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Sample records for brachytherapy catheter patterns

  1. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V100Prostate>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V75Bladder75Rectum125Urethra<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may

  2. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  3. Dosimetric equivalence of non-standard high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy catheter patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative HDR prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Methods: Prostate HDR brachytherapy uses a grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. On CT data from ten previously-treated patients new catheters were digitized following three catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a p...

  4. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Samia de Freitas Brandao; Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted int...

  5. Fricke gel dosimetric catheters in high dose rate brachytherapy. In phantom dose distribution measurements of a 5 catheter implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the complexity and the many steps involved in a high dose rate brachytherapy process, radiation dose delivered to the patient during the treatment is susceptible to many inaccuracies and may not accurately match the planned dose. In vivo dosimetry is a reliable solution to compare planned and delivered dose distributions, representing therefore a valid tool to systematically perform a quality control of the radiotherapic process and eventually increment treatment accuracy. In this study, Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) were investigated to perform dose distribution measurements of a brachytherapy implant. The brachytherapy implant was established in a water phantom with five flexible plastic needles and irradiation was performed with a high dose rate remote afterloading device provided with an Ir-192 radioactive source. Comparison between dose distributions measured with ten FGDC located in the proximity of the implant needles and calculated by the treatment planning system shows very good agreement for seven out of ten dosimeters, whereas the remaining three show a local underestimation of the dose. In phantom results indicate that Fricke gel dosimetric catheters might be valid candidates for performing in vivo dosimetry in high dose rate brachytherapy. However, further measurements are still required to validate this dosimetric method.

  6. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  7. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  8. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /1 and /2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /1 and /2 infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  9. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  10. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the prostate and cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-03-01

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed and is being evaluated in a clinical pilot study for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy in the treatment of cervix and prostate. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length × 180 deg and 3-4 cm × 360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers × dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and six prostate implants. 100 % of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target

  11. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O' Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  12. A system to use electromagnetic tracking for the quality assurance of brachytherapy catheter digitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using electromagnetic tracking (EMT), post-processing and an error-detection algorithm for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter digitization for treatment planning. Methods: EMT was used to localize 15 catheters inserted into a phantom using a stepwise acquisition technique. Five distinct acquisition experiments were performed. Noise associated with the acquisition was calculated. The dwell location configuration was extracted from the EMT data. A CT scan of the phantom was performed, and five distinct catheter digitization sessions were performed. No a priori registration of the CT scan coordinate system with the EMT coordinate system was performed. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT), and rigid registration was performed between EMT and CT dwell positions. EMT registration error was characterized in terms of the mean and maximum distance between corresponding EMT and CT dwell positions per catheter. An algorithm for error detection and identification was presented. Three types of errors were systematically simulated: swap of two catheter numbers, partial swap of catheter number identification for parts of the catheters (mix), and catheter-tip shift. Error-detection sensitivity (number of simulated scenarios correctly identified as containing an error/number of simulated scenarios containing an error) and specificity (number of scenarios correctly identified as not containing errors/number of correct scenarios) were calculated. Catheter identification sensitivity (number of catheters correctly identified as erroneous across all scenarios/number of erroneous catheters across all scenarios) and specificity (number of catheters correctly identified as correct across all scenarios/number of correct catheters across all scenarios) were calculated. The mean detected and identified shift was calculated. Results: The

  13. A system to use electromagnetic tracking for the quality assurance of brachytherapy catheter digitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, Antonio L., E-mail: adamato@lroc.harvard.edu; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Don, Sarah M.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using electromagnetic tracking (EMT), post-processing and an error-detection algorithm for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter digitization for treatment planning. Methods: EMT was used to localize 15 catheters inserted into a phantom using a stepwise acquisition technique. Five distinct acquisition experiments were performed. Noise associated with the acquisition was calculated. The dwell location configuration was extracted from the EMT data. A CT scan of the phantom was performed, and five distinct catheter digitization sessions were performed. No a priori registration of the CT scan coordinate system with the EMT coordinate system was performed. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT), and rigid registration was performed between EMT and CT dwell positions. EMT registration error was characterized in terms of the mean and maximum distance between corresponding EMT and CT dwell positions per catheter. An algorithm for error detection and identification was presented. Three types of errors were systematically simulated: swap of two catheter numbers, partial swap of catheter number identification for parts of the catheters (mix), and catheter-tip shift. Error-detection sensitivity (number of simulated scenarios correctly identified as containing an error/number of simulated scenarios containing an error) and specificity (number of scenarios correctly identified as not containing errors/number of correct scenarios) were calculated. Catheter identification sensitivity (number of catheters correctly identified as erroneous across all scenarios/number of erroneous catheters across all scenarios) and specificity (number of catheters correctly identified as correct across all scenarios/number of correct catheters across all scenarios) were calculated. The mean detected and identified shift was calculated. Results: The

  14. Near-catheter dosimetry of a HDR brachytherapy source using Gafchromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy treatments can be delivered using as few as one or two afterloading catheters, delivering doses of up to 10 Gy at 10 mm, leading to high dose gradients and extreme hot spots close to the catheter. These conditions have the potential to damage the patient's health tissues, possibly leading to necrosis, or even death from uncontrolled bleeding. Ionisation chambers and solid state detectors are limited in their usefulness for near-catheter dosimetry because of their physical size and in some cases energy and dose rate dependence. In contrast, radiochromic film has a large dose–response range, excellent spatial resolution, near-energy independence for megavoltage photons and the ability to measure dose in two dimensions, making it ideal for this application. The aim of this study was to measure the location and relative magnitude of any dosimetric hot spots produced by a typical endobronchial treatment plan. The study also investigated the effect of the step size of the 192Ir source on both the dose hot spots and dose distribution. Our measurements show that for a typical single catheter treatment with 2.5 mm step size the maximum dose hot spots at the catheter surface are up to 37 times the prescription dose, up to 40 times for a 5 mm step size, and up to 46 times for a 10 mm step size. It is important that brachytherapy clinicians and physicists understand that hot spot magnitude increases with source step sizes and are aware of the risks associated with this form of brachytherapy treatment.

  15. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  16. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators

  17. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-09-01

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length×180 deg and 3-4 cm×360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  18. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm lengthx180 deg and 3-4 cmx360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  19. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Brachytherapy What is Brachytherapy and how is it used? ... will I feel during this procedure? What is brachytherapy and how is it used? Brachytherapy is a ...

  20. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institute / Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pan, L; Gilson, W [Siemens Corporation, Corporate Technology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Seethamraju, R [Siemens Healthcare, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  1. Dose effects of guide wires for catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Guide wires with high torquability and steerability are commonly used to navigate through a tortuous and/or branching arterial tree in a catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy procedure. The dosimetric effects due to the presence of metallic guide wires have not been addressed. This work investigates these dose effects for the three most commonly used β and γ sources (90Sr, 32P, and 192Ir). Methods and Materials: The EGS4 Monte Carlo codes were used to calculate the dose distributions for the 90Sr(NOVOSTE), 32P (Guidant), and 192Ir (BEST Ind.) with and without a guide wire in place. Energy spectra for particles exiting the sources were calculated from the full phase-space data obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations of the source constructions. Guide wires of various thicknesses and compositions were studied. Results: The dose perturbations due to the presence of guide wires were found to be far more significant for the 90Sr/90Y and 32P beta sources than those for the 192Ir gamma source. Because of the attenuation by the guide wires, a dose reduction of up to 60% behind a guide wire was observed for the beta sources, whereas the dose perturbation was found to be negligible for the γ source. For a β source, the dose perturbations depend on the thickness and the material of the guide wire. When the region behind a guide wire is part of an intravascular brachytherapy target, the presence of the guide wire results in a significant underdosing for β sources. The underdosed region can extend a few mm behind the guide wire and up to 1 mm in other directions. Conclusion: Significant dose perturbations by the presence of a metallic guide wire have been found in catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy using β sources. The dose effects should be considered in the dose prescription and/or in analyzing the treatment outcome for β sources. Such precautions are not necessary if using a gamma source

  2. 166Ho labelled DTPA derivative for radiation brachytherapy using catheter balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Brachytherapy is one of the effective treatments for in-stent restenosis. Filling the dilatation catheter balloon with radioactive solutions has the advantages of an accurate source positioning and uniform dose delivery to the vessel walls. In addition, it can be used easily with an existing catheter. Moreover, a solution based beta ray source allows for the treatment of large vessels. Of the variety of radioisotopes prepared in a soluble form for use as a liquid radiation source, Ho-166 is a good radioisotope, because it can be readily produced by irradiating a natural Ho target using a low or medium flux research reactor (165Ho has 100% natural abundance). For X ray imaging, various iodinated X ray contrast agents having the 1,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid platform are used, mainly for computed tomography (CT) and angiographic applications. In the present study, we prepared a new DTPA bisamide derivative, DTPA-BTIPA (3-amino- 2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid) containing iodine in the structure. 166Ho was labeled with DTPA-BTIPA as a possible agent for IVRT for the prevention of restenisis. The optimum condition of the radiolabeling of DTPA-BTIPA with Ho-166 was achieved by varying different reaction parameters. To estimate the 166Ho-complex as a liquid radiation source for a potential clinical application of IVRT, which is readily excreted through the urinary system in the event of a balloon rupture, a dynamic imaging was acquired. 166Ho-(DTPA- BTIPA) was prepared by a simple mixing at room temperature. High radiochemical stability (>98%) was maintained over a period of 6 h at room temperature. The radioactivity curve in the kidneys of the rabbit administered with 166Ho-(DTPA-BTIPA) via an ear vein showed that the 166Ho-(DTPA- BTIPA) was rapidly cleared through the kidneys. The average of Tmax and T1/2 of 166Ho-(DTPA-BTIPA) in the kidneys were 2.26 ± 0.78 min and 7.80 ± 1.16 min, respectively. The serial static image scans of the rabbit administered with 166

  3. Real-time inverse high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning with catheter optimization by compressed sensing-inspired optimization strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, C. V.; Aschenbrenner, K. P.; Müller, R.; Polster, L.; Cormack, R. A.; Hesser, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that optimization strategies derived from the field of compressed sensing (CS) improve computational performance in inverse treatment planning (ITP) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following an approach applied to low-dose-rate brachytherapy, we developed a reformulation of the ITP problem with the same mathematical structure as standard CS problems. Two greedy methods, derived from hard thresholding and subspace pursuit are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art ITP solvers. Applied to clinical prostate brachytherapy plans speed-up by a factor of 56–350 compared to state-of-the-art methods. Based on a Wilcoxon signed rank-test the novel method statistically significantly decreases the final objective function value (p  optimization times were below one second and thus planing can be considered as real-time capable. The novel CS inspired strategy enables real-time ITP for HDR brachytherapy including catheter optimization. The generated plans are either clinically equivalent or show a better performance with respect to dosimetric measures.

  4. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  5. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttino, Laurie W., E-mail: lcuttino@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Onoclogy, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas [Allegheny Hospital, Temple School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  6. Characterisation of a Fricke gel compound adopted to produce dosimetric catheters for in vivo dose measurements in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses delivered to the patient during high dose rate brachytherapy treatments are susceptible to many inaccuracies and may not accurately match the planned doses. Novel Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) were developed in the laboratory to be used for in vivo measurements of high dose rate brachytherapy treatments and represent possible tools to increase treatment accuracy. In this study, the dosimetric compound adopted to achieve FGDC was studied in terms of dose sensitivity and linearity, and some potentialities and limits of its application were investigated. Results show that at doses higher than 400 cGy, the dosimeter response is linear with the delivered dose until a saturation effect is observed at doses higher than 2800 cGy. However, saturation is reached at lower doses as well with dose rates higher than 400 cGy/min.

  7. Characterisation of a Fricke gel compound adopted to produce dosimetric catheters for in vivo dose measurements in HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrara, M. [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Gambarini, G., E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it [Physics Department, Universita degli Studi, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Borroni, M.; Tomatis, S. [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Negri, A. [Physics Department, Universita degli Studi, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Pirola, L. [Physics Department, Universita degli Studi, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Cerrotta, A.; Fallai, C. [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Zonca, G. [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2011-10-01

    Radiation doses delivered to the patient during high dose rate brachytherapy treatments are susceptible to many inaccuracies and may not accurately match the planned doses. Novel Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) were developed in the laboratory to be used for in vivo measurements of high dose rate brachytherapy treatments and represent possible tools to increase treatment accuracy. In this study, the dosimetric compound adopted to achieve FGDC was studied in terms of dose sensitivity and linearity, and some potentialities and limits of its application were investigated. Results show that at doses higher than 400 cGy, the dosimeter response is linear with the delivered dose until a saturation effect is observed at doses higher than 2800 cGy. However, saturation is reached at lower doses as well with dose rates higher than 400 cGy/min.

  8. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas) by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001, respectively), as were the shifts between 6 and 12 weeks examinations (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the

  9. WE-A-17A-03: Catheter Digitization in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with the Assistance of An Electromagnetic (EM) Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using EM tracking, postprocessing and error-detection algorithms for measuring brachytherapy catheter locations and for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in treatment-planning catheter digitization. Methods: An EM tracker was used to localize 13 catheters in a clinical surface applicator (A) and 15 catheters inserted into a phantom (B). Two pairs of catheters in (B) crossed paths at a distance <2 mm, producing an undistinguishable catheter artifact in that location. EM data was post-processed for noise reduction and reformatted to provide the dwell location configuration. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT). EM dwell digitization error was characterized in terms of the average and maximum distance between corresponding EM and CT dwells per catheter. The error detection rate (detected errors / all errors) was calculated for 3 types of errors: swap of two catheter numbers; incorrect catheter number identification superior to the closest position between two catheters (mix); and catheter-tip shift. Results: The averages ± 1 standard deviation of the average and maximum registration error per catheter were 1.9±0.7 mm and 3.0±1.1 mm for (A) and 1.6±0.6 mm and 2.7±0.8 mm for (B). The error detection rate was 100% (A and B) for swap errors, mix errors, and shift >4.5 mm (A) and >5.5 mm (B); errors were detected for shifts on average >2.0 mm (A) and >2.4 mm (B). Both mix errors associated with undistinguishable catheter artifacts were detected and at least one of the involved catheters was identified. Conclusion: We demonstrated the use of an EM tracking system for localization of brachytherapy catheters, detection of digitization errors and resolution of undistinguishable catheter artifacts. Automatic digitization may be possible with a registration between the imaging and the EM frame of reference. Research funded by the Kaye Family Award 2012

  10. WE-A-17A-03: Catheter Digitization in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with the Assistance of An Electromagnetic (EM) Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, AL; Bhagwat, MS; Buzurovic, I; Devlin, PM; Friesen, S; Hansen, JL; Kapur, T; Lee, LJ; Mehrtash, A; Nguyen, PL; O' Farrell, D; Wang, W; Viswanathan, AN; Cormack, RA [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using EM tracking, postprocessing and error-detection algorithms for measuring brachytherapy catheter locations and for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in treatment-planning catheter digitization. Methods: An EM tracker was used to localize 13 catheters in a clinical surface applicator (A) and 15 catheters inserted into a phantom (B). Two pairs of catheters in (B) crossed paths at a distance <2 mm, producing an undistinguishable catheter artifact in that location. EM data was post-processed for noise reduction and reformatted to provide the dwell location configuration. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT). EM dwell digitization error was characterized in terms of the average and maximum distance between corresponding EM and CT dwells per catheter. The error detection rate (detected errors / all errors) was calculated for 3 types of errors: swap of two catheter numbers; incorrect catheter number identification superior to the closest position between two catheters (mix); and catheter-tip shift. Results: The averages ± 1 standard deviation of the average and maximum registration error per catheter were 1.9±0.7 mm and 3.0±1.1 mm for (A) and 1.6±0.6 mm and 2.7±0.8 mm for (B). The error detection rate was 100% (A and B) for swap errors, mix errors, and shift >4.5 mm (A) and >5.5 mm (B); errors were detected for shifts on average >2.0 mm (A) and >2.4 mm (B). Both mix errors associated with undistinguishable catheter artifacts were detected and at least one of the involved catheters was identified. Conclusion: We demonstrated the use of an EM tracking system for localization of brachytherapy catheters, detection of digitization errors and resolution of undistinguishable catheter artifacts. Automatic digitization may be possible with a registration between the imaging and the EM frame of reference. Research funded by the Kaye Family Award 2012.

  11. [Brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  12. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec - Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Binnekamp, D [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Best, DA (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  13. Outcome of a phase II prospective study on partial breast irradiation with interstitial multi-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an alternative to whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery in selected patients. Until the results of randomized phase III studies are available, phase II studies inform about PBI. We report the 5 year results of a phase II prospective study with PBI using interstitial multi-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: (NCT00499057)). Methods: Hundred patients received PBI (4 Gy, twice a day for 4 days, until 32 Gy). Inclusion criteria were: age ⩾40 years, infiltrating carcinoma without lobular histology, ductal in situ carcinoma, tumor size ⩽2.5 cm, negative surgical margins and axillary lymph nodes. Results: At a median follow-up of 60 months late toxicity occurred in 25 patients; the 5-year probability of freedom from late toxicity was 72.6% (95% CI: 63.7–81.7). Tamoxifen was the only significant risk factor for late toxicity. Cosmetic results, judged by physicians and patients, were good/excellent in 98 patients. Three local relapses (1 true, 2 elsewhere) and 1 regional relapse occurred. The 5-year probability of local or regional relapse-free survival was 97.7% (95% CI: 91.1–99.4) and 99.0% (95% CI: 92.9–99.8), respectively. Conclusion: PBI with interstitial multi-catheter brachytherapy is associated with low relapse and late toxicity rates

  14. Palliative endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy in obstructing malignancies: influence on survival and pattern of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the influence of endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy on survival and pattern of failure 117 patients with central obstructing bronchial carcinoma with EBRT and endobronchial brachytherapy were prospectively investigated and retrospectively matched with a group of patients who received EBRT but no HDR-brachytherapy. The matching criteria were Sex, Age, Histology, TNM-status and EBRT dose. 94 pairs of patient could be evaluated. Taken the two groups as a whole, no difference in suvival could be detected in both groups. However, those patients in whom (by endoscopic findings) a complete remission could be achieved by HDR-brachytherapy, had a significant (p< 0,01) longer survival than the matched group. Patients with endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy died significantly more often by final hemorrhage (26 versus 10). However, survival in the combined modality group was significantly longer. 90 % of the patients in both groups who died by final hemorrhage had a squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion palliative endobronchial HDR-brachytherapy offers not always benefit in survival to patients with a far advanced disease. However those patients who achieve a complete remission have a significant survival benefit, but with a consequence of a higher rate of final hemorrhage

  15. Microbiological pattern of arterial catheters in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Bharat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravascular catheter related infection (CRI is one of the most serious nosocomial infections. Diagnostic criteria include a positive culture from the catheter tip along with blood, yet in many patients with signs of infection, current culture techniques fail to identify pathogens on catheter segments. We hypothesised that a molecular examination of the bacterial community on short term arterial catheters (ACs would improve our understanding of the variety of organisms that are present in this niche environment and would help develop new methods for the diagnosis of CRI. Results The whole bacterial community presenting on all ACs was evaluated by molecular methods, i.e., a strategy of whole community DNA extraction, PCR amplification followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Ten ACs were removed from patients suspected of CRI and 430 clones from 5 "colonised" and 5 "uncolonised" (semi-quantitative method AC libraries were selected for sequencing and subsequent analysis. A total of 79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified at the level of 97% similarity belonging to six bacterial divisions. An average of 20 OTUs were present in each AC, irrespective of colonisation status. Conventional culture failed to reveal the majority of these bacteria. Conclusions There was no significant difference in the bacterial diversity between the 'uncolonised' and 'colonised' ACs. This suggests that vascular devices cultured conventionally and reported as non infective may at times potentially be a significant source of sepsis in critically ill patients. Alternative methods may be required for the accurate diagnosis of CRI in critically ill patients.

  16. WE-A-17A-06: Evaluation of An Automatic Interstitial Catheter Digitization Algorithm That Reduces Treatment Planning Time and Provide Means for Adaptive Re-Planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm that reduces treatment planning time and provide means for adaptive re-planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers. Methods: The semi-automatic catheter digitization tool utilizes a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. The CT images were first pre-processed to enhance the contrast between the catheters and soft tissue. Several seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The spline model of the catheters assisted in the region growing by preventing inter-catheter cross-over caused by air or metal artifacts. Source dwell positions from day one CT scans were applied to subsequent CTs and forward calculated using the automatically digitized catheter positions. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received HDR interstitial brachytherapy on an IRB approved image-guided radiation therapy protocol. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in 5 fractions, twice daily, over 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatic and manual digitization on day two CTs. Results: The region growing algorithm, assisted by the spline model of the catheters, was able to digitize all catheters. The difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.8±0.3 mm. The digitization time ranged from 34 minutes to 43 minutes with a mean digitization time of 37 minutes. The bulk of the time was spent on manual selection of initial seed positions and spline parameter adjustments. There was no significance difference in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. D90% to the CTV was 91.5±4.4% for the manual digitization versus 91.4±4.4% for the automatic digitization (p=0.56). Conclusion: A region growing algorithm was developed to semi-automatically digitize interstitial catheters in HDR brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. This automatic

  17. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB–IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB–IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB–IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB–IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB–IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  18. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Creutzberg, Carien L. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Craighead, Peter [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McCormack, Mary [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Reed, Nicholas [Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Long, Harry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Kim, Hak-Jae [Department of Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Marth, Christian [Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Cerrotta, Annmarie [Department of Radiation Therapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Trimble, Edward [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB-IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  19. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with multi-catheter brachytherapy: Local control, side effects and cosmetic outcome for 274 patients. Results of the German-Austrian multi-centre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multi-catheter brachytherapy. Patients and methods: Between 11/2000 and 04/2005, 274 patients participated. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer, a tumour diameter ≤3 cm, complete resection with clear margins ≥2 mm, negative axillary lymph nodes or singular nodal micro-metastasis, no distant metastases, hormone receptor-positive tumours, and were ≥35 years. Patients were excluded if mammographically they showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, poorly differentiated tumours, residual diffuse micro-calcifications, extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Median follow-up was 32 months (range; 8-68). Results: The local control rate was 99.3% (272/274), the 3 year-local-recurrence-free survival probability, 99.6%. Peri-operative complications occurred in 5.5% (15/274): 9 (3.3%) experienced implant infection and 6 (2.2%) hematoma. Acute toxicity (Grade 1/2 radio-dermatitis) was seen in 6.6% (18/274). Late side effects ≥ Grade 3 (fibrosis, telangiectasia) occurred in 1.8% (4/274). Cosmetic results were excellent/good in 94% (253/274). Conclusions: This analysis underlined the safety and effectiveness of APBI in a carefully selected subgroup with favourable disease characteristics. Of course, longer follow-up and randomised trials are necessary to conclusively assess the potential of APBI

  20. Analysis of Treatment Efficacy, Cosmesis, and Toxicity Using the MAMMOSITE Breast Brachytherapy Catheter to Deliver Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: The William Beaumont Hospital Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review our institution's experience of treating patients with the MammoSite (Cytyc Corp., Marlborough, MA) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI), for determining short-term treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to April 2006, 80 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) received adjuvant radiation using the MammoSite (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions prescribed to 1.0 cm from the balloon surface). Twenty-three patients (29%) had Stage 0 breast cancer, 46 (57%) had Stage I breast cancer, and 11 (14%) had Stage II breast cancer. The median follow-up was 22.1 months. Results: Two ipsilateral breast-tumor recurrences (IBTRs) (2.5%) developed for a 3-year actuarial rate of 2.9% (no regional failures were observed). On molecular-based clonality assay evaluation, both recurrences were clonally related. Younger age at diagnosis was the only variable associated with IBTR (continuous variable, p = 0.044; categorical variable [<55 years vs. ≥55 years], p = 0.012). The percentages of patients with good/excellent cosmetic results at 12 and 36 months were 96.9% and 88.2%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with applicator-to-skin spacing <7 mm and those who received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy exhibited lower rates of good/excellent cosmetic results, though the association was not statistically significant. The overall incidence of symptomatic seromas and any seromas was 10% and 45%, respectively. The overall incidence of fat necrosis and infections was 8.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Early-stage breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant APBI using the MammoSite catheter exhibited a 3-year treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity similar to those observed with other forms of interstitial APBI at this length of follow-up

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Pigge, F. Christopher [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO4) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl2/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO4 and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO4 and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured 4 was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT

  3. Intravascular catheter related infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolated bacteria in a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F J Mansur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of bacterial colonisation and catheter related blood stream infections (CRBSI together with the antibiotic susceptibility patterns in a tertiary care hospital. CRBSI was detected with semi-quantitative and quantitative methods. The antimicrobial susceptible patterns of the isolated organisms were performed by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. The rate of catheter colonisation and CRBSI were 42.1% and 14% (16.1/1000 catheter days respectively. The most common causative pathogens were Pseudomonas sp. (23.7%, Acinetobacter sp. (18.4%, Staphylococcus aureus (13.2% and Enterobacteriaceae (10.5%. The rate of isolation of methicillin resistance S. aureus, imipenem resistant Pseudomonas sp. and extended spectrum β lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae were 60%, 44.0% and 100%. The result of this study would be useful for control and treatment of CRBSI.

  4. Patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe (PC BE) in Spain and Poland: Comparative results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cancer incidence and its mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographic situation, and its incidence is growing around the world. Cancer incidence in Europe is now about 4000 patients per million per year and due to the ageing population a yearly increase of 1 - 1.5 % in cancer cases is estimated in the next two decades. Most of the cancer treatments will include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment and become more sophisticated with the spread of pulsed dose rate and high dose rate afterloading machines, and the use of new planning systems has additionally improved quality of treatment. Aim: The aim of the present study was to compare two countries (Poland and Spain) and to report the differences in the use of brachytherapy in these countries. For this reason, several characteristics related to brachytherapy were compared. Materials/Methods: The data used were collected using a web site questionnaire for the year 2002 where every centre that participated in the survey could introduce, change or update the information requested. Hospitals included in the study were those that provided data on brachytherapy, because our objective was to compare the brachytherapy facilities between Poland and Spain. Results: Data were available for 22 centres in Poland and 39 centres in Spain that provided brachytherapy in 2002. Spain having more centres that applied brachytherapy (1.0 centre per 1,000,000 inhabitants in Spain vs. 0.6 centre per 1,000,000 inhabitants in Poland), the average number of brachytherapy patients per centre is lower in Spain than in Poland, 137 and 382 respectively. The 5 main tumour sites treated with brachytherapy in Poland were: gynaecological (73.7 %), bronchus (13.0 %), breast (2.8 %), prostate (2.4 %) and head and neck (1.6 %). In Spain they were: gynaecological (59.7 %), breast (15.4 %), prostate (12.8 %), head

  5. American Brachytherapy Society survey regarding practice patterns of postoperative irradiation for endometrial cancer: Current status of vaginal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To survey the current postoperative recommendations for radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer, with an emphasis on vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). Methods and Materials: In August 2003, a 32-item questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 2396 members of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the American Brachytherapy Society. The sample excluded members-in-training, physicists, and non-U.S. members. A follow-up mailing was conducted in November 2003. Those who had not treated any patient in the previous year for endometrial carcinoma were instructed to indicate so at the beginning of the questionnaire and return it without responding to any other item. Responses were tabulated to determine the relative frequency distribution. Results: of the 2396 surveys sent out, 757 were returned, for a response rate of 31.6%. Of those who responded, 551 (72.8%) had performed postoperative irradiation for endometrial cancer and were included in this study. Of the 551 respondents, 99.8% had delivered external beam RT to some endometrial cancer patients. An increasing trend was found toward referrals for VBT; 91.5% of those who treated endometrial cancer performed VBT. The vaginal target most often irradiated was the upper vagina in 40.7%, upper 4-5 cm in 54.5%, and the entire vagina in 4.9%; 21.3% placed clips at the vaginal apex for applicator verification. The maximal dose to the bladder and rectum was recorded in 78.3% and 80.2% of patients, respectively. Of the respondents, 40% did not use low-dose-rate (LDR) VBT. The two most common LDR applicators were Delclos cylinders (29.7%) and Fletcher colpostats (29.3%). The mean boost dose delivered with LDR VBT when prescribed to the surface was 29.9 Gy and when prescribed to 0.5 cm was 23.8 Gy. When LDR therapy was used without external beam RT, the mean dose when prescribed to the surface was 56.8 Gy and when prescribed to 0.5 cm was 47.9 Gy. In 2002, 69.1% of respondents treated

  6. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  7. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Denis de Senneville, B; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Lagendijk, J J W; van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm(3)to 23.3 cm(3)) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions. PMID:26378657

  8. Modeling correlation indices between bladder and Foley′s catheter balloon dose with CT-based planning using limited CT slices in intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oinam Arun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To derive and validate an index to correlate the bladder dose with the catheter balloon dose using limited computed tomography (CT slices. Materials and Methods: Applicator geometry reconstructed from orthogonal radiographs were back-projected on CT images of the same patients for anatomy-based dosimetric evaluation. The correlation indices derived using power function of the catheter balloon dose and the bladder volume dose were validated in 31 patients with cervical cancer. Results: There was significant correlation between International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU-38 balloon reference dose (Dr and the dose received by 25% bladder volume (D 25 (P < 0.0001. Significant correlation was also found between the reference dose of mid-balloon point (D rm and the dose to D 25 (P < 0.0001. Average percentage difference [100 x (observed index - expected index / expected index] of observed value of I′ 25 (index for the dose to D25 bladder with respect to mid-balloon reference point from that of expected value was 0.52%, when the index was modeled with reference dose alone. Similarly the average percentage difference for I′10cc (index for the dose to 10 cc volume of bladder with respect to mid balloon point was 0.84%. When this index was modeled with absolute bladder volume and reference dose, standard deviation of the percentage difference between observed and expected index for D rm reduced by approximately 2% when compared to D r . Conclusion: For clinical applications, correlation index modeled with reference dose and volume predicts dose to absolute volume of bladder. Correlation index modeled with reference dose gives a good estimate of dose to relative bladder volume. From our study, we found D rm to be a better indicator of bladder dose than D r .

  9. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

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    Thompson, Stephen R., E-mail: stephen.thompson@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gabriel, Gabriel S. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Barton, Michael B. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)-the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)-to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  10. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources. (paper)

  11. Patterns of care and outcome in elderly cervical cancer patients: A special focus on brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The mean age of the general population has been prolonged and the incidence of cancer in elderly patients has increased. The purpose was to evaluate outcome of brachytherapy (BT) as an integrated part of the treatment of elderly patients with cervical cancer. Patients and methods: From November 1997 to January 2006, 1073 patients diagnosed with uterine cervical cancer with stages I-IV (FIGO) have completed BT at the Institut Gustave Roussy. A retrospective analysis was carried out with 113 patients aged over 70-year-old treated by conventional low dose rate (LDR) BT as a part of their treatment. Results: The median age was 76 years (range, 70.7-94.4). Eighty-four percent of the patients presented a squamous cell carcinoma. Fifty-two percent of the patients were treated by a sequence excluding surgery. The mean 15 and 60 Gy treated volumes were 235 cm3 (range, 30-371) and 138 cm3 (range, 81-234), respectively. For the 15 Gy treated volume, the mean ICRU bladder and rectal points were 18.5 Gy (range, 6-35) and 33 Gy (range, 5-63), respectively. For the 60 Gy treated volume, the mean ICRU bladder and rectal points were 33 Gy (range, 12-64) and 41 Gy (range, 23-65), respectively. Rectal, small bowel and urinary tract complications were observed in 25 (22.1%), 5 (4.4%), and in 16 patients (14.2%), respectively. Rectal complications Grades I/II, III/IV and V (fatal) crude incidences were 19.4% (22/113), 1.8% (2/113) and 0.9% (1/113), respectively. Acute toxicity death occurred in one patient with major diarrhea associated with a hemodynamic shock. Small bowel complications Grades I/II and III/IV crude incidences were 3.5% (4/113) and 0.9% (1/113), respectively. Urinary tract complications Grades I/II and III/IV crude incidences were 11.5% (13/113) and 2.7% (3/113), respectively. With a median follow-up of 3.1 years, 10 patients developed distant metastases and 10 others presented local relapses. The 3-year specific overall survival rate was 88.6% (95%CI, 77

  12. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... Brachytherapy takes 30 minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, ...

  13. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and

  14. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy

  15. New ferromagnetic catheters for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newly developed ferromagnetic catheters are more conspicuous than conventional radiographic catheters on MR images because they produce characteristic ferromagnetic signal patterns (FSPs). The authors systematically imaged ferromagnetic catheters (ferromagnetic concentration, 0.1--1.0 weight/weight%) in phantoms at 0.38 T and 1.5 T and compared their appearance with that of three radiographic catheters. The radiographic catheters always produced a signal void. The ferromagnetic catheters produced FSPs when perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the FSPs depended on the ferromagnetic concentration, strength of the main magnetic field, and the direction and strength of the frequency-encoding gradient. The ferromagnetic catheters produced no FSP when parallel to the magnetic field. Ferromagnetic catheters produce conspicuous FSPs on MR images, which depend on catheter position and the MR imaging parameters selected

  16. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments

  17. Peroperative brachytherapy with the use of a vicryl[reg] mat in advanced or recurrent pelvic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncontrolled tumor growth of pelvic tumors is a very serious problem. To test the possibility of combining intra-operative placement of brachytherapy catheters fixed in a vicryl[reg] mat, patients with pelvic tumors were subjected to surgery followed by brachytherapy plus external radiotherapy. In conclusion: the procedure is feasible

  18. Brachytherapy applications and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Written by the foremost experts in the field, this volume is a comprehensive text and practical reference on contemporary brachytherapy. The book provides detailed, site-specific information on applications and techniques of brachytherapy in the head and neck, central nervous system, breast, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, as well as on gynecologic brachytherapy, low dose rate and high dose rate sarcoma brachytherapy, vascular brachytherapy, and pediatric applications. The book thoroughly describes and compares the four major techniques used in brachytherapy-intraca

  19. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  20. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  1. Comparison of DVH parameters and loading patterns of standard loading, manual and inverse optimization for intracavitary brachytherapy on a subset of tandem/ovoid cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Comparison of inverse planning with the standard clinical plan and with the manually optimized plan based on dose-volume parameters and loading patterns. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight patients who underwent MRI based HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer were selected for this study. Three plans were calculated for each patient: (1) standard loading, (2) manual optimized, and (3) inverse optimized. Dosimetric outcomes from these plans were compared based on dose-volume parameters. The ratio of Total Reference Air Kerma of ovoid to tandem (TRAKO/T) was used to compare the loading patterns. Results: The volume of HR CTV ranged from 9-68 cc with a mean of 41(±16.2)cc. Mean V100 for standard, manual optimized and inverse plans was found to be not significant (p = 0.35, 0.38, 0.4). Dose to bladder (7.8 ± 1.6 Gy) and sigmoid (5.6 ± 1.4 Gy) was high for standard plans; Manual optimization reduced the dose to bladder (7.1 ± 1.7 Gy p = 0.006) and sigmoid (4.5 ± 1.0 Gy p = 0.005) without compromising the HR CTV coverage. The inverse plan resulted in a significant reduction to bladder dose (6.5 ± 1.4 Gy, p = 0.002). TRAK was found to be 0.49(±0.02), 0.44(±0.04) and 0.40(±0.04)cGy m-2 for the standard loading, manual optimized and inverse plans, respectively. It was observed that TRAKO/T was 0.82(±0.05), 1.7(±1.04) and 1.41(±0.93) for standard loading, manual optimized and inverse plans, respectively, while this ratio was 1 for the traditional loading pattern. Conclusions: Inverse planning offers good sparing of critical structures without compromising the target coverage. The average loading pattern of the whole patient cohort deviates from the standard Fletcher loading pattern.

  2. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwang21@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion [Department of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Pan, Li [Siemens Healthcare USA, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seethamraju, Ravi T. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Dumoulin, Charles L. [Radiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  3. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  4. CT-based interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach (Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT-based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT-based treatment planning has been developed and clinical evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron PLATO BPS treatment planning system for optimization and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are used for optimization of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram based analysis of the dose distribution (COIN analysis) enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumor sites in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results: The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using first a quality assurance phantom and second, a simulated interstitial implant of 12 needles. These were compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs. Both methods gave comparable results with regard to accuracy, but the CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility was proved in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumors, in pretreated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumor volumes treated were in the range 5.1 to 2,741 cm{sup 3}. Analysis of implant quality showed a slightly significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences with respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions: The Offenbach system, incorporating the PROMETHEUS software for interstitial HDR brachytherapy has proved to be extremely valuable

  5. Patterns of Recurrence After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: A Population-Based Study of 2223 Consecutive Low- and Intermediate-Risk Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Andrea C.; Morris, W. James, E-mail: JMorris@bccancer.bc.ca; Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; McKenzie, Michael; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Objectives: This study examined patterns of recurrence after low–dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB), estimated local recurrence rate and compared that rate to the estimated local recurrence rate after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A prospective database was maintained with clinical, dosimetric, and outcome data for all LDR-PB implantation procedures performed at our institution. From 1998 to 2008, 2223 patients with prostate cancer received LDR-PB without supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Patients who developed Phoenix-defined biochemical failure were reviewed for sites of relapse and investigations completed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5 years, 108 of 2223 patients (4.8%) developed biochemical relapse. In 1 additional patient, local relapse was found on transurethral prostate resection, but his prostate-specific antigen concentration was well short of triggering Phoenix-defined failure. Of the 109 patients with disease relapse, 18 of 2223 (0.8%) had a proven local recurrence, and 30 of 2223 (1.3%) had a proven distant recurrence. The remaining 61 of 2223 patients (2.7%) had unidentified sites of recurrence; of these, 57 patients (93%) had digital rectal examinations (DREs), 18 (30%) had post-treatment biopsies, 45 (74%) had bone scans, and 34 (56%) had computed tomography imaging of the abdomen and pelvis. If every biochemical failure were local, the local recurrence rate would be as high as 4.9%; however, by excluding those with proven distant failure and those with both a negative DRE and biopsy, we estimate that the local recurrence rate is 2.7% or less. Conclusions: In the context of limitations of the study design, our population-based analysis indicates that the local recurrence rate after LDR-PB is as low or lower than that after RP in our jurisdiction.

