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Sample records for brachial-ankle pulse wave

  1. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

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    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Comparison of atherosclerotic indicators between cardio ankle vascular index and brachial ankle pulse wave velocity.

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    Horinaka, Shigeo; Yabe, Akihisa; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Hara, Hitoshi; Iemua, Tomoyuki; Matsuoka, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity has been used for evaluating atherosclerosis. Recently, the development of the volume plethysmographic method has made it possible to easily measure the index of the pulse wave velocity. The brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and cardio ankle vascular index are used for estimating the extent of atherosclerosis. The diagnostic usefulness of these indexes in predicting coronary artery disease was examined. The brachial ankle pulse wave velocity, the cardio ankle vascular index, and the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured in 696 patients who had chest pain and underwent coronary angiography. Measurement values of brachial ankle pulse wave velocity were compared with those of cardio ankle vascular index in terms of the baseline covariates and the number of major coronary vessels involved (vessel disease). The brachial ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly correlated with age, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure but not with the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. The cardio ankle vascular index was correlated only with age and the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. The average of both brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and cardio ankle vascular index values was greater in 3 vessel disease group than in 0 vessel disease group. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the diagnostic accuracy of coronary artery disease was significantly higher in the cardio ankle vascular index than in the brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (area under the curve +/- standard error: 0.691 +/- 0.025 vs. 0.584 +/- 0.026; P cardio ankle vascular index are useful and that cardio ankle vascular index may have some advantages in its application to patients taking blood pressure-lowering medication because of the minimum effect of blood pressure on its measurement values. The cardio ankle vascular index has increased performance over brachial ankle pulse wave velocity in predicting the coronary artery disease.

  3. Factors associated with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the general population.

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    Sonoda, H; Takase, H; Dohi, Y; Kimura, G

    2012-12-01

    The present study investigated factors that modify or affect arterial stiffness as assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in the general population. Subjects had previously participated in a physical checkup program (n=911), and baPWV and urinary albumin and sodium excretion were also measured. Urine albumin was expressed as the ratio of urine albumin to urine creatinine. Individual salt intake was assessed by estimating 24-h urinary salt excretion and expressed as the ratio of estimated salt intake to body weight. The mean blood pressure and baPWV were 127.1±15.2/77.0±9.5 mm Hg and 15.9±3.3 m s(-1), respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated that baPWV correlated with various factors including age, blood pressure, electrocardiogram voltage (SV(1)+RV(5)), urine albumin and salt intake. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that electrocardiogram voltage (Pblood pressure (P<0.0001), urine albumin (P<0.001) and salt intake (P<0.001), independently correlated with baPWV after adjustment for other possible factors. Similar results were obtained for participants not taking any medication. These results suggest that the baPWV value is independently associated with individual salt intake and cardiac and renal damage, and could be a useful procedure for identifying individuals with concealed risk of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Independent association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and global longitudinal strain of left ventricle.

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    Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-A; Zo, Joo-Hee

    2015-12-01

    Data regarding the influence of arterial stiffness on left ventricular (LV) long-axis function has been scarce. This study was performed to investigate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and LV global longitudinal strain (GLS). A total of 248 subjects (mean age 59.2 ± 12.3 years; 50% were men) without structural heart problems were retrospectively evaluated. LV GLS was measured by 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography. baPWV measurements were made on the same day of echocardiography. The incidences of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were 51.2, 19.4, and 22.2%, respectively. The mean value of baPWV was 1557 ± 285 cm/s. In simple linear regression analysis, baPWV had a significant positive association with LV GLS (β = 0.215, P = 0.001). In multiple linear regression analysis, baPWV was independently associated with LV GLS even after controlling for potential confounders, including age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index, E/A, septal e' velocity and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (β = 0.211, P = 0.028). The results of this study suggest that baPWV may be independently associated with LV GLS, supporting the evidence of a close interaction between arterial stiffness and LV function. Increased arterial stiffness may result in impaired LV longitudinal function.

  5. Platelet to Lymphocyte Percentage Ratio Is Associated With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemodialysis.

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    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Su, Ho-Ming; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-02-01

    Increased arterial stiffness in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) is highly prevalent and is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In HD, inflammation is one of the major causes of increased arterial stiffness. Activation of platelets and decreased lymphocyte percentage (LYMPH%) may exhibit inflammation. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between platelet to LYMPH% ratio and arterial stiffness in HD patients.A total of 220 patients receiving HD were enrolled in this study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using an ankle-brachial index form device. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relations of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio and baPWV. The value of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio was 59.2 ± 33.3 (10 cells/L/%). After multivariate stepwise analysis, diabetes (β: 163.973, P = 0.02), high systolic blood pressure (per 1 mm Hg, β: 9.010, P < 0.001), high platelet to LYMPH% ratio (per 10 cells/L/%, β: 3.334, P < 0.01), and low albumin (per 0.1 mg/dL, β: -55.912, P < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased baPWV. Furthermore, high white blood cells (per 10 cells/L, β: 3.941, P < 0.001), high neutrophil percentage (per 1%, β: 1.144, P < 0.001), and high CRP (per 1 mg/L, β: 9.161, P = 0.03) were independently associated with an increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio.An increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio is associated with an increased baPWV in HD patients. An easy and inexpensive laboratory measure of platelet to LYMPH% ratio may provide an important information regarding arterial stiffness in patients with HD.

  6. Determinants of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Ping Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, and its associated risk factors in Chinese patients with RA. Methods. 138 Chinese RA patients and 150 healthy subjects were included. baPWV of all the participants was measured. RA related factors were determined, as well as traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results. baPWV was significant higher in RA group (1705.44 ± 429.20 cm/s compared to the healthy control group (1386.23 ± 411.09 cm/s (P<0.001. Compared with low baPWV group, high baPWV group patients were significantly older (P = 0.008 and taller (P = 0.033. Serum cholesterol (P = 0.035, triglycerides (P = 0.004, and LDL level (P = 0.006 were significantly higher in high baPWV group patients compared with low baPWV group patients. The baPWV of RA patients was positively correlated with age (r = 0.439, P<0.001, and serum cholesterol level (r = 0.231, P = 0.035, serum triglycerides level (r = 0.293, P<0.001, serum LDL level (r = 0.323, P = 0.003. Meanwhile, baPWV negatively correlated with the height of RA patients (r = −0.253, P = 0.043. Multivariate regression analysis showed that baPWV of RA group was independently associated with age and serum triglycerides level. Conclusions. The old age and high level of serum triglycerides may be the major determinants of arterial stiffness in Chinese RA patients.

  7. Relationships between Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

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    Byung Kil Ha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV is known to be a good surrogate marker of clinical atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a major predictor for developing neuropathy. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between baPWV and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsA retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted involving 692 patients with type 2 diabetes. The correlation between increased baPWV and DPN, neurological symptoms, and neurological assessment was analyzed. DPN was examined using the total symptom score (TSS, ankle reflexes, the vibration test, and the 10-g monofilament test. DPN was defined as TSS ≥2 and an abnormal neurological assessment. Data were expressed as means±standard deviation for normally distributed data and as median (interquartile range for non-normally distributed data. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups, and a multiple logistic regression test was used to evaluate independent predictors of DPN. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test was used to adjust for age.ResultsPatients with DPN had higher baPWV and systolic blood pressure, and were more likely to be older and female, when compared to the control group. According to univariate analysis of risk factors for DPN, the odds ratio of the baPWV ≥1,600 cm/sec was 1.611 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.072 to 2.422; P=0.021 and the odds ratio in female was 1.816 (95% CI, 1.195 to 2.760; P=0.005.ConclusionIncreased baPWV was significantly correlated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Impact of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial blood pressure index on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

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    Kitahara, Tokuyuki; Ono, Kumeo; Tsuchida, Akiyasu; Kawai, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiko; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Koyanagi, Hikaru; Noguchi, Toshiharu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Sekihara, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Yukiyasu; Kanai, Hideo; Ishida, Hideki; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2005-10-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABPI) are markers for atherosclerosis, and each predicts mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, there have been no studies in the past that compared head-to-head the clinical validity of these 2 parameters. Compared with conventional aortic PWV, brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is considered simple and thereby easily applicable to clinical use. To clarify the relationship between baPWV and ABPI and assess their prognostic values, we analyzed 785 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 60.2 +/- 12.5 (SD) years for whom ABPI and baPWV at baseline had been measured simultaneously and who were followed up for 33.8 +/- 10.8 months. Of 785 patients, 131 deaths were recorded. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, all-cause mortality was progressively and significantly greater from the lowest quartile of baPWV onward (log-rank test, 41.8; P hemodialysis patients. However, baPWV was useful to pick a high-risk population in patients with ABPI greater than 0.9. Thus, screening hemodialysis patients by means of baPWV and ABPI provides complementary information in identifying a high-risk population.

  9. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and the Risk Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis.

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    Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Kario, Kazuomi; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kita, Yoshikuni; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Maeda, Yasutaka; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Watada, Hirotaka; Munakata, Masanori; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ito, Norihisa; Nakamura, Michinari; Shoji, Tetsuo; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-06-01

    An individual participant data meta-analysis was conducted in the data of 14 673 Japanese participants without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to examine the association of the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) with the risk of development of CVD. During the average 6.4-year follow-up period, 687 participants died and 735 developed cardiovascular events. A higher baPWV was significantly associated with a higher risk of CVD, even after adjustments for conventional risk factors ( P for trend risk of CVD. Moreover, addition of baPWV to a model incorporating the Framingham risk score significantly increased the C statistics from 0.8026 to 0.8131 ( P analysis clearly established baPWV as an independent predictor of the risk of development of CVD in Japanese subjects without preexisting CVD. Thus, measurement of the baPWV could enhance the efficacy of prediction of the risk of development of CVD over that of the Framingham risk score, which is based on the traditional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

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    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  11. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis.

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    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD).We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4.Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003-1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046-1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4.Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients.

  12. Prognostic significance of ankle-brachial index, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, flow-mediated dilation, and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation in end-stage renal disease.

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    Morimoto, Satoshi; Yurugi, Takatomi; Aota, Yasuko; Sakuma, Takao; Jo, Fusakazu; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Maki, Kei

    2009-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease is important in managing patients undergoing hemodialysis. We evaluated a series of prognostic values: flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrogen-mediated dilation (NMD), an index of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, respectively, ankle-brachial index (ABI), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. A cohort of 199 patients was studied. At entry, these values were examined and the prognostic significances were investigated. In estimating the significance of baPWV, patients with ABI hemodialysis patients by means of ABI and baPWV but not FMD or NMD provides complementary information in identifying a high-risk population in these patients.

  13. Relationship between resistant hypertension and arterial stiffness assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the older patient

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    Chung CM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chang-Min Chung,1,2 Hui-Wen Cheng,2 Jung-Jung Chang,2 Yu-Sheng Lin,2 Ju-Feng Hsiao,2 Shih-Tai Chang,1 Jen-Te Hsu2,31School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 2Division of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 3Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan County, TaiwanBackground: Resistant hypertension (RH is a common clinical condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in older patients. Several factors and conditions interfering with blood pressure (BP control, such as excess sodium intake, obesity, diabetes, older age, kidney disease, and certain identifiable causes of hypertension are common in patients resistant to antihypertensive treatment. Arterial stiffness, measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, is increasingly recognized as an important prognostic index and potential therapeutic target in hypertensive patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between RH and arterial stiffness. Methods: This study included 1,620 patients aged ≥65 years who were referred or self-referred to the outpatient hypertension unit located at a single cardiovascular center. They were separated into normotensive, controlled BP, and resistant hypertension groups. Home BP, blood laboratory parameters, echocardiographic studies and baPWV all were measured. Results: The likelihood of diabetes mellitus was significantly greater in the RH group than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 2.114, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.194–3.744, P=0.010. Systolic BP was correlated in the RH group significantly more than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 1.032, 95% CI 1.012–1.053, P=0.001. baPWV (odds ratio 1.084, 95% CI 1.016–1.156, P=0.015 was significantly correlated with the presence of RH. The other factors were negatively correlated with the existence of RH.Conclusion: In

  14. Comparison of ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity between patients with chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis.

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    Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Lin, Feng-Hsien; Su, Ho-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are highly predisposed to atherosclerosis. However, there is limited data about the direct comparison of atherosclerosis between patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to compare ankle-brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) between patients with CKD and hemodialysis and thus examined the status of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and arterial stiffness between them. We enrolled 169 patients with CKD stage 3-5 and 225 hemodialysis patients in one regional hospital. ABI and baPWV were measured by using an ABI-form device (VP1000, Colin). A higher prevalence of ABI hemodialysis patients than in CKD patients (15.6 vs. 8.3%, p = 0.030). After a multivariate analysis, ABI hemodialysis treatment. The baPWV was positively associated with age, DM, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and negatively with body mass index. However, after adjusting for other variables, baPWV was comparable between patients with CKD and hemodialysis. The study revealed that PAOD might be more prevalent in patients with hemodialysis than in patients with CKD, but arterial stiffness might be comparable between them. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Influence of different measurement time points on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index in hemodialysis patients.

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    Su, Ho-Ming; Chang, Jer-Ming; Lin, Feng-Hsien; Chen, Szu-Chia; Voon, Wen-Chol; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2007-10-01

    In order to ensure that they are reliable markers of atherosclerosis and suitable for repetitive follow-up of disease progression and management responses in hemodialysis (HD) patients, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) should be tested to see whether they change with different measurement time points. The aim of this study was to assess whether baPWV and ABI vary according to whether they are measured before HD, after HD, or on the next dialysis-free day. Eighty-nine patients undergoing regular HD were enrolled. The baPWV and ABI were measured 10-30 min before and after HD, and if patients agreed, on the next dialysis-free day. The third measurement of baPWV and ABI, performed 22+/-2 h after HD, was taken in 72 patients (81%). The body weight reduction after HD was 2.5+/-0.9 kg (por=0.498). In conclusion, despite the significant decrease in body weight and blood pressures, baPWV increased significantly after HD. In addition, baPWV, but not ABI, may vary at different measurement time points. Therefore, baPWV, but not ABI, should be assessed in a timely manner in HD patients.

  16. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function

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    Yang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. Methods: A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT and hypertensive (HT groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905 and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505. However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P Conclusion: Plasma renalase may not be associated with BP and baPWV in Chinese subjects with normal renal function.

  17. Periodontal disease and atherosclerosis from the viewpoint of the relationship between community periodontal index of treatment needs and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity

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    Hoshi Keika

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that periodontal disease may be an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to assess the effects of periodontal disease on atherosclerosis. Methods The study design was a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 291 healthy male workers in Japan. We used the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN score, average probing depth and gingival bleeding index (rate of bleeding gums to assess the severity of periodontal disease. We also used the Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity (baPWV as the index for the development of atherosclerosis. Results The unadjusted odds ratio (OR of atherosclerosis in relation to the CPITN score was 1.41 [95% CI: 1.16–1.73]. However, after adjustment for age, systolic blood pressure and smoking, the CPITN score had no relationship with atherosclerosis (adjusted OR: 0.91 [0.68–1.20]. Conclusion Our results show no relationship between mild periodontal disease and atherosclerosis after appropriate adjustments.

  18. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity predicts all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes: the Kyushu Prevention Study of Atherosclerosis.

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    Maeda, Yasutaka; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Etoh, Erina; Kodama, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Shuji; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Nawata, Hajime; Shimabukuro, Michio; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Whether brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a noninvasive marker for arterial stiffness, is a useful predictive maker for cardiovascular events in subjects with diabetes is not established. In the present cohort study, we evaluated the benefit of baPWV for the prediction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes. A total of 4,272 outpatients with diabetes were enrolled in the Kyushu Prevention Study of Atherosclerosis. Of these, 3,628 subjects, excluding those with an ankle-brachial index of mortality. RP revealed baPWVs of 14 and 24 m/s as statistically adequate cutoff points for cardiovascular events and mortality, respectively. High-baPWV classes showed significantly low event-free ratios in Kaplan-Meier curves for all end points and remained independent risks for all-cause mortality and cerebrovascular events, but not for coronary artery events after adjustments for age, sex, BMI, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and hemoglobin A1c by Cox proportional hazards models. This large-scale cohort study provided evidence that high baPWV is a useful independent predictor of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in subjects with diabetes. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and the cardio-ankle vascular index as a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes in patients on regular hemodialysis.

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    Kato, Akihiko; Takita, Takako; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Maruyama, Yukitaka; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2012-06-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) are both used to evaluate arterial stiffness. The aim of the present study is to determine whether baPWV or CAVI is superior as a marker of arterial stiffness in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Of 194 patients, 59 patients had been excluded from the study due to advanced age over 76 years old (n = 29), or abnormal ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) (<0.90 or ≥1.30) (n = 30). We then followed the 135 patients (age: 60 ± 11 years, time on HD: 110 ± 93 months) for the 63 ± 4 (55-70) months. Thirty-two (23.7%) patients had expired, 22 of them of cardiovascular (CV) causes. There were 37 fatal and non-fatal CV events. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the patients with the highest tertile of baPWV (≥16.6 m/s) had a significantly lower survival rate (P < 0.01) when compared with the second (13.4 ≤ baPWV < 16.6 m/s) and the lowest tertiles (<13.4 m/s). Cox hazards analysis after adjustment for comorbid risk factors revealed that the top tertile of baPWV was a determinant of CV death (hazards ratio [HR]: 16.9 [1.1-251.8], P < 0.05) In contrast, CAVI did not associate with CV mortality or events. These findings suggest that baPWV is superior to CAVI as a predictor of CV outcomes in patients on regular HD. © 2012 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2012 International Society for Apheresis.

  20. Ability of the Ankle Brachial Index and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity to Predict the 3-Month Outcome in Patients with Non-Cardioembolic Stroke.

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    Matsushima, Hayato; Hosomi, Naohisa; Hara, Naoyuki; Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Neshige, Shuichiro; Kono, Ryuhei; Himeno, Takahiro; Takeshima, Shinichi; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Ota, Taisei; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Kuriyama, Masaru; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2017-11-01

    Both the ankle brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) are surrogates for atherosclerosis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the ability of ABI and baPWV to predict stroke outcome in patients with first-ever non-cardioembolic stroke. This study included consecutive patients with first-ever non-cardioembolic stroke admitted within 1 week after onset to Ota Memorial Hospital between January 2011 and December 2013. Baseline characteristics and National Institutes of Health stroke scale scores at admission were noted. ABI and baPWV were evaluated within 5 days of admission. The patients were categorized according to ABI (cut-off 0.9) and baPWV (cut-off 1870 cm/s) determined using the receiver operation curve for poor outcome. Clinical outcomes were defined based on the modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores 3 months after stroke onset as good (0 and 1) or poor (2-6). A total of 861 patients were available for evaluation. ABI <0.9 and baPWV >1870 cm/s were associated with poor outcome in the univariate analysis (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). After adjusting for factors that showed differences between groups, ABI <0.9 was associated with poor outcome. Among patients with ABI ≥ 0.9, higher baPWV showed a slight association with poor outcome after adjustment [odds ratio 1.46 (95% CI 0.95-2.27)]. Our study suggests that the stroke outcome can be predicted using ABI and to an extent using baPWV when ABI ≥ 0.9 in patients with non-cardioembolic stroke.

  1. Ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity are associated with albuminuria in community-based Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiqi; He, Jinggui; Wang, Shuxia; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiujin; Tao, Tao; Wang, Hao; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Haijun; Li, Xiaoying

    Our study aimed to explore whether the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were associated with albuminuria in community-based Han Chinese. Total 2127 subjects (860 men and 1267 women) aged 60 years and over were recruited in Beijing. Albuminuria was assessed by the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) of ≥30 mg/g. BaPWV was divided by quartile. The logistic regression was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of ABI and baPWV with albuminuria. ABI was associated with albuminuria in the interaction model (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.99 by every 0.1 unit increase of ABI), especially in hypertension (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.73-0.92) and diabetes (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.68-0.98) groups. BaPWV groups were also significantly associated with albuminuria, ORs of having albuminuria for baPWV quartile II, III, and IV were 1.02(0.65-1.52), 1.05(0.72-1.61), and 1.18(1.04-1.47) in the interaction model. For hypertension and diabetes patients, only the baPWV quartile IV group had higher OR. ABI and baPWV were associated with albuminuria after adjusting for other risk factors in Chinese community-based elderly Han population. The association of ABI with albuminuria was stronger in hypertension and diabetes patients.

  2. Arterial stiffness in patients after Kawasaki disease without coronary artery involvement: Assessment by performing brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and cardio-ankle vascular index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Ryo; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Saiki, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Sugimoto, Masaya; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    It remains unclear whether systemic arterial beds other than the coronary arteries are truly healthy in patients without coronary artery lesions (CAL) after Kawasaki disease (KD). We tested the hypothesis that patients with KD without echocardiographic evidence of CAL during the acute phase of the disease have abnormal mechanical properties in systemic arteries later. We studied 201 consecutive patients with KD (age 2-23 years, mean 10±4 years; 109 male, 92 female) without CAL during the acute phase. Data were compared with those in 129 control subjects (age 2-25 years, mean 10±4 years; 73 male, 56 female; control group). We examined arterial stiffness by using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). The baPWV in the KD group was significantly higher than that in the control group (913±121cm/s vs. 886±135cm/s, p=0.04). In contrast, there was no significant difference in CAVI (4.0±1.0 vs. 4.2±1.0, p=0.9) between the two groups. Multivariate analysis indicated a highly significant difference in baPWV (higher baPWV in patients with KD than in controls, p=0.004), after controlling for age, gender, body height and weight, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but no difference in CAVI between the groups. Years after KD occurs in patients without apparent CAL during the acute phase, there is a small but significant change in systemic arterial properties, characterized by increased wall stiffness. The clinical importance of these findings must be clarified by performing long-term follow-up studies. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-10-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke.

  4. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity is associated with coronary calcium in young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults: The Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Rampal, Sanjay; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Zhang, Yiyi; Zhao, Di; Cho, Juhee; Choi, Yuni; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lim, So Yeon; Bruguera, Jordi; Elosua, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a convenient, non-radiating, readily available measurement of arterial stiffness, and coronary artery calcium (CAC), a reliable marker of coronary atherosclerosis, in a large sample of young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults; and to assess the incremental value of baPWV for detecting prevalent CAC beyond traditional risk factors. Cross-sectional study of 15,185 asymptomatic Korean adults who voluntarily underwent a comprehensive health screening program including measurement of baPWV and CAC. BaPWV was measured using an oscillometric method with cuffs placed on both arms and ankles. CAC burden was assessed using a multi-detector CT scan and scored following Agatston's method. The prevalence of CAC > 0 and CAC > 100 increased across baPWV quintiles. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC > 0 comparing baPWV quintiles 2-5 versus quintile 1 were 1.06 (0.87-1.30), 1.24 (1.02-1.50), 1.39 (1.15-1.69) and 1.60 (1.31-1.96), respectively (P trend  100 were 1.30 (0.74-2.26), 1.59 (0.93-2.71), 1.74 (1.03-2.94) and 2.59 (1.54-4.36), respectively (P trend  100, the area under the ROC curve for baPWV alone was 0.71 (0.68-0.74), and the addition of baPWV to traditional risk factors significantly improved the discrimination and calibration of models for detecting prevalent CAC > 0 and CAC > 100. BaPWV was independently associated with the presence and severity of CAC in a large sample of young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults. BaPWV may be a valuable tool for identifying apparently low-risk individuals with increased burden of coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical assessment and comparison of pulse wave velocity methods aiming at measuring aortic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Hasan; Soulat, Gilles; Mousseaux, Elie; Laurent, Stéphane; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Segers, Patrick

    2017-10-31

    Pulse waveform analyses have become established components of cardiovascular research. Recently several methods have been proposed as tools to measure aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV). The carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), the current clinical gold standard method for the noninvasive assessment of aPWV, uses the carotid-to-femoral pulse transit time difference (cf-PTT) and an estimated path length to derive cf-PWV. The heart-ankle PWV (ha-PWV), brachial-ankle PWV (ba-PWV) and finger-toe (ft-PWV) are also methods presuming to approximate aPWV based on time delays between physiological cardiovascular signals at two locations (~heart-ankle PTT, ha-PTT; ~brachial-ankle PTT, ba-PTT; ~finger-toe PTT, ft-PTT) and a path length typically derived from the subject's height. To test the validity of these methods, we used a detailed 1D arterial network model (143 arterial segments) including the foot and hand circulation. The arterial tree dimensions and properties were taken from the literature and completed with data from patient scans. We calculated PTTs with all the methods mentioned above. The calculated PTTs were compared with the aortic PTT (aPTT), which is considered as the absolute reference method in this study. The correlation between methods and aPTT was good and significant, cf-PTT (R 2  =  0.97; P  methods, but absolute values differed because of the different path lengths used. In conclusion, our computer model-based analyses demonstrate that for PWV methods based on peripheral signals, pulse transit time differences closely correlate with the aortic transit time, supporting the use of these methods in clinical practice.

  6. A database of virtual healthy subjects to assess the accuracy of foot-to-foot pulse wave velocities for estimation of aortic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-08-15

    While central (carotid-femoral) foot-to-foot pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered to be the gold standard for the estimation of aortic arterial stiffness, peripheral foot-to-foot PWV (brachial-ankle, femoral-ankle, and carotid-radial) are being studied as substitutes of this central measurement. We present a novel methodology to assess theoretically these computed indexes and the hemodynamics mechanisms relating them. We created a database of 3,325 virtual healthy adult subjects using a validated one-dimensional model of the arterial hemodynamics, with cardiac and arterial parameters varied within physiological healthy ranges. For each virtual subject, foot-to-foot PWV was computed from numerical pressure waveforms at the same locations where clinical measurements are commonly taken. Our numerical results confirm clinical observations: 1) carotid-femoral PWV is a good indicator of aortic stiffness and correlates well with aortic PWV; 2) brachial-ankle PWV overestimates aortic PWV and is related to the stiffness and geometry of both elastic and muscular arteries; and 3) muscular PWV (carotid-radial, femoral-ankle) does not capture the stiffening of the aorta and should therefore not be used as a surrogate for aortic stiffness. In addition, our analysis highlights that the foot-to-foot PWV algorithm is sensitive to the presence of reflected waves in late diastole, which introduce errors in the PWV estimates. In this study, we have created a database of virtual healthy subjects, which can be used to assess theoretically the efficiency of physiological indexes based on pulse wave analysis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Validity and reproducibility of arterial pulse wave velocity measurement using new device with oscillometric technique: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patnaik Amar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of a range of techniques and devices allow measurement of many variables related to the stiffness of large or medium sized arteries. There is good evidence that, pulse wave velocity is a relatively simple measurement and is a good indicator of changes in arterial properties. The pulse wave velocity calculated from pulse wave recording by other methods like doppler or tonometry is tedious, time-consuming and above all their reproducibility depends on the operator skills. It requires intensive resource involvement. For epidemiological studies these methods are not suitable. The aim of our study was to clinically evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new automatic device for measurement of pulse wave velocity that can be used in such studies. Methods In 44 subjects including normal healthy control and patients with coronary artery disease, heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle and carotid femoral pulse wave velocities were recorded by using a new oscillometric device. Lead I and II electrocardiogram and pressure curves were simultaneously recorded. Two observers recorded the pulse wave velocity for validation and one observer recorded the velocity on two occasions for reproducibility. Results and Discussion Pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index were recorded in 24 control and 20 coronary artery disease patients. All the velocities were significantly high in coronary artery disease patients. There was highly significant correlation between the values noted by the two observers with low standard deviation. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for various velocities ranged from (r = 0.88–0.90 with (p Conclusion The new device "PeriScope" based on oscillometric technique has been found to be a simple, non-invasive and reproducible device for the assessment of pulse wave velocity and can be used to determine arterial stiffness in large population based studies.

