing machine. Methods: We have successfully indigenously developed the 3D printing machine. Which contain the 3 dimensional motion platform, Heater unit, base plate, ect… To fabricate the Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & non shielding applicators the 3D design were developed in the computer as virtual design. This virtual design is made in a CAD computer file using a 3D modeling program. Separate programme for the shielding & non shielding applicators. We have also provided the extra catheter insert provision in the applicator for the multiple catheter. The DICOM file of the applicator were then converted to stereo Lithography file for the 3D printer. The shielding & Non Shielding Applicators were printed on a indigenously developed 3D printer material. The same dimensions were used to develop the applicators in the acrylic material also for the comparative study. A CT scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon beams and compared against water and soft tissue. Applicator were then scanned to confirm the placement of multiple catheter position. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated applicators. Results: The doses measured from the ion Chamber and X-Omat film test were within 2%. The shielded applicator reduce the rectal dose comparatively with the non shielded applicator. Conclusion: As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and tested dosimetrically. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be

  8. A Comparison of Skin Dose Delivered with MammoSite and Multicatheter Breast Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshaghi M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers however skin, chest wall and Lung doses are correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy. Objective: To investigate the percentage of the dose received by critical organ (skin, thermoluminescence detector was used in MammoSite brachytherpy and the ability to control skin dose between MammoSite and MultiCatheter brachytherapy was compared with each other. Method: Dosimetry is carried out using a female-equivalent mathematical chest phantom and Ir-192 source for brachytherapy application. Results: Our initial results has shown good agreement with surface doses between those calculated from the treatment planning results and those measured by the thermoluminescence detector. The mean skin dose for the experimental dosimetry in MammoSite was 2.3 Gy (56.76% of prescription dose. Conclusion: The results show that the MultiCatheter method is associated with signifcantly lower mean skin and chest wall dose than is the MammoSite. The MultiCatheter technique is quite flexible and can be applied to any size of breast or lumpectomy cavity, But in MammoSite technique, verifcation of balloon symmetry, balloon/ cavity conformance and overlying skin thickness is essential to assure target coverage and toxicity avoidance.

  9. An intrauterine ultrasound applicator for targeted delivery of thermal therapy in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy to the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Juang, Titania; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    An intracavitary hyperthermia applicator for targeted heat delivery to the cervix was developed based on a linear array of sectored tubular ultrasound transducers that provides truly 3-D heating control (angular and along the length). A central conduit can incorporate an HDR source for sequential or simultaneous delivery of heat and radiation. Hyperthermia treatment volumes were determined from brachytherapy treatment planning data and used as a basis for biothermal simulations analyzing the effects of device parameters, tissue properties, and catheter materials on heating patterns. Devices were then developed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90-180° sectors and a 15-35 mm heating length, housed within a 6-mm diameter water-cooled PET catheter. Directional heating from sectored transducers could extend lateral penetration of therapeutic heating (41°C) >2 cm while maintaining rectum and bladder temperatures within 12 mm below thermal damage thresholds. Imaging artifacts were evaluated with standard CT, cone beam CT, and MR images. MR thermal imaging was used to demonstrate shaping of heating profiles in axial and coronal slices with artifact <2 mm from the device. The impact of the high-Z applicator materials on the HDR dose distribution was assessed using a well-type ionization chamber and was found to be less than 6% attenuation, which can readily be accounted for with treatment planning software. The intrauterine ultrasound device has demonstrated potential for 3-D conformal heating of clinical tumors in the delivery of targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with brachytherapy to the cervix.

  10. Manifestation pattern of early-late vaginal morbidity after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: an analysis from the EMBRACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study (www.embracestudy.dk) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity is still pronounced with currently applied IGABT, and it needs further attention

  11. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  12. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery, School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John [CCSEO, Kingston General Hospital and Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  13. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000157.htm Central venous catheter - flushing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have a central venous catheter. This is a tube that goes into a ...

  14. Bladder wall recurrence of prostate cancer after high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Hsu, I-Chow; Braunstein, Steve; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Roach, Mack

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer seeding after needle biopsy has been reported in the perineum, rectal wall, and periprostatic soft tissue. In this article, we report the results of a localized prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder following protrusion of a single high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter through the bladder wall at the ultimate site of failure. A 62-year-old man with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma was treated with long-term androgen deprivation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation, and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost. He developed biochemical recurrence 4 years after treatment, and a CT scan of the pelvis revealed a nodule in the posterior, inferior bladder wall. Surgical pathology following transurethral resection of tumor within the bladder was consistent with high-grade prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient's prostate-specific antigen level fell to the range of normal postoperatively, and whole body imaging, including a multi-parametric MRI of the prostate with diffusion and spectroscopy, failed to reveal any other sites of disease. Review of the CT scan obtained for dosimetry at the time of brachytherapy demonstrated a lone catheter protruding through the bladder wall at the site of eventual recurrence. The tumor recurred in the bladder 12 months later, once more without evidence of disease within the prostate itself or distantly, and the patient was started on salvage androgen deprivation therapy. This case is the first report of prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder wall after brachytherapy and raises questions about prostate cancer biology, brachytherapy technique, and the timing of brachytherapy boost relative to whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. New era of electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prabhakar

    2017-04-28

    Traditional brachytherapy refers to the placement of radioactive sources on or inside the cancer tissues. Based on the type of sources, brachytherapy can be classified as radionuclide and electronic brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy uses miniaturized X-ray sources instead of radionuclides to deliver high doses of radiation. The advantages of electronic brachytherapy include low dose to organs at risk, reduced dose to treating staff, no leakage radiation in off state, less shielding, and no radioactive waste. Most of these systems operate between 50 and 100 kVp and are widely used in the treatment of skin cancer. Intrabeam, Xoft and Papillon systems are also used in the treatment of intra-operative radiotherapy to breast in addition to other treatment sites. The rapid fall-off in the dose due to its low energy is a highly desirable property in brachytherapy and results in a reduced dose to the surrounding normal tissues compared to the Ir-192 source. The Xoft Axxent brachytherapy system uses a 2.25 mm miniaturized X-ray tube and the source almost mimics the high dose rate Ir-192 source in terms of dose rate and it is the only electronic brachytherapy system specifically used in the treatment of cervical cancers. One of the limiting factors that impede the use of electronic brachytherapy for interstitial application is the source dimension. However, it is highly anticipated that the design of miniaturized X-ray tube closer to the dimension of an Ir-192 wire is not too far away, and the new era of electronic brachytherapy has just begun.

  16. New era of electronic brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Traditional brachytherapy refers to the placement of radioactive sources on or inside the cancer tissues. Based on the type of sources, brachytherapy can be classified as radionuclide and electronic brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy uses miniaturized X-ray sources instead of radionuclides to deliver high doses of radiation. The advantages of electronic brachytherapy include low dose to organs at risk, reduced dose to treating staff, no leakage radiation in off state, less shielding, and no radioactive waste. Most of these systems operate between 50 and 100 kVp and are widely used in the treatment of skin cancer. Intrabeam, Xoft and Papillon systems are also used in the treatment of intra-operative radiotherapy to breast in addition to other treatment sites. The rapid fall-off in the dose due to its low energy is a highly desirable property in brachytherapy and results in a reduced dose to the surrounding normal tissues compared to the Ir-192 source. The Xoft Axxent brachytherapy system uses a 2.25 mm miniaturized X-ray tube and the source almost mimics the high dose rate Ir-192 source in terms of dose rate and it is the only electronic brachytherapy system specifically used in the treatment of cervical cancers. One of the limiting factors that impede the use of electronic brachytherapy for interstitial application is the source dimension. However, it is highly anticipated that the design of miniaturized X-ray tube closer to the dimension of an Ir-192 wire is not too far away, and the new era of electronic brachytherapy has just begun. PMID:28529679

  17. SU-F-BRA-02: Electromagnetic Tracking in Brachytherapy as An Advanced Modality for Treatment Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellermeier, M; Herbolzheimer, J; Kreppner, S; Lotter, M; Strnad, V [University Clinic Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Bert, C [University Clinic Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the use of Electromagnetic Tracking (EMT) for quality assurance in brachytherapy by means of phantom studies and to assess the clinical applicability of EMT during HDR breast brachytherapy. Methods: An EMT system was investigated to examine its suitability for clinical applications in brachytherapy. A field generator served as electromagnetic field emitter. Sensors (magnetic sensitive only), connected to a control unit, were used and their respective position and orientation inside a pre-defined measurement volume (500 mm cube length) determined. Up to three 6DoF sensors were placed on the phantom’s surface to obtain additional reference coordinates used to derive relative measured positions of a smaller 5DoF sensor inserted in the 6F catheters of the implant. The catheters were successively measured by manual displacement of the sensor at ∼40 mm/s. The measured catheter tracks, acquired multiple times at various locations (CT and treatment room), were smoothed, divided into intervals (2.5 mm dwell step size), registered (rigid Iterative Closest Point transformation) and compared against the known phantom geometry. Results: The reference coordinates were used to exclude the influence of external (e.g., respiratory-induced) motion. Precision tests in a clinical setting showed variances below 1 mm (translational) and 1° (rotational), respectively. Our method for catheter reconstruction preserved the length of the tracked catheter (within 1 mm). The measured tracking accuracy was 1±0.3 mm (maximum: 2 mm). The results are less accurate in environments potentially interfering with the magnetic field, e.g., in the vicinity of ferromagnetic table components. Conclusion: Our EMT system is able to perform reproducible and accurate catheter tracking and reconstruction. Currently, measurements of the implant geometry in HDR breast treatments are initiated. Online implant monitoring by means of EM tracking may be a first step towards advanced

  18. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O'Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm.

  19. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Westerveld, Henrike [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiotherapy, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  20. Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Miguel, Inigo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Vazquez-Garcia, Blanca [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Pagola, Maria; Gaztanaga, Miren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martin-Algarra, Salvador [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations

  1. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-07-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue >=41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax 200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM43 °C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients >=41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 >= 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to generate conformal therapeutic heating ranging from a single endocervical device targeting small volumes local to the cervix (directional interstitial applicators in the lateral periphery to target much larger volumes (6 cm radial), while preferentially limiting heating of the bladder and rectum.

  2. Assessment of the implant geometry in fractionated interstitial HDR breast brachytherapy using an electromagnetic tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermeier, Markus; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav; Bert, Christoph

    During the partial-breast treatment course by interstitial brachytherapy, electromagnetic tracking (EMT) was applied to measure the implant geometry. Implant-geometry variation, choice of reference data, and three registration methods were assessed. The implant geometry was measured in 28 patients after catheter implantation (EMTbed), during CT imaging (EMTCT), and in each of up to n = 9 treatment fractions (EMTF(k), k = 1, 2,… n). EMTF(k) were registered to the planned implant reconstruction (CTplan) by using all dwell positions (DPs), the button centers, or three fiducial sensors on the patient's skin. Variation in implant geometry obtained from EMTF(k) was assessed for EMTbed, EMTCT, and CTplan. EMT was used to measure 3932 catheters. A duration of 6.5 ± 1.7 min was needed for each implant measurement (mean, 17 catheters) plus setup of the EMT system. Data registration based on the DP deviated significantly lower than registration on button centers or fiducial sensors. Within a registration group, there was a geometry in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy breast treatments. EMTbed, EMTCT, and CTplan data can serve as reference for assessment of implant changes. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. (106)Ruthenium brachytherapy for retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Hana; Moeckli, Raphaël; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Pica, Alessia; Zografos, Leonidas; Balmer, Aubin; Pampallona, Sandro; Munier, Francis L

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with (106)Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. A total of 63 tumors were treated with (106)Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. (106)Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which (106)Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which (106)Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. (106)Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with (106)Ru brachytherapy.

  4. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  5. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. (Department of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Beth Israel (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  6. Exploring relationships of catheter-associated urinary tract infection and blockage in people with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; McMahon, James M; Crean, Hugh F; Brasch, Judith

    2017-09-01

    To describe and explore relationships among catheter problems in long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, including excess healthcare use for treating catheter problems. Long-term urinary catheter users experience repeated problems with catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage of the device, yet little has been reported of the patterns and relationships among relevant catheter variables. Secondary data analysis was conducted from a sample in a randomised clinical trial, using data from the entire sample of 202 persons over 12 months' participation. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the sample over time. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were employed for logistic regressions to evaluate predictor variables of the presence/absence and frequencies of catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage. Catheter-related urinary tract infection was marginally associated with catheter blockage. Problems reported at least once per person in the 12 months were as follows: catheter-related urinary tract infection 57%, blockage 34%, accidental dislodgment 28%, sediment 87%, leakage (bypassing) 67%, bladder spasms 59%, kinks/twists 42% and catheter pain 49%. Regression analysis demonstrated that bladder spasms were significantly related to catheter-related urinary tract infection and sediment amount, and catheter leakages were marginally significantly and positively related to catheter-related urinary tract infection. Frequencies of higher levels of sediment and catheter leakage were significantly associated with higher levels of blockage, and being female was associated with fewer blockages. Persons who need help with eating (more disabled) were also more likely to have blockages. Catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage appear to be related and both are associated with additional healthcare expenditures. More research is needed to better understand how to prevent adverse catheter outcomes and patterns of problems in

  7. Radiation recall secondary to adjuvant docetaxel after balloon-catheter based accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Nathan W. [Summer Intern, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Wong, William W., E-mail: wong.william@mayo.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E. Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (United States); Karlin, Nina J. [Division of Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gray, Richard J. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    For early stage breast cancer, wide local excision and post-operative whole breast irradiation is a standard treatment. If adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended, radiation is usually given after completion of chemotherapy. In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy has become an option for selected patients. For these patients, adjuvant chemotherapy would have to be administered after radiation. The sequence of treatment with radiation followed by chemotherapy results in increased risk of radiation recall reaction (RRD) in these patients. Docetaxel is becoming a more commonly used drug as adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Here we report a case of docetaxel induced RRD after APBI with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy. Such reaction would have an adverse impact on the cosmetic outcome and quality of life of the patient. For patients who develop an intense skin reaction after the administration of docetaxel following APBI, RRD should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  8. Palliative interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent rectal cancer. Implantation techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Roeddiger, S.; Martin, T.; Tselis, N.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Hospital, Offenbach (Germany); Strassmann, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital, Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany); Aebersold, D.M. [Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Bern, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To report the methods and clinical results of CT-based interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedures for the palliative treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 brachytherapy implants were performed in 38 patients. CT-guided catheter implants were performed in 34 patients under local anesthesia and sedation, and four patients were implanted intraoperatively. Of 40 CT-guided implants, 20 were done using metallic needles introduced via the sacrum and 20 were transperineal implants of plastic tubes in the presacral region. Postimplant CT scans were used for three-dimensional (3-D) conformal brachytherapy planning. Patients implanted with metallic needles were given a single fraction of 10-15 Gy using HDR {sup 192}Ir, and those who received transperineal implants of plastic catheters were given fractionated brachytherapy, 5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 30-40 Gy. The median tumor volume was 225 cm{sup 3} with a range of 41-2,103 cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 23.4 months, a total of 13/38 patients were alive. The median postbrachytherapy survival was 15 months with 18 of the 25 deaths due to distant metastases. Tumor response was as follows: 6/38 partial remission, 28/38 stable disease, and 4/38 local progression. A planning target volume (PTV) coverage > 85% was achieved in 42/44 implants. The treatment was well tolerated, and no acute complications were observed. One patient developed a fistula after 8 months. Pain relief was recorded in 34 patients (89.5%), and the median duration of this palliative effect was 5 months with a range of 1-13 months. Conclusions: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is a valuable tool for the delivery of high doses and achieves effective palliation in recurrent rectal carcinoma. (orig.)

  9. Comment on "Comparison of dose rates calculated on Nucletron NPS v11 catheter tracking versus catheter describing"

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Laarse, R

    2003-01-01

    N D MacDougall has reported to Nucletron a dose error in the module MPS v11.33 of the Nucletron NPS brachytherapy program. This dose error occurred when an implant was reconstructed using the image tracking method. MPS v11 offers five methods for reconstruction from radiographs of the 3D localization in space of an iridium wire implant. The method using catheter-describing points is the most accurate one. It is based on digitizing the corresponding images of X-ray markers in the catheters on two radiographs, taken at different angles with an isocentric X-ray machine such as a treatment simulator. The method using tracking is the least accurate one. It tracks wire images on the radiographs to reconstruct a wire in space consisting of maximally 98 wire segments. This is the least accurate method because there is no correspondence between the image points of a wire on the radiographs.

  10. Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    As introduction a short overview of the history of brachytherapy (BT) is given, with a focus on the evolution in the photon sources that have been used over the years. A major step in this evolution was the introduction of the automatic afterloading devices, which could be compared to the introduction of linear accelerators in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The modern afterloaders allow for optimization of the dose delivery and the use of different dose rates (low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate) in function of tumor biology and patient comfort. Still today new sources are under investigation, and these developments together with the improvements in treatment planning and treatment techniques will enforce the role and place of BT as a valuable alternative for or supplementary to EBRT.

  11. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR-brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorissen, Bram L; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2014-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 seconds, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iter...

  12. Catheter simulator software tool to generate electrograms of any multi-polar diagnostic catheter from 3D atrial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillieto, Kristina E; Ganesan, Prasanth; Salmin, Anthony J; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Pertsov, Arkady M; Ghoraani, Behnaz

    2016-08-01

    Simulations are excellent tools for assessing new therapeutic strategies and are often conducted before implementing new therapy options in a clinical practice. For patients suffering from a heart arrhythmia, the main source of information comes from an intracardiac catheter. One of the common catheters is a Lasso multi-pole diagnostic catheter, which is a catheter that has 20 electrodes in a circular pattern. In this paper, we developed algorithm and simulation software that allows the users to place a multi-pole catheter on the atrial endocardial surface and record electrograms. In 3D atrial tissue, the plane of principal curvature is determined using eigenvectors of catheter vertices, from where the normals are projected and registered to the surface using 3D geodesic distance. This tool provides a platform for performing customized virtual cardiac experiments.

  13. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J S; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  14. On the Feasibility of Verification of 3D Dosimetry Near Brachytherapy Sources Using PRESAGE/Optical-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierquet M; Craciunescu O; Steffey B; Song H; Oldham M, E-mail: haijun.song@duke.ed [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 27710 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The feasibility of using the PRESAGE/Optical-CT system for 3D dosimetry verification around a brachytherapy source is investigated. Method and Materials: Brachytherapy dose distributions were obtained by irradiation of cylindrical PRESAGE volumes 6cm in diameter by 8cm height with a GammaMed 12i Ir-192 HDR unit (Varian Medical Systems). A narrow channel on the central axis was created by setting a steel catheter in the Presage during manufacture, enabling measurements close to the source ({approx}3mm). Results: Comparison of dose line profiles shows good agreement between PRESAGE and verified calculated dose calculation, in both high and low dose regions. Conclusion: The PRESAGE/Optical-CT shows good potential in verification of 3D dose distributions around brachytherapy sources.

  15. Dose volume uniformity index: a simple tool for treatment plan evaluation in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Prabhakar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In radiotherapy treatment planning, dose homogeneity inside the target volume plays a significant role in the final treatment outcome. Especially in brachytherapy where there is a steep dose gradient in the dose distribution inside the target volume, comparing the plans based on the dose homogeneity helps in assessing the high dose volume inside the final treatment plan. In brachytherapy, the dose inhomogeneity inside the target volume depends on many factors such as the type of sources, placement of these radioactive sources, distance between the applicators/implanttubes, dwell time of the source, etc. In this study, a simple index, the dose volume uniformity index (DVUI, has been proposed to study the dose homogeneity inside the target volume. This index gives the total dose volume inhomogeneity inside a given prescription isoline.Material and methods: To demonstrate the proposed DVUI in this study, a single plane implant (breast: 6 catheters, a double plane implant (breast: 9 catheters and a tongue implant (5 catheters were selected. The catheters were reconstructed from the CT image datasets in the Plato treatment planning system. The doses for the single, double and tongue implants were prescribed to the reference dose rate as per the Paris technique. DVUI was computed from the cumulative dose volume histogram.Results: For a volume receiving a uniform dose inside the prescription isoline, the DVUI is 1. Any value of DVUI > 1 shows the presence of a relatively high dose volume inside the prescription isoline. In addition to the concept of DVUI, a simple conformality index, the dose volume conformality index (DVCI, has also been proposed in this study based on the DVUI.Conclusion: The DVUI and the proposed DVCI in this study provide an easy way of comparing the rival plans in brachytherapy.

  16. Manifestation pattern of early-late vaginal morbidity after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: an analysis from the EMBRACE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A.; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study (www.embracestudy.dk)

  17. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M.; Van Hecke, H.; Boterberg, T.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  19. Indwelling catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an indwelling catheter are urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), surgery that made ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  20. Suprapubic catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), surgery that made ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  1. SU-F-T-55: Reproducibility of Interstitial HDR Brachytherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Ellis, R; Traughber, B; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating gynecological cancers with interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires precise reconstruction of catheter positions to obtain accurate dosimetric plans. In this study, we investigated the degree of reproducibility of dosimetric plans for Syed HDR brachytherapy. Methods: We randomly selected five patients having cervix-vaginal cancer who were recently treated in our clinic with interstitial HDR brachytherapy with a prescription dose of 25–30 Gy in five fractions. Interstitial needles/catheters were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and intra-operative 3T MRI scan was performed to confirm the desired catheter placement for adequate target volume coverage. A CT scan was performed and fused with the MRI for delineating high-risk CTV (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR-CTV) and OARs. HDR treatment plans were generated using Oncentra planning software. A single plan was used for all five fractions of treatment for each patient. For this study, we took the original clinical plan and removed all the reconstructed catheters from the plan keeping the original contours unchanged. Then, we manually reconstructed all the catheters and entered the same dwell time from the first original clinical plan. The dosimetric parameters studied were: D90 for HR-CTV and IR-CV, and D2cc for bladder, rectum, sigmoid and bowel. Results: The mean of absolute differences in dosimetric coverage (D90) were (range): 1.3% (1.0–2.0%) and 2.0% (0.9–3.6%) for HR-CTV and IR-CTV, respectively. In case of OARs, the mean of absolute variations in D2cc were (range): 4.7% (0.7–8.9%) for bladder, 1.60% (0.3–3.2%) for rectum, 1.6% (0–3.9%) for sigmoid, and 1.8% (0–5.1%) for bowel. Conclusion: Overall, the reproducibility of interstitial HDR plans was within clinically acceptable limit. Observed maximum variation in D2cc for bladder. If number of catchers and dwell points were relatively low or any one catheter was heavily loaded, then reproducibility of the plan

  2. Brachytherapy in oesophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, J.T.; Kuan, R. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    Patients with recurrent or locally advanced oesophageal carcinoma have a poor prognosis. Relief of dysphagia is often the goal of any further treatment. Several methods, including laser re-canalization, prosthetic intubation, dilatation, external beam irradiation (EBI) and intraluminal brachytherapy (IBT) can be used to alleviate dysphagia. In this retrospective review of 11 patients, eight with recurrent tumour and three newly diagnosed patients were treated with low dose rate IBT. Relief of dysphagia was achieved in nine patients, all of whom were able to maintain swallowing of at least a semi-solid diet until death or last follow-up. Toxicity was minimal, but survival was poor, with a median survival of only 3 months. IBT presents several advantages over other palliative methods, especially in recurrent tumours where re-treatment with EBI is often difficult because of normal tissue tolerance. Low dose rate IBT takes only 1-2 days to deliver, is highly effective, has little morbidity and the palliation achieved is relatively durable. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  3. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  4. Extrascleral extension of choroidal melanoma: post-enucleation high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Paul T; Tena, Lawrence B; Semenova, Ekaterina; Aridgides, Paul; Choi, Walter H

    2014-01-01

    To investigate if orbital extension of uveal melanoma can be treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. This study is a retrospective analysis of the results of a clinical case series was performed on 10 patients. Each underwent primary enucleation for uveal melanoma, was discovered to have orbital extension, and consented for HDR brachytherapy. By American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) initial tumor grading, there was one each (T1c, T2c, T2d, and T3d, three T4c, and two T4d-staged uveal melanomas. One was AJCC-staged R2 due to orbital recurrence presenting 16 months after enucleation. (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy involved transcutaneous circumferential orbital incisions allowing for evenly spaced brachytherapy catheters into the orbit. A target dose of 32.85 Gy (range, 32.85-34 Gy) was delivered in 9-10 twice-daily fractions (range, 3.4-3.65 Gy per fraction) over 5 consecutive days. Data analysis included but was not limited to radiation therapy methods, local tumor control, side effects, and metastatic rate. In the 9 patients who tolerated treatment, there has been no orbital recurrence at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 1-62 months). Four patients died of metastatic disease (one presented with a treated solitary liver metastasis before brachytherapy). There was no significant eyelash or eyebrow loss. There was no radiation-induced eyelid erythema, orbital infection, or contracted sockets. All orbits accepted and maintained ocular prostheses. Brachytherapy was used as an alternative to external beam radiation treatment for postenucleation orbital melanoma. This series reports complete local control, few side effects, and excellent cosmetic results. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, L.M., E-mail: moutinho@ua.pt [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Castro, I.F.C. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Peralta, L. [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M.C. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40–50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25–100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  6. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  7. Central Venous Catheter (Central Line)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... venous catheter (KATHeter), also known as a central line or CVC, is long, soft, thin, hollow tube ... into a large vein (blood vessel). A central line is much like an intravenous (IV) catheter that ...

  8. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Olsen, Dag Rune; Grau, Cai; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-10-01

    Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the potential benefit in patients. In 14 patients, treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index (OI), homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12 theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. Geometrical and graphical optimisation improved the dose plans significantly with graphical optimisation being superior. Graphically optimised dose plans showed a significant decrease of 18%+/-9% in high dose volume (p<0.001). HI, COIN, and OI were significantly improved from 0.50+/-0.05 to 0.60+/-0.05, from 0.65+/-0.04 to 0.71+/-0.04, and from 0.19+/-0.03 to 0.15+/-0.03, respectively (p<0.001 for all). Moreover, minimum target dose increased significantly from 71%+/-5% to 80%+/-5% (p<0.001). The improvement in OI and HI obtained by optimisation depended on the regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose plans between patients. Dwell time optimisation significantly improved the dose distribution regarding homogeneity, conformity, minimum target dose, and size of high dose volumes. Graphical optimisation is fast, reproducible and superior to geometric optimisation.

  9. Custom-made micro applicators for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of chronic psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we present the treatment of the psoriatic nail beds of patients refractory to standard therapies using high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. The custom-made micro applicators (CMMA were designed and constructed for radiation dose delivery to small curvy targets with complicated topology. The role of the HDR brachytherapy treatment was to stimulate the T cells for an increased immune response. Material and methods: The patient diagnosed with psoriatic nail beds refractory to standard therapies received monthly subunguinal injections that caused significant pain and discomfort in both hands. The clinical target was defined as the length from the fingertip to the distal interphalangeal joint. For the accurate and reproducible setup in the multi-fractional treatment delivery, the CMMAs were designed. Five needles were embedded into the dense plastic mesh and covered with 5 mm bolus material for each micro applicator. Five CMMAs were designed, resulting in the usage of 25 catheters in total. Results: The prescription dose was planned to the depth of the anterior surface of the distal phalanx, allowing for the sparing of the surrounding tissue. The total number of the active dwell positions was 145 with step size of 5 mm. The total treatment time was 115 seconds with a 7.36 Ci activity of the 192Ir source. The treatment resulted in good pain control. The patient did not require further injections to the nail bed. After this initial treatment, additional two patients with similar symptoms received HDR brachytherapy. The treatment outcome was favorable in all cases. Conclusions : The first HDR brachytherapy treatment of psoriasis of the nail bed is presented. The initial experience revealed that brachytherapy treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in adequate control of the disease. A larger cohort of patients will be required for additional conclusions related to the long-term clinical benefits.

  10. Application of RADPOS in Vivo Dosimetry for QA of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherpak, A.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The RADPOS in vivo dosimetry system combines an electromagnetic positioning sensor with MOSFET dosimetry, allowing for simultaneous online measurements of dose and spatial position. In this work, we assess the potential use of RADPOS for measurements of motion and dose during prostate HDR......Gy. Conclusions: In vivo dosimetry can potentially signal errors in catheter placement or numbering before entire dose is delivered. The demonstrated accuracy of RADPOS dose measurements and its ability to simultaneously measure displacement makes it a powerful tool for HDR brachytherapy treatments for prostate...