  6. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue ≥41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax ≤ 47 deg. C, Trectum ≤ 41.5 deg. C, and Tbladder ≤ 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (3600 or 2 x 1800 output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (1800, 2700, or 3600 output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m-3 s-1) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM43deg.C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients ≥41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 ≥ 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to

  7. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J, E-mail: CDiederich@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue {>=}41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T{sub max} {<=} 47 deg. C, T{sub rectum} {<=} 41.5 deg. C, and T{sub bladder} {<=} 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360{sup 0} or 2 x 180{sup 0} output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180{sup 0}, 270{sup 0}, or 360{sup 0} output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1}) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm{sup 3}) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T{sub 90} in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM{sub 43deg.C}) at 1 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1} with 10/14 patients {>=}41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T{sub 90} {>=} 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant

  8. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  9. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125I/Pd103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  10. Suprapubic catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000145.htm Suprapubic catheter care To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A suprapubic catheter (tube) drains urine from your bladder. It is ...

  11. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your catheter and what company made it. Write this information down and keep it handy. To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ...

  12. A quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakri, Abderrahim; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management (QM) program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. The proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient. Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. PMID:12512720

  13. Partial breast irradiation with interstitial high dose-rate brachytherapy: acute and late toxicities and cosmetic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation aims at decreasing the overall treatment time and reducing toxicity. The study we report is for early stage breast cancer and is a multicentre clinical investigation of partial breast irradiation achieved by interstitial high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with intraoperative placement of catheters. We have been able to conclude from the initial data that an interstitial perioperative brachytherapy implant is a feasible method of treatment with good tolerance and good cosmetic results. (author)

  14. Strategies and technical aspects in endoluminal HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoluminal brachytherapy is an effective palliative modality to relieve endoluminal obstruction (in bronchus. bile, bile ducts and oesophageal neoplasms) that can be used alone or definitively to boost the primary site after or during a course of external irradiation. It is known that those patients with local complete response after radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy survive longer than those with a worse regional control. So it is really important to deliver the highest dose to the tumour while minimizing side-effects. Our studies are now directed to focus tolerance of bronchial tree vs pulmonary parenchymal tissue of oesophageal mucosa vs pulmonary and gastrointestinal structures of biliary tree vs liver parenchyma. Recent reports relate about mucosal ulceration and stenosis with pseudomembrane build up and/or fatal haemoptysis and haemorrhage. The question that we address now is if it is possible to obtain a real three dimensional view of the isodose curves in patients instead of constantly relying on catheter placements controlling high dose side effects. In our department the operating room is planned for the patient preparation and to enable precise localization of applicators and accurate delivery of HDR brachytherapy. So in the same room anaestesy, endoscopy, X-rays and therapy are performed without the need to transfer patients elsewhere that can lead to catheter displacement. We are also trying to introduce systematically some marker near or in the tumour during endoscopy in order to verify the precise localization of our target in the radiogram. In bronchus HDR-brachytherapy we generally use a specific contrast medium (Hystrast) that allows us to see the entire region of the pulmonary tree where catheters are introduced. So we can conclude that the major improvements achieved because of the integration of application, planning and treatment are 1) Individualization of treatment planning with respect to the target volume. 2) Improvement of planning

  15. Thermal boost combined with interstitial brachytherapy in breast conserving therapy - Assessment of early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Hyperthermia (HT) causes a direct damage to cancerous cells and/or sensitize them to radiotherapy with usually minimal injury to normal tissues. Adjuvant HT is probably one of the most effective radiation sensitizers known and works best when delivered simultaneously with radiation. In breast conserving therapy, irradiation has to minimize the risk of local relapse within the treated breast, especially in an area of a tumor bed. Brachytherapy boost reduces 5-year local recurrence rate to mean 5,5%, so there still some place for further improvement. The investigated therapeutic option is an adjuvant single session of local HT (thermal boost) preceding standard CT-based multi catheter interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost in order to increase the probability of local cure. Aim: To report the short-term results in regard to early toxicity of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) boost with or without interstitial microwave hyperthermia (MV HT) for early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). Materials and methods: Between February 2006 and December 2007, 57 stage IA-IIIA breast cancer patients received a 10 Gy HDR BT boost after conservative surgery and 42.5-50 Gy whole breast irradiation (WBI) ± adjuvant chemotherapy. 32 patients (56.1%) were treated with additional pre-BT single session of interstitial MW HT to a tumor bed (multi-catheter technique). Reference temperature was 43 oC and therapeutic time (TT) was 1 h. Incidence, severity and duration of radiodermatitis, skin oedema and skin erythema in groups with (I) or without HT (II) were assessed, significant p-value ≤ 0.05. Results: Median follow-up was 40 months. Local control was 100% and distant metastasis free survival was 91.1%. HT sessions (median): reference temperature 42.2 .C, therapeutic time (TT) 61.4 min, total thermal dose 42 min and a gap between HT and BT 30 min. Radiodermatitis grades I and II occurred in 24 and 6 patients, respectively, differences

  16. Interstitial brachytherapy dosimetry update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) published an update to the AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) which was initially published in 1995. This update was pursued primarily due to the marked increase in permanent implantation of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources in the United States over the past decade, and clinical rationale for the need of accurate dosimetry in the implementation of interstitial brachytherapy. Additionally, there were substantial improvements in the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, accuracy of related parameters and methods for determining these parameters. With salient background, these improvements are discussed in the context of radiation dosimetry. As an example, the impact of this update on the administered dose is assessed for the model 200 103Pd brachytherapy source. (authors)

  17. Implantation of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickmann catheters are used mainly in patients with hematologic diseases, especially lymphatic and myelotic leukemias, and malignant lymphomas. They facilitate the administration of chemotherapeutics, hyperosmolar solutions and other substances with local toxicity as well as frequent taking of blood samples. Usually Hickmann catheters are placed by surgical cutdown on a jugular vein. In lieu of this surgical placement, we recommend the implantation of Hickman catheters by means of interventional radiology techniques. In a period of 13 months 78 Hickman catheters were placed in 67 patients. 37 catheters (=47%) stayed more than one month, 8 catheters (=10%) stayed 5 to 8 months in the central venous system. 26, respectively 6, of these catheters are until now in situ. Lethal or life threatening complications did not occur. There were no infections at the introduction site of the catheter. The main complications were: Pneumothorax without drainage: 3.2%, pneumothorax with drainage: 3.2%, slipping back of the tip of the catheter: 4.8%, thrombosis of the subclavian vein: 3.2%, fluid in the pleural cavity: 1.6%. In correspondance to the literature the complications of Hickman catheter placement by means of interventional radiology are less serious than by means of surgical cutdown. Further advantages are: General anesthesia can be avoided (less strain on severely ill patients, no problems to wean from assisted ventilation in patients with respiratory insufficiency), the smooth curve of the implanted catheter avoids sharp kinking and occlusion of the lumen, very small skin incisions are sufficient (lesser risk of hematomas in patients with thrombopenia), time and cost are reduced in comparison to surgical placement. (orig.)

  18. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  19. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  20. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-05-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  1. Balloon brachytherapy: how I do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the technical aspects of insertion of MammoSite Radiation System, cosmetic issues, patients selection for the procedure and their satisfaction. Seventy patients underwent brachytherapy after insertion of the MammoSite catheter and received a boost HDR totaling 1500 cGy in six fractions over a three day period. Each patient then received 5 weeks of external beam radiotherapy to the whole breast. Only T1-2 patients were treated. All patients had excellent cosmetic results. The complications (minimal skin erythema, hematoma, balloon leak, seroma, were minimal. The safety and effectiveness of the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System as a replacement for whole breast irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer has not yet been established. (author)

  2. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  3. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  4. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery, School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John [CCSEO, Kingston General Hospital and Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  5. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  6. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter

  7. Comment on "Comparison of dose rates calculated on Nucletron NPS v11 catheter tracking versus catheter describing"

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Laarse, R

    2003-01-01

    N D MacDougall has reported to Nucletron a dose error in the module MPS v11.33 of the Nucletron NPS brachytherapy program. This dose error occurred when an implant was reconstructed using the image tracking method. MPS v11 offers five methods for reconstruction from radiographs of the 3D localization in space of an iridium wire implant. The method using catheter-describing points is the most accurate one. It is based on digitizing the corresponding images of X-ray markers in the catheters on two radiographs, taken at different angles with an isocentric X-ray machine such as a treatment simulator. The method using tracking is the least accurate one. It tracks wire images on the radiographs to reconstruct a wire in space consisting of maximally 98 wire segments. This is the least accurate method because there is no correspondence between the image points of a wire on the radiographs.

  8. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J S; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  9. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use

  10. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  11. Radiation recall secondary to adjuvant docetaxel after balloon-catheter based accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Nathan W. [Summer Intern, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Wong, William W., E-mail: wong.william@mayo.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E. Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (United States); Karlin, Nina J. [Division of Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gray, Richard J. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    For early stage breast cancer, wide local excision and post-operative whole breast irradiation is a standard treatment. If adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended, radiation is usually given after completion of chemotherapy. In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy has become an option for selected patients. For these patients, adjuvant chemotherapy would have to be administered after radiation. The sequence of treatment with radiation followed by chemotherapy results in increased risk of radiation recall reaction (RRD) in these patients. Docetaxel is becoming a more commonly used drug as adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Here we report a case of docetaxel induced RRD after APBI with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy. Such reaction would have an adverse impact on the cosmetic outcome and quality of life of the patient. For patients who develop an intense skin reaction after the administration of docetaxel following APBI, RRD should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  12. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  13. Inverse planning in brachytherapy from radium to high rate 192 iridium afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the inverse planning problem in brachytherapy, i.e. the problem to determine an optimal number of catheters, number of sources for low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) and the optimal dwell times for high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) necessary to obtain an optimal as possible dose distribution. Starting from the 1930s, inverse planning for LDR brachytherapy used geometrically derived rules to determine the optimal placement of sources in order to achieve a uniform dose distribution of a specific level in planes, spheres and cylinders. Rules and nomograms were derived which still are widely used. With the rapid development of 3D imaging technologies and the rapidly increasing computer power we have now entered the new era of computer-based inverse planning in brachytherapy. The inverse planning is now an optimisation process adapted to the individual geometry of the patient. New inverse planning optimisation algorithms are anatomy-based that consider the real anatomy of the tumour and the organs at risk (OAR). Computer-based inverse planning considers various effects such as stability of solutions for seed misplacements which cannot ever be solved analytically without gross simplifications. In the last few years multiobjective (MO) inverse planning algorithms have been developed which recognise the MO optimisation problem which is inherent in inverse planning in brachytherapy. Previous methods used a trial and error method to obtain a satisfactory solution. MO optimisation replaces this trial and error process by presenting a representative set of dose distributions that can be obtained. With MO optimisation it is possible to obtain information that can be used to obtain the optimum number of catheters, their position and the optimum distribution of dwell times for HDR brachytherapy. For LDR brachytherapy also the stability of solutions due to seed migration can also be improved. A spectrum of alternative solutions is available and the treatment planner

  14. CT use for nasopharingeal molds realization in endocavitary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the following procedure for the making of individual molds with dental silicone for endocavitary brachytherapy of nasopharingeal cancer aided by CT scan. Procedure: Head immobilization during the realization of nasopharynx CT. Planification of treatment using these CT images, to determine the optimum position of radioactive sources. Printing on paper CT images with the nasopharynx contoured walls and the radioactive sources position. Realization of the mold in plastiline with the aid of the cuts of printer paper cut out with the nasopharynx form. Obtaining of the negative of the mold of plastiline by means of the use of alginate. Placement of two number 20 rectal rigid catheters with metal malleable bars inside them, in order to give them an adequate form in relation to the previous carried out planning. Filling in of alginato negative, where rectal catheters were placed, with Provil MCD Bayer Dental, a silicone based material for precision impression. We recommend to crossing the catheters' end with a number 2 silk thread to secure the catheter. An end of the silk thread is left outside the mold in order to help the extraction at the end of application. We advise to carry out a neuroleptic anaesthesia for its insertion, for the purpose of achieving a soft palate suitable relaxation. It makes the insertion easier. Repeat CT with the mold and phantoms in position to know a definitive dose distribution calculation. Conclusion: This method avoids the necessity of general anaesthesia in the realization of individual molds of nasopharyx for endocavitary brachytherapy and it improves the implant dosimetry

  15. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-07-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue >=41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax 200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM43 °C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients >=41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 >= 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to generate conformal therapeutic heating ranging from a single endocervical device targeting small volumes local to the cervix (<2 cm radial) to a combination of a 2 × 180° endocervical and directional interstitial applicators in the lateral periphery to target much larger volumes (6 cm radial), while preferentially limiting heating of the bladder and rectum.

  16. High dose rate endovascular brachytherapy in aorto-iliac lesion for the prevention of restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the applicability of endovascular brachytherapy to larger del arteries such as the abdominal aorta and iliac artery. Endovascular brachytherapy using an Ir-192 HDR source was administered 11 times to nine patients who had undergone percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) between 1995 and 1999. The follow-up lasted 13 to 55 months after treatment (median, 24 months). Eight of the 11 lesions have been controlled so far. Although one case developed thrombus inside the stent five months later, recanalization was achieved by means of retreatment. One patient who underwent low-dose irradiation (6 Gy) without stent implantation showed restenosis five months after treatment. We used a centering catheter that did not block the blood stream for exact centering of the radiation source in larger vessels such as the abdominal aorta. Although endovascular brachytherapy is a promising and safe procedure, careful follow-up is needed to detect untoward reactions such as thrombosis. (author)

  17. High dose rate endovascular brachytherapy in aorto-iliac lesion for the prevention of restenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Tomoda, Kaname; Shiomi, Hiroya [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine] [and others

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the applicability of endovascular brachytherapy to larger del arteries such as the abdominal aorta and iliac artery. Endovascular brachytherapy using an Ir-192 HDR source was administered 11 times to nine patients who had undergone percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) between 1995 and 1999. The follow-up lasted 13 to 55 months after treatment (median, 24 months). Eight of the 11 lesions have been controlled so far. Although one case developed thrombus inside the stent five months later, recanalization was achieved by means of retreatment. One patient who underwent low-dose irradiation (6 Gy) without stent implantation showed restenosis five months after treatment. We used a centering catheter that did not block the blood stream for exact centering of the radiation source in larger vessels such as the abdominal aorta. Although endovascular brachytherapy is a promising and safe procedure, careful follow-up is needed to detect untoward reactions such as thrombosis. (author)

  18. Development of a Brachytherapy Software Nomogram Equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this project is developing a software nomogram equivalent. A nomogram is a graph typically comprised of three parallel lines. Each of the lines is graduated for a different variable, often in a non-linear scale. The lines are oriented in such a manner that if a straight line is drawn connecting two of the three variables, the value of the third variable is uniquely determined by the intersection of the connecting line and the graduated line of the third variable. The value of the third variable is determined by reading the graduated scale at the point of intersection. A nomogram as applied in brachytherapy is used for determining the required amount of radioactive material to be implanted in a diseased site. A typical brachytherapy nomogram relates the average dimension of a site, the air kerma strength per source and the number of sources required for yielding a therapeutic radiation dose to the site. More sophisticated nomograms also provide scales for recommending source and needle spacings. For decades the nomogram has been clinically employed as a brachytherapy treatment planning tool. Imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasound ushered in modern image-based brachytherapy treatment planning. These modern imaging techniques dramatically advanced the state of the art of brachytherapy, often obviating the use of nomograms. Although the routine use of nomograms has decreased, there are clinical situations where nomograms still prove useful for brachytherapy treatment planning. Often times the dimensions of a tumor or tumor bed are not known prior to surgery and delineated images of the site are not available. In such situations the tumor dimensions can be measured in the OR and a nomogram applied for rapid treatment planning. By definition a nomogram is a graphical tool, which is fixed and cannot be modified. Differences of opinion and treatment philosophies exist among physicians and institutions. These varying approaches can lead to

  19. HDR brachytherapy. An option for preventing nonmalignant obstruction in patients after lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Interventional bronchoscopy is the main treatment modality in managing benign airway obstructions following lung transplantation. We analyzed the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on preventing recurrence of hyperplastic tissue. Patients and methods: From September 2002 to September 2004, a total of 24 intraluminal brachytherapy applications were carried out on 12 lung transplant patients in 15 different locations. A single dose of 3 Gy was calculated at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface; the target volume included a stenosis plus safety interval of 0.5-1.0 cm. Results: All patients had a mean 10.6 local interventions (Argon plasma coagulation, balloon dilatations, stenting) over 4.4 months before the first application of endobronchial brachytherapy, with a mean amount of 2.4 applications per month. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 2,219 ml in the 3 months before application of brachytherapy. After endobronchial brachytherapy, all patients experienced improvement in clinical status and respiratory function. The mean level of FEV1 in the 3 months after application was 2,435 ml (p = 0.02), and the number of invasive interventions dropped to a mean rate of 5.2 interventions in the 5.1 months after the first intervention, with an amount of 1 application per month. No treatment-related complications were seen. Four patients were treated twice, 1 patient three times, and 1 patient four times at the same localization. Conclusions: Recurrent symptomatic benign airway obstruction from hyperplastic tissue in the bronchus after lung transplantation can be successfully treated with intraluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy with a dose of 3 Gy at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface and a longitudinal safety margin of 1 cm. (orig.)

  20. HDR brachytherapy. An option for preventing nonmalignant obstruction in patients after lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Christiansen, H. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Warszawski-Baumann, A.; Baumann, R. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Practice for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Gottlieb, J.; Welte, T. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Interventional bronchoscopy is the main treatment modality in managing benign airway obstructions following lung transplantation. We analyzed the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on preventing recurrence of hyperplastic tissue. Patients and methods: From September 2002 to September 2004, a total of 24 intraluminal brachytherapy applications were carried out on 12 lung transplant patients in 15 different locations. A single dose of 3 Gy was calculated at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface; the target volume included a stenosis plus safety interval of 0.5-1.0 cm. Results: All patients had a mean 10.6 local interventions (Argon plasma coagulation, balloon dilatations, stenting) over 4.4 months before the first application of endobronchial brachytherapy, with a mean amount of 2.4 applications per month. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 2,219 ml in the 3 months before application of brachytherapy. After endobronchial brachytherapy, all patients experienced improvement in clinical status and respiratory function. The mean level of FEV1 in the 3 months after application was 2,435 ml (p = 0.02), and the number of invasive interventions dropped to a mean rate of 5.2 interventions in the 5.1 months after the first intervention, with an amount of 1 application per month. No treatment-related complications were seen. Four patients were treated twice, 1 patient three times, and 1 patient four times at the same localization. Conclusions: Recurrent symptomatic benign airway obstruction from hyperplastic tissue in the bronchus after lung transplantation can be successfully treated with intraluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy with a dose of 3 Gy at a 5-mm distance from the catheter surface and a longitudinal safety margin of 1 cm. (orig.)

  1. Patterns of toxicity following high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer: Mature prospective phase I/II study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To examine the long-term morbidity of high dose rate brachytherapy boost (HDRBB) in prostate cancer. Patients and methods: A phase I/II HDRBB dose escalation protocol recruited 108 men up to November 1999. Treatment combined 46 Gy external beam radiation to the prostate with four fractions of HDR totalling 16 or 20 Gy. Morbidity data were collected prospectively regarding urological, bowel and erectile dysfunction (ED) symptoms using a validated clinician completed instrument. Actuarial incidence and prevalence of symptoms were estimated; the latter to account for potential recovery. Results: The median follow-up was 78 months, with 880 questionnaires completed. The respective actuarial cumulative incidence and point prevalence rates of any grade 2 or higher symptom score at 5 years were 24.9% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 16.8-33.5%) and 7.7% (95% CI 1.8-14.5%) for urinary toxicity; and 11.3% (95% CI 5.6-17.1%) and 3.0% (0-7.6%) for rectal toxicity, meaning that most symptom sub-domains showed substantial recovery with time. Corresponding erectile function toxicity figures for the subgroup of men (n = 53) with normal erectile function prior to treatment and no androgen deprivation therapy were 77.0% (95% CI 64.9-88.1%) and 45.3% (95% CI 27.2-64.6%). Some late toxicity profiles developed after twelve months, typically with low grade bowel and urinary urgency. These peaked at 12-24 months and stayed relatively stable subsequently. Paradoxically, grade 1 or more nocturia symptoms settle with time, despite the accumulation of grade 2 or more toxicity beyond 24 months. Conclusions: HDRBB as a means of dose escalation in prostate cancer is associated with low and relatively stable rates of long-term bowel and urinary morbidity, and compares favourably with external beam results. Actuarial incidence methods overstate the burden of toxicity with substantial recovery noted in most domains

  2. Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Miguel, Inigo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Vazquez-Garcia, Blanca [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Pagola, Maria; Gaztanaga, Miren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martin-Algarra, Salvador [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Navarre (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations

  3. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Westerveld, Henrike [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiotherapy, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  4. Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations

  5. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  6. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author)

  7. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  8. Intracavitary mould brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To integrate brachytherapy in the combined modality management of malignant tumors of the maxilla, as a means of increasing the radiotherapy dose to the tumor bed while avoiding high doses to the orbital contents. Materials and methods: Following a partial or total maxillectomy, a duplication of the interim surgical obturator was created using a wash of vinyl polysiloxane. This mould was used as a carrier for afterloading nylon catheters through which 192-Iridium seed-ribbons were inserted. Following brachytherapy, selected patients also received external beam irradiation. Results and discussion: After a median follow-up of 36 months, 9 out of 11 patients are alive and disease-free; 1 developed a local recurrence and another relapsed at another site in the oral cavity. Transient grade 1 - 2 mucositis at the implant site was observed in all patients. The review of computer isodose distributions showed that the average dose received by the homolateral eyeball was 10% (range 9,2 - 10.0) of the prescribed surface dose to the surgical cavity. Conclusions: Brachytherapy can be integrated in the management of patients with malignant tumors of the maxilla in the form of a custom-made intracavitary mould carrying 192-Iridium sources. We found this technique particularly useful in cases with close or positive surgical margins

  9. Stereolithographic modelling as an aid to orbital brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper describes the technique of stereolithographic biomodelling and its application to a patient who was treated using orbital brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The process uses a moving laser beam, directed by a computer, to draw cross-sections of the model onto the surface of photo-curable liquid plastic. Using a stereolithographic apparatus (SLA), solid or surface data is sliced by software into very thin cross-sections. A helium cadmium (HeCd) laser then generates a small intense spot of ultraviolet (UV) light that is moved across the top of a vat of liquid photo monomer by a computerised optical scanning system. The laser polymerises the liquid into a solid where it touches, precisely printing each cross-section. A vertical elevator lowers the newly formed layer, and a recoating and levelling system establishes the next layer's thickness. Successive cross-sections (0.25 mm thick), each one adhering to the one below, are built one on top of the other, to form the part from the bottom up. The biomodel allowed the implant to be planned in detail prior to the surgery. The accurate placement of brachytherapy catheters was assured, and the dosimetry could be determined and optimised prior to the definitive procedure. Conclusions: Stereolithography is a useful technique in the area of orbital brachytherapy. It allows the implant to to be carried out with greater accuracy and confidence. For the patient, it minimises the risk to the eye and provides them with a greater understanding of the procedure

  10. Criteria for the evaluation of brachytherapy for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty two patients with recurrent or unresectable malignant brain tumors were treated by interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 seeds. After-loading catheters were stereotactically implanted under local anesthesia using a Brown-Roberts-wells (BRW) CT guided stereotactic system. The response to the therapy was followed by serial CT and MRI scans and evaluated three months after implantation by the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy because there is no set of criteria available for radiation therapy. After interstitial brachytherapy, the most commonly observed CT and MRI finding was central low attenuation, that is, the central enhanced tumor replaced by the radiation necrosis. Three months after the treatment, these findings were observed in 23 patients out of 32 patients on the CT and MRI. We observed complete response (CR) in 6 of 32 patients, partial response (PR) in 9, no change (NC) in 7 and progressive disease (PD) in 9. In 6 CR patients, the tumor disappeared by three months after treatment. In 15 patients of 17 NC and PD patients, the central low attenuation was observed and their prognosis was better than those without central necrosis. The results suggested the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy, such as CR, PR etc, cannot be applicable to our series because the tumor mass replaced by necrotic tissue and remained as a mass lesion in most cases and new criteria in consideration of this low attenuation on CT and MRI will be needed for the evaluation of brachytherapy on neuroimagings. (author)

  11. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  12. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. (Department of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Beth Israel (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  13. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications

  14. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  15. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  16. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  17. 106Ruthenium Brachytherapy for Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of 106Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with 106Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 63 tumors were treated with 106Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. 106Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which 106Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which 106Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. Conclusion: 106Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with 106Ru brachytherapy

  18. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR-brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorissen, Bram L; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2014-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 seconds, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iter...

  19. HDR endobronchial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This is a restrospective study to review the palliation rate, survival rate and complications of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of airway obstruction of recurrent lung cancer or metastasis. Material and method: Between september 1992 and may 1995 it has been treated forty (40) patients with endobronchial lesions. 38 patients with unique endobronchial lesion and 2 patients with double lesions. 32 had primary lung carcinoma: 27 with epidermoid carcinoma (1 bilateral), 2 with adenocarcinoma, 1 with small cell carcinoma, 1 with undifferentiated carcinoma and 1 with primary double (adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma). 8 patients had endobronchial metastasis: 2 hypernefroma, 3 breast carcinoma, 1 colon cancer, 1 seminoma and 1 Ewing sarcoma. 33 patients were male (82.5%) and 7 female (17.5%). The treatment was carried out in three weekly fractions with a dose of 750 cGy per fraction at 1 cm from the source. An afterloaded equipment was used (microselectron HDR). The most frequent sites were: right main stem bronchus 9 patients (22.5%), left main stem bronchus 7 patients (17.5%), and right middle bronchus 5 patients (12.5%). Results and discussion: The endoscopic global response assessed after three weeks was of 70%. The symptomatic response was 95% hemoptysis control, 87% dysnea control, 80% obstructive pneumonia control and 70% cough control. The minimum follow up was one year. There were three cases of massive hemoptysis and three patients developed local recurrence (one received a second brachytherapy treatment). Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy offers an excellent long term palliation for any of the obstructing symptoms, being effective in more than 70% in patients with recurrence lung primary cancer or endobronchial metastasis with a low complication rate

  20. Intra coronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the initial promise of vasculopathy intervention restenosis- a consequence of the (normal) would healing process-has emerged as a major problem. Angiographic restenosis has been reported in 40-60% of patients after successful P TCA. The basic mechanism of restenosis, (acute recoil, negative remodeling and neo intimal hyperplasia), are only partially counteracted by endovascular prosthetic devices (s tents). The rate of in-s tent restenosis, which is primarily caused by neo intimal hyperplasia due to the (micro) trauma of the arterial wall by the s tent struts, has been reduced to 18-32%. Ionizing (beta or gamma) radiations has been established as a potent treatment for malignant disorders. In recent years, there has also been increasing interest among clinicians in the management of benign lesions with radiation. Over the past several years, there has been a growing body of evidence that endovascular brachytherapy has a major impact on the biology of the restenosis. It must be underlined that understanding the biology and pathophysiology of restenosis and assessing various treatment options should preferably be a team effort, with the three gracesbeing interventional cardiologist, nuclear oncologist, and industrial partners. The vast amount of data in over 20000 patients from a wide range of randomized controlled trials, has shown that brachytherapy is the only effective treatment for in-s tent restenosis. We are learning more and more about how to improve brachytherapy. While the new coated s tents that we heard about today is fascinating and extremely promising, brachytherapy still has a very important place in difficult patients, such as those with total occlusions, osti al lesions, left main lesions, multivessel disease and diabetes. Regarding to above mentioned tips, we (a research team work, in the Nuclear Research Center Of the Atomic Energy Organization Of Iran), focused on synthesis and preparation of radioactive materials for use in I c-B T. We

  1. Radiologic placement of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman catheter inserter has previously been predominantly accomplished surgically by means of venous cutdown or percutaneous placement in the operating room. The authors describe their method and results for 55 consecutive percutaneous placements of Hickman catheters in the interventional radiology suite. Complication rates were comparable to those for surgical techniques. Radiologic placement resulted in increased convenience, decreased time and cost of insertion, and super fluoroscopic control of catheter placement and any special manipulations. Modern angiographic materials provide safer access to the subclavian vein than traditional methods. The authors conclude that radiologic placement of Hickman catheters offers significant advantages over traditional surgical placement

  2. Brachytherapy- past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discovery of radioactivity by Henry Becquerel and radium by Madame and Pierre Curie was probably the greatest event of 19th century in the field of medical science. Radium was used for brachytherapy as early as 1901. Today almost every organ is amenable to brachytherapy procedure. High dose rate remote afterloading systems have increased the patients comfort and complete radiation protection to the staff during treatment. Computers have not only improved the precision of treatment but also made 3 D conformal brachytherapy possible. As the goal of cancer management is changing from just life preservation to organ and function preservation without compromising cure rate, the role of brachytherapy is becoming more and more prominent. Intensive efforts will be needed to meet with the future challenges. (author). 13 refs

  3. New Brachytherapy Standards Paradigm Shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose to water rate at short distances in water is the quantity of interest for dosimetry in radiotherapy, but no absorbed dose to water primary standards have been available to date for dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. Currently, the procedures to determine the absorbed dose imparted to the patient in brachytherapy treatments are based on measurements traceable to air kerma standards. These procedures are affected by an uncertainty that is larger than the limit recommended by the IAEA dosimetry protocol (IAEA TRS 398 (2000)). Based on this protocol, the goal for the uncertainty of the dose delivered to the target volume should be within 5% (at the level of one standard deviation) to assure the effectiveness of a radiotherapy treatment. The international protocols for the calibration of brachytherapy gamma ray sources are based on the reference air kerma rate or the air kerma strength. The absorbed dose to water, in water at the reference position around a brachytherapy source is then calculated by applying the formalism of the protocols based on a conversion constant, the dose rate constant Λ, specific for the characteristics and geometry of the brachytherapy source. The determination of this constant relies on Monte Carlo simulations and relative measurements performed with passive dosimeters, and therefore it is typically affected by large uncertainties, larger than 5% (at the level of one standard deviation). The conversion procedure needed for brachytherapy dosimetry is a source of additional uncertainty on the final value of the absorbed dose imparted to the patient. It is due to a lack of metrology standards that makes dosimetry of brachytherapy sources less accurate than dosimetry of external radiation beams produced by 60Co sources and accelerators currently used in external beam radiotherapy. This paper reviews the current developments of absorbed dose to water primary standards for brachytherapy and the rationale for the choice of the

  4. Nerve tolerance to high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with soft tissue sarcoma: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy, interstitial tumor bed irradiation, following conservative surgery has been shown to provide excellent local control and limb preservation in patients with soft tissue sarcomas (STS), whereas little is known about the tolerance of peripheral nerves to brachytherapy. In particular, nerve tolerance to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has never been properly evaluated. In this study, we examined the efficacy and radiation neurotoxicity of HDR brachytherapy in patients with STS in contact with neurovascular structures. Between 1995 and 2000, seven patients with STS involving the neurovascular bundle were treated in our institute with limb-preserving surgery, followed by fractionated HDR brachytherapy. Pathological examination demonstrated that 6 patients had high-grade lesions with five cases of negative margins and one case with positive margins, and one patient had a low-grade lesion with a negative margin. Afterloading catheters placed within the tumor bed directly upon the preserved neurovascular structures were postoperatively loaded with Iridium-192 with a total dose of 50 Gy in 6 patients. One patient received 30 Gy of HDR brachytherapy combined with 20 Gy of adjuvant external beam radiation. With a median follow-up of 4 years, the 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 83.3, 68.6, and 83.3%, respectively. None of the 7 patients developed HDR brachytherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Of 5 survivors, 3 evaluable patients had values of motor nerve conduction velocity of the preserved peripheral nerve in the normal range. In this study, there were no practical and electrophysiological findings of neurotoxicity of HDR brachytherapy. Despite the small number of patients, our encouraging results are valuable for limb-preserving surgery of unmanageable STS involving critical neurovascular structures

  5. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  6. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  7. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy

  8. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M.; Van Hecke, H.; Boterberg, T.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  9. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty

  10. Erectile function after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to determine the effect of multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and materials: A total of 226 patients with preimplant erectile function determined by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003 for clinical Stage T1c-T2c (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Of the 226 patients, 132 were potent before treatment and, of those, 128 (97%) completed and returned the IIEF questionnaire after brachytherapy. The median follow-up was 29.1 months. Potency was defined as an IIEF score of ≥13. The clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age; preimplant IIEF score; clinical T stage; pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level; Gleason score; elapsed time after implantation; preimplant nocturnal erections; body mass index; presence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus; tobacco consumption; the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose (V100/150/200); the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate gland (D90); androgen deprivation therapy; supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); isotope; prostate volume; planning volume; and radiation dose to the proximal penis. Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 50.5%. For patients who maintained adequate posttreatment erectile function, the preimplant IIEF score was 29, and in patients with brachytherapy-related ED, the preimplant IIEF score was 25. The median time to the onset of ED was 5.4 months. After brachytherapy, the median IIEF score was 20 in potent patients and 3 in impotent patients. On univariate analysis, the preimplant IIEF score, patient age, presence of nocturnal erections

  11. Implementation of GaN based real-time source position monitoring in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy Quality Assurance (QA), we propose a seed position verification method by using two GaN dosimetric probes integrated in an instrumented phantom. As dose rate measured from one probe is related to the seed distance, seed position inside catheter can be determined. The proposed two-probe method extends measureable range and improves accuracy in comparison with the use of one single probe. One instrumented phantom implementing the method was designed, fabricated and tested in clinical conditions. The measureable range of the two-probe method is 105 mm compared to 36 mm using single probe. The validity of the method was experimentally verified. - Highlights: • A simple brachytherapy QA phantom has been instrumented. • Dwell positions have been estimated according to measured dose rate by GaN probes. • Measured dose rate shows 1% average deviation from calculated results. • Determined dwell position precision and measureable range was studied

  12. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta Ajay; Ahmed Shwan J; Rimington Peter

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with low...