  8. Association between pulse wave velocity and hot flashes/sweats in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruwei; Zhou, Yang; Li, Changbin; Tao, Minfang

    2017-10-23

    As women age and go through menopause, they suffer a higher incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that a relationship exists between hot flashes/sweats and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the association between hot flashes/sweats and arterial stiffness is unclear. We aim to explore the relationship between hot flashes/sweats and arterial stiffness using the modified Kupperman index (KMI) questionnaire and measure the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The prevalence of hot flashes in our research was reported to be 41.77%. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean baPWV among groups that experienced different severities of hot flashes/sweats according to one-way ANOVA test (p hot flashes/sweats based on linear regression after adjusting for established cardiovascular confounders (95% CI: (5.86, 43.23), p = 0.01). To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation to propose that baPWV may serve both as an objective index for evaluating the severity of hot flashes/sweats and as a predictor of arterial stiffness beyond Cardiac Vascular Disease (CVD) risk factors in middle-aged women.

  9. Effects of cardiac timing and peripheral resistance on measurement of pulse wave velocity for assessment of arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hanguang; Butlin, Mark; Tan, Isabella; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-20

    To investigate the effects of heart rate (HR), left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and wave reflection on arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV), a pulse wave propagation simulation system (PWPSim) based on the transmission line model of the arterial tree was developed and was applied to investigate pulse wave propagation. HR, LVET, arterial elastic modulus and peripheral resistance were increased from 60 to 100 beats per minute (bpm), 0.1 to 0.45 seconds, 0.5 to 1.5 times and 0.5 to 1.5 times of the normal value, respectively. Carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) were calculated by intersecting tangent method (cfPWVtan and baPWVtan), maximum slope (cfPWVmax and baPWVmax), and using the Moens-Korteweg equation ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Results showed cfPWV and baPWV increased significantly with arterial elastic modulus but did not increase with HR when using a constant elastic modulus. However there were significant LVET dependencies of cfPWVtan and baPWVtan (0.17 ± 0.13 and 0.17 ± 0.08 m/s per 50 ms), and low peripheral resistance dependencies of cfPWVtan, cfPWVmax, baPWVtan and baPWVmax (0.04 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.04, 0.06 ± 0.03 and 0.09 ± 0.07 m/s per 10% peripheral resistance), respectively. This study demonstrated that LVET dominates the effect on calculated PWV compared to HR and peripheral resistance when arterial elastic modulus is constant.

  10. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA; Poole, Brian R [Tracy, CA

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  11. Increased pulse-wave velocity in patients with anxiety: implications for autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeragani, Vikram Kumar; Tancer, Manuel; Seema, K P; Josyula, Krishnapriya; Desai, Nagaraj

    2006-07-01

    Decreased vagal function is associated with vascular dysfunction. In this study, we compared vascular indices and correlated heart rate and QT variability measures with vascular indices in patients with anxiety disorders and normal controls. We compared age- and sex-matched controls (n=23) and patients with anxiety (n=25) using the Vascular Profiler (VP-1000; Colin Medical Instruments, Japan), approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Using this machine, we obtained ankle and brachial blood pressure (BP) in both arms (brachial), both legs (ankle), and carotid artery, and lead I electrocardiogram (ECG) and phonocardiogram. Using these signals, pulse-wave velocity (PWV), and arterial stiffness index % and preejection period can be calculated. We also obtained ECG sampled at 1000 Hz in lead II configuration in supine posture to obtain beat-to-beat interbeat interval (R-R) and QT interval variability for 256 s. Patients with anxiety had significantly higher carotid mean arterial pressure (MAP) %, brachial-ankle PWV (BAPWV), arterial stiffness index %, MAP, and diastolic BP of the extremities compared to controls. We found significant negative correlations (r values from .4 to .65; P<.05 to .007) between R-R interval high-frequency (0.15-0.5 Hz) power (which is an indicator of cardiac vagal function), and increased BAPWV and systolic BP of the extremities only in patients. We were unable to find such correlations in controls. We also found significant positive correlations between QT variability index (a probable indicator of cardiac sympathetic function) and MAP of the extremities and BAPWV only in the patient group. These findings suggest an important association between decreased vagal and increased sympathetic function, and decreased arterial compliance and possible atherosclerotic changes and increased BP in patients with anxiety.

  12. Pulses and waves of contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min

    2017-12-04

    The nature of signal transduction networks in the regulation of cell contractility is not entirely clear. In this study, Graessl et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201706052) visualized and characterized pulses and waves of Rho activation in adherent cells and proposed excitable Rho signaling networks underlying cell contractility. © 2017 Wu.

  13. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  14. Localized wave pulses in the keyport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D.H.; Lewis, D.K.

    1998-02-17

    Localized wave (LW) pulses were produced using a standard Navy array in the anechoic tank at Navy Underwater Weapons Center (NUWC) Keyport. The LW pulses used were the MPS pulse first derived by Ziolkowski, and a new type of pulse based on a superposition of Gaussian beam modes. This new type is motivated by a desire to make a comparison of the MPS pulse with another broad band pulse built from solutions to the wave equation. The superposed Gaussian pulse can be described by parameters which are analogous to those describing the MPS pulse. We compare the directivity patternsand the axial energy decay between the pulses. We find the behavior of the pulses to be similar so that the superposed Gaussian could be another candidate in the class of low diffractive pulses known as localized waves.

  15. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  16. Effect of stone Spa bathing and hot-spring bathing on pulse wave velocity in healthy, late middle-aged females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Ikuharu; Izumi, Yurina; Inoue, Miyabi; Okada, Kanako; Sakaguchi, Kaho; Miyai, Natsuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of stone spa bathing (Ganban-yoku) and hot-spring bathing on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in healthy, late middle-aged females. The subjects were 13 females (mean age, 47.3 years). The skin and tympanic temperatures, blood pressure, and baPWV were measured before and after stone spa bathing and hot-spring bathing. For the stone spa bathing, the subjects lay down three times for approximately 10 min each time over warm stone beds. Although body weight showed no change after the hot-spring bathing, it significantly increased after the stone spa bathing. The increase was significantly related to the amount of water intake. The skin and tympanic temperatures increased to a smaller degree after the stone spa bathing than after the hot-spring bathing. The diastolic blood pressure decreased to a smaller degree after the stone spa bathing. BaPWV showed no significant change after bathing both in the stone spa and in the hot-spring. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that the factors significantly related to the change in baPWV after the stone spa bathing were the changes in skin and tympanic temperatures and habit of smoking, and that after the hot-spring bathing was the change in skin temperature. The results suggest that, compared with the hot-spring bathing, stone spa bathing causes less strain on the body. The stone spa bathing and hot-spring bathing showed no marked effect on baPWV. However, there is a possibility that the stone spa bathing may be used as a load for investigating arterial stiffness.

  17. Pulse wave analysis with diffusing-wave spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belau, Markus; Scheffer, Wolfgang; Maret, Georg

    2017-07-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and thus at the origin of many deaths by e.g. heart attack or stroke. Hypertension is caused by many factors including an increase in arterial stiffness which leads to changes in pulse wave velocity and wave reflections. Those often result in an increased left ventricular load which may result in heart failure as well as an increased pulsatile pressure in the microcirculation l to damage to blood vessels. In order to specifically treat the different causes of hypertension it is desirable to perform a pulse wave analysis as a complement to measurements of systolic and diastolic pressure by brachial cuff sphygmomanometry. Here we show that Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive portable tool, is able to monitor blood flow changes with a high temporal resolution. The measured pulse travel times give detailed information of the pulse wave blood flow profile.

  18. Photoacoustic microscopy of blood pulse wave

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important physiological parameter that characterizes vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized, photoacoustic microscopy for noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of living mice. Interestingly, blood pulse wave-induced fluctuations in blood flow speed were clearly observed in arteries and arterioles, but not in veins or venules. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references to...

  19. Pulse-wave morphology and pulse-wave velocity in healthy human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, M; Nielsen, A H; Kamper, A-L

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Applanation tonometry for pulse-wave analysis (PWA) and determination of pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is a non-invasive method for assessment of the central aortic pressure waveform and indices of arterial stiffness. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of eating...

  20. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  1. Ultrashort-pulse wave-front autocorrelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, R; Neumann, U; Griebner, U; Reimann, K; Steinmeyer, G; Kebbel, V

    2003-12-01

    Combined spatially resolved collinear autocorrelation and Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensing of femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The beam is divided into multiple nondiffracting subbeams by thin-film micro-optical arrays. With hybrid refractive-reflective silica/silver microaxicons, wave-front autocorrelation is performed in oblique-angle reflection. Simultaneous two-dimensional detection of local temporal structure and wave-front tilt of propagating few-cycle wave packets is demonstrated.

  2. Photoacoustic microscopy of blood pulse wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important physiological parameter that characterizes vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized, photoacoustic microscopy for noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of living mice. Interestingly, blood pulse wave-induced fluctuations in blood flow speed were clearly observed in arteries and arterioles, but not in veins or venules. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references to measure the travel time of the pulse wave between two cross sections of a chosen vessel and vessel segmentation analysis enabled accurate quantification of the travel distance. PWVs were quantified in ten vessel segments from two mice. Statistical analysis shows a linear correlation between the PWV and the vessel diameter which agrees with known physiology.

  3. Four-wave mixing with femtosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skenderovic, H [Institute of Physics, Bijenicka cesta 46, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: hrvoje@ifs.hr

    2009-07-15

    The recent development of noncollinear optical parametric amplifiers (NOPAs) has equipped many laboratories with widely tunable, spectrally broad ultrashort laser pulses with a duration of 15-30 fs. The present work deals with sub-20 fs pulsed degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) on high-frequency vibrational levels in all-trans-{beta}-carotene. The observed wavepacket motion on the electronic ground state revealed fast oscillating vibrational modes whose frequencies and time development were measured. The coherent control in an open loop is demonstrated by appropriate phase shaping of the pulses.

  4. Changes in ankle brachial pulse wave velocity during a five-year follow-up period in older Japanese adults: sub-analysis results of the health research volunteer study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doba, Nobutaka; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Goldstein, Nathan E; Kushiro, Toshio; Hinohara, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness. However, precisely how aging, hypertension and other factors influence this in progressively stiffening large arteries, especially in older adults, remains uncertain. We examined changes in arterial stiffness in a population of active older Japanese adults using a five-year follow-up cohort study. Comprehensive geriatric assessments were performed in socially active adults over the age of 70 years at The Life Planning Center Clinic in Tokyo. Clinically acceptable baPWV measurements at baseline and at the end of the study were obtained in 257 individuals (115 men, baseline mean age of 78±4 years; 142 women, baseline mean age of 77±4 years) classified into four groups based on the use of antihypertensive interventions at the end of the study: Group 1 (112 normotensives), Group 2 (49 hypertensives without medication use), Group 3 (39 hypertensives with medication use initiated during the follow-up period) and Group 4 (57 hypertensives receiving medications throughout the follow-up period). During the follow-up period, Group 1 exhibited no changes in blood pressure with increases in baPWV. Group 2 exhibited increases in blood pressure and baPWV. Both Groups 3 and 4 exhibited decreases in blood pressure without any changes in baPWV. Other factors such as age, gender and the hemoglobin level could also have influenced baPWV. Arterial stiffness increases with aging; however, antihypertensive medications were found to provide protective effects against the development of arterial stiffness during a five-year follow-up period. Other factors that modify baPWV were also identified.

  5. Pulsed Ejector Wave Propogation Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rene; Slater, John W.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2003-01-01

    The development of, and initial test data from, a nondetonating Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) simulator tested in the NASA Glenn 1 x 1 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) is presented in this paper. The concept is a pulsed ejector driven by the simulated exhaust of a PDE. This pro- gram is applicable to a PDE entombed in a ramjet flowpath, i.e., a PDE combined-cycle propulsion system. The ejector primary flow is a pulsed, uiiderexpanded, supersonic nozzle simulating the supersonic waves ema- nating from a PDE, while the ejector secondary flow is the 1 x 1 foot SWT test section operated at subsonic Mach numbers. The objective is not to study the detonation details, but the wave physics including t,he start- ing vortices, the extent of propagation of the wave front, the reflection of the wave from the secondary flowpath walls, and the timing of these events of a pulsed ejector, and correlate these with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code predictions. Pulsed ejectors have been shown to result in a 3 to 1 improvement in LID (length-to-diameter) and a near 2 to 1 improvement in thrust augmentation over a steady ejector. This program will also explore the extent of upstream interactions between an inlet and large, periodically applied, backpressures to the inlet as would be present due to combustion tube detonations in a PDE. These interactions could result in inlet unstart or buzz for a supersonic mixed compression inlet. The design of the present experiment entailed the use of an 2-t diagram characteristics code to study the nozzle filling and purging timescales as well as a series of CFD analyses conducted using the WIND code. The WIND code is a general purpose CFD code for solution of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations and can be applied to both steady state and time-accurate calculations. The first, proof-of-concept, test entry (spring 2001) pressure distributions shown here indicate the simulation concept was successful and therefore the experimental

  6. Improved beamforming performance using pulsed plane wave decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    A tool for calculating the beamformer setup associated with a specified pulsed acoustic field is presented. The method is named Pulsed Plane Wave Decomposition (PPWD) and is based on the decomposition of a pulsed acoustic field into a set of PPWs at a given depth. Each PPW can be propagated to th...

  7. Arterial pulse wave propagation velocity in healthy dogs by pulse wave Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Rodrigo B; Pereira, Lucas A; Basso, Alice F; da Fonseca, Ingrid S; Alves, Lorena A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) values in healthy dogs using pulse wave Doppler ultrasound. A secondary aim was to determine the feasibility of this method and to report the intra- and interobserver reproducibilities of the PWV in conscious dogs. The data were studied in 30 healthy, adult, male (n = 15) and female (n = 15) dogs. The time interval marked between the R wave peak of the electrocardiogram and the intersection of the blood flow wave upstroke of the Doppler spectrum with the baseline of zero frequency was determined for the carotid (T1) and for the femoral (T2) arteries. The distance covered by the pulse wave (L) was determined. The PWV was then calculated using the following formula: L/T2 - T1. The mean values of PWV calculated from the total sample (n = 30) evaluated were 13.41 ± 2.20 m/s. No significant statistical difference was observed for the PWV measurements between males (14.82 ± 3.18 m/s) and females (12.64 ± 2.45 m/s). The analysis revealed no intra nor interobserver differences. A reasonable reproducibility of the PWV measurements was showed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and the coefficients of variation (CV). These data demonstrate that noninvasive vascular Doppler analysis is a feasible and reproducible method to determine the carotid-femoral PWV in dogs.

  8. AORTIC PULSE WAVE VELOCITY MEASURED BY PULSE WAVE IMAGING (PWI): A COMPARISON WITH APPLANATION TONOMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Luo, Jianwen; Okajima, Kazue; Di Tullio, Marco; Konofagou, Elisa

    2011-06-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established indicator of cardiovascular disease outcome. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) is a surrogate for arterial stiffness that is measured either globally using carotid to femoral applanation tonometry or locally using biomedical imaging methods. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method for both qualitative visualisation of pulse wave propagation and quantitative estimation of arterial stiffness. The objective of this study is to assess the PWI performance in PWV estimation by comparing local abdominal aortic PWV values obtained by PWI to the carotid-femoral PWV measured by applanation tonometry. A total of 18 subjects (age 18-66, 32.5±14.5) with no history of cardiovascular disease were consecutively tested by both PWI and tonometry. The correlation coefficient r between values found by the two methods was found to be equal to 0.68. A linear regression yielded PWVPWI = 1.02* PWVtonometry +0.15. Tukey mean-difference plots indicated that PWVPWI was significantly lower than PWVtonometry (-0.3 m/s) at lower PWV values (PWV≤7 m/s), whereas PWVPWI was significantly higher (+1.4 m/s) than PWVtonometry at higher PWV values (PWV>7 m/s). Despite the regional nature of the PWVPWI measurements, as opposed to the global PWVtonometry measurements, abdominal PWVPWI and carotid-femoral PWVtonometry values were found to be similar, with an average bias equal to 0.25 m/s. Such a bias and its variation with PWV may be partially explained by both physiological variations of PWV along the arterial tree and by the increasing uncertainty of the PWV estimate by PWI as PWV increases.

  9. Sub-10 fs deep-ultraviolet pulses generated by chirped-pulse four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Yuichiro; Liu, Jun; Teramoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2010-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a novel way of generating sub-10fs deep-UV pulses. The technique is based on chirped-pulse four-wave mixing induced by a broadband near-IR (NIR) pulse and a near-UV pulse. The broadband IR pulse is prepared by preliminarily broadening the spectral width of an NIR pulse by self-phase modulation. The positively chirped broadband IR pulse is suitable for generating a negatively chirped deep-UV pulse, which can be compressed by normal group-velocity dispersion in a transparent medium. Self-compression of the generated deep-UV pulse in air has been demonstrated to produce sub-10fs deep-UV pulses with excellent temporal and spectral profiles for ultrafast spectroscopy in the deep UV.

  10. Histological difference between pulsed wave laser and continuous wave laser in endovenous laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansaku, Rei; Sakakibara, Naoki; Amano, Atsushi; Endo, Hisako; Shimabukuro, Takashi; Sueishi, Michiaki

    2015-07-01

    Endovenous laser ablation to saphenous veins has been popular as a minimally invasive treatment for chronic venous insufficiency. However, adverse effects after endovenous laser ablation using continuous wave laser still remain. Pulsed wave with enough short pulse duration and sufficiently long thermal relaxation time may avoid the excess energy delivery, which leads to the perforation of the vein wall. (1) Free radiation: Laser is radiated in blood for 10 s. (2) Endovenous laser ablation: Veins were filled with blood and placed in saline. Endovenous laser ablations were performed. (1) There were clots on the fiber tips with continuous wave laser while no clots with pulsed wave laser. (2) In 980-nm continuous wave, four of 15 specimens had ulcers and 11 of 15 had perforation. In 1470-nm continuous wave with 120 J/cm of linear endovenous energy density, two of three presented ulcers and one of three showed perforation. In 1470-nm continuous wave with 60 J/cm of linear endovenous energy density, two of four had ulcers and two of four had perforation. In 1320-nm pulsed wave, there were neither ulcers nor perforation in the specimens. While endovenous laser ablation using continuous wave results in perforation in many cases, pulsed wave does not lead to perforation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Nonlinear Landau resonance with localized wave pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Rankin, R.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2017-05-01

    Wave-particle resonant interaction is responsible for many important space plasma processes and can be formally described theoretically for two main regimes: particle scattering (quasilinear diffusion) by low-intensity waves and particle trapping/phase bunching by sufficiently intense waves. There are important modifications of these regimes in inhomogeneous plasma systems. However, almost all theoretical results have been derived for harmonic waves and linear plasma modes. High-resolution spacecraft measurements of spatially localized plasma waves in Earth's magnetosphere demonstrate electron acceleration attributed to the Landau resonance mechanism. In the classical mechanism, the magnitude of the electric potential determines the maximum energy gain of electrons. However, a less reported mechanism of electron acceleration becomes possible in inhomogeneous plasma and magnetic field. In this Commentary, we discuss how combination of wave localization and plasma inhomogeneity modifies the nonlinear Landau resonance. We underline the important property of this resonance: an electron energy gain depends on the gradient in wave potential and not just its magnitude. We also consider this modified resonance mechanism in context of generation of hot field-aligned electron populations, particle transport, and energy transfer in the magnetosphere.

  12. Pulse wave analysis and diabetes mellitus. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdova, Jaromira; Karasek, David; Goldmannova, Dominika; Krystynik, Ondrej; Schovanek, Jan; Vaverkova, Helena; Zadrazil, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the primary cause of death in diabetic patients and one of the explanations may be increased arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness assessment using pulse wave analysis, is a predictive factor of CV events. The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge of relations between diabetes mellitus and pulse wave analysis. A MEDLINE search was performed to retrieve both original and review articles addressing the relations and influences on arterial stiffness in diabetics. Pulse wave analysis is considered as a gold standard in CV risk evaluation for patients at risk, especially diabetics. Arterial stiffness assessment may be helpful for choosing more aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, particularly in younger patients to reduce the incidence of CV disease in these patients.

  13. Limited Diffraction Maps for Pulsed Wave Annular Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure is provided for decomposing the linear field of flat pulsed wave annular arrays into an equivalent set of known limited diffraction Bessel beams. Each Bessel beam propagates with known characteristics, enabling good insight into the propagation of annular fields to be obtained...

  14. Numerical continuation of travelling waves and pulses in neural fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; Coombes, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We study travelling waves and pulses in neural fields. Neural fields are a macroscopic description of the activity of brain tissue, which mathematically are formulated as integro-differential equations. While linear and weakly nonlinear analysis can describe instabilities and small amplitude

  15. Beat wave injection of electrons into plasma waves using two interfering laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fubiani, G.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-03-04

    An electron injector concept that uses a single injection laser pulse colliding with a pump laser pulse in a plasma is analyzed. The pump pulse generates a large amplitude laser wakefield (plasma wave). The counter propagating injection pulse collides with the pump laser pulse to generate a beat wave with a slow phase velocity. The ponderomotive force of the slow beat wave is responsible for injecting plasma electrons into the wakefield near the back of the pump pulse. Test particle simulations indicate that significant amounts of charge can be trapped and accelerated ({approx} 10 pC). For higher charge, beam loading limits the validity of the simulations. The accelerated bunches are ultrashort ({approx} 1 fs) with good beam quality (relative energy spread of a few percent at a mean energy of {approx} 10 MeV and a normalized rms emittance on the order 0.4 mm.mrad). The effects of interaction angle and polarization are also explored, e.g., efficient trapping can occur for near-collinear geometries. Beat wave injection using a single injection pulse has the advantages of simplicity, ease of experimental implementation, and requires modest laser intensity I {approx_equal} 8.8 x 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Increasing vaccine production using pulsed ultrasound waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jida Xing

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a safe and effective approach to prevent deadly diseases. To increase vaccine production, we propose that a mechanical stimulation can enhance protein production. In order to prove this hypothesis, Sf9 insect cells were used to evaluate the increase in the expression of a fusion protein from hepatitis B virus (HBV S1/S2. We discovered that the ultrasound stimulation at a frequency of 1.5 MHz, intensity of 60 mW/cm2, for a duration of 10 minutes per day increased HBV S1/S2 by 27%. We further derived a model for transport through a cell membrane under the effect of ultrasound waves, tested the key assumptions of the model through a molecular dynamics simulation package, NAMD (Nanoscale Molecular Dynamics program and utilized CHARMM force field in a steered molecular dynamics environment. The results show that ultrasound waves can increase cell permeability, which, in turn, can enhance nutrient / waste exchange thus leading to enhanced vaccine production. This finding is very meaningful in either shortening vaccine production time, or increasing the yield of proteins for use as vaccines.

  17. Blood pulse wave velocity measured by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator for vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized photoacoustic microscopy for in vivo noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of mice. Interestingly, strong correlation between blood flow speed and ECG were clearly observed in arteries but not in veins. PWV is measured by the pulse travel time and the distance between two spot of a chose vessel, where simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references. Statistical analysis shows a linear correlation between the PWV and the vessel diameter, which agrees with known physiology. Keywords: photoacoustic microscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, bilirubin, scattering medium.

  18. Width-modulated square-wave pulses for ultrasound applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter R; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven

    2013-11-01

    A method of output pressure control for ultrasound transducers using switched excitation is described. The method generates width-modulated square-wave pulse sequences that are suitable for driving ultrasound transducers using MOSFETs or similar devices. Sequences are encoded using an optimized level-shifted, carrier-comparison, pulse-width modulation (PWM) strategy derived from existing PWM theory, and modified specifically for ultrasound applications. The modifications are: a reduction in carrier frequency so that the smallest number of pulses are generated and minimal switching is necessary; alteration of a linear carrier form to follow a trigonometric relationship in accordance with the expected fundamental output; and application of frequency modulation to the carrier when generating frequency-modulated, amplitude- tapered signals. The PWM method permits control of output pressure for arbitrary waveform sequences at diagnostic frequencies (approximately 5 MHz) when sampled at 100 MHz, and is applicable to pulse shaping and array apodization. Arbitrary waveform generation capability is demonstrated in simulation using convolution with a transducer's impulse response, and experimentally with hydrophone measurement. Benefits in coded imaging are demonstrated when compared with fixed-width square-wave (pseudo-chirp) excitation in coded imaging, including reduction in image artifacts and peak side-lobe levels for two cases, showing 10 and 8 dB reduction in peak side-lobe level experimentally, compared with 11 and 7 dB reduction in simulation. In all cases, the experimental observations correlate strongly with simulated data.