  11. Malignant soft tissue sarcoma of the shoulder treated by surface mould brachytherapy boost in an adjuvant setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Mukherji

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities account for half of all soft tissue sarcomas. Radiotherapy and surgery have been the standard modalities in the treatment of this type of cancer. Brachytherapy can be used as the sole therapy, if the target volume is localized and easily accessible. This work reports three cases of shoulder soft tissue sarcomas with positive deep resected margins, treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and surface mould brachytherapy boost technique. Material and methods : Between January and June 2014, three patients received brachytherapy with sites close to the shoulder, and post-surgery involved deep resected margins. Each mould was made on a base of thermoplastic, over which dental wax was coated and catheters implanted. The target volume was defined as the tissue covering the tumor bed with lateral margins of 2-2.5 cm and depth of 1-1.5 cm. Treatment planning was computed tomography- based and dose prescribed was 85-100% isodose. Treatments has been delivered twice daily, six hours interval, and a review of reactions evaluated. Results : Volume receiving more than 150% of the prescribed dose has been limited to less than 2%, and that above 200% to be inside the mould. Brachytherapy equivalent dose at 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2 of these patients was 24 and 28.6 Gy. Maximum dose to organ at risk (OAR (2 cc of OAR ranged between 55-87% of prescribed dose, with a median dose being 80%. All cases had only grade 1 post-radiotherapy skin immediate reactions, which resolved within four weeks. In all patients, no treatment failures were noted at nearly 2-years post-irradiation. Conclusions : Surface mould brachytherapy in soft tissue sarcomas could be a useful alternative to interstitial bra­chytherapy, especially where the target volume is superficially extensive with underlying critical structures, and where catheter placement may be difficult, such as the shoulder.

  12. Next generation of ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus based on parametric designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, M; Giménez, A; Amigó, J M; Schuhmann, M; Gazzeri, R; Thomale, U; McAllister, J P

    2018-02-01

    The flow pattern of the cerebrospinal fluid is probably the most important factor related to obstruction of ventricular catheters during the normal treatment of hydrocephalus. To better comprehend the flow pattern, we have carried out a parametric study via numerical models of ventricular catheters. In previous studies, the flow was studied under steady and, recently, in pulsatile boundary conditions by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in three-dimensional catheter models. This study aimed to bring in prototype models of catheter CFD flow solutions as well to introduce the theory behind parametric development of ventricular catheters. A preceding study allowed deriving basic principles which lead to designs with improved flow patterns of ventricular catheters. The parameters chosen were the number of drainage segments, the distances between them, the number and diameter of the holes on each segment, as well as their relative angular position. CFD results of previously unreleased models of ventricular catheter flow solutions are presented in this study. Parametric development guided new designs with better flow distribution while lowering the shear stress of the catheters holes. High-resolution 3D printed catheter solutions of three models and basic benchmark testing are introduced as well. The next generation of catheter with homogeneous flow patterns based on parametric designs may represent a step forward for the treatment of hydrocephalus, by possibly broadening their lifespan.

  13. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in 1,000. There is a very slight risk of an allergic reaction if contrast material is injected. Any procedure that involves placement of a catheter inside a blood vessel carries certain risks. These risks include damage to the blood vessel, ...

  14. Rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shimul A; Cima, Robert R; Benoit, Eric; Breen, Elizabeth L; Bleday, Ronald

    2004-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is gaining wide popularity as an alternative to resection for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. Rectal-urethral fistula after prostate brachytherapy is a rare but serious complication, and its incidence, presentation, risk factors, and clinical management have not been well described. From January 1997 to October 2002, seven patients with rectal-urethral fistulas were referred to two institutions (Brigham and Women's Hospital and West Roxbury Veteran's Administration Hospital) of a major teaching referral center. Clinical presentation, risk factors, prostate staging, and clinical management were examined in a retrospective fashion. Seven rectal-urethral fistulas developed from roughly 700 (1 percent) patients treated with prostate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. The average patient age was 67.7 years, preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 7.1, and Gleason score was 3+3. Symptoms occurred at a mean of 27.3 months after prostate brachytherapy was started and included anorectal pain (57 percent), clear mucous discharge (57 percent), diarrhea (43 percent), and rectal ulceration (43 percent). Coronary artery disease was a common comorbidity (71 percent). Previous transurethral resection of prostate (28 percent) and pelvic irradiation or external beam radiation therapy (14 percent) were not associated with increased risk of rectal-urethral fistula. All patients underwent a diverting colostomy (86 percent) or ileostomy (14 percent), and four patients went on to have definitive therapy. Definitive resection was performed between 5 and 43 months after diverting ostomy and was chosen on the basis of comorbid disease, quality of life, and degree of operation. Two patients required a second diversion after definitive resection because of anorectal pain and a colocutaneous fistula. Postoperative complications included myocardial infarction (14 percent), blood transfusion (14 percent), and bowel perforation (14 percent). Patients

  15. Hemodialysis catheter design and catheter performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Meersch, Hans; De Bacquer, Dirk; Vandecasteele, Stefaan J; Van den Bergh, Barbara; Vermeiren, Pieter; De Letter, Jan; De Vriese, An S

    2014-12-01

    A complication of long-term use of tunneled cuffed catheters for hemodialysis is the high rate of infection and thrombus-related dysfunction. Specific mechanical features of tunneled cuffed catheters may improve hemodynamic performance and decrease thrombosis and infection rates. However, there currently is no proven advantage of one design over another. Single-center randomized clinical trial. 302 hemodialysis patients who required a tunneled cuffed catheter as temporary or definite vascular access. Palindrome Symmetric Tip Dialysis Catheter or HemoStar Long-Term Hemodialysis Catheter. The primary end point was primary assisted patency. Secondary end points were incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, and 2 indicators of rheologic function: mean effective blood flow rate and urokinase use. Mean primary assisted patency was 135.9 days for Palindrome and 136.5 days for HemoStar (P=0.8). Definite CRBSI occurred in 0.24 and 0.10/1,000 catheter-days for Palindrome and HemoStar, respectively (P=0.3). Removal rates for thrombosis that could not be resolved with thrombolysis were 0.53 and 0.43/1,000 catheter-days for Palindrome and HemoStar, respectively (P=0.7). Urokinase use was lower for Palindrome than for HemoStar, as evidenced by a lower number of urokinase infusions/1,000 catheter-days (17 and 35; Pcatheters that never required thrombolysis (58% and 45%; P=0.03). Mean effective blood flow rate was higher for Palindrome than for HemoStar (333 and 304mL/min; Pcatheter types. The Palindrome catheter required less thrombolysis and achieved higher blood flow rates than the HemoStar catheter. These findings suggest that mechanical catheter design may improve catheter rheology, but does not affect risks for thrombosis and infection and hence catheter survival. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early stage oral tongue cancer – 15 year experience from a tertiary care institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuma Bansal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine outcomes of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT in patients with early stage oral tongue cancer. Material and methods : Ninety-two patients with stage I and II oral tongue cancer were treated with HDR-BT between 1999 and 2014: brachytherapy alone = 62 (67.4%, and combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and brachytherapy = 30 (32.6%. Median follow-up was 53.5 months. Patterns of failure, overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, local control rates (LCR, and nodal control rates (NCR were determined. Results : 5-year OS, DFS, LCR, and NCR were 73.2%, 58.2%, 64.2%, and 83.8%, respectively. In total, 43 patients (46.7% failed treatment: isolated local failures = 28 (30.4%, isolated nodal failures = 8 (8.7%, both local and regional failures = 7 (7.6%. While in T1 stage, 5 year LCR were significantly higher in brachytherapy alone group compared to combined EBRT and brachytherapy group (81.7% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.04, the isolated nodal failure rates were not significantly different among the two groups. For T2 stage, NCR were higher in combined EBRT and brachytherapy group compared to brachytherapy alone (92.9% vs. 74.3%. Acute mucositis (grade ≥ 2 was seen more in brachytherapy alone group compared to the combined modality group (87% vs. 66%, and this correlated significantly with the higher biological equivalent dose (BED in the brachytherapy alone group. Conclusions : Our study recommends treating patients with brachytherapy alone in T1 stage, and demonstrates the need for addressing nodal region either by neck dissection or nodal irradiation in T2 stage patients. Also, the study highlights the need for dose escalation (from the doses used in the study in both T1 and T2 stage tumors when using interstitial brachytherapy either as sole modality or as a boost.

  17. Intravascular brachytherapy for peripheral vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA through balloon dilatation with or without stenting, i.e. vessel expansion through balloons with or without of implantation of small tubes, called stents, are used in the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD. The intravascular vessel irradiation, called intravascular brachytherapy, promises a reduction in the rate of repeated stenosis (rate of restenosis after PTA. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of brachytherapy in PAOD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in August 2007 in the most important medical electronic databases for publications beginning from 2002. The medical evaluation included randomized controlled trials (RCT. The information synthesis was performed using meta-analysis. Health economic modeling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economical assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG-2007. Results: Medical evaluation: Twelve publications about seven RCT on brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy were included in the medical evaluation. Two RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six and/or twelve months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after successful balloon dilatation, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.84. At five years, time to recurrence of restenosis was significantly delayed after brachytherapy. One RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after PTA with optional stenting, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.95. One RCT observed a significantly higher rate of late thrombotic occlusions after brachytherapy in the subgroup of stented patients. A single RCT for brachytherapy

  18. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  19. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor

  20. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  1. The use of adjuvant high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy in patients with collagen vascular disease: a collaborative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Anthony E; Harper, Jennifer L; Olyejar, S Eric; Zunzunegui, Raul G; Wazer, David E

    2011-01-01

    To analyze toxicity and cosmesis in patients with collagen vascular disease (CVD) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) via high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. This is a pooled analysis of patients with early stage and in situ breast cancer with CVD treated with adjuvant multicatheter or balloon brachytherapy. Physicians at multiple institutions were asked to review their experience and report data regarding toxicity and cosmesis in patients with CVD. All patients fit American Society of Breast Surgeons recommendations for APBI and were treated with HDR brachytherapy with ≥ 3 months followup. Nine cases from five institutions are the subject of this analysis. The median patient age was 54 years and median followup was 31 months. All patients had documented history and active signs/symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosis, psoriatic arthritis, or scleroderma. All patients had received medical therapy for CVD in the past, and 78% were under active treatment at the time of brachytherapy. All the patients were treated with multicatheter or balloon (MammoSite [Hologic, Inc., Marlboro, MA], MammoSite ML [Hologic, Inc., Marlboro, MA], or Contura [Senorx, Irvine, CA]) brachytherapy with a median volume of 45.5 cc and a median skin distance of 7.5mm. Acute toxicity included Grade 1 skin erythema (5) and catheter-site wound dehiscence (1). Late toxicity included seroma (5), induration (5), pain (2), telangectasia (2), and superficial infection (1). Cosmesis was excellent or good for all the patients. Women with CVD have a toxicity and cosmesis profile consistent with other APBI series. Although confirmatory data is needed, it may not be necessary to exclude these patients from clinical trials of APBI. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  3. Catheter associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation.

  4. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  5. Electrifying catheters with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekař, Martin; van Rens, Jeannet; van der Mark, Martin B

    2017-04-17

    Smart minimally invasive devices face a connectivity challenge. An example is found in intracardiac echocardiography where the signal transmission and supply of power at the distal end require many thin and fragile wires in order to keep the catheter slim and flexible. We have built a fully functional bench-top prototype to demonstrate that electrical wires may be replaced by optical fibers. The prototype is immediately scalable to catheter dimensions. The absence of conductors will provide intrinsic galvanic isolation as well as radio frequency (RF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility. Using optical fibers, we show signal transfer of synthetic aperture ultrasound images as well as photo-voltaic conversion to supply all electronics. The simple design utilizes only off the shelf components and holds a promise of cost effectiveness which may be pivotal for translation of these advanced devices into the clinic.

  6. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  7. American Brachytherapy Society: Brachytherapy treatment recommendations for locally advanced cervix cancer for low-income and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneja, Gita; Brown, Derek; Chang, Amy; Erickson, Beth; Fidarova, Elena; Grover, Surbhi; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Nag, Subir; Narayan, Kailash; Bvochora-Nsingo, Memory; Viegas, Celia; Viswanathan, Akila N; Lin, Ming Yin; Gaffney, David

    Most cervix cancer cases occur in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC), and outcomes are suboptimal, even for early stage disease. Brachytherapy plays a central role in the treatment paradigm, improving both local control and overall survival. The American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) aims to provide guidelines for brachytherapy delivery in resource-limited settings. A panel of clinicians and physicists with expertise in brachytherapy administration in LMIC was convened. A survey was developed to identify practice patterns at the authors' institutions and was also extended to participants of the Cervix Cancer Research Network. The scientific literature was reviewed to identify consensus papers or review articles with a focus on treatment of locally advanced, unresected cervical cancer in LMIC. Of the 40 participants invited to respond to the survey, 32 responded (response rate 80%). Participants were practicing in 14 different countries including both high-income (China, Singapore, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and United States) and low-income or middle-income countries (Bangladesh, Botswana, Brazil, India, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam). Recommendations for modifications to existing ABS guidelines were reviewed by the panel members and are highlighted in this article. Recommendations for treatment of locally advanced, unresectable cervical cancer in LMIC are presented. The guidelines comment on staging, external beam radiotherapy, use of concurrent chemotherapy, overall treatment duration, use of anesthesia, applicator choice and placement verification, brachytherapy treatment planning including dose and prescription point, recommended reporting and documentation, physics support, and follow-up. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Consensus statement for brachytherapy for the treatment of medically inoperable endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Julie K; Beriwal, Sushil; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Erickson, Beth; Feltmate, Colleen; Fyles, Anthony; Gaffney, David; Jones, Ellen; Klopp, Ann; Small, William; Thomadsen, Bruce; Yashar, Catheryn; Viswanathan, Akila

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this consensus statement from the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) is to summarize recent advances and to generate general guidelines for the management of medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients with radiation therapy. Recent advances in the literature were summarized and reviewed by a panel of experts. Panel members participated in a series of conference calls and were surveyed to determine their current practices and patterns. This document was reviewed and approved by the full panel, the ABS Board of Directors and the ACR Commission on Radiation Oncology. A transition from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning for the definitive treatment of medically inoperable endometrial cancer is described. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to define the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), and the organs at risk (OARs). Brachytherapy alone can be used for medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients with clinical Stage I cancer with no lymph node involvement and no evidence of deep invasion of the myometrium on MR imaging. In the absence of MR imaging, a combined approach using external beam and brachytherapy may be considered. Recent advances support the use of MR imaging and 3D planning for brachytherapy treatment for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multicatheter hybrid breast brachytherapy: a potential alternative for patients with inadequate skin distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriwal, Sushil; Coon, Devin; Kim, Hayeon; Haley, Marsha; Patel, Rakesh; Das, Rupak

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ClearPath (CP) multicatheter hybrid device was able to achieve acceptable dosimetry in patients in whom the proximity of the breast surgical cavity to the skin precluded treatment with intracavitary MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. The study consisted of 11 patients who had the MS catheter placed and who were subsequently not treated due to inadequate skin distance. A phantom scan of the CP multicatheter hybrid device was superimposed on the MS CT scan and a dosimetric comparison was performed. The median MS balloon size, diameter, and minimum skin distance were 40 cc, 4.1cm, and 5mm, respectively. The D(90), V(100), V(150), and V(200) with MS vs. CP were 95.29% vs. 97.06%, 88.8% vs. 91.3%, 35.7% vs. 38.0%, and 9.4% vs. 9.6%, respectively. The median maximum skin dose was 5.5 Gy vs. 3.9 Gy (p skin dose significantly without compromising the planning target volume coverage, DHI, or dose to other critical organs. The use of this device has the potential to increase the applicability of accelerated partial breast brachytherapy (APBI) in patients with a surgical cavity close to skin compared with balloon brachytherapy.

  10. On the use of particle filters for electromagnetic tracking in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Th I.; Lahmer, G.; Brandt, T.; Kallis, K.; Strnad, V.; Bert, Ch; Hensel, B.; Tomé, A. M.; Lang, E. W.

    2017-10-01

    Modern radiotherapy of female breast cancers often employs high dose rate brachytherapy, where a radioactive source is moved inside catheters, implanted in the female breast, according to a prescribed treatment plan. Source localization relative to the patient’s anatomy is determined with solenoid sensors whose spatial positions are measured with an electromagnetic tracking system. Precise sensor dwell position determination is of utmost importance to assure irradiation of the cancerous tissue according to the treatment plan. We present a hybrid data analysis system which combines multi-dimensional scaling with particle filters to precisely determine sensor dwell positions in the catheters during subsequent radiation treatment sessions. Both techniques are complemented with empirical mode decomposition for the removal of superimposed breathing artifacts. We show that the hybrid model robustly and reliably determines the spatial positions of all catheters used during the treatment and precisely determines any deviations of actual sensor dwell positions from the treatment plan. The hybrid system only relies on sensor positions measured with an EMT system and relates them to the spatial positions of the implanted catheters as initially determined with a computed x-ray tomography.

  11. A method for restricting intracatheter dwell time variance in high-dose-rate brachytherapy plan optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Adam; Siauw, Timmy; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2016-01-01

    To present the algorithm of a modification to the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimization engine that allows for restriction of the intracatheter dwell time variance. IPSA was modified to allow user control of dwell time variance within each catheter through a single parameter, the dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC). The minimum DTDC value (DTDC = 0) does not impose any restriction on dwell time variance, and the maximum value (DTDC = 1) restricts all dwell times within each catheter to take on the same value. The final optimization penalty function value was evaluated as a function of DTDC. The algorithm proposed fully preserves the inverse planning nature of the IPSA algorithm along with the penalty-based dose optimization workflow. Increasing DTDC creates less variance in dwell time between dwell positions in each catheter and may be used to induce a more smooth change in dwell time with dwell position in each catheter. Nonzero DTDC values always increased the optimization penalty function value. The DTDC was developed as an extension to IPSA to allow restriction of the difference in dwell time between adjacent dwell positions. This results in less variation between neighboring dwell positions which can be clinically desirable. However, the impact of this restriction needs to be considered for its clinical relevance on a case-by-case basis because considerable degradation in dose-volume histogram metrics can result for large DTDC values. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Catheter-Related Sepsis Due to Rhodotorula glutinis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2003-01-01

    We describe a central venous catheter-related (Port-A-Cath; Smiths Industries Medical Systems [SIMS] Deltec, Inc., St. Paul, Minn.) infection caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 51-year-old man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. He was treated with fluconazole for 8 weeks and had the catheter removed. Two isolates of R. glutinis recovered from blood specimens (one obtained via peripheral veins and one via the catheter) before administration of fluconazole and one recovered from the removed catheter 17 days after initiation of fluconazole therapy exhibited high-level resistance to fluconazole (MICs, >256 μg/ml). These three isolates were found to belong to a single clone on the basis of identical antibiotypes determined by the E test (PDM Epsilometer; AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden) and biotypes determined by API ID32 C (bioMerieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France) and their identical random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns. PMID:12574300

  13. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-S?nchez, Rosa; Celada-?lvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Garc?a-Mart?nez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A.; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Mic?, Alejandro; Rodr?guez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applic...

  14. Changes in brachytherapy-based APBI patient selection immediately before and after publication of the ASTRO consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zain A; Lloyd, Shane; Shah, Chirag; Wilson, Lynn D; Koshy, Matthew; Mahmood, Usama

    2015-01-01

    In July 2009, American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) released a consensus statement (CS) to guide patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). The goal of this study was to examine how practice patterns changed following the guideline's release. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried from 2008 to 2010 for females aged ≥20 years receiving breast conservation via brachytherapy. Among the APBI cohort, characteristics and CS grouping ("suitable," "cautionary," or "unsuitable") of patients receiving APBI in the 18 months before (January 2008 to June 2009) and after (July 2009 to December 2010) guideline publication were analyzed. A total of 87,528 patients undergoing breast conservation therapy were identified. Of this, 4,253 patients (4.9%) received brachytherapy-based APBI. Limiting the analysis to patients not missing data that would affect their CS classification rendered 3,828 patients. The proportion of breast conservation patients receiving brachytherapy-based APBI before and after CS release remained the same (4.9% vs. 4.8%, p = 0.36). Among patients receiving brachytherapy-based APBI, the unsuitable category decreased (15.8 vs. 11.1%, p ASTRO CS was associated with a decrease in "unsuitable" patients and an increase in "suitable" patients being treated with brachytherapy-based APBI. This trend began before guideline release and thus cannot be definitively attributed to the ASTRO CS. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Commissioning of Brachytherapy TPS Using a 2D-Array of Ion Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yewondwossen, Mammo; Meng, Jim

    2010-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Unlike external beam treatment planning system (TPS) commissioning, a brachytherapy TPS requires little input, no modeling with most brachytherapy TPS calculations are based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism. The dose distribution using the AAPM TG-43 dose formalism is usually compared with the calculations using the Sievert summation, Monte Carlo simulation or dose distributions measured by with GAFCHROMIC film. These methods have shown an agreement of within 5% compared to the AAPM TG-43 dose formalism. The purpose of this study is to report our experience of using a 2D-array of ion chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) for dosimetric verification of conformal CT-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy.Material/Methods: After benchmarking the new TPS against the old TPS used in the clinical for several years and comparing with MATLAB calculated dose distribution, the dose calculation accuracy of TPS systems was investigated by measuring dose distributions experimentally using MatriXX Evolution. The phantom used for this technique consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector and a slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The TPS dose distribution was calculated on the CT scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. Results: The average absolute dose difference over the ROI was 1.67% and the gamma agreement index computed for a distance to agreement of 3 mm and a dose difference of 3% showed agreement for 98.7% of all pixels, with gamma <= 1. Conclusion: We have found that MatriXX 2D dosimetric technique provides a fast and accurate way to validate a brachytherapy TPS for both commissioning and quality assurance.

  16. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. 

  17. The influence of the dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter on dosimetry with IPSA optimisation for HDR prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan L; Panettieri, Vanessa; Lancaster, Craig; Mason, Natasha; Franich, Rick D; Millar, Jeremy L

    2015-03-01

    To investigate how the dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter, applied to inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation limits large dwell times from occurring in each catheter and to characterise the effect on the resulting dosimetry for prostate high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. An unconstrained IPSA optimised treatment plan, using the Oncentra Brachytherapy treatment planning system (version 4.3, Nucletron an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden), was generated for 20 consecutive HDR prostate brachytherapy patients, with the DTDC set to zero. Successive constrained optimisation plans were also created for each patient by increasing the DTDC parameter by 0.2, up to a maximum value of 1.0. We defined a "plan modulation index", to characterise the change of dwell time modulation as the DTDC parameter was increased. We calculated the dose volume histogram indices for the PTV (D90, V100, V150, V200%) and urethra (D10%) to characterise the effect on the resulting dosimetry. The average PTV D90% decreases as the DTDC is applied, on average by only 1.5 %, for a DTDC = 0.4. The measures of high dose regions in the PTV, V150 and V200%, increase on average by less than 5 and 2 % respectively. The net effect of DTDC on the modulation of dwell times has been characterised by the introduction of the plan modulation index. DTDC applied during IPSA optimisation of HDR prostate brachytherapy plans reduce the occurrence of large isolated dwell times within individual catheters. The mechanism by which DTDC works has been described and its effect on the modulation of dwell times has been characterised. The authors recommend using a DTDC parameter no greater than 0.4 to obtain a plan with dwell time modulation comparable to a geometric optimised plan. This yielded on average a 1.5 % decrease in PTV coverage and an acceptable increase in V150%, without compromising the urethral dose.

  18. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000156.htm Central venous catheter - dressing change To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have a central venous catheter. This is a tube that goes into a ...

  19. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  20. Continuous peripheral nerve block catheter infections in combat-related injuries: a case report of five soldiers from Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tristan T; Jaeger, Lisa; Jones, Benjamin L; Kaderbek, Eric W; Malchow, Randall J

    2011-11-01

    Case series. Military medical facility providing acute care for soldiers injured while fighting in the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. To report a series of infections related to use of continuous peripheral nerve catheters for postoperative pain control in the military polytraumatic setting. The analysis of the above infections includes similarities and differences in infection patterns and attempts to clarify possible risk factors for such infections to include duration of catheter placement, type of catheter, preprocedural antibiotics, and tunnel vs nontunneled catheters. The goal of this analysis is to assist in the development of protocols that may prevent future catheter infections. Clinical data were obtained from five previously healthy male soldiers receiving acute care at Brooke Army Medical Center using continuous peripheral nerve catheters for postoperative pain for multiple and frequent procedures. In a total of six catheter infections, two were noted to have superficial skin infections while four were shown to have deep tissue involvement confirmed by imaging studies. All patients were started on initial or additional antibiotics after catheter removal. Three catheter infections, all with stimulating catheters, required surgical irrigation and debridement in the operating room. Continuous peripheral nerve catheters are not without complications and risks including infection. Duration of catheter use was the most significant factor with the development of a catheter-related infection in our series. This series also highlights how stimulating and nonstimulating catheter infections may present differently, as stimulating catheters may have a greater tendency to present as deep space infections with minimal superficial findings. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Modeling study for optimization of skin dose for partial breast irradiation using Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Hiatt, Jessica R; Cardarelli, Gene A; Wazer, David E

    2010-01-01

    Balloon brachytherapy with the MammoSite system (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) is a widely used approach for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Inherent to this approach, high skin doses can occur if the balloon to skin distance is small. This has been associated with late skin toxicity, particularly telangiectasia. The Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy balloon applicator (Xoft, Fremont, CA) is a novel device for accelerated partial breast irradiation. It is unique in that it uses an electronic 50-kV source. This source has a pronounced anisotropy with constriction of isodose distribution at the proximal end of the catheter. This anisotropy can be considered as an advantage to optimize skin dose when the cavity to skin distance is small. In this study, we simulated various balloon-insertion orientations to optimized skin surface dose. Breast phantoms were constructed of tissue-equivalent material. Xoft Axxent balloon catheters were inserted at a distance of 6mm from the surface. The catheter was placed at three different catheter to surface orientations: (1) perpendicular to the surface, (2) oblique to the surface (45 degrees), and (3) parallel to the surface. Three-dimensional treatment planning was then performed using Nucletron's Plato planning system (Nucletron, Columbia, MD). Multiple dwell positions were used, and the dose was optimized to the target volume. The target volume was defined as volume from the balloon surface to 1-cm distance from the balloon surface or to the phantom surface (if less then 1cm from the balloon surface). Target volume coverage was compared between plans using dose-volume histograms. Surface doses were compared using isodose line distribution and surface point doses. Plato planned surface doses were then verified by direct measurement using Landauer Dot InLight dosimeters (Landauer, Glenwood, IL). Excellent target coverage was obtained for all three catheter orientations with a D(95) of > or =95%. Surface dose was lowest for

  2. CT-guided brachytherapy. A novel percutaneous technique for interstitial ablation of liver malignancies; CT-gesteuerte Brachytherapie. Eine neue perkutane Technik zur interstitiellen Ablation von Lebermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, J.; Wust, P.; Stohlmann, A.; Beck, A.; Cho, C.H.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Spors, B.; Werk, M.; Rosner, C.; Haenninen, E.L.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Patients and methods: 21 patients with 21 liver malignancies (19 metastases, two primary liver tumors) were treated with interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy applying a {sup 192}Ir source. In all patients, the use of image-guided thermal tumor ablation such as by radiofrequency or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was impeded either by tumor size {>=} 5 cm in seven, adjacent portal or hepatic vein in ten, or adjacent bile duct bifurcation in four patients. Dosimetry was performed using three-dimensional CT data sets acquired after CT-guided positioning of the brachytherapy catheters. Results: the mean tumor diameter was 4.6 cm (2.5-11 cm). The mean minimal tumor dose inside the tumor margin amounted to 17 Gy (12-20 Gy). The proportion of the liver parenchyma exposed to > 5 gy was 18% (5-39%) of total liver parenchyma minus tumor volume. Nausea and vomiting were observed in six patients after brachytherapy (28%). One patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice due to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. We commonly encountered asymptomatic increases of liver enzymes. Local control rates after 6 and 12 months were 87% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-guided brachytherapy is safe and effective. This technique displays broader indications compared to image-guided thermal ablation by radiofrequency or LITT with respect to tumor size or localization. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse der Sicherheit und Effektivitaet CT-gesteuerter Brachytherapie zur Ablation von Lebermalignomen. Patienten und Methodik: 21 Patienten mit 21 Lebermalignomen (19 Metastasen, zwei primaere Lebermalignome) wurden mit perkutaner, CT-gesteuerter interstitieller Brachytherapie mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. Alle Patienten wiesen Umstaende auf, die eine bildgefuehrte thermische Ablation mit Radiofrequenz oder laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT) einschraenkten

  3. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  4. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2015-01-21

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  5. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  6. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-Sánchez, Rosa; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; García-Martínez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applicator close to the skin surface, and therefore combines the benefits of brachytherapy with those of low energy X-ray radiotherapy. The Esteya electronic brachytherapy system is specifically designed for skin surface brachytherapy procedures. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical implementation of the new Esteya electronic brachytherapy system, which may provide guidance for users of this system. The information covered includes patient selection, treatment planning (depth evaluation and margin determination), patient marking, and setup. The justification for the hypofractionated regimen is described and compared with others protocols in the literature. Quality assurance (QA) aspects including daily testing are also included. We emphasize that these are guidelines, and clinical judgment and experience must always prevail in the care of patients, as with any medical treatment. We conclude that clinical implementation of the Esteya brachytherapy system is simple for patients and providers, and should allow for precise and safe treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  7. Impact of interfraction seroma collection on breast brachytherapy dosimetry - a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Aashish; Sowards, Keith; Bhatt, Geetika; Freeman, Andrew; Dragun, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Balloon brachytherapy is a widely accepted modality for delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Our hypothesis was that inter-fraction seroma collection around the balloon surface would have an adverse effect on dosimetry of the target. This is a dosimetric re-planning study using two volumetric models (30 cc and 45 cc) in a Contura(®) multi-lumen balloon (MLB) catheter. In a previously treated patient, two customized baseline plans were generated using multiple channels of the Contura(®) catheter prescribed to the Planning Target Volume Evaluation (PTV_Eval). Symmetric expansions of 1.0 mm (0-9 mm) increments around the balloon surface were performed to simulate a "Virtual Seroma" (VS) accumulation for both balloon volumes and plans were obtained for each expansion using Eclipse Brachyvision™. An analysis of these plans was then performed to evaluate the effect of seroma accumulation on dosimetric parameters of V100 and V90. 20 plans were generated and analyzed (10 plans for each balloon volume), representing VS of 6.0-66.0 cc. There was a commensurate decrease in the dose delivered to the PTV_Eval V100 and V90 (as defined by the original treatment plan) with increasing VS accumulation leading to a sub-optimal coverage of the PTV_Eval. For 30 cc MLB catheter, V100 decreased by 1.4% and V90 decreased by 0.9% for every 1 cc of VS. For 45cc MLB catheter, V100 decreased by 1.3% and V90 decreased by 1.15% for every 1.0 cc accumulation of VS. Balloon catheter-tissue adherence ensures daily dose delivery to the planned PTV_Eval. Accumulation of seroma, hematoma or air between HDR fractions can significantly impact PTV_Eval dosimetry. Vacuum-port aspiration prior to delivery of each fraction, if available, should be considered to minimize the risk of geographic under dosing.