  13. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  14. Brachytherapy of stage II mobile tongue carcinoma. Prediction of local control and QOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no consensus as to the prognostic model for brachytherapy of tongue carcinoma. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors for local control based on a large population under a unified treatment policy. Between 1970 and 1998, 433 patients with stage II tongue squamous cell carcinoma were treated by low-dose-rate brachytherapy. This series included 277 patients treated with a linear source with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. A spacer was introduced in 1987. The primary local control rates were 85.6%. In the multivariate analysis, an invasive growth pattern was a significant factor for local recurrence. The disease-related survival was influenced by old age and an invasive growth pattern. A spacer lowered mandibular bone complications. The growth pattern was the most important factor for recurrence. Brachytherapy was associated with a high cure rate and the use of spacers brought about good quality of life (QOL)

  15. Radiological protection of patients in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The prefix 'brachy' means short-range, so brachytherapy is the administration of radiation therapy using small radioactive sources in the form of needles, tubes, wires or seeds, which are placed within the tumor -interstitial form- or very near of it, superficially or in an endo-cavity form. This technique, which was limited by the size of the primary tumor, has the advantage, that the radiation, can be adjusted to the size and shape of the tumor volume and the radioisotope used, - short range -, is selected with the criteria of getting the dose in the organs at risk, as low as possible, making what it is known as conformal radiotherapy. Radioactive sources may be permanent or temporary implants. The application of radioactive material, can be manually or automatically. In the first case, a major breakthrough from the radioprotection point of view, was the use of afterloading devices, methodology highly recommended to reduce the radiation exposure to staff. With the development of technology, remotely controlled afterloading devices were introduced, which in addition to complying with the above requirement, allow the source to move in different positions along catheters housed in one or more channels, making therapeutic brachytherapy treatments in tumor volumes possible, that due to its length, decades ago would have been an unthinkable deal. In all cases, sources, which may vary from the 3 mm in length, 125 Iodine or 198 Gold seeds, to extensive wires of 192 Iridium, are encapsulated for two main purposes: preventing leakage of radioactive material and absorption of unwanted radiation, alpha and beta, produced by the radioactive decay. Consequently, it should be highly unlikely that the radioactive material, could be lost or located in the patient, in a different place of the one that was planned. However, history shows us the opposite. Its is known the kind of deterministic effect that radiation is going to produce in the tumor, where the severity of

  16. Inverse planning and class solutions for brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy or interventional radiooncology is a method of radiation therapy. It is a method, where a small encapsulated radioactive source is placed near to / in the tumour and therefore delivers high doses directly to the target volume. Organs at risk (OARs) are spared due to the inverse square dose fall-off. In the past years there was a slight stagnation in the development of techniques for brachytherapy treatment. While external beam radiotherapy became more and more sophisticated, in brachytherapy traditional methods have been still used. Recently, 3D imaging was considered also as the modality for brachytherapy and more precise brachytherapy could expand. Nowadays, an image guided brachytherapy is state-of-art in many centres. Integration of imaging methods lead to the dose distribution individually tailored for each patient. Treatment plan optimization is mostly performed manually as an adaptation of a standard loading pattern. Recently, inverse planning approaches have been introduced into brachytherapy. The aim of this doctoral thesis was to analyze inverse planning and to develop concepts how to integrate inverse planning into cervical cancer brachytherapy. First part of the thesis analyzes the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimization (HIPO) algorithm and proposes a workflow how to safely work with this algorithm. The problem of inverse planning generally is that only the dose and volume parameters are taken into account and spatial dose distribution is neglected. This fact can lead to unwanted high dose regions in a normal tissue. A unique implementation of HIPO into the treatment planning system using additional features enabled to create treatment plans similar to the plans resulting from manual optimization and to shape the high dose regions inside the CTV. In the second part the HIPO algorithm is compared to the Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing (IPSA) algorithm. IPSA is implemented into the commercial treatment planning system. It

  17. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  18. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 08: The Role and Benefits of Electromagnetic Needle-Tracking Technologies in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modern brachytherapy, application of large doses of ionizing radiation in a limited number of fractions is frequent. Furthermore, as with any surgical procedures, brachytherapy is subject to learning curve effects. In this context, there could be advantages of integrating real-time tracking of needles/catheters to existing protocols given the recent prominent advances in tracking technologies. In this work, we review the use of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) based on the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator (Northern Digital Inc) and custom design needles (Philips Healthcare) for brachytherapy applications. The position and orientation information is obtained from 5 degrees of freedom sensors. Basic system performance characterization is performed in well-controlled conditions to establish accuracy and reproducibility as well as potential interference from standard brachytherapy equipment. The results show that sensor locations can be tracked to within 0.04mm (la) when located within 26cm of the generator. Orientation accuracy of the needle remained within ±1° in the same region, but rose quickly at larger distances. The errors on position and orientation strongly dependent the sensor position in the characterization volume (500×500×500mm3). The presence of an ultrasound probe was shown to have negligible effects on tracking accuracy. The use of EMTS for automatic catheter/applicator reconstruction was also explored. Reconstruction time was less than 10 sec/channel and tips identification was within 0.69±0.29mm of the reference values. Finally, we demonstrate that hollow needle designs with special EM adaptation also allow for real-time seed drop position estimation. In phantom experiments showed that drop positions were on average within 1.6±0.9mm of the reference position measured from μCT. Altogether, EMTS offer promising benefits in a wide range of brachytherapy applications

  19. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 08: The Role and Benefits of Electromagnetic Needle-Tracking Technologies in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, L.; Racine, E.; Boutaleb, S.; Filion, O. [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, Québec (Québec), and Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d' Optique et Centre de recherche en sur le Cancer, Université Laval, Québec (Québec) (Canada); Poulin, E.; Hautvast, G. [Biomedical Systems, Philips Group Innovation, High Tech Campus 34 (HTC 34), Eindhoven (Netherlands); Binnekamp, D. [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    In modern brachytherapy, application of large doses of ionizing radiation in a limited number of fractions is frequent. Furthermore, as with any surgical procedures, brachytherapy is subject to learning curve effects. In this context, there could be advantages of integrating real-time tracking of needles/catheters to existing protocols given the recent prominent advances in tracking technologies. In this work, we review the use of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) based on the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator (Northern Digital Inc) and custom design needles (Philips Healthcare) for brachytherapy applications. The position and orientation information is obtained from 5 degrees of freedom sensors. Basic system performance characterization is performed in well-controlled conditions to establish accuracy and reproducibility as well as potential interference from standard brachytherapy equipment. The results show that sensor locations can be tracked to within 0.04mm (la) when located within 26cm of the generator. Orientation accuracy of the needle remained within ±1° in the same region, but rose quickly at larger distances. The errors on position and orientation strongly dependent the sensor position in the characterization volume (500×500×500mm{sup 3}). The presence of an ultrasound probe was shown to have negligible effects on tracking accuracy. The use of EMTS for automatic catheter/applicator reconstruction was also explored. Reconstruction time was less than 10 sec/channel and tips identification was within 0.69±0.29mm of the reference values. Finally, we demonstrate that hollow needle designs with special EM adaptation also allow for real-time seed drop position estimation. In phantom experiments showed that drop positions were on average within 1.6±0.9mm of the reference position measured from μCT. Altogether, EMTS offer promising benefits in a wide range of brachytherapy applications.

  20. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, L.M., E-mail: moutinho@ua.pt [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Castro, I.F.C. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Peralta, L. [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M.C. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40–50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25–100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  1. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  2. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the...

  3. Brachytherapy in coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medicine School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality across the world. Percutaneous coronary intervention has become the major technique of revascularization. However, restenosis remains a major limitation of this procedure. Recently the need for repeat intervention due to restenosis, the most vexing long-term failure of percutaneous coronary intervention, has been significantly reduced owing to the introduction to two major advances, intracoronary brachytherapy and the drug-eluting stents, intracoronary brachytherapy has been employed in recent years to prevent restenosis lesions with effective results, principally in in-stent restenosis. Restenosis is generally considered as an excessive form of normal wound healing divided up in processes: elastic recoil, neointimal hyperplasia, and negative vascular remodeling. Restenosis has previously been regarded as a proliferative process in which neointimal thickening, mediated by a cascade of inflammatory mediators and other factors, is the key factor. Ionizing radiation has been shown to decrease the proliferative response to injury in animal models of restenosis. Subsequently, several randomized, double-blind trials have demonstrated that intracoronary brachytherapy can reduce the rates to both angiographic restenosis and clinical event rates in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for in-stent restenosis. Some problems, such as late thrombosis and edge restenosis, have been identified as limiting factors of this technique. Brachytherapy is a promising method of preventing and treating coronary artery restenosis.

  4. Treatment of keloids by high-dose-rate brachytherapy: A seven-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the results obtained in a prospective group of patients with keloid scars treated by high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with or without surgery. Methods and Materials: One hundred and sixty-nine patients with keloid scars were treated with HDR brachytherapy between December 1991 and December 1998. One hundred and thirty-four patients were females, and 35 were males. The distribution of keloid scars was as follows: face, 77; trunk, 73; and extremities, 19. The mean length was 4.2 cm (range 2-22 cm), and the mean width 1.8 cm (range 1.0-2.8 cm). In 147 patients keloid tissues were removed before HDR brachytherapy treatment, and in 22 HDR brachytherapy was used as definitive treatment. In patients who underwent prior surgery, a flexible plastic tube was put in place during the surgical procedure. Bottoms were used to fix the plastic tubes, and the surgical wound was repaired by absorbable suture. HDR brachytherapy was administered within 30-60 min of surgery. A total dose of 12 Gy (at 1 cm from the center of the catheter) was given in four fractions of 300 cGy in 24 h (at 09.00 am, 15.00 pm, 21.00 pm, and 09.00 am next day). Treatment was optimized using standard geometric optimization. In patients who did not undergo surgery, standard brachytherapy was performed, and plastic tubes were placed through the skin to cover the whole scar. Local anesthesia was used in all procedures. In these patients a total dose of 18 Gy was given in 6 fractions of 300 cGy in one and a half days (at 9.00 am, 3.00 pm, and 9.00 pm; and at 9.00 am, 3.00 pm, and 9.00 pm next day). No further treatment was given to any patient. Patients were seen in follow-up visits every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second year, and yearly thereafter. No patient was lost to follow-up. Particular attention was paid to keloid recurrence, late skin effects, and cosmetic results. Results: All patients completed the treatment. After a follow-up of seven years, 8

  5. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  6. SU-E-J-263: Dosimetric Analysis On Breast Brachytherapy Based On Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare and evaluate the dosimetry difference between breast brachytherapy protocols with different fractionation using deformable image registration. Methods: The accumulative dose distribution for multiple breast brachytherapy patients using four different applicators: Contura, Mammosite, Savi, and interstitial catheters, under two treatment protocols: 340cGy by 10 fractions in 5 days and 825cGy by 3 fractions in 2days has been reconstructed using a two stage deformable image registration approach. For all patients, daily CT was acquired with the same slice thickness (2.5mm). In the first stage, the daily CT images were rigidly registered to the initial planning CT using the registration module in Eclipse (Varian) to align the applicators. In the second stage, the tissues surrounding the applicator in the rigidly registered daily CT image were non-rigidly registered to the initial CT using a combination of image force and the local constraint that enforce zero normal motion on the surface of the applicator, using a software developed in house. We calculated the dose distribution in the daily CTs and deformed them using the final registration to convert into the image domain of the initial planning CT. The accumulative dose distributions were evaluated by dosimetry parameters including D90, V150 and V200, as well as DVH. Results: Dose reconstruction results showed that the two day treatment has a significant dosimetry improvement over the five day protocols. An average daily drop of D90 at 1.3% of the prescription dose has been observed on multiple brachytherapy patients. There is no significant difference on V150 and V200 between those two protocols. Conclusion: Brachytherapy with higher fractional dose and less fractions has an improved performance on being conformal to the dose distribution in the initial plan. Elongated brachytherapy treatments need to consider the dose uncertainty caused by the temporal changes of the soft tissue

  7. The contribution from transit dose for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, G. P.; Landry, G.; Reniers, B.; Hoffmann, A.; Rubo, R. A.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.; Verhaegen, F.

    2014-04-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems that use model-based dose calculation algorithms employ a more accurate approach that replaces the TG43-U1 water dose formalism and adopt the TG-186 recommendations regarding composition and geometry of patients and other relevant effects. However, no recommendations were provided on the transit dose due to the source traveling inside the patient. This study describes a methodology to calculate the transit dose using information from the treatment planning system (TPS) and considering the source's instantaneous and average speed for two prostate and two gynecological cases. The trajectory of the 192Ir HDR source was defined by importing applicator contour points and dwell positions from the TPS. The transit dose distribution was calculated using the maximum speed, the average speed and uniform accelerations obtained from the literature to obtain an approximate continuous source distribution simulated with a Monte Carlo code. The transit component can be negligible or significant depending on the speed profile adopted, which is not clearly reported in the literature. The significance of the transit dose can also be due to the treatment modality; in our study interstitial treatments exhibited the largest effects. Considering the worst case scenario the transit dose can reach 3% of the prescribed dose in a gynecological case with four catheters and up to 11.1% when comparing the average prostate dose for a case with 16 catheters. The transit dose component increases by increasing the number of catheters used for HDR brachytherapy, reducing the total dwell time per catheter or increasing the number of dwell positions with low dwell times. This contribution may become significant (>5%) if it is not corrected appropriately. The transit dose cannot be completely compensated using simple dwell time corrections since it may have a non-uniform distribution. An accurate measurement of the source acceleration and maximum speed should be

  8. The contribution from transit dose for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems that use model-based dose calculation algorithms employ a more accurate approach that replaces the TG43-U1 water dose formalism and adopt the TG-186 recommendations regarding composition and geometry of patients and other relevant effects. However, no recommendations were provided on the transit dose due to the source traveling inside the patient. This study describes a methodology to calculate the transit dose using information from the treatment planning system (TPS) and considering the source's instantaneous and average speed for two prostate and two gynecological cases. The trajectory of the 192Ir HDR source was defined by importing applicator contour points and dwell positions from the TPS. The transit dose distribution was calculated using the maximum speed, the average speed and uniform accelerations obtained from the literature to obtain an approximate continuous source distribution simulated with a Monte Carlo code. The transit component can be negligible or significant depending on the speed profile adopted, which is not clearly reported in the literature. The significance of the transit dose can also be due to the treatment modality; in our study interstitial treatments exhibited the largest effects. Considering the worst case scenario the transit dose can reach 3% of the prescribed dose in a gynecological case with four catheters and up to 11.1% when comparing the average prostate dose for a case with 16 catheters. The transit dose component increases by increasing the number of catheters used for HDR brachytherapy, reducing the total dwell time per catheter or increasing the number of dwell positions with low dwell times. This contribution may become significant (>5%) if it is not corrected appropriately. The transit dose cannot be completely compensated using simple dwell time corrections since it may have a non-uniform distribution. An accurate measurement of the source acceleration and maximum speed

  9. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  10. Spinal canal extension of hyperalimentation catheter without neurologic sequela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt at placement of a left femoral vein hyperalimentation catheter resulted in entrance of the catheter into the spinal canal. Catheter location was documented by injections of nonionic contrast material into the catheter without neurologic sequellae. (orig.)

  11. Brachytherapy: Physical and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a term used to describe the short distance treatment of cancer with radiation from small, encapsulated radionuclide sources. This type of treatment is given by placing sources directly into or near the volume to be treated. The dose is then delivered continuously, either over a short period of time (temporary implants) or over the lifetime of the source to a complete decay (permanent implants). Most common brachytherapy sources emit photons; however, in a few specialized situations b or neutron emitting sources are used. There are two main types of brachytherapy treatment: 1) Intracavitary, in which the sources are placed in body cavities close to the tumour volume; 2) Interstitial, in which the sources are implanted within the tumour volume. Intracavitary treatments are always temporary, of short duration, while interstitial treatments may be temporary or permanent. Temporary implants are inserted using either manual or remote afterloading procedures. Other, less common forms of brachytherapy treatments include surface plaque, intraluminal, intraoperative and intravascular source applications; for these treatments either g or b emitting sources are used. The physical advantage of brachytherapy treatments compared with external beam radiotherapy is the improved localized delivery of dose to the target volume of interest. The disadvantage is that brachytherapy can only be used in cases in which the tumour is well localized and relatively small. In a typical radiotherapy department about 10-20% of all radiotherapy patients are treated with brachytherapy. Several aspects must be considered when giving brachytherapy treatments. Of importance is the way in which the sources are positioned relative to the volume to be treated, and several different models have been developed over the past decades for this purpose. The advantage of using a well established model is that one benefits from the long experience associated with such models and that one can

  12. Manual calculation of treatment time for high dose rate brachytherapy with a flexible intraoperative template (FIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for estimating the total treatment time for a brachytherapy radiation fraction with a planar flexible intraoperative template (FIT), using an 192Ir high dose rate afterloading device. The FIT can be rectangular or irregularly shaped. The manual calculation serves as an independent check of the treatment time calculated by the treatment planning system for applications with varying sizes, shapes and dose prescription depths. The parameters required for the calculation are the number of active dwell positions, the catheter spacing and dwell position spacing, the source strength, the applied dose and the depth of dose prescription. For a fixed depth of dose prescription (1.25 cm) and fixed dwell position and catheter spacing (0.5 and 1 cm respectively) the manual calculation accurately predicts (usually within 2%) the total treatment time as calculated by the treatment planning system. For varying catheter and dwell position spacings and dose prescription depths the accuracy is still within 7%. An action threshold of 5% allows detection of errors made in the number of active dwell positions (±9), catheter spacing (±1 mm) and dose prescription depth (±1 mm). Errors in dwell position spacing (0.25 cm or more) could also be accurately detected. (author)

  13. Kasr El-Aini experience in radiation safety and quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management QM program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. Kasr El-Aini Hospital -Medical college-Cairo University installed intravascular Brach therapy treatment modality in 1999 so it was a must to proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient: Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. (author)

  14. Review of catheter thrombectomy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Jose A; Meyerrose, Gary E; Phisitkul, Sorot; Kennedy, Shalyn; Roongsritong, Chanwit; Tsikouris, James; Huang, Shoei K Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequently fatal event that causes significant compromise of hemodynamic stability. Unfortunately, mortality rates for PE have remained relatively constant despite advances in prophylactic and treatment measures. In addition to embolus size, symptom recognition for diagnosis and emergent treatment are two distinct factors that dictate survival. Treatment generally includes thrombolytic agents; however, not all patients are candidates for aggressive thrombolytic management. Development of catheter thrombectomy devices provides an alternative treatment modality for severe cases when thrombolytics are contraindicated. Catheter thrombectomy devices have undergone major advances over the last decade, but literature support of their success is limited. PMID:14988612

  15. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or groin. The catheter is often used to draw blood, or give fluids or medications. It may ... an antiseptic solution before using the catheter to draw blood or give medications. Healthcare providers also clean ...

  16. A new CT prostate segmentation for CT-based HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. Prostate HDR treatment involves placing 10 to 20 catheters (needles) into the prostate gland, and then delivering radiation dose to the cancerous regions through these catheters. These catheters are often inserted with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance and the HDR treatment plan is based on the CT images. The main challenge for CT-based HDR planning is to accurately segment prostate volume in CT images due to the poor soft tissue contrast and additional artifacts introduced by the catheters. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel approach to segment the prostate in CT images through TRUS-CT deformable registration based on the catheter locations. In this approach, the HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intra-operative TRUS and planning CT images, and then used as landmarks for the TRUS-CT image registration. The prostate contour generated from the TRUS images captured during the ultrasound-guided HDR procedure was used to segment the prostate on the CT images through deformable registration. We conducted two studies. A prostate-phantom study demonstrated a submillimeter accuracy of our method. A pilot study of 5 prostate-cancer patients was conducted to further test its clinical feasibility. All patients had 3 gold markers implanted in the prostate that were used to evaluate the registration accuracy, as well as previous diagnostic MR images that were used as the gold standard to assess the prostate segmentation. For the 5 patients, the mean gold-marker displacement was 1.2 mm; the prostate volume difference between our approach and the MRI was 7.2%, and the Dice volume overlap was over 91%. Our proposed method could improve prostate delineation, enable accurate dose planning and delivery, and potentially enhance prostate HDR treatment outcome.

  17. Rectal function following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quality of life following therapeutic intervention for carcinoma of the prostate gland has not been well documented. In particular, a paucity of data has been published regarding bowel function following prostate brachytherapy. This study evaluated late bowel function in 209 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients via a one-time questionnaire administered 16-55 months postimplant. Materials and Methods: Two hundred nineteen consecutive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 through February 1998 using either 125I or 103Pd for clinical T1c-T3a carcinoma of the prostate gland. Of the 219 patients, 7 had expired. Of the remaining 212 patients (median follow-up, 28 months), each patient was mailed a self-administered questionnaire (10 questions) with a prestamped return envelope; 209 (98.6%) surveys were returned. Clinical parameters evaluated for bowel dysfunction included patient age, diabetes, hypertension, history of tobacco consumption, clinical T-stage, elapsed time since implant, and prostate ultrasound volume. Treatment parameters included utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, utilization of moderate dose external beam radiation therapy prior to implantation, choice of isotope (125I vs. 103Pd), rectal dose (average, median and maximum doses), total implanted seed strength, values of the minimum dose received by 90% of the prostate gland (D90), and the percent prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed minimum peripheral dose (V100, V150 and V200, respectively). Because detailed baseline bowel function was not available for these patients, a cross-sectional survey was performed in which 30 newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients of comparable demographics served as controls. Results: The total rectal function scores for the brachytherapy and control patients were 4.3 and 1.6, respectively, out of a total 27 points (p 103Pd resulted in lower radiation doses to the rectum, the choice of

  18. Effectiveness of interstitial brachytherapy HDR combined with surgery in the treatment of locally advanced carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To asses the potential improvement of local control and survival of patients operated for stage III carcinoma of the vulva with adjuvant interstitial brachytherapy HDR. The potential for sparing the urethral and anal sphincter was also examined. Thirty one patients with stage III carcinoma of vulva were treated primarily with radical vulctomy. Due to proximity of tumor to the urethra or anus flexible or rigid catheters were placed in the involved area for perioperative interstitial brachytherapy HDR. Total dose delivered to the treatment volume was 30 Gy (6Gy per fraction) or 25 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) if external beam irradiation was given. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 48 months (median 29 months). The 3-year overall survival was 74 %. Eight patients (26 %) died of the disease. Eleven patients (34.5 %) recurred: 8 locally, 3 had distant metastases. A multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size and nodal status were independent prognostic factors for survival and local control. Eleven patients (34.5%) developed grade 3 or 4 (EORTC scoring system) complications. Preservation of sphincter function was obtained in all but one patient. The addition of interstitial brachytherapy HDR to primary surgery for locally advanced carcinoma of the vulva has a potential for improving local control and survival. By limiting the need for exonerative surgery, it also contributes to a significantly better quality of due to preservation of the urethra and anus. Further improvement in the stability of the catheters is needed to improve the incidence of severe complications. (author)

  19. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories... Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A suprapubic urological catheter...

  20. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early stage oral tongue cancer – 15 year experience from a tertiary care institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Anshuma; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Oinam, Arun S; Sharma, Suresh Chander; Dhanireddy, Bhaswanth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine outcomes of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with early stage oral tongue cancer. Material and methods Ninety-two patients with stage I and II oral tongue cancer were treated with HDR-BT between 1999 and 2014: brachytherapy alone = 62 (67.4%), and combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy = 30 (32.6%). Median follow-up was 53.5 months. Patterns of failure, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local control rates (LCR), and nodal control rates (NCR) were determined. Results 5-year OS, DFS, LCR, and NCR were 73.2%, 58.2%, 64.2%, and 83.8%, respectively. In total, 43 patients (46.7%) failed treatment: isolated local failures = 28 (30.4%), isolated nodal failures = 8 (8.7%), both local and regional failures = 7 (7.6%). While in T1 stage, 5 year LCR were significantly higher in brachytherapy alone group compared to combined EBRT and brachytherapy group (81.7% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.04), the isolated nodal failure rates were not significantly different among the two groups. For T2 stage, NCR were higher in combined EBRT and brachytherapy group compared to brachytherapy alone (92.9% vs. 74.3%). Acute mucositis (grade ≥ 2) was seen more in brachytherapy alone group compared to the combined modality group (87% vs. 66%), and this correlated significantly with the higher biological equivalent dose (BED) in the brachytherapy alone group. Conclusions Our study recommends treating patients with brachytherapy alone in T1 stage, and demonstrates the need for addressing nodal region either by neck dissection or nodal irradiation in T2 stage patients. Also, the study highlights the need for dose escalation (from the doses used in the study) in both T1 and T2 stage tumors when using interstitial brachytherapy either as sole modality or as a boost. PMID:26985198

  1. Toward endobronchial Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy therapeutic optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of patients with lung cancer receive either palliative or curative high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy. Up to a third of patients treated with endobronchial HDR die from hemoptysis. Rather than accept hemoptysis as an expected potential consequence of HDR, we have calculated the radial dose distribution for an Ir-192 HDR source, rigorously examined the dose and prescription points recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS), and performed a radiobiological-based analysis. The radial dose rate of a commercially available Ir-192 source was calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the linear quadratic model, the estimated palliative, curative and blood vessel rupture radii from the center of an Ir-192 source were obtained for the ABS recommendations and a series of customized HDR prescriptions. The estimated radius at risk for blood vessel perforation for the ABS recommendations ranges from 7 to 9 mm. An optimized prescription may in some situations reduce this radius to 4 mm. The estimated blood perforation radius is generally smaller than the palliative radius. Optimized and individualized endobronchial HDR prescriptions are currently feasible based on our current understanding of tumor and normal tissue radiobiology. Individualized prescriptions could minimize complications such as fatal hemoptysis without sacrificing efficacy. Fiducial stents, HDR catheter centering or spacers and the use of CT imaging to better assess the relationship between the catheter and blood vessels promise to be useful strategies for increasing the therapeutic index of this treatment modality. Prospective trials employing treatment optimization algorithms are needed

  2. Toward endobronchial Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy therapeutic optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, H A [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Allison, R R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Downie, G H [Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Mota, H C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Austerlitz, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jenkins, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Sibata, C H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2007-06-07

    A number of patients with lung cancer receive either palliative or curative high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy. Up to a third of patients treated with endobronchial HDR die from hemoptysis. Rather than accept hemoptysis as an expected potential consequence of HDR, we have calculated the radial dose distribution for an Ir-192 HDR source, rigorously examined the dose and prescription points recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS), and performed a radiobiological-based analysis. The radial dose rate of a commercially available Ir-192 source was calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the linear quadratic model, the estimated palliative, curative and blood vessel rupture radii from the center of an Ir-192 source were obtained for the ABS recommendations and a series of customized HDR prescriptions. The estimated radius at risk for blood vessel perforation for the ABS recommendations ranges from 7 to 9 mm. An optimized prescription may in some situations reduce this radius to 4 mm. The estimated blood perforation radius is generally smaller than the palliative radius. Optimized and individualized endobronchial HDR prescriptions are currently feasible based on our current understanding of tumor and normal tissue radiobiology. Individualized prescriptions could minimize complications such as fatal hemoptysis without sacrificing efficacy. Fiducial stents, HDR catheter centering or spacers and the use of CT imaging to better assess the relationship between the catheter and blood vessels promise to be useful strategies for increasing the therapeutic index of this treatment modality. Prospective trials employing treatment optimization algorithms are needed.

  3. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  4. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  5. Risk analysis of brachytherapy events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For prevention radiological events it is necessary to identify hazardous situation and to analyse the nature of committed errors. Though the recommendation on the classification and prevention of radiological events: Radiological accidents has been prepared in the framework of Czech Society of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics and it was approved by Czech regulatory body (SONS) in 1999, only a few reports have been submitted up to now from brachytherapy practice. At the radiotherapy departments attention has been paid more likely to the problems of dominant teletherapy treatments. But in the two last decades the usage of brachytherapy methods has gradually increased because .nature of this treatment well as the possibilities of operating facility have been completely changed: new radionuclides of high activity are introduced and sophisticate afterloading systems controlled by computers are used. Consequently also the nature of errors, which can occurred in the clinical practice, has been changing. To determine the potentially hazardous parts of procedure the so-called 'process tree', which follows the flow of entire treatment process, has been created for most frequent type of applications. Marking the location of errors on the process tree indicates where failures occurred and accumulation of marks along branches show weak points in the process. Analysed data provide useful information to prevent medical events in brachytherapy .The results strength the requirements given in Recommendations of SONS and revealed the need for its amendment. They call especially for systematic registration of the events. (authors)

  6. Aspects of the application of complementary brachytherapy for early invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial studies of brachytherapy with the 'Mammosite Radiation Therapy System', a device consisted by a catheter centered inside a inflate balloon, to perform breast brachytherapy was revised. A high activity source was applied into the balloon, exposing to the tumor bed to a high absorbed dose, while the surrounding areas receives one reduced by to a factor 1/r2, during a short interval of time. The high acute dose provides a booster to conventional radiation therapy, resulting in a better local control. The acceptable esthetic impact achieved and an easier device setting stimulated the present dosimetric study. The brachytherapy with Ir192 was simulated through the development of a computerized digital voxels phantom, which represented the breast anatomy. The Monte Carlo Code (MCNP TM, 1977) was used to evaluate the radiation of the tumor bed and health tissues. Results from simulations shows, as example, an amount of radiation absorbed by the tumor bed of 11.30 Gy up to 5 mm around the balloon surface. Radiation selectivity is also shown, in which tumour bed absorbed more radiation than the surrounding tissues, whose maximum values were: skin (6.73 Gy), muscle (7.69 Gy), and lung (3.02 Gy), for a fifteen-minute exposure of a Ir-152 source. The simulation results are presented. Reliability of this radiotherapy technique as a postoperative booster in early breast cancer is presented and confirmed in this work. (author)

  7. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  8. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  9. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  10. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Ajay

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with lower abdominal scar. The risk may be reduced with the use of ultrasound scan guidance.

  11. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and 192Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci192Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively.Conclusions: For cervical cancer patients, D

  12. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  13. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  14. Conformational episcleral brachytherapy in ocular tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy with an episcleral plate is an alternative treatment for choroid melanomas and retinoblastomas that allows the sight to be saved. The most common techniques use a metal applicator with beta or Co-60 transmitters, which have a standard geometry, require surgical installation of the active devices and do not allow optimized dosimetry. In 1997, the Clinica Alemana in Santiago, Chile, developed a new device based on the one described by J.P. Gerard (1988), with plastic material, personalized and with delayed charge. Three cases have been treated. Two retinoblastomas: 1) Primary treatment in unilateral Rb, R.E. group II in a 9 month old boy, 2) External post radiotherapy rescue in oculus ultimus by bilateral Rb in a 10 year old girl, and 3) Choroid melanoma T3N0M0 in a 77 year old woman. A personalized applicator was prepared in each case depending on the size and location of the tumor. The distribution of the vector catheters was designed following the Paris system standards. The applicator was inserted in the operating room, under general anesthesia by a team of trained ophthalmologists. An X-ray and helichoidal simulation scan were taken with fictitious sources. Previsional dosimetry was undertaken, with evaluation of the dosage to the tumor apex, crystalline lens, sclera and optic nerve. Prolonged activation with low level dosage Ir-192 wires was performed in a protected room. When the programmed dosage was completed, the sources and then the inactive applicator were removed. Dosage: A 40 Gy dose was applied in the retinoblastoma to the tumor apex and 60 Gy to the melanoma, over a 2 to 3 day period. Tolerance was excellent, there were no incidents or acute complications. The retinoblastomas fully regressed in 1 to 2 weeks, with no local relapse or after affects after 2, 4 and 6 months of follow-up. The 3 patients have retained their sight. The development of this technique is feasible and with enough resources, relatively easy to implement. It has

  15. HDR intralumenal brachytherapy in bronchial cancer: review of our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main indications for brachytherapy in the treatment of endobronchial cancer are dyspnea. postobstructive pneumonia and atelectasis, cough and hemoptysis resulting from broncus obstruction by exophytic intralumenal tumor growth. High Dose Rate intralumenal brachytherapy (HDRBT) may be combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in particular as almost all tumors are too large for HDRBT alone. From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 268 patients affected by bronchial cancer, with EBRT combined with HDRBT. All patients were staged as IIIa-IIIb-IV but KPS was >60 and expectancy of life > than 3 months. After bronchoscopy and Tc simulation we found that almost 10% of patients were downstaged. Treatment was always realized delivering 60 Gy to the tumour volume and 50 Gy to the mediastinal structures with EBRT. Brachytherapy was performed during the radiotherapy course. In 38 patients HDRBT was realized just one time, at the beginning of EBRT, with a dose of 10 Gy calculated at 1cm from the central axis of the catheter. In 47 HDRBT was performed twice (at the beginning and at the end of EBRT) with a dose of 7 Gy calculated at 1 cm from the central axis. From 1994 we started a 3 fractions protocol (Timing: days 1.15.30) with a dose of 5 Gy calculated at 0.5 cm from the axis. Of the 183 patients introduced in the protocol 170 received the three fractions of HDRBT and 13 were excluded from the study for personal or clinical reasons. In 97% of cases the application did not need general anesthesia; local anesthesia has been sufficient supplemented by some drug for sedation and coughing. Anyway both bronchoscopy and HDRBT (with anterior-posterior and lateral chest X-ray) are performed in the same shielded room without the necessity of displacing the patient. In almost 60% of treatments we used just one endobronchial applicator. In case of tumor involvement of the carina, two applicators were introduced. By this a larger tumor volume can be treated with adequate

  16. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  17. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment.  PMID:25679174

  18. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed El Gharib; Gamal Niazi; Waleed Hetta; Yahya Makkeyah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with the technique of transhepatic venous access for hemodialysis and to evaluate its functionality and complications. Patients and methods: From March 2012 till October 2012, 23 patients with age ranging from 12 to 71 years old having end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were included in our study and were subjected to transhepatic venous catheter insertion. In 21 patients there were not any remaining patent peripheral venous accesses. In 2 patients there wer...

  19. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  20. The use of TLDs for brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are routinely used to measure the dose around brachytherapy sources due to their small size and high precision. This work presents a concise overview of the use of LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs for brachytherapy dosimetry including the experimental procedures required to achieve high-precision measurements as well as new results regarding the intrinsic energy dependence with some of the commonly used brachytherapy sources. Equations to correct TLD light output to air kerma are outlined and a description of the method to determine the intrinsic energy dependence is presented. For the intrinsic energy dependence investigation, a review of previously published results is presented as well as new experimental results using 125I, 103Pd, 192Ir, and miniature x-ray brachytherapy sources at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The results of these experiments are consistent with previous work and give valuable insight to investigators using TLDs for brachytherapy measurements. - Highlights: • Brachytherapy measurements with LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs performed. • Intrinsic energy dependence for several brachytherapy sources determined. • New LiF:Mg,Ti energy dependence results compared with previous data for x-ray beams. • Uncertainty of LiF:Mg,Ti TLD measurements reviewed

  1. The Transition from 2-D Brachytherapy to 3-D High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a major treatment modality in the treatment of common cancers including cervical cancer. This publication addresses the recent technological change in brachytherapy treatment planning with better access to 3-D volumetric patient imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) as opposed to traditional 2-D planar images. In the context of 2-D and 3-D brachytherapy, the publication provides definitions, clinical indications, transitioning milestones, commissioning steps, quality assurance measures, and a related questionnaire. Staff training and resourcing are also addressed. The publication will serve as a guide to radiotherapy departments in Member States who wish to make the transition from 2-D to 3-D brachytherapy

  2. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  3. Definition study of the project Dosimetry Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the research project Dosimetry Brachytherapy is the standardization of calibration methods and quality control procedures used for Brachytherapy sources. Proposals to develop measurement standards and methods for calibrating these sources are presented. Brachytherapy sources will be calibrated in terms of reference airkerma rate or in terms of absorbed dose in water. Therefore, in this project, special attention will be given to the in-phantom measurement method described by Meertens and the use of re-entrant ionisation chambers as transfer standards. In this report, a workplan and time schedule is included. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig

  4. CT based HDR brachytherapy for intracavitary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is most commonly used in combination with external radiotherapy for gynecological cancers of cervix, vagina and endometrium. The characteristic rapid fall off of the dose in brachytherapy makes it useful to deliver a localized high dose to tumor. In gynecological applications the dose limiting critical structures are bladder and rectum. The dose received by rectum and bladder has been an interesting issue all these decades. This work presents the dosimetric and planning aspects of CT based High Dose Rate brachytherapy for intracavitary applications

  5. CT-guided brachytherapy. A novel percutaneous technique for interstitial ablation of liver malignancies; CT-gesteuerte Brachytherapie. Eine neue perkutane Technik zur interstitiellen Ablation von Lebermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, J.; Wust, P.; Stohlmann, A.; Beck, A.; Cho, C.H.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Spors, B.; Werk, M.; Rosner, C.; Haenninen, E.L.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Patients and methods: 21 patients with 21 liver malignancies (19 metastases, two primary liver tumors) were treated with interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy applying a {sup 192}Ir source. In all patients, the use of image-guided thermal tumor ablation such as by radiofrequency or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was impeded either by tumor size {>=} 5 cm in seven, adjacent portal or hepatic vein in ten, or adjacent bile duct bifurcation in four patients. Dosimetry was performed using three-dimensional CT data sets acquired after CT-guided positioning of the brachytherapy catheters. Results: the mean tumor diameter was 4.6 cm (2.5-11 cm). The mean minimal tumor dose inside the tumor margin amounted to 17 Gy (12-20 Gy). The proportion of the liver parenchyma exposed to > 5 gy was 18% (5-39%) of total liver parenchyma minus tumor volume. Nausea and vomiting were observed in six patients after brachytherapy (28%). One patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice due to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. We commonly encountered asymptomatic increases of liver enzymes. Local control rates after 6 and 12 months were 87% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-guided brachytherapy is safe and effective. This technique displays broader indications compared to image-guided thermal ablation by radiofrequency or LITT with respect to tumor size or localization. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse der Sicherheit und Effektivitaet CT-gesteuerter Brachytherapie zur Ablation von Lebermalignomen. Patienten und Methodik: 21 Patienten mit 21 Lebermalignomen (19 Metastasen, zwei primaere Lebermalignome) wurden mit perkutaner, CT-gesteuerter interstitieller Brachytherapie mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. Alle Patienten wiesen Umstaende auf, die eine bildgefuehrte thermische Ablation mit Radiofrequenz oder laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT) einschraenkten

  6. Flush Foley's catheter: The most easy way

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay P. Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Foley catheters are used for monitoring urine output in anesthetized patients, comatose patients, incontinent patients, acute urinary retention, paralysed patients, trauma patients, urethral surgeries, ureterectomy, kidney disease, before and after cesarean sections etc. When a Foley catheter becomes clogged, it can cause various complications. For which it is flushed or replaced.Objectives: To find a simple way to flush a Foleys catheter.Material & Methods: Patient was expl...