  19. Noninvasive continuous monitoring of digital pulse waves during hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkert, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis treatment is a frequent complication in patients with end-stage renal failure. A noninvasive method for continuous hemodynamic monitoring is needed. We used noninvasive digital photoplethysmography and an algorithm for continuous, investiga......Intermittent hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis treatment is a frequent complication in patients with end-stage renal failure. A noninvasive method for continuous hemodynamic monitoring is needed. We used noninvasive digital photoplethysmography and an algorithm for continuous......, investigator-independent, automatic analysis of digital volume pulse in 10 healthy subjects and in 20 patients with end-stage renal failure during the hemodialysis session. The reflective index was defined representing the diastolic component of the digital pulse wave. The properties of the reflective index...... were studied in healthy control subjects (n=10). An increased reflective index was due to increased peripheral pulse wave reflection (e.g., vasoconstriction). During a hemodialysis session, the reflective index increased significantly from 36+/-3 arbitrary units to 41+/-3 arbitrary units (n=20; p...

  20. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PULSED SHORT WAVE TREATMENT. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogaru Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed short waves are short electromagnetic waves emitted as intermittent trains with a fixed duration, separated by free intervals of variable duration. The biological effects of pulsed short waves could be explained according to most of the authors by an activation of cellular enzymatic reactions, a stimulation of energy metabolism, a stimulation of liver function, of adrenal gland function and of the reticulocyte system, changes in cell permeability, by an increase of peripheral blood flow through the enhancement of local vascularization. This research aimed to investigate the biological effects of exposure to pulsed short waves at different doses on the adrenal glands of experimental animals, by structural and ultrastructural studies. The study included 35 animals assigned to 4 groups. Group I included 10 experimental animals exposed to radiation at a dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, group II, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, group III, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 6/600 impulses/sec, for 10 min/day, and the control group consisted of 5 unexposed animals. Structural and ultrastructural changes of adrenal glands induced by the dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, compared to the unexposed control group and the dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, include an intensification of protein synthesis processes, an enhancement of energy metabolism in providing the energy required for an increased production of hormones, an intensification of collagen fiber synthesis processes in the capsule, necessary for healing. It was demonstrated that this dose induced an intensification of hormone synthesis and secretion, a stimulation of adrenal function. At the dose of 6/600 cycles/sec, a slight diminution of hormone synthesis and secretion activity was found, which was not below the limits existing in the unexposed control group, but was comparable to group II. This dose is probably too strong for experimental animals, inducing them a state of stress. The

  1. Determinants of radial artery pulse wave analysis in asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, Daniel A; Kaiser, Daniel R; Whitwam, Wayne; Finkelstein, Stanley; Belalcazar, Andres; Patterson, Robert; Glasser, Stephen; Cohn, Jay N

    2004-08-01

    Noninvasive techniques to evaluate arterial stiffness include noninvasive radial artery pulse contour analysis. Diastolic pulse contour analysis provides a separate assessment of large (C1) and small artery (C2) elasticity. Analysis of the systolic pulse contour identifies two pressure peaks (P1 and P2) that relate to incident and reflected waves. This study aimed to compare indices from systolic and diastolic pulse contour analysis from the radial pressure waveform and to correlate these indices with traditional risk factors in asymptomatic individuals screened for cardiovascular disease. In 298 consecutive subjects (206 male and 92 female healthy subjects with a mean age of 50 +/- 12 years), noninvasive radial artery pressure waveforms were acquired with a piezoelectric transducer and analyzed for 1) diastolic indices of C1 and C2 from the CR-2000 CVProfiler, and 2) systolic indices of augmentation as defined by augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), and systolic reflective index (SRI = P2/P1). These indices were then correlated to each other as well as to individual traditional risk factors and the Framingham Risk Score. Diastolic indices were significantly and inversely correlated to systolic indices with C2 showing a stronger inverse association than C1. C2 and Alx were significantly correlated with height, weight, and body mass index in men but not in women. All indices correlated better to blood pressure in women than men. In women, only systolic indices were significantly correlated to HDL cholesterol and only diastolic indices were significantly correlated to LDL cholesterol. All indices were significantly correlated to the Framingham Risk Score, which was stronger in women then men, but when adjusted for age only diastolic indices remained significant in women. Diastolic and systolic indices of pulse contour analysis correlate differently with traditional risk factors in men and women. Copyright 2004 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

  2. Wavelet brain angiography suggests arteriovenous pulse wave phase locking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Butler

    Full Text Available When a stroke volume of arterial blood arrives to the brain, the total blood volume in the bony cranium must remain constant as the proportions of arterial and venous blood vary, and by the end of the cardiac cycle an equivalent volume of venous blood must have been ejected. I hypothesize the brain to support this process by an extraluminally mediated exchange of information between its arterial and venous circulations. To test this I introduce wavelet angiography methods to resolve single moving vascular pulse waves (PWs in the brain while simultaneously measuring brain pulse motion. The wavelet methods require angiographic data acquired at significantly faster rate than cardiac frequency. I obtained these data in humans from brain surface optical angiograms at craniotomy and in piglets from ultrasound angiograms via cranial window. I exploit angiographic time of flight to resolve arterial from venous circulation. Initial wavelet reconstruction proved unsatisfactory because of angiographic motion alias from brain pulse motion. Testing with numerically simulated cerebral angiograms enabled the development of a vascular PW cine imaging method based on cross-correlated wavelets of mixed high frequency and high temporal resolution respectively to attenuate frequency and motion alias. Applied to the human and piglet data, the method resolves individual arterial and venous PWs and finds them to be phase locked each with separate phase relations to brain pulse motion. This is consistent with arterial and venous PW coordination mediated by pulse motion and points to a testable hypothesis of a function of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles of the brain.

  3. Pulsed short-wave diathermy effects on human fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan; Lewis, Martyn; Mills, Pauline; Kielty, Cay

    2002-06-01

    To investigate the influence of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD) on fibroblast and chondrocyte cell proliferation rates and to establish the influences of different dosages applied. Four single-blind trials. Laboratory, in vitro study. Human adult dermal fibroblast and chondrocyte cells were plated at known concentrations and incubated for 5 days. Exposure to PSWD, twice daily, on days 2, 3, and 4. After crystal violet staining (day 5), optical density (cell number) was determined spectrophotometrically. PSWD, given at mean power of 48W for 10 minutes, increased fibroblast proliferation compared with control groups (P<.001). There was a relationship between cell proliferation and the amount of energy given (P<0.001). The optimal mean power for proliferation was estimated to be 13.8W. While keeping mean power constant at 6W, altering pulse duration and pulse repetition rate dosage parameters did not have a significant effect on proliferation (P=.519). Chondrocyte proliferation also increased with PSWD exposure of 6W at 10 minutes duration (P=.015). In addition, treatment time was significantly associated with chondrocyte proliferation (P<.001). PSWD is associated with increased rates of fibroblast and chondrocyte proliferation in vitro, which is dose dependent. These results contribute to an understanding of the physiologic mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of PSWD. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  4. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D- region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R.

    2008-12-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f = 3 - 100 kHz). The building-block of the calculation is a differential-equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's Equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular Direct Fourier Transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long- wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (200 - 500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, we use the classic D- region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Wait. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array.

  5. Validation of oscillometric pulse wave analysis measurements in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Lee; Lambrick, Danielle M; Westrupp, Nicole; Young, Joanna; Faulkner, James

    2014-06-01

    Pulse wave analysis (PWA) has emerged as a noninvasive, valid, reliable, and widely used technique to investigate central blood pressures and systemic arterial wave reflection (augmentation index). The gold-standard technique is tonometry, but this technique can be challenging, especially when used on children. The purpose of this study was to validate oscillometric PWA for use in children. Fifty-seven healthy children were recruited for participation. Central blood pressures and peripheral augmentation index (pAIx) were measured objectively using oscillometric (Pulsecor R7) and tonometric (SphygmaCor) devices. All measurements were made during the same visit under standardized conditions between the hours of 8 am and 10 am in the fasted state. Tonometric measurements were unsuccessful on 1 child. Comparisons were made on 56 children (mean age = 9.8±1.0 y; 57% male). A very strong relationship was found between devices for central systolic (r = 0.94; P blood pressures. However, Bland-Altman analysis indicated a bias toward greater systolic blood pressures with the oscillometric monitor (mean difference = 4.5mm Hg; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -5.16 to -3.89). A good relationship was found for pAIx (r = 0.71; P oscillometric PWA provides valid measures of central blood pressure and arterial wave reflection in children aged 8-10 years.

  6. Clinical Use of Pulse Wave Analysis: Proceedings From a Symposium Sponsored by North American Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R; Black, Henry R; Chirinos, Julio A; Feig, Peter U; Ferdinand, Keith C; Germain, Michael; Rosendorff, Clive; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Stepanek, Jan A

    2015-07-01

    The use of pulse wave analysis may guide the provider in making choices about blood pressure treatment in prehypertensive or hypertensive patients. However, there is little clinical guidance on how to interpret and use pulse wave analysis data in the management of these patients. A panel of clinical researchers and clinicians who study and clinically use pulse wave analysis was assembled to discuss strategies for using pulse wave analysis in the clinical encounter. This manuscript presents an approach to the clinical application of pulse waveform analysis, how to interpret central pressure waveforms, and how to use existing knowledge about the pharmacodynamic effect of antihypertensive drug classes in combination with brachial and central pressure profiles in clinical practice. The discussion was supplemented by case-based examples provided by panel members, which the authors hope will provoke discussion on how to understand and incorporate pulse wave analysis into clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evanescent-wave proton postaccelerator driven by intense THz pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pálfalvi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hadron therapy motivates research dealing with the production of particle beams with ∼100  MeV/nucleon energy and relative energy fluctuation on the order of 1%. Laser-driven accelerators produce ion beams with only tens of MeV/nucleon energy and an extremely broad spectra. Here, a novel method is proposed for postacceleration and monochromatization of particles, leaving the laser-driven accelerator, by using intense THz pulses. It is based on further developing the idea of using the evanescent field of electromagnetic waves between a pair of dielectric crystals. Simple model calculations show that the energy of a proton bunch can be increased from 40 to 56 MeV in five stages and its initially broad energy distribution can be significantly narrowed down.

  8. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts...

  9. Left ventricular ejection time, not heart rate, is an independent correlate of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Paolo; Palombo, Carlo; Salvi, Giovanni Matteo; Labat, Carlos; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase

    2013-12-01

    Several studies showed a positive association between heart rate and pulse wave velocity, a sensitive marker of arterial stiffness. However, no study involving a large population has specifically addressed the dependence of pulse wave velocity on different components of the cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to explore in subjects of different age the link between pulse wave velocity with heart period (the reciprocal of heart rate) and the temporal components of the cardiac cycle such as left ventricular ejection time and diastolic time. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was assessed in 3,020 untreated subjects (1,107 men). Heart period, left ventricular ejection time, diastolic time, and early-systolic dP/dt were determined by carotid pulse wave analysis with high-fidelity applanation tonometry. An inverse association was found between pulse wave velocity and left ventricular ejection time at all ages (heart period was also found, with the exception of the youngest subjects (P = 0.20). A significant positive correlation was also found between pulse wave velocity and dP/dt (P heart period no longer became significant. Our data demonstrate that pulse wave velocity is more closely related to left ventricular systolic function than to heart period. This may have methodological and pathophysiological implications.

  10. Self-similar propagation of Hermite-Gauss water-wave pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally propagation dynamics of surface gravity water-wave pulses, having Hermite-Gauss envelopes. We show that these waves propagate self-similarly along an 18-m wave tank, preserving their general Hermite-Gauss envelopes in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. The measured surface elevation wave groups enable observing the envelope phase evolution of both nonchirped and linearly frequency chirped Hermite-Gauss pulses, hence allowing us to measure Gouy phase shifts of high-order Hermite-Gauss pulses for the first time. Finally, when increasing pulse amplitude, nonlinearity becomes essential and the second harmonic of Hermite-Gauss waves was observed. We further show that these generated second harmonic bound waves still exhibit self-similar Hermite-Gauss shapes along the tank.

  11. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyung Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n=329 or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n=212. Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI (p=0.050 but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p=0.021 and time to first peak from baseline (T1 (p=0.035 in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance.

  12. Uric Acid Level Has a J-Shaped Association with Arterial Stiffness in Korean Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungbin; Jung, Young-Hyo; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Park, Byoungjin

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid has been reported to function both as an oxidant or antioxidant depending on the context. A previous study in the Korean population reported a positive linear association between serum uric acid level and arterial stiffness in men, but little is known about how serum uric acid level is related to the risk of increased arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women. We performed a cross-sectional study of 293 subjects who participated in a health examination program run by the health promotion center of Gangnam Severance Hospital between October 2007 and July 2010. High brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was defined as a brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity of more than 1,450 cm/s. The odds ratios (ORs) for high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across uric acid quartiles after adjusting for other indicators of cardiovascular risk. The 293 postmenopausal women were divided into quartiles according to uric acid level. The mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity values of each quartile were as follows: Q1, 1,474 cm/s; Q2, 1,375 cm/s; Q3, 1,422 cm/s; Q4, 1,528 cm/s. The second quartile was designated as the control group based on mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value. Multivariate adjusted ORs (95% confidence intervals) for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity across the uric acid quartiles were 2.642 (Q1, 1.095-6.3373), 1.00, 4.305 (Q3, 1.798-10.307), and 4.375 (Q4, 1.923-9.949), after adjusting for confounding variables. Serum uric acid level has a J-shaped association with arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women.

  13. Glycemic index, glycemic load, and pulse wave reflection in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Rodriguez, J I; Gomez-Marcos, M A; Patino-Alonso, M-C; Rodrigo-De Pablo, E; Cabrejas-Sánchez, A; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, M S; Repiso-Gento, I; Gonzalez-Viejo, N; Maderuelo-Fernandez, J A; Agudo-Conde, C; Garcia-Ortiz, L

    2015-01-01

    Diets with a high glycemic index (GI), high glycemic load (GL), or both, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study examined the association of GI and GL in a regular diet with the peripheral augmentation index (i.e., a marker of vascular aging) in a sample of adults. Cross-sectional study. The findings presented in this manuscript are a subanalysis of the EVIDENT study whose purpose was to analyze the relationship between lifestyle and arterial aging. For the sample population, 1553 individuals aged 20-80 years were selected through random sampling from the patients of general practitioners at six health centers in Spain. GI and GL for each patient's diet were calculated from a previously validated, semi-quantitative, 137-item food frequency questionnaire. The peripheral augmentation index corrected for a heart rate of 75 bpm (PAIx75) was measured with pulse-wave application software (A-Pulse CASP). Based on a risk factor adjusted regression model, for every 5 unit increase in GI, the PAIx75 increased by 0.11 units (95% CI: 0.04-0.19). Similarly, for every increase in 10 units in GL, the PAIx75 increased by 1.13 (95% CI: 0.21-2.05). High PAIx75 values were observed in individuals with diets in the third GI tertile (i.e., the highest), and lower PAIx75 values in those with diets in the first tertile (i.e., the lowest), (93.1 vs. 87.5, respectively, p = 0.001). GI and GL were directly associated with PAIx75 values in adults without cardiovascular diseases regardless of age, gender, physical activity, and other confounders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Laboratory Model of the Cardiovascular System for Experimental Demonstration of Pulse Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Bojana; Nestorovic, Zorica; Djuric, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system.…

  15. Nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents. Unlike the well-understood mixing of quasi-monochromatic waves, this configuration is highly non-intuitive due to the complex coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom of the interacting pulses. We illustrate the process intuitively with transitions between different branches of the dispersion curves and interpret it in terms of spectral exchange between the interacting pulses. We verify our interpretation with an example whereby a spectrally-narrow pulse “inherits” the wide spectrum of a pump pulse centered at a different wavelength, using exact numerical simulations, as well as a simplified coupled mode analysis and an asymptotic analytical solution. The latter also provides a simple and intuitive quantitative interpretation. The complex wave mixing process studied here may enable flexible spatio-temporal shaping of short pulses and is the starting point of the study of more complicated systems.

  16. MOSFET-based high voltage double square-wave pulse generator with an inductive adder configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Qiaogen, E-mail: hvzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Long, Jinghua [College of Physics, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Lei, Yunfei; Liu, Jinyuan [Institute of Optoelectronics, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a fast MOSFET-based solid-state pulse generator for high voltage double square-wave pulses. The generator consists mainly of an inductive adder system stacked of 20 solid-state modules. Each of the modules has 18 power MOSFETs in parallel, which are triggered by individual drive circuits; these drive circuits themselves are synchronously triggered by a signal from avalanche transistors. Our experiments demonstrate that the output pulses with amplitude of 8.1 kV and peak current of about 405 A are available at a load impedance of 20 Ω. The pulse has a double square-wave form with a rise and fall time of 40 ns and 26 ns, respectively and bottom flatness better than 12%. The interval time of the double square-wave pulses can be adjustable by varying the interval time of the trigger pulses.

  17. Estimation of aortic compliance using magnetic resonance pulse wave velocity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boese, J.M.; Bock, M.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Schad, L.R. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    A method for compliance estimation employing magnetic resonance pulse wave velocity measurement is presented. Time-resolved flow waves are recorded at several positions along the vessel using a phase contrast sequence, and pulse wave velocity is calculated from the delay of the wave onsets. Using retrospective cardiac gating in combination with an optically decoupled electrocardiogram acquisition, a high temporal resolution of 3 ms can be achieved. A phantom set-up for the simulation of pulsatile flow in a compliant vessel is described. In the phantom, relative errors of pulse wave velocity estimation were found to be about 15%, whereas in a volunteer, larger errors were found that might be caused by vessel branches. Results of pulse wave velocity estimation agree with directaortic distension measurements which rely on a peripheral estimate of aortic pressure and are therefore less accurate. Studies in 12 volunteers show values of pulse wave velocity consistent with the literature; in particular the well-known increase in pulse wave velocity with age was observed. Preliminary results show that the method can be applied to aortic aneurysms. (author)

  18. Pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography in birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, J; Forbes, N A; Thielebein, J; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E

    2003-12-13

    Pulsed-wave spectral Doppler echocardiography was applied to 111 diurnal and nocturnal raptors of both sexes weighing between 190 and 4200 g. In the first stage, 40 birds were examined without special preparation; in the second stage, 15 birds were examined first when they were not anaesthetised and then when they were anaesthetised; in the third stage, 41 birds were examined after they had been fasted for different periods of time; and finally 15 birds, in which echocardiography had not been possible by using standard (dorsal) restraint and positioning, were examined after being placed in lateral and ventral recumbency. Doppler-derived diastolic inflow into the ventricles was detectable in approximately 80 per cent of the birds weighing between 190 and 2300 g independently of their weight, heart rate and whether they had been anaesthetised or fasted, and aortic blood flow was detected in about 50 per cent of them. It was possible to apply the technique under standard conditions of dorsal recumbency to only one of the birds weighing more than 3000 g and to about 80 per cent of those weighing between 190 and 2300 g. In 11 of 15 birds in which the technique could not be applied under standard conditions, blood flow could be detected in the ventricles and/or the aorta after the birds had been repositioned. No systolic blood flow through the pulmonary artery was detectable in any of the birds.

  19. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hau-Tieng Wu

    Full Text Available We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features.

  20. Effects of isosorbide mononitrate and AII inhibition on pulse wave reflection in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Gordon S; Barin, Edward S; Gilfillan, Kerry L

    2003-02-01

    The aortic pulse wave contour in isolated systolic hypertension often shows a prominent reflection peak, which combines with the incident wave arising from cardiac ejection so as to widen pulse pressure. We investigated the effects of an extended-release nitrate preparation and of 2 angiotensin II (AII) inhibitors (an AII receptor antagonist and an ACE inhibitor) on the aortic pulse wave contour and systemic blood pressure in hypertensive subjects with high augmentation index caused by exaggerated pulse wave reflection. Two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover studies were carried out in a total of 16 elderly patients with systolic hypertension resistant to conventional antihypertensive therapy. In 1 study, pharmacodynamic responses to single doses of placebo, isosorbide mononitrate, eprosartan, and captopril were determined; in the other, single-dose isosorbide mononitrate and placebo were compared in subjects treated with AII inhibitors at baseline. Blood pressure was measured by sphygmomanometry and pulse wave components by applanation tonometry at the radial artery. All 3 agents were shown to decrease brachial systolic blood pressure, aortic systolic blood pressure, and aortic pulse pressure. Qualitative effects on the aortic pulse wave contour differed: augmentation index was not significantly altered by either captopril or eprosartan but was decreased (PAII inhibition.

  1. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  2. Stimulated generation of superluminal light pulses via four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Ryan T; Vogl, Ulrich; Lett, Paul D

    2012-04-27

    We report on the four-wave mixing of superluminal pulses, in which both the injected and generated pulses involved in the process propagate with negative group velocities. Generated pulses with negative group velocities of up to v(g)=-1/880c are demonstrated, corresponding to the generated pulse's peak exiting the 1.7 cm long medium ≈50 ns earlier than if it had propagated at the speed of light in vacuum, c. We also show that in some cases the seeded pulse may propagate with a group velocity larger than c, and that the generated conjugate pulse peak may exit the medium even earlier than the amplified seed pulse peak. We can control the group velocities of the two pulses by changing the seed detuning and the input seed power.

  3. Non-invasive measurement of aortic pressure in patients: Comparing pulse wave analysis and applanation tonometry

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, M.U.R.; C Prabhakar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to validate and compare novel methods to determine aortic blood pressure non-invasively based on Oscillometric Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurement using four limb-cuff pressure waveforms and two lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) with a validated tonometric pulse wave analysis system in patients. Materials and Methods: After receiving the consent, in 49 patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, PWV, and central blood p...

  4. Saturation properties of four-wave mixing between short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Mecozzi, A.; Diez, S.

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. The authors report the first comparison between theory and experiment on the four wave mixing between trains of short pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The theory is able to explain all qualitative features seen in the experiment.......Summary form only given. The authors report the first comparison between theory and experiment on the four wave mixing between trains of short pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The theory is able to explain all qualitative features seen in the experiment....

  5. Detailed characterization of CW- and pulsed-pump four-wave mixing in highly nonlinear fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Galili, Michael; Grüner-Nielsen, L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative comparison of continuouswave- (CW) and pulsed-pump four-wave mixing (FWM) in commercially available highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs), and suggest properties for which the CW and pulsed FWM bandwidths are limited in practice. The CWand pulsed-pump parametric gain is charac......We present a quantitative comparison of continuouswave- (CW) and pulsed-pump four-wave mixing (FWM) in commercially available highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs), and suggest properties for which the CW and pulsed FWM bandwidths are limited in practice. The CWand pulsed-pump parametric gain...... bandwidth. However, an inverse scaling of the TOD with the dispersion fluctuations, leads to different CW-optimized fibers, which depend only on the even dispersion-orders....

  6. Free-electron-laser-induced shock-wave control and mechanistic analysis using pulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Taizo; Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Awazu, Kunio

    2008-11-01

    The wavelength of the free electron laser (FEL) in Osaka University can be continuously varied in the range of 5.0-20.0 microm. The FEL has a double-pulse structure, consisting of a train of macropulses of pulse duration 12 micros. Each macropulse contains a train of 330 micropulses of pulse duration 5 ps. The tunability and picosecond pulses afford new medical and biological applications. However, a macropulse of long pulse duration leads to undesirable secondary effects. Precise control of the macropulse duration is essential for the high-precision applications of the FEL. An FEL pulse control system using acousto-optic modulators has been developed to investigate mechanical (shock-wave) effects of the FEL on living tissues. With this system, we have controlled photoinduced shock waves and determine the mechanism of interaction during FEL-induced tissue ablation.

  7. Efficient Femtosecond Mid-infrared Pulse Generation by Dispersive Wave Radiation in Bulk Lithium Niobate Crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Guo, Hairun; Bache, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate efficient mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersive wave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal. Femtosecond mid-IR pulses centering from 2.8-2.92 μm are generated using the single pump wavelengths from 1.25-1.45 μm. © 2014 Optical Society of America...

  8. Increasing accuracy of pulse transit time measurements by automated elimination of distorted photoplethysmography waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.N. van Velzen (M. H N); A.J. Loeve (Arjo J.); S.P. Niehof (Sjoerd); E.G. Mik (Egbert)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPhotoplethysmography (PPG) is a widely available non-invasive optical technique to visualize pressure pulse waves (PWs). Pulse transit time (PTT) is a physiological parameter that is often derived from calculations on ECG and PPG signals and is based on tightly defined characteristics of

  9. Increasing accuracy of pulse transit time measurements by automated elimination of distorted photoplethysmography waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, M.H.N.; Loeve, A.J.; Niehof, S.P.; Mik, E.G.

    2017-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a widely available non-invasive optical technique to visualize pressure pulse waves (PWs). Pulse transit time (PTT) is a physiological parameter that is often derived from calculations on ECG and PPG signals and is based on tightly defined characteristics of the PW

  10. a New Approach of Dynamic Blood Pressure Measurement Based on the Time Domain Analysis of the Pulse Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimei, Su; Wei, Xu; Hui, Yu; Fei, Du; Jicun, Wang; Kexin, Xu

    2009-08-01

    In this study the pulse wave characteristics were used as a new approach to measure the human blood pressure. Based the principle of pulse wave and theory of the elastic vascular, the authors analyzed the characteristic of the pulse waveforms and revealed the characteristics points which could be used to represent the blood pressure. In this investigation the relevant mathematical feature was used to identify the relationship between the blood pressure and pulse wave parameters in a more accurate way. It also provided an experimental basis to carry out continuing non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using the pulse wave method.

  11. Fifth-order intensity autocorrelations based on six-wave mixing of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaižauskas, Eugenijus; Steponkevičius, KÈ©stutis; Vaičaitis, Virgilijus

    2016-02-01

    It is shown both experimentally and by numerical simulations that fifth-order intensity autocorrelations of femtosecond laser pulses can be obtained from two-beam noncollinear six-wave mixing in air. A numerical analysis of competing direct and six-wave-assisted third-harmonic-generation pathways showed that these measurements are suitable for the background-free temporal characterization of laser pulses. Reshaping of the pulse and 10 fs subpulse formation during the primary stages of light filamentation were observed using the proposed method.