  8. Successful management of a broken epidural catheter!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippalgaonkar, Amruta Vinod; Kudalkar, Amala G; Gaikwad, Smita M; Modak, Shailendra; Gupta, Hema B; Tendolkar, Bharati A

    2017-01-01

    Breakage of epidural catheter though rare is a well-known but worrisome complication. Visualization of retained catheter is difficult even with modern radiological imaging techniques, and active surgical intervention might be necessary for removal of catheter fragment. We report such a case of breakage of an epidural catheter during its removal which led to surgical intervention.

  9. Successful management of a broken epidural catheter!!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Vinod Hippalgaonkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakage of epidural catheter though rare is a well-known but worrisome complication. Visualization of retained catheter is difficult even with modern radiological imaging techniques, and active surgical intervention might be necessary for removal of catheter fragment. We report such a case of breakage of an epidural catheter during its removal which led to surgical intervention.

  10. Colonization of peripheral intravascular catheters with biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Biofilms often colonize catheters and contribute to catheter-related septicemia. However, predictors of catheter colonization by biofilms remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical factors that may be associated with biofilm colonization of catheters. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 ...

  11. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of a...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of a...

  13. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must...

  14. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in accordance...

  15. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  16. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo [Center of Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Physics, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  17. An integrated system for clinical treatment verification of HDR prostate brachytherapy combining source tracking with pretreatment imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan L; Hanlon, Max; Panettieri, Vanessa; Millar, Jeremy L; Matheson, Bronwyn; Haworth, Annette; Franich, Rick D

    2017-09-22

    High-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment is usually delivered in one or a few large dose fractions. Poor execution of a planned treatment could have significant clinical impact, as high doses are delivered in seconds, and mistakes in an individual fraction cannot be easily rectified. Given that most potential errors in HDR brachytherapy ultimately lead to a geographical miss, a more direct approach to verification of correct treatment delivery is to directly monitor the position of the source throughout the treatment. In this work, we report on the clinical implementation of our treatment verification system that uniquely combines the 2D source-tracking capability with 2D pretreatment imaging, using a single flat panel detector (FPD). The clinical brachytherapy treatment couch was modified to allow integration of the FPD into the couch. This enabled the patient to be set up in the brachytherapy bunker in a position that closely matched that at treatment planning imaging. An anteroposterior image was acquired of the patient immediately before treatment delivery and was assessed by the Radiation Oncologist online, to reestablish the positions of the catheters relative to the prostate. Assessment of catheter positions was performed in the left-right and superior-inferior directions along the entire catheter length and throughout the treatment volume. Source tracking was then performed during treatment delivery, and the measured position of the source dwells were directly compared to the treatment plan for verification. The treatment verification system was integrated into the clinical environment without significant change to workflow. Two patient cases are presented in this work to provide clinical examples of this system, which is now in routine use for all patient treatments in our clinic. The catheter positions were visualized relative to the prostate, immediately before treatment delivery. For one of the patient cases presented in this work, they

  18. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributab...

  19. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  20. Flexible tip guides and intermediate catheters: two center experience and a proposed taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ferdinand K; Schuette, A Jesse; Spiotta, Alejandro M; Yim, John; Obuchowski, Nancy; Rasmussen, Peter A; Hussain, Mohammed Shazam; Cawley, C Michael; Dion, Jacques E; Tong, Frank C

    2014-10-01

    Stable access to target lesions is foundational to endovascular therapy, be it in hemorrhagic or ischemic disease. Continued evolution in access technology has resulted in next generation catheters that afford improved trackability and proximal support. Assess safety and patterns of use at two high volume centers, and conceptualize usage patterns. A retrospective review of 608 cases in which a 'next generation' catheter was used during 2008-2010 at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA) and throughout 2009-2010 at Emory University Hospital (Atlanta, Georgia, USA) was conducted, and the cases classified by indication. Catheter placement, distal most location, and related complications were recorded and experience summarized. We also reviewed the differences in the catheters and the rationale for catheter selection, as well as relative costs for each approach. 311 Neuron 053, 166 Neuron 070, 36 distal access catheter (DAC) 3.9 F, 61 DAC 4.3 F, and 34 DAC 5.2 F catheters were deployed. Of these, 459 placements were in the anterior circulation, 130 in the posterior circulation, 11 in the external carotid artery, and eight were used intravenously. Complication rates were 9/131 (6.9%) for the DAC catheter group, 16/311 (5.1%) for the Neuron 053 group, and 14/166 (8.4%) for the Neuron 070 group (p=0.37, χ(2) test). Next generation access catheters possess characteristics that blend qualities of traditional microcatheters and stiff guide catheters. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between the various catheter families in this small retrospective review, and the complication rates were similar to historical complication rates. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Utilization of Intravenous Catheters by Prehospital Providers during Pediatric Transports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderKooy, Timothy; Spaur, Kelsey; Brou, Lina; Caffrey, Sean; Adelgais, Kathleen M

    2017-08-09

    Prehospital intravenous (IV) access in children may be difficult and time-consuming. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) protocols often dictate IV placement; however, some IV catheters may not be needed. The scene and transport time associated with attempting IV access in children is unknown. The objective of this study is to examine differences in scene and transport times associated with prehospital IV catheter attempt and utilization patterns of these catheters during pediatric prehospital encounters. Three non-blinded investigators abstracted EMS and hospital records of children 0-18 years of age transported by EMS to a pediatric emergency department (ED). We compared patients in which prehospital IV access was attempted to those with no documented attempt. Our primary outcome was scene time. Secondary outcomes include utilization of the IV catheter in the prehospital and ED settings and a determination of whether the catheter was indicated based on a priori established criteria (prehospital IV medication administration, hypotension, GCS Prehospital IV medications were given in 38.7% (43/111). One patient received a prehospital IV medication with no alternative route of administration. Among patients with a prehospital IV attempt, 31% (46/149) received IV medications in the ED and 23% (34/396) received IV fluids in the ED. Mean time to use of the IV in the ED was 70 minutes after arrival. Patients with prehospital IV attempt were more likely to receive IV medication within 30 minutes of ED arrival (39.1% vs. 19.0%, p = 0.04). Overall, 34.2% of IV attempts were indicated. Prehospital IV catheter placement in children is not associated with an increase in scene or transport time. Prehospital IV catheters were used in approximately one-third of patients. Further study is needed to determine which children may benefit most from IV access in the prehospital setting.

  2. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy ... a grain of rice) in or near the tumor and leaving them there permanently. ... the radioactivity level of the implants eventually diminishes to nothing. ...

  3. Removal of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters Due to Catheter Failures Among Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Ryoko; Uchida, Miho; Oe, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Oya, Maiko; Komiyama, Chieko; Sanada, Hiromi

    This prospective observational study was designed to clarify the rate of peripheral intravenous catheter, especially short peripheral catheter, failures among adult patients in medical and surgical wards. The study was conducted during a 2-month period at a university hospital in Tokyo, Japan. A total of 5316 catheters from 2442 patients were studied. The rate of catheter removal as a result of catheter failure was 18.8%. The reasons for removal in catheter failures were infiltration (41.3%) and pain (19.3%). Pain was a major reason for catheter failure and removal. For this reason, observing changes under the skin before signs and symptoms appear might help prevent catheter failures.

  4. Laparoscopic correction of peritoneal catheter dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Gholamhossein; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi Saeed; Tavassoli, Alireza

    2008-10-01

    To present our experiences with laparoscopic repair of peritoneal catheter dysfunction Total of 24 patients with peritoneal catheter malfunction were considered for two-port laparoscopic manipulation. Two patients with unsuccessful result in the first trial and 3 patients with successful peritoneal dialysis results were reoperated because of catheter dysfunction. The success rates at the first and second manipulation was 79% and 80%. The most frequent cause of catheters dysfunction was migration of catheters out of the true pelvis. During the follow up, 8 patients were referred for renal transplantation, 8 underwent hemodialysis and 5 continued with normal catheter function. The mean longevity of the catheters after laparoscopic correction was 42 months. One year longevity rate as measured as 79%. Laparoscopy is the procedure of choice even in recurrent cases, for correction of malfunctioning continuous ambulatory peritoneal catheters, because this procedure is the only technique that can detects pathologic causes of catheters malfunction and can resolve those problems at the same time.

  5. Intracranial migration of a fractured intrathecal catheter from a baclofen pump system: case report and analysis of possible causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugans, Todd A

    2010-02-01

    This case report describes a new complication associated with a baclofen pump in which its fractured intrathecal catheter migrated into the patient's ventricular system. A thecal model was developed to evaluate catheter buoyancy in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The literature was reviewed to identify possible mechanical and physiologic causes of catheter migration. A 16-year-old boy with cerebral palsy presented with cervical pain, nausea, and vomiting. He was known to have a nonfunctioning baclofen pump with a 1-piece intrathecal catheter. Imaging studies showed mild ventriculomegaly and a fractured segment of the intrathecal catheter that extended from the cervical subarachnoid space into the third and fourth ventricles. The patient had complete symptom resolution after undergoing urgent surgical removal of the catheter segment. Manufacturer analysis of the retrieved catheter revealed a crushed, jagged proximal end. In an experimental thecal sac model, catheter segments in lengths of 0.5 to 89 cm were denser than the artificial CSF and, therefore, did not float in the thecal sac. This finding negates the role of buoyancy in migration. Review of the literature advocates for caudocranial CSF flow patterns as a plausible mechanism for migration. This complication alerts surgeons to the migration risk of loose intrathecal catheter segments into the ventricular system. CSF flow patterns and mechanical processes, but not material properties of the catheter, are likely causes.

  6. Photoacoustic active ultrasound element for catheter tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kang, Jin U.; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, various methods have been developed to improve ultrasound based interventional tool tracking. However, none of them has yet provided a solution that effectively solves the tool visualization and mid-plane localization accuracy problem and fully meets the clinical requirements. Our previous work has demonstrated a new active ultrasound pattern injection system (AUSPIS), which integrates active ultrasound transducers with the interventional tool, actively monitors the beacon signals and transmits ultrasound pulses back to the US probe with the correct timing. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments have proved that AUSPIS greatly improved tool visualization, and provided tool-tip localization accuracy of less than 300 μm. In the previous work, the active elements were made of piezoelectric materials. However, in some applications the high driving voltage of the piezoelectric element raises safety concerns. In addition, the metallic electrical wires connecting the piezoelectric element may also cause artifacts in CT and MR imaging. This work explicitly focuses on an all-optical active ultrasound element approach to overcome these problems. In this approach, the active ultrasound element is composed of two optical fibers - one for transmission and one for reception. The transmission fiber delivers a laser beam from a pulsed laser diode and excites a photoacoustic target to generate ultrasound pulses. The reception fiber is a Fabry-Pérot hydrophone. We have made a prototype catheter and performed phantom experiments. Catheter tip localization, mid-plan detection and arbitrary pattern injection functions have been demonstrated using the all-optical AUSPIS.

  7. A study of optimization techniques in HDR brachytherapy for the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ghana Shyam

    Several studies carried out thus far are in favor of dose escalation to the prostate gland to have better local control of the disease. But optimal way of delivery of higher doses of radiation therapy to the prostate without hurting neighboring critical structures is still debatable. In this study, we proposed that real time high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with highly efficient and effective optimization could be an alternative means of precise delivery of such higher doses. This approach of delivery eliminates the critical issues such as treatment setup uncertainties and target localization as in external beam radiation therapy. Likewise, dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy is not influenced by organ edema and potential source migration as in permanent interstitial implants. Moreover, the recent report of radiobiological parameters further strengthen the argument of using hypofractionated HDR brachytherapy for the management of prostate cancer. Firstly, we studied the essential features and requirements of real time HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. Automating catheter reconstruction with fast editing tools, fast yet accurate dose engine, robust and fast optimization and evaluation engine are some of the essential requirements for such procedures. Moreover, in most of the cases we performed, treatment plan optimization took significant amount of time of overall procedure. So, making treatment plan optimization automatic or semi-automatic with sufficient speed and accuracy was the goal of the remaining part of the project. Secondly, we studied the role of optimization function and constraints in overall quality of optimized plan. We have studied the gradient based deterministic algorithm with dose volume histogram (DVH) and more conventional variance based objective functions for optimization. In this optimization strategy, the relative weight of particular objective in aggregate objective function signifies its importance with respect to other objectives

  8. Rat indwelling urinary catheter model of Candida albicans biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Brooks, Erin G; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-associated Candida albicans biofilm infection that mimics this common process in patients. In the setting of a functioning, indwelling urinary catheter in a rat, Candida proliferated as a biofilm on the device surface. Characteristic biofilm architecture was observed, including adherent, filamentous cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Similar to what occurs in human patients, animals with this infection developed candiduria and pyuria. Infection progressed to cystitis, and a biofilmlike covering was observed over the bladder surface. Furthermore, large numbers of C. albicans cells were dispersed into the urine from either the catheter or bladder wall biofilm over the infection period. We successfully utilized the model to test the efficacy of antifungals, analyze transcriptional patterns, and examine the phenotype of a genetic mutant. The model should be useful for future investigations involving the pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and drug resistance of Candida biofilms in the urinary tract. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer - from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2017-02-01

    In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical) are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  10. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, S F; Campos, T P R

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes a combination of californium-252 ((252)Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: (252)Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0-5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the (252)Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis.

  11. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  12. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  13. Optimisation-based thermal treatment planning for catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Diederich, Chris J; Wootton, Jeffery H; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I-Chow

    2010-02-01

    A patient-specific optimisation-based hyperthermia treatment planning program for catheter-based ultrasound technology was developed for a priori evaluation of proposed applicator implant strategies and determination of initial applied power settings. The interstitial and endocavity heating applicators, designed for delivering 3-D controllable hyperthermia within High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy implants, consist of linear and sectored arrays of ultrasound transducers with variable power control in both length and angle. A 3D biothermal model, which incorporates relevant anatomical structures and implant geometries based upon HDR treatment planning, has been developed to simulate the temperature distributions induced by these ultrasound applicators within the catheter implants. A temperature-based constrained optimisation algorithm was devised and integrated within the finite-element thermal solver to determine the optimal applied power levels. A temperature-expressed objective function and constraints were employed to limit maximum temperature (T(max)), maximise target coverage (T(target)), and minimise thermal exposure to normal tissue and surrounding organs. The optimisation-based treatment planning was applied on representative examples of clinical HDR implants for endocavity treatment of cervix (n = 3) and interstitial treatment of prostate (n = 3). Applicator positioning and orientation, T(max), and T(target), were varied, and temperature volume and thermal dose volume histograms calculated for each plan. The optimisation approach provided optimal applied power levels (4-24 independent transducer sections) leading to conforming or tailored temperature distributions for all cases, as indicated with improved temperature index T(90) in the target volume and negligible temperature and thermal dose (t(43,max) optimised power estimates was shown to be within optimisation (optimisation-based treatment planning platform for catheter-based ultrasound applicators is

  14. Time-resolved in vivo dosimetry for source tracking in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Jacob Graversen; Rylander, Susanne; Buus, Simon; Bentzen, Lise; Hokland, Steffen Bjerre; Søndergaard, Christian Skou; With, Anders Karl Mikael; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Tanderup, Kari

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that brachytherapy source tracking can be realized with in vivo dosimetry. This concept could enable real-time treatment monitoring. In vivo dosimetry was incorporated in the clinical routine during high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy at Aarhus University Hospital. The dosimetry was performed with a radioluminescent crystal positioned in a dedicated brachytherapy needle in the prostate. The dose rate was recorded every 50-100 ms during treatment and analyzed retrospectively. The measured total delivered dose and dose rates for each dwell position with dwell times >0.7 s were compared with expected values. Furthermore, the distance between the source and dosimeter, which was derived from the measured dose rates, was compared with expected values. The measured dose rate pattern in each needle was used to determine the most likely position of the needle relative to the dosimeter. In total, 305 needles and 3239 dwell positions were analyzed based on 20 treatments. The measured total doses differed from the expected values by -4.7 ± 8.4% (1SD) with range (-17% to 12%). It was possible to determine needle shifts for 304 out of 305 needles. The mean radial needle shift between imaging and treatment was 0.2 ± 1.1 mm (1SD), and the mean longitudinal shift was 0.3 ± 2.0 mm (1SD). Time-resolved in vivo dosimetry can be used to provide geometric information about the treatment progression of afterloading brachytherapy. This information may provide a clear indication of errors and uncertainties during a treatment and, therefore, enables real-time treatment monitoring. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The American Brachytherapy Society consensus guidelines for plaque brachytherapy of uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To present the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines for plaque brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma. An international multicenter Ophthalmic Oncology Task Force (OOTF) was assembled to include 47 radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and ophthalmic oncologists from 10 countries. The ABS-OOTF produced collaborative guidelines, based on their eye cancer-specific clinical experience and knowledge of the literature. This work was reviewed and approved by the ABS Board of Directors as well as within the journal's peer-reivew process. The ABS-OOTF reached consensus that ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy is best performed in subspecialty brachytherapy centers. Quality assurance, methods of plaque construction, and dosimetry should be consistent with the 2012 joint guidelines of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and ABS. Implantation of plaque sources should be performed by subspecialty-trained surgeons. Although there exist select restrictions related to tumor size and location, the ABS-OOTF agreed that most melanomas of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid could be treated with plaque brachytherapy. The ABS-OOTF reached consensus that tumors with gross orbital extension and blind painful eyes and those with no light perception vision are unsuitable for brachytherapy. In contrast, only select retinoblastomas are eligible for plaque brachytherapy. Prescription doses, dose rates, treatment durations, and clinical methods are described. Plaque brachytherapy is an effective eye and vision-sparing method to treat patients with intraocular tumors. Practitioners are encouraged to use ABS-OOTF guidelines to enhance their practice. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Applicator reconstruction in MRI 3D image-based dose planning of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Søren; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Gelineck, John; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-05-01

    To elaborate a method for applicator reconstruction for MRI-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Custom-made plastic catheters with a copper sulphate solution were made for insertion in the source channels of MR-CT compatible applicators: plastic and titanium tandem ring applicators, and titanium needles. The applicators were CT and MR scanned in a phantom for accurate 3D assessment of applicator visibility and geometry. A reconstruction method was developed and evaluated in 19 patient MR examinations with ring applicator (plastic: 14, titanium: 5). MR applicator reconstruction uncertainties related to inter-observer variation were evaluated. The catheters were visible in the plastic applicator on T1-weighted images in phantom and in 14/14 clinical applications. On T2-weighted images, the catheters appeared weaker but still visible in phantom and in 13/14 MR clinical applications. In the titanium applicator, the catheters could not be separated from the artifacts from the applicator itself. However, these artifacts could be used to localize both titanium ring applicator (5/5 clinical applications) and needles (6/6 clinical applications). Standard deviations of inter-observer differences were below 2 mm in all directions. 3D applicator reconstruction based on MR imaging could be performed for plastic and titanium applicators. Plastic applicators proved well to be suited for MRI-based reconstruction. For improved practicability of titanium applicator reconstruction, development of MR applicator markers is essential. Reconstruction of titanium applicator and needles at 1.5 T MR requires geometric evaluations in phantoms before using the applicator in patients.

  17. Progress on system for applying simultaneous heat and brachytherapy to large-area surface disease (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Schlorff, Jaime L.; Juang, Titania; Neuman, Daniel G., Jr.; Johnson, Jessi E.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Pouliot, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that thermal enhancement of radiation response increases substantially for higher thermal dose (approaching 100 CEM43) and when hyperthermia and radiation are delivered simultaneously. Unfortunately, equipment capable of delivering uniform doses of heat and radiation simultaneously has not been available to test the clinical potential of this approach. We present recent progress on the clinical implementation of a system that combines the uniform heating capabilities of flexible printed circuit board microwave array applicators with an array of brachytherapy catheters held a fixed distance from the skin for uniform radiation of tissue brachytherapy source. The system is based on the Combination Applicator which consists of an array of up to 32 Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) apertures driven at 915 MHz for heating tissue, coupled with an array of 1 cm spaced catheters for HDR therapy. Efforts to optimize the clinical interface and move from rectangular to more complex shape applicators that accommodate the entire disease in a larger number of patients are described. Improvements to the system for powering and controlling the applicator are also described. Radiation dosimetry and experimental performance results of a prototype 15 x 15 cm dual-purpose applicator demonstrate dose distributions with good homogeneity under large contoured surfaces typical of diffuse chestwall recurrence of breast carcinoma. Investigations of potential interaction between heat and brachytherapy components of a Combination Applicator demonstrate no perceptible perturbation of the heating field from an HDR source or leadwire, no perceptible effect of a scanning HDR source on fiberoptic thermometry, and <0.5% variation of radiation dose delivered through the CMA applicator. By applying heat and radiation simultaneously for maximum synergism of modalities, this dual therapy system should expand the number of patients that can benefit from effective

  18. Brachytherapy in France in 2002: results of the ESTRO-PCBE questionnaire; La curietherapie en France en 2002: resultats de l'enquete PCBE de l'ESTRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Mazeron, J.J. [Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Centre des Tumeurs, 75 - Paris (France); Guedea, F. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia Idibell, L' hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelone (Spain); Nisin, R. [ESTRO office, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2007-05-15

    The authors report the results of the Patterns of Care for Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE) throughout France. Responses were obtained for 91% of the Radiation Oncology departments, which have declared using brachytherapy for 67, and gave detailed data for 49 ones. The equipments and treated tumours were recorded. LDR brachytherapy remained the most often used (53.5 ), followed by HDR (28%). PDR represented 5.5% and permanent implants 11%. The authors discuss the development of new equipment, with an aggregation of the structures, and an increase of the PDR and prostate implants use. (authors)

  19. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  20. Optimization and comparison of balloon-based partial breast brachytherapy using a single source, a standard plan line source, and both forward and inverse planned multilumen techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Katie; Whitney, Diane; Mukesh, Mukesh; Wilson, Charles; Coles, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    This study directly compares four dosimetric techniques for balloon-based partial breast brachytherapy: single source, standard line source, and both forward planned and inverse planned multilumen (ML). A standard line source plan is presented to be used in a single catheter or as a starting point for forward planned ML. The study population consists of 12 patients previously treated with a single lumen. Inverse plans were created for 7 patients and used to create a standard line source plan. ML plans were created on the same patient data sets. The dosimetric aims were as follows: PTV_EVAL (planning target volume for evaluation) D95 (dose received [%] by 95% of PTV_EVAL volume)≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD), the maximum skin and rib dose ≤125% of prescription dose, breast V150 (volume [cc] receiving 150% of the PD)≤50cc, and V200 (volume [cc] receiving 200% of the PD)≤10cc. The number of patients fulfilling all dosimetric constraints went from 1 patient of 12 with a single catheter to 6 patients of 12 with inverse planned ML and 7 patients of 12 with forward planned ML. PTV_EVAL D95 increased significantly with the standard line source plans and ML plans when compared with the single-source plans. Forward planning took, on average, 7min longer than inverse planning. Multiple sources in a single catheter improve coverage at catheter ends, whereas ML can further improve coverage and reduce dose to organs at risk. Using a standard line source as a starting point for forward planning ML means increase in planning time is kept to a minimum, making it a practicable option for centers without inverse planning software. Patients previously ineligible for treatment with a single catheter may be treated using ML. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The American Brachytherapy Society Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix Part II: High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Beriwal, Sushil; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Gaffney, David; Hansen, Jorgen; Jones, Ellen; Kirisits, Christian; Thomadsen, Bruce; Erickson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This report presents the 2011 update to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy guidelines for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in cervical cancer brachytherapy formulated updated guidelines for HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring, ovoids, cylinder or interstitial applicators for locally advanced cervical cancer were revised based on medical evidence in the literature and input of clinical experts in gynecologic brachytherapy. Results The Cervical Cancer Committee for Guideline Development affirms the essential curative role of tandem-based brachytherapy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer. Proper applicator selection, insertion, and imaging are fundamental aspects of the procedure. Three-dimensional imaging with magnetic resonance or computed tomography or radiographic imaging may be used for treatment planning. Dosimetry must be performed after each insertion prior to treatment delivery. Applicator placement, dose specification and dose fractionation must be documented, quality assurance measures must be performed, and follow-up information must be obtained. A variety of dose/fractionation schedules and methods for integrating brachytherapy with external-beam radiation exist. The recommended tumor dose in 2 Gray (Gy) per fraction radiobiologic equivalence (EQD2) is 80–90 Gy, depending on tumor size at the time of brachytherapy. Dose limits for normal tissues are discussed. Conclusion These guidelines update those of 2000 and provide a comprehensive description of HDR cervical cancer brachytherapy in 2011. PMID:22265437

  2. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    OpenAIRE

    Loschak, Paul; Brattain, Laura; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translati...

  3. Late coronary occlusion after intracoronary brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Costa (Marco); M. Sabaté (Manel); I.P. Kay (Ian Patrick); P. Cervinka; J.M.R. Ligthart (Jürgen); P. Serrano (Pedro); V.L.M.A. Coen (Veronique); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.C. Levendag (Peter); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Intracoronary brachytherapy appears to be a promising technology to prevent restenosis. Presently, limited data are available regarding the late safety of this therapeutic modality. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of late (>1 month)

  4. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study aims to report the incidence of treatment-induced acute toxicities, local control and survival of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy concomitant with weekly Cisplatin chemotherapy. Methods: Forty patients with FIGO Stages IB2 ...

  5. Use of customized-mold brachytherapy in the management of malignancies arising in the maxillary antrum after maxillectomy: a dosimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciérvide, Raquel; Ramos, Luis; Aristu, Jose Javier; Montesdeoca, Nestor; Martínez-Monge, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of a intraoral mold high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of tumors arising in the maxillary antrum after maxillectomy and to describe the dosimetric profile of HDR brachytherapy in such an unusual location. A customized mold with four 6-French catheters was designed and produced in transparent acrylic resin. The catheters formed a soft loop that allowed the passage of the HDR source. CT-based dose evaluation in several volumes of interest, including the gross tumor volume (GTV) and several organs at risk (OARs), such as the skin of the cheek, eyeball, lens, optic nerve, optic chiasm, and spinal cord was performed. Treatments were delivered uneventfully. A favorable OAR/GTV ratio was observed. The GTV D(90) was covered by the 3.8 Gy isodose (95% of the prescription isodose of 4 Gy) and the doses received by the OARs varied between 4% and 43% of the prescription isodose for the V1 cc of spinal cord and eyeball, respectively. The only structure that could not be adequately spared was the skin overlying the tumoral lesion that received between 94% and 107% of the prescription isodose (1.0 and 0.5 cm(2) of skin, respectively). Intraoral mold-based HDR brachytherapy can be used to treat tumors involving the maxillary antrum provided that access is possible through a previous maxillectomy. A dose reduction of 4-43% in several OARs, such as the spinal cord, pituitary gland, optic chiasm, optic nerve, eyeball, and lens, is obtained. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MO-D-BRD-00: Electronic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  7. Median sternotomy for an unexpected complication of permanent hemodialysis catheters: "stuck catheter".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, S; Ak, K; Tugrular, S; Civelek, A; Isbir, C; Arsan, S

    2008-08-01

    Cuffed tunneled venous access catheters are commonly used for temporary and permanent access in patients undergoing hemodialysis. These catheters play an essential role in providing permanent access in patients in whom all other access options have been exhausted. However, they are prone to several complications like catheter thrombosis, catheter fibrin sheating and infection. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of stuck hemodialysis cuffed tunneled catheters causing stenosis and thrombosis in central veins which needed to be removed by median sternotomy.