  7. Reuse of catheters for angiography. 2. Contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reuse of sterile medical devices designated for single use is a controversal practice, known to be performed in many countries. As far as catheters for angiography are concerned, various methods for cleaning and sterilisation are in use. However, interactions of detergents and ethylene oxide used in reprocessing with polyethylene materials of the catheters have not been investigated systematically. This paper presents a physico-chemical characterisation of common angiographic catheters. The interaction of polyethylene and ethylene oxide is examined. (orig.)

  8. Potential brachytherapy nuclides of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past there were relatively few radionuclides available for brachytherapy. But the situation is rapidly changing with the development of many new sources with properties that may be advantageous in certain clinical situations. In the choice of an acceptable, rather than an ideal radionuclide, it is important to consider the physical dose distribution, radiobiological effectiveness, ease of radiation protection, logistics and cost. Taking into account these factors, a number of radionuclides have been tried and more are being considered for specific type of applications. Presently, 137Cs is the most commonly used radionuclide for intracavitary therapy and 192Ir for interstitial therapy. 125I has more or less replaced 198Au for permanent implants. Clinical studies are being carried out to assess the feasibility of replacing 137Cs with 241Am for intracavitary applications and 125I with 103Pd and/or 169Yb for interstitial permanent implants. Other radionuclides being considered are 75Fe and 145Sm. Neutron induced brachytherapy is a new technique being tried to ensure complete radiation safety. (author). 1 tab

  9. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  10. The changing landscape of brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a Canadian practice survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T.; Mula-Hussain, L.; Pavamani, S.; Pearce, A.; D’Souza, D.; Patil, N.G.; Traptow, L.; Doll, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We documented changes in practice from 2009 to 2012 for cervical cancer brachytherapy in Canada. Methods Centres with gynecologic brachytherapy services were sent an e-mail questionnaire querying their 2012 practice. Responses are reported and compared with practice patterns identified in a similar survey for 2009. Results The response rate was 77% (24 of 31 centres). Almost all use high-dose-rate brachytherapy (92%); low-dose-rate brachytherapy has been completely phased out. Most continue to move patients from the site of applicator insertion to the radiation treatment simulation suite (75%) or to a diagnostic imaging department (29%), or both. In 2012, the imaging modalities used for dose specification were computed tomography [ct (75%)], magnetic resonance imaging [mri (38%)], plain radiography (21%), and cone-beam ct (8%). The number of institutions using mri guidance has markedly increased during the period of interest (9 vs. 1). Most respondents (58% vs. 14%) prescribed using guidelines from the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, but they also used point A as a reference. Commonly used high-dose radiation regimens included 30 Gy in 5 fractions and 24 Gy in 3 fractions. Conclusions In Canada, image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer continues to evolve. Although ct-based imaging remains the most commonly used modality, many centres have adopted mri for at least 1 brachytherapy treatment. More centres are using fewer fractions and a slightly lower biologically effective dose, but are still achieving EQD2 (2-Gy equivalent) doses of 80–90 Gy in combination with external-beam radiation therapy. PMID:26628868

  11. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  12. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  13. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir and 60Co sources, and permanent seed implants with 125I, 103Pd and 131Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with 125I, 106Ru, 90Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  14. [Catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoky, A; Heberer, M; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1985-10-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy is used to a varying extent today. Therefore, the need for nutritional support was evaluated following elective abdominal surgery and compared to experiences with postoperative enteral feeding. Oesophagectomy, total gastrectomy and the Whipple procedure were identified as good indications for catheter jejunostomy, whereas with other types of operation an individual decision is required. PMID:3935397

  15. Audit of catheter urine culture requests.

    OpenAIRE

    Manek, N; Napier Rees, E

    1992-01-01

    An audit to assess the appropriateness of catheter urine culture requests was carried out for a period of one month. The requests were followed up by members of the Infection Control Team at ward level. The laboratory report had no impact on the removal of the catheter in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients, although the reports did aid antibiotic prescribing in symptomatic patients.

  16. Audit of catheter urine culture requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manek, N; Napier Rees, E

    1992-01-01

    An audit to assess the appropriateness of catheter urine culture requests was carried out for a period of one month. The requests were followed up by members of the Infection Control Team at ward level. The laboratory report had no impact on the removal of the catheter in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients, although the reports did aid antibiotic prescribing in symptomatic patients. PMID:1740523

  17. Soft thrombus formation in radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demolin, JM; Eick, OJ; Munch, K; Koullick, E; Nakagawa, H; Wittkampf, FHM

    2002-01-01

    During RF catheter ablation, local temperature elevation can result in coagulum formation on the ablation electrode, resulting in impedance rise. A recent study has also demonstrated the formation of a so-called soft thrombus during experimental ablations. This deposit poorly adhered to the catheter

  18. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Top of page What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that involves ... page What is a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)? A catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) occurs when germs (usually bacteria) ...

  19. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  20. Intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the practicability and preliminary effect of intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Methods: Intraluminal brachytherapy was performed in 4 patients who had been treated with biliary stent implantation. Results: No complications related to intraluminal brachytherapy had happened. One patient was followed up by means of CT, showing reduction in tumor size. Conclusion: Intraluminal brachytherapy is a safe and effective method in treating malignant tumor causing obstructive jaundice

  1. A reappraisal of local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    pain they experienced with their prostate biopsy on a scale of 0-10 (no pain to pain at its worst). They were asked to rate their pain at the time of the catheter insertion, the lidocaine infiltration of the perineum and prostate and again at the completion of the seed insertion. Results: The amount of lidocaine administered ranged from 250 to 450 mg, with a median of 300 mg. There were no untoward effects of lidocaine. Average pain scores for patients' biopsy, catheter insertion, lidocaine infiltration and seed insertion were 3.3, 3.0, 4.0 and 2.7, respectively. Patients' total time in the simulator room, including taking post-implant dosimetric films, remove the intravenous line and catheter, and to clean the perineum, ranged from 77 to 135 min, with a median of 105 min. The median post-implant CT-defined target coverage by the prescription isodose was 94%, with a range of 80-100%. Conclusions: Performing prostate brachytherapy under local anesthesia, as reported here, is simple, efficient and well tolerated

  2. Temporal resolution of urinary morbidity following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the short-term urinary morbidity for prostate brachytherapy patients without a preimplant history of a transurethral resection of the prostate gland and who received prophylactic and prolonged α-blockers. α-blockers may decrease radiation-induced urethritis and increase urinary flow. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated to identify factors associated with increased acute urinary morbidity. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection of the prostate gland underwent transperineal ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy for clinical T1c-T3a carcinoma of the prostate gland. For all patients, an α-blocker was initiated prior to implantation and continued at least until the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) returned to baseline levels. Clinical parameters evaluated for short-term urinary morbidity included patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS (obtained within 3 weeks of implantation), and prostate ultrasound volume. Treatment parameters included the utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, the utilization of moderate dose external beam radiation therapy before implantation, the choice of isotope, the urethral dose, the total implant activity in millicuries, and a variety of dosimetric quality indicators (D90 and V100/V150/V200). Catheter dependency and the duration of α-blocker dependency was also evaluated. On average, 11.2 IPSS surveys were obtained for each patient. Results: One hundred fifty of the 170 patients (88.2%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on day 0. Only one patient required an urinary catheter for > 5 days. Two patients (1.2%) required a subsequent transurethral resection of the prostate gland because of prolonged obstructive/irritative symptoms. To date, no patient has developed an urinary stricture or urinary incontinence. The IPS score on average peaked at 2 weeks following implantation. This

  3. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique. PMID:6421183

  4. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  5. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  6. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  7. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  8. Navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the stud was to develop a computed tomography (CT) based electromagnetic navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy. This is especially designed for situations when needles have to be positioned adjacent to or within critical anatomical structures. In such instances interactive 3D visualisation of the needle positions is essential. The material consisted of a Polhemus electromagnetic 3D digitizer, a Pentium 200 MHz laptop and a voice recognition for continuous speech. In addition, we developed an external reference system constructed of Perspex which could be positioned above the tumour region and attached to the patient using a non-invasive fixation method. A specially designed needle holder and patient bed were also developed. Measurements were made on a series of phantoms in order to study the efficacy and accuracy of the navigation system. The mean navigation accuracy of positioning the 20.0 cm length metallic needles within the phantoms was in the range 2.0-4.1 mm with a maximum of 5.4 mm. This is an improvement on the accuracy of a CT-guided technique which was in the range 6.1-11.3 mm with a maximum of 19.4 mm. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the implant geometry was 3.2 mm within a non-ferromagnetic environment. We found that although the needles were metallic this did not have a significant influence. We also found for our experimental setups that the CT table and operation table non-ferromagnetic parts had no significant influence on the navigation accuracy. This navigation system will be a very useful clinical tool for interstitial brachytherapy applications, particularly when critical structures have to be avoided. It also should provide a significant improvement on our existing technique

  9. Direct measurement of instantaneous source speed for a HDR brachytherapy unit using an optical fiber based detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamisawa, R. A.; Rubo, R. A.; Seraide, R. M.; Rocha, J. R. O.; Almeida, A. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, FFCLRP, University of Sao Paulo, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); INRAD, Medical School - University of Sao Paulo, Clinical Hospital (HCUSP), 05403-001, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); CAISM Radiotherapy Service, CEB, State University of Campinas, 13083-881, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Department of Physics and Mathematics, FFCLRP, University of Sao Paulo, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Several attempts to determine the transit time of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit have been reported in the literature with controversial results. The determination of the source speed is necessary to accurately calculate the transient dose in brachytherapy treatments. In these studies, only the average speed of the source was measured as a parameter for transit dose calculation, which does not account for the realistic movement of the source, and is therefore inaccurate for numerical simulations. The purpose of this work is to report the implementation and technical design of an optical fiber based detector to directly measure the instantaneous speed profile of a {sup 192}Ir source in a Nucletron HDR brachytherapy unit. Methods: To accomplish this task, we have developed a setup that uses the Cerenkov light induced in optical fibers as a detection signal for the radiation source moving inside the HDR catheter. As the {sup 192}Ir source travels between two optical fibers with known distance, the threshold of the induced signals are used to extract the transit time and thus the velocity. The high resolution of the detector enables the measurement of the transit time at short separation distance of the fibers, providing the instantaneous speed. Results: Accurate and high resolution speed profiles of the {sup 192}Ir radiation source traveling from the safe to the end of the catheter and between dwell positions are presented. The maximum and minimum velocities of the source were found to be 52.0{+-}1.0 and 17.3{+-}1.2 cm/s. The authors demonstrate that the radiation source follows a uniformly accelerated linear motion with acceleration of |a|=113 cm/s{sup 2}. In addition, the authors compare the average speed measured using the optical fiber detector to those obtained in the literature, showing deviation up to 265%. Conclusions: To the best of the authors' knowledge, the authors directly measured for the first time the instantaneous speed

  10. Direct measurement of instantaneous source speed for a HDR brachytherapy unit using an optical fiber based detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Several attempts to determine the transit time of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit have been reported in the literature with controversial results. The determination of the source speed is necessary to accurately calculate the transient dose in brachytherapy treatments. In these studies, only the average speed of the source was measured as a parameter for transit dose calculation, which does not account for the realistic movement of the source, and is therefore inaccurate for numerical simulations. The purpose of this work is to report the implementation and technical design of an optical fiber based detector to directly measure the instantaneous speed profile of a 192Ir source in a Nucletron HDR brachytherapy unit. Methods: To accomplish this task, we have developed a setup that uses the Cerenkov light induced in optical fibers as a detection signal for the radiation source moving inside the HDR catheter. As the 192Ir source travels between two optical fibers with known distance, the threshold of the induced signals are used to extract the transit time and thus the velocity. The high resolution of the detector enables the measurement of the transit time at short separation distance of the fibers, providing the instantaneous speed. Results: Accurate and high resolution speed profiles of the 192Ir radiation source traveling from the safe to the end of the catheter and between dwell positions are presented. The maximum and minimum velocities of the source were found to be 52.0±1.0 and 17.3±1.2 cm/s. The authors demonstrate that the radiation source follows a uniformly accelerated linear motion with acceleration of |a|=113 cm/s2. In addition, the authors compare the average speed measured using the optical fiber detector to those obtained in the literature, showing deviation up to 265%. Conclusions: To the best of the authors' knowledge, the authors directly measured for the first time the instantaneous speed profile of a radiation source in a HDR

  11. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency, a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5F angiographic catheters (pigtail, Sos Omni), goose-neck snare, or combinations thereof. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients, port catheter malposition correction was not possible because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. In migrated catheter tips, radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis, port catheter correction is often more challenging

  12. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging

  13. Computed Tomography-Guided Interstitial HDR Brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) of the Liver in Patients with Irresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the clinical outcome of patients with irresectable, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC) treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided HDR-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) for local tumor ablation.MethodFifteen consecutive patients with histologically proven cholangiocarcinoma were selected for this retrospective study. Patients were treated by high-dose-rate internal brachytherapy (HDRBT) using an Iridium-192 source in afterloading technique through CT-guided percutaneous placed catheters. A total of 27 brachytherapy treatments were performed in these patients between 2006 and 2009. Median tumor enclosing target dose was 20 Gy, and mean target volume of the radiated tumors was 131 (± 90) ml (range, 10–257 ml). Follow-up consisted of clinical visits and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver every third month. Statistical evaluation included survival analysis using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 (range, 1–27) months after local ablation, 6 of the 15 patients are still alive; 4 of them did not get further chemotherapy and are regarded as disease-free. The reached median local tumor control was 10 months; median local tumor control, including repetitive local ablation, was 11 months. Median survival after local ablation was 14 months and after primary diagnosis 21 months. Conclusion: In view of current clinical data on the clinical outcome of cholangiocarcinoma, locally ablative treatment with CT-HDRBT represents a promising and safe technique for patients who are not eligible for tumor resection.

  14. Influence of catheter insertion on the hemodynamic environment in coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Sun, Anqiang; Liu, Xiao; Pu, Fang; Deng, Xiaoyan; Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular stenting is one of the most commonly used treatments to restore the vascular lumen and flow conditions, while perioperative complications such as thrombosis and restenosis are still nagging for patients. As the catheter with crimped stent and folded balloon is directly advanced through coronary artery during surgery, it is destined to cause interference as well as obstructive effect on blood flow. We wonder how the hemodynamic environment would be disturbed and weather these disturbances cause susceptible factors for those complications. Therefore, a realistic three-dimensional model of left coronary artery was reconstructed and blood flow patterns were numerically simulated at seven different stages in the catheter insertion process. The results revealed that the wall shear stress (WSS) and velocity in left anterior descending (LAD) were both significantly increased after catheter inserted into LAD. Besides, the WSS on the catheter, especially at the ending of the catheter, was also at high level. Compared with the condition before catheter inserted, the endothelial cells of LAD was exposed to high-WSS condition and the risk of platelet aggregation in blood flow was increased. These influences may make coronary arteries more vulnerable for perioperative complications. PMID:27394085

  15. Real-time in vivo dosimetry and error detection during afterloading brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir

    Image guided afterloaded brachytherapy (BT) allows for conformal and patient specific radiotherapy (RT) treatments against cancer, where high dose concentrations are administered to the tumor volume and small doses to organs at risk (OARs). In afterloaded BT, ionizing radiation is delivered by...... cervical cancer at the Aarhus University Hospital. The tools and methods developed for the implementation targeted requirements for accurate IVD and the demands for a time-efficient and straightforward clinical approach. The performance of all developments was explored based on IVD results for 20 PDR BT...... means of a radionuclide attached to a source chain that is placed inside source catheters implanted in the target region. As for any RT treatment modality, BT treatments are subject to discrepancies between the delivered and planned treatments. Given the localized and high dose concentration near BT...

  16. Endobronchial and endoesophageal high dose rate brachytherapy for malignant airway and digestive tract obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: High dose rate brachytherapy has had a rapid increase in use for endo-luminal treatment especially in tracheobronchial and esophageal carcinoma. The increase in utilization of this modality has outpaced the development of treatment indications, standardization of dose prescription and specification, and reporting of outcome. The course will address these issues. Treatment of endobronchial carcinoma by high dose rate brachytherapy will be discussed covering a survey of low dose, medium dose, and high dose rate treatments reported in the literature to provide prospective. Indications, treatment protocol and results of the author for HDR (including 47 patients treated with medium dose rate) will be discussed, covering more than 500 patients treated on dose searching protocols. Results will include improvement in obstruction (using the obstruction score), symptoms (using the fourtiered symptom complex scores), recurrence patterns, oxygen saturation, performance status, and survival (including cause of death). Complications discussed will be immediate i.e., pneumothorax, and delayed such as fatal hemoptysis, and radiation bronchitis/stenosis. Treatment recommendations for radiation bronchitis/stenosis will be covered. Esophageal brachytherapy for more than 100 patients will be discussed. Procedure, treatment protocols for palliative treatment (both initial disease and recurrence) and for curative intent will be discussed. The curative intent protocol consists of radiation only (external and endoluminal) vs radiation and chemotherapy (reduced dose of external with concurrent 5-FU + Cis-Platinum), then endoluminal brachytherapy. For curative patients, results will include survival and long term complications. Treatment complications to be discussed include perforation, stricture and ulceration

  17. Catheter-tip fixation of a percutaneously implanted port-catheter system to prevent dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of catheter tip dislocation in patients with percutaneously implanted port-catheters for hepatic arterial chemotherapy with catheter tip fixation. Forty-seven patients (31 men and 16 women; mean age 66 years) with unresectable advanced liver cancers (primary liver cancer, n=19; metastatic liver cancer, n=28) underwent percutaneously implantable port-catheter system placement with the tip fixed at the gastroduodenal artery with coils and side hole opened at the common hepatic artery. In 39 patients, n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with Lipiodol was added for fixation. The position of the side hole after the indwelling port-catheter system was investigated, and the correction method in cases with catheter dislocation was determined. In 2 (25%) of the 8 patients without NBCA fixation, dislocation of the catheter was noted, in contrast to none (0%) of 37 patients with NBCA fixation. Two patients in whom NBCA was used could not undergo long-term intra-arterial chemotherapy because of hepatic arterial thrombotic occlusion which occurred after placement of the indwelling catheter, and were excluded from the evaluation. Fixation of the catheter tip with combined use of coils and NBCA-Lipiodol mixture to the gastroduodenal artery is important to prevent dislocation of the port-catheter system. (orig.)

  18. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  19. Radiofrequency catheter oblation in atrial flutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the radiofrequency catheter ablation for type I atrial flutter through application of Holo catheter labelling with anatomic imaging localization to ablate the isthmus of IVCTA during complete double-way block. Methods: Eleven cases with type I atrial flutter undergone Holo catheter labelling technique and consecution with conduction time change of coronary venous sinus orifice with-right atrial lower lateral wall pace excitation, were performed with radiofrequency catheter ablation for the isthmus outcoming with complete double-way conduction block. Results: All together 11 cases with 4 of atrial flutter and 7 of sinus rhythm were undergone radiofrequency catheter ablation resulting with double-way conduction block of the isthmus accompanied by prolongation of right atrial conduction time 56.0 ± 2.3 ms and 53.0 ± 4.6 ms respectively. The right atrial excitation appeared to be in clockwise and counter-clockwise of single direction. No recurrence occurred during 3-34 months follow up with only one showing atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: The application of Holo catheter labelling technique with anatomic imaging localization to achieve the double-way conduction block by radiofrequency catheter ablation of TVC-TA isthmus, is a reliable method for treating atrial flutter

  20. Endocavity Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Patient-specific Modeling, Experimental Verification, and Combination with HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of targeted hyperthermia delivery by an intrauterine ultrasound applicator to patient-specific treatment volumes in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy was investigated using theory and experiment. 30 HDR brachytherapy treatment plans were inspected to define hyperthermia treatment volumes (HTVs) based on tumor and radiation target volumes. Several typical cases were imported into a patient-specific treatment planning platform that optimized acoustic output power from an endocavity multisectored tubular array to conform temperature and thermal dose to HTVs. Perfusion was within a clinical range of 0.5-3 kg m-3 s-1. Applicators were constructed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90 deg. -360 deg. sectoring and 25-35 mm heating length housed in a water-cooled PET catheter. Acoustic output was compared to heating in ex vivo tissue assessed with implanted thermometry. Radiation attenuation through the device was measured in an ionization chamber. The HTV extends 2-4 cm in diameter and 2-4 cm in length. The bladder and rectum can be within 10-12 mm. HTV targets can be covered with temperature clouds >41 deg. and thermal dose t43>5 min with 45 deg. C maximum temperature and rectal temperature <41.5 deg. C. Sectored applicators preferentially direct energy laterally into the parametrium to limit heating of rectum and bladder. Interstitial brachytherapy catheters within the HTV could be used for thermal feedback during HT treatment. Temperature distributions in phantom show preferential heating within sectors and align well with acoustic output. Heating control along the device length and in angle is evident. A 4-6% reduction in radiation transmission through the transducers was observed, which could likely be compensated for in planning. Patient-specific modeling and experimental heating demonstrated 3-D conformal heating capabilities of endocavity ultrasound applicators.

  1. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  2. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  3. Catheter meaning for the adolescents in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Cristina Morales

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Goal: Terminal renal failure affects all the person’s life dimensions. The impact of this illness during adolescence is quite dramatic because the adolescent must live with the illness demands and the demands from this crucial developmental stage. Knowledge regarding the impact of the dialysis catheter on the adolescent’s life is spare. Methodology: A phenomenological study was carried out with 8 female and male adolescents that were in dialysis. Findings: The adolescents had to learn to live with the dialysis catheter in their body. The catheter became an obstacle to achieve their identity and deteriorated their physical appearance and peer relationships.

  4. Brachytherapy as Part of the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Childhood Rhabdomyosarcomas of the Orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Rhabdomyosarcomas in the orbit form a major challenge in terms of cure without severe side effects in childhood cancer. Our specifically developed approach consists of applying brachytherapy to the tumor area using a mold. Analysis of its results for 20 patients was performed. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients were referred for brachytherapy if complete remission was not reached after chemotherapy (Group I) and 7 in case of relapse (Group II). In total, 20 patients were treated between 1991 and 2007. Four were female and 16 male; their ages varied from 1.1 to 16.5 years, with an average of 8.5 years. After macroscopically radical tumor resection, molds with holes drilled to hold flexible catheters were placed into the orbit. The dose to the clinical target volume was 40-50 Gy. Results: Three patients of Group I and 1 patient of Group II developed local recurrence and underwent exenteration. The progression-free survival in Group I is 71.9% (95% CI 0.44-1.0), in Group II 85.7% (95% CI 0.60-1.0), the overall 5-year survival rate of the entire group is 92% (95% CI 0.76-1.0). During treatment, no serious side effects were observed. The late complications encountered in this series were cataract in 2 patients, 1 of whom also developed mild retinopathy. Two patients with ptosis needed surgical correction. No facial asymmetries or bone growth anomalies were observed. Conclusions: This entire procedure of brachytherapy with a mold offers a tailor-made treatment for orbital rhabdomyosarcomas with only few signs of late toxicity.

  5. Intravascular brachytherapy after percutaneous recanalization of occluded femoral artery: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the use of introvascular brachytherapy after percutaneus recanalization and angioplasty of the femoral artery in a 65-year old patient with hypertension, a history of heavy smoking, and early stage diabetes. The patient was admitted to hospital with rest ischeamia of the right crus and trophic skin changes in that region. After primary pharmacological treatment angiography was performed revealing the femoro-popliteal artery to be occluded in the distal part of the adductor canal. The patency of the artery was established. Subsequently the occluded par of the artery was completely dilated without residual stenosis. Control angiography revealed good contrast flow through the dilated artery and correct configuration of the arteries below the open and dilated part of the femoro-popliteal artery. These arteries were, however, anatomically narrow. On clinical examination the pulse was present on peripheral arteries, while cyanosis of the right foot and the pain had disappeared. To prevent restenosis after angioplasty intravascular brachytherapy was performed with Microselectron192Ir. A PARIS catheter was used as the applicator. It was introduced into the artery using the same access as angiography and angioplasty. The target for irradiation was the dilated part of the artery with bilateral 1.5 cm margins - altogether 10 cm. One dose of 15 Gy was applied 2 mm from the inner surface of the arterial wall (2 mm from the applicator surface). There were no early side effects after the treatment. (author)

  6. ACPSEM brachytherapy working group recommendations for quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendation papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews and have also been approved by the ACPSEM Council. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM Brachytherapy Working Group (BTWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendation papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendation papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  7. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  8. Perfusion scintigraphy (/sup 99m/Tc MAA) during surgery for placement of chemotherapy catheter in hepatic artery: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 17 patients receiving regional hepatic chemotherapy, /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin imaging was used to aid arterial catheter placement and to assess perfusion patterns. Intraoperative imaging with a portable gamma camera allowed immediate monitoring of hepatic and extrahepatic perfusion patterns and assisted catheter manipulation when necessary to achieve optimal flow distribution. In all 12 patients with standard hepatic arterial anatomy, complete perfusion of both lobes of the liver was achieved, although three of them required intraoperative catheter manipulation and repeat imaging after initial placement. The remaining five patients had aberrant hepatic arterial anatomy, and complete perfusion was more difficult to achieve; they exemplified the need for dual catheters, ligation of accessory hepatic branches, and repeated imaging

  9. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  10. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish S Raut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube (ETT suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases.

  11. Venous port catheter dislocation as an unusual cause of pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Serhat Sanrı

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of central venous port catheter is a very useful method for long-term therapy in patients with malignancy. Catheter insertion technique and maintenance of equipment is very important to the prevention of catheter-related complications. The most frequent complications are deep venous thrombosis, port infection, catheter obstruction. İn this article, pneumonia occurrence after chemotherapy infusion in a patient who has a completely extravasated central venous port catheter discussed.

  12. Brachytherapy on treatment of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were: to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferencial technique to each clinical situation. Seventeen patients were female and four male with a median age of five years (range of 3 months to 15 years). Seven children showed head and neck tumors, seven in extremities, five genital, one perineal and one in trunk. Four patients were group II, fifteen group III and two group IV according the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) classification. The histologic type presented eighteen embryonary rhabdomyosarcoma, one alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and in two patients was not possible to be determined. The therapeutic approach included induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to the primary site in association or not with surgical ressection and maintenance chemotherapy. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were: Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40Gy to 60Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20Gy to 40Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% ((13(21)) patients) and 72.2% ((13(18)) patients) respectively. Staging and age showed statistic significance for survival. Distant metastasis occurred in seven patients (33.3%), mainly to the lungs. Patients treated with total radiation dose higher than 45Gy showed more incidence of

  13. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  14. A feasibility study for using ABS plastic and a low-cost 3D printer for patient-specific brachytherapy mould design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Benjamin D; Nilsson, Sanna; Poole, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    This feasibility study aims to determine if a low-cost 3D printer (BitsFromBytes 3D Touch) with ABS plastic can print custom mould structures and catheter channels defined in a brachytherapy treatment planning system (Nucletron Oncentra) for patient-specific treatment. Printer accuracy was evaluated through physical measurement, and print quality was investigated by adjusting print parameters (print speed, layer thickness, percentage infill). Catheter positioning and reproducibility were measured over repeated insertions. ABS plastic water equivalency was investigated by comparing Ir-192 HDR source dose distributions, measured with radiochromic film, in ABS plastic and in water. Structures and catheter channels were printed accurately to within 0.5 mm laterally and 1 mm in the vertical print direction. Adjusting print parameters could reduce print time, albeit with reduced print quality. 3.5 mm channel diameters allowed for easy catheter insertion. Catheter positioning was reproducible to within 0.5 mm but, because of catheter flex within the channel, was on average 1 mm offset from defined TPS positions. This offset could be accounted for by repeating the treatment planning CT scan with the printed mould positioned on the patient. Dose attenuation in ABS plastic and in water was equivalent to within the measurement limitations. While clinical uses for this particular low-cost printer and ABS plastic are limited by print size restrictions and non-certification for biocompatibility, it has been demonstrated that a low-cost 3D printer set-up can accurately create custom moulds and catheter channels potentially acceptable for clinical use. PMID:26108891

  15. Dosimetric calculus in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment). Known as Intravascular Brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, 0.30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several radionuclides. Two stent sources employing 32P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the radionuclides and source geometries are discussed and the dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients. (author)

  16. An Unusual Complication of Suprapubic Catheter Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Ananthakrishnan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient who had a small bowel mesentery perforation following insertion of a suprapubic catheter (SPC is described. He had no bowel complaints immediately following the procedure, but presented 10 weeks later with insidious onset bowel obstruction due to the kink caused by the catheter. This complication occurred despite cystoscopy control and adequate bladder distension prior to the procedure. This isolated case illustrates the fact that regardless of the ease and frequency of SPC insertion, complications do occur.

  17. Wound catheter techniques for postoperative analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    VINTAR, NELI

    2009-01-01

    Wound catheter technique is a technique of postoperative analgesia in which the surgeon places a catheter to infuse local anesthetic into wounds at the end of the procedure. It can be used in abdominal colorectal surgery or after holecystectomies, was studied after caesarean delivery. It was effective after some orthopaedic procedures such as shoulder and knee surgery, at the donor site in the iliac crest. It can be used in plastic surgery after breast surgery. It is technically efficie...

  18. Brachytherapy of stage II mobile tongue carcinoma. Prediction of local control and QOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Hiroshi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus as to the prognostic model for brachytherapy of tongue carcinoma. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors for local control based on a large population under a unified treatment policy. Results Between 1970 and 1998, 433 patients with stage II tongue squamous cell carcinoma were treated by low-dose-rate brachytherapy. This series included 277 patients treated with a linear source with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. A spacer was introduced in 1987. The primary local control rates were 85.6%. Conclusion In the multivariate analysis, an invasive growth pattern was a significant factor for local recurrence. The disease-related survival was influenced by old age and an invasive growth pattern. A spacer lowered mandibular bone complications. The growth pattern was the most important factor for recurrence. Brachytherapy was associated with a high cure rate and the use of spacers brought about good quality of life (QOL.

  19. Haemolyzed samples: responsibility of short catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisky, F; Gauthier, C; Marchal, A; Blum, D

    1994-01-01

    The haemolysis of blood samples is a source of error in the electrolytic and enzymatic determination in clinical biochemistry. This circumstance seems dependent on the material used for the venepuncture. In this study we compared three kinds of material in 350 patients who were sampled in the emergency department. This randomized study compared the haemolysis of blood samples collected with stainless steel needles and short catheters, either Teflon FEP (Cathlon Critikon) or polyurethane Vialon (Insyte Becton-Dickinson). Quantification of hemolysis was performed by assay of the optical density of plasma haemoglobin. Results were analysed, after verification of the randomization, by one-way analysis of variance by ranks. This study demonstrated a highly significant relation between occurrence of haemolysis and the sampling material, used according to its technical obligations. Haemolysis occurred frequently when short catheters were used in 42% and 55% of cases with the Teflon and Vialon catheters, respectively. Haemolysis was much less frequent with stainless steel needles (12%). This difference was even more marked for haemoglobin levels above 1.5 milligrams of plasma, where the incidence was 4.2%, 9% and 30%, respectively, for the stainless steel needles, the Teflon catheter and the Vialon catheter. This study induced our emergency department to take more blood samples with a needle, even if an infusion was to be given subsequently, or to take them using a Teflon catheter. PMID:7840428

  20. Patient specific optimization-based treatment planning for catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia and thermal ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Punit; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    A 3D optimization-based thermal treatment planning platform has been developed for the application of catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for treating advanced pelvic tumors. Optimal selection of applied power levels to each independently controlled transducer segment can be used to conform and maximize therapeutic heating and thermal dose coverage to the target region, providing significant advantages over current hyperthermia technology and improving treatment response. Critical anatomic structures, clinical target outlines, and implant/applicator geometries were acquired from sequential multi-slice 2D images obtained from HDR treatment planning and used to reconstruct patient specific 3D biothermal models. A constrained optimization algorithm was devised and integrated within a finite element thermal solver to determine a priori the optimal applied power levels and the resulting 3D temperature distributions such that therapeutic heating is maximized within the target, while placing constraints on maximum tissue temperature and thermal exposure of surrounding non-targeted tissue. This optimizationbased treatment planning and modeling system was applied on representative cases of clinical implants for HDR treatment of cervix and prostate to evaluate the utility of this planning approach. The planning provided significant improvement in achievable temperature distributions for all cases, with substantial increase in T90 and thermal dose (CEM43T90) coverage to the hyperthermia target volume while decreasing maximum treatment temperature and reducing thermal dose exposure to surrounding non-targeted tissues and thermally sensitive rectum and bladder. This optimization based treatment planning platform with catheter-based ultrasound applicators is a useful tool that has potential to significantly improve the delivery of hyperthermia in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy. The planning platform has been extended

  1. Dosimetric fundamentals of endovascular brachytherapy using Re-188 to prevent restenosis after angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various radionuclides can be used for endovascular brachytherapy. A new concept is to inflate the balloon of a dilitation catheter with a radioactive solution. Re-188 can be eluated from a generator system and is available daily. The aim of this study was to obtain dosimetric data for this radionuclide. The dose decrease of Re-188 was calculated and measured with a TLD-system radial to a balloon catheter typically used in cardiology (diameter: 3 mm, length: 20 mm). Using a specific acitivity of 370 MBq/ml a dose of 0,3 Gy could be achieved within 1 min in a TLD in contact with the balloon. Paired TLDs differed about 3%. A fast dose reduction of 50% and 10% were stated within 0.5 mm and 2.5 mm, respectively. Calculated and measured values were in good agreement. The data are comparable to those known for Y-90. Calculations of dose distribution are consistent with TLD measurements of Re-188. Using a specific activity of 1.85 GBq/ml, a dose of 10-15 Gy at the coronary artery wall can be achieved within 2-3 min. (orig./MG)

  2. HDR brachytherapy with surface applicators: technical considerations and dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbas, Albert M; Kulidzhanov, Fridon G; Presser, Joseph; Hayes, Mary K; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    2004-06-01

    HDR surface molds offer an alternative radiotherapy modality to electrons for the treatment of skin lesions. Treatment planning and dosimetry are discussed for two types of surface molds used in our clinic. Standard rectangular applicators are used on a variety of sites where surface curvature is minimal. In these cases an idealized planar geometry is used for treatment planning dose calculations. The calculations yield treatment dose uniformity at the prescription depth in tissue as well as skin dose, as a percentage of the treatment dose, and its dose uniformity. The availability of optimization techniques results in superior dose uniformity at depth but the dose at the skin has to be carefully evaluated. We have studied the dependence of these dosimetric parameters on the size of the surface mold and the type of optimization procedure used in the dosimetry calculations. The second type of surface applicator involves the use of a customized silicone rubber mold attached to a thermoplastic mask of the patient. We have used them to treat lesions of the face where surface curvatures are appreciable and reproducibility of setup is more critical. In these cases a CT data set is used for reconstruction of the catheters, activation of relevant dwell positions and dosimetry, including optimization. Towards establishing effective methods for quality assurance of the optimized HDR surface mold planning calculations, we have compared their dosimetry to both a classical brachytherapy system and to one based on an analytical model of the applicator. The classical system yields an independent verification of the integrated activity used in the planning calculations, whereas the analytical model is used to evaluate depth dose dependence on mold size and optimization. PMID:15161319

  3. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of urethral strictures is a major challenge in urology. For investigation of different treatment methods an animal model was developed by reproducible induction of urethral strictures in rabbits to mimic the human clinical situation. By means of this model the potential of endoluminal LDR brachytherapy using β-irradiation as prophylaxis of recurrent urethral strictures investigated. Material and Methods: A circumferential urethral stricture was induced by energy deposition using laser light application (wavelength λ=1470 nm, 10 W, 10 s, applied energy 100 J) in the posterior urethra of anaesthetized New Zealand White male rabbits. The radial light emitting fiber was introduced by means of a children resectoscope (14F). The grade of urethral stricture was evaluated in 18 rabbits using videourethroscopy and urethrography at day 28 after stricture induction. An innovative catheter was developed based on a β-irradiation emitting foil containing 32P, which was wrapped around the application system. Two main groups (each n=18) were separated. The "internal urethrotomy group" received after 28days of stricture induction immediately after surgical urethrotomy of the stricture the radioactive catheter for one week in a randomized, controlled and blinded manner. There were 3 subgroups with 6 animals each receiving 0 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy. In contrast animals from the "De Nuovo group" received directly after the stricture induction (day 0) the radioactive catheter also for the duration of one week divided into the same dose subgroups. In order to determine the radiation tolerance of the urethral mucosa, additional animals without any stricture induction received a radioactive catheter applying a total dose of 30 Gy (n=2) and 15 Gy (n=1). Cystourethrography and endoscopic examination of urethra were performed on all operation days for monitoring treatment progress. Based on these investigation a classification of the stricture size was performed and

  4. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette H;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  5. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  6. Dose calculation in brachytherapy with microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer algorithms, that allow the calculation of brachytherapy doses and its graphic representation for implants, using programs developed for Pc microcomputers are presented. These algorithms allow to localized the sources in space, from their projection in radiographics images and trace isodose counter. (C.G.C.)