  12. Aortic pulse wave velocity measurement in systemic sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sebastiani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and widespread microangiopathy. However, a macrovascular damage could be also associated. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV is known to be a reliable indicator of arterial stiffness and a useful prognostic predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, aPWV may be easily measured by non-invasive, user-friendly tool. Aim of our study was to evaluate aPWV alterations in a series of SSc patients. Methods. The aPWV was evaluated in 35 consecutive female SSc patients and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. aPWV alterations were correlated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Results. A significant increase of aPWV was observed in SSc patients compared to controls (9.4±3.2 m/s vs 7.3±1 m/s; P=0.002. In particular, 14/35 (40% SSc patients and only 1/26 (4% controls (P=0.0009 showed increased aPWV (>9 m/s cut-off value. Moreover, echocardiography evaluation showed an increased prevalence of right atrial and ventricular dilatation (atrial volume: 23.6±6.2 mL vs 20.3±4.3 mL, P=0.026; ventricular diameter 19.5±4.9 mm vs 15.9±1.6 mm; P=0.001 associated to higher values of pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs in SSc patients (31.5±10.4 mmHg vs 21.6±2.9 mmHg; P50 years old. Furthermore, altered aPWV was more frequently associated with limited cutaneous pattern, longer disease duration (≥5 years, and/or presence of anticentromere antibody (ACA. Conclusions. A significantly higher prevalence of abnormally increased aPWV was evidenced in SSc patients compared to healthy controls. The possibility of more pronounced and diffuse vascular damage in a particular SSc subset (ACA-positive subjects with limited cutaneous scleroderma and longer disease duration might be raised.

  13. Heart-Carotid Pulse Wave Velocity a Useful Index of Atherosclerosis in Chinese Hypertensive Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunyue; Xiong, Huahua; Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Wu, Dan; Li, Zhenzhou; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Wu, Wanqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to investigate the relationship between heart-carotid pulse wave velocity (hcPWV) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in hypertensive patients, and also to examine the effect of pre-ejection period (PEP) on it. Doppler ultrasound device was used to measure CIMT in left common carotid artery. Hypertensive patients were divided into normal (n?=?36, CIMT ?0.8?mm) and thickened (n?=?31, CIMT?>?0.8?mm) group. Electrocardiogram R-wave-based carotid pulse wave ...

  14. Probing double Rydberg wave packets in a helium atom with fast single-cycle pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Robicheaux, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fully quantum and classical calculations on a helium atom with two excited, radially localized Rydberg wave packets are performed. The differences between classical and quantum methods are compared for a wide range of principal quantum numbers to study the validity of the classical method for low-lying states. The effects of fast terahertz single-cycle pulses on an atomic system with one or two Rydberg wave packets are also studied using classical equations of motion. These results suggest that single-cycle pulses can be used as time-resolved probes to detect motion of the wave packets and to investigate autoionization properties.

  15. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) in Normal, Hypertensive and Aneurysmal Human Aortas In Vivo: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa. E.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 years ± 10.2), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 years ± 15.8), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 years ± 11.8) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m/s, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable information for the clinical characterization of aneurysms and other vascular pathologies that regionally alter the arterial wall mechanics. PMID:23770991

  16. Bit rate and pulse width dependence of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, S.; Mecozzi, A.; Mørk, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the saturation properties of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in a semiconductor optical amplifier. By varying the gain of the optical amplifier, we find a strong dependence of both conversion efficiency and signal-to-background ratio on pulse width and bit rate....... In particular, the signal-to-background ratio can be optimized for a specific amplifier gain. This behavior, which is coherently described in experiment and theory, is attributed to the dynamics of the amplified spontaneous emission, which is the main source of noise in a semiconductor optical amplifier....

  17. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  18. Upconversion imaging using short-wave infrared picosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathez, Morgan David; Rodrigo, Peter John; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, we present the first demonstration of short-wavelength infrared image upconversion that employs intense picosecond signal and pump beams. We use a fiber laser that emits a signal beam at 1877 nm and a pump beam at 1550 nm—both with a pulse width of 1 ps and a pulse...... by an improved model that considers the combined image blurring effect due to finite pump beam size, thick nonlinear crystal, and polychromatic infrared illumination....

  19. FPGA-based design and implementation of arterial pulse wave generator using piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Lisheng; Zhao, Dazhe; Yao, Yang; Song, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Because arterial pulse waves contain vital information related to the condition of the cardiovascular system, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of pulse waves in recent years. Accurate acquisition is essential to investigate arterial pulse waves. However, at the stage of developing equipment for acquiring and analyzing arterial pulse waves, specific pulse signals may be unavailable for debugging and evaluating the system under development. To produce test signals that reflect specific physiological conditions, in this paper, an arterial pulse wave generator has been designed and implemented using a field programmable gate array (FPGA), which can produce the desired pulse waves according to the feature points set by users. To reconstruct a periodic pulse wave from the given feature points, a method known as piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting is also proposed in this paper. Using a test database that contains four types of typical pulse waves with each type containing 25 pulse wave signals, the maximum residual error of each sampling point of the fitted pulse wave in comparison with the real pulse wave is within 8%. In addition, the function for adding baseline drift and three types of noises is integrated into the developed system because the baseline occasionally wanders, and noise needs to be added for testing the performance of the designed circuits and the analysis algorithms. The proposed arterial pulse wave generator can be considered as a special signal generator with a simple structure, low cost and compact size, which can also provide flexible solutions for many other related research purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectral analysis of intraocular pressure pulse wave in ocular hypertensive and primary open angle glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija M Bozic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In attempt to find an alternative way to determine conversion from ocular hypertension to primary open angle glaucoma (POAG (besides visual field and optic disc changes, we analyzed intraocular pressure (IOP pulse wave in spectral domain. Aims: The aim of this study was to test the potential differences in spectral content of IOP pulse wave between ocular hypertension and POAG patients, which could indicate conversion. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study designed to test the differences in the spectral content of pressure pulse wave between nontreated ocular hypertensive and nontreated, freshly diagnosed POAG patients. Methods: The total of 40 eyes of 40 subjects was included: 20 previously untreated ocular hypertensive patients, and 20 previously untreated POAG patients. Continuous IOP measuring gained by dynamic contour tonometry was submitted to fast Fourier transform signal analysis and further statistical data processing. Statistics Analysis Used: Ocular and systemic characteristics of the tested subjects were compared by analysis of variance appropriate for this study design. A P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Higher spectral components of the IOP pulse wave was discerned up to the fifth harmonic in both of the tested groups. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the tested harmonic amplitudes. Conclusions: There are no differences in the spectral content of IOP pulse wave between ocular hypertensive and primary open angle glaucoma patients which could be indicative for conversion.

  1. Compression of Linearly Chirped Gaussian Optical Pulses Induced by Microwave Magneto-Static Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bao-Jian; Gao, Xiang

    2009-04-01

    According to the coupled-mode theory of magneto-optic (MO) effects as a perturbation, the coupling equations for optical pulses with microwave magneto-static waves (MSWs) in MO film waveguides are presented, which can be used to analyze MSW-based optical pulse signal processing. For the case of a continuous MSW, the analytic expression for the complex amplitudes of diffracted and undiffracted optical pulses is obtained in frequency domain and then the compression characteristics of linearly chirped Gaussian optical pulses are studied in detail. The peak intensity of diffracted optical pulses is approximately proportional to the matching diffraction efficiency. With the increase of chirp parameters, the diffracted pulse waveforms go through two stages: single peak compression and multi-peak expansion.

  2. Steering dissociation of Br2 molecules with two femtosecond pulses via wave packet interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Hu, Wen-Hui; Yan, Tian-Min; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2008-04-07

    The dissociation dynamics of Br2 molecules induced by two femtosecond pump pulses are studied based on the calculation of time-dependent quantum wave packet. Perpendicular transition from X 1Sigma g+ to A 3Pi 1u+ and 1Pi 1u+ and parallel transition from X 1Sigma g+ to B 3Pi 0u+, involving two product channels Br (2P3/2)+Br (2P3/2) and Br (2P3/2)+Br* (2P1/2), respectively, are taken into account. Two pump pulses create dissociating wave packets interfering with each other. By varying laser parameters, the interference of dissociating wave packets can be controlled, and the dissociation probabilities of Br2 molecules on the three excited states can be changed to different degrees. The branching ratio of Br*/(Br+Br*) is calculated as a function of pulse delay time and phase difference.

  3. On-chip laser Doppler vibrometer for arterial pulse wave velocity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanlu; Segers, Patrick; Dirckx, Joris; Baets, Roel

    2013-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important marker for cardiovascular risk. The Laser Doppler vibrometry has been suggested as a potential technique to measure the local carotid PWV by measuring the transit time of the pulse wave between two locations along the common carotid artery (CCA) from skin surface vibrations. However, the present LDV setups are still bulky and difficult to handle. We present in this paper a more compact LDV system integrated on a CMOS-compatible silicon-on-insulator substrate. In this system, a chip with two homodyne LDVs is utilized to simultaneously measure the pulse wave at two different locations along the CCA. Measurement results show that the dual-LDV chip can successfully conduct the PWV measurement.

  4. Associations between plasma fibulin-1, pulse wave velocity and diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes is related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and arterial stiffness and its consequences may be the factor connecting the two. Arterial stiffness is often measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), but no plasma biomarker reflecting arterial stiffness...... undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS: Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis including augmentation index (Aix75) was measured in 273 patients, who subsequently underwent a coronary by-pass operation. Plasma samples were drawn and information was gathered on diabetes status, HbA1c...... indices are not directly related in patients with cardiac disease, despite the fact that both measures are increased among patients with diabetes....

  5. Optimal laser pulse design for transferring the coherent nuclear wave packet of H$_2^+$

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; He, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Within the Franck-Condon approximation, the single ionization of H$_2$ leaves H$_2^+$ in a coherent superposition of 19 nuclear vibrational states. We numerically design an optimal laser pulse train to transfer such a coherent nuclear wave packet to the ground vibrational state of H$_2^+$. The simulation results show that the population of the ground state after the transfer is more than 91%. Frequency analysis of the designed optimal pulse reveals that the transfer principle is mainly an ant...

  6. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p pathologies that regionally alter the arterial wall mechanics.

  7. Heart-Carotid Pulse Wave Velocity a Useful Index of Atherosclerosis in Chinese Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyue; Xiong, Huahua; Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Wu, Dan; Li, Zhenzhou; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Wu, Wanqing

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between heart-carotid pulse wave velocity (hcPWV) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in hypertensive patients, and also to examine the effect of pre-ejection period (PEP) on it. Doppler ultrasound device was used to measure CIMT in left common carotid artery. Hypertensive patients were divided into normal (n = 36, CIMT ≤0.8 mm) and thickened (n = 31, CIMT > 0.8 mm) group. Electrocardiogram R-wave-based carotid pulse wave velocity (rcPWV) and aortic valve-carotid pulse wave velocity (acPWV) were calculated as the ratio of the travel length to the pulse transit time with or without PEP, respectively. CIMT has significant relations with rcPWV (r = 0.611, P blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, antihypertensive medication, and plaque occurrence. However, similar results were not found in normal group. Since CIMT has been considered as an index of atherosclerosis, our results suggested that both rcPWV and acPWV could be useful indexes of atherosclerosis in thickened CIMT hypertensive patients. Additionally, if hcPWV is computed with heart-carotid pulse transit time, including PEP could improve the accuracy of atherosclerosis assessment in hypertensive patients.

  8. Visualization of superluminal pulses inside a white light cavity using plane wave spatio temporal transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, H N; Jang, Y J; Liu, X; Shahriar, M S

    2012-08-13

    In a white light cavity (WLC), the group velocity is superluminal over a finite bandwidth. For a WLC-based data buffering system we recently proposed, it is important to visualize the behavior of pulses inside such a cavity. The conventional plane wave transfer functions, valid only over space that is translationally invariant, cannot be used for the space inside WLC or any cavity, which is translationally variant. Here, we develop the plane wave spatio temporal transfer function (PWSTTF) method to solve this problem, and produce visual representations of a Gaussian input pulse incident on a WLC, for all times and positions.

  9. Liberation of a pinned spiral wave by a rotating electric pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Peng, Liang; Ma, Jun; Ying, He-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Spiral waves may be pinned to anatomical heterogeneities in the cardiac tissue, which leads to monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by electric pulses in one direction (EP) is a promising method for liberating such waves by using heterogeneities as internal virtual pacing sites. Here, based on the WEH effect, a new mechanism of liberation by means of a rotating electric pulse (REP) is proposed in a generic model of excitable media. Compared with the EP, the REP has the advantage of opening wider time window to liberate pinned spiral. The influences of rotating direction and frequency of the REP, and the radius of the obstacles on this new mechanism are studied. We believe this strategy may improve manipulations with pinned spiral waves in heart experiments.

  10. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Page R

    2008-07-29

    The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV). The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC) for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for more than fifty years is analyzed and shown to yield

  11. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Painter Page R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV. The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. Methods An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. Results For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for

  12. Pulse picker for synchrotron radiation driven by a surface acoustic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Petsiuk, Andrei; Dolbnya, Igor; Sawhney, Kawal; Erko, Alexei

    2017-05-15

    A functional test for a pulse picker for synchrotron radiation was performed at Diamond Light Source. The purpose of a pulse picker is to select which pulse from the synchrotron hybrid-mode bunch pattern reaches the experiment. In the present work, the Bragg reflection on a Si/B4C multilayer was modified using surface acoustic wave (SAW) trains. Diffraction on the SAW alters the direction of the x rays and it can be used to modulate the intensity of the x rays that reach the experimental chamber. Using electronic modulation of the SAW amplitude, it is possible to obtain different scattering conditions for different x-ray pulses. To isolate the single bunch, the state of the SAW must be changed in the short time gap between the pulses. To achieve the necessary time resolution, the measurements have been performed in conical diffraction geometry. The achieved time resolution was 120 ns.

  13. Correlates of Segmental Pulse Wave Velocity in Older Adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michelle L; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Palta, Priya; Cheng, Susan; Gouskova, Natalia; Aguilar, David; Heiss, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) is a well-established measure of central arterial stiffness, while brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is being used more frequently in East Asian countries. Few studies have simultaneously characterized the distributions and correlates of segment-specific PWV measures and their associations with cardiovascular risk factors. We evaluated segment-specific PWV (cfPWV, baPWV, and femoral-ankle (faPWV)) in 4,974 older-aged African American and Caucasian adults in the community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study using a standardized protocol and the OMRON VP-1000 Plus system. We examined the distribution and multivariable-adjusted correlates of PWV measures by race and sex. Mean age ranged from 74 ± 5 to 76 ± 5 years across race-sex groups. In all race-sex groups, cfPWV correlated with baPWV but not with faPWV, and cfPWV and baPWV were higher with age, whereas faPWV was not. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were positively associated and weight was negatively associated with all PWV measures; however, the associations with age, glycated hemoglobin, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol varied by segment and race-sex group. Our findings indicate that cfPWV and faPWV reflect distinct aspects of segment-specific vascular stiffness and their associated profile of cardiovascular risk factors. Even among older adults, age is associated with higher cfPWV and baPWV, but not with faPWV. Understanding factors that ostensibly play a role in increasing arterial stiffness in different arterial territories can inform opportunities for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and risk management. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams: a depleted wave model for type II second-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Mohammad Rezaee, Mostafa; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2014-11-10

    In this work, a three-dimensional and time-dependent nonlinear wave model to describe the generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss second-harmonic waves (SHWs) is presented. Three coupled equations, two for ordinary and extraordinary fundamental waves and one for extraordinary SHWs, describing type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal were solved by considering the depletion of fundamental waves (FWs). The results examined the validity of nondepleted wave approximation against the energy of pulses, beam spot size, and interaction length. It was shown that for pulses with spot sizes of ωf=80  μm and energy of 0.8j, the nonlinear interaction was accomplished over a distance of ∼5  mm. Therefore, for KTP crystals with lengths longer than 5 mm, the nondepleted wave approximation can no longer be valid. To be valid, the crystal must be shorter than the interaction length, i.e., 5 mm.

  15. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D region: Numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Abram R.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Holzworth, Robert

    2009-03-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f ~ 3-100 kHz). The building block of the calculation is a differential equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular direct Fourier transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long-wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (~200-500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, this article uses the classic D region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Volland. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array. A follow-on article will present a detailed comparison with data in order to retrieve ionospheric parameters.

  16. Acceleration dynamics of ions in shocks and solitary waves driven by intense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min-Qing; Dong, Quan-Li; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Weng, Su-Ming; Chen, Min; Wu, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jie

    2007-09-01

    The acceleration of ions in collisionless electrostatic shocks and solitary waves, driven by ultrashort intense laser pulses in a thin solid target under different conditions, is investigated theoretically. When a shock is formed, ions with certain initial velocities inside the target can be accelerated by the electrostatic field at the shock front to twice the shock speed. When a solitary wave is formed, only ions located at the rear surface of the target can be accelerated by the solitary wave together with the sheath field formed there.

  17. Theory of nondegenerate four-wave mixing between pulses in a semiconductor waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Mecozzi, A.

    1997-01-01

    We develop a perturbation theory for calculating the effects of saturation on nondegenerate four-wave mixing between short optical pulses in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Saturation due to ultrafast intraband dynamics like carrier heating and spectral hole burning is found to be important...

  18. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  19. A Wearable and Highly Sensitive Graphene Strain Sensor for Precise Home-Based Pulse Wave Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Jiang, Xin; Zhong, Yujia; Zhao, Xuanliang; Lin, Shuyuan; Li, Jing; Li, Xinming; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhihong; Zhu, Hongwei

    2017-07-28

    Profuse medical information about cardiovascular properties can be gathered from pulse waveforms. Therefore, it is desirable to design a smart pulse monitoring device to achieve noninvasive and real-time acquisition of cardiovascular parameters. The majority of current pulse sensors are usually bulky or insufficient in sensitivity. In this work, a graphene-based skin-like sensor is explored for pulse wave sensing with features of easy use and wearing comfort. Moreover, the adjustment of the substrate stiffness and interfacial bonding accomplish the optimal balance between sensor linearity and signal sensitivity, as well as measurement of the beat-to-beat radial arterial pulse. Compared with the existing bulky and nonportable clinical instruments, this highly sensitive and soft sensing patch not only provides primary sensor interface to human skin, but also can objectively and accurately detect the subtle pulse signal variations in a real-time fashion, such as pulse waveforms with different ages, pre- and post-exercise, thus presenting a promising solution to home-based pulse monitoring.

  20. The wave-field from an array of periodic emitters driven simultaneously by a broadband pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Steve; Hill, Samuel; Fan, Yichao; Rowlands, George

    2013-06-01

    The use of phased array methods are commonplace in ultrasonic applications, where controlling the variation of the phase between the narrowband emitters in an array facilitates beam steering and focusing of ultrasonic waves. An approach is presented here whereby emitters of alternating polarity arranged in a one-dimensional array are pulsed simultaneously, and have sufficiently wide, controlled bandwidth to emit a two-dimensional wave. This pulsed approach provides a rapid means of simultaneously covering a region of space with a wave-front, whereby any wave that scatters or reflects off a body to a detector will have a distinct arrival time and frequency. This is a general wave phenomenon with a potential application in radar, sonar, and ultrasound. The key result is that one can obtain a smooth, continuous wave-front emitted from the array, over a large solid angle, whose frequency varies as a function of angle to the array. Analytic and finite element models created to describe this phenomenon have been validated with experimental results using ultrasonic waves in metal samples.

  1. Pulse wave imaging of normal and aneurysmal abdominal aortas in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianwen; Fujikura, Kana; Tyrie, Leslie S; Tilson, M David; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-04-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common vascular disease. The current clinical criterion for treating AAAs is an increased diameter above a critical value. However, the maximum diameter does not correlate well with aortic rupture, the main cause of death from AAA disease. AAA disease leads to changes in the aortic wall mechanical properties. The pulse-wave velocity (PWV) may indicate such a change. Because of limitations in temporal and spatial resolution, the widely used foot-to-foot method measures the global, instead of regional, PWV between two points at a certain distance in the circulation. However, mechanical properties are nonuniform along the normal and pathological (e.g., the AAA and atherosclerosis) arteries; thus, such changes are typically regional. Pulse-wave imaging (PWI) has been developed by our group to map the pulse-wave propagation along the abdominal aorta in mice in vivo. By using a retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating technique, the radio-frequency (RF) signals over one cardiac cycle were obtained in murine aortas at the extremely high frame rate of 8 kHz and with a field-of-view (FOV) of 12 x 12 mm(2). The velocities of the aortic wall were estimated using an RF-based speckle tracking method. An Angiotensin II (AngII) infusion-based AAA model was used to simulate the human AAA case. Sequences of wall velocity images can noninvasively and quantitatively map the propagation of the pulse wave along the aortic wall. In the normal and sham aortas, the propagation of the pulse wave was relatively uniform along the wall, while in the AngII-treated aortas, the propagation was shown to be nonuniform. There was no significant difference ( p > 0.05) in the PWV between sham (4.67 +/- 1.15 m/s, n=5) and AngII-treated (4.34 +/- 1.48 m/s, n=17) aortas. The correlation coefficient of the linear regression was significantly higher ( p wave were lower and the pulse wave moved nonuniformly along the AngII-treated aorta ( p wave propagation

  2. Unidirectional Amplification and Shaping of Optical Pulses by Three-Wave Mixing with Negative Phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Alexander K; Myslivets, Sergey A; Slabko, Vitaly V

    2013-01-01

    A possibility to greatly enhance frequency-conversion efficiency of stimulated Raman scattering is shown by making use of extraordinary properties of three-wave mixing of ordinary and backward waves. Such processes are commonly attributed to negative-index plasmonic metamaterials. This work demonstrates the possibility to replace such metamaterials that are very challenging to engineer by readily available crystals which support elastic waves with contra-directed phase and group velocities. The main goal of this work is to investigate specific properties of indicated nonlinear optical process in short pulse regime and to show that it enables elimination of fundamental detrimental effect of fast damping of optical phonons on the process concerned. Among the applications is the possibility of creation of a family of unique photonic devices such as unidirectional Raman amplifiers and femtosecond pulse shapers with greatly improved operational properties.

  3. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dual square-wave pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qingchao; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Wanzhuo; Liu, Peng; Su, Yuwei; Jia, Qingsong

    2017-06-10

    We study a passively mode-locked square-wave pulse (SWP) fiber laser with a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror in the cavity. The net dispersion of the cavity is about 0.68  ps2 and the SWP mode-locked fiber laser can be realized. The peak power of the SWP hardly varies and the pulse duration gets expanded with the increasing pump power. SWPs breaking in the low nonlinear cavity can be observed and the stable dual SWP can be achieved in the experiment. When the total pump power stays at 800 mW, the interval of dual pulses is 41 ns. The widths of dual SWPs are both 1.5 ns. The output power rises linearly with the increasing of the pump power, while the interval of dual SWPs is almost constant. Then, the physical mechanism of the SWP breaking and vector nature of the pulse are analyzed.

  5. Pulse wave imaging using coherent compounding in a phantom and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias Apostolakis, Iason; McGarry, Matthew D. J.; Bunting, Ethan A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2017-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness linked to cardiovascular morbidity. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a technique developed by our group for imaging the pulse wave propagation in vivo. PWI requires high temporal and spatial resolution, which conventional ultrasonic imaging is unable to simultaneously provide. Coherent compounding is known to address this tradeoff and provides full aperture images at high frame rates. This study aims to implement PWI using coherent compounding within a GPU-accelerated framework. The results of the implemented method were validated using a silicone phantom against static mechanical testing. Reproducibility of the measured PWVs was assessed in the right common carotid of six healthy subjects (n  =  6) approximately 10-15 mm before the bifurcation during two cardiac cycles over the course of 1-3 d. Good agreement of the measured PWVs (3.97  ±  1.21 m s-1, 4.08  ±  1.15 m s-1, p  =  0.74) was obtained. The effects of frame rate, transmission angle and number of compounded plane waves on PWI performance were investigated in the six healthy volunteers. Performance metrics such as the reproducibility of the PWVs, the coefficient of determination (r 2), the SNR of the PWI axial wall velocities (\\text{SN}{{\\text{R}}{{\\text{v}_{\\text{PWI}}}}} ) and the percentage of lateral positions where the pulse wave appears to arrive at the same time-point, indicating inadequacy of the temporal resolution (i.e. temporal resolution misses) were used to evaluate the effect of each parameter. Compounding plane waves transmitted at 1° increments with a linear array yielded optimal performance, generating significantly higher r 2 and \\text{SN}{{\\text{R}}{{\\text{v}_{\\text{PWI}}}}} values (p  ⩽  0.05). Higher frame rates (⩾1667 Hz) produced improvements with significant gains in the r 2 coefficient (p  ⩽  0.05) and significant increase in both r 2 and \\text

  6. Feasibility and Validation of 4-D Pulse Wave Imaging in Phantoms and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Nauleau, Pierre; Papadacci, Clement; McGarry, Matthew D; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-09-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive technique for tracking the propagation of the pulse wave along the arterial wall. The 3-D ultrasound imaging would aid in objectively estimating the pulse wave velocity (PWV) vector. This paper aims to introduce a novel PWV estimation method along the propagation direction, validate it in phantoms, and test its feasibility in vivo. A silicone vessel phantom consisting of a stiff and a soft segment along the longitudinal axis and a silicone vessel with a plaque were constructed. A 2-D array with a center frequency of 2.5 MHz was used. Propagation was successfully visualized in 3-D in each phantom and in vivo in six healthy subjects. In three of the healthy subjects, results were compared against conventional PWI using a linear array. PWVs were estimated in the stiff (3.42 ± 0.23 m [Formula: see text]) and soft (2.41 ± 0.07 m [Formula: see text]) phantom segments. Good agreement was found with the corresponding static testing values (stiff: 3.41 m [Formula: see text] and soft: 2.48 m [Formula: see text]). PWI-derived vessel compliance values were validated with dynamic testing. Comprehensive views of pulse propagation in the plaque phantom were generated and compared against conventional PWI acquisitions. Good agreement was found in vivo between the results of 4-D PWI (4.80 ± 1.32 m [Formula: see text]) and conventional PWI (4.28±1.20 m [Formula: see text]) ( n=3 ). PWVs derived for all of the healthy subjects ( n = 6 ) were within the physiological range. Thus, the 4-D PWI was successfully validated in phantoms and used to image the pulse wave propagation in normal human subjects in vivo.