  8. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, James Edward; Yarney, Joel; Vanderpuye, Verna; Akpakli, Evans; Tagoe, Samuel; Sasu, Evans

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years). The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months). Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6%) experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2). One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3) following banding for hemorrhoids. Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively performed in a resource challenged environment if adequate training

  9. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edward Mensah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. Material and methods : A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results: The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years. The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months. Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6% experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2. One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3 following banding for hemorrhoids. Conclusions : Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively

  10. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  11. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-02-01

    In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR(60)Co and (192)Ir sources and a hypothetical (169)Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. For a 5 cm × 5 cm(192)Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about -3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than -1% for (60)Co and (192)Ir, yet -3% for (169)Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were -7% for (60)Co, -0.6% for (192)Ir, and -2.5% for (169)Yb. This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either (60)Co and (192)Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like (169)Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at

  12. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL; Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Fillmore, Helen [ORNL; Broaddus, William C [ORNL; Dyer, Rachel L [ORNL; Gillies, George [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  13. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  14. Robotic positioning of standard electrophysiology catheters: a novel approach to catheter robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bradley; Ayers, Gregory M; Cohen, Todd J

    2008-05-01

    Robotic systems have been developed to manipulate and position electrophysiology (EP) catheters remotely. One limitation of existing systems is their requirement for specialized catheters or sheaths. We evaluated a system (Catheter Robotics Remote Catheter Manipulation System [RCMS], Catheter Robotics, Inc., Budd Lake, New Jersey) that manipulates conventional EP catheters placed through standard introducer sheaths. The remote controller functions much like the EP catheter handle, and the system permits repeated catheter disengagement for manual manipulation without requiring removal of the catheter from the body. This study tested the hypothesis that the RCMS would be able to safely and effectively position catheters at various intracardiac sites and obtain thresholds and electrograms similar to those obtained with manual catheter manipulation. Two identical 7 Fr catheters (Blazer II; Boston Scientific Corp., Natick, Massachusetts) were inserted into the right femoral veins of 6 mongrel dogs through separate, standard 7 Fr sheaths. The first catheter was manually placed at a right ventricular endocardial site. The second catheter handle was placed in the mating holder of the RCMS and moved to approximately the same site as the first catheter using the Catheter Robotics RCMS. The pacing threshold was determined for each catheter. This sequence was performed at 2 right atrial and 2 right ventricular sites. The distance between the manually and robotically placed catheters tips was measured, and pacing thresholds and His-bundle recordings were compared. The heart was inspected at necropsy for signs of cardiac perforation or injury. Compared to manual positioning, remote catheter placement produced the same pacing threshold at 7/24 sites, a lower threshold at 11/24 sites, and a higher threshold at only 6/24 sites (p > 0.05). The average distance between catheter tips was 0.46 +/- 0.32 cm (median 0.32, range 0.13-1.16 cm). There was no difference between right atrial

  15. Y-configured metallic stent combined with 125 I seed strands cavity brachytherapy for a patient with type IV Klatskin tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Dechao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case in an inoperable patient with type IV Klatskin tumor treated by the use of a novel, two piece, Y-configured self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS combined with two 125 I seed strands via bilateral approach. The placement of the Y-shaped SEMS was successful and resulted in adequate biliary drainage. After 2 months of intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT, both 125 I seed strands and temporary drainage catheter were removed after patency of the expanded stents was confirmed by the cholangiogram. This technique was feasible and could be considered for the treatment of patients with Bismuth type IV Klatskin tumors.

  16. Totally implantable catheter embolism: two related cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Chaves Ribeiro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Long-term totally implantable catheters (e.g. Port-a-Cath® are frequently used for long-term venous access in children with cancer. The use of this type of catheter is associated with complications such as infection, extrusion, extravasation and thrombosis. Embolism of catheter fragments is a rare complication, but has potential for morbidity. The aim here was to report on two cases in which embolism of fragments of a long-term totally implantable catheter occurred. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case series study at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective review of catheter embolism in oncological pediatric patients with long-term totally implantable catheters. RESULTS: The first patient was a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with stage IV Wilms' tumor. Treatment was started with the introduction of a totally implantable catheter through the subclavian vein. At the time of removal, it was realized that the catheter had fractured inside the heart. An endovascular procedure was necessary to remove the fragment. The second case was a boy diagnosed with stage II Wilms' tumor at the age of two years. At the time of removal, it was noticed that the catheter had disconnected from the reservoir and an endovascular procedure was also necessary to remove the embolized catheter. CONCLUSION: Embolism of fragments of totally implantable catheters is a rare complication that needs to be recognized even in asymptomatic patients.

  17. Catheter design for effective manual bladder irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesfin, Samuel; Sarkissian, Carl; Malaeb, Bahaa; Monga, Manoj

    2011-12-01

    We compared the efficiency of clearance of a simulated clot from a bladder model using a 6-hole irrigation catheter, a traditional Malecot catheter and a modified Malecot catheter with additional side holes. Latex balloons 12 inches in diameter served as the bladder model. They were filled with 300 cc Jell-O® gelatin, which had been partially solidified for 8 hours at 36F. Five manual irrigation/aspiration cycles with a 60 cc catheter tip syringe were performed to remove simulated clot from the bladder models and the amount of clot removed was measured. Five bladder models were used to test the efficiency of clot removal for each 22Fr catheter design, including a standard 22Fr Model 361222 Malecot latex 4-wing catheter (Rusch, High Wycombe, United Kingdom) and a 22Fr Bardex® Model 606118-22 latex 6-hole catheter. Two modified versions of the Malecot catheter design involving 2 and 4 additional holes were also tested to determine the effect of a hybrid 6-hole/Malecot design. The 6-hole catheter was more efficient for clot evacuation than the Malecot catheter (p = 0.014). The modified Malecot catheter with 4 additional holes was more efficient than the original Malecot catheter (p = 0.020). However, it was not significantly better than the 6-hole catheter. After 5 irrigation/aspiration cycles 77.0% of residual clot remained in the bladder with the Malecot catheter compared to 60.4% and 54.0% for the 6-hole and modified 4-hole Malecot catheters, respectively. The 6-hole catheter showed an advantage in clot removal over the Malecot catheter design. The enhanced ability of the 6-hole design to remove simulated clot may be attributable to the larger area covered by the holes at the catheter tip. Further investigation to determine the effect of spacing between the holes and the number of holes on the ability to break apart and remove clot is recommended for a more thorough understanding of differences among catheter models and methods of improvement. Copyright © 2011

  18. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of urethral strictures is a major challenge in urology. For investigation of different treatment methods an animal model was developed by reproducible induction of urethral strictures in rabbits to mimic the human clinical situation. By means of this model the potential of endoluminal LDR brachytherapy using β-irradiation as prophylaxis of recurrent urethral strictures investigated. Material and Methods: A circumferential urethral stricture was induced by energy deposition using laser light application (wavelength λ=1470 nm, 10 W, 10 s, applied energy 100 J) in the posterior urethra of anaesthetized New Zealand White male rabbits. The radial light emitting fiber was introduced by means of a children resectoscope (14F). The grade of urethral stricture was evaluated in 18 rabbits using videourethroscopy and urethrography at day 28 after stricture induction. An innovative catheter was developed based on a β-irradiation emitting foil containing 32P, which was wrapped around the application system. Two main groups (each n=18) were separated. The "internal urethrotomy group" received after 28days of stricture induction immediately after surgical urethrotomy of the stricture the radioactive catheter for one week in a randomized, controlled and blinded manner. There were 3 subgroups with 6 animals each receiving 0 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy. In contrast animals from the "De Nuovo group" received directly after the stricture induction (day 0) the radioactive catheter also for the duration of one week divided into the same dose subgroups. In order to determine the radiation tolerance of the urethral mucosa, additional animals without any stricture induction received a radioactive catheter applying a total dose of 30 Gy (n=2) and 15 Gy (n=1). Cystourethrography and endoscopic examination of urethra were performed on all operation days for monitoring treatment progress. Based on these investigation a classification of the stricture size was performed and

  19. A feasibility study for using ABS plastic and a low-cost 3D printer for patient-specific brachytherapy mould design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Benjamin D; Nilsson, Sanna; Poole, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    This feasibility study aims to determine if a low-cost 3D printer (BitsFromBytes 3D Touch) with ABS plastic can print custom mould structures and catheter channels defined in a brachytherapy treatment planning system (Nucletron Oncentra) for patient-specific treatment. Printer accuracy was evaluated through physical measurement, and print quality was investigated by adjusting print parameters (print speed, layer thickness, percentage infill). Catheter positioning and reproducibility were measured over repeated insertions. ABS plastic water equivalency was investigated by comparing Ir-192 HDR source dose distributions, measured with radiochromic film, in ABS plastic and in water. Structures and catheter channels were printed accurately to within 0.5 mm laterally and 1 mm in the vertical print direction. Adjusting print parameters could reduce print time, albeit with reduced print quality. 3.5 mm channel diameters allowed for easy catheter insertion. Catheter positioning was reproducible to within 0.5 mm but, because of catheter flex within the channel, was on average 1 mm offset from defined TPS positions. This offset could be accounted for by repeating the treatment planning CT scan with the printed mould positioned on the patient. Dose attenuation in ABS plastic and in water was equivalent to within the measurement limitations. While clinical uses for this particular low-cost printer and ABS plastic are limited by print size restrictions and non-certification for biocompatibility, it has been demonstrated that a low-cost 3D printer set-up can accurately create custom moulds and catheter channels potentially acceptable for clinical use.

  20. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources for...

  1. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual physical...

  2. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  3. Pulmonary Artery Catheter Placement Using Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Brett; Robbins, Robin; Maus, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of pulmonary artery catheter placement using transesophageal echocardiography inclusive of a description of the technique. A prospective, proof-of-concept study. Single university hospital. Twenty patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension scheduled for pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Pulmonary artery catheters were placed in 20 patients solely by transesophageal echocardiographic guidance. Placement of the pulmonary artery catheter in the pulmonary artery with transesophageal echocardiography guidance in fewer than 10 minutes was considered successful placement. The time to placement was measured from advancement of the pulmonary artery catheter in the superior vena cava (20 cm) to a final location at the junction of the right pulmonary artery and main pulmonary artery. All 20 pulmonary artery catheters were placed successfully using transesophageal echocardiography guidance and the median time to placement was 43 seconds. In 9 of the 20 patients (45%), the catheter was placed successfully on the first attempt without any adjustments. However, in 9 others (45%), the catheter required manipulation under transesophageal echocardiography vision. In 3 patients (15%), the pulmonary artery catheter was observed to be coiled in the right atrium and in 1 instance (5%) manipulation of the catheter in the right ventricle was required to enter the outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiography is a viable adjunctive method to conventional pressure waveform placement of pulmonary artery catheters in potentially difficult patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Outcome of radiologically placed tunneled haemodialysis catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayani, Raza; Anwar, Muhammad; Tanveer-ul-Haq; Al-Qamari, Nauman; Bilal, Muhammad Asif

    2013-12-01

    To study the outcome of radiologically placed double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheters for the management of renal failure. Case series. Interventional Suite of Radiology Department at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from April 2010 to June 2011. All consecutive patients who were referred to the department of radiology by the nephrologists for double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheter (Permacath) placement during the study period were included. Patients with septicemia, those for whom follow-up was not available, those coming for catheter exchange or who died due to a noncatheter related condition were excluded. A radio-opaque, soft silicone double lumen catheter was inserted through a subcutaneous tunnel created over the anterior chest wall. The catheter tip was placed in the right atrium via the internal jugular vein. Ultrasound guidance was used for initial venous puncture. The rest of the procedure was carried out under fluoroscopic guidance. Technical success, catheter related bacteremia rates, adequacy of dialysis, patency, and adverse events were analyzed. Overall 88 tunneled haemodialysis catheters were placed in 87 patients. Patients were followed-up for duration of 1 - 307 days with mean follow-up period of 4 months. Immediate technical success was 100%. The procedural complication rate was 5.6% (5 catheters). Eight patients died during the study period, seven from causes unrelated to the procedure. One patient died due to septicemia secondary to catheter related infection. Of the remaining 69 patients, 50 (72.4%) predominantly had uneventful course during the study period. Twelve patients developed infection (17.3%); two were successfully treated conservatively while in 10 patients catheter had to be removed. Seven catheters (10.1%) failed due to mechanical problems. In 3 patients the internal jugular veins got partially thrombosed. One catheter was accidentally damaged in the ward and had to be removed. Radiological guided tunneled

  5. Development of a brachytherapy audit checklist tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann; Hadley, Scott; Jolly, Shruti; Lee, Choonik; Roberson, Peter; Roberts, Donald; Ritter, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    To develop a brachytherapy audit checklist that could be used to prepare for Nuclear Regulatory Commission or agreement state inspections, to aid in readiness for a practice accreditation visit, or to be used as an annual internal audit tool. Six board-certified medical physicists and one radiation oncologist conducted a thorough review of brachytherapy-related literature and practice guidelines published by professional organizations and federal regulations. The team members worked at two facilities that are part of a large, academic health care center. Checklist items were given a score based on their judged importance. Four clinical sites performed an audit of their program using the checklist. The sites were asked to score each item based on a defined severity scale for their noncompliance, and final audit scores were tallied by summing the products of importance score and severity score for each item. The final audit checklist, which is available online, contains 83 items. The audit scores from the beta sites ranged from 17 to 71 (out of 690) and identified a total of 7-16 noncompliance items. The total time to conduct the audit ranged from 1.5 to 5 hours. A comprehensive audit checklist was developed which can be implemented by any facility that wishes to perform a program audit in support of their own brachytherapy program. The checklist is designed to allow users to identify areas of noncompliance and to prioritize how these items are addressed to minimize deviations from nationally-recognized standards. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  7. Clinical implementation of a novel applicator in high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In this study, we present the clinical implementation of a novel transoral balloon centering esophageal applicator (BCEA and the initial clinical experience in high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer, using this applicator. Material and methods: Acceptance testing and commissioning of the BCEA were performed prior to clinical use. Full performance testing was conducted including measurements of the dimensions and the catheter diameter, evaluation of the inflatable balloon consistency, visibility of the radio-opaque markers, congruence of the markers, absolute and relative accuracy of the HDR source in the applicator using the radiochromic film and source position simulator, visibility and digitization of the applicator on the computed tomography (CT images under the clinical conditions, and reproducibility of the offset. Clinical placement of the applicator, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient’s response to the treatment were elaborated as well. Results : The experiments showed sub-millimeter accuracy in the source positioning with distal position at 1270 mm. The digitization (catheter reconstruction was uncomplicated due to the good visibility of markers. The treatment planning resulted in a favorable dose distribution. This finding was pronounced for the treatment of the curvy anatomy of the lesion due to the improved repeatability and consistency of the delivered fractional dose to the patient, since the radioactive source was placed centrally within the lumen with respect to the clinical target due to the five inflatable balloons. Conclusions : The consistency of the BCEA positioning resulted in the possibility to deliver optimized non-uniform dose along the catheter, which resulted in an increase of the dose to the cancerous tissue and lower doses to healthy tissue. A larger number of patients and long-term follow-up will be required to investigate if the delivered optimized treatment can

  8. Untangling of knotted urethral catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambrook, Andrew J. [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Todd, Alistair [Raigmore Hospital, Inverness (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Intravesical catheter knotting during micturating cystourethrography is a rare but recognized complication of the procedure. We were able to untangle a knot utilizing a fluoroscopically guided vascular guidewire. Following this success, a small study was performed using a model. Various types of guidewires and techniques were tested for different diameters of knots in order to predict the likelihood of success in this type of situation. (orig.)

  9. Chlorhexidine sustained-release varnishes for catheter coating - Dissolution kinetics and antibiofilm properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefter Shenderovich, Julia; Zaks, Batya; Kirmayer, David; Lavy, Eran; Steinberg, Doron; Friedman, Michael

    2018-01-15

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are difficult to eradicate or prevent, due to their biofilm-related nature. Chlorhexidine, a widely used antiseptic, was previously found to be effective against catheter-related biofilms. For the present study, we developed sustained-release chlorhexidine varnishes for catheter coating and evaluated their antibiofilm properties and chlorhexidine-dissolution kinetics under various conditions. The varnishes were based on ethylcellulose or ammonio methacrylate copolymer type A (Eudragit® RL). Chlorhexidine was released by diffusion from a heterogeneous matrix in the case of the ethylcellulose-based formulation, and from a homogeneous matrix in the case of Eudragit® RL. This dictated the release pattern of chlorhexidine under testing conditions: from film specimens, and from coated catheters in a static or flow-through system. Momentary saturation was observed with the flow-through system in Eudragit® RL-based coatings, an effect that might be present in vivo with other formulations as well. The coatings were retained on the catheters for at least 2weeks, and showed prolonged activity in a biological medium, including an antibiofilm effect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The current study demonstrates the potential of catheter coatings with sustained release of chlorhexidine in the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Modified Open Surgery Technique for Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement Decreases Catheter Malfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunming; Xu, Linfeng; Chen, Yun; Yan, Xiang; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a new, modified open surgery technique on catheter-related malfunction. ♦ Methods: During the period from January 1997 to June 2009, 216 patients received initial peritoneal catheters. For the present study, patients were divided into four groups according to the catheter types and the surgery techniques: TO-S: traditional open surgery, straight Tenckhoff catheter TO-C: traditional open surgery, coiled Tenckhoff catheter TO-SN: traditional open surgery, swan-neck catheter MO-S: modified open surgery, straight Tenckhoff catheter The modified surgery was characterized by a low incision site, a short intra-abdominal catheter segment and an additional upward straight subcutaneous tunnel. All patients were followed up for 2 years or until death. Survival rates, complications caused by catheter placement, and the probability of malfunction-free catheter survival were compared between the groups. ♦ Results: Catheter malfunction was the most frequent mechanical complication, found in 31 patients (14.4%), who experienced 38 malfunctions. Only 2 episodes of catheter malfunction were found in the MO-S group, representing a rate significantly less than those in the TO-S and TO-C groups (both p catheter survival showed a significantly different malfunction-free probability for the various groups (p = 0.009). After 2 years of follow-up, 136 patients (63.0%) survived with their initial PD catheter. The initial catheter survival rate was 76.8% in the MO-S group. Kaplan-Meier curves for initial catheter survival showed that the highest survival rate was found in the MO-S group (p = 0.001). ♦ Conclusions: The modified open surgery technique is a reliable method for catheter placement. PMID:24991051

  11. The stuck catheter: a hazardous twist to the meaning of permanent catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Venkat Sainaresh; Watson, Diane; Rajan, Dheeraj K; Bhola, Cynthia B; Lok, Charmaine E

    2015-01-01

    Permanent central venous catheter use is associated with significant complications that often require their timely removal. An uncommon complication is resistant removal of the catheter due to adherence of the catheter to the vessel wall. This occasionally mandates invasive interventions for removal. The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of this "stuck catheter" phenomenon and its consequences. A retrospective review of all the removed tunneled hemodialysis catheters from July 2005 to December 2014 at a single academic-based hemodialysis center to determine the incidence of stuck catheters. Data were retrieved from a prospectively maintained computerized vascular access database and verified manually against patient charts. In our retrospective review of tunneled hemodialysis catheters spanning close to a decade, we found that 19 (0.92%) of catheters were retained, requiring endovascular intervention or open sternotomy. Of these, three could not be removed, with one patient succumbing to catheter-related infection. Longer catheter vintage appeared to be associated with 'stuck catheter'. Retention of tunneled central venous catheters is a rare but important complication of prolonged tunneled catheter use that nephrologists should be aware of. Endoluminal balloon dilatation procedures are the initial approach, but surgical intervention may be necessary.

  12. Impact of interfraction seroma collection on breast brachytherapy dosimetry – a mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowards, Keith; Bhatt, Geetika; Freeman, Andrew; Dragun, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Balloon brachytherapy is a widely accepted modality for delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Our hypothesis was that inter-fraction seroma collection around the balloon surface would have an adverse effect on dosimetry of the target. Material and methods This is a dosimetric re-planning study using two volumetric models (30 cc and 45 cc) in a Contura® multi-lumen balloon (MLB) catheter. In a previously treated patient, two customized baseline plans were generated using multiple channels of the Contura® catheter prescribed to the Planning Target Volume Evaluation (PTV_Eval). Symmetric expansions of 1.0 mm (0-9 mm) increments around the balloon surface were performed to simulate a “Virtual Seroma” (VS) accumulation for both balloon volumes and plans were obtained for each expansion using Eclipse Brachyvision™. An analysis of these plans was then performed to evaluate the effect of seroma accumulation on dosimetric parameters of V100 and V90. Results 20 plans were generated and analyzed (10 plans for each balloon volume), representing VS of 6.0-66.0 cc. There was a commensurate decrease in the dose delivered to the PTV_Eval V100 and V90 (as defined by the original treatment plan) with increasing VS accumulation leading to a sub-optimal coverage of the PTV_Eval. For 30 cc MLB catheter, V100 decreased by 1.4% and V90 decreased by 0.9% for every 1 cc of VS. For 45cc MLB catheter, V100 decreased by 1.3% and V90 decreased by 1.15% for every 1.0 cc accumulation of VS. Conclusions Balloon catheter-tissue adherence ensures daily dose delivery to the planned PTV_Eval. Accumulation of seroma, hematoma or air between HDR fractions can significantly impact PTV_Eval dosimetry. Vacuum-port aspiration prior to delivery of each fraction, if available, should be considered to minimize the risk of geographic under dosing. PMID:23349651

  13. The impact of primary Gleason grade on biochemical outcome following brachytherapy for hormone-naive Gleason score 7 prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Gregory S; Butler, Wayne M; Wallner, Kent E; Galbreath, Robert W; Allen, Zachariah A; Adamovich, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Although the perception exists that biochemical outcome in patients with a Gleason score of 7 with dominant pattern 4 histology is inferior to that of patients with a Gleason score of 7 with a primary Gleason grade of 3, conflicting conclusions have been reported for radical prostatectomy and brachytherapy. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the dominant histologic pattern in Gleason score 7 prostate cancer on biochemical progression-free survival after brachytherapy. Between April 1995 and October 2001, 273 consecutive patients underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy without androgen deprivation therapy for clinical T1c-T3a NxM0 (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. No patient underwent seminal vesicle biopsy or pathological lymph node staging. All patients underwent brachytherapy more than 3 years before analysis. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate specific antigen (PSA) cut point ASTRO) consensus definition. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated for biochemical progression-free survival included primary Gleason grade; clinical T stage; pretreatment PSA level; risk group; percent positive biopsy results; perineural invasion; patient age; isotope; supplemental external-beam radiation therapy; prostate volume; brachytherapy planning volume; percent of the target volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose (V100/150/200); minimum percent of the prescribed dose covering 90% of the target volume (D90); tobacco consumption; hypertension; and diabetes. For the entire cohort, the actuarial 8-year biochemical progression-free survival rate was 94.5% and 94.8% using a PSA cut point ASTRO consensus definition, respectively. For biochemically disease free patients, the median posttreatment PSA level was probability of 8-year biochemical progression-free survival and is independent of Gleason 3 + 4 versus 4 + 3 histology.

  14. Endocervical ultrasound applicator for integrated hyperthermia and HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical success of hyperthermia adjunct to radiotherapy depends on adequate temperature elevation in the tumor with minimal temperature rise in organs at risk. Existing technologies for thermal treatment of the cervix have limited spatial control or rapid energy falloff. The objective of this work is to develop an endocervical applicator using a linear array of multisectored tubular ultrasound transducers to provide 3-D conformal, locally targeted hyperthermia concomitant to radiotherapy in the uterine cervix. The catheter-based device is integrated within a HDR brachytherapy applicator to facilitate sequential and potentially simultaneous heat and radiation delivery. Methods: Treatment planning images from 35 patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer were inspected to assess the dimensions of radiation clinical target volumes (CTVs) and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) surrounding the cervix and the proximity of organs at risk. Biothermal simulation was used to identify applicator and catheter material parameters to adequately heat the cervix with minimal thermal dose accumulation in nontargeted structures. A family of ultrasound applicators was fabricated with two to three tubular transducers operating at 6.6–7.4 MHz that are unsectored (360°), bisectored (2×180°), or trisectored (3×120°) for control of energy deposition in angle and along the device length in order to satisfy anatomical constraints. The device is housed in a 6 mm diameter PET catheter with cooling water flow for endocervical implantation. Devices were characterized by measuring acoustic efficiencies, rotational acoustic intensity distributions, and rotational temperature distributions in phantom. Results: The CTV in HDR brachytherapy plans extends 20.5±5.0 mm from the endocervical tandem with the rectum and bladder typically 5EM43 °C over 4–5 cm diameter with Tmaxconformal thermal delivery to the uterine cervix. Feasibility of heating

  15. SU-G-TeP1-01: A Simulation Study to Investigate Maximum Allowable Deformations of Implant Geometry Before Plan Objectives Are Violated in Prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babier, A [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In prostate HDR brachytherapy dose distributions are highly sensitive to changes in prostate volume and catheter displacements. We investigate the maximum deformations in implant geometry before planning objectives are violated. Methods: A typical prostate Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy reference plan was calculated on the Oncentra planning system, which used CT images from a tissue equivalent prostate phantom (CIRS Model 053S) embedded inside a pelvis wax phantom. The prostate was deformed and catheters were displaced in simulations using a code written in MATLAB. For each deformation dose distributions were calculated, based on TG43 methods, using the MATLAB code. The calculations were validated through comparison with Oncentra calculations for the reference plan, and agreed within 0.12%SD and 0.3%SD for dose and volume, respectively. Isotropic prostate volume deformations of up to +34% to −27% relative to its original volume, and longitudinal catheter displacements of 7.5 mm in superior and inferior directions were simulated. Planning objectives were based on American Brachytherapy Society guidelines for prostate and urethra volumes. A plan violated the planning objectives when less than 90% of the prostate volume received the prescribed dose or higher (V{sub 100}), or the urethral volume receiving 125% of prescribed dose or higher was more than 1 cc (U{sub 125}). Lastly, the dose homogeneity index (DHI=1-V{sub 150}/V{sub 100}) was evaluated; a plan was considered sub-optimal when the DHI fell below 0.62. Results and Conclusion: Planning objectives were violated when the prostate expanded by 10.7±0.5% or contracted by 11.0±0.2%; objectives were also violated when catheters were displaced by 4.15±0.15 mm and 3.70±0.15 mm in the superior and inferior directions, respectively. The DHI changes did not affect the plan optimality, except in the case of prostate compression. In general, catheter displacements have a significantly larger impact on plan

  16. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au; Millar, Jeremy L.; Franich, Rick D. [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia and School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia); Haworth, Annette [School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Panettieri, Vanessa [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolution and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the {sup 192}Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. Results: The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). Conclusions: We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring the

  17. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan L; Haworth, Annette; Panettieri, Vanessa; Millar, Jeremy L; Franich, Rick D

    2016-05-01

    Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolution and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the (192)Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring the source position as each dwell was delivered

  18. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  19. Improving the efficiency of image guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Otter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy is an essential component of the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancers. It enables the dose to the tumor to be boosted whilst allowing relative sparing of the normal tissues. Traditionally, cervical brachytherapy was prescribed to point A but since the GEC-ESTRO guidelines were published in 2005, there has been a move towards prescribing the dose to a 3D volume. Image guided brachytherapy has been shown to reduce local recurrence, and improve survival and is optimally predicated on magnetic resonance imaging. Radiological studies, patient workflow, operative parameters, and intensive therapy planning can represent a challenge to clinical resources. This article explores the ways, in which 3D conformal brachytherapy can be implemented and draws findings from recent literature and a well-developed hospital practice in order to suggest ways to improve the efficiency and efficacy of a brachytherapy service. Finally, we discuss relatively underexploited translational research opportunities.