  7. Strategies for the control of catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J; Evans, A; Morris, N; Hughes, G

    2002-06-01

    Two general strategies have been adopted to develop catheter materials that resist encrustaion by bacterial biofilms: (a) the incorporation of antimicrobial agents into the polymers and (b) the production of materials with surface properties which prevent the adherence of bacterial cells. Our experience to develop non-adherent surfaces which abstracts design from nature is reported. Compounds based on 2-methacryloloxyethylphosphorylcholine co-polymerised with long-chain alkyl methacrylates have been produced which have structural and surface properties similar to those of the outer membranes of erythrocytes. These PC-coatings have been applied onto catheter base materials where they produce polar surfaces that are extremely hydrophilic. In experiments using a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder we found that the PC-coatings did not reduce colonisation of latex or silicone catheters by crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm. There were no significant difference between the amounts of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on coated and non-coated catheters. In a further set of experiments the PC-coatings did not significantly increase the mean times for which catheters drained freely. In a parallel clinical study, the performance of PC-coated ureteral stents was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and bacteriological analysis on 44 PC-coated stents that had been implanted in patients for 12-week periods and 28 control stents suggested that the PC-coated devices were less vulnerable to encrustation and colonisation by bacterial biofilm than normal stents. It was of interest that in contrast to encrusted catheters, urease producing species such as P. mirabilis were rarely isolated from the stents. The main organisms colonising the stents were enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that the mechanisms of catheter and stent encrustation may be different and require different strategies for control. PMID:12135840

  8. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha

  9. Langzeitergebnisse bei Aderhautmelanom nach 106Ruthenium-Brachytherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Nona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: 106Ruthenium-brachytherapy (106Ru-brachytherapy) is an established therapy for small and medium-sized uveal melanomas. The aim of this study was to examine the long-time results in regard to recurrence rate, complication rate, ocular preservation, metastasis rate and survival with malignant uveal and ciliary body melanoma, as well as relevant prognosis factors, subsequent to 106Ru-brachytherapy. Methodology: In this retrospective study of all cases with uveal or with ciliary ...

  10. Prostate cancer brachytherapy; Braquiterapia de cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F. [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Oncologia. Dep. de Radioterapia; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Disciplina de Urologia]. E-mail: cevitabr@mandic.com.br

    1999-07-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with {sup 125}I/Pd{sup 103} seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy.

  11. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  12. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  13. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  14. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  15. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: The feasibility and cosmetic outcome of a fractionated outpatient delivery scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, potential toxicity, and cosmetic outcome of fractionated interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the management of patients with breast cancer at increased risk for local recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 1996, 18 women with early stage breast cancer underwent conventionally fractionated whole breast radiotherapy (50-50.4 Gy) followed by interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost. All were considered to be at high risk for local failure. Seventeen had pathologically confirmed final surgical margins of less than 2 mm or focally positive. Brachytherapy catheter placement and treatment delivery were conducted on an outpatient basis. Preplanning was used to determine optimal catheter positions to enhance dose homogeneity of dose delivery. The total HDR boost dose was 15 Gy delivered in 6 fractions of 2.5 Gy over 3 days. Local control, survival, late toxicities (LENT-SOMA), and cosmetic outcome were recorded in follow-up. In addition, factors potentially influencing cosmesis were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results: The minimum follow-up is 40 months with a median 50 months. Sixteen patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. There have been no in-breast failures observed. One patient died with brain metastases, and another died of unrelated causes without evidence of disease. Grade 1-2 late toxicities included 39% with hyperpigmentation, 56% with detectable fibrosis, 28% with occasional discomfort, and 11% with visible telangiectasias. Grade 3 toxicity was reported in one patient as persistent discomfort. Sixty-seven percent of patients were considered to have experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Factors with a direct relationship to adverse cosmetic outcome were extent of surgical defect (p = 0.00001), primary excision volume (p = 0.017), and total excision volume (p = 0.015). Conclusions: For high risk patients who may benefit from increased doses, interstitial HDR

  16. Brachytherapy in the treatment of genitourinary rhabdomyosarcoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy has been widely used at the Institut Gustave Roussy since 1972 in pediatric oncology. In genitourinary rhabdomyosarcoma, because of its ballistic and physical characteristics, it represents the optimal treatment whenever irradiation is required and brachytherapy feasible. Between 1976 and 1998, 23 children with bladder or prostate rhabdomyosarcoma were treated with a protocol including brachytherapy, with five of them treated with a salvage brachytherapy. All but one brachytherapy was performed during the surgery. Among the 18 brachy-therapies performed as a first-line treatment, eight presented a tumoral evolution: five presented a local evolution, one a local and nodal evolution and two a nodal evolution. Brachytherapy allowed a conservative treatment among ten out of 11 children alive with no evidence of disease. Among the five patients with salvage brachytherapy, two presented a second recurrence. Sequelae were minimal, consisting of one grade I rectitis and one asymptomatic vesical and ureteral reflux. These results are consistent with the published data using more radical treatment. Brachytherapy can represent an alternative to radical surgery, when indications are clearly defined in bladder or prostate rhabdomyosarcoma. This type of treatment can be performed only integrated with other treatments, more particularly with surgery. This approach requires a close cooperation between the different specialists: pediatricians, surgeons and brachy-therapists. (authors)

  17. Implementation of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Limited Resource Settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is an essential component of the curative treatment of cervical cancer, a disease with high incidence in many developing countries The IAEA supports the use of high dose rate brachytherapy for centres with a large number of patients with this disease. HDR brachytherapy is also used in other common cancers such as breast cancer, lung, oesophagus and prostate. This publication provides guidance to radiation oncologists, medical physicists and planners on establishing and operating a high dose rate brachytherapy unit with modern standards and presents the main issues to be addressed for its effective and safe operation

  18. Cost effective method of manual afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In radiotherapy, brachytherapy mode of treatment has equal importance like the external beam radiotherapy. In our hospital we have manual afterloading 137Cs kit supplied by BRIT for intracavitary treatment of carcinoma cervix and vaginal cases. In July 1999, we also started afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy. For a hospital like ours, where funds are minimal, it is impossible to procure remote afterloading brachytherapy unit, which is very costly. So we have developed the cost-effective 192Ir manual brachytherapy and so far we have done 60 cases which include intraluminal and interstitial cases

  19. A comparison of complications between ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy and open prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy has reemerged during the 1990s as a treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. The renewed popularity of prostate brachytherapy is largely due to the use of transrectal ultrasound of the prostate, which allows for more accurate isotope placement within the prostate when compared to the open approach. The present study investigates whether this improved cancer control is at the expense of increased morbidity by comparing the morbidity after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy to the morbidity after prostate brachytherapy performed via an open approach. Methods and Materials: All men in the Medicare population who underwent prostate brachytherapy in the year 1991 were identified. These men were further stratified into those men who underwent prostate brachytherapy via an open approach and the men who underwent prostate brachytherapy with ultrasound guidance. All subsequent inpatient, outpatient, and physician (Part B) Medicare claims for these men from the years 1991-1993 were then analyzed to determine outcomes. Results: In the year 1991, 2124 men in the Medicare population underwent prostate brachytherapy. An open approach was used in 715 men (33.7%), and ultrasound guidance was used in 1409 men (66.3%). Mean age for both cohorts was 73.7 years with a range of 50.7-92.8 years for the ultrasound group and 60.6-92.1 years for the open group. A surgical procedure for the relief of bladder outlet obstruction was performed in 122 men (8.6%) in the ultrasound group and in 54 men (7.6%) in the open group. An artificial urinary sphincter was placed in 2 men (0.14%) in the ultrasound group and in 2 men (0.28%) in the open group. A penile prosthesis was implanted in 10 men (0.71%) in the ultrasound group and in 4 men (0.56%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for urinary incontinence was carried by 95 men (6.7%) in the ultrasound group and by 45 men (6.3%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for erectile dysfunction

  20. Impact of short-term hemodialysis catheters on the central veins: a catheter venographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguzkurt, Levent E-mail: loguzkurt@yahoo.com; Tercan, Fahri; Torun, Dilek; Yildirim, Tuelin; Zuemruetdal, Ayseguel; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2004-12-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the central veins in hemodialysis patients with temporary catheters. Methods and material: In this prospective study, 57 patients (40 males, 17 females) with temporary dialysis catheters had catheter venography by pulling back the catheter just before removal. Patient's age range was 25-87 years (mean age, 51 years). The venographic studies were evaluated for pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) and the superior vena cava (SVC). The IJV could only be evaluated if there was adequate filling during contrast administration. In a subgroup of patients who had had only right IJV or only right SCV catheters, impact of these catheters on the central veins was compared. Results: The catheter location was right internal jugular vein (IJV) in 26 cases, right subclavian vein (SCV) in 27 cases, left IJV in 1 case, and left SCV in 3 cases. Thirty-two patients (56%) had had only one temporary catheter and the rest had had more than one inserted. The mean dwell time for the catheters was 21 days (range 7-59 days). A pericatheter sleeve was detected on venography in 32 (56%) patients and thrombus formation was noted in 16 patients (28%). A total of 41 patients (72%) exhibited pericatheter sleeve and/or thrombus formation. While 19 of the 32 patients (59%) without previous catheterization had a sleeve around the catheter, only 13 (52%) of 25 patients who had had multiple catheters inserted had a sleeve (P>0.05). Of the eight patients (14%) with BCV stenosis, two had >50% stenosis. Only one patient (2%) had mild stenosis of the SVC. Three patients out of 15 (20%) who had diagnostic venography for the IJV had severe stenosis of the vein. Pericatheter sleeve formation was more frequent in women (P<0.05). However, there were no statistical differences with respect to pericatheter sleeve formation, luminal filling

  1. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  2. Everting (toposcopic) catheter for broad clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, D R; Doppman, J L; Cattau, E L; Goldstein, S R

    1986-05-01

    The advanced development of the clinical everting (toposcopic) catheter is described. A detailed discussion of the design and outline of the fabrication techniques are followed by a thorough performance evaluation and summary of the first two clinical applications. The everting element is a low-durometer thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer. Surface treatments include the bonding of a hydrophilic polymeric coating, optimized for lubricity, to the sliding internal surfaces of the catheter. Eversion pressures and infusion/aspiration flow rates have been measured under various conditions and the infusate-in-blood mixing potential investigated. A preliminary assessment is given of the clinical performance of the catheter in the vascular delivery of chemotherapy and standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:3724105

  3. [Phlebitogenicity of venous catheters of Vialon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassolt, A

    1985-12-01

    During three days 132 surgical patients with postoperative infusion treatment were checked on the frequency of venous reactions in the arms when catheters/cannulas of 4 different materials were used and the outcome compared. A significant result was obtained in connection with the I-cath catheter made of vialon (a polyurethanelike resin polymer) and the L-cath of polyurethane. Phlebitis was decreased to 27.3% resp. 24.2% - approximately half of its usual frequency - when I-cath of polyvinyl-chloride and FEP-teflon vasofix cannulas were applied (both 51.5%). The different predisposing factors of infusion phlebitis are under discussion. PMID:4093198

  4. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  5. Comparison of catheter tip migration using flexible and stimulating catheters inserted into the adductor canal in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher A J; Kim, T Edward; Funck, Natasha; Howard, Steven K; Harrison, T Kyle; Ganaway, Toni; Keng, Heidi; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    Use of adductor canal blocks and catheters for perioperative pain management following total knee arthroplasty is becoming increasingly common. However, the optimal equipment, timing of catheter insertion, and catheter dislodgement rate remain unknown. A previous study has suggested, but not proven, that non-tunneled stimulating catheters may be at increased risk for catheter migration and dislodgement after knee manipulation. We designed this follow-up study to directly compare tip migration of two catheter types after knee range of motion exercises. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 30 catheter insertion trials were randomly assigned to one of two catheter types: flexible or stimulating. All catheters were inserted using an ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane technique. Intraoperative knee manipulation similar to that performed during surgery was simulated by five sequential range of motion exercises. A blinded regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after exercise. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.547) and catheter length within the adductor canal (p = 0.498) were not different between groups. Therefore, catheter type may not affect the risk of catheter tip migration when placed prior to knee arthroplasty. PMID:25510467

  6. Prevention of catheter-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ping; Liu Wei; Kong Jinliang; Wu Hong; Chen Yiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Implanted medical catheter-related infections are increasing,hence a need for developing catheter polymers bonded to antimicrobials.We evaluated preventive effects of levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in catheterrelated Psuedomonas aeruginosa (strain PAO1) infection.Methods Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was measured in vitro.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheters were immersed in 5 ml 50% Luria Bertani medium containing 108 CFU/ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa then incubated for 6,12,24 or 48 hours at 37℃ when bacteria adhering to the catheters and bacteria in the growth culture medium were determined.Impregnated and PVC catheters were singly implanted subcutaneously in mice,50 μl (107CFU) of PAO1 was injected into catheters.After the first and fifth days challenge,bacterial counts on implanted catheters and in surrounding tissues were determined microbiologically.Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on implanted catheters were assessed by scanning electron microscopy.Results Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was rapid.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters had significantly fewer bacteria compared to PVC in vitro.After first and fifth day of challenge,no or significantly fewer bacteria adhered to impregnated catheters or in surrounding tissues compared to PVC.Scanning electron microscopical images after first day displayed from none to significantly fewer bacteria adhering to impregnated implanted catheters,compared to bacteria and microcolonies adhering to PVC catheters.After the fifth day,no bacteria were found on impregnated catheters,compared to clusters surrounding mucus-like substance and coral-shaped biofilms with polymorphonuclear leukocyte on PVC catheters.After the first day of challenge,secretion occurred in all implanted catheters with surrounding tissues mildly hyperaemic and swollen.After the fifth day,minute secretions inside impregnated catheters and no

  7. Catheter-Related Sepsis Due to Rhodotorula glutinis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2003-01-01

    We describe a central venous catheter-related (Port-A-Cath; Smiths Industries Medical Systems [SIMS] Deltec, Inc., St. Paul, Minn.) infection caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 51-year-old man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. He was treated with fluconazole for 8 weeks and had the catheter removed. Two isolates of R. glutinis recovered from blood specimens (one obtained via peripheral veins and one via the catheter) before administration of fluconazole and one recovered from the removed cathet...

  8. Force control of flexible catheter robots for beating heart surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in cardiac catheter technology promise to allow physicians to perform most cardiac interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, current cardiac devices, including newly developed catheter robots, are unable to accurately track and interact with the fast moving cardiac tissue without applying potentially damaging forces. This paper examines the challenges of implementing force control on a flexible robotic catheter. In particular, catheter frictio...

  9. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  10. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Dávalos, A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M; Díaz-Perches, R; Arzamendi-Pérez, S

    2002-01-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200 with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. PMID:12382798

  11. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Arzamendi-Perez, S

    2002-07-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200) with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. (author)

  12. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200) with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. (author)

  13. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  14. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Instituut Verbeeten, P.O. Box 90120, 5000 LA Tilburg (Netherlands); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  15. Sexual function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation following permanent prostate brachytherapy and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function. Materials and Methods: 425 patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. 209 patients who were potent prior to brachytherapy and currently not receiving hormonal manipulation were mailed an International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire with a pre-addressed stamped envelope. 180 patients completed and returned the questionnaire. Median patient follow-up was 39 months (range 18-74 months). Pre-implant erectile function was assigned using a three-tiered scoring system (2 = erections always or nearly always sufficient for vaginal penetration; 1 = erections sufficient for vaginal penetration but considered suboptimal; 0 = the inability to obtain erections and/or erections inadequate for vaginal penetration). Post-implant potency was defined as an IIEF score >11. Clinical parameters evaluated for sexual function included patient age, clinical T stage, elapsed time since implantation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco consumption. Evaluated treatment parameters included the utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation and the choice of isotope. The efficacy of sildenafil citrate in brachytherapy induced erectile dysfunction (ED) was also evaluated. Results: A pre-treatment erectile function score of 2 and 1 were assigned to 126 and 54 patients respectively. With 6 year follow up, 39% of patients maintained potency following prostate brachytherapy with a plateau on the curve. Post-implant preservation of potency (IIEF>11) correlated with pre-implant erectile function (50% versus 14% for pre-implant scores of 2 and 1 respectively, p≤0.0001), patient age (56%, 38%, and 23% for patients <60 years of age, 60-69 years of age, and ≥70 years of age respectively, p=0.012) and a history of diabetes mellitus

  16. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  17. Damage of Central Catheters in Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błasiak Renata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available According to the ESPEN and ASPEN guidelines, in the case of a long-term (>3-month parenteral nutrition should be administered via a subcutaneous central venous catheter (CVC. There are three types of mechanical complications of tunnelled central catheter: catheter rupture, occlusion by TPN depositing and thrombofibrotic occlusion.

  18. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Bonasso, Patrick C.; Brandon Lucke-Wold; Uzer Khan

    2016-01-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  19. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Bonasso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  20. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  1. Activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis attached to plastic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A; García, I; Ramirez de Arellano, E; Perea, E J

    1995-08-01

    The activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on different plastic catheters was evaluated. Sparfloxacin showed high bactericidal activity against S. epidermidis biofilms on Vialon and polyvinylchloride catheters. The combination of sparfloxacin with amikacin or rifampicin significantly increased its activity against bacterial biofilms on polyurethane and Teflon catheters. PMID:8522473

  2. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  4. American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To develop and disseminate the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for the clinical quality assurance and guidelines of permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy with 125I or 103Pd. Methods and Materials: The ABS formed a committee of experts in prostate brachytherapy to develop consensus guidelines through a critical analysis of published data supplemented by their clinical experience. The recommendations of the panels were reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the ABS. Results: Patients with high probability of organ-confined disease are appropriately treated with brachytherapy alone. Brachytherapy candidates with a significant risk of extraprostatic extension should be treated with supplemental external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Patient selection guidelines were developed. Dosimetric planning of the implant should be carried out for all patients before seed insertion. A modified peripheral loading is preferred. The AAPM TG-43 recommendations requiring a change in prescription dose for 125I sources should be universally implemented. The recommended prescription doses for monotherapy are 145 Gy for 125I and 115-120 Gy for 103Pd. The corresponding boost doses (after 40-50 Gy EBRT) are 100-110 Gy and 80-90 Gy, respectively. Clinical evidence to guide selection of radionuclide (103Pd or 125I) is lacking. Post implant dosimetry and evaluation must be performed on all patients. It is suggested that the dose that covers 90% (D90) and 100% (D100) of the prostate volume and the percentage of the prostate volume receiving the prescribed dose (V100) be obtained from a dose-volume histogram (DVH) and reported. Conclusion: Guidelines for appropriate patient selection, dose reporting, and improved quality of permanent prostate brachytherapy are presented. These broad recommendations are intended to be technical and advisory in nature, but the ultimate responsibility for the medical decisions rests with the treating

  5. Survival benefit of hyperthermia in a prospective randomized trial of brachytherapy boost ± hyperthermia for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B patients vs. 76 weeks for 33 arm A patients (p = 0.014). Factors associated with improved survival in the multivariate analysis of all 80 randomized patients included lower age (p = 0.001), higher KPS (p = 0.022), and randomization to arm B as opposed to arm A (p = 0.014). Thermal parameters were not associated with survival. There were 2 Grade 4 toxicities (meningitis) and 3 Grade 3 toxicities (1 infection, 1 case of increased hemiparesis, and 1 case of liver toxicity from hydroxyurea) on arm B, representing a 12.5% ((5(40))) incidence of serious toxicity. There were no grade 3, 4, or grade 5 toxicities on arm A. Conclusion: Adjuvant interstitial brain hyperthermia given for 30 minutes before and after brain brachytherapy boost after conventional external beam radiotherapy significantly improves survival of patients with focal glioblastoma multiforme, with acceptable toxicity. This represents the first positive randomized North American hyperthermia trial. We feel that our study benefited from the precise image-based treatment planning and catheter placement inherent in stereotactic technique and the lack of pain sensation within brain parenchyma, allowing good quality hyperthermia

  6. The humanization of catheter room design: its clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American scholar Engeer has proposed biological, psychological and sociological medicine pattern, which has been well accepted by the society, It has manifested the medical arena humanism return and has made the profound influence on the nursing development. The idea, 'the human is a whole', has gradually become the mainstream of the nurse service concept, meanwhile, the environment has more and more become a beneficial part for diagnosing and treating in hospitalization. The improvement and more user-friendly design of the diagnosing and treating environment has already become an important ring linked with the whole nursing work. At the beginning of the fitting up design for the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA, the authors receive the idea 'the environment experience and admiration of the patient', put more attention to the humanization in the diagnosing and treating environmental construction. The functional compartments are separated clearly. The color, the background music as well as the video are designed to be coordinated with each other in order to produce a relaxing system. Practice for the past three years indicates that the use of humanization environment design can markedly reduce the patient intense and the anxious level in perioperative period, it can also significantly promote the patient to be restored to health. This article will describe user-friendly diagnosing and treating environmental construction practice in the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA. (authors)

  7. Evolution of dose distribution calculations in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the evolution of dose distribution calculations is revised in detail, considering the simplest case (a point source in free space) and the more complex situation of a real encapsulated line source embedded in a scattering medium. The most recent formalism to perform the dosimetry of interstitial brachytherapy sources is presented, where measured or measurable dose rates from actual sources in a tissue equivalent phantom are required as input data

  8. Brachytherapy in treatment of vaginal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Kaprin; V. N. Galkin; S. A. Ivanov; V. A. Solodkiy; V. A. Titova

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of diagnosis and treatment of different types of primary vaginal cancer are highlighted, the role and place of brachytherapy as independent method or combined treatment modality for this pathology is shown in the review. Epidemiological data on incidence of vaginal cancer in Russia are represented, presumptive mechanisms for development of the disease, risk factors, histological types, features of the course, clinical presentation, diagnostic algorithm are described. Treatment...

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA...

  10. Procedures for calibration of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy source strength verification is a responsibility of the user of these source, in fact of the Medical Physicists in charge of this issue in a Radiotherapy Service. The calibration procedures in the users conditions are shown. Specifics methods for source strength determination are recommended, both for High Dose Rate (HDR) sources with Remote Afterloading equipment and for Low Dose Rate sources. The The results of the calibration of HDR Remote After loaders are indicated

  11. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 ≥ 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  12. Magnetite nanoparticles for nonradionuclide brachytherapy1

    OpenAIRE

    Safronov, Victor; Sozontov, Evgeny; Polikarpov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles possess several properties that can make them useful for targeted delivery of radiation to tumors for the purpose of brachytherapy. Such particles are biodegradable and magnetic and can emit secondary radiation when irradiated by an external source. In this work, the dose distribution around a magnetite particle of 10 nm diameter being irradiated by monochromatic X-rays with energies in the range 4–60 keV is calculated.

  13. Not to Knot a Catheter. Case Report of the Knotting of a Suprapubic Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Farook

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-month-old boy, who underwent left nephrectomy, had a suprapubic catheter inserted that knotted within the bladder. This case report identifies possible causes for such occurrences and how best to manage them.

  14. Not to Knot a Catheter. Case Report of the Knotting of a Suprapubic Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Farook, S. A.; Kariholu, U.; Kousidis, G.; Powlis, M.

    2007-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy, who underwent left nephrectomy, had a suprapubic catheter inserted that knotted within the bladder. This case report identifies possible causes for such occurrences and how best to manage them.

  15. A comparison of the priming properties of two central venous catheters and one pulmonary artery catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    The time taken to prime the individual lumina of two multilumen central venous catheters (Viggo-Spectramed 14G 20 cm Hydrocath and Vialon 14G 20 cm Deltacath) and one pulmonary artery catheter (Viggo-Spectramed 110 cm 7.5F Pentacath) at flows between 5 ml.h-1 and 99 ml.h-1 is reported. The catheters supplied by different manufacturers but of identical length and gauge have significantly different priming times (p < 0.001). A protocol which may be used to prime the individual lumina of the three catheters studied is described. By means of an in vitro test the accuracy of this protocol is validated. PMID:7702147

  16. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  17. Paraspinal tumors: Techniques and results of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of their proximity to nerve roots and the spinal cord, it is frequently difficult to achieve complete resection of paraspinal tumors. We have used brachytherapy in an attempt to prevent local recurrence and its associated neurological sequelae. This report analyzes our experience with 35 patients to determine the feasibility, optimal techniques, and efficacy of this approach. The tumor types were non small-cell lung cancer (18), sarcomas (9), and other tumor types (8). Temporary, single plane implants using Ir-192 (median minimum peripheral dose 3000 cGy) were used in 21 patients, and permanent I-125 implants were used in 14 cases (median matched peripheral dose 12,500 cGy). Local control was achieved in 51% (18/35). However, local control was poor when lung cancers were implanted and in cases where the dura was exposed. Radiation myelitis did not occur despite the combined effects of previous external beam radiotherapy (N = 21) and brachytherapy. Our experience demonstrates that combined surgery and paraspinal brachytherapy can be performed with acceptable toxicity and is reasonably effective in preventing local relapse and its neurologic sequelae, particularly for tumors other than lung cancers

  18. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  19. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Messing, E. [University of Rochester, Departments of Urology and Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States); Rubens, D. [University of Rochester, Departments of Imaging Science and Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States); Sarkar, N. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Ng, W. [Nangyang Technical University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  20. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly. PMID:27017651

  1. Complications after placement of peritoneal catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević-Mirković Tatjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Peritoneal dialysis is one of the modalities used for treatment of end-stage chronic kidney failure. Nowadays, this method is complementary to haemodialysis and renal transplantation. Owing to the rich vascularization of the peritoneum, it is used in the processes of osmosis and diffusion, enabling the removal of uremic material from the body. The procedure includes introduction of peritoneal fluid via the peritoneal catheter. Complications. The catheter is placed through the anterior abdominal wall with its tip positioned in the small pelvis. There are several techniques for catheter placement considered minimally invasive, which, however, may be associated with various complications. These complications can be divided into mechanical (catheter dysfunction, cuff protrusion, hernia, dialysate leaks, visceral perforation and infectious (early peritonitis, exit site or tunnel infection, surgical wounds. In most cases, such complications are rare and can be successfully managed using conservative therapy; however, in some situations severe complications can endanger the life of the patient. On-time recognition of complications, particularly in patients at risk, is of paramount importance for an effective treatment. The development of complications can increase the morbidity and the chance of treatment failure, and therefore transfer to haemodialysis. Conclusion. The preoperative evaluation and determination of the risk factors as well as the early recognition and adequate management of complications are essential in their prevention.

  2. Technical Note: Removing the stem effect when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors: A relevant and necessary step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not a stem effect removal technique is necessary when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using a scintillation detector. Methods: A red-green-blue photodiode connected to a multichannel electrometer was used to detect the light emitted from a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) during irradiation with an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source. Accuracy in dose measurement was compared with and without the use of stem effect removal techniques. Monochromatic and polychromatic filtration techniques were studied. An in-house template was built for accurate positioning of catheters in which the source and the PSD were inserted. Dose distribution was measured up to 5 cm from source to detector in the radial and longitudinal directions. Results: The authors found the stem effect to be particularly important when the source was close to the optical fiber guide and far from the scintillation component of the detector. It can account for up to (72±3)% of the signal under clinically relevant conditions. The polychromatic filtration outperformed the monochromatic filtration as well as the absence of filtration in regard to dose measurement accuracy. Conclusions: It is necessary to implement a stem effect removal technique when building a PSD for in vivo dosimetry during Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. The PSD that the authors have developed for this study would be suitable for such an application.

  3. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Using a Ligated Catheter for Recurrent Catheter Obstruction: Antireflux Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hakuta, Ryunosuke; ITO Yukiko; Nakata, Ryo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an established procedure for biliary obstruction. However, duodenobiliary or jejunobiliary reflux of the intestinal contents through a PTBD catheter sometimes causes recurrent catheter obstruction or cholangitis. A 64-year-old female patient with a history of choledochojejunostomy was referred to our department with acute cholangitis due to choledochojejunal anastomotic obstruction. Emergent PTBD was performed, but frequent obstructions of ...

  4. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  5. Computed tomography-guided permanent brachytherapy for locoregional recurrent gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locoregional recurrence is the typical pattern of recurrence in gastric cancer, and cannot be removed by surgery in most of the patients. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided brachytherapy for patients with locoregional recurrent gastric cancer. We reviewed the case histories of 28 patients with locoregional recurrent gastric cancer that were selected for CT- guided brachytherapy by a multidisciplinary team. The clinical data of the patients including patient characteristics, treatment parameters, short-term effects, and survival data were collected and analyzed. 15-75 125I seeds were implanted into each patient to produce a minimal peripheral dose (MPD) 100-160 Gy. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 (the volume treated with the prescription dose) 95.8% (90.2-120.5%) and D90 (prescription dose received by at least 90% of the volume) 105.2% (98.0-124.6%) of prescription dose. No serious complications occurred during the study. Two months after brachytherapy, complete response, partial response and progressive disease were observed in 50.0%, 28.6% and 21.4% of patients, respectively. The median survival time was 22.0 ± 5.2 months, and the 1, 2,and 3-year survival rate was 89 ± 6%, 52 ± 10% and 11 ± 7%, respectively. A univariate analysis showed that the tumor size was a significant predictor of overall survival (P = 0.034). Patients with tumors <3 cm had relatively higher complete response rate (66.7%), compared to those with tumors >3 cm (30.8%). The PTV (planning target volume) smaller than 45 cm3 was significantly correlated with achieving complete tumor eradication in the treated region (P = 0.020). For selected patients with limited locoregional recurrent gastric cancer, CT-guided brachytherapy using 125I seeds implantation can provide a high local control rate, with minimal trauma

  6. Radiation Exposure Reduction to Brachytherapy Staff By Using Remote Afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposures to the personnel staff from patients with brachytherapy implants in a brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposures to the brachytherapy personnel, as determined by Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) monitors, indicates a four-fold reduction in exposures after the implantation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for seven quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the brachytherapy staff of 2543 Μ Sv. After the implantation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per person of 153 Μ Sv. This is 76% reduction in exposure to brachytherapy personnel with the use of these devices

  7. Penile brachytherapy: Results for 49 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report results for 49 men with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis treated with primary penile interstitial brachytherapy at one of two institutions: the Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: From September 1989 to September 2003, 49 men (mean age, 58 years; range, 22-93 years) had brachytherapy for penile SCC. Fifty-one percent of tumors were T1, 33% T2, and 8% T3; 4% were in situ and 4% Tx. Grade was well differentiated in 31%, moderate in 45%, and poor in 2%; grade was unspecified for 20%. One tumor was verrucous. All tumors in Toronto had pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (n = 23), whereas those in Ottawa had either Iridium wire (n 22) or seeds (n = 4). Four patients had a single plane implant with a plastic tube technique, and all others had a volume implant with predrilled acrylic templates and two or three parallel planes of needles (median, six needles). Mean needle spacing was 13.5 mm (range, 10-18 mm), mean dose rate was 65 cGy/h (range, 33-160 cGy/h), and mean duration was 98.8 h (range, 36-188 h). Dose rates for PDR brachytherapy were 50-61.2 cGy/h, with no correction in total dose, which was 60 Gy in all cases. Results: Median follow-up was 33.4 months (range, 4-140 months). At 5 years, actuarial overall survival was 78.3% and cause-specific survival 90.0%. Four men died of penile cancer, and 6 died of other causes with no evidence of recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate for never having experienced any type of failure at 5 years was 64.4% and for local failure was 85.3%. All 5 patients with local failure were successfully salvaged by surgery; 2 other men required penectomy for necrosis. The soft tissue necrosis rate was 16% and the urethral stenosis rate 12%. Of 8 men with regional failure, 5 were salvaged by lymph node dissection with or without external radiation. All 4 men with distant failure died of disease. Of 49 men, 42 had an intact

  8. Erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and Materials: Four hundred twenty-five patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. Two hundred nine patients who were potent before brachytherapy and who at the time of the survey were not receiving hormonal therapy were mailed the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The questionnaire consisted of 5 questions, with a maximal score of 25. Of the 209 patients, 181 (87%) completed and returned the questionnaire. The mean and median follow-up was 40.4±14.9 and 40.6 months, respectively (range 19-75). Preimplant erectile function was assigned using a three-tiered scoring system (2 = erections always or nearly always sufficient for vaginal penetration; 1 = erections sufficient for vaginal penetration but considered suboptimal; 0 = the inability to obtain erections and/or erections inadequate for vaginal penetration). Postimplant potency was defined as an IIEF score ≥11. The clinical parameters evaluated for erectile function included patient age, preimplant potency, clinical T-stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, elapsed time after implantation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco consumption. Treatment parameters included radiation dose to the prostate gland, use of hormonal manipulation, use of supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), choice of isotope, prostate volume, and planning volume. The efficacy of sildenafil citrate in brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) was also evaluated. Results: Pretreatment erectile function scores of 2 and 1 were assigned to 125 and 56 patients, respectively. With a 6-year follow

  9. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: A Retrospective Study of 226 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with inoperable endobronchial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records (April 1991-May 2004) of patients with non-small-cell carcinoma, with no extrabronchial spread on computed tomography scans, who underwent HDR brachytherapy because of contraindications to surgery and external beam radiation therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared by the log-rank test. Prognostic factors were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Results: 226 patients (223 men, 3 women, mean age: 62.2 years (range, 40-84)) were included. Of those, 217 (97%) had squamous cell carcinoma (Tis/T1/T2/Tx: 60/153/9/4). Dose was prescribed at 1 cm from the radius (24-35 Gy in 4-6 fractions). Mean follow-up was 30.4 months (range, 9-116). Complete endoscopic response rate was 93.6% at 3 months. One hundred twenty-eight patients (56%) died of intercurrent disease (n = 45), local failure (n = 36), metastasis (n = 10), local failure and metastasis (n = 11), complications (n = 13), and other causes (n = 12). The 2-year and 5-year survival rates were, respectively, 57% and 29% (overall) (median, 28.6 months), 81% and 56% (cancer-specific), and 68% and 50% (local disease-free). Acute toxicity included pneumothorax (1.5%) and mucosal inflammation (10%). Late complications were hemoptysis (6.6% with 5% of fatalities), bronchitis (19.5%), and necrosis (3.5%). In multivariate analysis, a distal tumor location and the use of two catheters were associated with improved local disease-free survival (p = 0.003 and p = 0.007, respectively) and a distal tumor location with improved overall survival (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: This large retrospective study confirms that HDR brachytherapy is an efficient and safe treatment in patients with inoperable endobronchial carcinoma.