  7. Spectral broadening of picosecond pulses forming dispersive shock waves in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parriaux, A; Conforti, M; Bendahmane, A; Fatome, J; Finot, C; Trillo, S; Picqué, N; Millot, G

    2017-08-01

    We investigate analytically, numerically, and experimentally the spectral broadening of pulses that undergo the formation of dispersive shocks, addressing in particular pulses in the range of tens of ps generated via electro-optic modulation of a continuous-wave laser. We give an analytical estimate of the maximal spectral extension and show that super-Gaussian waveforms favor the generation of flat-topped spectra. We also show that the weak residual background of the modulator produces undesired spectral ripples. Spectral measurements confirm our estimates and agree well with numerical integration of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  8. Pulse-wave propagation in straight-geometry vessels for stiffness estimation: theory, simulations, phantoms and in vitro findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Li, Ronny X; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-11-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method for noninvasive characterization of arterial stiffness based on pulse wave propagation. Reliable numerical models of pulse wave propagation in normal and pathological aortas could serve as powerful tools for local pulse wave analysis and a guideline for PWI measurements in vivo. The objectives of this paper are to (1) apply a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation of a straight-geometry aorta to confirm the Moens-Korteweg relationship between the pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the wall modulus, and (2) validate the simulation findings against phantom and in vitro results. PWI depicted and tracked the pulse wave propagation along the abdominal wall of canine aorta in vitro in sequential Radio-Frequency (RF) ultrasound frames and estimates the PWV in the imaged wall. The same system was also used to image multiple polyacrylamide phantoms, mimicking the canine measurements as well as modeling softer and stiffer walls. Finally, the model parameters from the canine and phantom studies were used to perform 3D two-way coupled FSI simulations of pulse wave propagation and estimate the PWV. The simulation results were found to correlate well with the corresponding Moens-Korteweg equation. A high linear correlation was also established between PWV² and E measurements using the combined simulation and experimental findings (R² =  0.98) confirming the relationship established by the aforementioned equation.

  9. Scattering-induced changes in the degree of polarization of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Cai, Yangjian; Zhang, Yongtao; Pan, Liuzhan

    2012-06-01

    The scattering of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse on a deterministic spherical medium is investigated. An analytical formula for the degree of polarization (DOP) of the scattered field in the far zone is derived. Letting pulse duration T(0) → ∞, our formula can be applied to study the scattering of a stationary stochastic electromagnetic light wave. Numerical results show that the DOP of the far zone field is closely determined by the size of the spherical medium when the incident field is a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse. This is much different from the case when the incident field is a stationary stochastic electromagnetic light wave, where the DOP of the far zone field is independent of the size of the medium. One may obtain the information of the spherical medium by measuring the scattering-induced changes in the DOP of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse.

  10. Generation of shock waves in dense plasmas by high-intensity laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasley John

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When intense short-pulse laser beams (I > 1022 W/m2, τ < 20 ps interact with high density plasmas, strong shock waves are launched. These shock waves may be generated by a range of processes, and the relative significance of the various mechanisms driving the formation of these shock waves is not well understood. It is challenging to obtain experimental data on shock waves near the focus of such intense laser–plasma interactions. The hydrodynamics of such interactions is, however, of great importance to fast ignition based inertial confinement fusion schemes as it places limits upon the time available for depositing energy in the compressed fuel, and thereby directly affects the laser requirements. In this manuscript we present the results of magnetohydrodynamic simulations showing the formation of shock waves under such conditions, driven by the j × B force and the thermal pressure gradient (where j is the current density and B the magnetic field strength. The time it takes for shock waves to form is evaluated over a wide range of material and current densities. It is shown that the formation of intense relativistic electron current driven shock waves and other related hydrodynamic phenomena may be expected over time scales of relevance to intense laser–plasma experiments and the fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. A newly emerging technique for studying such interactions is also discussed. This approach is based upon Doppler spectroscopy and offers promise for investigating early time shock wave hydrodynamics launched by intense laser pulses.

  11. Flexible rectangular wave-breaking-free pulse generation in actively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate nanosecond scale rectangular wave-breaking-free pulse generation in an actively mode locked Yb-doped fiber laser based on a combined action of active periodic cavity loss modulation and nonlinear polarization rotation effect. The pulse width of the laser can be controlled in the range of 890 ps to above 124 ns instantaneously by adjusting the electrical signal applied on the modulator. As high as 19.8 nJ wave-breaking-free pulse is achieved with maximum available pump power. The output pulse temporal dynamics exhibit various distinct characteristics under different modulation and polarization control. The laser presents unusually flexible tunabilities in pulse width, pulse energy and pulse shape.

  12. Possibility of rarefaction shock wave under short pulse laser ablation of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, N M

    1999-10-01

    Attention is drawn to a phenomenon that may give a radically different explanation for the recent observations of the system of dark rings above a solid surface vaporized by a short laser pulse. If a substance is heated to near-critical temperature, the existence of the compression shock wave becomes impossible, whereas the rarefaction wave takes a form of shock. The rarefaction shock can be considered as an interface in the expanding near-critical substance to form Newton rings in time-resolved optical microscopy experiments. The qualitative picture of the laser-ablated material expansion in vacuum with the generation of the rarefaction shock is discussed.

  13. Monitoring and Staging Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Disease with Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandlall, Sacha D.; GoldKlang, Monica P.; Kalashian, Aubrey; Dangra, Nida A.; D’Armiento, Jeanine M.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    The Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a silent and often deadly vascular disease caused by the localized weakening of the arterial wall. Previous work has shown that local changes in wall stiffness can be detected with Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI), which is a noninvasive technique for tracking the propagation of pulse waves along the aorta at high spatial and temporal resolutions. This study aims at assessing the capability of PWI to monitor and stage AAA progression in a murine model of the disease. ApoE/TIMP-1 knockout mice (N = 18) were given angiotensin II for 30 days via subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps. The suprarenal sections of the abdominal aortas were imaged every 2-3 days after implantation using a 30 MHz Visualsonics Vevo 770 with 115 μm lateral resolution. Pulse wave propagation was monitored at an effective frame rate of 8 kHz by using retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating and by performing 1-D cross-correlation on the radio-frequency (RF) signals to obtain the displacements induced by the waves. In normal aortas, the pulse waves propagated at constant velocities (2.8±0. 9 m/s, r2 = 0.89±0.11), indicating that the composition of these vessels was relatively homogeneous. In the mice that developed AAAs (N = 10), the wave speeds in the aneurysm sac were 45% lower (1.6±0.6 m/s) and were more variable (r2 = 0.66±0.23). Moreover, the wave-induced wall displacements were at least 80% lower within the sacs compared to the surrounding vessel. Finally, in mice that developed fissures (N = 5) or ruptures (N = 3) at the sites of their AAA, higher displacements directed out of the lumen and with no discernible wave pattern (r2 PWI can be used to distinguish normal murine aortas from aneurysmal, fissured, and ruptured ones. Hence, PWI could potentially be used to monitor and stage human aneurysms by providing information complementary to standard B-modes. PMID:25130446

  14. Pulse wave velocity 24-hour monitoring with one-site measurements by oscillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posokhov IN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Igor N PosokhovHemodynamic Laboratory Ltd, Nizhniy Novgorod, RussiaAbstract: This review describes issues for the estimation of pulse wave velocity (PWV under ambulatory conditions using oscillometric systems. The difference between the principles of measuring the PWV by the standard method and by oscillometry is shown, and information on device validation studies is summarized. It was concluded that currently oscillometry is a method that is very convenient to use in the 24-hour monitoring of the PWV, is relatively accurate, and is reasonably comfortable for the patient. Several indices with the same principles as those in the analysis of blood pressure in ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure, namely the assessment of load, variability, and circadian rhythm, are proposed.Keywords: pulse wave velocity, 24-hour monitoring, oscillometry

  15. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts...... cardiovascular disease (CVD) as good as the measured cfPWV. Because ePWV predicts CVD as good as cfPWV, some might wonder whether ePWV could be replaced by cfPWV, which is a time-consuming measurement requiring an expensive apparatus. This question is addressed in this mini-review. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  16. A FBG pulse wave demodulation method based on PCF modal interference filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Shan; Shen, Ziqi; Zhao, Junfa; Miao, Changyun; Bai, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Fiber optic sensor embedded in textiles has been a new direction of researching smart wearable technology. Pulse signal which is generated by heart beat contains vast amounts of physio-pathological information about the cardiovascular system. Therefore, the research for textile-based fiber optic sensor which can detect pulse wave has far-reaching effects on early discovery and timely treatment of cardiovascular diseases. A novel wavelength demodulation method based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) modal interference filter is proposed for the purpose of developing FBG pulse wave sensing system embedded in smart clothing. The mechanism of the PCF modal interference and the principle of wavelength demodulation based on In-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (In-line MZI) are analyzed in theory. The fabricated PCF modal interferometer has the advantages of good repeatability and low temperature sensitivity of 3.5pm/°C from 25°C to 60°C. The designed demodulation system can achieve linear demodulation in the range of 2nm, with the wavelength resolution of 2.2pm and the wavelength sensitivity of 0.055nm-1. The actual experiments' result indicates that the pulse wave can be well detected by this demodulation method, which is in accordance with the commercial demodulation instrument (SM130) and more sensitive than the traditional piezoelectric pulse sensor. This demodulation method provides important references for the research of smart clothing based on fiber grating sensor embedded in textiles and accelerates the developments of wearable fiber optic sensors technology.

  17. Effects of Mechanical Pumping on the Arterial Pulse Wave Velocity: Peripheral Artery and Micro-Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    EFFECTS OF MECHANICAL PUMPING ON THE ARTERIAL PULSE WAVE VELOCITY : PERIPHERAL ARTERY AND MICRO -VESSELS Shu-Mei Wu*†, Yio-Wha Shau**, Bor-Shyh...was contributed from the results of BA-RA, the PWV for the micro -vessels (BA-finger) on the contrary was increased. Keywords- Mechanical Pumping ...arterial conduit (brachial artery-radial artery; BA-RA) and the micro -vessels (RA-ring finger) to mechanical pumping was evaluated. II

  18. Temperature variation induced by the pulsed-periodic laser pumping under terahertz wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaeva, G. Kh; Moiseenko, E. V.; Shepelev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    During nonlinear-optical parametric frequency conversion the heat-related effects occur, considerably influencing the conversion process. We develop versatile methods for analytic and numerical calculations of thermo-optical parameters and the temperature distribution inside a non-linear crystal pumped by periodic laser pulses. As an example, numerical results are presented for a number of laser-based schemes actual for the non-linear optical terahertz wave generation and parametric frequency conversion processes.

  19. Optimal laser pulse design for transferring the coherent nuclear wave packet of H+2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; He, Guang-Qiang; He, Feng

    2014-07-01

    Within the Franck-Condon approximation, the single ionisation of H2 leaves H+2 in a coherent superposition of 19 nuclear vibrational states. We numerically design an optimal laser pulse train to transfer such a coherent nuclear wave packet to the ground vibrational state of H+2. Frequency analysis of the designed optimal pulse reveals that the transfer principle is mainly an anti-Stokes transition, i.e. the H+2 in 1sσg with excited nuclear vibrational states is first pumped to 2pσg state by the pulse at an appropriate time, and then dumped back to 1sσg with lower excited or ground vibrational states. The simulation results show that the population of the ground state after the transfer is more than 91%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest transition probability when the driving laser field is dozens of femtoseconds.

  20. Electric field measurements in a nanosecond pulse discharge by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ben; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved electric field measurements in hydrogen by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing are presented. Measurements are carried out in a high voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry, at pressures of up to several hundred Torr, and with a time resolution of 0.2 ns. Absolute calibration of the diagnostics is done using a sub-breakdown high voltage pulse of 12 kV/cm. A diffuse discharge is obtained by applying a peak high voltage pulse of 40 kV/cm between the electrodes. It is found that breakdown occurs at a lower field, 15--20 kV/cm, after which the field in the plasma is reduced rapidly due to plasma self shielding The experimental results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, showing good agreement between the measured and the predicted electric field.

  1. Time-resolved observations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by femtosecond laser pulses in corneal tissue and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, T; Kastis, G A; Suárez, C; Bor, Z; Bron, W E

    1996-01-01

    Photodisruption in ocular media with high power pulsed lasers working at non-absorbing frequencies have become a well established surgical tool since the late seventies. Shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by the optical breakdown may strongly influence the surgical effect of photodisruptive lasers. We have investigated the shock wave and cavitation bubble effects of femtosecond laser pulses generated during photodisruption in corneal tissue and water. The results are compared to those obtained with longer laser pulses. Laser pulses with 150 fs duration at approximately 620 nm wavelength have been focused into corneal tissue and water to create optical breakdown. Time-resolved flash photography has been used to investigate the dynamics of the generated shock waves and cavitation bubbles. A rapid decay of the shock waves is observed in both materials with similar temporal characteristics and with a spatial range considerably smaller than that of shock waves induced by picosecond (or nanosecond) optical breakdown. Cavitation bubbles are observed to develop more rapidly and to reach smaller maximum diameter than those generated by longer pulses. In corneal tissue, single intrastromal cavitation bubbles generated by femtosecond pulses disappear within a few tens of seconds, notably faster than cavitation bubbles generated by picosecond pulses. The reduced shock wave and cavitation bubble effects of the femtosecond laser result in more localized tissue damage. Therefore, a more confined surgical effect should be expected from a femtosecond laser than that from picosecond (or nanosecond) lasers. This indicates a potential benefit from the applications of femtosecond laser technology to intraocular microsurgery.

  2. Hardness variation of welded boron steel using continuous wave (CW) and pulse wave (PW) mode of fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, K. I.; Ishak, M.; Idris, S. R. A.; Aiman, M. H.; Khalil, N. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Recent car manufacturer requirement in lightweight and optimum safety lead to utilization of boron steel with tailor welded blank approach. Laser welding process in tailor welded blank (TWB) production can be applied in continuous wave (CW) of pulse wave (PW) which produce different thermal experience in welded area. Instead of microstructure identification, hardness properties also can determine the behavior of weld area. In this paper, hardness variation of welded boron steel using PW and CW mode is investigated. Welding process is conducted using similar average power for both welding mode. Hardness variation across weld area is observed. The result shows similar hardness pattern across weld area for both welding mode. Hardness degradation at fusion zone (FZ) is due to ferrite formation existence from high heat input applied. With additional slower cooling rate for CW mode, the hardness degradation is become obvious. The normal variation of hardness behavior with PW mode might lead to good strength.

  3. Measurements of Electric Field in a Nanosecond Pulse Discharge by 4-WAVE Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratte, Edmond; Adamovich, Igor V.; Simeni Simeni, Marien; Frederickson, Kraig

    2017-06-01

    Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and spatially resolved electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric discharge sustained in room air and in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen diffusion flame. Measurements of the electric field, and more precisely the reduced electric field (E/N) in the plasma is critical for determination rate coefficients of electron impact processes in the plasma, as well as for quantifying energy partition in the electric discharge among different molecular energy modes. The four-wave mixing measurements are performed using a collinear phase matching geometry, with nitrogen used as the probe species, at temporal resolution of about 2 ns . Absolute calibration is performed by measurement of a known electrostatic electric field. In the present experiments, the discharge is sustained between two stainless steel plate electrodes, each placed in a quartz sleeve, which greatly improves plasma uniformity. Our previous measurements of electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharge by picosecond 4-wave mixing have been done in air at room temperature, in a discharge sustained between a razor edge high-voltage electrode and a plane grounded electrode (a quartz plate or a layer of distilled water). Electric field measurements in a flame, which is a high-temperature environment, are more challenging because the four-wave mixing signal is proportional to the to square root of the difference betwen the populations of N2 ground vibrational level (v=0) and first excited vibrational level (v=1). At high temperatures, the total number density is reduced, thus reducing absolute vibrational level populations of N2. Also, the signal is reduced further due to a wider distribution of N2 molecules over multiple rotational levels at higher temperatures, while the present four-wave mixing diagnostics is using spectrally narrow output of a ps laser and a high

  4. Pulse wave travel distance as a novel marker of ventricular-arterial coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Yurie; Ruzankin, Pavel; Gottschalk, Allan; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-10-03

    Each stroke volume ejected by the heart is distributed along the arterial system as a pressure waveform. How far the front of the pressure waveform travels within the arterial system depends both on the pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the ejection time (ET). We tested the hypothesis that ET and PWV are coupled together, in order to produce a pulse wave travel distance (PWTD = PWV × ET) which would match the distance from the heart to the most distant site in the arterial system. The study was conducted in 11 healthy volunteers. We recorded lead II of the ECG along with pulse plethysmography at ear, finger and toe. The ET at the ear and pulse arrival time to each peripheral site were extracted. We then calculated PWV followed by PWTD for each location. Taken into account the individual subject variability PWTDToe in the supine position was 153 cm (95% CI 146-160 cm). It was not different from arterial pathway distance from the heart to the toe (D Toe 153 cm). The PWTDFinger and PWTDEar were longer than the distance from the heart to the finger and ear irrespective of body position. ETEar and PWVToe appear to be coupled in healthy subjects to produce a PWTD that is roughly equivalent to the arterial pathway distance to the toe. We propose that PWTD should be evaluated further to test its potential as a noninvasive parameter of ventricular-arterial coupling in subjects with cardiovascular diseases.

  5. [A quick algorithm of dynamic spectrum photoelectric pulse wave detection based on LabVIEW].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Li, Na; Li, Gang

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic spectrum (DS) detection is attractive among the numerous noninvasive blood component detection methods because of the elimination of the main interference of the individual discrepancy and measure conditions. DS is a kind of spectrum extracted from the photoelectric pulse wave and closely relative to the artery blood. It can be used in a noninvasive blood component concentration examination. The key issues in DS detection are high detection precision and high operation speed. The precision of measure can be advanced by making use of over-sampling and lock-in amplifying on the pick-up of photoelectric pulse wave in DS detection. In the present paper, the theory expression formula of the over-sampling and lock-in amplifying method was deduced firstly. Then in order to overcome the problems of great data and excessive operation brought on by this technology, a quick algorithm based on LabVIEW and a method of using external C code applied in the pick-up of photoelectric pulse wave were presented. Experimental verification was conducted in the environment of LabVIEW. The results show that by the method pres ented, the speed of operation was promoted rapidly and the data memory was reduced largely.

  6. Interaction of excitable waves emitted from two defects by pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Zhang, Han; Qiao, Li-Yan; Liang, Hong; Sun, Wei-Gang

    2018-01-01

    In response to a pulsed electric field, spatial distributed heterogeneities in excitable media can serve as nucleation sites for the generation of intramural electrical waves, a phenomenon called as ;wave emission from heterogeneities; (WEH effect). Heterogeneities in cardiac tissue strongly influence each other in the WEH effect. We study the WEH effect in a medium possessing two defects. The role of two defects and their interaction by pulsed DC electric fields (DEF) and rotating electric fields (REF) are investigated. The direction of the applied electric field plays a major role not only in the minimum electrical field necessary to originate wave propagation, but also in the degree of influences of nearby defects. The distance between two defects, i.e. the density of defects, also play an important role in the WEH effect. Generally, the REF is better than the DEF when pulsed electric fields are applied. These results may contribute to the improved application of WEH, especially in older patients with fibrosis and scarring, which are accompanied by a higher incidence of conductivity discontinuities.

  7. Correlates of Osteoprotegerin and Association with Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Mary B.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Appel, Lawrence; Wolf, Myles; Budoff, Matt J.; Chen, Jing; Lustigova, Eva; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Glenn, Melanie; Hanish, Asaf; Raj, Dominic; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Seliger, Stephen L.; Weir, Matthew R.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a cytokine that regulates bone resorption, has been implicated in the process of vascular calcification and stiffness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Serum OPG was measured in 351 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD) from one site of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Cortical bone mineral content (BMC) was measured by quantitative computed tomography in the tibia. Multivariable linear regression was used to test the association between serum OPG and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, measures of abnormal bone and mineral metabolism, and pulse wave velocity. Results Higher serum OPG levels were associated with older age, female gender, greater systolic BP, lower estimated GFR, and lower serum albumin. OPG was not associated with measures of abnormal bone or mineral metabolism including serum phosphorus, albumin-corrected serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, or cortical BMC. Among 226 participants with concurrent aortic pulse wave velocity measurements, increasing tertiles of serum OPG were associated with higher aortic pulse wave velocity after adjustment for demographics, traditional vascular risk factors, and nontraditional risk factors such as estimated GFR, albuminuria, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, presence of secondary hyperparathyroidism, serum albumin, and C-reactive protein or after additional adjustment for cortical BMC in a subset (n = 161). Conclusions These data support a strong relationship between serum OPG and arterial stiffness independent of many potential confounders including traditional cardiovascular risk factors, abnormal bone and mineral metabolism, and inflammation. PMID:21940840

  8. Blood pulse wave velocity and pressure sensing via fiber based and free space based optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in continuous monitoring of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. In this paper, we introduce two techniques for non-contact sensing of vital bio signs. In the first approach the optical sensor is based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual. In the second concept we show a remote noncontact blood pulse wave velocity and pressure measurement based on tracking the temporal changes of reflected secondary speckle patterns produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beams. In both concept experimental validation of the proposed schemes is shown and analyzed.

  9. Effect of heat-induced pain stimuli on pulse transit time and pulse wave amplitude in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Kortekaas, Minke C; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G; Stolker, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pain is commonly assessed subjectively by interpretations of patient behaviour and/or reports from patients. When this is impossible the availability of a quantitative objective pain assessment tool based on objective physiological parameters would greatly benefit clinical practice and research beside the standard self-report tests. Vasoconstriction is one of the physiological responses to pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) decrease in response to this vasoconstriction when caused by heat-induced pain. The PTT and PWA were measured in healthy volunteers, on both index fingers using photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. Each subject received 3 heat-induced pain stimuli using a Temperature-Sensory Analyzer thermode block to apply a controlled, increasing temperature from 32.0 °C to 50.0 °C to the skin. After reaching 50.0 °C, the thermode was immediately cooled down to 32.0 °C. The study population was divided into 2 groups with a time-interval between the stimuli 20s or 60s. The results showed a significant (p  induced pain causes a decrease of PTT and PWA. Consequently, it is expected that, in the future, PTT and PWA may be applied as objective indicators of pain, either beside the standard self-report test, or when self-report testing is impossible.

  10. Cascading pulse tubes on a large diaphragm pressure wave generator to increase liquefaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, A.; Meier, J.; Nation, M.; Reynolds, H.; Boyle, C.; Tanchon, J.

    2017-12-01

    Fabrum Solutions, in collaboration with Absolut System and Callaghan Innovation, produce a range of large pulse tube cryocoolers based on metal diaphragm pressure wave generator technology (DPWG). The largest cryocooler consists of three in-line pulse tubes working in parallel on a 1000 cm3 swept volume DPWG. It has demonstrated 1280 W of refrigeration at 77 K, from 24 kW of input power and was subsequently incorporated into a liquefaction plant to produce liquid nitrogen for an industrial customer. The pulse tubes on the large cryocooler each produced 426 W of refrigeration at 77 K. However, pulse tubes can produce more refrigeration with higher efficiency at higher temperatures. This paper presents the results from experiments to increase overall liquefaction throughput by operating one or more pulse tubes at a higher temperature to pre-cool the incoming gas. The experiments showed that the effective cooling increased to 1500 W resulting in an increase in liquefaction rate from 13 to 16 l/hour.

  11. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Teemu Myllylä; Vesa Korhonen; Erkki Vihriälä; Hannu Sorvoja; Tuija Hiltunen; Osmo Tervonen; Vesa Kiviniemi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the ...

  12. Generation of 12 fs deep-ultraviolet pulses by four-wave mixing through filamentation in neon gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Takao; Horio, Takuya; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2007-09-01

    Generation of deep-ultraviolet femtosecond pulses by four-wave mixing through filamentation in neon gas was demonstrated. Fundamental (omega) and second-harmonic (2omega) pulses of 25 fs Ti:sapphire amplifier output were focused into neon gas, and 20 microJ pulses with the center wavelength of 260 nm were produced by a four-wave mixing process, 2omega+2omega-omega?3omega through an ~15 cm filament. Additionally, pulses with an energy of 2 microJ at 200 nm were generated, probably by a cascaded process, 3omega+2omega-omega?4omega. The 260 nm pulses were compressed by a grating-based compressor and characterized by a dispersion-free transient grating frequency-resolved optical gating. The estimated pulse width was 12 fs.

  13. Detection of cerebral ischemia using the power spectrum of the pulse wave measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Akira; Tanaka, Yuichi; Konno, Takehiko; Kawasaki, Shingo; Fujiwara, Michiyuki; Watanabe, Eiju

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and medical treatment of cerebral ischemia are becoming more important due to the increase in the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease. However, conventional methods of evaluating cerebral perfusion have several drawbacks: they are invasive, require physical restraint, and the equipment is not portable, which makes repeated measurements at the bedside difficult. An alternative method is developed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS signals are measured at 44 positions (22 on each side) on the fronto-temporal areas in 20 patients with cerebral ischemia. In order to extract the pulse-wave component, the raw total hemoglobin data recorded from each position are band-pass filtered (0.8 to 2.0 Hz) and subjected to a fast Fourier transform to obtain the power spectrum of the pulse wave. The ischemic region is determined by single-photon emission computed tomography. The pulse-wave power in the ischemic region is compared with that in the symmetrical region on the contralateral side. In 17 cases (85%), the pulse-wave power on the ischemic side is significantly lower than that on the contralateral side, which indicates that the transmission of the pulse wave is attenuated in the region with reduced blood flow. Pulse-wave power might be useful as a noninvasive marker of cerebral ischemia.

  14. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Six-channel ECG-based pulse wave velocity for assessing whole-body arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, An-Bang; Chen, Zong-Li; Huang, Ruay-Ming; Chen, Ching-Pin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan

    2012-06-01

    Despite the proposal of different means of non-invasive arterial stiffness assessment, none offers simultaneous information on whole-body peripheral arterial condition. We investigated the validity of applying a six-channel electrocardiogram-based pulse wave velocity (ECG-PWV) measurement system for this purpose. The study consisted of two parts. Part One enrolled hypertensive (Group 1, n = 32) and normal (Group 2, n = 32) subjects, whereas Part Two recruited diabetic (Group 3, n = 50) and normal (Group 4, n = 50) subjects. To validate the application of ECG-PWV in assessing peripheral arterial stiffness in different parts of body, ECG-PWV data were compared with three other parameters including the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), pulse wave velocity-digital volume pulse (PWV-DVP) and intima-media thickness (IMT). ECG-PWV in healthy subjects in Part One correlated significantly with CAVI and PWV-DVP (p blood sugar, serum creatinine and ECG-PWV from the foot. However, no significant difference was noted in PWV-DVP between two groups. Six-channel ECG-PWV measurement system showed remarkable correlation with IMT in hypertensive subjects and with key anthropometric and biochemical parameters in diabetic patients, suggesting its validity in assessing whole-body arterial stiffness in subjects with peripheral arterial diseases within 10 min.