  20. [Knot in a thoracic epidural catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, F; Helms, O; Hentz, J-G; Steib, A

    2011-02-01

    We report a case of impossible injection into a thoracic epidural catheter associated with a difficult withdrawal of this catheter after its introduction on the T3-T4 level. Thanks to a gentle and continuous traction, the catheter was finally successfully removed without being broken, but presented a simple knot at 13mm from its end. No neurological complication was observed later on. This complication happened during the introduction of the catheter at the thoracic level where anatomic conditions are less favorable for this kind of complication to happen than at the lumbar level. We have been probably confronted with a catheter taking an abnormal direction due to an anatomic structure. This case shows us that knots in an epidural catheter are also possible on the high thoracic level and that its ascent within the epidural space must happen without any resistance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated Catheter Navigation With Electromagnetic Image Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Herman A; Nardelli, Pietro; O'Shea, Conor; Tugwell, Josef; Khan, Kashif A; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Kennedy, Marcus P; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a novel method of controlling an endoscopic catheter by using an automated catheter tensioning system with the objective of providing clinicians with improved manipulation capabilities within the patient. Catheters are used in many clinical procedures to provide access to the cardiopulmonary system. Control of such catheters is performed manually by the clinicians using a handle, typically actuating a single or opposing set of pull wires. Such catheters are generally actuated in a single plane, requiring the clinician to rotate the catheter handle to navigate the system. The automation system described here allows closed-loop control of a custom bronchial catheter in tandem with an electromagnetic tracking of the catheter tip and image guidance by using a 3D Slicer. An electromechanical drive train applies tension to four pull wires to steer the catheter tip, with the applied force constantly monitored through force sensing load cells. The applied tension is controlled through a PC connected joystick. An electromagnetic sensor embedded in the catheter tip enables constant real-time position tracking, whereas a working channel provides a route for endoscopic instruments. The system is demonstrated and tested in both a breathing lung model and a preclinical animal study. Navigation to predefined targets in the subject's airways by using the joystick while using virtual image guidance and electromagnetic tracking was demonstrated. Average targeting times were 29 and 10 s, respectively, for the breathing lung and live animal studies. This paper presents the first reported remote controlled bronchial working channel catheter utilizing electromagnetic tracking and has many implications for future development in endoscopic and catheter-based procedures.

  2. A broken catheter in the epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwari, Jamil S; Al-Wahbi, Yahya; Al-Nahdi, Saleh

    2014-04-01

    The Arrow FlexTip epidural catheter has reinforced coiled stainless steel wire, which facilitates its insertion and is less likely to puncture the blood vessels. However, as compared with non-reinforced, reinforced epidural catheters are more vulnerable to break. We report a case from Saudi Arabia on a retained fragment of a broken epidural catheter. Measures to prevent this mishap and its management are discussed.

  3. Conformal treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, G. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Hebbinghaus, D. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Dennert, P. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Kohr, P. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Wilhelm, R. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Kimmig, B. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie)

    1996-09-01

    Quality of a brachytherapy application depends on the choice of the target volume, on the dose distribution homogeneity and radiation injury on critical tissue, which should be postulated by advanced brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Basic imaging method for conformal treatment planning is the cross-sectional imaging. The clinical applicatibility of a new type 3D planning system using CT and/or MRT-simulation or US-simulation for planning purposes was studied. The planning system developed at Kiel University differs from usual brachytherapy planning systems because of the obligatory use of cross-sectional imaging as basic imaging method for reconstruction of structures of interest. Dose distribution and normal anatomy can be visualized on each CT/MRT/US slice as well as coronal, sagittal, axial and free chosen reconstructions (3D), as well as dose-volume histogram curves and special colour-coded visualization of dose homogeneity in the target can be analyzed. Because of the experience in the clinical routine, as well as on the base of 30 simultaneous planning procedures on both 2D (semi-3D) and 3D planning systems we observed similar time consumption. Advantages of 3D planning were the better interpretation of target delineation, delineation of critical structures as well as dose distribution, causing more accurate volume optimisation of dose distribution. Conformal brachytherapy treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy means significant advantages for the clinical routine compared to 2D or semi-3D methods. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Qualitaet einer Brachytherapieapplikation ist abhaengig von der Zielvolumenwahl, der homogenen Dosisverteilung und der Schonung kritischer Organe. Diese Voraussetzungen koennen am besten mit Hilfe eines 3D-Planungssystem erfuellt werden. Als Planungsvorlage fuer die Konformationstherapieplanung sind am besten Schnittbilder (CT, MRT, US) geeignet. Es wurde die Anwendbarkeit eines auf CT- (oder MRT-)Simulation oder geeignete

  4. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsatli Raed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pulmonary artery catheter (PAC is an important tool in the preoperative cardiac management, and it provides measurements which helps in the patient management During open heart surgery the catheter tends to rest against the anterior lateral wall of the right atrium where the catheter may be caught by a suture in the cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass. We describe a very rare complication which is inadvertent surgical suturing of the PAC to the inferior vena cava that necessitated reopening the chest, cutting, the suture and removing the catheter.

  5. Hemodialysis Catheters: How to Keep Yours Working Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide Hemodialysis Catheters: How to Keep Yours Working Well Print ... access also see Hemodialysis Access What is a hemodialysis catheter? The catheter used for hemodialysis is a ...

  6. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Eric; Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-12-01

    In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0.05) and they were

  7. Pulsatile flow in ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Á.; Galarza, M.; Thomale, U.; Schuhmann, M. U.; Valero, J.; Amigó, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    The obstruction of ventricular catheters (VCs) is a major problem in the standard treatment of hydrocephalus, the flow pattern of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) being one important factor thereof. As a first approach to this problem, some of the authors studied previously the CSF flow through VCs under time-independent boundary conditions by means of computational fluid dynamics in three-dimensional models. This allowed us to derive a few basic principles which led to designs with improved flow patterns regarding the obstruction problem. However, the flow of the CSF has actually a pulsatile nature because of the heart beating and blood flow. To address this fact, here we extend our previous computational study to models with oscillatory boundary conditions. The new results will be compared with the results for constant flows and discussed. It turns out that the corrections due to the pulsatility of the CSF are quantitatively small, which reinforces our previous findings and conclusions. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  8. Perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy for soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Deo, S V Suryanarayana; Rath, Goura Kisor; Shukla, Nootan Kumar; Bakhshi, Sameer; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (PHDRIBT) in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with localized soft tissue sarcoma (STS). From year 2004 to 2010, 52 patients with localized STS were treated with wide local excision plus PHDRIBT followed by EBRT. Median size of the tumor was 8 cm (range, 4-19 cm). A single-plane interstitial brachytherapy implant with an average of nine catheters was performed during the surgical resection. The PHDRIBT was started on third postoperative day to deliver a high-dose-rate dose of 16 Gy in four fractions over 2 days using twice-a-day fractionation schedule. After 4 weeks, EBRT was started for a prescription dose of 50 Gy by conventional fractionation. Subsequently, chemotherapy was administered, if indicated as per our institutional policy. Patients were followed up regularly to study local control, survival, and toxicity. At a median followup of 46 months, no patient developed local recurrence, but 12 patients developed distant metastases. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 67% and 63%, respectively. Main acute toxicity was delayed wound healing observed in 3 patients (5.7%). Commonest late toxicity was chronic skin/subcutaneous fibrosis noticed in 5 patients (9.6%). The PHDRIBT combined with EBRT provides excellent local control and survival rates with acceptable acute and late toxicity in patients with localized STS. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of MammoSite brachytherapy: Advantages, disadvantages and clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaleh, Saleh; Bezak, Eva; Borg, Martin (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia))

    2009-05-15

    Background. The MammoSite radiotherapy system is an alternative treatment option for patients with early-stage breast cancer to overcome the longer schedules associated with external beam radiation therapy. The device is placed inside the breast surgical cavity and inflated with a combination of saline and radiographic contrast to completely fill the cavity. The treatment schedule for the MammoSite monotherapy is 34 Gy delivered in 10 fractions at 1.0 cm from the balloon surface with a minimum of 6 hours between fractions on the same day. Material and methods. This review article presents the advantages, disadvantages, uncertainties and clinical outcomes associated with the MammoSite brachytherapy (MSB). Results. Potential advantages of MSB are: high localised dose with rapid falloff for normal tissue sparing, minimum delay between surgery and RT, catheter moves with breast, improved local control, no exposure to staff, likely side-effects reduction and potential cost/time saving (e.g. for country patients). The optimal cosmetic results depend on the balloon-to-skin distance. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results are achieved for patients with balloon-skin spacing of =7 mm. There have been very few published data regarding the long term tumour control and cosmesis associated with the MSB. The available data on the local control achieved with the MSB were comparable with other accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques. The contrast medium inside the balloon causes dose reduction at the prescription point. Current brachytherapy treatment planning systems (BTPS) do not take into account the increased photon attenuation due to high Z of contrast. Some BTPS predicted up to 10% higher dose near the balloon surface compared with Monte Carlo calculations using various contrast concentrations (5-25%). Conclusion. Initial clinical results have shown that the MammoSite device could be used as a sole radiation treatment for selected patients with early stage breast cancer

  10. Comparison of IPSA and HIPO inverse planning optimization algorithms for prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Smith, Ryan L; Mason, Natasha J; Millar, Jeremy L

    2014-11-08

    Publications have reported the benefits of using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for the treatment of prostate cancer, since it provides similar biochemical control as other treatments while showing lowest long-term complications to the organs at risk (OAR). With the inclusion of anatomy-based inverse planning opti- mizers, HDRB has the advantage of potentially allowing dose escalation. Among the algorithms used, the Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing (IPSA) optimizer is widely employed since it provides adequate dose coverage, minimizing dose to the OAR, but it is known to generate large dwell times in particular positions of the catheter. As an alternative, the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning Optimization (HIPO) algorithm was recently implemented in Oncentra Brachytherapy V. 4.3. The aim of this work was to compare, with the aid of radiobiological models, plans obtained with IPSA and HIPO to assess their use in our clinical practice. Thirty patients were calculated with IPSA and HIPO to achieve our department's clinical constraints. To evaluate their performance, dosimetric data were collected: Prostate PTV D90(%), V100(%), V150(%), and V200(%), Urethra D10(%), Rectum D2cc(%), and conformity indices. Additionally tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated with the BioSuite software. The HIPO optimization was performed firstly with Prostate PTV (HIPOPTV) and then with Urethra as priority 1 (HIPOurethra). Initial optimization constraints were then modified to see the effects on dosimetric parameters, TCPs, and NTCPs. HIPO optimizations could reduce TCPs up to 10%-20% for all PTVs lower than 74 cm3. For the urethra, IPSA and HIPOurethra provided similar NTCPs for the majority of volume sizes, whereas HIPOPTV resulted in large NTCP values. These findings were in agreement with dosimetric values. By increasing the PTV maximum dose constraints for HIPOurethra plans, TCPs were found to be in agreement with

  11. Dosimetry evaluation of SAVI-based HDR brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoharan Sivasubramanian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI with high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy offers an excellent compact course of radiation due to its limited number of fractions for early-stage carcinoma of breast. One of the recent devices is SAVI (strut-adjusted volume implant, which has 6, 8 or 10 peripheral source channels with one center channel. Each channel can be differentially loaded. This paper focuses on the treatment planning, dosimetry and quality assurance aspects of HDR brachytherapy implant with GammaMed Plus HDR afterloader unit. The accelerated PBI balloon devices normally inflate above 35 cc range, and hence these balloon type devices cannot be accommodated in small lumpectomy cavity sizes. CT images were obtained and 3-D dosimetric plans were done with Brachyvision planning system. The 3-D treatment planning and dosimetric data were evaluated with planning target volume (PTV_eval V90, V95, V150, V200 skin dose and minimum distance to skin. With the use of the SAVI 6-1 mini device, we were able to accomplish an excellent coverage - V90, V95, V150 and V200 to 98%, 95%, 37 cc (<50 cc volume and 16 cc (<20 cc volume, respectively. Maximum skin dose was between 73% and 90%, much below the prescribed dose of 34 Gy. The minimum skin distance achieved was 5 to 11 mm. The volume that received 50% of the prescribed radiation dose was found to be lower with SAVI. The multi-channel SAVI-based implants reduced the maximum skin dose to markedly lower levels as compared to other modalities, simultaneously achieving best dose coverage to target volume. Differential-source dwell-loading allows modulation of the radiation dose distribution in symmetric or asymmetric opening of the catheter shapes and is also advantageous in cavities close to chest wall.

  12. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for female peri-urethral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daya Nand Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Peri-urethral cancer (PUC in females is a rare malignancy. Surgery is not usually contemplated due to associated morbidity. Radiation therapy (RT can be employed in the form of interstitial brachytherapy (IBT alone for early lesions, and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT with or without IBT for advanced lesions. We report our first experience in the literature to evaluate the role of high-dose-rate (HDR IBT in female PUC. Material and methods : Between 2008 and 2013, 10 female patients with PUC (5 primary and 5 recurrent were treated with HDR-IBT with or without EBRT at our center. Size of the lesion ranged from 1.5 cm to 5.0 cm. A 2-3 plane free-hand implant was performed using plastic catheters. The prescribed dose of HDR-IBT was 42 Gy in 14 fractions for brachytherapy alone (5 patients, and 18-21 Gy for the boost along with EBRT (5 patients. Patients were followed up regularly for assessment of disease control and toxicity. Results: At a median follow up of 25 months, six patients were disease free at their last follow up. Four patients developed recurrence: 2 at inguinal nodes, 1 at local site, and 1 at both local as well as inguinal nodes. Moist desquamation was the commonest acute toxicity observed in all 5 patients treated with IBT alone, which healed within 4 weeks’ time. Overall, grade II delayed complication rate was 30%. Conclusions : Though small sample size, the results of our study have shown that HDR-IBT provides good loco-regional control with acceptable toxicity for female PUC.

  13. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  14. SU-G-201-04: Can the Dynamic Library of Flap Applicators Replace Treatment Planning in Surface Brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Harris, T; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Contemporary brachytherapy treatment planning systems-(TPS) include the applicator model libraries to improve digitization; however, the library of surface-flap-applicators-(SFA) is not incorporated into the commercial TPS. We propose the dynamic library-(DL) for SFA and investigate if such library can eliminate applicator reconstruction, source activation and dose normalization. Methods: DL was generated for the SFA using the C++class libraries of the Visualization Toolkit-(VTK) and Qt-application framework for complete abstraction of the graphical interface. DL was designed such that the user can initially choose the size of the applicator that corresponds to the one clinically placed to the patient. The virtual applicator-(VA) has an elastic property so that it can be registered to the clinical CT images with a real applicator-(RA) on it. The VA and RA matching is performed by adjusting the position and curvature of the VA. The VA does not elongate or change its size so each catheter could always be at a distance of 5mm from the skin and 10mm apart from the closest catheter maintaining the physical accuracy of the clinical setup. Upon the applicator placement, the dwell positions were automatically activated, and the dose is normalized to the prescription depth. The accuracy of source positioning was evaluated using various applicator sizes. Results: The accuracy of the applicator placement was in the sub-millimeter range. The time-study reveals that up to 50% of the planning time can be saved depending on the complexity of the clinical setup. Unlike in the classic approach, the planning time was not highly dependent on the applicator size. Conclusion: The practical benefits of the DL of the SFA were demonstrated. The time demanding planning processes can be partially automated. Consequently, the planner can dedicate effort to fine tuning, which can result in the improvement of the quality of treatment plans in surface brachytherapy.

  15. Bladder catheter protocol: technical modification for the change of Long-Term bladder catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rueda Pérez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of urinary catheters is a common practice in chronic patients for both outpatients and inpatients. This action involves a large number of nursing interventions either planned or caused by emergency (obstruction, incorrect implantation, etc.... This modification of the catheter technique tries to improve the patient’s quality of life by minimizing the stress produced by urethral catheter replacements and reducing malpractice risks. This change in the urinary catheter technique also intends to alleviate some of the side effects of permanent urethral catheterization. By filling the bladder with saline prior to the change of catheter, it is possible to get a quick and safe implantation, dragging possible sediment and microorganisms and thereby reducing the number of nursing actions related to the process of the urinary catheter replacement (obstruction or incorrect catheter implantations etc.

  16. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  17. Soft versus firm catheters for intrauterine insemination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, Nicolien; Farquhar, Cindy; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M.; Benschop, Laura; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a recommended treatment for unexplained subfertility. The treatment involves the direct delivery of spermatozoa into the uterus using a catheter. Many factors influence the success of IUI treatments including the type of catheter used. To compare pregnancy-related

  18. Soft versus firm catheters for intrauterine insemination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, Nicolien; Farquhar, Cindy; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M.; Benschop, Laura; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2010-01-01

    Background Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a recommended treatment for unexplained subfertility. The treatment involves the direct delivery of spermatozoa into the uterus using a catheter. Many factors influence the success of IUI treatments including the type of catheter used. Objectives To

  19. Alternatives to Indwelling Catheters Cause Unintended Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jessica; Harvey, Ellen M; Lollar, Daniel I; Bradburn, Eric H; Hamill, Mark E; Collier, Bryan R; Love, Katie M

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), limiting use of indwelling catheters is encouraged with alternative collection methods and early removal. Adverse effects associated with such practices have not been described. We also determined if CAUTI preventative measures increase the risk of catheter-related complications. We hypothesized that there are complications associated with early removal of indwelling catheters. We described complications associated with indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization, and compared complication rates before and after policy updates changed catheterization practices. We performed retrospective cohort analysis of trauma patients admitted between August 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013 who required indwelling catheter. Associations between catheter days and adverse outcomes such as infection, bladder overdistention injury, recatheterization, urinary retention, and patients discharged with indwelling catheter were evaluated. The incidence of CAUTI and the total number of catheter days pre and post policy change were similar. The incidence rate of urinary retention and associated complications has increased since the policy changed. Practices intended to reduce the CAUTI rate are associated with unintended complications, such as urinary retention. Patient safety and quality improvement programs should monitor all complications associated with urinary catheterization practices, not just those that represent financial penalties.

  20. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control.

  1. Percutaneous Placement of Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To describe our patients' demographics and clinical characteristics, our method of PD catheter placement within the Radiology Department at Kimberley Provincial Hospital, compare our early complication types and frequencies, overall peritonitis rate and one-year catheter survival rate with findings in the ...

  2. [Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P; Martinet, L; Perrot, P; Baraer, F; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J-Y; Malard, O; Ferron, C; Dreno, B

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medicosurgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6h). The median dose was 20Gy (range, 15-40Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early - within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6cm (p=0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Early perioperative LDR brachytherapy delivering 20Gy at 5mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. 2009 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Brachytherapy at the Institut Gustave-Roussy: Personalized vaginal mould applicator: technical modification and improvement; Curietherapie a l'Institut Gustave-Roussy: applicateur moule vaginal personnalise: modification et amelioration techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albano, M.; Dumas, I.; Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de curietherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2008-12-15

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with gynaecological cancers. At the Institut Gustave-Roussy, the technique of vaginal mould applicator has been used for decades. This technique allows a personalized tailored irradiation, integrating tumour shape, size and extension and vaginal anatomy. Vaginal expansion reduces the dose to the vaginal mucosa and to the organs at risk. We report a modification of the material used for vaginal mould manufacture. The advantages of the new material are a lighter weight, and transparency allowing a better accuracy in the placement of catheters for radioactive sources. This material is applicable for low dose-rate, pulse dose-rate and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Since 2001, more than 700 vaginal moulds have been manufactured with this new approach without any intolerance. (authors)

  4. Stereotactic radiotherapy as an alternative to plaque brachytherapy in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldebawy, Eman; Patrocinio, Horacio; Evans, Michael; Hashem, Rania; Nelson, Sylvie; Sidi, Rubina; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-12-01

    Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role for selected patients with retinoblastoma. Newer non-invasive radiotherapy techniques such as stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCR) that uses highly accurate positioning to deliver treatment with small beams may be an interesting alternative to brachytherapy. We report a case treated with SCR and compare the dosimetry with that achievable with brachytherapy. With advantages and disadvantages to both, SCR should more often be considered in the management of RB because of the more homogeneous dose within the target volume and similar or lower doses to surrounding normal tissues.

  5. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  6. Flap reconstruction and interstitial brachytherapy in nonextremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vineeta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is an integral component of management of high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. Interstitial brachytherapy is used to deliver a boost or radical dose with several advantages over external beam radiotherapy. There has always been a concern to use brachytherapy with flap reconstruction of skin defects after wide excision. We preset our initial experience with interstitial brachytherapy in two patients of recurrent high-grade non-extremity sarcomas treated with surgical excision and soft tissue reconstruction of surgical defect.

  7. Traditional Long-Term Central Venous Catheters Versus Transhepatic Venous Catheters in Infants and Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amanda Marie; Danford, David A; Curzon, Christopher L; Anderson, Venus; Delaney, Jeffrey W

    2017-10-01

    Children with congenital heart disease may require long-term central venous access for intensive care management; however, central venous access must also be preserved for future surgical and catheterization procedures. Transhepatic venous catheters may be an useful alternative. The objective of this study was to compare transhepatic venous catheters with traditional central venous catheters regarding complication rate and duration of catheter service. Retrospective review of 12 congenital heart disease patients from September 2013 to July 2015 who underwent placement of one or more transhepatic venous catheters. Single freestanding pediatric hospital located in the central United States. Pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent placement of transhepatic venous catheter. Cohort's central venous catheter complication rates and duration of catheter service were compared with transhepatic venous catheter data. Twelve patients had a total of 19 transhepatic venous lines. Transhepatic venous lines had a significantly longer duration of service than central venous lines (p = 0.001). No difference between the two groups was found in the number of documented thrombi, thrombolytic burden, or catheter sites requiring wound care consultation. A higher frequency of infection in transhepatic venous lines versus central venous lines was found, isolated to four transhepatic venous lines that had a total of nine infections. All but one was successfully managed without catheter removal. The difference in the proportion of infections to catheters in transhepatic venous lines versus central venous lines was significant (p = 0.0001), but no difference in the rate of infection-related catheter removal was found. Without compromising future central venous access sites, transhepatic venous lines had superior duration of service without increased thrombosis, thrombolytic use, or insertion site complications relative to central venous lines. Transhepatic venous

  8. Unusual migration of pulmonary artery catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kuravinakop

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery catheter is widely used in intensive care. Distal migration of the catheter is a know complication. Diagnosis of such a migration is made by both clinical criteria and radiographs. A 55 year old septic lady was admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary artery catheter introduced for cardiac output monitoring migrated from right lung to left lung. Diagnosis was made following a chest radiograph the following day of insertion with the clinical criteria remaining unaltered. Migration of pulmonary artery catheter can occur not only distally but from one lung to another. Clinical criteria alone cannot rule out migration. Chest radiographs form an important part in monitoring the position of the pulmonary artery catheter.

  9. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique.

  10. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...... cardiologists towards catheter ablation for AF, using a nationwide survey. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed a purpose-designed questionnaire to evaluate attitudes towards catheter ablation for AF that was sent to all Danish cardiologists (n = 401; response n = 272 (67.8%)). There was no association between...... attitudes towards ablation and the experience or age of the cardiologist with respect to patients with recurrent AF episodes with a duration of 7 days and/or need for cardioversion. The majority (69%) expected a recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in more than 30% of the cases...

  11. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  12. Central Venous Catheter-Related Hydrothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Hun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of 88-year-old women who developed central venous catheter-related bilateral hydrothorax, in which left pleural effusion, while right pleural effusion was being drained. The drainage prevented accumulation of fluid in the right pleural space, indicating that there was neither extravasation of infusion fluid nor connection between the two pleural cavities. The only explanation for bilateral hydrothorax in this case is lymphatic connections. Although vascular injuries by central venous catheter can cause catheter-related hydrothorax, it is most likely that the positioning of the tip of central venous catheter within the lymphatic duct opening in the right sub-clavian-jugular confluence or superior vena cava causes the catheter-related hydrothorax. Pericardial effusion can also result from retrograde lymphatic flow through the pulmonary lymphatic chains.

  13. [Catheter ablation in supraventricular tachycardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitschner, H F; Neuzner, J

    1996-01-01

    The first report about successful radio frequency ablation of a right-posterior-septal accessory pathway appeared in 1986. Since then, the technology of both guidable ablation catheters and radio frequency generators has been considerably improved in an initially clinical-experimental phase. At the same time, electrophysiologists were equally able to enlarge their knowledge in the field of signal characteristics of arrhythmogenic substrates. This included the discovery of action potentials of accessory pathways (preexcitation syndromes), the location of fast and slow AV node conduction (AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, AVNRT), the functional importance of the anatomical isthmus between the os of the coronary sinus, the tricuspid valve and the inferior caval vein (atrial flutter). Mapping techniques such as transient and concealed entrainment became, among others, significant tools in finding the best localization for radio frequency catheter ablation. Thus, technical development and the increased knowledge of clinical electrophysiologists resulted in firmly establishing the procedure of catheter ablation as the method of first choice in the curative treatment of supraventricular tachycardias in a potential collective of about 5 per mill of the normal population (without atrial fibrillation). Supraventricular tachycardias with a reentry mechanism in the broadest sense (> 95% of all pts. with SVT) and those with focal automaticity ( 90% versus uncommon type 90%). Atrial reentrant tachycardias are rather rare (with the exception of atrial fibrillation/flutter). The literature suggests medical therapy to be successful in about 60% of these patients. Those patients who are presently proposed to receive radio frequency catheter ablation usually continue to be symptomatic despite pharmacological therapy and/or have a potential risk for sudden cardiac death due to atrial fibrillation in WPW syndrome, or rate-dependent hemodynamic compromise secondary to cardiac disease

  14. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Nathan H J; Orio, Peter F; Merrick, Gregory S; Prestidge, Bradley R; Hartford, Alan Charles; Rosenthal, Seth A

    Transperineal permanent brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) has produced practice parameters for LDR prostate brachytherapy. These practice parameters define the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric guidelines, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these parameters can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo measurements for high dose rate brachytherapy with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Renu; Jursinic, Paul A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of clinical implementation of OSLDs for high dose-rate (HDR) in vivo dosimetry for gynecological and breast patients. To discuss how the OSLDs were characterized for an Ir-192 source, taking into account low gamma energy and high dose gradients. To describe differences caused by the dose calculation formalism of treatment planning systems.Methods: OSLD irradiations were made using the GammaMedplus iX Ir-192 HDR, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA. BrachyVision versions 8.9 and 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA, were used for calculations. Version 8.9 used the TG-43 algorithm and version 10.0 used the Acuros algorithm. The OSLDs (InLight Nanodots) were characterized for Ir-192. Various phantoms were created to assess calculated and measured doses and the angular dependence and self-absorption of the Nanodots. Following successful phantom measurements, patient measurements for gynecological patients and breast cancer patients were made and compared to calculated doses.Results: The OSLD sensitivity to Ir-192 compared to 6 MV is between 1.10 and 1.25, is unique to each detector, and changes with accumulated dose. The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment planning system and found to be in agreement for the gynecological patients to within measurement uncertainty. The range of differences between the measured and Acuros calculated doses was -10%-14%. For the breast patients, there was a discrepancy of -4.4% to +6.5% between the measured and calculated doses at the skin surface when the Acuros algorithm was used. These differences were within experimental uncertainty due to (random) error in the location of the detector with respect to the treatment catheter.Conclusions: OSLDs can be successfully used for HDR in vivo dosimetry. However, for the measurements to be meaningful one must account for the angular dependence, volume-averaging, and the greater sensitivity to Ir-192 gamma rays than to 6 MV x

  16. Central venous catheters: detection of catheter complications and therapeutical options; Zentralvenoese Katheter: Diagnostik von Komplikationen und therapeutische Optionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, B.; Beck, A. [Universitaetsmedizin Charite, Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Wagner, H.J. [Vivantes-Kliniken, Friedrichshain und Am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie; Vivantes-Kliniken, Hellersdorf und Prenzlauer Berg (Germany). Radiologie

    2008-06-15

    For modern medicine central venous catheters play an important role for diagnostic and therapeutic options. Catheter implantation, complication detection and therapy of catheter complications are an increasing demand for the radiologist. The review article provides an overview of different catheter types, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Catheter malpositions are usually detectable in conventional X-ray. Most malpositions are correctable using interventional-radiological techniques. In addition therapeutical options for thrombotic complications (venous thrombosis, catheter occlusion, fibrin sheath) are discussed. In case of an infectious catheter complication, usually a catheter extraction and re-implantation is necessary.