  10. A well chamber method of measuring the transit dose of an hour brachytherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Treatment planning for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with a single stepping-source generally neglects the transit dose. The transit dose due to the source movement comprises entry, interdwell and exit components. There is a lack of reliable results reported in the literature on transit dose and this leads to difficulties in predicting its significance in some clinical situations. This study investigates the effects of the transit dose in the planning target volume (PTV) of a HDR brachytherapy unit. A well-type chamber was used to determine the dose differences between two sets of measurements, one being the stationary dose only and the other being the sum of stationary and transit doses. The entry and exit components of the transit dose were also measured. Single catheters of active lengths of 20 and 40 mm, different dwell times of 0.5, 1,2 and 5 s and different step sizes of 2.5, 5 and 10 mm were used in the measurements with the well-type chamber. The measured dose differences between stationary and stationary plus transit source movement in most clinical cases were within 2%. The additional dose due to the source transit can be as high as 25% for the case of 0.5 s dwell time, 10 mm step-size and 20 m active length. For this particular case, the dose at 10 mm on the transverse bisector would be 11 cGy, which is far less than a typical prescribed dose. It is found that the transit dose to the PTV in most clinical cases is within 2% and is negligible. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  11. Review of MammoSite brachytherapy: Advantages, disadvantages and clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaleh, Saleh; Bezak, Eva; Borg, Martin (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia))

    2009-05-15

    Background. The MammoSite radiotherapy system is an alternative treatment option for patients with early-stage breast cancer to overcome the longer schedules associated with external beam radiation therapy. The device is placed inside the breast surgical cavity and inflated with a combination of saline and radiographic contrast to completely fill the cavity. The treatment schedule for the MammoSite monotherapy is 34 Gy delivered in 10 fractions at 1.0 cm from the balloon surface with a minimum of 6 hours between fractions on the same day. Material and methods. This review article presents the advantages, disadvantages, uncertainties and clinical outcomes associated with the MammoSite brachytherapy (MSB). Results. Potential advantages of MSB are: high localised dose with rapid falloff for normal tissue sparing, minimum delay between surgery and RT, catheter moves with breast, improved local control, no exposure to staff, likely side-effects reduction and potential cost/time saving (e.g. for country patients). The optimal cosmetic results depend on the balloon-to-skin distance. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results are achieved for patients with balloon-skin spacing of =7 mm. There have been very few published data regarding the long term tumour control and cosmesis associated with the MSB. The available data on the local control achieved with the MSB were comparable with other accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques. The contrast medium inside the balloon causes dose reduction at the prescription point. Current brachytherapy treatment planning systems (BTPS) do not take into account the increased photon attenuation due to high Z of contrast. Some BTPS predicted up to 10% higher dose near the balloon surface compared with Monte Carlo calculations using various contrast concentrations (5-25%). Conclusion. Initial clinical results have shown that the MammoSite device could be used as a sole radiation treatment for selected patients with early stage breast cancer

  12. Curative HDR brachytherapy for endobronchial carcinomas: the Oscar Lambret center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From May 1993 to October 1995, 26 patients with limited endobronchial carcinomas were treated in a curative intent by HDR endoluminal brachytherapy. Patients were separated into 3 groups: Strictly endobronchial tumors in inoperable patients (group 1, n=21); recurrent lesions in non-previously irradiated patients (group 2, n=3); boost after external radiotherapy (group 3, n=3). Inclusion criteria were squamous cell carcinomas with a diameter less than 1 cm and normal CT scan. 1 patient was treated for 2 successive lesions, so a total of 27 treatments were applied. Patients received fractions of 6 Gy (n=3) or 7 Gy (n=24) specified at 1 cm from the source. 4 to 6 fractions were administered once a week to groups 1 and 2, in group 3 the protocol was limited to 2 fractions. 24 patients were evaluable for response with a median follow-up of 7 months (1-25). We noted 20 endoscopic and histological complete responses and 4 local failures. Median survival was 11 months. 12 patients died; 4 with evolutive neoplasic disease, 3 by hemoptysis, 5 by non-tumoral disease. 26 patients were evaluable for complications. No immediate complications were noted. 18 late complications observed were identified as radiation bronchitis which were symptomatic in 6 patients. The radiation bronchitis was distributed as follows: grade 1 in 7 patients, grade 2 in 4, grade 3 in 4 and grade 4 in 3 according to SPEISER's score. Because of the high rate of complete responses ((20(26))), we consider HDR brachytherapy as an effective treatment of limited endobronchial carcinoma in inoperable patients. However, our study was also marked by a high incidence of radiation bronchitis. So we suggest improving procedures for catheter placement to avoid close contact of the iridium source with the bronchial mucosa and using a lower dose per fraction (5 Gy/fraction with 6 fractions once a week)

  13. Implants with 32P-foils for LDR-brachytherapy of benign stenosis in urology and gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For LDR-brachytherapy, a limited number of implant geometries and materials are available. To avoid wound healing related hyper-proliferation (stenosis, keloids) a novel radioactive foil system was developed based on beta emitting 32P, which can be easily integrated in existing implants such as urethral catheters or bile duct stents. As substrate material for these foils PEEK (polyetherethercetone) was chosen because of its radiation hardness during neutron activation of 32P. The activity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and gamma spectroscopy, dose distributions were measured with scintillation detectors and radiochromic films. The correlation between activity and dose was checked by Monte-Carlo-simulations (Geant4). Prototypes of the 32P-implants have shown in wash-out tests the required tightness for sealed radioactive sources. In animal tests on urethra and bile duct, the uncomplicated and save application of 32P-foils mounted on standard implants has been demonstrated, which is almost unchanged due to the simple radiation protection with plexiglass. This concept of radioactive implants with integrated 32P-foils could extend essentially the application possibilities of LDR-brachytherapy. (orig.)

  14. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  15. New brachytherapy standards paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The absorbed dose rate to water at short distances (1 cm typically) in water, is the quantity of interest for dosimetry in radiotherapy treatments. Moreover, the dose imparted to cancer patients must be known within a narrow band of uncertainty to avoid either damage to the healthy tissue resulting from exceeding international accepted tolerance levels or lack of tumor control due to a low dose delivered to the target volume. The goal for the uncertainty of the dose delivered to the target volume would be around 5% (at the level of one standard deviation), to assure the effectiveness of the radiotherapy treatment. This also takes into account the uncertainties in dose calculation algorithms. In current brachytherapy (BT) treatments, the procedures to determine the absorbed dose imparted to the patient are not based on absorbed dose standards, but are based on measurements traceable to air kerma standards. In fact, the recommended quantity for the calibration of BT gamma ray sources is the reference air kerma rate, KR, defined as the kerma rate to air, in air, at the reference distance of 1 m from the radioactive source, corrected for air attenuation and scattering. The absorbed dose around a BT source is currently calculated by applying the formalism of the international AAPM Task Group 43 protocol and its update. This protocol is based on the air kerma strength, SK, a quantity that is numerically equivalent to KR, at a distance of 1 m from the source. The dose rate constant Λ converts the air-kerma strength SK to the absorbed dose rate to water, D.(r0,θ0), in water at the reference position: D.(r0,θ0) = SK·A (1). Recently, a lower limit of 2,50 % was obtained for the estimated overall uncertainty (at the level of one standard deviation) on measurements of D.(r0,θ0) due to a HDR 192I BT source based on equation (1). However, in most cases the determination of 5K is typically affected by an uncertainty within 0,8 % (at the level of one standard

  16. High-Dose-Rate intraluminal brachytherapy for biliary obstruction by secondary malignant biliary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yang, Dae Sik; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Yong [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To analyze the survival period, prognostic factors and complications of patients having under gone high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDR-ILB) as a salvage radiation therapy, while having a catheter, for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), inserted due to biliary obstruction caused by a secondary malignant biliary tumor. A retrospective study was performed on 24 patients having undergone HDR-ILB, with PTBD catheter insertion, between December 1992 and August 2001, Their median age was 58.5, ranging from 35 to 82 years. The primary cancer site were the stomach, gallbladder, liver, pancreas and the colon, with 12, 6, 3, 2 and 1 cases, respectively. Eighteen patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy and HDR-ILB, while six were treated with HDR-ILB only. The total external beam, and brachytherapy radiations dose were 30-61.2 and 9-30 Gy, with median doses of 50 and 15 Gy, respectively. Of the 24 patients analyzed, 22 died during the follow-up period, with a median survival of 7.3 months. The 6 and 12 months survival rates were 54.2 (13 patients) and 20.8% (5 patients), respectively. The median survivals for stomach and gallbladder cancers were 7.8 and 10.2 months, respectively. According to the univariate analysis, a significant factor affecting survival of over one year was the total radiation dose (over 50 Gy) (0=0.0200), with all the patients surviving more than one year had been irradiated with more than 50 Gy. The acute side effects during the radiation therapy were managed with conservative treatment. During the follow-up period, 5 patients showed symptoms of cholangitis due to the radiation therapy. An extension to the survival of those patients treated with HDR-ILB is suggested compared to the median historical survival of those patients treated with external biliary drainage. A boost radiation dose could be effectively given, by performing HDR-ILB, which is a prognostic factor. In addition, the acute complications of

  17. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  18. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  19. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-08-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi. PMID:26738054

  20. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  1. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  2. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  3. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy in the Next Decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy procedures are increasing in number, and account for an important share of radiation exposure in medicine at a time when there is a dramatic rise in cancer across the developing world. Important areas in relation to radiation safety in brachytherapy include that all efforts be made to ensure that protection in the treatment is optimized and all measures are taken to prevent accidental exposures from occurring. Historical and ongoing accidents that have resulted in patient and public doses or inappropriate medical outcomes represent opportunities for continuous improvement in radiation protection. Additionally, staff in brachytherapy treatment facilities may receive high radiation doses if radiological protection tools are not used properly. Brachytherapy uniquely presents the possibility for doses that require active management. In modern brachytherapy centres, radiation doses are incurred by staff (e.g. loading of seeds, plaques, caesium implants, associated fluoroscopy). There is also a large variation in the practice of brachytherapy on a global scale and several facilities still practise older techniques with significantly higher staff dose potential. In addition, technological developments and newer techniques present new radiation protection concerns and an increasing blurring of historical responsibilities that need to be addressed with specific recommendations for the practising medical community. Along with an increase in equipment and to safeguard resources, additional qualified and trained brachytherapy staff are required worldwide. (author)

  4. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D50) and 25% (D25) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D50 should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation

  5. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D90 of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  6. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  7. Electromagnetic tracking and steering for catheter navigation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donoghue, Kilian

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the use of electromagnetics for both steering and tracking of medical instruments in minimally invasive surgeries. The end application is virtual navigation of the lung for biopsy of early stage cancer nodules. Navigation to the peripheral regions of the lung is difficult due to physical dimensions of the bronchi and current methods have low successes rates for accurate diagnosis. Firstly, the potential use of DC magnetic fields for the actuation of catheter devices with ...

  8. Robotic Catheters for Beating Heart Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Compliant and flexible cardiac catheters provide direct access to the inside of the heart via the vascular system without requiring clinicians to stop the heart or open the chest. However, the fast motion of the intracardiac structures makes it difficult to modify and repair the cardiac tissue in a controlled and safe manner. In addition, rigid robotic tools for beating heart surgery require the chest to be opened and the heart exposed, making the procedures highly invasive. The novel robot...

  9. Transpleural central venous catheter discovered during thoracotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ashima Malhotra; Prakash Sharma; Ashvini Kumar; Nikhil Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    We report an uncommon complication of subclavian central venous catheterization, discovered at thoracotomy. The central venous catheter (CVC) was placed by left infraclavicular route after induction of general anesthesia. CVC was secured after aspiration of blood and satisfactory central venous tracing. On thoracotomy, CVC was noticed to traverse the pleural cavity while the tracing was normal. CVC was thus removed consequent to which bleeding from each puncture site was noticed, that were se...

  10. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  11. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death.

  12. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death

  13. Radiation exposure of staff during endovascular brachytherapy with Re-188 after PTA in the peripheral blood stream; Strahlenexposition des Personals bei der endovaskulaeren Brachytherapie (EVBT) mit Re-188 nach PTA im peripheren Stromgebiet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Ilona; Rimpler, Arndt [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, AG-SG 2.2, Berlin (Germany); Nikula, Tuomo; Schilp, Michael; Buck, Oliver [Isotope Technologies Munich AG/itm FlowMedical GmbH, Garching (Germany); Wengenmair, Hermann; Leissner, Giesbert; Kopp, Juergen; Sciuk, Joachim [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Endovascular brachytherapy using a balloon catheter filled with Re-188 solution is a promising method for the prophylaxis of restenosis in peripheral blood circulation after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) treatments. Thereby about 20 GBq Re-188 with a specific activity of about 5 GBq/ml are used. The high ionisation density of the beta radiation with high energy leads to selective irradiation of the blood vessel wall near the catheter, whereas the surrounding tissue remains almost unaffected. However the hospital staff has to carry out some work steps within close range to the high activity during preparation and therapy, causing a high risk of skin exposure, in particular at the hands. Estimations and measurements of the maximal local skin dose were made with thin-layered thermoluminescence dosimeters. It was assessed that the annual dose limit for skin of 500 mSv may be exceeded considerably when using conventional procedures and considering the expected number of 75 treatments per annum. By using the newly developed rhenium-188 application device ''FlowMedical Application System'' the exposure risk for the staff could be reduced drastically. The maximum skin dose of 76 mSv for the radiologist and of 50 mSv for the physicist was decreased to 2 mSv per treatment for both of them. Consequently, from the radiation protection point of view, the itm Rhenium-PTA registered is a safe method. Any exceeding of the dose limit can be prevented. (orig.)

  14. Interventional radiological imaging and treatment of port catheter dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of interventional radiological imaging and treatment of central venous port catheter complications. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis 429 port catheter dysfunctions were evaluated in 393 port catheter systems for a total of 389 patients over a period of 10 years. The study included 193 (49.1 %) patients with radiologically implanted port catheter systems and 200 (50.9 %) referred patients with surgically implanted port systems. Port catheter dysfunctions were subdivided into early and late complications as well as into non-thrombotic and thrombotic events. After administration of contrast medium, the port system was visualized using digital subtraction angiography. Data were retrospectively collected from the in-house databases and then analyzed descriptively. Results: 429 contrast media injections via port catheters were performed in 393 port catheter systems. There were 359 (83.7 %) late complications and 70 (16.3 %) early complications. In 299 (69.7 %) cases thrombotic events occurred and 130 (30.3 %) non-thrombotic events were recorded. The most common reason for contrast media injection via port catheter system was port catheter-related thrombosis in 269 (62.7 %) cases. 70 (16.3 %) catheter migrations and 30 (7.0 %) fibrin sheath formations were detected. 18 (4.2 %) port needle malfunctions could be resolved through needle exchange. All 15 (3.5 %) catheter disconnections had to be revised in all cases. Also six port explantations were performed in 6 (1.4 %) catheter fractures. Conclusion: The possibilities of angiographic imaging and interventional radiological correction of port catheter dysfunctions must be exploited fully in order to avoid premature port explantation. (orig.)

  15. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  16. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  17. Urethral and periurethral dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy: is there a convenient surrogate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess and compare two models for a surrogate urethra to be used for postimplant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty men with a urinary catheter present at the time of postimplant computed tomographic imaging were studied. Urethral and periurethral volumes were defined as 5-mm and 10-mm diameter volumes, respectively. Three contours of each were used: one contour of the true urethra (and periurethra), and two surrogate models. The true volumes were centered on the catheter center. One surrogate model used volumes centered on the geometrical center of each prostate contour (centered surrogate). The other surrogate model was based on the average deviation of the true urethra from a reference line through the geometrical center of the axial midplane of the prostate (deviated surrogate). Maximum point doses and the D10, D25, D50, D90, V100, V120, and V150 of the true and surrogate volumes were measured and compared (Dn is the minimum dose [Gy] received by n% of the structure, and Vm is the volume [%] of the structure that received m% of the prescribed dose) as well as the distances between the surrogate urethras and the true urethra. Results: Doses determined from both surrogate urethral and periurethral volumes were in good agreement with the true urethral and periurethral doses except in the superior third of the gland. The deviated surrogate provided a physically superior likeness to the true urethra. Certain dose-volume histogram (DVH)-based parameters could also be predicted reasonably well on the basis of the surrogates. Correlation coefficients ≥0.85 were seen for D25, D50, V100, V120, and V150 for both models. All the other parameters had correlation coefficients in the range of 0.73 - 0.85. Conclusions: Both surrogate models predicted true urethral dosimetry reasonably well. It is recommended that the simpler deviated surrogate would be a more suitable surrogate for routine clinical practice

  18. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  19. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  20. Radiation exposure of staff during endovascular brachytherapy with Re-188 after PTA in the peripheral blood stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endovascular brachytherapy using a balloon catheter filled with Re-188 solution is a promising method for the prophylaxis of restenosis in peripheral blood circulation after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) treatments. Thereby about 20 GBq Re-188 with a specific activity of about 5 GBq/ml are used. The high ionisation density of the beta radiation with high energy leads to selective irradiation of the blood vessel wall near the catheter, whereas the surrounding tissue remains almost unaffected. However the hospital staff has to carry out some work steps within close range to the high activity during preparation and therapy, causing a high risk of skin exposure, in particular at the hands. Estimations and measurements of the maximal local skin dose were made with thin-layered thermoluminescence dosimeters. It was assessed that the annual dose limit for skin of 500 mSv may be exceeded considerably when using conventional procedures and considering the expected number of 75 treatments per annum. By using the newly developed rhenium-188 application device ''FlowMedical Application System'' the exposure risk for the staff could be reduced drastically. The maximum skin dose of 76 mSv for the radiologist and of 50 mSv for the physicist was decreased to 2 mSv per treatment for both of them. Consequently, from the radiation protection point of view, the itm Rhenium-PTA registered is a safe method. Any exceeding of the dose limit can be prevented. (orig.)

  1. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  2. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR)192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose

  3. A comparison between tandem and ovoids and interstitial gynecologic template brachytherapy dosimetry using a hypothetical computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution within the clinical target volume between two gynecologic brachytherapy systems - the tandem and ovoids and the Syed-Neblett gynecologic template - using a hypothetical computer model. Methods and Materials: Source positions of an intracavitary system (tandem and ovoids) and an interstitial system (GYN template) were digitized into the Nucletron Brachytherapy Planning System. The GYN template is composed of a 13-catheter implant (12 catheters plus a tandem) based on the Syed-Neblett gynecologic template. For the tandem and ovoids, the dwell times of all sources were evenly weighted to produce a pear-shaped isodose distribution. For the GYN template, the dwell times were determined using volume optimization. The prescribed dose was then normalized to point A in the intracavitary system and to a selected isodose line in the interstitial system. The treated volume in the two systems was kept approximately the same, and a cumulative dose-volume histogram of the treated volume was then generated with the Nucletron Brachytherapy Planning System to use for comparison. To evaluate the dose to a hypothetical target, in this case the cervix, a 2-cm-long, 3-cm-diameter cylinder centered along the tandem was digitized as the clinical target volume. The location of this hypothetical cervix was based on the optimal application of the brachytherapy system. A visual comparison of clinical target coverage by the treated volume on three different orthogonal planes through the treated volume was performed. The percentage dose-volume histograms of the target were generated for comparison. Multiple midline points were also placed at 5-mm intervals away from the tandem in the plane of the cervix to simulate the location of potential bladder and rectal dose points. Doses to these normal structures were calculated for comparison. Results: Although both systems covered the hypothetical cervix adequately, the interstitial system had a better

  4. Indications for needle catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberer, M; Bodoky, A; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1987-06-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy for postoperative nutritional support is now employed worldwide. However, there is a large discrepancy regarding indications for this technique which this study attempts to rectify. The need for nutritional support after elective abdominal procedures in 464 patients was analyzed and compared with the experience with needle catheter jejunostomy in 42 patients. The results show that needle catheter jejunostomy is indicated after extensive operations of the upper gastrointestinal tract, for example, esophagectomy, total gastrectomy, and the Whipple procedure. With minor upper gastrointestinal operations, or procedures of the lower gastrointestinal tract, needle catheter jejunostomy should be performed only in patients with poor nutritional status or in the presence of postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In an unclear situation, liberal insertion of the needle catheter jejunostomy and a postponed decision on enteral feeding is recommended, as there is no significant catheter-related morbidity. PMID:3109269

  5. Technique of Peritoneal Catheter Placement under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peritoneal catheters are mainly used for peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Other uses of this catheter include intraperitoneal chemotherapy and gene therapy for ovarian cancer and draining of uncontrolled refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Traditionally, surgeons place most of these peritoneal catheters either by laparoscopy or open laparotomy. We detail our percutaneous approach to placing peritoneal catheters using fluoroscopic guidance. We emphasize the use of additional ultrasound guidance, including gray scale and color Doppler ultrasound, to determine the safest puncture site and to guide the initial needle puncture in order to avoid bowel perforation and injury to epigastric artery. We present our experience in placing peritoneal catheters using this technique in 95 patients with various indications. Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous placement of peritoneal catheters is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective alternative to open surgical or laparoscopic placement.

  6. Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I‘mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma (γ) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100–300 kVp and the detector response (kuser) showed strong energy dependence for 100–300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR

  7. Robotic catheter cardiac ablation combining ultrasound guidance and force control

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin; Howe, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheters allow physicians to access the inside of the heart and perform therapeutic interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, conventional manual and actuated cardiac catheters are currently unable to precisely track and manipulate the intracardiac tissue structures because of the fast tissue motion and potential for applying damaging forces. This paper addresses these challenges by proposing and implementing a robotic catheter system that uses 3D ultras...

  8. Role of biofilm in catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2004-01-01

    The predominant form of life for the majority of microorganisms in any hydrated biologic system is a cooperative community termed a “biofilm.” A biofilm on an indwelling urinary catheter consists of adherent microorganisms, their extracellular products, and host components deposited on the catheter. The biofilm mode of life conveys a survival advantage to the microorganisms associated with it and, thus, biofilm on urinary catheters results in persistent infections that are resistant to antimi...

  9. Rat Indwelling Urinary Catheter Model of Candida albicans Biofilm Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Brooks, Erin G.; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-a...

  10. The Activity Check of Brachytherapy Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isotope Ir-192, which is used in brachytherapy depends on import in whole quantities. There are a few ways for its activity. measurement using Welltype chamber or the way to rely on authentic decay table of manufacturer. In-air dosimetry using Farmer Chamber, etc. In this paper, let me introduce the way using Farmer chamber which is easier and simple. With the Farmer chamber and source calibration jig, take a measurement the activity of an isotope Ir-192 and compare the value with the value from decay table of manufacturer and check the activity of source. The result of measurement, compared the value from decay table, by ±2.1. (which belongs to recommendable value for AAPM ±5% as difference of error range). It is possible to use on clinical medicine. With the increase in use of brachytherapy, the increase of import is essential. And an accurate activity check of source is compulsory. For the activity check of source, it was possible to use Farmer chamber and source calibration jig without additional purchase of Well type chamber.

  11. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within ±10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  13. Samarium-145: a new brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radiation source has been produced for brachytherapy, with radiation energies slightly above those of 125I, and a Tsub(1/2) of 340 d. This source, 145Sm, is produced by neutron irradiation of 144Sm (96.5% enriched). Decay is by electron capture with 140 K x-rays per 100 disintergrations in the energy region between 38-45 keV, plus 13 γ-rays at 61 keV. These sources are encapsulated in Ti tubes, approx. 0.8 mm x 4.5 mm, and have been developed for temporary implantation in brain and ocular tumours. The 38-61 keV photons should make such sources easy to shield, while providing a dose distribution from source arrays somewhat more homogeneous than that from 125I. In addition, the 340 d half life of 145Sm permits its use for times significantly longer than that of 60 d 125I. While the 145Sm sources have been designed primarily for implantation in a brain tumour, they should be useful for almost any conventional brachytherapy application. (author)

  14. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the options?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C.K. Ho

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and lithoclast. We describe here another technique of dealing with a stuck and encrustated catheter, via direct crushing of the encrustations with a rigid cystoscope inserted through a suprapubic cystostomy tract.

  15. Real-time multipoint gastrointestinal 19-fluorine catheter tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Tobias; Kozerke, Sebastian; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Boesiger, Peter; Steingoetter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop MR based real-time gastrointestinal 19-Fluorine (19F) catheter tracking and visualization allowing for real-time detection and feedback of 3D catheter shape and movement as well as catheter-driven adjustments of 1H imaging geometry parameters. METHODS: Data were acquired on a 3T clinical system using 3D Golden Angle radial sampling. Two gastrointestinal catheters incorporating four fiducial 19F markers (65 or 50 µL marker volume) were tracked while being pulled through ...

  16. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  17. Use of tunnelled catheters in haematological malignancy patients with neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariosmanoglu, N; Uğurlu, B; Turgut, N H; Demirkan, F; Ozsan, H; Ergor, G; Gulay, Z; Hazan, E; Oto, O

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study analysed 83 patients (age 45 +/- 17 years) with haematological neoplasms, implanted with 93 tunnelled catheters, who were neutropenic or developed neutropenia during treatment. Catheters were implanted in the right (n = 82) or left (n = 11) jugular vein by the same surgical team using the same technique. They remained in place for 124 +/- 88 days: 29% were removed due to infection; 18% due to treatment termination and 2% due to mechanical problems. Seventeen patients died with catheters in place. At 30, 60, 90, 120 and 200 days mean catheter duration rates were 82%, 75%, 65%, 60% and 35%, respectively, and freedom from catheter removal due to infection was 92%, 88%, 80%, 77% and 67%, respectively. Patient diagnosis and history of previous catheter infection did not increase catheter infection risk, but patients undergoing stem cell transplantation had an increased infection risk. Tunnelled catheters can be used in high-risk patients with neutropenia. Systemic infections can be managed in most patients without catheter removal. PMID:18831907

  18. A prototype catheter designed for ultraviolet C disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Begovic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    possible to design a single-lumen catheter with a hub, tube connector and tube parts that can be UVC-disinfected throughout its entire lumen. Methods Two single-lumen catheters were designed: one control and one for UVC exposure. They were contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (104–105 cfu/mL) before...... UVC light exposure, sampling and plate counting. Findings Two minutes of UVC exposure was sufficient to obtain 4 log10 disinfection for the full-length prototype catheter. This exposure corresponds to ∼40 mJ/cm2 at the catheter tip and indicates that even shorter exposure times can be achieved...

  19. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Leah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such interventions in the magnetic environment are summarized. Designs for remote control catheter guidance include a catheter tip electromagnetic microcoil design, a ferromagnetic sphere-tipped catheter design, smart material-actuated catheters, and hydraulically actuated catheters. Remote control catheter guidance systems were compared and contrasted with respect to visualization, safety, and performance. Performance is characterized by bending angles achievable by the catheter, time to achieve bending, degree of rotation achievable, and miniaturization capacity of the design. Necessary improvements for furthering catheter design, especially for use in the MRI environment, are addressed, as are hurdles that must be overcome in order to make MRI guided endovascular procedures more accessible for regular use in clinical practice. Conclusions MR-guided endovascular interventions under remote control steering are in their infancy due to issues regarding safety and reliability. Additional experimental studies are needed prior to their use in humans.

  20. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to a basic guide to the principles of the production of ionizing radiation and to methods of radiation protection and dosimetry, this booklet includes information about radiation protection procedures for brachytherapy

  1. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy

  2. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  3. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  4. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  5. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  6. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  7. Endocervical ultrasound applicator for integrated hyperthermia and HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J. [Thermal Therapy Research Group, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States) and Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The clinical success of hyperthermia adjunct to radiotherapy depends on adequate temperature elevation in the tumor with minimal temperature rise in organs at risk. Existing technologies for thermal treatment of the cervix have limited spatial control or rapid energy falloff. The objective of this work is to develop an endocervical applicator using a linear array of multisectored tubular ultrasound transducers to provide 3-D conformal, locally targeted hyperthermia concomitant to radiotherapy in the uterine cervix. The catheter-based device is integrated within a HDR brachytherapy applicator to facilitate sequential and potentially simultaneous heat and radiation delivery. Methods: Treatment planning images from 35 patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer were inspected to assess the dimensions of radiation clinical target volumes (CTVs) and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) surrounding the cervix and the proximity of organs at risk. Biothermal simulation was used to identify applicator and catheter material parameters to adequately heat the cervix with minimal thermal dose accumulation in nontargeted structures. A family of ultrasound applicators was fabricated with two to three tubular transducers operating at 6.6-7.4 MHz that are unsectored (360 deg.), bisectored (2x180 deg.), or trisectored (3x120 deg.) for control of energy deposition in angle and along the device length in order to satisfy anatomical constraints. The device is housed in a 6 mm diameter PET catheter with cooling water flow for endocervical implantation. Devices were characterized by measuring acoustic efficiencies, rotational acoustic intensity distributions, and rotational temperature distributions in phantom. Results: The CTV in HDR brachytherapy plans extends 20.5{+-}5.0 mm from the endocervical tandem with the rectum and bladder typically <8 mm from the target boundary. The GTV extends 19.4{+-}7.3 mm from the tandem. Simulations indicate that for 60

  8. CT-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Roeddiger, S.; Filipowicz, I.; Kontova, M.; Heyd, R.; Zamboglou, N. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Kolotas, C. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiotherapy; Birn, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Fountzilas, G.; Selviaridis, P. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki (Greece); Baltas, D.; Anagnostopoulos, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics and Engineering

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: Recurrences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) within previously irradiated volumes pose a serious therapeutic challenge. This retrospective study evaluates the long-term tumor control of recurrent GBM treated with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2003, 84 patients were treated for recurrent cerebral GBM located within previously irradiated volumes. All patients had received adjuvant external radiotherapy following primary surgery, with a focal dose up to 60 Gy. The median recurrent tumor volume was 51 cm{sup 3} (3-207 cm{sup 3}), and the HDR-BRT consisted of an afterloading {sup 192}Ir implant which delivered a median dose of 40 Gy (30-50 Gy). Catheter implantation was implemented using interactive computed tomography (CT) guidance under local anesthesia and sedoanalgesia. Results: After a median follow-up of 61 months, 5/84 patients (6%) were alive. The median post-BRT survival was 37 weeks, and the median overall survival 78 weeks. Moderate to severe complications occurred in 5/84 cases (6%). Conclusion: For patients with recurrences of GBM within previously irradiated volumes, CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT is a feasible treatment option that can play an important role in providing palliation. (orig.)

  9. Treatment results of stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy for primary and metastatic brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, G.L.; Luxton, G.; Cohen, D.; Petrovich, Z.; Langholz, B.; Apuzzo, M.L.; Sapozink, M.D. (USC School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1991-08-01

    A total of 41 stereotactic interstitial brain implants in 39 patients were performed for recurrence after teletherapy (recurrence implant), or as part of initial treatment in conjunction with teletherapy (primary implant). Implanted tumors consisted of malignant gliomas (33), other primary brain tumors (3), and single metastatic lesions (3). All patients were temporarily implanted with Ir-192 using a coaxial catheter afterloading system; two patients were implanted twice. Survival post-implant for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 13 patients, was 10 months whether implanted primarily or for recurrence. Mean time to recurrence, measured from initiation of teletherapy to implantation, was 10 months. Twenty patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) had a median survival post-implant of 23 months for primary implants (7 patients) and 11 months for recurrence implants (13 patients). Mean time to recurrence, measured from initiation of teletherapy to implantation, was 19 months. Three patients (9%) of the evaluable group required reoperation for symptomatic mass effect, all with initial diagnosis of AA. Survival for this subgroup was 14, 22, and 32 months post-implantation. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically feasible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to offer limited prolongation of control for a subset of patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. The role of this modality in primary treatment for malignant gliomas needs to be further defined by prospectively randomized trials.

  10. Investigation into the causes of indwelling urethral catheter implementation and its effects on clinical outcomes and health care resources among dementia patients with pneumonia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshiki; Babazono, Akira; Nishi, Takumi; Yasui, Midori; Harano, Yumi

    2016-08-01

    There is a possibility that unnecessary treatments and low-quality medical care, such as inappropriate indwelling urethral catheter use, are being provided to older Japanese individuals.The aim of this study was to investigate contextual effects relating to indwelling urethral catheters in older people with dementia and to clarify the effects of indwelling urethral catheter use on patients' mortality, length of stay (LOS), and health care spending. This retrospective cohort study involved 4501 male and female Japanese participants. Those who were aged 75 or older with dementia and had a primary diagnosis of acute lower respiratory disease with antibiotics administered during hospitalization were eligible for inclusion. Patient mortality, LOS, and total charge during hospitalization were the main study outcomes. This study showed that indwelling urethral catheter use was significantly associated with higher mortality, longer LOS, and higher total charge for hospitalization. The pattern of indwelling urethral catheter use was clustered by care facility level. Physician density was significantly associated with indwelling urethral catheter use; the relationship was not linear but U-shaped, such that the approximate median had the lowest rate of urethral catheter use and this increased gradually toward both lower and higher physician densities. Our study found considerable variation in indwelling urethral catheter use between care facilities in older people with dementia. Additionally, indwelling urethral catheter use was related to poor outcomes. Based on these findings, we consider there to be an urgent need for constructing a framework to measure, report on, and promote the improvement of care quality for older individuals in Japan. PMID:27583898

  11. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning. (paper)

  12. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  13. Intraluminal brachytherapy in the treatment of bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with carcinoma of the biliary tract have a poor prognosis because the disease is often unresectable at diagnosis. Intraluminal brachytherapy has been reported as an effective treatment for localized cholangiocarcinoma of the biliary tract. The purpose of our study was to analyse the survival of patients treated with brachytherapy and make some recommendations regarding its use. Fifteen patients underwent brachytherapy via a trans-hepatic approach at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital from 1983 to 1993. Eleven patients had low-dose rate brachytherapy and four patients had high-dose rate treatment. There were nine males and six females. The median age was 64 years. Other treatment included bypass procedures in two patients, endoscopic stents in 14 patients and external beam irradiation in one patient. The median survival was 12.5 months and 47% of the patients survived 1 year. The only complication reported was cholangitis which was seen in one patient. There did not seem to be any difference in survival or complications between low- and high-dose rate brachytherapy. It is concluded that the addition of intraluminal brachytherapy after biliary drainage prolongs survival and is a safe and effective treatment, but patients still have a high rate of local failure, and further studies will be needed to address this problem. (authors)

  14. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2–15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  15. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  16. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  17. Monitoring Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni B Forleo, MD PhD; MAssimo Moltrasio, MD; Michela Casella MD, PhD; Antonio Dello Russo MD, PhD; Getano Fassini, MD; Manfredi Tesauro, MD, PhD; Claudio Tondo, MD, PhD.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although catheter ablation is an effective treatment for recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF, there is no consensus on the definition of success or follow-up strategies. Symptoms are the major motivation for undergoing catheter ablation in patients with AF, however it is well known that reliance on perception of AF by patients after AF ablation results in an underestimation of recurrence of the arrhythmia. Because symptoms of AF occurrence may be misleading, a reliable assessment of rhythm outcome is essential for the definition of success in both clinical care and research trials. Continuous rhythm monitoring over long periods of time is superior to intermittent recording using external monitors to detect the presence of AF episodes and to quantify the AF burden. Today, new devices implanted subcutaneously using a minimally invasive technique have been developed for continuous AF monitoring. Implantable devices keep detailed information about arrhythmia recurrences and might allow identification of very brief episodes of AF, the significance of which is still uncertain. In particular, it is not known whether there is any critical value of daily AF burden that has a prognostic significance. This issue remains an area of active discussion, debate and investigation. Further investigation is required to determine if continuous AF monitoring with implantable devices is effective in reducing stroke risk and facilitating maintenance of sinus rhythm after AF ablation.

  18. Engineering Considerations Of Catheters For Intravascular Ultrasonic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy W.; Johnson, Christopher C.

    1989-08-01

    The mechanical properties of commonly used fluid transfusion or pressure monitoring catheters are similar to the properties required of catheters which include sensing devices. Consequently, bending and torsional stiffness of commercial catheters and tubes were measured at both room and body temperature. Five of these usually placed with the aid of fluoroscopy had an average Young's modulus of 5714x101 dyne/cm at 21°C which decreased 29% at body temperature; a shear modulus of 70.5x101 dyne/cm 4 at 21°C which decreased 13% at body temperature, and plastic deformation of 8% when loaded for 1 minute at 37°. Four of these were composed of a composite material. Catheters which are balloon directed during insertion had moduli values approximately 1/3 of these or less. The drag forces produced on balloons used on such catheters were measured for fluid velocities ranging from 10-50 cm/sec. Using this information the average force applied to a balloon throughout a cardiac cycle was calculated; values of 1280 dynes for a .6 ml balloon and 2490 dynes for a 1 ml balloon were found. The maximum wall thicknesses to catheter radii for single lumen catheters were determined for various material moduli which would allow the catheter tip to be directed by a balloon during its passage into the right heart.

  19. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  20. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  1. MRI/TRUS data fusion for brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Daanen, V; Giraud, J Y; Fourneret, P; Descotes, J L; Bolla, M; Collomb, D; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate brachytherapy consists in placing radioactive seeds for tumour destruction under transrectal ultrasound imaging (TRUS) control. It requires prostate delineation from the images for dose planning. Because ultrasound imaging is patient- and operator-dependent, we have proposed to fuse MRI data to TRUS data to make image processing more reliable. The technical accuracy of this approach has already been evaluated. METHODS: We present work in progress concerning the evaluation of the approach from the dosimetry viewpoint. The objective is to determine what impact this system may have on the treatment of the patient. Dose planning is performed from initial TRUS prostate contours and evaluated on contours modified by data fusion. RESULTS: For the eight patients included, we demonstrate that TRUS prostate volume is most often underestimated and that dose is overestimated in a correlated way. However, dose constraints are still verified for those eight patients. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms our init...

  2. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  3. Human error in remote Afterloading Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US. The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error

  4. Verification of ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophthalmic brachytherapy dose calculations were performed as an independent verification of commercial dosimetry software (BEBIG Plaque Simulator). Excel spreadsheets were constructed to follow the formalism of the AAPM Task Group No. 43. As a software commissioning tool, TG43 seed-based coordinates were reformatted to be compatible with plaque-based BEBIG dose tables for centrally positioned seeds. Plaque central axis doses were also calculated for rings of seeds. Close agreement with BEBIG doses was obtained in both cases. Tailored spreadsheet versions were subsequently created to verify patient treatment plans. Treatment time and dose to a specified central-axis point are calculated for ROPES plaques fully loaded with I-125 model 6702 seeds. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  5. Real-time optimized intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of real-time intraoperative treatment planning for permanent prostate brachytherapy analyzing the impact on operative time and adequacy of postimplant dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive patients undergoing permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer had real-time intraoperative computer-based and optimized treatment planning. The first 8 patients were implanted using a plan generated before the surgery and served to assure the team qualitatively that this could be performed without greatly increasing intraoperative time. They served as control group for expected achieved dosimetry results reviewing the D90, V100, V150 parameters from the dose-volume histograms. The next 9 patients were implanted according to the real-time plan. The times needed to carry out various steps of the procedure were recorded. The achieved dosimetry was then compared to the control group to assure that accuracy was unchanged. Results: The median operative time for patients undergoing intraoperative dosimetry was 57 min. Of this, 21 min were devoted to anesthesia and nursing functions. Postoperative dosimetry showed a median achieved V100 (volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose) of 97% for the control group. For the real-time dosimetry group, the median V100 was similar at 94%. The V150 (volume receiving 150%) is 49% for both groups. The D90 (dose received by 90% of the target) was normalized for easy comparison and was consistently slightly greater than the prescription dose. Conclusion: Treatment planning for permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer has historically been performed as a computer-generated and optimized plan run weeks in advance of an implant, or according to a set pattern using an intraoperative nomogram. These data show that planning can now be optimized intraoperatively using widely available software without compromising the operative time or implant quality.