  16. Generation of spin waves by a train of fs-laser pulses: a novel approach for tuning magnon wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savochkin, I V; Jäckl, M; Belotelov, V I; Akimov, I A; Kozhaev, M A; Sylgacheva, D A; Chernov, A I; Shaposhnikov, A N; Prokopov, A R; Berzhansky, V N; Yakovlev, D R; Zvezdin, A K; Bayer, M

    2017-07-18

    Currently spin waves are considered for computation and data processing as an alternative to charge currents. Generation of spin waves by ultrashort laser pulses provides several important advances with respect to conventional approaches using microwaves. In particular, focused laser spot works as a point source for spin waves and allows for directional control of spin waves and switching between their different types. For further progress in this direction it is important to manipulate with the spectrum of the optically generated spin waves. Here we tackle this problem by launching spin waves by a sequence of femtosecond laser pulses with pulse interval much shorter than the relaxation time of the magnetization oscillations. This leads to the cumulative phenomenon and allows us to generate magnons in a specific narrow range of wavenumbers. The wavelength of spin waves can be tuned from 15 μm to hundreds of microns by sweeping the external magnetic field by only 10 Oe or by slight variation of the pulse repetition rate. Our findings expand the capabilities of the optical spin pump-probe technique and provide a new method for the spin wave generation and control.

  17. Analysis of pulse thermography using similarities between wave and diffusion propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Pulse thermography or thermal wave imaging are commonly used as nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. While the technical aspect has evolve with time, theoretical interpretation is lagging. Interpretation is still using curved fitting on a log log scale. A new approach based directly on the governing differential equation is introduced. By using relationships between wave propagation and the diffusive propagation of thermal excitation, it is shown that one can transform from solutions in one type of propagation to the other. The method is based on the similarities between the Laplace transforms of the diffusion equation and the wave equation. For diffusive propagation we have the Laplace variable s to the first power, while for the wave propagation similar equations occur with s2. For discrete time the transformation between the domains is performed by multiplying the temperature data vector by a matrix. The transform is local. The performance of the techniques is tested on synthetic data. The application of common back projection techniques used in the processing of wave data is also demonstrated. The combined use of the transform and back projection makes it possible to improve both depth and lateral resolution of transient thermography.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Pulse Wave Propagation in Arteries Using Fluid Structure Interaction Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Elkenani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present a reliable computational scheme to serve in pulse wave velocity (PWV assessment in large arteries. Clinicians considered it as an indication of human blood vessels’ stiffness. The simulation of PWV was conducted using a 3D elastic tube representing an artery. The constitutive material model specific for vascular applications was applied to the tube material. The fluid was defined with an equation of state representing the blood material. The onset of a velocity pulse was applied at the tube inlet to produce wave propagation. The Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian (CEL modeling technique with fluid structure interaction (FSI was implemented. The scaling of sound speed and its effect on results and computing time is discussed and concluded that a value of 60 m/s was suitable for simulating vascular biomechanical problems. Two methods were used: foot-to-foot measurement of velocity waveforms and slope of the regression line of the wall radial deflection wave peaks throughout a contour plot. Both methods showed coincident results. Results were approximately 6% less than those calculated from the Moens-Korteweg equation. The proposed method was able to describe the increase in the stiffness of the walls of large human arteries via the PWV estimates.

  19. Detection and Characterization of Flaws in Sprayed on Foam Insulation with Pulsed Terahertz Frequency Electromagnetic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    The detection and repair of flaws such as voids and delaminations in the sprayed on foam insulation of the external tank reduces the probability of foam debris during shuttle ascent. The low density of sprayed on foam insulation along with it other physical properties makes detection of flaws difficult with conventional techniques. An emerging technology that has application for quantitative evaluation of flaws in the foam is pulsed electromagnetic waves at terahertz frequencies. The short wavelengths of these terahertz pulses make them ideal for imaging flaws in the foam. This paper examines the application of terahertz pulses for flaw detection in foam characteristic of the foam insulation of the external tank. Of particular interest is the detection of voids and delaminations, encapsulated in the foam or at the interface between the foam and a metal backing. The technique is shown to be capable of imaging small voids and delaminations through as much as 20 cm of foam. Methods for reducing the temporal responses of the terahertz pulses to improve flaw detection and yield quantitative characterizations of the size and location of the flaws are discussed.

  20. Blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity measured on the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puke, Sawa; Suzuki, Takuji; Nakayama, Kanako; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Minami, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Recently, monitoring of blood pressure fluctuation in the daily life is focused on in the hypertension care area to predict the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease events. In this paper, in order to propose an alternative system to the existed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) sphygmomanometer, we have developed a prototype of small wearable device consisting of electrocardiogram (ECG) and photopelthysmograph (PPG) sensors. In addition, it was examined whether blood pressure can be estimated based on pulse wave transit time (PWTT) only by attaching that device on the surface of the chest. We indicated that our system could also sense tendency of time-dependent change of blood pressure by measuring pulse of vessel over the sternum while its propagation distance is short.

  1. When shock is shocked: Riemann problem dynamics at pulse ionization of a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshchenko, Igor; Znamenskaya, Irina; Koroteev, Dmitry; Kuli-zade, Tahir

    2017-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the gas flow discontinuities after pulse ionization of a half space in front of a flat shock wave moving in a channel. Pulse volumetric electric discharge initiated in the vicinity of the shock concentrates in front of the shock and heats the gas there. The heating is shown to be very rapid. We use the shadow imaging technique and a high speed camera to study the flow pattern evolution after the discharge. The pattern consists of two shocks separated by a contact surface. This structure corresponds to the classical Riemann problem formulation. Based on the observed pattern, we estimate the amount of discharge energy converted to heat during the discharge time: the rate of temperature increase is in the order of several degrees K per nanosecond.

  2. Arterial stiffness and pulse wave reflection are increased in patients suffering from severe periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Jockel-Schneider

    Full Text Available AIM: This single blind cross-sectional study compared the vascular health of subjects suffering from severe chronic periodontitis, severe aggressive periodontitis and periodontal healthy controls by evaluating pulse wave velocity (PWV, augmentation index (AIx and pulse pressure amplification (PPA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a total of 158 subjects, 92 suffering from severe periodontitis and 66 matched periodontal healthy controls, PWV, AIx, central and peripheral blood pressure were recorded using an oscillometric device (Arteriograph. RESULTS: Subjects suffering from severe chronic or aggressive periodontitis exhibited significantly higher PWV (p = 0.00004, higher AIx (p = 0.0049 and lower PPA (p = 0.028 than matched periodontal healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study confirm the association between periodontal inflammation and increased cardiovascular risk shown by impaired vascular health in case of severe periodontitis. As impaired vascular health is a common finding in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease a concomitant routine cardiovascular evaluation may be advised.

  3. Relations between diabetes, blood pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity in haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjærgaard, Krista Dybtved; Dzeko, Mirela

    Diabetes (DM) is common in haemodialysis (HD) patients and affects both blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects the stiffness of the aorta and is regarded as a strong risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) mortality in HD patients. However, PWV...... (HD) and 32 HD patients with DM (HD+DM). The SphygmoCor system was used for estimation of PWV. HD-duration, age, gender and BP medication were similar in the two groups. Mean DM-duration was 23±11 years and 25(78%) had type 2 DM. HD+DM had higher BMI (26±5 vs. 29±5 kg/m2, p=0.02), systolic BP (142......±20 vs. 152±21 mmHg, p=0.02) and pulse pressure (65±17 vs. 80±18 mmHg, p

  4. Blood pressure and pulse wave velocity as metrics for evaluating pathologic ageing of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Peter M; Khalili, Payam; Franklin, Stanley S

    2014-02-01

    The influence of chronological ageing on the components of the cardiovascular system is of fundamental importance for understanding how hemodynamics change and the cardiovascular risk increases with age, the most important risk marker. An increase in peripheral vascular resistance associated with increased stiffness of central elastic arteries represents hallmarks of this ageing effect on the vasculature, referred to as early vascular ageing (EVA). In clinical practice, it translates into increased brachial and central systolic blood pressure and corresponding pulse pressure in subjects above 50 years of age, as well as increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV)--a marker of arterial stiffness. A c-f PWV value ≥ 10 m/s is threshold for increased risk according. Improved lifestyle and control of risk factors via appropriate drug therapy are of importance in providing vascular protection related to EVA. One target group might be members of risk families including subjects with early onset cardiovascular disease.

  5. Wave shape recovery for terahertz pulse field detection via photoconductive antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinsong; Zou, Si; Yang, Zhengang; Wang, Kejia; Ye, Kefei

    2013-07-01

    For photoconductive (PC) antennae used as terahertz (THz) detectors, traditional data processing methods should be improved because the space-charge and radiation field screening effects and the time dependence of photocarriers density have not been considered. Through developing a double-probe-pulse THz detection technique and using an equivalent-circuit model to describe PC antennae, we present a new method to restore the THz-field wave shape from the measurement data of currents between two electrodes on the antenna. This method is verified to be effective through building a special THz time-domain spectroscopy system with double probes. This work is significant for the accurate determination of pulse THz fields.

  6. Generation of spherical and cylindrical shock acoustic waves from optical breakdown in water, stimulated with femtosecond pulse

    OpenAIRE

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Using shadow photography technique we have observed shock acoustic wave from optical breakdown, excited in water by tightly focused Cr:Forsterite femtosecond laser beam, and have found two different regimes of shock wave generation by varying only the energy of laser pulse. At low energies a single spherical shock wave is generated from laser beam waist, and its radius tends to saturation with energy increasing. At higher energies long laser filament in water is fired, that leads to the cylin...

  7. [Pulse wave velocity as an early marker of diastolic heart failure in patients with hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczulska, Beata; Kubiak, Monika; Bryczkowska, Anna; Malinowska, Ewa

    2017-04-21

    According to the WHO, hypertension is one of the major causes of death worldwide. It leads to a number of severe complications. Diastolic heart failure, that is heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is especially common. New, but simple, indices for the early detection of patients who have not yet developed complications or are in their early developmental stages are still searched for. The aim of this study is to examine the correlation between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and markers of diastolic heart failure (DHF) assessed in echocardiography in patients with hypertension and no symptoms of heart failure. The study was comprised of 65 patients with treated hypertension. Patients with symptoms of heart failure, those with diabetes and smokers were excluded. Arterial stiffness was measured with the Mobil-O-Graph NG PWA. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was estimated. The following markers of diastolic heart failure were assessed in the echocardiographic examination: E/A ratio - the ratio of the early (E) to late (A) ventricular filling velocities, DT - decceleration time, E/E' - the ratio of mitral peak velocity of early filling (E) to early diastolic mitral annular velocity E' in tissue Doppler echocardiography. PWV was statistically significantly higher in the DHF group. In the group of patients with heart failure, the average E/A ratio was significantly lower as compared to the group with no heart failure. Oscillometric measurement of pulse wave velocity is non-invasive, lasts a few minutes and does not require the presence of a specialist. It allows for an early detection of patients at risk of diastolic heart failure even within the conditions of primary health care.

  8. Robust segmentation methods with an application to aortic pulse wave velocity calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Danilo; Devos, Daniel; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Westenberg, Jos; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Philips, Wilfried

    2014-04-01

    Aortic stiffness has proven to be an important diagnostic and prognostic factor of many cardiovascular diseases, as well as an estimate of overall cardiovascular health. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) represents a good measure of the aortic stiffness, while the aortic distensibility is used as an aortic elasticity index. Obtaining the PWV and the aortic distensibility from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data requires diverse segmentation tasks, namely the extraction of the aortic center line and the segmentation of aortic regions, combined with signal processing methods for the analysis of the pulse wave. In our study non-contrasted MRI images of abdomen were used in healthy volunteers (22 data sets) for the sake of non-invasive analysis and contrasted magnetic resonance (MR) images were used for the aortic examination of Marfan syndrome patients (8 data sets). In this research we present a novel robust segmentation technique for the PWV and aortic distensibility calculation as a complete image processing toolbox. We introduce a novel graph-based method for the centerline extraction of a thoraco-abdominal aorta for the length calculation from 3-D MRI data, robust to artifacts and noise. Moreover, we design a new projection-based segmentation method for transverse aortic region delineation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images which is robust to high presence of artifacts. Finally, we propose a novel method for analysis of velocity curves in order to obtain pulse wave propagation times. In order to validate the proposed method we compare the obtained results with manually determined aortic centerlines and a region segmentation by an expert, while the results of the PWV measurement were compared to a validated software (LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands). The obtained results show high correctness and effectiveness of our method for the aortic PWV and distensibility calculation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. On Peculiarities of Radio Wave Scattering by a Sound Pulse in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukhovetski, A. S.; Vichkan', A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Scattering of radio waves by a sound pulse in the atmosphere is investigated theoretically. Design/methodology/approach: The asymptotic of the scattered field in the approximation of the Fresnel diffraction is analyzed using the quadratic expansion of the phase and Gaussian directional patterns of radiating systems. Findings: It is shown that for small angles of backscattering the field is determined by the focusing effects. Conclusions: Explanation of the focus by “degenerate” saddle points of the studied integrand phase is suggested.

  10. Research of the elastic waves generated by a pulse laser. Excitation mechanism of elastic waves and application to nondestructive testing; Pulse laser de reikishita danseiha ni kansuru kenkyu. Danseiha reiki no mechanism to hihakai kensa eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Engineering

    1994-07-20

    A bulk wave is generated when a pulse laser is irradiated to the material, and the characteristics of a Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio can be nondestructively estimated from the bulk wave. The generation mechanism of laser ultrasonic waves must be first clarified for such application. In this paper, fundamental research was conducted to study the generation mechanism of the elastic waves excited by a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, and the generation method and characteristics of Rayleigh waves. The following result was obtained. A bulk wave is generated by the disk-like adiabatic expansion near the surface if the laser power is small when a spot-shape pulse laser was irradiated. A bulk wave is generated by the thin disk-like adiabatic expansion beneath the surface due to the thermal diffusion in the depth direction of a base material when the laser power becomes large. Moreover, a bulk wave is generated by the impact force due to abrasion and plasma when the power becomes still larger. The information on the bulk wave characteristics and Rayleigh wave was also obtained. 25 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A pulse coding and decoding strategy to perform Lamb wave inspections using simultaneously multiple actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Luca; Marzani, Alessandro; Moll, Jochen; Kudela, Paweł; Radzieński, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2017-07-01

    The performance of Lamb wave based monitoring systems, both in terms of diagnosis time and data complexity, can be enhanced by increasing the number of transducers used to actuate simultaneously the guided waves in the inspected medium. However, in case of multiple simultaneously-operated actuators the interference among the excited wave modes within the acquired signals has to be considered for the further processing. To this aim, in this work a code division strategy based on the Warped Frequency Transform is presented. At first, the proposed procedure encodes actuation pulses using Gold sequences. Next, for each considered actuator the acquired signals are compensated from dispersion by cross correlating the warped version of the actuated and received signals. Compensated signals form the base for a final wavenumber imaging meant at emphasizing defects and or anomalies by removing incident wavefield and edge reflections. The proposed strategy is tested numerically, and validated through an experiment in which guided waves are actuated in a plate by four piezoelectric transducers operating simultaneously.

  12. Pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of hepatic vein in dogs with tricuspid regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the relationships between hepatic vein (HV) measurements, including flow velocity and waveform, using pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler ultrasonography, and the severity of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in dogs. The study included 22 dogs with TR and 7 healthy dogs. The TR group was subdivided into 3 groups according to TR jet profile obtained by echocardiography. The hepatic venous waveform was obtained and classified into 3 types. A variety of HV measurements, including the maximal velocities of the atrial systolic, systolic (S), end ventricular systolic, and diastolic (D) waves and the ratio of the S- and D- wave velocities (S/D ratio), were acquired. TR severity was significantly correlated with the S- (r = −0.380, p = 0.042) and D- (r = 0.468, p = 0.011) wave velocities and the S/D ratio (r = −0.747, p ultrasonography of the HV can be used to identify the presence of significant TR and to classify TR severity in dogs. PMID:27515264

  13. Experimental and numerical study of shock wave propagation in water generated by pulsed arc electrohydraulic discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Maurel, Olivier; La Borderie, Christian; Reess, Thierry; De Ferron, Antoine; Matallah, Mohammed; Pijaudier-Cabot, Gilles; Jacques, Antoine; Rey-Bethbeder, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to simulate the propagation of the shock wave in water due to an explosion. The study is part of a global research program on the development of an alternative stimulation technique to conventional hydraulic fracturing in tight gas reservoirs aimed at inducing a distributed state of microcracking of rocks instead of localized fracture. We consider the possibility of increasing the permeability of rocks with dynamic blasts. The blast is a shock wave generated in water by pulsed arc electrohydraulic discharges. The amplitude of these shock waves is prescribed by the electrohydraulic discharges which generate high pressures of several kilobars within microseconds. A simplified method has been used to simulate the injected electrical energy as augmentation of enthalpy in water locally. The finite element code EUROPLEXUS is used to perform fluid fast dynamic computation. The predicted pressure is consistent with the experimental results. In addition, shock wave propagation characteristics predicted with simulation can be valuable reference for design of underwater structural elements and engineering of underwater explosion.

  14. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Myllylä

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the human body and at different depths, for example, on the chest and forehead and at the fingertip. An accurate determination of a pulse wave allows calculating the pulse transit time (PTT of a particular heart pulse in different parts of the human body. This result can then be used to estimate the pulse wave velocity of blood flow in different places. Both measurement methods are realized using magnetic resonance-compatible fibres, which makes the methods applicable to the MRI environment. One of the developed sensors is an extraordinary accelerometer sensor, while the other one is a more common sensor based on photoplethysmography. All measurements, involving several test patients, were performed both inside and outside an MRI room. Measurements inside the MRI room were conducted using a 3-Tesla strength closed MRI scanner in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  15. Generation of spherical and cylindrical shock acoustic waves from optical breakdown in water, stimulated with femtosecond pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Potemkin, F V; Podshivalov, A A; Gordienko, V M

    2014-01-01

    Using shadow photography technique we have observed shock acoustic wave from optical breakdown, excited in water by tightly focused Cr:Forsterite femtosecond laser beam, and have found two different regimes of shock wave generation by varying only the energy of laser pulse. At low energies a single spherical shock wave is generated from laser beam waist, and its radius tends to saturation with energy increasing. At higher energies long laser filament in water is fired, that leads to the cylindrical shock wave generation, which longitude increases logarithmically with laser pulse energy. From shadow pictures we estimated maximal velocity in front or shock wave of 2300+/-150m/s and pressure of 1.0+/-0.1 GPa

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation modulation of corticospinal excitability by targeting cortical I-waves with biphasic paired-pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Savolainen, Petri; Järnefelt, Gustaf; Koskenkorva, Päivi; Karhu, Jari; Julkunen, Petro

    2017-10-20

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) induced I-wave behavior can be demonstrated at neuronal population level using paired-pulses and by observing short-interval cortical facilitation (SICF). Advancements in stimulator technology have made it possible to apply biphasic paired-pulses to induce SICF. Our aim was to characterize the SICF I-wave interaction by biphasic paired-pulses with the ultimate objective to enhance TMS effects via SICF in various TMS-applications. We used biphasic paired-pulses in 15 volunteers to characterize corticospinal SICF using various 1.2-8.0ms inter-stimulus intervals, and measuring SICF input-output response. SICF interaction with the first I-wave (I1) was observed in the output responses (motor evoked potentials; MEPs) in all subjects. Most subjects (≥80%) also exhibited later SICF I-wave interaction. SICF at I1 was present at all applied intensities below 140% of resting motor threshold. At I2, we observed SICF only with intensities just above motor threshold. Biphasic paired-pulses can reliably induce SICF shown by the facilitatory I-wave interaction, and could therefore be applied with repetitive bursts to enhance responsiveness to TMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Data Communications Using Guided Elastic Waves by Time Reversal Pulse Position Modulation: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Ying

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present and demonstrate a low complexity elastic wave signaling and reception method to achieve high data rate communication on dispersive solid elastic media, such as metal pipes, using piezoelectric transducers of PZT (lead zirconate titanate. Data communication is realized using pulse position modulation (PPM as the signaling method and the elastic medium as the communication channel. The communication system first transmits a small number of training pulses to probe the dispersive medium. The time-reversed probe signals are then utilized as the information carrying waveforms. Rapid timing acquisition of transmitted waveforms for demodulation over elastic medium is made possible by exploring the reciprocity property of guided elastic waves. The experimental tests were conducted using a National Instrument PXI system for waveform excitation and data acquisition. Data telemetry bit rates of 10 kbps, 20 kbps, 50 kbps and 100 kbps with the average bit error rates of 0, 5.75 × 10−4, 1.09 × 10−2 and 5.01 × 10−2, respectively, out of a total of 40, 000 transmitted bits were obtained when transmitting at the center frequency of 250 kHz and a 500 kHz bandwidth on steel pipe specimens. To emphasize the influence of time reversal, no complex processing techniques, such as adaptive channel equalization or error correction coding, were employed.

  18. Thermal transport in shock wave-compressed solids using pulsed laser heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Lone, B M; Capelle, G; Stevens, G D; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ~25 GPa and ~1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  19. Pulse wave velocity is associated with cognitive impairment in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Susanne; Baumann, Marcus; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Mayer, Christopher Clemens; Steubl, Dominik; Hauser, Christine; Suttmann, Yana; Reichelt, Anna-Lena; Satanovskij, Robin; Lorenz, Georg; Lukas, Moritz; Haller, Bernhard; Heemann, Uwe; Grimmer, Timo; Schmaderer, Christoph

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive impairment in hemodialysis patients is common and associated with adverse outcomes. So far, the underlying pathogenesis remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the potential relationship between cognitive impairment and three different categories of risk factors with particular focus on arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV). A total of 201 chronic hemodialysis patients underwent cognitive testing under standardized conditions using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Demographic data including cardiovascular risk factors, dialysis-associated factors as well as factors related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) were analyzed. To account for arterial stiffness, PWV was measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoried with an oscillometric device that records brachial blood pressure along with pulse waves. In our cohort, 60.2% of patients showed pathological MoCA test results indicating cognitive impairment. PWV was significantly associated with cognitive impairment apart from age, educational level, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. High prevalence of cognitive impairment in hemodialysis patients was confirmed. For the first time, an association between cognitive impairment and arterial stiffness was detected in a larger cohort of hemodialysis patients. Concerning the underlying pathogenesis of cognitive impairment, current results revealed a potential involvement of arterial stiffness, which has to be further evaluated in future studies. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Spectral broadening measurement of the lower hybrid waves during long pulse operation in Tore Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-By, G.; Decampy, J.; Antar, G. Y.; Goniche, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Delpech, L.; Leroux, F.; Tore Supra Team

    2014-02-01

    On many tokamaks (C-Mod, EAST, FTU, JET, HT-7, TS), a decrease in current drive efficiency of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves is observed in high electron density plasmas. The cause of this behaviour is believed to be: Parametric Instabilities (PI) and Scattering from Density Fluctuations (SDF). For the ITER LH system, our knowledge must be improved to avoid such effects and to maintain the LH current drive efficiency at high density. The ITPA IOS group coordinates this effort [1] and all experimental data are essential to validate the numerical codes in progress. Usually the broadening of the LH wave frequency spectrum is measured by a probe located in the plasma edge. For this study, the frequency spectrum of a reflected power signal from the LH antenna was used. In addition, the spectrum measurements are compared with the density fluctuations observed on RF probes located at the antenna mouth. Several plasma currents (0.6 to 1.4 MA) and densities up to 5.2 × 1019 m-3 have been realised on Tore Supra (TS) long pulses and with high injected RF power, up to 5.4 MW-30s. This allowed using a spectrum analyser to make several measurements during the plasma pulse. The side lobe amplitude, shifted by 20-30MHz with respect to the main peak, grows with increasing density. Furthermore, for an increase of plasma current at the same density, the spectra broaden and become asymmetric. Some parametric dependencies are shown in this paper.

  1. Performance assessment and optimization of Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) in ex vivo canine aortas and in vivo normal human arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X; Qaqish, William W; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-01-01

    The amplitude, velocity, and morphology of the arterial pulse wave may all provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method developed by our group to noninvasively visualize and map the spatio-temporal variations of the pulse wave-induced vessel wall motion. Because PWI is capable of acquiring multiple wall motion waveforms successively along an imaged arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle in vivo, the regional morphological changes, amplitudes, and velocity (i.e. pulse wave velocity, or PWV) of the pulse wave can all be evaluated. In this study, an ex vivo setup was used to assess the effects of varying PWI image acquisition variables (beam density/frame rate and scanning orientation) and signal processing methods (beam sweep compensation scheme and waveform feature tracking) on the PWV estimation in order to validate the optimal parameters. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of six healthy volunteers for identification of several salient features of the waveforms over the entire cardiac cycle that may aid in assessing the morphological changes of the pulse wave. The ex vivo results suggest that the PWI temporal resolution is more important for PWV estimation than the PWI spatial resolution, and also that the reverse scanning orientation (i.e. beam sweeping direction opposite the direction of fluid flow) is advantageous due to higher precision and less dependence on the frame rate. In the in vivo waveforms, the highest precision PWV measurements were obtained by tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveforms. Finally, the dicrotic notch, reflected wave, and several inflection points were qualitatively identified in the carotid and aortic anterior wall motion waveforms and shown in one representative subject.

  2. Control of propagation characteristics of spin wave pulses via elastic and thermal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Arista, Ivan [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O., E-mail: oleg.kolokoltsev@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Acevedo, A.; Qureshi, N. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Ordóñez-Romero, César L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico)

    2017-05-01

    A study of the magnetoelastic (ME) and thermal effects governing the phase (φ) and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides is presented. The ME effects were studied in a flexural configuration, under punctual mechanical force (F). Thermally induced ME and demagnetization phenomena were controlled by optically injected thermal power P{sub th}. It was determined that in an unclamped Ga:YIG waveguide, the force F that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the P{sub th} at which Δφ=π decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. For nano-volume waveguides the ME control energy (E{sub me}) can be of order of aJ, and the thermal control energy (ΔE{sub th}) can be as small as 50 fJ. The response time of these effects lies in the ns time scale. Both the mechanical and the thermo-magnetic forces provide an effective control of MSSW pulse amplitude, in addition to its phase shift. The thermo-magnetic effect allows one to realize variable delays of a MSSW pulse. - Highlights: • The Magneto-elastic (ME) and optically induced thermal effects governing the phase and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides are presented. • A mechanical force that causes phase shift Δφ=π for spin waves in the waveguides decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the optical power that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. • The response time of these effects can lie in the ns time scale.