  17. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a customizable intraluminal solution for postoperative treatment of tracheal mucosa recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Laura A; Harrison, Amy S; Cognetti, David; Xiao, Ying; Yu, Yan; Liu, Haisong; Ahn, Peter H; Anné, P Rani; Showalter, Timothy N

    2011-01-01

    Delivering adequate dose to tracheal mucosa recurrence after multiple prior courses of surgery and radiation presented a challenge for radiation delivery. Tumor bed location and size, combined with previous doses to surrounding areas, complicated the use of external beam therapy with either photons or electrons. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was explored to provide sufficient dose coverage. A 45-year-old gentleman presented with recurrent head and neck cancer. After undergoing additional excision of gross tumor in the tracheal region, radiation was recommended to improve local control. The region of residual tumor was confined to a small superficial lesion at the posterior-superior aspect of the trachea, involving mucosa located along the bend of the trachea, immediately deep to the stoma. External beam treatment was discussed but was not recommended based on recurrence location in the prior radiation field and patient's flexed chin position. HDR technique with a custom applicator was preferred. A three-dimensional HDR plan based on computed tomography used a single catheter optimized to cover gross tumor volume as delineated by physician. Prescribed dose was 5 Gy/fraction for six fractions (two fractions/wk). The applicator position was verified daily with computed tomography and physician setup approval before treatment. The patient was positioned on a wing board to allow access to the stoma. HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. Intraluminal HDR brachytherapy is a viable option for providing dose to region inside tracheal stoma. Advantages over photon and electron beam therapy include reduced dose to surrounding tissues previously irradiated, skin dose, and reproducibility of treatment delivery. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient specific optimization-based treatment planning for catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia and thermal ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Punit; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    A 3D optimization-based thermal treatment planning platform has been developed for the application of catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for treating advanced pelvic tumors. Optimal selection of applied power levels to each independently controlled transducer segment can be used to conform and maximize therapeutic heating and thermal dose coverage to the target region, providing significant advantages over current hyperthermia technology and improving treatment response. Critical anatomic structures, clinical target outlines, and implant/applicator geometries were acquired from sequential multi-slice 2D images obtained from HDR treatment planning and used to reconstruct patient specific 3D biothermal models. A constrained optimization algorithm was devised and integrated within a finite element thermal solver to determine a priori the optimal applied power levels and the resulting 3D temperature distributions such that therapeutic heating is maximized within the target, while placing constraints on maximum tissue temperature and thermal exposure of surrounding non-targeted tissue. This optimizationbased treatment planning and modeling system was applied on representative cases of clinical implants for HDR treatment of cervix and prostate to evaluate the utility of this planning approach. The planning provided significant improvement in achievable temperature distributions for all cases, with substantial increase in T90 and thermal dose (CEM43T90) coverage to the hyperthermia target volume while decreasing maximum treatment temperature and reducing thermal dose exposure to surrounding non-targeted tissues and thermally sensitive rectum and bladder. This optimization based treatment planning platform with catheter-based ultrasound applicators is a useful tool that has potential to significantly improve the delivery of hyperthermia in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy. The planning platform has been extended

  19. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  20. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R., E-mail: ccg.andreza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  1. A flattening filter for brachytherapy skin irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Haque, Mamoon; Foulkes, Kristie; Jeraj, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Radioactive sources in close contact offer an alternative to superficial radiation in the treatment of skin lesions. A flattening filter was designed for a lead surface applicator to improve the skin dose distribution of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit (Nucletron). At three heights from the opening (10, 15 and 25 mm) of the cylindrical applicator, the 192Ir source can be driven into the centre of the applicator. Thin sheets of lead foil (0.2 mm) were cut into circular shapes and placed in the opening to build a cylindrical cone that acts as a flattening filter. The shape of the cone was optimized in an iterative process using a spreadsheet and the resulting dose distribution under the applicator was determined using radiosensitive film. The use of the filter improved the dose distribution in a plane perpendicular to the beam axis to be within +/-5% of the central axis dose. The present applicator and flattening filter together with an HDR brachytherapy unit offer an alternative for skin irradiation where a superficial unit is not available or will be replaced with a more flexible device. As the depth dose characteristics can be modified using different source-to-surface distances, the dose throughout the patient's skin can be shaped as desired by the radiation oncologist using a compensator design type approach.

  2. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yung Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Ko, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Koo; Choi, Moon Sik [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within {+-}10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author).

  3. Alteplase use for malfunctioning central venous catheters correlates with catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Courtney M; Miller, Kathryn E; Beardsley, Andrew L; Ahmed, Sheikh S; Rojas, Luis A; Hedlund, Terri L; Speicher, Richard H; Nitu, Mara E

    2013-03-01

    A catheter thrombosis and the presence of a catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CBSI) often occur simultaneously, but it is unclear if or to what degree the two complications relate. Several animal and adult studies indicate a relationship between fibrin sheaths and thrombi in the development of CBSIs. To date, there has been limited human investigation in the pediatric population to determine a clear link between the presence of a thrombus and bacteremia. The use of alteplase for malfunctioning central venous catheter may indicate the formation of intraluminal thrombus or fibrin sheath. A catheter that requires alteplase is at higher risk of a CBSI. A retrospective chart review from July 2008 to December 2010. PICU. All patients with central catheters admitted to the PICU. No interventions performed with the retrospective study. Number of total central venous catheters, number of central venous catheters that received treatment with alteplase, and number of CBSIs. Preliminary data during the study period identified 3,289 central venous catheters. Twelve percent of these catheters required at least one dose of alteplase. There were 40 CBSIs during this same time period of which 28% received alteplase during the 5 days preceding the positive blood culture. The odds ratio for getting a CBSI when alteplase is administered is 2.87 (confidence interval 1.42-5.80; p = 0.002). The average age of the central venous catheters at time of infection was not statistically different, 16.1 days in the alteplase catheters compared with 25.6 days for the catheters that did not receive alteplase (p = 0.6). There is a positive correlation between the use of alteplase for malfunctioning central venous catheters and the development of a CASBI. This is likely associated with the presence of an intraluminal fibrin sheath or thrombus. This study adds evidence linking thrombus formation to CBSI.

  4. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  5. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  6. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  7. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  8. Principles of tunneled cuffed catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Tunneled cuffed catheters provide reliable and instant long-term intravenous access for a large variety of therapeutic purposes, including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and apheresis. The most frequent application is for patients with renal failure as an access device for hemodialysis. In this capacity, the rate of catheter use has remained stable in the United States, despite the promotion of arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous grafts. The latter 2 procedures achieve superior longevity and much higher cost-efficiency. Tunneled catheters, however, serve as bridging devices during maturation of newly placed arteriovenous fistulas or as the final option in patients in whom fistulas and grafts have failed. High-quality vascular access is a hallmark of interventional radiology, and its significance for patient care and for our specialty cannot be overestimated. Familiarity with basic concepts of the device and procedural techniques are crucial to achieve successful long-term venous access. The following article demonstrates key concepts of tunneled venous catheter placement by means of dialysis, inasmuch as dialysis catheters represent the most commonly placed tunneled central venous catheters. The principles of placement and techniques utilized, however, are applicable to devices that are used for chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition, such as the Hickman, Broviac, Groshong, or tunneled peripherally inserted central catheters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Incidence of central venous catheter hub contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Julie L; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Rice, Mark J; Rand, Kenneth H; Fahy, Brenda G

    2017-06-01

    To investigate microorganisms causing central venous catheter contamination and how this contamination differs across different catheter metrics. After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, 830 cultures were prospectively obtained from 45 ICU patients with central venous catheter or peripherally inserted central catheter. Bacterial colonies were identified by mass spectrometry. Bacterial contamination of central catheter hubs occurred 44% of the time in this study in the ICU setting. Coagulase-positive staphylococci cultures had higher median (±interquartile range) CFUs (12±232) versus coagulase-negative (3±10) and other bacteria (1±3; Pcentral venous pressure monitoring connections (25.8% vs. 7.1% without). Internal jugular sites (10.0% vs. 2.7% femoral, 6.2% PICC, P=0.031) and medial lumens of triple lumen catheters (11.9% vs. 5.6% distal, 7.0% proximal, P=0.049) had increased incidence of higher bacteria loads (>15 CFUs). This study found a high incidence of central access catheter hub bacterial contamination, which correlated with positive blood cultures in 2 of 3 total bacteremia cases identified in the 45 patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  11. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  12. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  13. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic tracking (EMT is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  14. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Doggett; James Brazil; Marketa Limova; Leah Press; Sidney Smith; Jeremy Peck

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX), an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California). All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up...

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya(®) Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy.

  16. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph Bert; Markus Kellermeier; Kari Tanderup

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  17. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Complication following fracture of a central venous catheter can be catastrophic to both the patient and the attending doctor. Catheter fracture has been attributed to several factors namely prolong mechanical force acting on the catheter, and forceful removal or insertion of the catheter. CASE DETAILS: In ...

  18. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, P.L. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pecklingtan@hotmail.com; Gibson, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications.

  19. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  20. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  1. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Doggett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX, an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California. All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up of 23.7 months, the local recurrence rate is 12.5%. The single lesion that failed was not debulked surgically prior to electronic brachytherapy. Conclusions : To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the use of radiation therapy as curative primary treatment for AFX. No contraindication to the use of radiations is found in the literature, with surgery being the sole treatment for AFX noted. Our recurrence rate is 0% for debulked lesions. Risk of recurrence is mitigated with surgical debulking prior to brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy appears to be a safe and effective treatment for debulked AFX. Multiple excisions, skin grafting, and wound care can be avoided in elderly patients by the use of electronic brachytherapy.

  2. MO-B-BRC-01: Introduction [Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, J. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  3. SU-F-T-11: Scintillator Based Quality Assurance Device for HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozsef, G [New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To build a test device for HDR afterloaders capable of checking source positions, times at positions and estimate the activity of the source. Methods: A catheter is taped on a plastic scintillation sheet. When a source travels through the catheter, the scintillator sheet lights up around the source. The sheet is monitored with a video camera, and records the movement of the light spot. The center of the spot on each image on the video provides the source location, and the time stamps of the images can provide the dwell time the source spend in each location. Finally, the brightness of the light spot is related to the activity of the source. A code was developed for noise removal, calibrate the scale of the image to centimeters, eliminate the distortion caused by the oblique view angle, identifying the boundaries of the light spot, transforming the image into binary and detect and calculate the source motion, positions and times. The images are much less noisy if the camera is shielded. That requires that the light spot is monitored in a mirror, rather than directly. The whole assembly is covered from external light and has a size of approximately 17×35×25cm (H×L×W) Results: A cheap camera in BW mode proved to be sufficient with a plastic scintillator sheet. The best images were resulted by a 3mm thick sheet with ZnS:Ag surface coating. The shielding of the camera decreased the noise, but could not eliminate it. A test run even in noisy condition resulted in approximately 1 mm and 1 sec difference from the planned positions and dwell times. Activity tests are in progress. Conclusion: The proposed method is feasible. It might simplify the monthly QA process of HDR Brachytherapy units.

  4. Catheter-directed Thrombolysis in Acute Superior Vena Cava Syndrome Caused by Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Kawai, Tasuo; Irani, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters have been reported to increase the risk of superior venous cava (SVC) syndrome. This case report describes the development of acute SVC syndrome in a 28-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease implanted with a left-side hemodialysis reliable outflow graft and a right-side double lumen hemodialysis catheter via internal jugular veins. Her symptoms were not alleviated after catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation therapy. She was eventually treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and a predischarge computer tomographic venogram on postthrombolytic procedure day 7 showed patent central veins and patient remained asymptomatic. This case demonstrates that catheter-directed thrombolysis can be safely employed to treat refractory catheter-induced acute SVC syndrome in end-stage renal disease patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose. PMID:26290399

  6. Innovation in catheter design for intra-arterial liver cancer treatments results in favorable particle-fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoven, Andor F; Lam, Marnix G E H; Jernigan, Shaphan; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Buckner, Gregory D

    2015-08-01

    Liver tumors are increasingly treated with radioembolization. Here, we present first evidence of catheter design effect on particle-fluid dynamics and downstream branch targeting during microsphere administrations. A total of 7 experiments were performed in a bench-top model of the hepatic arterial vasculature with recreated hemodynamics. Fluorescent microspheres and clinically used holmium microspheres were administered with a standard microcatheter (SMC) and an anti-reflux catheter (ARC) positioned at the same level along the longitudinal vessel axis. Catheter-related particle flow dynamics were analyzed by reviewing video recordings of UV-light illuminated fluorescent microsphere administrations. Downstream branch distribution was analyzed by quantification of collected microspheres in separate filters for two first-order branches. Mean deviation from a perfectly homogenous distribution (DHD) was used to compare the distribution homogeneity between catheter types. The SMC administrations demonstrated a random off-centered catheter position (in 71 % of experiments), and a laminar particle flow pattern with an inhomogeneous downstream branch distribution, dependent on catheter position and injection force. The ARC administrations demonstrated a fixed centro-luminal catheter position, and a turbulent particle flow pattern with a more consistent and homogenous downstream branch distribution. Quantitative analyses confirmed a significantly more homogeneous distribution with the ARC; the mean DHD was 40.85 % (IQR 22.76 %) for the SMC and 15.54 % (IQR 6.46 %) for the ARC (p = 0.047). Catheter type has a significant impact on microsphere administrations in an in-vitro hepatic arterial model. A within-patient randomized controlled trial has been initiated to investigate clinical catheter-related effects during radioembolization treatment.

  7. THE KISSING BALLOON TECHNIQUE WITH 2 OVER-THE-WIRE BALLOON CATHETERS THROUGH A SINGLE 8-FRENCH GUIDING CATHETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHEIJER, P; BERNINK, PJLM; VANDIJK, RB; TWISK, SPM; LIE, KI

    Some of the newer over-the-wire coronary angioplasty catheters have shaft sizes of 3.0 French (F) or less. The inner diameter of modern 8-F guiding catheters is large enough to accommodate two of such balloon catheters. We report a kissing balloon procedure with two over-the-wire catheters through a

  8. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  9. Task-Space Motion Planning of MRI-Actuated Catheters for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a motion planning algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) actuated catheters for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The MRI-actuated catheters is a new robotic catheter concept which utilizes MRI for remote steering and guidance. Magnetic moments generated by a set of coils wound near the tip are used to steer the catheter under MRI scanner magnetic field. The catheter during an ablation procedure is modeled as a constrained robotic manipulator with flexible joints, and the proposed motion-planning algorithm calculates a sequence of magnetic moments based on the manipulator model to move the tip of the catheter along a predefined trajectory on the surface of the left atrium. The difficulties in motion planning of the catheter are due to kinematic redundancy and underactuation. The proposed motion planning algorithm overcomes the challenges by operating in the task space instead of the configuration space. The catheter is then regulated around this nominal trajectory using feedback control to reduce the effect of uncertainties.

  10. Breakage of an Epidural Catheter Inserted for Labor Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Üşar, Pınar; Kar, Aysun Afife; Çıtak, Güven; Maral, Jale; Canlı, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    The breakage of an epidural catheter, which is usually not noticed, is a rare but important complication encountered while inserting or removing the catheter during epidural blockade. While the epidural catheter was being inserted for labor analgesia, despite no problem being encountered in advancing the catheter, it was drawn back to verify the location; it was observed that 2 cm of the distal end of the catheter was missing. A neurosurgical consultation was requested; it was reported that t...

  11. 78 FR 41125 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting AGENCY...'s permanent implant brachytherapy program. This interim policy affects NRC licensees that are authorized to perform permanent implant brachytherapy. DATES: This policy revision is effective July 9, 2013...

  12. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after the...

  13. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Parahisian Accessory Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korodi Szilamér

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation of parahisian accessory pathways in pre-excitation syndrome is a challenging task, due to the extremely high risk of complete atrioventricular block. In this brief report we describe the case of a 32 year-old man presenting a parahisian accessory pathway, who has been successfully treated by radiofrequency ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation using low-power radiofrequency current is considered to be the most appropiate method of ablation in adult patients.

  14. SU-E-T-171: Characterization of the New Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy Source Using PRESAGE Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Followill, D; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Adamovics, J [John Adamovics, Skillman, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy source using PRESAGE™ dosimeters to obtain independent confirmation of TG-43U1 dosimetry values from previous studies and ascertain its reproducibility in HDR brachytherapy. Methods: PRESAGE™ dosimeters are solid, polyurethane-based dosimeters doped with radiochromic leucodyes that produce a linear optical-density response when exposed to radiation. Eight 1-kg dosimeters were scanned prior to irradiation on an optical-CT scanner to eliminate background signal and any optical imperfections from each dosimeter. To quantify potential imaging artifacts due to oversaturated responses in the immediate range of the source, half of the eight dosimeters were cast with a smaller channel diameter of 5.4 mm, and the other half were cast with a larger channel diameter of 15mm. During irradiation, the catheters were placed in the center of each channel. Catheters fit the 5.4mm diameters channels whereas polyurethane plugs were inserted into the larger channels to create a sturdy, immobile catheter which allowed uniform dose distributions. Two dosimeters of each 5.4mm and 15mm were irradiated at either 1517.3 cGy or 2017.5 cGy. Post-irradiation scans were performed within 48 hours of irradiation. A 3D reconstruction based on subtraction of these two images and the relative dose measurements were made using in-house software. Results: Comparing measured radial dose rates with previous results revealed smaller percent errors when PRESAGE™ irradiations were at lower maximum dose. The dosimeters showed small deviations in radial dose function, g{sub p} (r), from previous studies. Among the dosimeters irradiated at 1517.3 cGy, the g{sub p}(r) compared to previous studies fluctuated from 0.0043 to 0.3922. This suggests small fluctuations can drastically change radial dose calculations. Conclusion: The subtraction of pre-irradiation and post-irradiation scans of PRESAGE™ dosimeters using an optical-CT scanner

  15. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, A [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Taylor, M [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Australian Federal Police, Canberra, ACT (Australia); McDermott, L [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  16. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  17. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos, E-mail: nccf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  18. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  19. Fast dose optimization for rotating shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung; Wu, Xiaodong; Dadkhah, Hossein; Yi, Jirong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Xu, Weiyu

    2017-10-01

    To provide a fast computational method, based on the proximal graph solver (POGS) - A convex optimization solver using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), for calculating an optimal treatment plan in rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). RSBT treatment planning has more degrees of freedom than conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy due to the addition of emission direction, and this necessitates a fast optimization technique to enable clinical usage. The multi-helix RSBT (H-RSBT) delivery technique was investigated for five representative cervical cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for all patients using the POGS method and the commercially available solver IBM ILOG CPLEX. The rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), and HR-CTV boundary were the structures included in our optimization, which applied an asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control. Dose calculation resolution was 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 for all cases. The H-RSBT applicator had 6 helices, with 33.3 mm of translation along the applicator per helical rotation and 1.7 mm spacing between dwell positions, yielding 17.5° emission angle spacing per 5 mm along the applicator. For each patient, HR-CTV D90 , HR-CTV D100 , rectum D2cc , sigmoid D2cc , and bladder D2cc matched within 1% for CPLEX and POGS methods. Also, similar EQD2 values between CPLEX and POGS methods were obtained. POGS was around 18 times faster than CPLEX. For all patients, total optimization times were 32.1-65.4 s for CPLEX and 2.1-3.9 s for POGS. POGS reduced treatment plan optimization time approximately 18 times for RSBT with similar HR-CTV D90 , organ at risk (OAR) D2cc values, and EQD2 values compared to CPLEX, which is significant progress toward clinical translation of RSBT. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  1. Geometric stability of intracavitary pulsed dose rate brachytherapy monitored by in vivo rectal dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Christensen, Jens Juul; Granfeldt, Jørgen; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate geometric stability of applicator and rectum during pulsed dose rate (PDR) intracavitary brachytherapy. A total of 14 patients with cervical cancer (stages IIB-IVA) were analysed retrospectively. A dose of 10 Gy to point A was prescribed per brachytherapy session, and PDR was given with 1 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h, using a ring applicator (Varian). A rectal dosimeter consisting of five diodes spaced by 1.5 cm was routinely placed in the rectum. The diodes detected the progression of each pulse of radiation, as the stepping source was advanced through the applicator. A mathematical model has been developed for spatial analysis of the pattern of the dose readings. The model transforms dose measurement into a quantification of the geometric relationship between rectum diodes and applicator. The model could be used for all treatment sessions, and the relative positions of diodes and applicator were calculated for each pulse of radiation. The SD of displacements during the treatment was below 2.8mm in all directions for all patients. The mean SD in lateral, longitudinal and anterior-posterior directions were 1.2 +/- 0.7, 1.2 +/- 0.7 and 0.9 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively. The mean measurement uncertainty was below 0.8 +/- 0.5 mm in all directions. A new mathematical method has been developed, enabling us to quantitate and monitor relative positions of applicator and rectal diodes during a PDR treatment. The spatial relation between rectal dosimeter and applicator was very stable during extended PDR treatments suggesting that the geometric stability of PDR treatment is at the same level as the stability reported for HDR brachytherapy.

  2. A modified dose calculation formalism for electronic brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWerd, Larry A; Culberson, Wesley S; Micka, John A; Simiele, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    To propose a modification of the current dose calculation formalism introduced in the Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. Electronic brachytherapy sources are miniature x-ray tubes emitting low energies with high-dose-rates. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has introduced a new primary air-kerma rate standard for one of these sources, in contrast to air-kerma strength. A modification of the TG-43 protocol for calculation of dose-rate distributions around electronic brachytherapy sources including sources in an applicator is presented. It cannot be assumed that the perturbations from sources in an applicator are negligible, and thus, the applicator is incorporated in the formalism. The modified protocol mimics the fundamental methodology of the original TG-43 formalism, but now incorporates the new NIST-traceable source strength metric of air-kerma rate at 50 cm and introduces a new subscript, i, to denote the presence of an applicator used in treatment delivery. Applications of electronic brachytherapy sources for surface brachytherapy are not addressed in this Technical Note since they are well documented in other publications. A modification of the AAPM TG-43 protocol has been developed to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. The modified TG-43 formalism allows dose calculations to be performed using a new NIST-traceable source strength metric and introduces the concept of applicator-specific formalism parameters denoted with subscript, i. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections: Causative pathogens and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Nargis; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Satti, Luqman; Gardezi, Adeel; Ahmed, Abeera; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-10-01

    We sought to determine the incidence of bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections, identify variables affecting biofilm formation, and identify etiologic bacterial pathogens and antibiotic-resistance patterns associated with biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in our setup. Patients who developed at least 2 symptoms of urinary tract infection after at least 2 days of indwelling urinary catheters were included. Urine was collected aseptically from catheter tubing and processed per standard microbiologic practices. Bacterial pathogens were identified on the basis of gram staining, colony morphology, and biochemical reactions. The detection of the biofilm was done using the tube adherence method. Drug susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Biofilm was detected in 73.4% isolates, whereas 26.6% of isolates were nonbiofilm producers. Mean duration of catheterization after which biofilm was detected was 5.01 ± 1.31 days. A latex catheter was used in 69.5% of patients, whereas a silicone catheter was used in 30.4% of patients. Escherichia coli was found to be the most common pathogen isolated (52.3%), whereas Enterobacter cloacae exhibited the highest biofilm production (87.5%) among isolated pathogens. Among biofilm producers, the highest resistance was observed with ampicillin (100%). Fosfomycin exhibited the lowest resistance (17.2%). Significant association with biofilm was detected for gender, duration of catheterization, and type of catheter. Biofilm-based CAUTI is an emerging problem. E coli was the most frequent isolate. High antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm-producing strains. Using the variables affecting biofilm formation, tailored intervention strategies can be implemented to reduce biofilm-based CAUTIs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Janita; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2017-08-11

    Neonatal sepsis is the most frequent health care-associated infection in neonatal units. This study aimed to analyze articles on the clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in neonates. A systematic search was performed for studies published from 1987-2017, without language restriction. Observational studies carried out in neonates with CRBSI diagnosed using catheter-drawn blood samples or catheter tip cultures were included. A total of 412 articles were identified in the databases and 10 articles were included. The 7 studies that evaluated central venous catheter tip cultures and cultures of catheter fragments presented sensitivities ranging from 58.5%-100% and specificities ranging from 60%-95.7%. Three studies that evaluated catheter-drawn blood cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, reported sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 71% when evaluated for the differential time to positivity. When quantitative evaluation was performed, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 99.4%. Most of the studies analyzed cultures from the central venous catheter tip and catheter fragments for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonatal populations. The results of this review suggest that the analysis of the catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, are efficient methods for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  6. Catheter ablation of epicardial ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Yamada, MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachycardias (VTs can usually be treated by endocardial catheter ablation. However, some VTs can arise from the epicardial surface, and their substrate can be altered only by epicardial catheter ablation. There are two approaches to epicardial catheter ablation: transvenous and transthoracic. The transvenous approach through the coronary venous system (CVS has been commonly used because it is easily accessible. However, this approach may be limited by the distribution of the CVS and insufficient radiofrequency energy delivery. Transthoracic epicardial catheter ablation has been developed to overcome these limitations of the transvenous approach. It is a useful supplemental or even preferred strategy to eliminate epicardial VTs in the electrophysiology laboratory. This technique has been applied for scar-related VTs secondary to often non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and sometimes ischemic cardiomyopathy, and idiopathic VTs as the epicardial substrates of these VTs have become increasingly recognized. When endocardial ablation and epicardial ablation through the CVS are unsuccessful, transthoracic epicardial ablation should be the next option. Intrapericardial access is usually obtained through a subxiphoidal pericardial puncture. This approach might not be possible in patients with pericardial adhesions caused by prior cardiac surgery or pericarditis. In such cases, a hybrid procedure involving surgical access with a subxiphoid pericardial window and a limited anterior or lateral thoracotomy might be a feasible and safe method of performing an epicardial catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory. Potential complications associated with this technique include bleeding and collateral damage to the coronary arteries and phrenic nerve. Although the risk of these complications is low, electrophysiologists who attempt epicardial catheter ablation should know the complications associated with this technique, how to minimize their

  7. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  8. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  9. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Melhus, Christopher S; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J

    2011-03-01

    AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Agreement using the gamma-index test was > or = 99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  10. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of radionuclide-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Chadha, Manjeet; Mourtada, Firas; Demanes, D Jeffrey

    Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy method in which radionuclide sources are used to deliver a radiation dose at a distance of up to a few centimeters by surface, intracavitary, intraluminal, or interstitial application. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclides for brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses radionuclides such as iridium-192 at dose rates of 20 cGy per minute (12 Gy per hour) or more to a designated target point or volume. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is indicated for treating malignant or benign tumors where the treatment volume or targeted points are defined and accessible. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safer urethral catheters: how study of catheter balloon pressure and force can guide design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alex K; Blaschko, Sarah D; Garcia, Maurice; McAninch, Jack W; Aaronson, David S

    2012-04-01

    To better define urethral catheter balloon pressures and extraction forces during traumatic placement and removal of urethral catheters. To help guide design for safer urethral catheters. Measurements of balloon pressure were made upon filling within the urethra vs the bladder. Extraction forces were measured upon removal of a catheter with a filled balloon from the bladder. Models for the bladder and urethra included an ex vivo model (funnel, 'bladder', attached to a 30 F tube, 'urethra') and fresh human male cadavers. The mean (SEM) balloon pressures and extraction forces were calculated. In the ex vivo model, the mean (SEM) pressures upon filling the balloon with 10 mL were on average three-times higher within the ex vivo'urethra' (177 [6] kPa) vs 'bladder' (59 [2] kPa) across multiple catheter types. In the human cadaver, the mean balloon pressure was 1.9-times higher within the urethra (139 [11] kPa) vs bladder (68 [4] kPa). Balloon pressure increased non-linearly during intraurethral filling of both models, resulting in either balloon rupture (silicone catheters) or 'ballooning' of the neck of the balloon filling port (latex catheters). Removal of a filled balloon per the ex vivo model 'urethra' and cadaveric urethra, similarly required increasing force with greater balloon fill volumes (e.g. 9.34 [0.44] N for 5 mL vs 41.37 [8.01] N for 10 mL balloon volume). Iatrogenic complications from improper urethral catheter use is common. Catheter balloon pressures and manual extraction forces associated with urethral injury are significantly greater than those found with normal use. The differences in pressure and force may be incorporated into a safer urethral catheter design, which may significantly reduce iatrogenic urethral injury associated with catheterization. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  12. Toxic catheters and urethral strictures: A concern about types of catheters used in resource-poor countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Popoola

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Various reports in the literature have confirmed urethral toxicity caused by the use of catheters, mostly latex catheters and their coated versions, resulting in long-segment urethral strictures or strictures located in multiple areas of the urethra. Most catheters used in resource-poor countries, such as Nigeria, are latex catheters with various coatings, such as silicone. The reasons for the widespread use of these potentially toxic catheters are mainly non-availability and/or the high cost of less toxic catheters. We report three cases of urethral strictures following the use of siliconized latex catheters in order to highlight the potential urethral toxicity associated with the use of latex catheters and to draw the authorities’ attention to the need to regulate the types of catheters used in the country.