  6. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the...

  7. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  8. Urethral catheter insertion forces: a comparison of experience and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K. Canales

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate the insertion forces utilized during simulated placement of a urethral catheter by healthcare individuals with a variety of catheter experience. Materials and Methods: A 21F urethral catheter was mounted to a metal spring. Participants were asked to press the tubing spring against a force gauge and stop when they met a level of resistance that would typically make them terminate a catheter placement. Simulated catheter insertion was repeated fives times, and peak compression forces were recorded. Healthcare professionals were divided into six groups according to their title: urology staff, non-urology staff, urology resident/ fellow, non-urology resident/ fellow, medical student, and registered nurse. Results: A total of fifty-seven healthcare professionals participated in the study. Urology staff (n = 6 had the lowest average insertion force for any group at 6.8 ± 2.0 Newtons (N. Medical students (n = 10 had the least amount of experience (1 ± 0 years and the highest average insertion force range of 10.1 ± 3.7 N. Health care workers with greater than 25 years experience used significantly less force during catheter insertions (4.9 ± 1.8 N compared to all groups (p < 0.01. Conclusions: We propose the maximum force that should be utilized during urethral catheter insertion is 5 Newtons. This force deserves validation in a larger population and should be considered when designing urethral catheters or creating catheter simulators. Understanding urethral catheter insertion forces may also aid in establishing competency parameters for health care professionals in training.

  9. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation. PMID:22515732

  10. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  11. Value of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation for continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with fixed catheter tip method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); White, Robert I. [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2008-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the use of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation with the fixed catheter tip method in comparison with other previously used coils. The cohort of this study was 143 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer for whom a port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted. In the most recent 32 patients, Micronester coils were used for catheter tip fixation. Details of embolic agents for fixation, persistent blood flow beyond the distal end of the indwelling catheter, and complications were compared between cases without and with Micronester coils. In all, percutaneous port-catheter placement was successful. Mean number of coils used for fixation was 4.2 without Micronester coils vs. 2.5 with Micronester coils. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol was additionally used for catheter tip fixation in 85.6% of 111 procedures without Micronester coils and in 50% of 32 using Micronester coils. The gastroduodenal artery beyond the distal end was not detected at the final examination after any procedure. Catheter dislocation occurred in five and hepatic arterial obstruction or severe stenosis in eight. The number of coils used and necessity of NBCA-Lipiodol could be decreased with usage of Micronester coils without decreasing fixation ability compared to other coils. (orig.)

  12. Value of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation for continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with fixed catheter tip method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively evaluate the use of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation with the fixed catheter tip method in comparison with other previously used coils. The cohort of this study was 143 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer for whom a port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted. In the most recent 32 patients, Micronester coils were used for catheter tip fixation. Details of embolic agents for fixation, persistent blood flow beyond the distal end of the indwelling catheter, and complications were compared between cases without and with Micronester coils. In all, percutaneous port-catheter placement was successful. Mean number of coils used for fixation was 4.2 without Micronester coils vs. 2.5 with Micronester coils. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol was additionally used for catheter tip fixation in 85.6% of 111 procedures without Micronester coils and in 50% of 32 using Micronester coils. The gastroduodenal artery beyond the distal end was not detected at the final examination after any procedure. Catheter dislocation occurred in five and hepatic arterial obstruction or severe stenosis in eight. The number of coils used and necessity of NBCA-Lipiodol could be decreased with usage of Micronester coils without decreasing fixation ability compared to other coils. (orig.)

  13. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  14. Characterization of a fiber-coupled Al2O3:C luminescence dosimetry system for online in vivo dose verification during Ir-192 brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Greilich, Steffen;

    2009-01-01

    fit into applicators such as standard needles or catheters. The system measures the absorbed dose rate (0.1 s time resolution) and total absorbed dose on the basis of radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from aluminum oxide crystals attached to optical fiber cables (1 mm...... outer diameter). The system was tested in the range from 0 to 4 Gy using a solid-water phantom, a Varian GammaMed Plus Ir-192 PDR afterloader, and dosimetry probes inserted into stainless-steel brachytherapy needles. The calibrated system was found to be linear in the tested dose range. The...... reproducibility (one standard deviation) for RL and OSL measurements was 1.3%. The measured depth-dose profiles agreed well with the theoretical expectations computed with the EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, suggesting that the energy dependence for the dosimeter probes (relative to water) is less than 6% for source...

  15. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  16. A first experience of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed HDR brachytherapy for 12 patients with tongue cancer from April, 1996 to May, 1998. The patients included 7 men and 5 women. Ten of patients received HDR brachytherapy alone and two were treated with HDR brachytherapy and external irradiation and chemotherapy. In brachytherapy alone cases irradiated dose were between 42 Gy/14 fr and 60 Gy/10 fr, and the other two were irradiated 18 Gy/6 fr and 30 Gy/10 fr. We obtained CR for 12 patients and recurrence occurred in three cases. Late injury was observed in one case. In conclusion, HDR brachytherapy will be a promising therapeutic protocol for treatment of stage 1, 2 tongue cancer. (author)

  17. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM. PMID:22256282

  18. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  19. Construction balance analysis of dose rate medium brachytherapy TDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important part of brachytherapy instrument design activities is analyze by determining the centroid point of construction in order to maintain the balance of brachytherapy instrument, either during operation as well as when transported. Operation of brachytherapy is not only done in one place so it is necessary to balance the analysis of the forces at the time did not move, moved on the horizontal floor and sloping floor. Calculation approach who is done to calculate the weight of mechanical components on each module, and then calculate the centroid of each module, for the balance of forces analysis performed with the assumption at the time of brachytherapy in the position of not moving on a horizontal floor, moved from a place to another on the horizontal floor and on the floor with sloping angle 30°. Base on the results of this analysis are expected to balance the four wheels can move without slipping at the time of decline or incline. Also, results of analysis can be used in designing a mobile construction brachytherapy taking into consideration the aesthetic ideal, easy to operate, ensure the safety of equipment, operator and patient. (author)

  20. Percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of a brachytherapy technique as a safe and effective treatment for adrenal metastasis. Adapting a paravertebral insertion technique in radiofrequency ablation of adrenal tumors, we developed an interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis achievable on an outpatient basis. Under local anesthesia and under X-ray CT guidance, brachytherapy applicator needles were percutaneously inserted into the target. A treatment plan was created to eradicate the tumor while preserving normal organs including the spinal cord and kidney. We applied this interstitial brachytherapy technique to two patients: one who developed adrenal metastasis as the third recurrence of uterine cervical cancer after reirradiation, and one who developed metachronous multiple metastases from malignant melanoma. The whole procedure was completed in 2.5 hours. There were no procedure-related or radiation-related early/late complications. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-CT images at two and three months after treatment showed absence of FDG uptake, and no recurrence of the adrenal tumor was observed for over seven months until expiration, and for six months until the present, respectively. This interventional interstitial brachytherapy procedure may be useful as a safe and eradicative treatment for adrenal metastasis. (author)

  1. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkenhead, A; Hamlett, L; Wood, D; Choudhury, A [The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, Greater Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.

  2. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature

  3. Modified multipurpose catheter enhances clinical utility for cardiac catheterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, S C; Scavina, M; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    The Multipurpose technique for coronary arteriography employs a single catheter. The benefits are a reduction in the cost of the procedure and a shorter procedural time by experienced operators. To enhance the performance of these catheters, a modification was made in the materials and tip design, and these modifications were clinically evaluated in a small study. Compared to the control group of patients (n = 41), patients catheterized with the Multipurpose-SM (n = 43) were shown to have a shorter procedural time as measured by a reduced fluoroscopy time (7.08 min vs. 9.52 min, P = .007). This difference is statistically significant at a 95% confidence level and resulted in less radiation exposure to the operator and cath lab staff. The procedural time was significantly reduced by fewer catheter exchanges (19% study vs. 46% control; P = .006), which were needed to successfully complete the procedure. The new Multipurpose-SM catheter also demonstrated enhanced flexibility for cannulating coronary arteries with superior or anterior takeoffs. This study concludes that the utilization of a modified Multipurpose-SM catheter is safe and effective in cannulating both the left and right coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and performing left ventriculography. The primary benefits of using this modified catheter are reduced fluoroscopy time and the need for fewer catheter exchanges. PMID:7834732

  4. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intraabdominal abscesses and fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kwon, Tae Hee; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho [Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-10-15

    Percutaneous catheter drainage has been reported to be an effective method in the management of selected patients with abscess and fluid collection. Its high success rate and relatively low complications make the procedure an alternative to surgery in the individual cases. During past two years percutaneous catheter drainage in 25 patients with intraabdominal abscesses and fluid collection was performed at the Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of medicine. Here the technique and author's results were summarized. 1. The total 25 patients who had percutaneous catheter drainage are 10 liver abscesses, 3 subphrenic, one subhepatic, 4 renal and perirenal, 2 pelvic, one psoas, one anterior pararenal fluid from acute pancreatitis, one pancreas pseudocyst and 2 malignant tumor necrosis. 2. The modified Seldinger technique used for all cases of abscess and fluid drainage under guidance of ultrasound scan. The used catheters were 10F. Pigtail and 14F. Malecot (Cook c/o) catheters. 3. The abscesses and fluid of 17 patients among 25 were cured by the percutaneous catheter drainage and 4 patients were clinically improved. The catheter drainage was failed in 2 patients and 3 complication were developed. 4. The success rate of this procedure was 91.3%, failure rate was 8.7% and complication rate was 12%.

  5. Required treatment margin for coronary endovascular brachytherapy with iridium-192 seed ribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Preliminary clinical trials (SCRIPPS I, WRIST and Gamma 1) employing catheter-based endovascular brachytherapy (EVBT) with iridium-192 (Ir-192) seeds show promising results in reducing restenosis after coronary intervention. Failure analysis of these studies showed a significant number of restenosis at the treatment margin called ''edge effect.'' The objective of this study is to investigate the factors that contribute to the adequacy of treatment margin. Methods and materials: The factors contributing to the margins are penumbra effect at the end of the seed train, uncertainty in target localization, longitudinal seed movement during cardiac cycle and barotrauma due to stent deployment. The magnitudes of the penumbra effect, which refers to the tapering off the prescribed isodose line near the ends of the source train, were calculated for various source lengths of Ir-192 seed ribbon using AAPM TG-43 algorithm. Uncertainty in target localization refers to the fact that the visual estimation of proximal and distal extent of the injury is not accurate, and this can be obtained by comparing the 'estimate' from the interventional cardiologist with careful review of the cine-angiogram. Longitudinal seed movements relative to the coronary vessel during the cardiac cycle were determined by frame-by-frame reviewing cine-angiograms of 30 patients. The proximal and distal source points were measured in reference to branching vessels during the contrast phase of the cine-angiogram. The maximum proximal and distal longitudinal movement was captured and source displacement was measured from the closest proximal and distal branching vessel. Barotrauma, additional injury to the vessel arising from the stent deployment balloon, was obtained by reviewing specifications from commercially available stent delivery systems. Results: The penumbra effect ranges from 3.9 to 4.5 mm for 6-22 Ir-192 seed ribbons. The uncertainty in target localization is within 3 mm for our

  6. High beta and electron dose from 192Ir: implications for 'gamma' intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Trains of multiple 192Ir seeds are used in many clinical trials for intravascular brachytherapy. 192Ir source is commonly considered as a gamma emitter, despite the understanding that this radionuclide also emits a wide range of electron and beta energies, with a similar range of energy. The high dose from betas and electrons in the submillimeter range due to unsealed ends of seed sources should be precisely quantified to fully understand the backdrop for complications associated with 192Ir coronary artery brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4C code) were performed for a model 5-seed 192Ir train used in SCRIPPS, GAMMA, and the Washington Radiation for In-Stent Restenosis (WRIST) randomized clinical trials. A stack of radiochromic films was also used to measure the dose distributions for an actual 6-seed train. Results: In the submillimeter range very close to the source, Monte Carlo results show that betas and electrons deposit a higher dose than 192Ir photons (gamma and X-rays) over the interseed gap. A high luminal dose from the combined effects of betas, electrons, and photons emitted from 192Ir can be deposited, particularly between seeds. When prescribing 15 Gy at 2 mm, the combined dose can be as high as 160 Gy at 0.5 mm. Different peak doses near the interseed gaps were noted, which may be due to variability of seed-end surfaces and nonuniformity of seed activity within a real multiseed train. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of lumen surfaces were evaluated for an eccentric seed train. The DVH parameters indicating the extent of hot spots in the lumen wall, DV10, DV5, DV2, and DV1 (dose received by 10, 5, 2, 1% respectively of the total lumen surface), can be as high as 55, 76, 81, and 155 Gy for a lumen with 3-mm diameter, and 75, 80, 110, and 158 Gy for a narrow 2-mm lumen. Conclusion: 192Ir multiple seed trains used in the SCRIPPS, GAMMA, and WRIST trials can deposit a very high dose to the luminal wall. A particularly

  7. Vascular brachytherapy with 90Sr/Y versus 192Ir: A health physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Currently there are two ongoing trials of catheter based radiation therapy in the United States, the BERT Trial (Emory University, Atlanta, GA) and the SCRIPPS Trial (Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA). The BERT method involved the use of a treatment system to manually deliver a source train consisting of 12, encapsulated 90Sr/Y seeds of 3 cm total active length. The total activity of the source train was approximately 3.7 GBq. The SCRIPPS trial involved the use of a hand delivered 192Ir (BEST Industries) source train of either 5 or 9 sources with 1 mm spacing between the sources. The average total activity of the source train was 3.6 GBq ± 1.08 GBq. It is the purpose of this study to compare the patient dose and staff exposures from the above source trains. A comparison with exposures from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory will also be made. Materials and Methods: Measurements made with a GM meter at specified locations around the BERT patients during the insertion of the seeds were compared with published information from the SCRIPPS Trial. Monte Carlo modeled measurements of the equivalent dose in humans from insertion of the source trains were also compared for both methods. The above were contrasted with GM measurements from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory. Results: Average exposure rates recorded at the patient's chest and groin from the BERT method were 4.9x10-4 and 1.29x10-4 C/kg·hr respectively. Average exposures to the operator from the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 8.6x10-6 and 1.03x10-3 C/kg respectively. A typical exposure rate for conventional cardiac fluoroscopy is 3.9x10-3 C/kg·hr. Monte Carlo modeled calculations of patient dose equivalent for the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 0.43 μSv and 6.41 mSv respectively. Conclusions: Vascular brachytherapy performed with 90Sr/Y sources resulted in staff exposures of at least a factor of 120 less and patient doses of a factor of nearly 15

  8. Long-term urinary function after transperineal brachytherapy for patients with large prostate glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To summarize longer-term postbrachytherapy morbidity in patients with prostate glands >50 cm3. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 1998, 33 patients with a transrectal ultrasound-based prostate volume >50 cm3 were treated at the University of Washington by 125I (144 Gy) or 103Pd (115 Gy) implantation for prostate carcinoma. These 33 patients comprised 7% of the total implant patient population. Twelve patients were treated with neoadjuvant androgen ablation before implantation. The 125I source strength ranged from 0.34 to 0.5 mCi and the 103Pd source strength ranged from 1.1 to 1.4 mCi (pre-NIST-99). The total number of sources implanted was 94-223 (median 155). Despite the typical implant-related volume increase, the postimplant CT-defined prostate volumes were generally well-covered by the prescription isodose (median coverage 92%, range 80-100%). The preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urological Association. Results: Of the 33 patients, 12 developed acute postimplant urinary retention, all presenting within 24 h of implantation. Patients who developed postimplant retention lasting >1 week were generally treated with intermittent self-catheterization. By 1 month, 85% of patients were catheter free. By 1 year, only 1 patient (4%) remained in urinary retention; the remainder of cases had resolved spontaneously. With follow-up of 1.7-2.6 years, the last American Urological Association scores were higher than the pretreatment scores in 15 patients and lower in 7 patients. No patient developed permanent urinary incontinence. Long-term changes in the American Urological Association scores were unrelated to whether the patient had been in urinary retention after implantation. Two patients developed rectal fistulas; they had preimplant transrectal ultrasound prostate volumes of 53 and 59 cm3, in the low range for this group of patients. No other patient had persistent rectal bleeding suggestive of clinically

  9. The pathogenesis and epidemiology of catheter-related infection with pulmonary artery Swan-Ganz catheters: a prospective study utilizing molecular subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermel, L A; McCormick, R D; Springman, S R; Maki, D G

    1991-09-16

    To delineate the pathogenesis and epidemiology of catheter-related infection with Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery (PA) catheters, a prospective clinical study of hospitalized adult medical and surgical patients was done. Role of catheter material was assessed by randomizing insertions to heparin-bonded PA catheters made of polyvinylchloride or polyurethane. Sources of infection and pathogenesis were studied by culturing skin, the introducer, the PA catheter tip, all hubs, infusate from each lumen, and the extravascular portion of the PA catheter beneath the external protective plastic sleeve. Concordance between isolates from sources and infected catheters was determined by speciation, antibiogram, and for coagulase-negative staphylococci, plasmid profile analysis. Risk factors for infection were determined by stepwise logistic regression. Overall, 65 (22%) of 297 Swan-Ganz catheters showed local infection of the introducer (58 catheters) or the intravascular portion of the PA catheter (20 catheters); only two catheters (0.7%) caused bacteremia. Eighty percent of infected Swan-Ganz catheters (the introducer or PA catheter) showed concordance with organisms cultured from skin of the insertion site, 17% with a contaminated hub and 18% with organisms contaminating the extravascular portion of the PA catheter beneath the sleeve. Isolates from infected PA catheters were most likely to show concordance with concomitantly infected introducers (71%). Cutaneous colonization of the insertion site with greater than 10(2) cfu/10 cm2 (relative risk [RR] 5.5; p less than 0.001), insertion into an internal jugular vein (RR 4.3; p less than 0.01), catheterization greater than 3 days (RR 3.1; p less than 0.01), and insertion in the operating room using less stringent barrier precautions (RR 2.1; p = 0.03) were each associated with a significantly increased risk of catheter-related infection. The risk of bacteremic infection with Swan-Ganz catheters is now low, in the range of 1%, with

  10. Hickman catheter embolism in a child during stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of stem cell recipients rely on indwelling central venous catheters situated in superior vena cava or right atrium. Semi-permanent tunneled silicone rubber Hickman catheters are widely used to provide durable central venous access for patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. A case of 5 years old child with diagnosis of severe aplastic anemia is reported. The patient received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and had successful engraftment with complete hematological recovery. He had Hickman catheter embolism in the pulmonary circulation following unsuccessful attempt to remove the line. The catherter was successfully removed by midsternostomy operation. The child is normal with sustained remission on day +218 post stem cell transplant. (author)

  11. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  12. Automated treatment planning engine for prostate seed implant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a computer-intelligent planning engine for automated treatment planning and optimization of ultrasound- and template-guided prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: The genetic algorithm was modified to reflect the 2D nature of the implantation template. A multi-objective decision scheme was used to rank competing solutions, taking into account dose uniformity and conformity to the planning target volume (PTV), dose-sparing of the urethra and the rectum, and the sensitivity of the resulting dosimetry to seed misplacement. Optimized treatment plans were evaluated using selected dosimetric quantifiers, dose-volume histogram (DVH), and sensitivity analysis based on simulated seed placement errors. These dosimetric planning components were integrated into the Prostate Implant Planning Engine for Radiotherapy (PIPER). Results: PIPER has been used to produce a variety of plans for prostate seed implants. In general, maximization of the minimum peripheral dose (mPD) for given implanted total source strength tended to produce peripherally weighted seed patterns. Minimization of the urethral dose further reduced the loading in the central region of the PTV. Isodose conformity to the PTV was achieved when the set of objectives did not reflect seed positioning uncertainties; the corresponding optimal plan generally required fewer seeds and higher source strength per seed compared to the manual planning experience. When seed placement uncertainties were introduced into the set of treatment planning objectives, the optimal plan tended to reach a compromise between the preplanned outcome and the likelihood of retaining the preferred outcome after implantation. The reduction in the volatility of such seed configurations optimized under uncertainty was verified by sensitivity studies. Conclusion: An automated treatment planning engine incorporating real-time sensitivity analysis was found to be a useful tool in dosimetric planning for prostate

  13. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Kirsteen R. [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada); Guo, Lancia L. Q. [University of Calgary, Department of Radiology (Canada); Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K., E-mail: dheeraj.rajan@uhn.on.ca [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  14. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  15. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  16. HDR neutron brachytherapy for prostatic cancer in lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to analyse the physical and radiobiological background of the HDR Cf-252 Neutron brachytherapy boost in the combined radiation therapy for locally advanced prostatic cancer. The treatment schedule:two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy(5Gy-eq at the dose point 2 cm from source movement trajectory) with interval 24 hours; 5-8 fractions of the photon beam external radiation therapy(5 fractions per week, 2 Gy per fraction) to the prostate, two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy and after that external beam radiation therapy is continued till total dose 40-45 Gy. Six patients completed the proposed combined radiation therapy. The results of this trial will be discussed

  17. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with prior evidence of prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To refute a misconception that a prior history of prostatitis is a contraindication to prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Five patients with clinical or pathologic evidence of prior prostatitis were treated with transperineal brachytherapy. Four of the patients received a single i.v. dose of ciprofloxacin (500 mg) intraoperatively. Postimplant antibiotics were not given. The pretreatment biopsy slides were reviewed. Results: Two of the five patients developed postimplant urinary retention requiring short-term catheterization, and both resolved spontaneously. One patient developed what appeared to be an exacerbation of his chronic prostatitis. Conclusion: We continue to recommend prostate brachytherapy for the treatment of clinically organ-confined cancer, with no concern about prior clinical or pathologic evidence of prostatitis

  18. The long term effects of high dose rate brachytherapy on neointimal hyperplasia formation in the rat carotid artery - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: A large number of investigators have begun utilizing radiation modalities in order to prevent or delay neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) formation. Following our initial successful studies looking at single fraction low doses of HDR brachytherapy given immediately after injury, we extended this model to look at the long term effects on the inhibition of NIH in the rat common carotid artery. Materials and Methods: The right common carotid arteries (CCA) of 4-5 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were injured using a 2F balloon catheter. Immediately post-injury, a delivery catheter was sutured alongside the injured artery and the vessel received either 0, 5, or 10 Gy irradiation using an Iridium 192 afterloader. Six months post-treatment, the animals were sacrificed and both the right and left CCA were harvested following perfusion fixation, and processed for light and electron micrography. Specimens were stained with PAS and the intima and media areas were calculated using a computer-assisted digitizing program. Additional immunocytochemical staining was carried out, looking particularly at PDGF. Results: In contrast to our previous findings which were assessed at 3 weeks post-treatment, at the later time point of 6 months post-treatment, there was no significant reduction in intimal area of the radiation-treated balloon-injured animals compared to the balloon-injured alone and the intima: media ratios was the same in both groups (Fig. 1). The lumenal area in both treatment groups was significantly reduced from normal controls (Fig. 2). Immunocytochemical staining for PDGF at 3 weeks demonstrated that there was an immediate (24 hours) release of growth factor from the medial smooth muscle in the balloon-injured animals; there was no similar release in the radiation-treated animals at the 1 day, 1 or 3 week time points. This will now be assessed at the later time points. Higher doses of 15-25 Gy are now being studied since other investigators have shown

  19. Brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In treatment choices of stage II (T2N0M0) tongue cancer, brachytherapy is less invasive and superior in function preservation, therefore its role is more important in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate treatment results and morbidity of brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. Between 1980 and 2001, 198 patients with stage II tongue cancer were treated with brachytherapy at Hiroshima University Hospital. Patient ages ranged from 21 to 89 years old (median: 62 years old). Patients were divided into three groups as follows: 119 patients younger than 65 years old (Non-Elderly group), 53 patients between 65 and 75 years old (Junior Elderly group), and 26 patients 75 years or older (Senior Elderly group). Radiotherapy was performed in 101 patients with brachytherapy alone, and in 97 patients with brachytherapy and external radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was also performed in 77 patients. Follow-up period ranged from 4 to 243 months (median: 55 months). The 5-year local control rate was 85% in the Non-Elderly group, 85% in the Junior Elderly group and 81% in the Senior Elderly group. There was no significant difference among these groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 85%, 81% and 70% respectively. The Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate than the other two groups (p=0.03). There was also a tendency of higher incidence of neck metastasis and low salvage rate by neck dissection in the Senior Elderly group. Although the Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate, the local control rate was similar to those of the other two groups. Brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. (author)

  20. Image-Based 3D Treatment Planning for Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy: Dosimetric Effects of Bladder Filling on Organs at Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of bladder filling on organs at risk (OARs) using three-dimensional image-based treatment planning for vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent postoperative high–dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. For three-dimensional planning, patients were simulated by computed tomography with an indwelling catheter in place (empty bladder) and with 180 mL of sterile water instilled into the bladder (full bladder). The bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel (OARs) were contoured, and a prescription dose was generated for 10 to 35 Gy in 2 to 5 fractions at the surface or at 5 mm depth. For each OAR, the volume dose was defined by use of two different criteria: the minimum dose value in a 2.0-cc volume receiving the highest dose (D2cc) and the dose received by 50% of the OAR volume (D50%). International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder and rectum point doses were calculated for comparison. The cylinder-to-bowel distance was measured using the shortest distance from the cylinder apex to the contoured sigmoid or small bowel. Statistical analyses were performed with paired t tests. Results: Mean bladder and rectum D2cc values were lower than their respective ICRU doses. However, differences between D2cc and ICRU doses were small. Empty vs. full bladder did not significantly affect the mean cylinder-to-bowel distance (0.72 vs. 0.92 cm, p = 0.08). In contrast, bladder distention had appreciable effects on bladder and small bowel volume dosimetry. With a full bladder, the mean small bowel D2cc significantly decreased from 677 to 408 cGy (p = 0.004); the mean bladder D2cc did not increase significantly (1,179 cGy vs. 1,246 cGy, p = 0.11). Bladder distention decreased the mean D50% for both the bladder (441 vs. 279 cGy, p = 0.001) and the small bowel (168 vs. 132 cGy, p = 0.001). Rectum and sigmoid volume doses were not

  1. Image-Based 3D Treatment Planning for Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy: Dosimetric Effects of Bladder Filling on Organs at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Jennifer; Shen Sui; De Los Santos, Jennifer F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Kim, Robert Y., E-mail: rkim@uabmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of bladder filling on organs at risk (OARs) using three-dimensional image-based treatment planning for vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent postoperative high-dose rate vaginal cylinder brachytherapy. For three-dimensional planning, patients were simulated by computed tomography with an indwelling catheter in place (empty bladder) and with 180 mL of sterile water instilled into the bladder (full bladder). The bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel (OARs) were contoured, and a prescription dose was generated for 10 to 35 Gy in 2 to 5 fractions at the surface or at 5 mm depth. For each OAR, the volume dose was defined by use of two different criteria: the minimum dose value in a 2.0-cc volume receiving the highest dose (D{sub 2cc}) and the dose received by 50% of the OAR volume (D{sub 50%}). International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder and rectum point doses were calculated for comparison. The cylinder-to-bowel distance was measured using the shortest distance from the cylinder apex to the contoured sigmoid or small bowel. Statistical analyses were performed with paired t tests. Results: Mean bladder and rectum D{sub 2cc} values were lower than their respective ICRU doses. However, differences between D{sub 2cc} and ICRU doses were small. Empty vs. full bladder did not significantly affect the mean cylinder-to-bowel distance (0.72 vs. 0.92 cm, p = 0.08). In contrast, bladder distention had appreciable effects on bladder and small bowel volume dosimetry. With a full bladder, the mean small bowel D{sub 2cc} significantly decreased from 677 to 408 cGy (p = 0.004); the mean bladder D{sub 2cc} did not increase significantly (1,179 cGy vs. 1,246 cGy, p = 0.11). Bladder distention decreased the mean D{sub 50%} for both the bladder (441 vs. 279 cGy, p = 0.001) and the small bowel (168 vs. 132 cGy, p = 0.001). Rectum

  2. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Anderson, James H.

    1999-01-01

    We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of manimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program....... Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  3. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  4. Brachytherapy in vulvar cancer: analysis of 18 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: Vulvar cancer is a rather common neoplasm in elderly patients. Surgery, followed eventually by postoperative radiotherapy, is the treatment of choice. The results of exclusive radiotherapy (external beam irradiation and/or brachytherapy) are not well defined and in the recent literature only small series are reported. Radiotherapy however is the only therapeutic option in patients who are not fit for radical surgery. It is thus necessary to review its indications and its modalities. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1990 to 1994 18 pts with a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva have been submitted to brachytherapy. Age ranged from 60 to 92 years (mean age 76, 1 ys). 14 pts were treated at diagnosis (11 pts) or for recurrent disease after surgery (3 pts). In 8 of them brachytherapy (total dose 35-45 Gy, dose rate: 0,4-0,78 Gy/h) was preceded by external beam irradiation (Co60 or electron beam, 40-50 Gy to primary and inguinal nodes); 6 pts were treated with brachytherapy alone (58-60 Gy; dose rate 0,44-0,63 Gy/h). 4 pts underwent to brachytherapy alone for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (total dose 45-60 Gy; dose rate 0,37-0,49 Gy/h). Brachytherapy was always performed with 192 Ir. Plastic tubes (2 to 5 lines) were used for single plane implantation of small exophytic lesions limited to the labia (8 cases); a perineal template (10 cases) was employed in lesions extended to the vaginal mucosa or involving the clitoris or the area of the perineum. (10(14)) pts treated at diagnosis are alive and free from local recurrence after 11-48 mos. 3 of them, treated with brachytherapy alone, have presented a nodal recurrence in the groin after 14, 15 and 27 mos. respectively. All of them are alive and free from disease after surgery and external radiotherapy. None of the pts treated for recurrent disease after surgery + external beam radiotherapy has achieved a local control. CONCLUSION: Brachytherapy alone or

  5. Planning for brachytherapy using a 3D-simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D-simulation model made with a milling system was applied to HDR-brachytherapy. The 3D-simulation model is used to simulate the 3D-structure of the lesion and the surrounding organs before the actual catheterization for brachytherapy. The first case was recurrent prostatic cancer in a 61-year-old man. The other case was lymph node recurrence of a 71-year-old woman's upper gum cancer. In both cases, the 3D-simulation model was very useful to simulate the 3D-conformation, to plan the treatment process and to avoid the risk accompanying treatment. (author)

  6. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  7. Radiation Protection Training in Intracoronary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the educational objectives and contents on Radiation Protection (RP) for the practice of Intracoronary Brachytherapy (ICB) procedures. The wide international experience on training programs for ICB as well as our own experience organizing several courses aimed at Cardiologists, Radio therapists and Medical Physicists has been used to elaborate specific RP objectives and contents. The objectives, differentiated for Cardiologists, Radio therapists, Medical Physicists, Nurses and Technicians, pretend to guarantee the safety and RP of both patient and staff in the procedures of ICB. The objectives are necessarily different because their RP formation and their role in the procedure are different. The general topics included in RP training programmes for ICB could be: general topics on RP (Interaction of radiation and matter, RP principles, radiobiology, etc), principles of operation of ICB and interventional X-ray equipment, quantification of radiation dose and risks, optimisation of protection of staff and patients, accidents and emergencies, regulations, responsibilities, quality assurance program, handling of ICB sources, installation and commissioning. Training programs based on the objectives presented in this paper would encourage positive safety culture in ICB and can also be used as a starting point by the Regulatory Authority for the authorization of new Installations and credentialing of professionals involved in this technique as well as for the continuous education of the staff involved. (Author) 10 refs

  8. Endovascular brachytherapy to prevent restenosis after angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endovascular radiotherapy is the first effective prophylaxis of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting. The FDA recently approved two devices for the delivery of intracoronary radiation following coronary artery stenting. Published multicenter, double-blind, randomized trials of intracoronary radiation therapy report good results for preventing in-stent restenosis, while the data for the peripheral circulation are still inconclusive. Beta-emitters are easier applicable and probably also safer, whereas gamma-emitters have been more extensively evaluated clinically so far. Primary indication for endovascular brachytherapy are patients at high risk for restenosis, such as previous restenoses, in-stent hyperplasia, long stented segment, long PTA lesion, narrow residual vascular lumen and diabetes. Data from coronary circulation suggest a safety margin of at least 4 to 10 mm at both ends of the angioplastic segment to avoid edge restenosis. To prevent late thrombosis of the treated coronary segment, antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin are recommended for at least 6 months after PTA and for 12 months after a newly implanted stent. An established medication regimen after radiotherapy of peripheral arteries is still lacking. (orig.)

  9. Halo's production in vitro on brachytherapy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since earlier of 1960, one of the most significant contributions of radiation biology has been the theory of cell killing as a function of increasing doses of a cytotoxic agent, as well as the demonstration of repair of sublethal or potentially lethal damage after irradiation. The impact of cellular and molecular radiobiology, by exploitation of cellular mechanisms related to apoptosis, may be the cell killing with irradiation by including changes other than unrepaired DNA damage. Based on the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and how growth factors and proteins produced by irradiated cells may alter cellular processes, improved combined-modality strategies may emerge. This effect was show since 1960's, but here we propose to demonstrate this phenomenon in Brachytherapy. The present goal is to verify the macroscopic response through the production and analysis of clonogenic control based on halos generation by radioactive seeds of Ho-165 and Sm-153, aiming to study the effect of this type of irradiation. Confluent cell culture flasks with HeLa cell line were subjected to radiation in a period up to five half-lives of radionuclide, respectively. Devices were introduced which set the polymer-ceramic Ho-165 and Sm-153 seeds in the vials. After a period of exposure, the flasks were stained with violet Gensiana. The results showed the formation of halos control of confluent cancer cells. This paper will describe these experiments in the current stage of the research and report the implications of this new way of therapy for cancer treatment. (author)

  10. Urinary catheter related nosocomial infections in paediatric intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study was carried out in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mumbai. The objective was to determine the incidence, risk factors, mortality and organisms responsible for urinary catheter related infections (UCRI. Colonization and/or bacteriuria was labelled as urinary catheter related infection (UCRI. Forty-four patients with 51 urinary catheters were studied. Incidence of UCRI was 47.06%. Age, female sex and immunocompromised status did not increase the risk of UCRI. Duration of catheter in-situ and duration of stay in the PICU were associated with higher risk of UCRI. The mortality was not increased by UCRI. Commonest organism isolated in UCRI was E. coli, which had maximum susceptibility to nitrofurantoin and amikacin.

  11. Suprapubic catheter change resulting in terminal ileal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic cystostomy is commonly performed in patients with neurogenic bladder or bladder outlet obstruction. The most serious complication is bowel injury, which usually occurs during catheter insertion. Bowel perforation during suprapubic catheter exchange is rare. We herein report an extremely rare case of terminal ileal perforation resulting from a change of suprapubic catheter. After insertion of the suprapubic catheter, a feculent material was noted in the terminal ileum. A cystography revealed that the contrast medium passed directly into the terminal ileum and colon. A computed tomographic scan confirmed the presence of a balloon tip in the terminal ileum. Terminal ileum perforation was diagnosed. Emergent laparotomy and loop ileostomy were performed. The patient's recovery was uneventful.

  12. Collateral damage from Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwarang Wongcharoen, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia, contributing to a significant morbidity and mortality. Catheter ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs and left atrium (LA has been shown to be an effective strategy for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Regardless of technological advances and technique improvement, catheter ablation for AF remains a highly complex procedure and the risk of procedural complications is not negligible. The major complications have been reported to occur in up to 5.2% of procedures. A systematic investigation among 32,569 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF has demonstrated that mortality is around 0.1%. Nevertheless, the true prevalence of complications is possibly underestimated in retrospective surveys because of recollection bias and other factors. This article will focus on the management of serious complications of catheter AF ablation including PV stenosis, atrioesophageal fistula, cardiac tamponade, stroke and thromboembolic complication

  13. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tract Infection” What is “catheter-associated urinary tract infection”? A urinary tract infection (also called “UTI”) is an infection in the urinary system, which includes the bladder (which stores the ...