  3. Enhancement of Lamb Wave Imaging Resolution by Step Pulse Excitation and Prewarping

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    Shangchen Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the damage localization accuracy, a prewarping technology is combined with step pulse excitation and this method is used in Lamb wave imaging of plate structures with adjacent damages. Based on the step pulse excitation, various narrowband or burst response can be derived by signal processing technology and this method provides flexibility for further prewarping approach. A narrowband signal warped with a preselected distance is then designed, and the dispersion in the response of this prewarping signal will be greatly reduced. However, in order to calculate the distance for prewarping, the first arrival needs to be estimated from the burst response. From the step-pulse response, narrowband responses at different central frequencies can be obtained, and by averaging peak-value time of their first arrivals, a more accurate estimation can be calculated. By using the prewarping method to the damage scattering signals before imaging, the imaging resolution of the delay-and-sum method can be highly enhanced. The experiment carried out in an aluminum plate with adjacent damages proves the efficiency of this method.

  4. Pulse wave detection method based on the bio-impedance of the wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianman; Wang, Mengjun; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    The real-time monitoring of pulse rate can evaluate the heart health to some extent, and the measurement of bio-impedance has the potential in wearable health monitoring system. In this paper, an effective method, which contains self-balancing bridge, flexible electrode, and high-speed digital lock-in algorithm (DLIA) with over-sampling, was designed to detect the impedance pulse wave at the wrist. By applying the self-balancing bridge, the basic impedance can be compensated as much as possible, and the low amplitude of impedance variation related to heart pulse can be obtained more easily. And the flexible conductive rubber electrode used in our experiment is human-friendly. Besides, the over-sampling method and high-speed DLIA are used to enhance the effective resolution of the existing data sampled by analog to digital converter. With the high-speed data process and simple circuit above, this proposed method has the potential in wrist-band wearable systems and it can satisfy quests of small volume and low power consumption.

  5. Effective suppression of pulse shortening in a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yibing; Song, Zhimin; Wu, Ping; Fan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yuchuan; Teng, Yan; Sun, Jun

    2017-03-01

    This paper discusses pulse shortening present in a C-band relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Effects of the collector plasma are believed to be the main cause. This viewpoint is first verified in numerical simulation. The simulation results show that light charged particles such as hydrogen ions in the collector plasma would axially enter into the beam-microwave interaction region and suppress high-power microwave (HPM) generation. Simultaneously, heavy charged particles such as oxygen or ferric ions in the collector plasma would radially expand out and change the end reflection of the RBWO. All these effects can result in pulse shortening. Simulations also demonstrate that a coaxial collector can effectively suppress plasma effects by retarding their axial and radial expansions. Furthermore, a HPM experiment has confirmed the validity of the coaxial collector. Using this structure, the output power of the RBWO has been increased from 2.5 GW to 3 GW. No pulse shortening has been observed in the HPM experiment.

  6. Effects of bee venom acupuncture on heart rate variability, pulse wave, and cerebral blood flow for types of Sasang Constitution

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    Lee Sang-min

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 1. Objectives: To evaluate effects of bee venom acupuncture on cardiovascular system and differences according to each constitution. 2. Methods: Heart rate variability, pulse wave and the velocity of cerebral blood flow were measured before bee venom acupuncture(BVA, right after and after 30 minuets, had been applied to 20 subjects. 3. Results: 1. BVA did not have effects on measurement variables of heart rate variability. 2. BVA had effects on pulse wave, showing total time, radial augmentation index up and height of percussion wave, time to percussion wave, sum of pulse pressure down. 3. BVA did not have effects on the cerebral blood flow velocity when considering not Sasang Constitution 4. Considering Sasang Constitution, BVA demonstrates different responses in time to preincisura wave, mean blood flow velocity, peak systolic velocity and end diastolic velocity. 4.Conclusion: From those results, the following conclusions are obtained. Cause BVA alters pulse wave and makes differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity according to Sasang Constitution. Various methods of BVA treatment are needed considering Sasang Constitution.

  7. Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Wave Reflection in Young Adult Heterozygous Sickle Cell Carriers

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    Tünzale Bayramoğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulse wave velocity (PWV and aortic augmentation index (AI are indicators of arterial stiffness. Pulse wave reflection and arterial stiffness are related to cardiovascular events and sickle cell disease. However, the effect of these parameters on the heterozygous sickle cell trait (HbAS is unknown. The aim of this study is to evaluate the arterial stiffness and wave reflection in young adult heterozygous sickle cell carriers. METHODS: We enrolled 40 volunteers (20 HbAS cases, 20 hemoglobin AA [HbAA] cases aged between 18 and 40 years. AI and PWV values were measured by arteriography. RESULTS: Aortic blood pressure, aortic AI, and brachial AI values were significantly higher in HbAS cases compared to the control group (HbAA (p=0.033, 0.011, and 0.011, respectively. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between aortic pulse wave velocity and mean arterial pressure, age, aortic AI, brachial AI, weight, and low-density lipoprotein levels (p=0.000, 0.017, 0.000, 0.000, 0.034, and 0.05, respectively in the whole study population. Aortic AI and age were also significantly correlated (p=0.026. In addition, a positive correlation between aortic PWV and systolic blood pressure and a positive correlation between aortic AI and mean arterial pressure (p=0.027 and 0.009, respectively were found in HbAS individuals. Our study reveals that mean arterial pressure and heart rate are independent determinants for the aortic AI. Mean arterial pressure and age are independent determinants for aortic PWV. CONCLUSION: Arterial stiffness measurement is an easy, cheap, and reliable method in the early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease in heterozygous sickle cell carriers. These results may depend on the amount of hemoglobin S in red blood cells. Further studies are required to investigate the blood pressure changes and its effects on arterial stiffness in order to explain the vascular aging mechanism in the HbAS trait population.

  8. Role of birth weight and postnatal growth on pulse wave velocity in teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Paolo; Revera, Miriam; Joly, Laure; Reusz, George; Iaia, Maurizio; Benkhedda, Salim; Chibane, Ahcene; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase; Temmar, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth appear to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. The aim of the present study was to characterize the factors determining pulse wave velocity (PWV) in teenagers and, in particular, to verify the relationship with birth weight, postnatal growth, timing of adiposity rebound, lifestyle, and hemodynamic parameters. Carotid-femoral and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities of 558 healthy teenagers (age range: 16.2-19.9 years) were determined by means of a PulsePen tonometer. Birth weight and gestational age were obtained from obstetrical records, and data regarding postnatal growth were obtained from pediatric clinical records. No change in aortic PWV was found in association with birth weight, postnatal growth, and timing of adiposity rebound. However, the study showed a strong association between accelerated growth from 0 to 12 months and carotid-radial PWV (trend: p = .02). Subjects with birth weight values <2,500 g showed higher values of upper limb PWV (p < .05) and higher values of diastolic and mean arterial pressure (p < .05). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that mean arterial pressure, age, and height were the main independent factors determining aortic PWV in this young population. These results suggest that there is no linear correlation between birth weight and hemodynamic parameters in teenagers; however, subjects characterized by very low birth weight and accelerated postnatal weight gain appear to demonstrate increased upper limb PWV and diastolic and mean arterial pressure values. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aortic distensibility measured by pulse-wave velocity is not modified in patients with Chagas' disease

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    Arteaga Edmundo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies demonstrate that infection with trypanosoma cruzi causes vasculitis. The inflammatory lesion process could hypothetically lead to decreased distensibility of large and small arteries in advanced Chagas' disease. We tested this hypothesis. Methods and results We evaluated carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV in 53 Chagas' disease patients compared with 31 healthy volunteers (control group. The 53 patients were classified into 3 groups: 1 16 with indeterminate form of Chagas' disease; 2 18 with Chagas' disease, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and normal systolic function; 3 19 with Chagas' disease, systolic dysfunction, and mild-to-moderate congestive heart failure. No difference was noted between the 4 groups regarding carotid-femoral PWV (8.4 ± 1.1 vs 8.2 ± 1.5 vs 8.2 ± 1.4 vs 8.7 ± 1.6 m/s, P = 0.6 or pulse pressure (39.5 ± 7.6 vs 39.3 ± 8.1 vs 39.5 ± 7.4 vs 39.7 ± 6.9 mm Hg, P = 0.9. A positive, significant, similar correlation occurred between PWV and age in patients with Chagas' disease (r = 0.42, P = 0.002, in controls (r = 0.48, P = 0.006, and also between PWV and systolic blood pressure in both groups (patients with Chagas' disease, r = 0.38, P = 0.005; healthy subjects, r = 0.36, P = 0.043. Conclusion Carotid femoral pulse-wave velocity is not modified in patients with Chagas' disease, suggesting that elastic properties of large arteries are not affected in this disorder.

  10. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

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    Michael R Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Graham1, Peter Evans2, Bruce Davies1, Julien S Baker11Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom; 2Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, United KingdomAbstract: Blood pressure (BP measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV. Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH, secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD is reversed by recombinant human (rh GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two infl ammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rh

  11. Chirped-Pulse millimeter-Wave spectroscopy for dynamics and kinetics studies of pyrolysis reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozument, Kirill; Barratt Park, G; Shaver, Rachel G; Vasiliou, AnGayle K; Oldham, James M; David, Donald E; Muenter, John S; Stanton, John F; Suits, Arthur G; Barney Ellison, G; Field, Robert W

    2014-08-14

    A Chirped-Pulse millimeter-Wave (CPmmW) spectrometer is applied to the study of chemical reaction products that result from pyrolysis in a Chen nozzle heated to 1000-1800 K. Millimeter-wave rotational spectroscopy unambiguously determines, for each polar reaction product, the species, the conformers, relative concentrations, conversion percentage from precursor to each product, and, in some cases, vibrational state population distributions. A chirped-pulse spectrometer can, within the frequency range of a single chirp, sample spectral regions of up to ∼10 GHz and simultaneously detect many reaction products. Here we introduce a modification to the CPmmW technique in which multiple chirps of different spectral content are applied to a molecular beam pulse that contains the pyrolysis reaction products. This technique allows for controlled allocation of its sensitivity to specific molecular transitions and effectively doubles the bandwidth of the spectrometer. As an example, the pyrolysis reaction of ethyl nitrite, CH3CH2ONO, is studied, and CH3CHO, H2CO, and HNO products are simultaneously observed and quantified, exploiting the multi-chirp CPmmW technique. Rotational and vibrational temperatures of some product molecules are determined. Subsequent to supersonic expansion from the heated nozzle, acetaldehyde molecules display a rotational temperature of 4 ± 1 K. Vibrational temperatures are found to be controlled by the collisional cooling in the expansion, and to be both species- and vibrational mode-dependent. Rotational transitions of vibrationally excited formaldehyde in levels ν4, 2ν4, 3ν4, ν2, ν3, and ν6 are observed and effective vibrational temperatures for modes 2, 3, 4, and 6 are determined and discussed.

  12. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  13. The association between pulse wave velocity and cognitive function: the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study.

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    Joel Singer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Pulse wave velocity (PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and its increase with ageing has been associated with damage to cerebral microvessels and cognitive impairment. This study examined the relationship between carotid-femoral PWV and specific domains of cognitive function in a non-demented elderly sample. METHOD: Data were drawn from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study, a cohort study of non-demented community-dwelling individuals aged 70-90 years, assessed in successive waves two years apart. In Wave 2, PWV and cognitive function were measured in 319 participants. Linear regression was used to analyse the cross-sectional relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive function in the whole sample, and separately for men and women. Analysis of covariance was used to assess potential differences in cognition between subjects with PWV measurements in the top and bottom tertiles of the cohort. Covariates were age, education, body mass index, pulse rate, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, depression, alcohol, smoking, hormone replacement therapy, apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype, use of anti-hypertensive medications, history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, angina, diabetes, and also sex for the whole sample analyses. RESULTS: There was no association between PWV and cognition after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. When examining this association for males and females separately, an association was found in males, with higher PWV being associated with lower global cognition and memory, however, a significant difference between PWV and cognition between males and females was not found. CONCLUSION: A higher level of PWV was not associated with lower cognitive function in the whole sample.

  14. Comparison of pulsed wave and color Doppler myocardial velocity imaging in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, G; Killich, M; Hartmann, K

    2010-01-01

    Tissue velocity imaging (TVI) is increasingly used in small animal cardiology. Tissue velocity of the myocardial wall can be measured by pulsed wave (PW) or color Doppler (CD) imaging methods. Currently, the same reference ranges are used for PW TVI and CD TVI methods. However, if and how both methods correlate, and whether they can be used interchangeably, have not been assessed in small animals. To compare the results of PW TVI and CD TVI measurements. Seventy-one healthy dogs. Longitudinal myocardial velocity profiles were recorded from the 4-chamber left apical view. Peak maximal systolic (S), early (E), and late diastolic (A) velocities were measured off-line in a blinded fashion in the septal and lateral left ventricular wall by PW TVI and CD TVI. Differences between peak PW TVI and CD TVI waves were analyzed by a paired t-test. Regression analysis and Bland-Altman difference plots also were used to assess agreement between methods. There was a significant correlation between PW TVI and CD TVI (P waves measured by PW TVI were significantly higher than the CD TVI values (P < .001). Peak systolic and diastolic PW velocities were approximately 2.20 cm/s higher than corresponding mean CD TVI velocities. PW TVI measurements are significantly higher compared with CD TVI measurements. Theses differences are clinically relevant. These methods should not be used interchangeably, and different reference ranges for PW TVI and CD TVI should be used.

  15. Generation of thermo-acoustic waves from pulsed solar/IR radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aowabin

    Acoustic waves could potentially be used in a wide range of engineering applications; however, the high energy consumption in generating acoustic waves from electrical energy and the cost associated with the process limit the use of acoustic waves in industrial processes. Acoustic waves converted from solar radiation provide a feasible way of obtaining acoustic energy, without relying on conventional nonrenewable energy sources. One of the goals of this thesis project was to experimentally study the conversion of thermal to acoustic energy using pulsed radiation. The experiments were categorized into "indoor" and "outdoor" experiments, each with a separate experimental setup. The indoor experiments used an IR heater to power the thermo-acoustic lasers and were primarily aimed at studying the effect of various experimental parameters on the amplitude of sound waves in the low frequency range (below 130 Hz). The IR radiation was modulated externally using a chopper wheel and then impinged on a porous solid, which was housed inside a thermo-acoustic (TA) converter. A microphone located at a certain distance from the porous solid inside the TA converter detected the acoustic signals. The "outdoor" experiments, which were targeted at TA conversion at comparatively higher frequencies (in 200 Hz-3 kHz range) used solar energy to power the thermo-acoustic laser. The amplitudes (in RMS) of thermo-acoustic signals obtained in experiments using IR heater as radiation source were in the 80-100 dB range. The frequency of acoustic waves corresponded to the frequency of interceptions of the radiation beam by the chopper. The amplitudes of acoustic waves were influenced by several factors, including the chopping frequency, magnitude of radiation flux, type of porous material, length of porous material, external heating of the TA converter housing, location of microphone within the air column, and design of the TA converter. The time-dependent profile of the thermo-acoustic signals

  16. Ionospheric cusp flows pulsed by solar wind Alfvén waves

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    P. Prikryl

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs in the cusp foot-print have been observed by the SuperDARN radars with periods between a few minutes and several tens of minutes. PIFs are believed to be a consequence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF reconnection with the magnetospheric magnetic field on the dayside magnetopause, ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs. The quasiperiodic PIFs are correlated with Alfvénic fluctuations observed in the upstream solar wind. It is concluded that on these occasions, the FTEs were driven by Alfvén waves coupling to the day-side magnetosphere. Case studies are presented in which the dawn-dusk component of the Alfvén wave electric field modulates the reconnection rate as evidenced by the radar observations of the ionospheric cusp flows. The arrival of the IMF southward turning at the magnetopause is determined from multipoint solar wind magnetic field and/or plasma measurements, assuming plane phase fronts in solar wind. The cross-correlation lag between the solar wind data and ground magnetograms that were obtained near the cusp footprint exceeded the estimated spacecraft-to-magnetopause propagation time by up to several minutes. The difference can account for and/or exceeds the Alfvén propagation time between the magnetopause and ionosphere. For the case of short period ( < 13 min PIFs, the onset times of the flow transients appear to be further delayed by at most a few more minutes after the IMF southward turning arrived at the magnetopause. For the case of long period (30 – 40 min PIFs, the observed additional delays were 10–20 min. We interpret the excess delay in terms of an intrinsic time scale for reconnection (Russell et al., 1997 which can be explained by the surface-wave induced magnetic reconnection mechanism (Uberoi et al., 1999. Here, surface waves with wavelengths larger than the thickness of the neutral layer induce a tearing-mode instability whose rise time explains the

  17. Effect of pulse-wave factors in Middle Aged Women by Mountain Cultivated Ginseng Pharmacopuncture Original Articles

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    Park Sang Wook

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this experiment is to know about Effect of pulse-wave factors in Middle Aged Women by Mountain Cultivated Ginseng Pharmacopuncture. Methods: First 20 Middle Aged women are diagnosed by pulse diagnosis, and then Mountain Cultivated Ginseng Pharmacopuncture(1 injection 20cc were injected. 30 minutes later, pulse diagnosis again performed. As a result, method of one-group pretest-posttes design were used for evaluation. Results: T(Total pulse cycle time statistically significant increased on both left and right chon, kwan,cheok. T4 time statistically significant increased on both left and right chon, kwan, cheok. T4-T1/T indexs except left cheokmaek, Right cheokmaek observation area decreased significantly in four sites.Wm(indicating high pressure retention time indexs increased significantly in the five sites were observed except right chon maek. Conclusions: Effect of pulse-wave factors in Middle Aged Women by Mountain Cultivated Ginseng Pharmacopuncture increased T, T4, Wm and decreased T4-T1/T indexs. The results of this experiment,Mountain Cultivated Ginseng Pharmacopuncture induced to increase the Pulse-wave's stability and strength.

  18. Experimental study regarding the effects of pulsed short waves on nervous tissue

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    DOGARU Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed short waves are part of high frequency therapy and have through their biological effects, the good therapeutic results and the lack of side effects many indications in various disorders: rheumatologic, traumatologic, burns, neurological (nerve tissue regeneration, ischemic vascular accidents, vascular disorders. The experimental study consisted of the exposure of laboratory animals to the action of pulsed short waves in different doses and the monitoring of changes in the brain cellular and subcellular structure. The study included 35 Wistar rats, assigned to four groups, three groups of 10 animals and the control group of five non-irradiated animals. Group I was exposed to a dose of 1/80 cycles/sec, group II to 4/400 cycles/sec, and group III to 6/600 cycles/sec, for 10 minutes/day, for 15 days. After the rats were sacrificed, nervous tissue fragments were collected. These were adequately processed for their examination by optical and electron microscopy. At structural level, in the control group and the groups exposed to the dose of 1/80 cycles/sec, the neurons were normally structured. In group II, a slight increase of brain metabolic activity was seen, in group III there was a significant increase of brain metabolism, with better myelinated white matter axons, which suggests a better protection for the rapid conduction of nerve impulses to effectors. In group II, electron microscopy revealed similar aspects to those of the control group. A high ribosome density was found in the neuroplasm, which means an intense protein synthesis process. In group III, there was an intense protein synthesis activity, and a strong axon myelination in the white matter, resulting in a better protection for the transmission of nerve impulses. Conclusions: pulsed short waves caused brain changes depending on the dose. The analysis of electron microscopic images showed that irradiation at a dose of 6/600 cycles/sec induced an intense protein synthesis

  19. Heat distribution in the lower leg from pulsed short-wave diathermy and ultrasound treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, C L; Draper, D O; Knight, K L

    2000-01-01

    To compare tissue temperature rise and decay after 20-minute diathermy and ultrasound treatments. We inserted 3 26-gauge thermistor microprobes into the medial aspect of the anesthetized triceps surae muscle at a depth of 3 cm and spaced 5 cm apart. Eight subjects received the diathermy treatment first, followed by the ultrasound treatment. This sequence was reversed for the remaining 8 subjects. The diathermy was applied at a frequency of 27.12 MHz at the following settings: 800 bursts per second, 400-microsecond burst duration, 850-microsecond interburst interval, peak root mean square amplitude of 150 W per burst, and an average root mean square output of 48 W per burst. The ultrasound was delivered at a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 1.5 W/cm(2) in the continuous mode for 20 minutes over an area of 40 times the effective radiating area. The study was performed in a ventilated research laboratory. Sixteen (11 men, 5 women) healthy subjects (mean age = 23.56 +/- 4.73 years) volunteered to participate in this study. We recorded baseline, final, and decay temperatures for each of the 3 sites. The average temperature increases over baseline temperature after pulsed short-wave diathermy were 3.02 degrees C +/- 1.02 degrees C in site 1, 4.58 degrees C +/- 0.87 degrees C in site 2, and 3.28 degrees C +/- 1.64 degrees C in site 3. The average temperature increases over baseline temperature after ultrasound were only 0.17 degrees C +/- 0.40 degrees C, 0.09 degrees C +/- 0.56 degrees C, and -0.43 degrees C +/- 0.41 degrees C in sites 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The temperature dropped only 1 degrees C in 7.65 +/- 4.96 minutes after pulsed short-wave diathermy. We conclude that pulsed short-wave diathermy was more effective than 1-MHz ultrasound in heating a large muscle mass and resulted in the muscles' retaining heat longer.

  20. Mapping of Coherent Nuclear Wave Packet Dynamics in D_2^+ with Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2003-05-01

    Fast ionization of D2 leads to the coherent population of many vibrational states of D_2^+. Usually, only the squared absolute values of the vibrational state amplitudes, known as Franck-Condon factors, are observed since insufficient experimental time resolution averages out all coherence effects. We propose a Coulomb explosion imaging method to visualize the coherent motion of bound wave packets using ultrashort (5 fs), intense pump-probe laser pulses. With this type of experiment, decoherence times in the fs to ps range could be directly measured, providing essential information for coherent control. Supported in part by NSF (grant PHY-0071035) and Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Scienes, Office of Energy Research, US DOE.

  1. High resolution wireless body area network with statistically synchronized sensor data for tracking pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kejia; Warren, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Wireless body area networks (WBANs) will take on more diverse forms in terms of their sensor combinations and communication protocols as their presence is extended to a greater number of monitoring scenarios. This paper presents an application layer protocol that solves issues caused by sensor nodes that must compete for high speed, real-time communication with the receiver. Such applications emphasize the delivery of large amounts of raw data from different sensor nodes in a time-synchronized manner, rather than channels that experience intermittent operation. An example of tracking pulse wave velocity (PWV) is introduced in this paper, where high-precision PWVs are estimated with the help of timeline recovery and feature extraction processes in MATLAB.

  2. Central blood pressure assessment using 24-hour brachial pulse wave analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muiesan ML

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Lorenza Muiesan, Massimo Salvetti, Fabio Bertacchini, Claudia Agabiti-Rosei, Giulia Maruelli, Efrem Colonetti, Anna Paini Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: This review describes the use of central blood pressure (BP measurements during ambulatory monitoring, using noninvasive devices. The principles of measuring central BP by applanation tonometry and by oscillometry are reported, and information on device validation studies is described. The pathophysiological basis for the differences between brachial and aortic pressure is discussed. The currently available methods for central aortic pressure measurement are relatively accurate, and their use has important clinical implications, such as improving diagnostic and prognostic stratification of hypertension and providing a more accurate assessment of the effect of treatment on BP. Keywords: aortic blood pressure measurements, ambulatory monitoring, pulse wave analysis

  3. Evaluation of agreement between temporal series obtained from electrocardiogram and pulse wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikan, GM; Rossi, E.; Sanz, MCuadra; Delisle Rodríguez, D.; Mántaras, MC; Nicolet, J.; Zapata, D.; Lapyckyj, I.; Siri, L. Nicola; Perrone, MS

    2016-04-01

    Heart rate variability allows to study the cardiovascular autonomic nervous system modulation. Usually, this signal is obtained from the electrocardiogram (ECG). A simpler method for recording the pulse wave (PW) is by means of finger photoplethysmography (PPG), which also provides information about the duration of the cardiac cycle. In this study, the correlation and agreement between the time series of the intervals between heartbeats obtained from the ECG with those obtained from the PPG, were studied. Signals analyzed were obtained from young, healthy and resting subjects. For statistical analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient and the Bland and Altman limits of agreement were used. Results show that the time series constructed from the PW would not replace the ones obtained from ECG.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Propagation and Decay of Fast Ionization Waves Generated by Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifei; Starikovskaya, Svetlana; Babaeva, Natalie; Kushner, Mark; Electrical Engineering; Computer Science Dept Collaboration; InstituteHigh Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences Collaboration; Cold Plasma Team Team

    2016-09-01

    Fast ionization waves (FIW) are an effective tool for studying plasma kinetics in nanosecond pulsed discharges. A numerical investigation of FIWs in air having high energy deposition was conducted in capillary tubes having different diameters using a two dimensional model. Continuity equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation and Poisson's equation were implicitly integrated together with a propagator model for photoionization which includes both ionizing and non-ionizing absorption. The species and reactions included in the study were selected on the basis of a sensitivity analysis. The main goals of this work are to quantify how system parameters (e.g., pressure, voltage and specific energy deposition) affect the properties of the plasma in the early afterglow (tens to hundreds of nanoseconds) following the FIW.

  5. Serum Osteopontin Level Correlates with Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in Geriatric Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Jen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is involved in the regulation of vascular calcification processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between fasting serum OPN concentration and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV in geriatric persons. Fasting blood samples were obtained from 93 geriatric persons. cfPWV were performed by SphygmoCor system. Serum OPN levels were measured using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Geriatric adults who had diabetes (P=0.007 or dyslipidemia (P=0.029 had higher cfPWV levels than those without diabetes or dyslipidemia. The univariable linear regression analysis showed that age (P=0.002, waist circumference (P=0.048, body mass index (P=0.004, systolic blood pressure (P=0.001, diastolic blood pressure (P=0.036, pulse pressure (P=0.017, creatinine (P=0.002, and log-OPN level (P=0.001 were positively correlated with cfPWV levels, while the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol level (P=0.007 and glomerular filtration rate (P=0.001 were negatively correlated with cfPWV levels among the geriatric adults. Multivariable forward stepwise linear regression analysis of the significant variables also showed that log-OPN (β=0.233, R2=0.123, regression coefficient: 1.868, P=0.011 was still an independent predictor of cfPWV levels in geriatric persons.