  13. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek; Hiorns, Melanie P. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or 'linogram' technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. (orig.)

  14. Intravesical catheter knotting: an unusual complication of suprapubic catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiğiter, Murat; Salman, Ahmet Bedii

    2016-01-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used to drain urine temporarily from the bladder. Although it is a commonly performed procedure, it is not without complications. Many of these complications related to surgical technique. However, some unpredictable complications are related to the catheter itself. Intravesical catheter knotting is a very rare event and usually has been reported in feeding catheters used as an urethral catheter. We report a case of a suprapubic Cystofix catheter knot, removed by sustained traction. This complication was probably due to an excessive length of catheter having been inserted into the bladder, thus forming redundant loops that increased the risk of bending onto itself.

  15. Effectiveness of Left Judkins Catheter as a Single Multipurpose Catheter in Transradial Coronary Angiography From Right Radial Artery: A Randomized Comparison With Conventional Two-Catheter Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Burak; Erkol, Ayhan; Mutlu, Ayhan; Daşli, Tolga; Erden, İsmail

    2016-06-01

    To investigate safety and efficacy of left Judkins (JL) catheter as a single multipurpose catheter in transradial coronary angiography (TRA). Most operators use standard femoral catheters instead of special multipurpose transradial catheters during TRA. Patients undergoing TRA through right radial artery (RRA) were randomized into single-catheter approach with JL3.5 and two-catheter approach with JL3.5 and right Judkins 4.0 catheters. Primary outcome measures were rate of success in selective and stable engagement of both coronary arteries with JL catheter, procedure and fluoroscopy times. Of 314 patients enrolled, 206 patients (aged 60.3 ± 12.4 years, 36.9% female) were randomized. JL3.5 was successful in 66.0% of patients as a single catheter. Additional catheter was needed more frequently in single-catheter group (34 vs. 0.97%, P < 0.001). Single-catheter approach reduced procedure time significantly (6.7 ± 2.1 vs. 7.9 ± 3.3 minutes, P = 0.002). However on average there was 19.7% relative increase in fluoroscopy time (2.61 ± 1.38 vs. 2.18 ± 1.54 minutes, P = 0.035) with single-catheter approach. Radial artery spasm tended to develop more frequently in two-catheter group (22.3 vs. 12.6%, P = 0.067). In nearly half of the patients, procedure had been completed successfully with JL3.5 catheter within a fluoroscopy time similar to that of two-catheter group. In TRA from RRA, JL3.5 catheter can be very effective when dedicated multipurpose catheter is not available. As a single multipurpose catheter, JL works perfectly in nearly half of procedures without prolonging procedure and fluoroscopy times. However insisting on a single-catheter approach with JL could unnecessarily increase fluoroscopy time and, hence, radiation exposure. (J Interven Cardiol 2016;29:257-264). © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Catheter related venous thrombosis with cooling and warming catheters: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunet, Bertrand; Lacroix, Guillaume; Bordes, Julien; Poyet, Raphael; D'Aranda, Erwan; Goutorbe, Philippe

    2009-09-08

    Intravascular cooling and warming catheters are among a range of proliferating technologies used for temperature control. Complications related to the use of these devices are few, and no definitive evidence has been presented thus far to indicate any differences in complication rates between these balloon catheters and other central vein catheters. We report two cases of cooling and warming catheter-related venous thrombosis. They are the both first ones report of this kind in the literature. The first case was a 17-year-old man admitted with severe head trauma. On day 6, he presented with severe intracranial hypertension, requiring increased medical treatment: mannitol osmotherapy, barbiturate-induced coma, and mild therapeutic hypothermia. A double-lumen Alsius CoolLine catheter was placed in the inferior veina cava via the left femoral vein and active cooling was begun. On day 10, physical examination of the left inguinal area and echo-doppler revealed catheter-related thrombophlebitis with left iliocaval vein occlusion. The second case was a 42-year-old man admitted with a severe burn. On day 2, the patient was taken to the operating room for the first staged excision of his burn wounds. A triple lumen Alsius Icy catheter was placed in the inferior vena cava via the right femoral vein and active core warming of the patient was begun. From day 2 to day 7, active core warming of the patient was maintained. On day 7, he presented with a septic thrombophlebitis. Echo-doppler revealed a 4-cm-long thrombus at the femoral catheter site with complete blood flow obstruction and blood cultures and catheter tip were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Although generally considered safe, cooling and warming catheters can be associated with mechanical complications such as catheter-related venous thrombosis. Intensivists who use these devices should be aware of this possible complication. Finally, as with any other invasive catheter, to reduce the

  17. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis.

  18. Developing a Verification and Training Phantom for Gynecological Brachytherapy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbobeh Nazarnejad

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dosimetric accuracy is a major issue in the quality assurance (QA program for treatment planning systems (TPS. An important contribution to this process has been a proper dosimetry method to guarantee the accuracy of delivered dose to the tumor. In brachytherapy (BT of gynecological (Gyn cancer it is usual to insert a combination of tandem and ovoid applicators with a complicated geometry which makes their dosimetry verification difficult and important. Therefore, evaluation and verification of dose distribution is necessary for accurate dose delivery to the patients. Materials and Methods The solid phantom was made from Perspex slabs as a tool for intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetric QA. Film dosimetry (EDR2 was done for a combination of ovoid and tandem applicators introduced by Flexitron brachytherapy system. Treatment planning was also done with Flexiplan 3D-TPS to irradiate films sandwiched between phantom slabs. Isodose curves obtained from treatment planning system and the films were compared with each other in 2D and 3D manners. Results The brachytherapy solid phantom was constructed with slabs. It was possible to insert tandems and ovoids loaded with radioactive source of Ir-192 subsequently. Relative error was 3-8.6% and average relative error was 5.08% in comparison with the films and TPS isodose curves. Conclusion Our results showed that the difference between TPS and the measurements is well within the acceptable boundaries and below the action level according to AAPM TG.45. Our findings showed that this phantom after minor corrections can be used as a method of choice for inter-comparison analysis of TPS and to fill the existing gap for accurate QA program in intracavitary brachytherapy. The constructed phantom also showed that it can be a valuable tool for verification of accurate dose delivery to the patients as well as training for brachytherapy residents and physics students.

  19. Radioactive seed migration following parotid gland interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of pulmonary seed migration after parotid brachytherapy using a novel migrated seed detection technique. Patients diagnosed with parotid cancer who underwent permanent parotid brachytherapy from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Head and neck CT scans and chest X-rays were evaluated during routine follow-up. Mimics software and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and migrated seed detection from the original implanted region, respectively. Postimplant dosimetry analysis was performed after seeds migration if the seeds were still in their emitting count. Adverse clinical sequelae from seed embolization to the lung were documented. The radioactive seed implants were identified on chest X-rays in 6 patients. The incidence rate of seed migration in 321 parotid brachytherapy patients was 1.87% (6/321) and that of individual seed migration was 0.04% (6/15218 seeds). All migrated seeds were originally from the retromandibular region. No adverse dosimetric consequences were found in the target region. Pulmonary symptoms were not reported by any patient in this study. In our patient set, migration of radioactive seeds with an initial radioactivity of 0.6-0.7 mCi to the chest following parotid brachytherapy was rare. Late migration of a single seed from the central target region did not affect the dosimetry significantly, and patients did not have severe short-term complications. This study proposed a novel technique to localize the anatomical origin of the migrated seeds during brachytherapy. Our evidence suggested that placement of seeds adjacent to blood vessels was associated with an increased likelihood of seed migration to the lungs. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of short-term hemodialysis catheters on the central veins: a catheter venographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguzkurt, Levent E-mail: loguzkurt@yahoo.com; Tercan, Fahri; Torun, Dilek; Yildirim, Tuelin; Zuemruetdal, Ayseguel; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2004-12-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the central veins in hemodialysis patients with temporary catheters. Methods and material: In this prospective study, 57 patients (40 males, 17 females) with temporary dialysis catheters had catheter venography by pulling back the catheter just before removal. Patient's age range was 25-87 years (mean age, 51 years). The venographic studies were evaluated for pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) and the superior vena cava (SVC). The IJV could only be evaluated if there was adequate filling during contrast administration. In a subgroup of patients who had had only right IJV or only right SCV catheters, impact of these catheters on the central veins was compared. Results: The catheter location was right internal jugular vein (IJV) in 26 cases, right subclavian vein (SCV) in 27 cases, left IJV in 1 case, and left SCV in 3 cases. Thirty-two patients (56%) had had only one temporary catheter and the rest had had more than one inserted. The mean dwell time for the catheters was 21 days (range 7-59 days). A pericatheter sleeve was detected on venography in 32 (56%) patients and thrombus formation was noted in 16 patients (28%). A total of 41 patients (72%) exhibited pericatheter sleeve and/or thrombus formation. While 19 of the 32 patients (59%) without previous catheterization had a sleeve around the catheter, only 13 (52%) of 25 patients who had had multiple catheters inserted had a sleeve (P>0.05). Of the eight patients (14%) with BCV stenosis, two had >50% stenosis. Only one patient (2%) had mild stenosis of the SVC. Three patients out of 15 (20%) who had diagnostic venography for the IJV had severe stenosis of the vein. Pericatheter sleeve formation was more frequent in women (P<0.05). However, there were no statistical differences with respect to pericatheter sleeve formation, luminal filling

  1. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  2. Aspects of dosimetry and clinical practice of skin brachytherapy: The American Brachytherapy Society working group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhib, Zoubir; Kasper, Michael; Perez Calatayud, Jose; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Pai, Sujatha; Strasswimmer, John

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common type of human malignancy. Although surgical techniques are the standard treatment, radiation therapy using photons, electrons, and brachytherapy (BT) (radionuclide-based and electronic) has been an important mode of treatment in specific clinical situations. The purpose of this work is to provide a clinical and dosimetric summary of the use of BT for the treatment of NMSC and to describe the different BT approaches used in treating cutaneous malignancies. A group of experts from the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, and dermatology, who specialize in managing cutaneous malignancies reviewed the literature and compiled their clinical experience regarding the clinical and dosimetric aspects of skin BT. A dosimetric and clinical review of both high dose rate ((192)Ir) and electronic BT treatment including surface, interstitial, and custom mold applicators is given. Patient evaluation tools such as staging, imaging, and patient selection criteria are discussed. Guidelines for clinical and dosimetric planning, appropriate margin delineation, and applicator selection are suggested. Dose prescription and dose fractionation schedules, as well as prescription depth are discussed. Commissioning and quality assurance requirements are also outlined. Given the limited published data for skin BT, this article is a summary of the limited literature and best practices currently in use for the treatment of NMSC. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel robotic catheter remote control system: feasibility and safety of transseptal puncture and endocardial catheter navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Walid; Cummings, Jennifer E; Oh, Seil; Zhang, Youhua; Mazgalev, Todor N; Schweikert, Robert A; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate the safety and the feasibility of the robotic catheter remote control system (CCS) in endocardial navigation in all cardiac chambers, as well as facilitation of the transseptal puncture. CCS has been developed to facilitate control and precise positioning of catheters within the cardiovascular system. CCS consists of a remote catheter manipulator, a set up joint, a physician workstation, and a steerable guide catheter (SGC) and sheath. A conventional 4-mm tip catheter was inserted through the SGC to perform mapping of five predefined targets in each cardiac chamber. Seven mongrel dogs were used in this study. Intracardiac echocardiography and three-dimensional (3-D) electroanatomical mapping were integrated with CCS to facilitate catheter manipulation and to guide transseptal puncture. The time to complete the transseptal puncture and the time to complete access to the predefined targets in each cardiac chamber were measured. Gross and microscopic examinations of the accessed and ablation sites were performed to evaluate safety. Transseptal puncture was performed successfully in all animals with a mean time of 7 +/- 3 minutes. Procedure times to access the five targets in the right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, and left ventricle were 5.6 +/- 1.7, 4.6 +/- 1.5, 13.5 +/- 11.0, 7.0 +/- 2.9 minutes, respectively. There were no intracardiac damages associated with catheter manipulation noted in the excised hearts. Endocardial catheter navigation and mapping using the robotic catheter remote control is safe and feasible. Moreover, the CCS could be used to perform transseptal puncture and left atrial instrumentation.

  4. Persistent catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Ho Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CRSAB occasionally persists despite catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of persistent CRSAB after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with CRSAB were prospectively included from over a 41-month period. We compared the clinical features, 40 bacterial virulence genes, and outcomes between patients with persistent CRSAB (i.e., bacteremia for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and non-persistent CRSAB. RESULTS: Among the 220 episodes of CRSAB, the catheter was kept in place in 17 (6% and removed in 203 (94% cases. In 43 (21% of the 203 episodes, bacteremia persisted for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance (Odds ratio [OR], 9.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05-26.61; P<0.001, non-catheter prosthetic devices (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 1.62-17.80; P=0.006, and renal failure (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.48-7.08; P=0.003 were independently associated with persistent CRSAB. Patients with persistent CRSAB were more like to experience complication than were those with non-persistent CRSAB (72% vs. 15%; P<0.001. Among all episodes due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus, persistent CRSAB isolates were associated with accessory gene regulator (agr group II (P= .04, but presence of other bacterial virulence genes, distribution of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration distribution, and frequency of vancomycin heteroresistance did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with CRSAB, bacteremia persisted in 21% of cases despite catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance, renal failure, and non-catheter prosthetic devices were independent risk factors for persistent CRSAB, which was

  5. Open-irrigated laser catheter ablation: influence of catheter-tissue contact force on lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagerer-Gerhardt, Michaela; Weber, Helmut P

    2015-03-01

    Catheter-tissue contact force (CF) is a major determinant for radiofrequency (RF) ablation lesion size and quality. We sought to test the influence of catheter CF on lesion formation by using an open-irrigated electrode-laser mapping and ablation (ELMA) catheter. With the ELMA catheter in a stable vertical position, continuous wave 1064 nm laser impacts at 15 W (9.5 W/mm(2)), 30 s (285 J/mm(2)), irrigation flow 30 mL/min, were aimed at the endocardial surface of bovine myocardium in heparinized stagnant blood (ACT >350 s) at room temperature (18 °C). Lesions were produced with CFs of 100 g, 10 g, in contact but without pressure, with the catheter tip 2.0 mm, and 5.0 mm away (n = 10, each). Lesions were evaluated morphometrically and were compared by the unpaired t tests. There were no significant differences between volumes of lesions achieved with catheter-tissue CF of 100 g, 10 g, and in contact without pressure: 297 ± 56.0 vs. 300 ± 39 vs. 320 ± 24, respectively (p > 0.05). However, volumes of lesions produced at a distance of 2 mm (95 ± 14 mm(3)) were significantly smaller (p laser ablation lesion size and quality. Maximum sizes of lesions can be achieved with the catheter in intimate endocardial contact without pressure. However, lesions can be produced also at a catheter-tissue distance of 2.0 mm. Noticeably, there is no thrombus formation during laser application with the free floating ELMA catheter in the stagnant blood.

  6. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  7. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  8. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  9. Broviac catheter infection with Kluyvera cryocrescens: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V K

    1987-01-01

    Kluyvera cryocrescens was isolated from a blood culture drawn from a patient with a Broviac catheter-related infection. K. cryocrescens has been considered an opportunistic pathogen but has not previously been associated with central venous catheter infections. PMID:3597755

  10. Broviac catheter infection with Kluyvera cryocrescens: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, V K

    1987-01-01

    Kluyvera cryocrescens was isolated from a blood culture drawn from a patient with a Broviac catheter-related infection. K. cryocrescens has been considered an opportunistic pathogen but has not previously been associated with central venous catheter infections.

  11. Toward adaptive stereotactic robotic brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Demonstration of an adaptive workflow incorporating inverse planning and an MR stealth robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUNHA, J. ADAM; HSU, I-CHOW; POULIOT, JEAN; ROACH, MACK; SHINOHARA, KATSUTO; KURHANEWICZ, JOHN; REED, GALEN; STOIANOVICI, DAN

    2011-01-01

    To translate any robot into a clinical environment, it is critical that the robot can seamlessly integrate with all the technology of a modern clinic. MRBot, an MR-stealth brachytherapy delivery device, was used in a closed-bore 3T MRI and a clinical brachytherapy cone beam CT suite. Targets included ceramic dummy seeds, MR-Spectroscopy-sensitive metabolite, and a prostate phantom. Acquired DICOM images were exported to planning software to register the robot coordinates in the imager’s frame, contour and verify target locations, create dose plans, and export needle and seed positions to the robot. The coordination of each system element (imaging device, brachytherapy planning system, robot control, robot) was validated with a seed delivery accuracy of within 2 mm in both a phantom and soft tissue. An adaptive workflow was demonstrated by acquiring images after needle insertion and prior to seed deposition. This allows for adjustment if the needle is in the wrong position. Inverse planning (IPSA) was used to generate a seed placement plan and coordinates for ten needles and 29 seeds were transferred to the robot. After every two needles placed, an image was acquired. The placed seeds were identified and validated prior to placing the seeds in the next two needles. The ability to robotically deliver seeds to locations determined by IPSA and the ability of the system to incorporate novel needle patterns were demonstrated. Shown here is the ability to overcome this critical step. An adaptive brachytherapy workflow is demonstrated which integrates a clinical anatomy-based seed location optimization engine and a robotic brachytherapy device. Demonstration of this workflow is a key element of a successful translation to the clinic of the MRI stealth robotic delivery system, MRBot. PMID:20642386

  12. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  13. A novel system for commissioning brachytherapy applicators: example of a ring applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Voncken, Robert; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-11-01

    A novel system was developed to improve commissioning and quality assurance of brachytherapy applicators used in high dose rate (HDR). It employs an imaging panel to create reference images and to measure dwell times and dwell positions. As an example: two ring applicators of the same model were evaluated. An applicator was placed on the surface of an imaging panel and a HDR 192Ir source was positioned in an imaging channel above the panel to generate an image of the applicator, using the gamma photons of the brachytherapy source. The applicator projection image was overlaid with the images acquired by capturing the gamma photons emitted by the source dwelling inside the applicator. We verified 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 cm interdwell distances for different offsets, applicator inclinations and transfer tube curvatures. The data analysis was performed using in-house developed software capable of processing the data in real time, defining catheters and creating movies recording the irradiation procedure. One applicator showed up to 0.3 cm difference from the expected position for a specific dwell position. The problem appeared intermittently. The standard deviations of the remaining dwell positions (40 measurements) were less than 0.05 cm. The second ring applicator had a similar reproducibility with absolute coordinate differences from expected values ranging from  ‑0.10 up to 0.18 cm. The curvature of the transfer tube can lead to differences larger than 0.1 cm whilst the inclination of the applicator showed a negligible effect. The proposed method allows the verification of all steps of the irradiation, providing accurate information about dwell positions and dwell times. It allows the verification of small interdwell positions (⩽0.1 cm) and reduces measurement time. In addition, no additional radiation source is necessary since the HDR 192Ir source is used to generate an image of the applicator.

  14. Characterization of a fiber-coupled Al2O3:C luminescence dosimetry system for online in vivo dose verification during 192Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus E; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Greilich, Steffen; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-03-01

    A prototype of a new dose-verification system has been developed to facilitate prevention and identification of dose delivery errors in remotely afterloaded brachytherapy. The system allows for automatic online in vivo dosimetry directly in the tumor region using small passive detector probes that fit into applicators such as standard needles or catheters. The system measures the absorbed dose rate (0.1 s time resolution) and total absorbed dose on the basis of radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from aluminum oxide crystals attached to optical fiber cables (1 mm outer diameter). The system was tested in the range from 0 to 4 Gy using a solid-water phantom, a Varian GammaMed Plus 192Ir PDR afterloader, and dosimetry probes inserted into stainless-steel brachytherapy needles. The calibrated system was found to be linear in the tested dose range. The reproducibility (one standard deviation) for RL and OSL measurements was 1.3%. The measured depth-dose profiles agreed well with the theoretical expectations computed with the EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, suggesting that the energy dependence for the dosimeter probes (relative to water) is less than 6% for source-to-probe distances in the range of 2-50 mm. Under certain conditions, the RL signal could be greatly disturbed by the so-called stem signal (i.e., unwanted light generated in the fiber cable upon irradiation). The OSL signal is not subject to this source of error. The tested system appears to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  15. Endoluminal brachytherapy for recurrent laryngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, M.M. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, (Australia). Dept of Radiotherapy; Smart, G.P.; Hedland-Thomas, B. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA, (Australia). Dept of Medical Physics; Harper, C.S. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA (Australia). Radiation Oncology Centre

    1997-11-01

    Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx is usually treated with local field radiotherapy. Surgery is used for salvage following recurrence. Further recurrences present a more difficult therapeutic problem which requires individualized management. The aims of local control, survival, maintenance of function and minimizing side effects all need to be balanced according to the site and extent of disease. The present case study looks at the management of a 54-year-old man with multiple recurrences from a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. It describes a technique of endoluminal brachytherapy using an iridium-192 wire spiraled around the outer part of a tracheotomy tube that achieves good local control while enabling self-insertion and self-cleaning during the procedure. The dose given was 2500 cGy at 5 mm over 25.2 h and was achieved with minimal early or delayed side effects. The patient had no further symptoms relating to the stomal recurrence until his death from metastatic disease 6 months later. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non-deflating Foley catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Okorie

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Most urinary catheters marketed in developing countries are unidentifiable after unpacking. A catheterization diary is a useful tool for solving catheter-related problems, and its application in health-care facilities should be encouraged. Companies marketing Foley catheters should print the catheter name on both the catheter packaging and on the catheter itself.

  17. the self retaining catheter for long term gastrostomy and cystostomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    damage the bulb of the catheter. The cuff fits firmly on the catheter, but will slide on it to adjust it to the position it is required. ABM. The Foley's catheter is inserted into the cavity (Urinary. V bladder or Stomach), in the usual method, the cuffed flange outside the skin. The balloon of the catheter is inflated as required.

  18. SU-G-201-07: Dosimetric Verification of a 3D Printed HDR Skin Brachytherapy Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, K; Stanley, D; Eng, T; Kirby, N; Gutierrez, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Baumgarten, A; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Feng, Y; Huang, Z; Ju, A [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Corbett, M [Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of radiation as a treatment modality for skin cancer has increased significantly over the last decade with standardized applicators. Utilizing 3D printing, the ability to make applicators specifically designed for each patient’s anatomy has become economically feasible. With this in mind it was the aim of this study to determine the dosimetric accuracy of a 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicator for the skin. Methods: A CT reference image was used to generate a custom applicator based on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. To create the applicator a 1cm expansion anteriorly with 0.5cmX0.5cm trenches on the outer surface that were spaced 1cm sup-inf to accommodate standard 6F flexible catheters. The applicator was printed using PLA material using a printrbot simple printer. A treatment plan optimized to deliver a clinically representative volume was created in Oncentra and delivered with a nucletron afterloader. Measurements were made using TLDs and EBT3 gafchromic film that were placed between the applicator and the phantom’s forehead. An additional piece of film was also used to qualitatively asses the dose distribution in the transverse plane. Using a standard vaginal cylinder and bolus, a standardized curve correlating TLD and film exposure-to-radiation dose was established by irradiating film to known doses (200,500,700 cGy) at a 3.5 cm radius distance. Results: Evaluated TLDs showed the absolute dose delivered to the skin surface using the 3-D printed bolus was 615cGy±6%, with a mean predicted TPS value in the measured area of 617.5±7%. Additionally, planar dose distributions had good qualitative agreement with calculated TPS isodoses. Conclusion: This work demonstrates patient specific 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicators for skin cancer treatments are practical and accurate in TPS calculations but additional measurements are needed to verify additional sites and dose at depth.

  19. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma: short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Joshi, Nikhil P; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Haresh, Kunhi P; Gupta, Subhash; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kisor

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) is a preferred treatment option over partial penectomy in selected patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma because of its organ preservation ability. Literature is mostly based on the use of low-dose-rate IBT, and experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) IBT is extremely limited. We studied the role of HDR-IBT alone in patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma. Between April 2010 and July 2013, 14 patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma were treated with HDR-IBT at our center. Size of the primary lesion ranged from 1.5 to 4.0cm. A two-to-four-plane free-hand implant was performed using plastic catheters. The prescribed dose of HDR-IBT was 42-51Gy in 14-17 fractions using twice-a-day fractionation schedule. Patients were followed up regularly for assessment of local control, survival, toxicity, and sexual function. At a median followup of 22 months, 2 patients developed recurrent disease at locoregional site. The 3-year overall survival was 83% with penis preservation rate of 93%. All patients developed acute Grade III skin toxicity that healed during 6-8-weeks time. Urethral stenosis and soft tissue necrosis was not seen in any of the patients. A total of 4 patients experienced mild asymptomatic fibrosis in the implanted area. Around 10 patients had satisfactory sexual function status at the last followup visit. Although it was a small sample size, our results have demonstrated excellent local control rate and acceptable toxicity with HDR-IBT in patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. On the experimental validation of model-based dose calculation algorithms for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Eleftherios P.; Zoros, Emmanouil; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Peppa, Vasiliki; Zourari, Kyveli; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2017-05-01

    There is an acknowledged need for the design and implementation of physical phantoms appropriate for the experimental validation of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCA) introduced recently in 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS), and this work investigates whether it can be met. A PMMA phantom was prepared to accommodate material inhomogeneities (air and Teflon), four plastic brachytherapy catheters, as well as 84 LiF TLD dosimeters (MTS-100M 1  ×  1  ×  1 mm3 microcubes), two radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT3) and a plastic 3D dosimeter (PRESAGE). An irradiation plan consisting of 53 source dwell positions was prepared on phantom CT images using a commercially available TPS and taking into account the calibration dose range of each detector. Irradiation was performed using an 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source. Dose to medium in medium, Dmm , was calculated using the MBDCA option of the same TPS as well as Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with the MCNP code and a benchmarked methodology. Measured and calculated dose distributions were spatially registered and compared. The total standard (k  =  1) spatial uncertainties for TLD, film and PRESAGE were: 0.71, 1.58 and 2.55 mm. Corresponding percentage total dosimetric uncertainties were: 5.4-6.4, 2.5-6.4 and 4.85, owing mainly to the absorbed dose sensitivity correction and the relative energy dependence correction (position dependent) for TLD, the film sensitivity calibration (dose dependent) and the dependencies of PRESAGE sensitivity. Results imply a LiF over-response due to a relative intrinsic energy dependence between 192Ir and megavoltage calibration energies, and a dose rate dependence of PRESAGE sensitivity at low dose rates (required for the full characterization of dosimeter response for 192Ir and the reduction of experimental uncertainties.

  1. Evaluation of hybrid inverse planning and optimization (HIPO) algorithm for optimization in real-time, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Shyam; Rana, Suresh; Blikenstaff, Joseph; Sadeghi, Amir; Prestidge, Bradley

    2013-07-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of the HIPO planning and optimization algorithm for real-time prostate HDR brachytherapy. This study consists of 20 patients who underwent ultrasound-based real-time HDR brachytherapy of the prostate using the treatment planning system called Oncentra Prostate (SWIFT version 3.0). The treatment plans for all patients were optimized using inverse dose-volume histogram-based optimization followed by graphical optimization (GRO) in real time. The GRO is manual manipulation of isodose lines slice by slice. The quality of the plan heavily depends on planner expertise and experience. The data for all patients were retrieved later, and treatment plans were created and optimized using HIPO algorithm with the same set of dose constraints, number of catheters, and set of contours as in the real-time optimization algorithm. The HIPO algorithm is a hybrid because it combines both stochastic and deterministic algorithms. The stochastic algorithm, called simulated annealing, searches the optimal catheter distributions for a given set of dose objectives. The deterministic algorithm, called dose-volume histogram-based optimization (DVHO), optimizes three-dimensional dose distribution quickly by moving straight downhill once it is in the advantageous region of the search space given by the stochastic algorithm. The PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100) was 97.56% and 95.38% with GRO and HIPO, respectively. The mean dose (D(mean)) and minimum dose to 10% volume (D10) for the urethra, rectum, and bladder were all statistically lower with HIPO compared to GRO using the student pair t-test at 5% significance level. HIPO can provide treatment plans with comparable target coverage to that of GRO with a reduction in dose to the critical structures.

  2. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkenhead, A; Hamlett, L; Wood, D; Choudhury, A [The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, Greater Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.

  3. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in in...

  4. PREVENTION OF CATHETER-ASSOCIATED INFECTION IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Tepaev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to an urgent issue of intensive therapy in neonatology – prevention of catheter-related blood flow infections. The article dwells upon etiological factors, formation mechanisms and modern methods of preventing colonization of central venous catheters and catheter-related infections.

  5. Misplaced left internal jugular venous catheter with an exceptional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year in the intensive care units and misplacement occurs frequently. Many critically ill patients require central venous catheterization for multiple and varied reasons. Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheter is one of the most frequent central venous catheters in ...