  14. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  15. Right atrial indwelling catheter for patients requiring long-term intravenous therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, M F; Adam, S M; Hickman, R O; Gibson, D L

    1978-12-01

    The use of a central venous catheter for long-term intravenous therapy is described. The catheter's history, physical description, and uses are discussed. Also reviewed are complications from use of the catheter, the pharmacist's role in patient teaching, and the procedure for administering medications through the catheter. A listing of drugs administered through the catheter, incompatibility data and patient teaching instructions are also included. PMID:717409

  16. Number and location of drainage catheter side holes: in vitro evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of number and location of catheter shaft side holes regarding drainage efficiency in an in vitro model. Materials and methods: Three different drainage catheter models were constructed: open-ended model with no side holes (one catheter), unilateral side hole model (six catheters with one to six unilateral side holes), and bilateral side hole model (six catheters with one to six bilateral side holes). Catheters were inserted into a drainage output-measuring device with a constant-pressure reservoir of water. The volume of water evacuated by each of the catheters at 10-second intervals was measured. A total of five trials were performed for each catheter. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The open-ended catheter had a mean drainage volume comparable to the unilateral model catheters with three, four, and five side holes. Unilateral model catheters had significant drainage volume increases up to three side holes; unilateral model catheters with more than three side holes had no significant improvement in drainage volume. All bilateral model catheters had significantly higher mean drainage volumes than their unilateral counterparts. There was no significant difference between the mean drainage volume with one, two, or three pairs of bilateral side holes. Further, there was no drainage improvement by adding additional bilateral side holes. Conclusion: The present in vitro study suggests that beyond a critical side hole number threshold, adding more distal side holes does not improve catheter drainage efficiency. These results may be used to enhance catheter design towards improving their drainage efficiency. -- Highlights: •We evaluated the drainage potential of three different drainage catheter models. •We found adding numerous distal sideholes does not improve catheter drainage. •Bilateral sidehole catheters performed better than unilateral sidehole catheters. •Our in vitro findings may be used to

  17. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  18. Penile gangrene following condom catheter urinary drainage : A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhya Gupta; Vinod Tamaknand; Amit Dangi; Bhawan Nangarwal; Rajesh Godara; Pradeep Garg

    2016-01-01

    External urine collecting devices have been a boon to patients of urinary incontinence since their invention in late 90s. They have replaced the need for uncomfortable indwelling catheters in these patients. As safe as they may be, ghastly complications have occurred infrequently, mostly due to their inappropriate application. Such penile and urethral complications add to the morbidity of the patients significantly. They can be easily avoided by following few simple steps of catheter care, th...

  19. Periinterventional prophylactic antibiotics in radiological port catheter implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate whether catheter-related infections after radiologically placed port catheters can be reduced by single-shot periinterventional antibiosis. Materials and Method: Between January and September 2002, 164 consecutive patients with indication for central venous port catheter implantation were included in the present study. During implantation the interventional radiologist was responsible for deciding whether to administer a prophylactic single-shot antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis entailed intravenous administration of ampicillin and sulbactam (3 g Unacid, Pfizer) or 100 mg ciprofloxacine (Ciprobay, Bayer) in the case of an allergy history to penicillins. Catheter-related infection was defined as a local or systemic infection necessitating port catheter extraction. Results: Indication for port catheter implantation was a malignant disease requiring chemotherapy in 158 cases. The port catheter (Chemosite [Tyco Healthcare] [n = 123], low-profile [Arrow International] [n = 35], other port system [n = 6]) was implanted via sonographically guided puncture of the right jugular vein in 139 patients, via the left jugular vein in 24 cases and via the right subclavian vein in one patient. 75 patients received periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis (Unacid [n = 63] Ciprobay [n 12]) and 89 patients did not receive antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis caused a minor allergic reaction in one patient that improved with antihistamic and corticoid medication. A total of 7 ports, 6 without prophylactic antibiosis versus one with periinterventional prophylaxis, were extracted due to infectious complications. Conclusion: Single-shot periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis can reduce early and late infectious complications after radiological-interventional placement of central venous port catheters. (orig.)

  20. Catheter Migration of a Port-a-Cath System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient with axillary venous thrombosis caused by lymph node compression and the presence of a displaced catheter in the vascular lumen is presented. In this case, percutaneous interventional radiological procedures (balloon angioplasty and snare loop method) in conjunction with medical treatment were effective in limiting the post-thrombotic syndrome and restoring the proper positioning of the catheter, thereby saving the central venous access

  1. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There...

  2. Imaging and management of complications of central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) provide valuable vascular access. Complications associated with the insertion and maintenance of CVCs includes pneumothorax, arterial puncture, arrhythmias, line fracture, malposition, migration, infection, thrombosis, and fibrin sheath formation. Image-guided CVC placement is now standard practice and reduces the risk of complications compared to the blind landmark insertion technique. This review demonstrates the imaging of a range of complications associated with CVCs and discusses their management with catheter salvage techniques

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment. It has been defined as the presence of local or systemic signs without other obvious infection site, plus the microbiologic evidence involving the catheter. This document includes a review and update of concepts, main clinical aspects, and treatment and stresses the importance of prophylactic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena.; Marcos Diosdado Iraola Ferrer

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment. It has been defined as the presence of local or systemic signs without other obvious infection site, plus the microbiologic evidence involving the catheter. This document includes a review and update of concepts, main clinical aspects, and treatment and stresses the importance of prophylactic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  5. Urinary catheter with polyurethane coating modified by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low friction urinary catheter that could be used without a lubricant is proposed in this work. A polyurethane coating was synthesised on the surface of a metal guide wire catheter. Ion implantation was applied to surface modify the polyurethane coating. FTIR ATR, wetting angle, AFM and friction tests were used for analysis. Low friction was found to be provided by the formation of a hard carbonised layer on the polyurethane surface

  6. Detection of endotoxin on sterile catheters used for cardiac catheterization.

    OpenAIRE

    Kundsin, R B; Walter, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Pyrogen reactions during cardiac catheterization are an alarming complication that frightens patients and baffles many physicans. This report describes a simple, reproducible, precise technique for the measurement of endotoxin-like activity on the inner and outer surfaces of catheters intended for intravascular insertion. This technique is useful in documenting the cause of patient reactions. Quality control procedures should be instituted following the manufacture of angiographic catheters s...

  7. Asystole during pulmonary artery catheter insertion under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of ongoing debate for the past 40 years, pulmonary artery catheters remain in use for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and management of critically ill patients. We describe a case of a sudden onset of asystolic cardiac arrest during the placement of a pulmonary artery catheter, while under general anesthesia. A brief review of the literature highlighting arrhythmic complications associated with pulmonary artery catheterization is also presented.

  8. Continuous shoulder analgesia via an indwelling axillary brachial plexus catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, S S; Steinberg, R B

    2000-09-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade can provide anesthesia and analgesia in the shoulder region. Difficulty accessing the interscalene space and premature displacement of interscalene catheters may preclude their use in certain situations. We present two case reports in which a catheter was advanced from the axilla along the brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space to provide continuous cervicobrachial plexus analgesia. In the first case report, previous neck surgery made the anatomic landmarks for performing an interscalene block very difficult. An epidural catheter was advanced from the axillary brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space under fluoroscopic guidance. This technique provided both intraoperative analgesia for shoulder surgery as well as 24-hour postoperative analgesia by an infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine. In the second case report, a catheter was inserted in a similar fashion from the axillary to the interscalene space to provide 14 days of continuous analgesia in the management of complex regional pain syndrome. We have found that this technique allows us to secure the catheter more easily than with the traditional interscalene approach and thus prevents premature dislodgment. This approach may be a suitable alternative when either an interscalene or an infraclavicular catheter may not be inserted. PMID:11090734

  9. Important aspects of the colonization of central venous catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli-Pinto, T J; Graziano, K U

    1999-01-01

    This study comprises five different kind of venous central catheters, 103 in total, made of Polyurethane Tecoflex, Polyurethane Vialon, PTFE and PVC, and the influence of their raw material on the microbial colonization. Patients age and sex, besides their clinical conditions, were taken into account, and neither considered as a sample vicious, nor associated with colonization. When the tips of the catheters were asseptically inoculated in Tryptic Soy Broth and Tioglicolate, colonization was detected in 15.5% of the catheters. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus, some of which with biofilm, were the predominant organisms found, although some bacillus have also been detected: Enterobacter aerogenes, Hafnia alvei, Pseudomonas cepacia, Xanthomonas maltophilia and Aeromonas sobria. It was not possible to notice any association between the colonization of the catheters and their raw material, probably due to the influence of a previous contact and linking with blood components. This contact causes a thin coating on the surface of the cathether, which makes all the catheters similar in respect of the attachment of a bacterial cell. So, the colonization depends on the virulence of the organism, much more then on the nature of the catheter. PMID:10326311

  10. Contact force assessment in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Kautzner; Petr Peichl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF remains limited. Increase of success would require more durable lesions without increased risk of steam pop and cardiac perforation. Recently, novel technologies have been developed to estimate real-time catheter-tissue contact force (CF. This paper reviews three available tools for assessment of CF and data on experimental or clinical experience. Experimental data with open-irrigated catheter showed that lesion size was greater with applications of lower power (like 30 W and greater CF (e.g. 30 to 40 g than vice versa. Impedance drop in the first 5 seconds was significantly correlated to catheter CF. Perforation was achieved more rapidly with the ablation catheter in a sheath despite the same CF because the sheath prevents catheter buckling. Clinical experience confirmed poor relationship between CF and either unipolar amplitude, bipolar amplitude, or impedance. Within the left atrium, the most common high CF site was found at the anterior/rightward LA roof, directly beneath the ascending aorta (confirmed by merging the CT image and map. Importantly, several studies showed that the use of CF leads to shorter procedure with less fluoroscopy time and less RF applications. CF assessment was also found to be associated with higher proportion of durable lesions. Finally, pilot studies showed that CF measurement could be associated with better clinical efficacy AF ablation.

  11. Bacterial biofilms in patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, David J

    2008-11-01

    Bacteria have a basic survival strategy: to colonize surfaces and grow as biofilm communities embedded in a gel-like polysaccharide matrix. The catheterized urinary tract provides ideal conditions for the development of enormous biofilm populations. Many bacterial species colonize indwelling catheters as biofilms, inducing complications in patients' care. The most troublesome complications are the crystalline biofilms that can occlude the catheter lumen and trigger episodes of pyelonephritis and septicemia. The crystalline biofilms result from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease raises the urinary pH and drives the formation of calcium phosphate and magnesium phosphate crystals in the biofilm. All types of catheter are vulnerable to encrustation by these biofilms, and clinical prevention strategies are clearly needed, as bacteria growing in the biofilm mode are resistant to antibiotics. Evidence indicates that treatment of symptomatic, catheter-associated urinary tract infection is more effective if biofilm-laden catheters are changed before antibiotic treatment is initiated. Infection with P. mirabilis exposes the many faults of currently available catheters, and plenty of scope exists for improvement in both their design and production; manufacturers should take up the challenge to improve patient outcomes. PMID:18852707

  12. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  13. External beam radiotherapy and high dose rate brachytherapy in lung cancer: a phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: For patients with localized non operable bronchial carcinoma, combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy can achieve only a 15 to 20 % local control rate. For some selected cases, high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) could be added to external beam radiotherapy to increase local tumour control. The risk of such a combined treatment is of increased toxicity. A feasibility study was developed in our Department. Methods: The HDRB is given once a week (I192 source) during the last four weeks of a conventional radiotherapy giving 60 Gy in 6 Weeks (4 x 2.5 Gy/week). A dose escalation study was planned with 4 x 3 Gy HDRB, then 4 x 4 Gy and 4 x 5Gy. Five patients have been treated at a dose of 4 x 3 Gy and two at 4 x 4 Gy. The given dose was prescribed according to the target volume and the physical dose was specified at 1 cm. The treatment catheter was positioned by the pneumologist (P.B.), and the treatment volume defined according to the endoscopy and to pre-treatment CT scanner, with a 2 cm safety margin on each extremity of the macroscopic tumour. The catheter was checked by X rays before any HDR treatment. Results: Median age of the patients was 65 year, with an OMS status <2. The location of the tumour was an upper lobe in 4 cases and a lower lobe in 3 cases. The mean treated volume was 14 cm3. With a mean follow up time of 6 months one fistulae, one pneumothorax and one radiation induced pneumonitis have been observed. Four patients have died: two from distant metastases with local tumour control, one from a myocardial infarct and one from local recurrence. Conclusion: In this feasibility study, some toxicity of combined external beam irradiation and HDRB has been found. The role of such a combined approach has to be very carefully assessed in the future

  14. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  15. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  16. High-dose rate brachytherapy in localized penile cancer: short-term clinical outcome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess clinical outcomes of high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy (HIB) in localized penile carcinoma. From 03/2006 to 08/2013, patients with biopsy-proven T1-T2 (<4 cm) non-metastatic localized penile squamous cell carcinoma underwent HIB. Under general anaesthesia, after Foley catheter placement, needles were placed in the target volume using a dedicated template. Planification was carried out with a post-implant CT-scan to deliver a total dose of 36 Gy in 9 fractions over 5 days (in adjuvant setting) or 39 Gy in 9 fractions over 5 days (as monotherapy). Dose-volume adaptation was manually achieved using graphical optimization. Dosimetric data and clinical outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicities were graded using the CTC v4.0. With a median follow-up of 27 months [5.1-83], 12 patients including 8 T1a, 3 T1b and 1 T2 N0 underwent HIB (sole therapy: 11 pts; adjuvant: 1 pt). The actuarial 5-year relapse-free, cause-specific and overall survival rates were 83%, 100% and 78% respectively. Comparing pre and post treatment evaluation, no IPSS or IIEF-5 changes were reported. Dermatitis was reported systematically 1 month after HIB including 6 G1, 5 G2 and 1 G3. Only 1 experienced long-term G3 successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. One urethral meatus stenosis G3 required meatotomy. In selected patients with T1-T2 localized penile cancer, HIB may be considered as an optional conservative therapy. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these encouraging preliminary results

  17. Preliminary report of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy in head-and-neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemlewski, A.; Zienkiewicz, J. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Serkies, K.; Badzio, A. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and acute/delayed toxicity of pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR BT) in head-and-neck tumors. Patients and Methods: 45 head and neck cancer patients underwent interstitial or contact PDR BT at a dose of 10.2-70 Gy (median, 70 Gy) and 0.6 or 1.0 Gy/pulse/h. 42 patients were administered BT as part of their curative treatment; 32 of them had sole BT. Three reirradiated patients with recurrent tumor had palliative BT. Results: PDR BT was well tolerated. Intense bleeding was the only complication associated with catheter removal from the tongue and bucca. 44 patients who completed BT experienced acute mucositis. Grade 3 toxicity of skin and oral mucosa occurred in three (6.8%) and six patients (13.6%), respectively. At a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 2-67 months), late serious toxicity (grade 4, for soft tissue and bone) was seen in seven patients (15.9%). Among the parameters analyzed, only dental care performed before BT had a significant impact on mucosal side effects. Acute severe mucositis was observed in 23% of patients without dental care compared to 0% of those with dental care (p = 0.044). Late severe mucositis occurred in 17.7% and 26.9% of the respective patients (p = 0.035), overall in 23%. The larger the volume encompassed by the reference isodose, the more late (p = 0.004) mucosal reactions were observed. Conclusion: PDR BT continued over a few days is a feasible and safe approach in head-and-neck tumors; however, it is accompanied by some toxicity. Dental care should precede isotope application. (orig.)

  18. Endovascular brachytherapy (EVBT) with rhenium-188 for restenosis prophylaxis after angioplasty of infrainguinal lesions. Early experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Restenosis remains a major problem in percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of peripheral arteries. The aim of this feasibility study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of a new endovascular brachytherapy (EVBT) device with Rhenium-188 in restenosis prophylaxis of infrainguinal arteries. Materials and Methods: From March 2006 to April 2009, 52 patients with 71 infrainguinal arterial lesions were treated with Re-188 to prevent restenosis after PTA. 40 patients with 53 lesions (24 de-novo lesions and 29 restenoses) were reexamined (clinic, color-coded duplex ultrasound) after a mean follow-up period of 12.7 months (2.6 to 25.1 months). The liquid beta-emitter Re-188 was introduced to the target lesion via an EVBT certified PTA balloon and a tungsten applicator. After the calculated irradiation time, Re-188 was aspirated back into the tungsten applicator. A dose of 13 Gy was applied at a depth of 2 mm into the vessel wall. Results: After a mean follow-up of 12.7 months, the overall restenosis rate after Re-PTA was 15.1 % (8/53 lesions). The restenosis rate for de-novo lesions was 20.8 % (5/24) and 10.3 % for restenoses (3/29). In 4 patients reintervention was necessary (3 PTAs and 2 major amputations). No periprocedural complications were observed. No elevated radiation dose for the patient or the interventionalist was measured. Conclusion: EVBT with a Re-188 filled balloon catheter was technically feasible and safe after PTA of infrainguinal arterial lesions with restenosis rates lower than expected compared to published results. Treatment of restenoses seems to be more effective than de-novo lesions. (orig.)

  19. Bacterial Biofilms and Catheters: A Key to Understanding Bacterial Strategies in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nickel, J. Curtis; Costerton, J. William

    1992-01-01

    Despite major technological improvements in catheter drainage systems, the indwelling Foley catheter remains the most common cause of nosocomial infection in medical practice. By approaching this common complicated urinary tract infection from the perspective of the biofilm strategy bacteria appear to use to overcome obstacles to produce bacteriuria, one appreciates a new understanding of these infections. An adherent biofilm of bacteria in their secretory products ascends the luminal and ext...

  20. Gamma radiation-sterilized, triple-lumen catheters coated with a low concentration of chlorhexidine were not efficacious at preventing catheter infections in intensive care unit patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherertz, R J; Heard, S O; Raad, I I; Gentry, L; Bowton, D; Scuderi, P; Hu, J.; Carruth, W; Satishchandra, B; J. Pepe; Mosenthal, A; Burke, T.; Dupuis, J.

    1996-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind trial, gamma radiation-sterilized, chlorhexidine-coated triple-lumen catheters were compared with uncoated control catheters for their ability to prevent catheter infection in 254 intensive care unit patients. The chlorhexidine coating was not efficacious, and a rabbit model demonstrated that reduction of chlorhexidine activity by gamma radiation sterilization was the likely explanation for the failure.

  1. Potential In Vivo UVC Disinfection of Catheter Lumens: Estimation of the Doses Received by the Blood Flow Outside the Catheter Tip Hole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Helfmann, Jurgen;

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated that it is possible to launch UVC LED light into bacterial contaminated polymer tubes/catheters and disinfect the intraluminal space of these tubes. This can be achieved by UVC treatment of the catheters on a regular basis. Catheters are in the distal end equipped with an exi...

  2. Carbon nanotubes on polymer-based pressure micro-sensor for manometric catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, M. F.; Hariz, A.; Hsu, H. Y.; Omari, T.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the fabrication process of a novel polymer based pressure micro-sensor for use in manometric measurements in medical diagnostics. Review and analysis of polymer materials properties and polymer based sensors has been carried out and has been reported by us elsewhere [1]. The interest in developing a novel polymer based flexible pressure micro-sensor was motivated by the numerous problems inherent in the currently available manometric catheters used in the hospitals. The most critical issue regarding existing catheters was the running and maintenance costs [2]. Thus expensive operation costs lead to reuse of the catheters, which increase the risk for disease transmission. The novel flexible polymer based pressure micro-sensor was build using SU-8, which is a special kind of negative photoresist. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and aluminum are used as the sensing material and contacting electrodes respectively. The pressure sensor diaphragm was first patterned on top of an oxidized silicon wafer using SU-8, followed by aluminum deposition to define the electrodes. The carbon nanotube is then deposited using dielectrophoresis (DEP) process. Once the carbon nanotubes are aligned in between these electrodes, the remaining of the sensor structure is formed using SU-8. Patterning of SU-8 and release from the substrate make the device ready for further testing of sensing ability. This research not only investigates the use of polymeric materials to build pressure sensors, but also explores the feasibility of full utilization of polymeric materials to replace conventional silicon materials in micro-sensors fabrication for use in medical environments. The completed sensor is expected to form an integral part of a large versatile sensing system. For example, the biocompatible artificial skin, is predicted to be capable of sensing force, pressure, temperature, and humidity, and may be used in such applications as medical and robotic system.

  3. Brachytherapy in Europe: philosophies, current practice and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Five months sabbatical leave provided an opportunity to visit six radiotherapy centres in France, Holland and England. While brachytherapy philosophies and practices within each country were similar, there were considerable differences in attitudes between countries. The Institute Gustave Roussy, home of the Paris System and host for the French sector confirmed that the Paris System is still very much the preferred dosimetry method in this part of the world. Though their preference for low dose rate brachytherapy is still evident, high dose rate brachytherapy has found some applications but the rules of the Paris System are never far away and the words 'what about the hyperdose sleeve' are firmly implanted into this visitor's brain. The use of real time dosimetry for I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Institute Curie (Paris) provided an interesting contrast to the standard pre and post implant dosimetry techniques commonly employed elsewhere. The two Dutch centres on the itinerary, in stark contrast to the traditional techniques seen in France, have applied the power of computers to investigate optimisation of the classic dosimetry systems and called on the analysis techniques (DVH, NTCP, TCP etc) now familiar to us all in external beam therapy. The Cookridge Hospital in England fitted somewhere between the French and Dutch centres. This centre showed how both modern and traditional techniques could be applied in an efficient way for a large variety of treatment sites. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Curative brachytherapy for recurrent/residual tongue cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayukawa, F.; Shibuya, H.; Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Watanabe, H.; Miura, M. [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The efficacy of curative low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for recurrent and/or residual cancer following radical operation or irradiation and posttreatment quality of life (QoL) were assessed. Patients and Methods: Between January 1979 and April 2004, 88 patients who had received curative LDR brachytherapy (28 with postoperative close or positive margins, six with postoperative recurrence, six with recurrence after external-beam irradiation, and 48 with recurrent/residual cancer after curative brachytherapy) were analyzed retrospectively. Late complications were assessed based on the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity score scheme. Results: The 5-year relapse-free and cause-specific survival rates were 92% and 96%, respectively, in the close/positive margin group and 52% and 56%, respectively, in the postbrachytherapy recurrence or residual cancer group. The incidence of late side effects was 8% (2/26) in the close or positive margin group and 22% (4/18) in the postbrachytherapy group. The only grade 4 late complication (bone exposure) was observed in one patient in the postbrachytherapy group. Conclusion: LDR brachytherapy as reirradiation for recurrent/residual tongue cancer was effective, and there was no increase in complications. (orig.)

  5. Independent brachytherapy plan verification software: Improving efficacy and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare the pre-treatment brachytherapy plan verification by a physicist assisted by custom plan verification software (SAV) with those performed manually (MV). Materials and methods: All HDR brachytherapy plans used for treatment in 2013, verified using either SAV or MV, were retrospectively reviewed. Error rate (number of errors/number of plans) was measured and verification time calculated. All HDR brachytherapy safety events recorded between 2010 and 2013 were identified. The rate of patient-related safety events (number of events/number of fractions treated) and the impact of SAV on the underlying errors were assessed. Results: Three/106 errors (2.8%) were found in the SAV group and 24/273 (8.8%) in the MV group (p = 0.046). The mean ±1 standard deviation plan verification time was 8.4 ± 4.0 min for SAV and 11.6 ± 5.3 for MV (p = 0.006). Seven safety events out of 4729 fractions delivered (0.15%) were identified. Four events (57%) were associated with plan verification and could have been detected by SAV. Conclusions: We found a safety event rate in HDR brachytherapy of 0.15%. SAV significantly reduced the number of undetected errors in HDR treatment plans compared to MV, and reduced the time required for plan verification

  6. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  7. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate c

  8. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author)

  9. Brachytherapy in cervix cancers: techniques and concepts evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last years and have benefited from imaging modalities development, specially MRI. Imaging modalities contribute to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. Ultrasound during brachytherapy has led to the almost complete eradication of uterine perforation. In the future, a more systematic use of systems allowing optimization may induce a better dose distribution in the tumor as well as in the critical organs. Recent data provided information in favor of a better analysis in the relative role of dose-rate, total dose and treated volume and their influence on the local control and complication incidence. Concomitant radio-chemotherapy represents a standard in the treatment of patients with tumoral size exceeding 4 cm. Some questions still remain: is concomitant chemotherapy of benefit during brachytherapy? Is there any place for complementary surgery, specially in patients with complete response after external irradiation with concomitant chemotherapy and brachytherapy? In order to answer the former question, a phase III randomized trial is going to start, with the Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer as a promoter. (authors)

  10. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  11. Brachytherapy surface mould: a treatment modality for some typical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy techniques generally used are interstitial implants, intracavitary/intraluminal applications and surface mould therapy. At M.D. Oswal Cancer Hospital surface moulds with remote after-moulding system with 192Ir wires for treatment of some typical sites have been used

  12. β-Ray brachytherapy with 106Ru plaques for retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of 134 patients who received 106Ru brachytherapy for retinoblastomas (175 tumors in 140 eyes). Treatment and follow-up were analyzed with special emphasis on tumor control organ, preservation, and late complications. Results: Treated tumors had a mean height and diameter of 3.7 ± 1.4 mm and 5.0 ± 2.8 disk diameters, respectively. The radiation dose values were recalculated according to the calibration standard recently introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The recalculation revealed a mean applied dose of 419 Gy at the sclera (SD, 207 Gy) and 138 Gy (SD, 67 Gy) at the tumor apex. The 5-year tumor control rate was 94.4%. Tumor recurrence was more frequent in eyes with vitreous tumor cell seeding or fish-flesh regression. The estimated 5-year eye preservation rate was 86.5%. Previous treatment by brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy, as well as a large tumor diameter, were significant factors for enucleation. The radiotherapy-induced complications after 5 years of follow-up were retinopathy (22%), optic neuropathy (21%), and cataract (17%). These complications were significantly more frequent after prior brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. Conclusion: Brachytherapy using 106Ru plaques is a highly efficient therapy with excellent local tumor control and an acceptable incidence of side effects

  13. Medical physics aspects of ophthalmic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraocular melanoma is the most common primary malignancy of the eye. Radiation therapy using ophthalmic plaque has proved successful in the management of various ocular lesions. Although a few centres were using 90Sr/90Y plaques for shallow turtlours some years ago, eye plaque therapy was not a common practice in India. A revived interest in the use of eye plaque therapy and very high cost of imported sources has led to the development and production of 125I seed sources by the Radiopharmaceuticals Division, BARC. This report presents a brief description on the clinical, dosimetry and radiation safety aspects of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray and 125I gamma ray eye plaque applicators. This report has been divided in five Sections. Section I presents general introduction of ophthalmic brachytherapy including the structure of a human eye, types of ophthalmic plaques and characteristics of radioisotopes commonly used in such applications. A brief review of sources, applicators and dosimetry of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta and 125I gamma ophthalmic plaques are given in Section II and Section III, respectively. Section IV contains the single seed dosimetry data of BARC OcuProsta 125I seed as well as dosimetry data of typical eye plaques loaded with BARC OcuProsta 125I seed. Quality assurance and radiation safety aspects of these eye applicators are described in Section V. A proforma of the application required to be filled in by the user institution for obtaining regulatory consent to start eye plaque therapy has also been appended to this report. (author)

  14. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  15. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.)

  16. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  17. Peroperative transperineal brachytherapy for recurrent pelvic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent pelvic malignancies represent often a challenge to the therapist due to the limited efficacy of most classical treatment especially in case of prior radiation or lateral extension. Moreover, a surgical resection such as a total pelvic exenteration is only recommended for central recurrence due to the severe mutilation. An innovative approach combining transperineal brachytherapy (BT) with rigid templates and peroperative BT with plastic tubes was developed for the treatment of pelvic recurrence. Plastic tubes were placed during surgery using hollow perineal needles. The laparotomy offers the possibility of a perfect visualisation of the target area to be implanted. Furthermore, a debulking of the tumor mass is possible, limiting the residual volume to be treated. One week after surgery, the loading with 192iridium wires is performed after simulation and dosimetry CTscan. Computed dosimetry is obtained by means of orthogonal radiographs and isodoses are superimposed on the CTslices. Since december 1994, 3 patients were treated for a pelvic relapse of a cervix cancer (2pts) and a sigmoidal cancer (1ppt) to test the feasibility of this approach. Two patients had an history of pelvic irradiation. The third patient was treated with an implant after 40 Gy external beam radiotherapy. A total dose of 60 to 80 Gy was delivered with this technique to a volume ranging from 15 to 24 cm3. One patient had an acute urethritis and another developed a vesicovaginal fistula after a biopsy performed for a slight irregularity of the vaginal mucosa in the highly irradiated area. One relapse in the implanted area is reported within this period of observation. Additional follow up and experience is required to assess the real efficacy of this method. Nevertheless, this approach offers a good alternative for patients relapsing in the pelvis especially in already irradiated area with a good acute and late tolerance and a satisfactory implantation technique

  18. A prospective randomized controlled trial of Wallace and Rocket embryo transfer catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shawarby, Salem A; Ravhon, Amir; Skull, Jonathan; Ellenbogen, Adrian; Trew, Geoffrey; Lavery, Stuart

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two embryo transfer catheters: Wallace and Rocket Embryon in an IVF programme of a tertiary referral university centre. A total of 308 patients undergoing embryo transfer were prospectively randomized to either a transfer with the Wallace catheter or a transfer with the Rocket catheter. The main outcome measure in this study was the clinical pregnancy rate, and secondary outcome measures included implantation rate, visibility of the catheter under ultrasound, number of retained embryos post transfer, and whether change of catheter was required. In addition, patient discomfort during the procedure was recorded. Pregnancy and implantation rates were similar when Wallace or Rocket catheters were used. However, for the Rocket catheter, the tip was more often clearly seen on ultrasound and it had a lower rate of retained embryos in the catheter after transfer (P < 0.05). Experience with different transfer catheters is recommended for difficult cases. PMID:18854110

  19. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  20. Role of TPS in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the role of TPS in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors. Methods: Sixty-six patients with orbital tumor treated with 125I seeds from 2005 to 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Forty-three patients were treated using TPS guided brachytherapy and the prescribed dose was 140 Gy. Other 23 patients were treated without TPS but simply implanted with 125I seeds at 1 cm intervals in parallel with each other intraoperatively. CT and TPS quality verification were performed postoperatively in all patients. Also, CT and (or) MRI examination were performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after brachytherapy for follow-up. χ2 test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank significance test were used with SPSS 17.0. Results: A total of 1070 125I seeds were implanted in 66 cases, on average, (16.2 ± 7.3) seeds for each patient. The satisfaction rates of postoperative quality verification in patients with and without TPS pre-plans were 79.07% (34/43) and 43.48% (10/23) respectively (χ2=8.542, P=0.003). Ten patients were lost in follow-up. Local recurrence rates in patients with favorable postoperative quality verification were 0 (0/37) in 3 months, 6.25% (2/32) in 6 months, 13.64% (3/22) in 12 months and 3/9 in 24 months respectively, which were significantly different from those (5.26% (1/19), 16.67% (3/18), 30.77% (4/13), 6/6) in the patients with inferior postoperative quality verification (χ2=9.017, P=0.0003). Conclusions: TPS plays an important role in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors. Also, postoperative quality verification by TPS may help predict the local recurrence after brachytherapy. (authors)

  1. An assessment of the radiological impact of brachytherapy application in Metro Manila hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important uses of radioactive sources in medicine is the application of brachytherapy technology. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation therapy where an encapsulated radioactive source delivers gamma or beta radiation into a tumor site. The paper describes different categories of brachytherapy applications involving manual insertion or afterloading and remote afterloading techniques. A list of five hospitals in Metro Manila practicing different techniques of brachytherapy are enumerated. Because of the widespread uses of radioactive sources in brachytherapy technology in medicine, inadequate control in its use had led to a number of incidents resulting to unnecessary exposure of radiation workers, patients and general public. This study was initiated to determine the radilogical hazards involved in brachytherapy applications. It presents contingency scenarios and their projected radiological consequences. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Radiation pneumonitis caused by a migrated brachytherapy seed lodged in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of radiation pneumonitis caused by a migrated seed lodged in the lung after prostate brachytherapy. A 71-year-old man underwent transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. On the day after brachytherapy, a routine postimplant chest X-ray revealed migration of one seed to the lower lobe of the left lung. After 1 month, pulmonary opacities were observed in the left lower lobe but not near the seed. He was diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia, and antibiotic therapy was commenced. Two months after brachytherapy, the patient's symptoms, laboratory data and pulmonary opacities improved; however, an abnormal shadow (consolidation) developed around the migrated seed. Lung consolidation disappeared almost completely 12 months after brachytherapy without any medical treatment. The abnormal shadow probably represented radiation pneumonitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation pneumonitis caused by a migrated brachytherapy seed in the lung. (author)

  3. Salvage brachytherapy for patients with locally persistent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Locally persistent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) carries an increased risk of local failure if additional treatment is not given. This study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of patients with locally persistent NPC as treated by high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy, and to explore whether routine brachytherapy boost could improve the local control. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven patients with locally persistent NPC treated during 1990-1998 with HDR intracavitary brachytherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Fibreoptic nasopharyngoscopy was performed 3-6 weeks after completion of the primary external radiation therapy (ERT). Biopsies were only taken from suspicious areas. Those with complete regression of local disease were put on observation. Eighty-seven patients were shown to have persistent viable disease at a median time of 6 weeks post-RT. The distribution according to Ho's staging system at initial diagnosis was as follows: Stage I-8, II-33, III-41, IV-5; T1-19, T2-48, T3-20; N0-32, N1-22, N2-28, N3-5. CT scan for restaging was not performed after the documentation of persistent disease. Our policy was to treat all patients with persistent disease with brachytherapy irrespective of the extent of disease just prior to brachytherapy. They were treated with HDR intracavitary brachytherapy, with either cobalt sources or an iridium source, giving 22.5-24 Gy in 3 weekly sessions in all but 4 patients. This dose was prescribed at a distance of 1.5 cm from the center of the surface as defined by the sources in the first six patients and subsequently reduced to 1 cm for the others. Twelve patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To compare the efficacy of brachytherapy, another 383 consecutive nonmetastatic patients, treated with curative intent by ERT, during the years 1990-1993, were evaluated. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year actuarial local

  4. In vivo Tl dosimetry for the quality control in Radiotherapy with 60 Co and brachytherapy of low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo dosimetry is used every time with more frequency as a valuable tool for the quality control in Radiotherapy. The measurements of input and output doses provide us information about the technique accuracy or the treatment procedure used; likewise the dose measurement which rectum or bladder receive in gynecologic implants contribute to the improving and adjusting the procedures in brachytherapy. Besides, it may be identify systematic errors in particular situations which allow to optimize the treatment and to minimize errors. It was realized a study at the Radiotherapy service in San Roque Hospital (Cordoba) to control the procedures used in the treatment of distinct oncologic pathologies. Its were selected patients, which were realized the routine planning with the planning system of computerized treatments Prowess 3000, that later its were controlled with In vivo thermoluminescent dosimetry using the Ceprocor Services (Cordoba). Its were realized dose skin measurements in treatments of mammary gland, pelvis, thorax, head and neck and it were measured doses in body cavities, as oral cavity, rectum, esophagus, etc. arranging the TLD inside special catheters. In the case of dose skin, the dosemeters were arranged in acrylic porta-dosemeters, at pairs, which later they were enveloped and sealed. It was founded a very good agreement among the In vivo measurements and the predicted by the planner. In some cases, the control allows to modify the treatment for to avoid over or sub dosages of the distinct organs affected by the radiation field. (Author)

  5. Dosimetry TL 'in vivo' for the quality control in radiotherapy with Co-60 and brachytherapy of low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The dosimetry 'in vivo' is used frequently as a valuable tool for the quality control in radiotherapy. Measurements of the entry and exit doses provide us of information on the precision of the technique or the procedure of used treatment; the measurement of the doses in rectal or bladder in gynecological implants contribute to perfect or to adjust the procedures in brachytherapy. Also systematic errors can be identified in particular situations that allow to optimize the treatment and to minimize errors. A study in the service of Radiotherapy of the San Roque Hospital, was realized for to control the procedures used in the treatment of different cancer therapy. Patients were selected, to which were carried out a routine planning with the system of planning of on line treatment Prowess 3000 that then were controlled with thermoluminescent dosemeters 'in vivo' using the Ceprocor Services. Skin doses were measurement in treatment of breast, pelvis, thorax, head and neck, and doses was measured in cavities of the body as oral cavity, rectal, esophagus, etc., placing the TLD inside special catheters. In the case of doses in skin, the dosimeters was placed in acrylic badges. A very good agreement was found between the measurements 'in vivo' and the plans of the planner. In some cases the control allowed to modify the doses to avoid organs damage for the radiation fields. (author)

  6. Fat necrosis in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the incidence of clinical, pathological and radiological fat necrosis (FN) in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) for early-stage breast cancer and to study certain variables associated with it. Methods and materials: Between May 2000 and August 2008, 171 women were treated with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) BRT. Patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 fractions/1 week with two fractions/day after intraoperative/postoperative placement of catheters. Results: At a median follow up of 48 months (SD: 28) 20 women developed FN with median time to detection being 24 months (range: 4–62 months, SD: 20). Actuarial 5 and 7 year FN rate was 18% and 23%, respectively. Grade 1 FN was seen in 4, grade 2 in 8 and grade 4 in 8 women. Additional investigations such as aspiration/biopsy were done in 9 patients. Volume of excision was the only significant factor affecting FN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Actuarial FN rate of 18% at 5 years in our study was comparable to other reported series of FN. Median time of detection of FN was 24 months. Higher volume of excision resulted in an increased incidence of fat necrosis.

  7. Integer Programs for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Needle and Dose Planning that Directly Optimize Clinical Objectives

    OpenAIRE