  6. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-25

    Nov 25, 2010 ... Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in ... urinary bladder catheter include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and lithoclast. We describe here .... 9. Stamm WE. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections: epide-.

  7. Accidental Breakage of Lumbar Epidural Catheter - Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breakage of epidural catheter is a rare occurrence with only isolated reports. Though insertion of epidural catheter is generally considered a safe procedure, breakage during removal leaving a segment in the patient's back can occur. There are many factors associated with breakage of an epidural catheter, such as the ...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  9. Management of Non- Deflating Foley Suprapubic Catheters - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The procedure described uses a 10 ml syringe and needle passed through the lumen of the catheter to puncture the inner surface of the catheter balloon and thus deflate it. Because the catheter balloon does not burst in this procedure there is no risk of balloon fragmentation or subsequent stone formation. The technique is ...

  10. 21 CFR 868.6810 - Tracheobronchial suction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheobronchial suction catheter. 868.6810... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6810 Tracheobronchial suction catheter. (a) Identification. A tracheobronchial suction catheter is a device used to aspirate liquids or...

  11. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  12. Obstruction of peritoneal dialysis catheter is associated with catheter type and independent of omentectomy: A comparative data analysis from a transplant surgical and a pediatric surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Josephine; Schild, Raphael; Reismann, Marc; Ridwelski, Robert-Richard; Kempf, Caroline; Nashan, Bjoern; Rothe, Karin; Koch, Martina

    2017-07-04

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter occlusion is a common complication with up to 36% of catheter obstructions described in the literature. We present a comparison of complications and outcome after implantation of PD catheters in a transplant surgical and a pediatric surgical department. We retrospectively analyzed 154 PD catheters, which were implanted during 2009-2015 by transplant surgeons (TS, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, n=85 catheters) and pediatric surgeons (PS, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, n=69 catheters) in 122 children (median (range) age 3.0 (0.01-17.1) years) for acute (n=65) or chronic (n=89) renal failure. All catheters were one-cuffed or double-cuffed curled catheters, except that straight catheters were implanted into smaller children (n=19) by TS in Hamburg. Patient characteristics and operation technique did not differ between the departments. Peritonitis was the most common complication (33 catheters, 21.4%). Leakage (n=18 catheters, 11.7%) occurred more often in children weighing catheters used in PS than catheters used in TS (30.4% vs. 11.8%, p=0.004). Omentectomy did not reduce the incidence of catheter obstruction (p=1.0). Perforation at the catheter tips was larger and appeared to be rougher in catheters used in PS than the catheters in TS. The type of catheter and presumably the type of perforation at the catheter tip may influence the incidence of peritoneal dialysis catheter obstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  14. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  15. electrode catheter techniques for treattnent of supraventricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome can be selectively damaged by radiofrequency energy (RP) delivered via catheters insened percutaneously without general ... drugs. Successful induction of complete hean block required the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. General anaesthesia was required because of the pain.

  16. Epidural catheter fragment entrapment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Epidural catheters are seldom difficult to remove from patients. The breakage of the catheters is uncommon, troublesome and occasionally dangerous. "n"nCase presentation: A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 17 year-old man for applying anesthesia for internal fixation of femur fracture and subsequent postoperative epidural analgesia. In the third postoperative day, during unsuccessful attempt for removing the catheter, it was broken and was retained in his back. A CT- scan was performed and shows a fragment of catheter in the sub- laminar ligament between L3 and L4 without any connection with epidural space. As the patient had no complaint the fractured fragment was left in site and he was just followed up in the clinic."n"nConclusion: The knowledge of practical method in locating the retained epidural catheter, and the indication for surgical removal are very important. CT- scan is useful in showing the mechanism and locating the epidural catheter entrapment and facilitating surgical follow-up.

  17. Spinal anaesthesia for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting and subjects: Forty female patients, presenting to Groote Schuur Hospital for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix, were randomised to receive either 5 mg or 9 mg (1 ml or 1.8 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, plus 15 μg fentanyl via the L3/L4 interspace. Results: Patients receiving the lower dose could be ...

  18. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes...

  19. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate

  20. Calculation of the Transit Dose in HDR Brachytherapy Based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Monte Carlo method, which is the gold standard for accurate dose calculations in radiotherapy, was used to obtain the transit doses around a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant with thirteen dwell points. The midpoints of each of the inter-dwell separations, of step size 0.25 cm, were representative of the ...

  1. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  2. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD...

  3. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  4. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A; Smith, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast brachytherapy after lumpectomy is controversial in younger patients, as effectiveness is unclear and selection criteria are debated. Methods Using MarketScan® healthcare claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (ages 18–64), treated from 2003–2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3,134) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups, based on age (Agebrachytherapy vs. WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: In patients Agebrachytherapy patients were Agebrachytherapy patients were Endocrine- vs. 44% of WBI patients (P=0.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Agebrachytherapy vs. 9.0% after WBI (Hazard ratio[HR]=2.18, 1.37–3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs. 4.9%; HR=1.76, 1.26–2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Agebrachytherapy vs. WBI and therefore may be useful for selecting appropriate younger brachytherapy candidates. PMID:26279027

  5. Balloon catheter versus basket catheter for endoscopic bile duct stone extraction: a multicenter randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Hisai, Hiroyuki; Yane, Kei; Onodera, Manabu; Eto, Kazunori; Haba, Shin; Okuda, Toshinori; Ihara, Hideyuki; Kukitsu, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Ryusuke; Kitaoka, Keisuke; Sonoda, Tomoko; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Endoscopic bile duct stone (BDS) removal is a well-established treatment; however, the preference for basket or balloon catheters for extraction is operator-dependent. We therefore conducted a multicenter prospective randomized trial to compare catheter performance. We enrolled patients with a BDS diameter ≤ 10 mm and common bile duct diameter ≤ 15 mm. Participants were randomly assigned to groups that were treated with basket or balloon catheters between October 2013 and September 2014. The primary endpoint was the rate of complete clearance of the duct; the secondary endpoints were the rate and time to complete clearance in one endoscopic session. We initially enrolled 172 consecutive patients; 14 were excluded after randomization. The complete clearance rates were 92.3 % (72/78) in the balloon group and 80.0 % (64 /80) in the basket group. The difference in the rates between the two groups was 12.3 percentage points, indicating non-inferiority of the balloon method (non-inferiority limit -10 %; P BDSs ≤ 10 mm, complete endoscopic treatment with a single catheter is more likely when choosing a balloon catheter over a basket catheter.University Hospital Medical Information Network Trials Registry: UMIN000011887. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Erickson, Beth A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Small, William; Eifel, Patricia J

    Brachytherapy is the use of radionuclides to treat malignancies or benign conditions by means of a radiation source placed close to or into the tumor or treatment site. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclide brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has traditionally been used for treating prostate, head and neck, breast, cervical, and endometrial cancers as well as obstructive bile duct, esophageal, or bronchial lesions. It has been practiced for over a century with a variety of sources including radium-226, cesium-137, and, more recently, iridium- 192, iodine-125, and palladium-103. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy can be given as interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and/or plesiotherapy to a wide variety of treatment sites. This practice parameter addresses sealed sources as they are used for LDR brachytherapy. It is recognized that unsealed sources (e.g., yttrium-90) are also a form of LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Repositioning of malpositioned or flipped central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Vogl, T.J. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Central Radiology Clinic, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Primary misplaced or secondary flipped implanted catheters are located mostly in the right jugular vein. We demonstrate an effective method to replace fix implanted catheters such as Ports, Grochomg or Hickman catheters. Using a femoral venous approach, replacement into the superior vena cava can easily be done with a Sidewinder 1 catheter which is hooked over the misplaced central venous approach. In all our patients the method was successful. The repositioning technique described is simple, fast and has low costs. We can keep sterile conditions and do not need to solve the catheters' fixation. (orig.)

  8. Catheter tip erosion due to Rotablator burr: An unusual complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Christopher; Schurtz, Guillaume; Lemesle, Gilles; Sudre, Arnaud; Van Belle, Eric; Delhaye, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    We report the occurrence of catheter tip erosion during use of a Rotablator, a rare but serious complication. A heavily calcified lesion of the right coronary artery ostium required use of a Rotablator, and the need for strong push led to the choice of an Amplatz Left guiding catheter. The traction of the catheter toward the ostium and the subsequent angle generated led to friction of the burr against the catheter and the erosion of its tip. If judged essential to get strong support, the Amplatz catheter should be used with caution in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  10. Breakage of a catheter in the epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbardelotto, Cristian; Yoshimi, Mauro Matsumoto; Pereira, Raquel da Rocha; de Castro, Renato Almeida Couto

    2008-01-01

    Breakage of epidural catheters during their removal is rare, but it has been described. The anesthesiologist should be aware of the complications and proper handling of those catheters. The objective of this report was to present a case of breakage of an epidural catheter in labor analgesia. A 33-year old female, gravida II, I delivery, was admitted to the maternity ward in labor. After two hours, the patient requested analgesia. On physical exam, the patient was in labor, with cervical dilation of 5 cm, regular uterine dynamics, broken amniotic membrane, and pain of 10 by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Labor analgesia was instituted using combined double puncture technique. During labor evolution, one analgesia complementation through the catheter. Catheter removal was somewhat difficult, leading to breakage of the catheter. Axial CT and X-ray of the lumbar spine did not show the fragment of the catheter. Since the patient was asymptomatic, without signs of radicular irritation, pain, or infection, proper precautions were taken and the patient was discharged from the hospital. Epidural catheters in the lumbar region are, occasionally, hard to remove. Factors that increase the chances of knot formation and the risk of breakage of catheters were listed. In the present case, one of the main factors was the excessive introduction of the epidural catheter. Luckily, neurologic complications are even less frequent, and applying gentle traction, in the absence of paresthesias, the catheter is usually successfully removed.

  11. Surgical resection and permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kim; Sneed, Penny K; Kunwar, Sandeep; Kragten, Annemarie; Larson, David A; Berger, Mitchel S; Chan, Albert; Pouliot, Jean; McDermott, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of surgical resection and permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy without adjuvant whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. Forty patients were treated with permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy at the time of resection of brain metastases from 1997 to 2003. Actuarial freedom from progression (FFP) and survival were measured from the date of surgery and estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with censoring at last imaging for FFP endpoints. The median survival was 11.3 months overall, 12.0 months in 19 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases and 7.3 months in 21 patients with recurrent brain metastases. Twenty-two patients (55%) remained free of progression of brain metastases, three failed at the resection cavity (including one with leptomeningeal dissemination), two failed with leptomeningeal spread only, and 13 failed elsewhere in the brain including two who also had leptomeningeal disease. The 1-year resection cavity FFP probabilities were 92%, 86% and 88%; and brain FFP probabilities were 29%, 43% and 37% for the newly diagnosed, recurrent and all patients, respectively. Symptomatic necrosis developed 7.4-40.0 months (median, 19.5 months) after brachytherapy in 9 patients (23%), confirmed by resection in 6 patients. Excellent local control was achieved using permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain metastasis resection cavities, although there is a high risk of radiation necrosis over time. These data support consideration of permanent brachytherapy without adjuvant WBRT as a treatment option in patients with symptomatic or large newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases.

  12. The bowed catheter sign: a risk for pericardial tamponade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Richard [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The use of a central venous catheter (CVC) has become commonplace in the care of children with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. Complications resulting from the insertion of these catheters are well recognized and can be life-threatening. When a temporary CVC or other catheter is inserted into the central venous system it is secured to the skin with a combination of sutures and sterile dressing. This fixes the catheter in place and does not allow it to retract, thereby putting pressure on the right atrial wall via the catheter tip if it is too long. The probability of wall penetration is increased if a catheter or device is tapered at the point of contact. The purpose of this case report is to present the bowed catheter sign and to review the anatomy of the cavotricuspid isthmus, a possible predisposing factor to cardiac perforation and tamponade. (orig.)

  13. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T. [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  14. Evaluation of complications and feasibility of indwelling epidural catheter use for post-operative pain control in dogs in the home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L R; McAbee, K P; Stephenson, N; Stanke, N J; Booms, M L; Degner, D D

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the use of indwelling epidural catheters post-operatively in dogs in a home environment, and to report associated complications. Dogs undergoing surgical procedures of the hind limb (n=83) were included in the study and were administered 0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg epidural morphine via an indwelling epidural catheter every 6 hours. Data compiled relating to catheter placement included time of placement, ease of placement and problems encountered, number of attempts of placement, and individual placing the catheter. A client questionnaire was provided to evaluate side effects, complications, pain, and ease of use of the epidural catheter system after discharge from the hospital and catheter removal at home. Side effects were compared between the dogs receiving 0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg epidural morphine. The most common patient complication was abnormal urination patterns (32/82, 39%); specifically dribbling urine where laying, emptying the entire bladder where laying, not urinating for extended periods of time, and taking a longer time to pass urine were reported. There were no significant differences in the number or types of side effects reported in either dosing group. The most common technical issues reported by owners were difficulty getting the needle into the injection port (10/81, 12%) and removing the adhesive covering keeping the epidural catheter system in place (19/78, 24%). There were no reports of inflammation or discharge at the catheter site in any of the dogs. Of the respondents surveyed, 76/79 (97%) found the epidural catheter system easy to use at home in the post-operative period. Indwelling epidural catheters are a feasible method of administration of post-operative analgesia in the immediate post-operative period in the home environment and were associated with only a few minor complications in this population.

  15. Successful catheter ablation of premature ventricular contractions originating from the tricuspid annulus using a Halo-type catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takumi; Allison, Jeffery Scott; McElderry, Hugh Thomas; Doppalapudi, Harish; Epstein, Andrew E; Plumb, Vance J; Kay, George Neal

    2008-10-01

    A 31-year-old woman with idiopathic premature ventricular contractions originating from the tricuspid annulus (TA) underwent electrophysiological testing. Activation mapping with a 20-pole bipolar Halo-type catheter positioned along the TA revealed the earliest ventricular activation at a site between 7 and 8 o'clock along the TA. A reversal in the polarity of the local ventricular electrograms was observed between the two neighbouring electrode pairs of the TA catheter. Successful catheter ablation was achieved at the ventricular site between those electrode pairs. A Halo-type catheter may be effective for mapping and catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias originating from the TA.

  16. Thermal dosimetry analysis combined with patient-specific thermal modeling of clinical interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia integrated within HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Scott, Serena; Hsu, I. C.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    This study presents thermal dosimetry analysis from clinical treatments where ultrasound hyperthermia (HT) was administered following high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer as part of a clinical pilot study. HT was administered using ultrasound applicators from within multiple 13-g brachytherapy catheters implanted along the posterior periphery of the prostate. The heating applicators were linear arrays of sectored tubular transducers (˜7 MHz), with independently powered array elements enabling energy deposition with 3D spatial control. Typical heat treatments employed time-averaged peak acoustic intensities of 1 - 3 W/cm2 and lasted for 60 - 70 minutes. Throughout the treatments, temperatures at multiple points were monitored using multi-junction thermocouples, placed within available brachytherapy catheters throughout mid-gland prostate and identified as the hyperthermia target volume (HTV). Clinical constraints allowed placement of 8 - 12 thermocouple sensors in the HTV and patient-specific 3D thermal modeling based on finite element methods (FEM) was used to supplement limited thermometry. Patient anatomy, heating device positions, orientations, and thermometry junction locations were obtained from patient CT scans and HDR and hyperthermia planning software. The numerical models utilized the applied power levels recorded during the treatments. Tissue properties such as perfusion and acoustic absorption were varied within physiological ranges such that squared-errors between measured and simulated temperatures were minimized. This data-fitting was utilized for 6 HT treatments to estimate volumetric temperature distributions achieved in the HTV and surrounding anatomy devoid of thermocouples. For these treatments, the measured and simulated T50 values in the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) were between 40.1 - 43.9 °C and 40.3 - 44.9 °C, respectively. Maximum temperatures between 46.8 - 49.8 °C were measured during

  17. SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therriault-Proulx, F; Bruno, T; Beddar, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec, Quebec, QC, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate in a water phantom the use of plastic scintillation detectors to measure dose to the urethra and the rectal wall during a clinically realistic low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy implant. Methods: A template was designed to replicate a clinically realistic LDR brachytherapy prostate implant inside a water phantom. Twenty-two catheters were inserted, including one mimicking the urethra and another the rectal wall. The needles inserted in the remaining 20 catheters were composed of thin-walled nylon tubes in which I-125 radioactive seeds (Air Kerma Strengths of (0.328±0.020)U) were abutted together with plastic spacers to replicate a typical loading. A plastic scintillation detector (PSD) with a 5-mm long × 1-mm diameter sensitive element was first placed inside the urethra and 1-second measurements were performed for 60s after each needle implant. Measurements were also performed at multiple positions along the urethra once all the needles were inserted. The procedure was then repeated with the PSD placed at the rectal wall. Results: Individual dose-rates ranging from 0.07µGy/s to 1.5µGy/s were measured after each needle implant. The average absolute relative differences were (6.2±3.6)% and (6.9±6.5)% to the values calculated with the TG-43 formalism, for the urethra and rectal wall respectively. These results are within expectations from the error uncertainty budget once accounting for uncertainties in seeds’ strength and positioning. Interestingly, the PSD allowed for unplanned error detection as the study was performed. Finally, the measured dose after the full implant at different positions along the mimicked organs at risk were in agreement with TG-43 values for all of the positions tested. Conclusion: Plastic scintillation detectors could be used as in vivo detectors for LDR brachytherapy as they would provide accurate dose information after each needle implant as well as along the organs at risk at the end of the implant.

  18. SU-F-BRA-11: An Experimental Commissioning Test of Brachytherapy MBDCA Dosimetry, Based On a Commercial Radiochromic Gel/optical CT System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, E; Karaiskos, P; Zourari, K; Peppa, V; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a 3D dose verification procedure of Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs) for {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy, based on a novel Ferrous Xylenol-orange gel (FXG) and optical CT read-out. Methods: The TruView gel was employed for absolute dosimetry in conjunction with cone-beam optical CT read-out with the VISTA scanner (both from Modus Medical Inc, London, ON, Canada). A multi-catheter skin flap was attached to a cylindrical PETE jar (d=9.6cm, h=16cm) filled with FXG, which served as both the dosimeter and the water equivalent phantom of bounded dimensions. X- ray CT image series of the jar with flap attached was imported to Oncentra Brachy v.4.5. A treatment plan consisting of 8 catheters and 56 dwell positions was generated, and Oncentra-ACE MBDCA as well as TG43 dose results were exported for further evaluation. The irradiation was carried out with a microSelecton v2 source. The FXG dose-response, measured via an electron irradiation of a second dosimeter from the same batch, was linear (R2>0.999) at least up to 12Gy. A MCNP6 input file was prepared from the DICOM-RT plan data using BrachyGuide to facilitate Monte Carlo (MC) simulation dosimetry in the actual experimental geometry. Agreement between experimental (reference) and calculated dose distributions was evaluated using the 3D gamma index (GI) method with criteria (5%-2mm applied locally) determined from uncertainty analysis. Results: The TG-43 GI failed, as expected, in the majority of voxels away from the flap (pass rate 59% for D>0.8Gy, corresponding to 10% of prescribed dose). ACE performed significantly better (corresponding pass rate 92%). The GI evaluation for the MC data (corresponding pass rate 97%) failed mainly at low dose points of increased uncertainty. Conclusion: FXG gel/optical CT is an efficient method for level-2 commissioning of brachytherapy MBDCAs. Target dosimetry is not affected from uncertainty introduced by TG43 assumptions in 192Ir skin brachytherapy

  19. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    OpenAIRE

    Susovan Banerjee; Tejinder Kataria; Deepak Gupta; Shikha Goyal; Shyam Singh Bisht; Trinanjan Basu; Ashu Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of br...

  20. Preliminary report of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy in head-and-neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemlewski, A.; Zienkiewicz, J. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Serkies, K.; Badzio, A. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and acute/delayed toxicity of pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR BT) in head-and-neck tumors. Patients and Methods: 45 head and neck cancer patients underwent interstitial or contact PDR BT at a dose of 10.2-70 Gy (median, 70 Gy) and 0.6 or 1.0 Gy/pulse/h. 42 patients were administered BT as part of their curative treatment; 32 of them had sole BT. Three reirradiated patients with recurrent tumor had palliative BT. Results: PDR BT was well tolerated. Intense bleeding was the only complication associated with catheter removal from the tongue and bucca. 44 patients who completed BT experienced acute mucositis. Grade 3 toxicity of skin and oral mucosa occurred in three (6.8%) and six patients (13.6%), respectively. At a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 2-67 months), late serious toxicity (grade 4, for soft tissue and bone) was seen in seven patients (15.9%). Among the parameters analyzed, only dental care performed before BT had a significant impact on mucosal side effects. Acute severe mucositis was observed in 23% of patients without dental care compared to 0% of those with dental care (p = 0.044). Late severe mucositis occurred in 17.7% and 26.9% of the respective patients (p = 0.035), overall in 23%. The larger the volume encompassed by the reference isodose, the more late (p = 0.004) mucosal reactions were observed. Conclusion: PDR BT continued over a few days is a feasible and safe approach in head-and-neck tumors; however, it is accompanied by some toxicity. Dental care should precede isotope application. (orig.)

  1. Second salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for radiorecurrent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metha Maenhout

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Salvage treatments for localized radiorecurrent prostate cancer can be performed safely when a focal and image guided approach is used. Due to the low toxicity, the opportunity exists to investigate a second salvage treatment when a second locally recurrent prostate cancer occurs. Here, we describe a second salvage treatment procedure of 4 patients. Material and methods : Four patients with a pathologically proven second local recurrence were treated in an outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided setting with a single fraction of 19 Gy focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Delineation was performed using choline-PET-CT or a 68Ga-PSMA PET in combination with multiparametric 3 Tesla MRI in all four patients. Toxicity was measured using common toxicity criteria for adverse events (CTCAE version 4.0. Results : With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-15, there were 2 patients with biochemical recurrence as defined by the Phoenix-definition. There were no patients with grade 3 or more toxicity. In all second salvage HDR-BT treatments, the constraints for rectum, bladder, and urethra were met. Median treatment volume (GTV was 4.8 cc (range, 1.9-6.6 cc. A median of 8 catheters (range, 6-9 were used, and the median dose to the treatment volume (GTV was a D95: 19.3 Gy (SD 15.5-19.4 Gy. Conclusions : Second focal salvage MRI-guided HDR-BT for a select group of patients with a second locally recurrent prostate cancer is feasible. There was no grade 3 or more acute toxicity for these four patients.

  2. An augmented reality system for patient-specific guidance of cardiac catheter ablation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Stijn; Maes, Frederik; Ector, Joris; Bogaert, Jan; Dymarkowski, Steven; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2005-11-01

    We present a system to assist in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias by catheter ablation. A patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical model, constructed from magnetic resonance images, is merged with fluoroscopic images in an augmented reality environment that enables the transfer of electrocardiography (ECG) measurements and cardiac activation times onto the model. Accurate mapping is realized through the combination of: a new calibration technique, adapted to catheter guided treatments; a visual matching registration technique, allowing the electrophysiologist to align the model with contrast-enhanced images; and the use of virtual catheters, which enable the annotation of multiple ECG measurements on the model. These annotations can be visualized by color coding on the patient model. We provide an accuracy analysis of each of these components independently. Based on simulation and experiments, we determined a segmentation error of 0.6 mm, a calibration error in the order of 1 mm and a target registration error of 1.04 +/- 0.45 mm. The system provides a 3-D visualization of the cardiac activation pattern which may facilitate and improve diagnosis and treatment of the arrhytmia. Because of its low cost and similar advantages we believe our approach can compete with existing commercial solutions, which rely on dedicated hardware and costly catheters. We provide qualitative results of the first clinical use of the system in 11 ablation procedures.

  3. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  5. Enterobacter cloacae multidrug-resistant: a case report of nosocomial urinary catheter-associated infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino De Conno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterobacter species, particularly E. cloacae and E. aerogenes, are important nosocomial pathogenes responsible for various infections.We report a 70-y-old patient with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI caused by a nosocomial Enterobacter cloacae with multidrug-resistance.The identification of isolates from clinical culture and the study of pattern antimicrobial susceptibility were performed to the clinical risolution of the patient’s disease.The initial empirical antimicrobial therapy resulted ineffective.

  6. Enterobacter cloacae multidrug-resistant: a case report of nosocomial urinary catheter-associated infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dino De Conno; Antonietta Palumbo; Mario Zeoli

    2008-01-01

    Enterobacter species, particularly E. cloacae and E. aerogenes, are important nosocomial pathogenes responsible for various infections.We report a 70-y-old patient with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by a nosocomial Enterobacter cloacae with multidrug-resistance.The identification of isolates from clinical culture and the study of pattern antimicrobial susceptibility were performed to the clinical risolution of the patient’s disease.The initial empirical antimicrobia...

  7. Skin and chest wall dose with multi-catheter and MammoSite breast brachytherapy: Implications for late toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttino, Laurie W; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Miheala; Arthur, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) continues to increase in popularity. Up to 14% of patients treated with the MammoSite (MS) report some degree of chronic pain, which may be related to chest wall toxicity. Reports from several institutions using the multicatheter (MC) technique have not shown associated elevated chest wall toxicity. Additionally, a recent investigation has suggested that increased toxicity may occur with the MS when the dose to the chest wall exceeds 125% of the prescribed dose. This investigation compares the skin and chest wall doses of a cohort of patients treated with the MC technique to a group treated with the MS. The dosimetric data for 43 patients treated with the MC technique and 83 patients treated with the MS at Virginia Commonwealth University were reviewed. This cohort represents consecutively treated patients from our most recent experience to minimize any learning curve effect on dosimetry. Plans were generated using 3D software (Brachyvision, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Multiple dwell positions were used for all MS patients to optimize dose delivery. The minimum distances from the planning target volume to the skin and chest wall were calculated, as well as the maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall. The mean skin distances for patients treated with the MC technique and the MS were 0.5 and 0.9cm, respectively (pskin distance, the mean skin dose for the MC technique was only 2.3Gy per fraction (67% of prescription dose). The mean skin dose for the MS was 3.2Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose, pskin dose for the MS was 3.6Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose, pskin doses in excess of 125% for the MC and MS were 0% and 9.6%, respectively. The percentage of patients receiving chest wall doses in excess of 125% for the MC and MS were 0% and 38.6%, respectively. The MC technique results in more conformal dose delivery, with significantly lower mean skin and chest wall doses. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or chest wall in excess of 125% of the prescription. Given the limited followup available for the MS, and the significant dose delivered to the chest wall, the use of this device may be associated with a higher incidence of late chest wall toxicity than previously expected.

  8. Sodium citrate versus heparin catheter locks for cuffed central venous catheters: a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Albert; Duncan, Neill; Singh, Seema K; Brown, Wendy; Dalby, Elizabeth; Edwards, Claire; Lynch, Kathleen; Prout, Virginia; Cairns, Tom; Griffith, Megan; McLean, Adam; Palmer, Andrew; Taube, David

    2009-06-01

    Sodium citrate has antibacterial and anticoagulant properties that are confined to the catheter when used as a catheter lock. Studies of its use as a catheter lock have suggested its efficacy in preventing infection and bleeding complications compared with sodium heparin. Open-label randomized controlled trial of 2 catheter locks to examine the hypothesis that sodium citrate catheter locks will reduce catheter-related bacteremia and exit-site infection. 232 consenting long-term hemodialysis patients in 4 satellite dialysis units to a large dialysis program with protocolized treatment and targets. All patients were using twin-catheter single-lumen Tesio-Caths (MedComp, Harleysville, PA). 6 months' use of 46.7% sodium citrate (citrate) or 5% heparin (heparin) locked postdialysis in the dead space of the central venous catheter. Primary end point of catheter-related bacteremia and exit-site infection. Secondary end points of catheter thrombosis defined by the use of urokinase lock and infusion, new catheter insertion, catheter-related admission, blood transfusions, parenteral iron, and erythropoietin requirements. Catheter-related bacteremia did not differ in the 2 groups, with an incidence of 0.7 events/1,000 catheter-days. There was no significant difference in rates of exit-site infection (0.7 versus 0.5 events/1,000 catheter-days; P = 0.5). The secondary end point of catheter thrombosis defined by the use of a urokinase lock was significantly more common in the citrate group, with an incidence of 8 versus 4.3/1,000 catheter-days (P < 0.001). Other secondary end points did not differ. Citrate treatment was curtailed compared with heparin because of a greater incidence of adverse events, with a mean treatment duration before withdrawal of 4.8 +/- 2.0 versus 5.7 +/- 1.2 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Low baseline catheter-related bacteremia and exit-site infection event rates may have underpowered this study. High adverse-event rates may have been related to high

  9. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  10. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  11. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  12. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line.