  6. Increasing accuracy of pulse transit time measurements by automated elimination of distorted photoplethysmography waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G

    2017-11-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a widely available non-invasive optical technique to visualize pressure pulse waves (PWs). Pulse transit time (PTT) is a physiological parameter that is often derived from calculations on ECG and PPG signals and is based on tightly defined characteristics of the PW shape. PPG signals are sensitive to artefacts. Coughing or movement of the subject can affect PW shapes that much that the PWs become unsuitable for further analysis. The aim of this study was to develop an algorithm that automatically and objectively eliminates unsuitable PWs. In order to develop a proper algorithm for eliminating unsuitable PWs, a literature study was conducted. Next, a '7Step PW-Filter' algorithm was developed that applies seven criteria to determine whether a PW matches the characteristics required to allow PTT calculation. To validate whether the '7Step PW-Filter' eliminates only and all unsuitable PWs, its elimination results were compared to the outcome of manual elimination of unsuitable PWs. The '7Step PW-Filter' had a sensitivity of 96.3% and a specificity of 99.3%. The overall accuracy of the '7Step PW-Filter' for detection of unsuitable PWs was 99.3%. Compared to manual elimination, using the '7Step PW-Filter' reduces PW elimination times from hours to minutes and helps to increase the validity, reliability and reproducibility of PTT data.

  7. Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time From Bioimpedance and Continuous Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Redout, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and tested a new architecture for pulse transit time (PTT) estimation at the central arteries using electrical bioimpedance, electrocardiogram, and continuous wave radar to estimate cuffless blood pressure. A transmitter and receiver antenna are placed at the sternum to acquire the arterial pulsation at the aortic arch. A four-electrode arrangement across the shoulders acquires arterial pulse across the carotid and subclavian arteries from bioimpedance as well as a bipolar lead I electrocardiogram. The PTT and pulse arrival times (PATs) are measured on six healthy male subjects during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Using linear regression, the estimated PAT and PTT values are calibrated to the systolic and mean as well as diastolic blood pressure from an oscillometric device. For all subjects, the Pearson correlation coefficients for PAT-SBP and PTT-SBP are -0.66 (p = 0.001) and -0.48 (p = 0.0029), respectively. Correlation coefficients for individual subjects ranged from -0.54 to -0.9 and -0.37 to -0.95, respectively. The proposed system architecture is promising in estimating cuffless arterial blood pressure at the central, proximal arteries, which obey the Moens-Korteweg equation more closely when compared to peripheral arteries. An important advantage of PTT from the carotid and subclavian arteries is that the PTT over the central elastic arteries is measured instead of the peripheral arteries, which potentially reduces the changes in PTT due to vasomotion. Furthermore, the sensors can be completely hidden under a patients clothes, making them more acceptable by the patient for ambulatory monitoring.

  8. Evaluation of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity: influence of timing algorithm and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millasseau, Sandrine C; Stewart, Andrew D; Patel, Sundip J; Redwood, Simon R; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2005-02-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, is determined from the time taken for the arterial pulse to propagate from the carotid to the femoral artery. Propagation time is measured variously from the foot of the waveform or point of maximum upslope. We investigated whether these methods give comparable values of PWV at rest, during beta-adrenergic stimulation, and pacing-induced tachycardia. In subjects at rest (n=43), values obtained using the foot-to-foot method (SphygmoCor system) were 1.7+/-0.75 m/s (mean+/-SD) greater than those obtained using the maximum slope (Complior system) at a mean value of 12 m/s. Isoprotenerol (0.5 to 1.5 microg/min; n=10), and pacing (in subjects with permanent pacemakers; n=11) increased heart rate but had differential effects on systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. The increase in heart rate produced by isoprotenerol (18+/-3 bpm) and pacing (40 bpm) was associated with an increase in PWV measured using both systems (increases of 0.7+/-0.2 m/s and 0.9+/-0.2 m/s for SphygmoCor and Complior, respectively, during isoprotenerol and increases of 2.1+/-0.5 m/s and 1.1+/-0.2 m/s for SphygmoCor and Complior, respectively, during pacing, each P<0.001). Reanalysis of waveforms recorded from the Complior system using the foot-to-foot method produced similar values of PWV to those obtained with the SphygmoCor, confirming that the difference between these systems was attributable to the timing algorithm rather than other aspects of signal acquisition. Carotid-femoral PWV is critically dependent on the method used to determine propagation time, but this does not account for variation of PWV with heart rate.

  9. Identifying Coronary Artery Disease in Asymptomatic Middle-Aged Sportsmen : The Additional Value of Pulse Wave Velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braber, Thijs L.; Prakken, Niek H. J.; Mosterd, Arend; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Doevendans, Pieter A. F. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular screening may benefit middle-aged sportsmen, as coronary artery disease (CAD) is the main cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death. Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), may help identify sportsmen with subclinical CAD. We examined the

  10. Short-term effects of a standardized glucose load on region-specific aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jacqueline T.; Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Hensen, Liselotte C. R.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; de Roos, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the short-term effects of a standardized oral glucose load on regional aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) using two-directional in-plane velocity encoded MRI. Materials and Methods A randomized, controlled intervention was performed in 16 male subjects (mean +/- standard deviation:

  11. Identifying coronary artery disease in asymptomatic middle-aged sportsmen : The additional value of pulse wave velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braber, Thijs L.; Prakken, Niek H J; Mosterd, Arend|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156271583; Mali, Willem P Th M; Doevendans, Pieter A F M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/164248366; Bots, Michiel L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110610032; Velthuis, Birgitta K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/176956301

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular screening may benefit middle-aged sportsmen, as coronary artery disease (CAD) is the main cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death. Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), may help identify sportsmen with subclinical CAD. We examined the

  12. Transient and time-resolved four-wave mixing with collinear pump and probe pulses using the heterodyne technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mecozzi, A.; Mørk, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    We review the recently proposed heterodyne technique for four-wave mixing experiments with collinear and co-polarized pulses. We discuss issues related to the parameters of the nonlinear dynamics of the sample that can be extracted by this technique....

  13. Pulse wave analysis in a 180-degree curved artery model: Implications under physiological and non-physiological inflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse pressures, and left ventricular hypertrophy contribute to cardiovascular risks. Increase of arterial stiffness due to aging and hypertension is an important factor in cardiovascular, chronic kidney and end-stage-renal-diseases. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) based on arterial pressure wave characteristics, is well established in clinical practice for evaluation of arterial distensibility and hypertension. The objective of our exploratory study in a rigid 180-degree curved artery model was to evaluate arterial pressure waveforms. Bend upstream conditions were measured using a two-component, two-dimensional, particle image velocimeter (2C-2D PIV). An ultrasonic transit-time flow meter and a catheter with a MEMS-based solid state pressure sensor, capable of measuring up to 20 harmonics of the observed pressure waveform, monitored flow conditions downstream of the bend. Our novel continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2), in addition to detecting coherent secondary flow structures is used to evaluate arterial pulse wave characteristics subjected to physiological and non-physiological inflows. Results of this study will elucidate the utility of wavelet transforms in arterial function evaluation and pulse wave speed. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  14. Verification of Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Measurement Method Based on Pulse Wave Signal Detected by FBG Sensor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurasawa, Shintaro; Koyama, Shouhei; Ishizawa, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Keisaku; Chino, Shun

    2017-11-23

    This paper describes and verifies a non-invasive blood glucose measurement method using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system. The FBG sensor is installed on the radial artery, and the strain (pulse wave) that is propagated from the heartbeat is measured. The measured pulse wave signal was used as a collection of feature vectors for multivariate analysis aiming to determine the blood glucose level. The time axis of the pulse wave signal was normalized by two signal processing methods: the shortest-time-cut process and 1-s-normalization process. The measurement accuracy of the calculated blood glucose level was compared with the accuracy of these signal processing methods. It was impossible to calculate a blood glucose level exceeding 200 mg/dL in the calibration curve that was constructed by the shortest-time-cut process. In the 1-s-normalization process, the measurement accuracy of the blood glucose level was improved, and a blood glucose level exceeding 200 mg/dL could be calculated. By verifying the loading vector of each calibration curve to calculate the blood glucose level with a high measurement accuracy, we found the gradient of the peak of the pulse wave at the acceleration plethysmogram greatly affected.

  15. Experiment and analysis of shock waves radiated from pulse laser focusing in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental understanding of shock and bubble dynamics in human tissues is essential to laser application for medical purposes. Here, we experimentally study the dynamics of shock waves in viscoelastic media. A nanosecond laser pulse of wavelength at 532 nm and of energy up to 2.66 +/- 0.09 mJ was focused through a microscope objective lens (10 x, NA = 0.30) into a gel of gelatin concentration at 3 and 10 wt%; a shock wave and a bubble can be generated, respectively, by rapid expansion of the laser-induced plasma and local heat deposition after the plasma recombines. The shock propagation and the bubble growth were recorded by a ultra-high-speed camera at 100 Mfps. The shock evolution was determined by image analysis of the recording and the shock pressure in the near field was computed according to the Rankine-Hugoniot relation. The far-field pressure was measured by a hydrophone. In the poster, we will present the decay rate of the shock pressure in the near and far fields and examine viscous effects on the shock dynamics. The Research Grant of Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science & Technology.

  16. On the estimation of total arterial compliance from aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Papaioannou, Theodore G; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos

    2012-12-01

    Total arterial compliance (C(T)) is a main determinant of cardiac afterload, left ventricular function and arterio-ventricular coupling. C(T) is physiologically more relevant than regional aortic stiffness. However, direct, in vivo, non-invasive, measurement of C(T) is not feasible. Several methods for indirect C(T) estimation require simultaneous recording of aortic flow and pressure waves, limiting C(T) assessment in clinical practice. In contrast, aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) measurement, which is considered as the "gold standard" method to assess arterial stiffness, is noninvasive and relatively easy. Our aim was to establish the relation between aPWV and C(T). In total, 1000 different hemodynamic cases were simulated, by altering heart rate, compliance, resistance and geometry using an accurate, distributed, nonlinear, one-dimensional model of the arterial tree. Based on Bramwell-Hill theory, the formula C(T) = k • aPWV(-2) was found to accurately estimate C(T) from aPWV. Coefficient k was determined both analytically and by fitting C(T) vs. aPWV data. C(T) estimation may provide an additional tool for cardiovascular risk (CV) assessment and better management of CV diseases. C(T) could have greater impact in assessing elderly population or subjects with elevated arterial stiffness, where aPWV seem to have limited prognostic value. Further clinical studies should be performed to validate the formula in vivo.

  17. Determination of thermal wave reflection coefficient to better estimate defect depth using pulsed thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirikham, Adisorn; Zhao, Yifan; Mehnen, Jörn

    2017-11-01

    Thermography is a promising method for detecting subsurface defects, but accurate measurement of defect depth is still a big challenge because thermographic signals are typically corrupted by imaging noise and affected by 3D heat conduction. Existing methods based on numerical models are susceptible to signal noise and methods based on analytical models require rigorous assumptions that usually cannot be satisfied in practical applications. This paper presents a new method to improve the measurement accuracy of subsurface defect depth through determining the thermal wave reflection coefficient directly from observed data that is usually assumed to be pre-known. This target is achieved through introducing a new heat transfer model that includes multiple physical parameters to better describe the observed thermal behaviour in pulsed thermographic inspection. Numerical simulations are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method against four selected state-of-the-art methods. Results show that the accuracy of depth measurement has been improved up to 10% when noise level is high and thermal wave reflection coefficients is low. The feasibility of the proposed method in real data is also validated through a case study on characterising flat-bottom holes in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates which has a wide application in various sectors of industry.

  18. Analysis of epidural pressure pulse wave (EDP-PW) and common carotid blood velocity (CBFV) in acute intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, M; Tokutomi, T; Kawaba, T; Nakashima, H; Kuramoto, S

    1986-06-01

    The changes in the two consistent components of epidural pressure pulse wave (EDP-PW), P1 and P2 waves, and mean velocity of common carotid blood flow (CBFV) were studied in 21 patients with acute intracranial hypertension to investigate the origin of th the amplitude change in these components. The amplitudes of P2 wave increased progressively with the rise of EDP, but those of P1 wave remained nearly invariable at EDP of more than 20-30 mmHg which is incompatible with the changes in CBFV. Jugular vein compression caused in rapid rise of EDP and a proportionate increase in the magnitudes of both waves. Hyperventilation and mannitol administration caused a disproportionate reduction in the amplitudes of P2 wave with a fall of EDP. But mannitol at high EDP (more than 40 mmHg) caused a mild fall of EDP and some increase in the amplitudes of P2 wave. These results indicate that the variations in the amplitudes of P1 wave reflect the changes in vascular resistance of the large intracranial conductive arteries, while those of P2 wave result from the changes in the volume of the cerebral bulk. The increase in the amplitudes of P2 wave induced by mannitol at high EDP may suggest a defective autoregulation of the cerebral vessels.

  19. Feasibility of pulse wave velocity estimation from low frame rate US sequences in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zontak, Maria; Bruce, Matthew; Hippke, Michelle; Schwartz, Alan; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered one of the most important clinical parameters to evaluate CV risk, vascular adaptation, etc. There has been substantial work attempting to measure the PWV in peripheral vessels using ultrasound (US). This paper presents a fully automatic algorithm for PWV estimation from the human carotid using US sequences acquired with a Logic E9 scanner (modified for RF data capture) and a 9L probe. Our algorithm samples the pressure wave in time by tracking wall displacements over the sequence, and estimates the PWV by calculating the temporal shift between two sampled waves at two distinct locations. Several recent studies have utilized similar ideas along with speckle tracking tools and high frame rate (above 1 KHz) sequences to estimate the PWV. To explore PWV estimation in a more typical clinical setting, we used focused-beam scanning, which yields relatively low frame rates and small fields of view (e.g., 200 Hz for 16.7 mm filed of view). For our application, a 200 Hz frame rate is low. In particular, the sub-frame temporal accuracy required for PWV estimation between locations 16.7 mm apart, ranges from 0.82 of a frame for 4m/s, to 0.33 for 10m/s. When the distance is further reduced (to 0.28 mm between two beams), the sub-frame precision is in parts per thousand (ppt) of the frame (5 ppt for 10m/s). As such, the contributions of our algorithm and this paper are: 1. Ability to work with low frame-rate ( 200Hz) and decreased lateral field of view. 2. Fully automatic segmentation of the wall intima (using raw RF images). 3. Collaborative Speckle Tracking of 2D axial and lateral carotid wall motion. 4. Outlier robust PWV calculation from multiple votes using RANSAC. 5. Algorithm evaluation on volunteers of different ages and health conditions.

  20. [Penultimate pulse wave velocity, better than baseline pulse wave velocity, predicted mortality in Italian ESRD cohort study - a case for daily hemodialysis for ESRD patients with accelerated pulse wave velocity changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuigbo, Macaulay; Onuigbo, Nnonyelum; Bellasi, Antonio; Russo, Domenico; Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac disease remains the major cause of death among ESRD patients. Indeed, the risk of cardiovascular events in ESRD is reported to be at least 3.4 fold higher than that of the general population. Moreover, annual mortality rates among ESRD patients on hemodialysis approximate 20%, with cardiovascular disease accounting for almost half of this mortality profile. Despite this knowledge, so far we have been unable to identify treatable pathogenetic factors among ESRD patients to help reverse these poor cardiovascular outcomes. The difficulty to prognosticate cardiovascular mortality in ESRD remains elusive. However, in 2011, our group, for the first time, had demonstrated that cyclic variations of arterial stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) before and after hemodialysis determined mortality differences within an ESRD cohort. We have therefore examined the impact of individual patient-level translational PWV changes over time on mortality outcomes in an Italian ESRD cohort. Prospective observational study, 2007-2010, in an Italian ESRD cohort who underwent in-center outpatient conventional thrice weekly hemodialysis. PWV was measured by the foot-to-foot method and repeated after six months. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was measured at 0, 12 and 24 months. Routine clinical data and patient demographics were recorded and mortality outcomes were analyzed. Between 2007 and 2010, 466 Italian ESRD patients, 229 males and 237 females, age 19-97 (65.6) years, were followed up for 28.9 months. 128 patients (74M:54F) died. The major causes of death were acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in 47 (37%) patients (age 70, 26M:21F) and sudden death (SD) in 29 (23%) patients (age 72, 19M:10F). Paired PWV data was available in 308 surviving patients and in 106 patients who died. Baseline PWV was lower in surviving vs dead patients 8.46 +/- 1.8 vs 9.43 +/- 3.75 (p=0.0005). Repeat PWV values were unchanged in the 308 survivors (8.46 +/- 1.8 vs 8.53 +/- 1.85, p=0

  1. Continuous-Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy in a Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawoos, Shameemah; Suas-David, Nicolas; Suits, Arthur

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a new approach that couples a pulsed uniform supersonic flow with high sensitivity continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (UF-CRDS) operated in the near infrared (NIR). This combination is related to the CRESU technique developed in France and used for many years to study reaction kinetics at low temperature, and to the microwave based chirped-pulse uniform supersonic flow spectrometer (CPUF) developed in our group which has successfully demonstrated the use of pulsed uniform supersonic flow to probe reaction dynamics at temperatures as low as 22 K. CRDS operated with NIR permits access to the first overtones of C-H and O-H stretching/bending which, in combination with its extraordinary sensitivity opens new experiments complementary to the CPUF technique. The UF-CRDS apparatus (Figure) utilizes the pulsed uniform flow produced by means of a piezo-electric stack valve in combination with a Laval nozzle. At present, two machined aluminum Laval nozzles designed for carrier gases Ar and He generate flows with a temperature of approximately 25 K and pressure around 0.15 mbar. This flow is probed by an external cavity diode laser in the NIR (1280-1380 nm). Laval nozzles designed using a newly developed MATLAB-based program will be used in the future. A detailed illustration of the novel UF-CRDS instrumentation and its performance will be presented along with future directions and applications. I. Sims, J. L. Queffelec, A. Defrance, C. Rebrion-Rowe, D. Travers, P. Bocherel, B. Rowe, I. W. Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4229-4241, (1994). C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, N. Ariyasingha, L. N. Zack, I. R. Sims, R. W. Field, A. G. Suits, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 1599-1604, (2015). N. Suas-David, T. Vanfleteren, T. Foldes, S. Kassi, R. Georges, M. Herman, J. Phys. Chem.A, 119, 10022-10034, (2015). C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, Y. Shi, A. Kamasah, J. M. Oldham, A. G. Suits, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 116107, (2014).

  2. Numerical study of the wave-break in the vacuum-plasma interface during the interaction of an intense laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Chakhmachi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the wave break in the plasma-vacuum interface during the intense laser interaction is investigated. Since the nonlinear wave breaking is a non-adiabatic process, the fully kinetic 1D-3V Particle-In-Cell (PIC simulation experiments are performed to identify whether that the origin of this mechanism is electromagnetic or electrostatic. Our simulation results show that the nonlinear wave breaking on the vacuum-plasma interface has electrostatic origin. In addition, it is found that for pulse lengths exceeding the plasma wavelength this electrostatic phenomenon comes in conjunction with some active electromagnetic effects having the same impact on the electron acceleration. In these regards, we conduct sophisticated simulations isolating these electromagnetic effects and study the effects of the pulse parameters such as the pulse rise time, pulse length, and pulse shape on the boundary nonlinear wave breaking. The study of the pulse rise-time variation effects shows that as the rise time of the laser pulse decreases, the number of the electrons involved in the nonlinear wave breaking, maximum energy of the trapped electrons and the path length of the accelerated electrons in the phase space are increased. Also, the study of phase space and field patterns in our simulation indicates that the reduction of the pulse flat top duration time causes that the smaller part of the electrons and the smaller portion of the wake wave involve in the nonlinear wave breaking.

  3. Bilateral symmetry of radial pulse in high-level tennis players: implications for the validity of central aortic pulse wave analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojanovic, Boris; Waeber, Bernard; Gremion, Gerald; Liaudet, Lucas; Feihl, François

    2009-08-01

    Reconstruction of the central aortic pressure wave from the noninvasive recording of the radial pulse with applanation tonometry has become a standard tool in the field of hypertension. It is not presently known whether recording the radial pulse on the dominant or the nondominant side has any effect on such reconstruction. We carried out radial applanation tonometry on both forearms in young, healthy, male volunteers, who were either sedentary (n = 11) or high-level tennis players (n = 10). The purpose of including tennis players was to investigate individuals with extreme asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant upper limb. In the sedentary individuals, forearm circumference and handgrip strength were slightly larger on the dominant (mean +/- SD respectively 27.9 +/- 1.5 cm and 53.8 +/- 10 kg) than on nondominant side (27.3 +/- 1.6 cm, P central aortic pressure waveforms, as well as derived indices of central pulsatility, were not dependent on the side where applanation tonometry was carried out. Evidence from individuals with maximal asymmetry of dominant vs. nondominant upper limb indicates that laterality of measurement is not a methodological issue for central pulse wave analysis carried out with radial applanation tonometry.

  4. Visualization of Streamer Channels and Shock Waves Generated by Positive Pulsed Corona Discharge Using Laser Schlieren Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2004-01-01

    Streamer channels generated by a positive pulsed corona discharge are visualized using the laser schlieren method. The discharge occurs between a point-to-plane gap at atmospheric pressure with a pulse duration of less than 1 μs. In order to enhance the intensity of the schlieren image, water vapor is added to ambient gas. The schlieren visualizes heated gas in a streamer filament of 0.4 mm diameter. A temporal variation of the schlieren image after the discharge pulse shows that the heated gas moves outward from the streamer channel due to the diffusion. The diameter of the heated filament, in which the heated gas exists, increases from 0.4 mm to 1.1 mm within 1 ms following the discharge pulse. The schlieren image also shows shock waves generated by the discharge: a spherical shock wave generated at the tip of the point electrode and a plane shock wave generated at the surface of the plane electrode.

  5. Development of a Standard Protocol for the Harmonic Analysis of Radial Pulse Wave and Assessing Its Reliability in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Wei; Chen, Jiang-Ming; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to establish a standard protocol and to quantitatively assess the reliability of harmonic analysis of the radial pulse wave measured by a harmonic wave analyzer (TD01C system). Both intraobserver and interobserver assessments were conducted to investigate whether the values of harmonics are stable in successive measurements. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman plot were used for this purpose. For the reliability assessments of the intraobserver and the interobserver, 22 subjects (mean age 45 ± 14 years; 14 males and 8 females) were enrolled. The first eleven harmonics of the radial pulse wave presented excellent repeatability ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) for the intraobserver assessment and high reproducibility (ICCs range from 0.83 to 0.96 and [Formula: see text]) for the interobserver assessment. The Bland-Altman plot indicated that more than 90% of harmonic values fell within two standard deviations of the mean difference. Thus, we concluded that the harmonic analysis of the radial pulse wave using the TD01C system is a feasible and reliable method to assess a hemodynamic characteristic in clinical trial.

  6. Parametric uncertainty analysis of pulse wave propagation in a model of a human arterial network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Dongbin; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2007-10-01

    Reduced models of human arterial networks are an efficient approach to analyze quantitative macroscopic features of human arterial flows. The justification for such models typically arise due to the significantly long wavelength associated with the system in comparison to the lengths of arteries in the networks. Although these types of models have been employed extensively and many issues associated with their implementations have been widely researched, the issue of data uncertainty has received comparatively little attention. Similar to many biological systems, a large amount of uncertainty exists in the value of the parameters associated with the models. Clearly reliable assessment of the system behaviour cannot be made unless the effect of such data uncertainty is quantified. In this paper we present a study of parametric data uncertainty in reduced modelling of human arterial networks which is governed by a hyperbolic system. The uncertain parameters are modelled as random variables and the governing equations for the arterial network therefore become stochastic. This type stochastic hyperbolic systems have not been previously systematically studied due to the difficulties introduced by the uncertainty such as a potential change in the mathematical character of the system and imposing boundary conditions. We demonstrate how the application of a high-order stochastic collocation method based on the generalized polynomial chaos expansion, combined with a discontinuous Galerkin spectral/hp element discretization in physical space, can successfully simulate this type of hyperbolic system subject to uncertain inputs with bounds. Building upon a numerical study of propagation of uncertainty and sensitivity in a simplified model with a single bifurcation, a systematical parameter sensitivity analysis is conducted on the wave dynamics in a multiple bifurcating human arterial network. Using the physical understanding of the dynamics of pulse waves in these types of

  7. Characterizing Seismic Anisotropy across the Peruvian Flat-Slab Subduction Zone: Shear Wave Splitting from PULSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    Although 10% of subduction zones worldwide today exhibit shallow or flat subduction, we are yet to fully understand how and why these slabs go flat. An excellent study location for such a problem is in Peru, where the largest region of flat-subduction currently exists, extending ~1500 km in length (from 3 °S to 15 °S) and ~300 km in width. Across this region we investigate the pattern of seismic anisotropy, an indicator for past and/or ongoing deformation in the upper mantle. To achieve this we conduct shear wave splitting analyzes at 40 broadband stations from the PULSE project (PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment). These stations were deployed for 2+ years across the southern half of the Peruvian flat-slab region. We present detailed shear wave splitting results for deep and teleseismic events, making use of a wide variety of available phases that sample the upper mantle directly beneath the stations (such as SKS, SKKS, PKS, sSKS, SKiKS, ScS and local/direct S). We analyze the variability of our results with respect to initial polarizations and ray paths, as well as spatial variability between stations as the underlying slab morphology changes. Preliminary results show predominately NW-SE fast polarizations (trench oblique to sub-parallel) over the flat-slab region east of Lima. These results are consistent with observations of more complex multi-layered anisotropy beneath a nearby permanent station (NNA). Further south, towards the transition to steeper subduction, the splitting pattern becomes increasingly dominated by null measurements. Over to the east however, beyond Cuzco, where the mantle wedge might begin to play a role, we record fast polarizations quasi-parallel to the local slab contours. We carefully evaluate the different possible source locations within the subduction zone for this seismic anisotropy and observe increasing evidence for distinct anisotropy within the slab as well as the sub-slab mantle.

  8. Temporally resolved diagnosis of an atmospheric-pressure pulse-modulated argon surface wave plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe; Zhang, Jialiang; Liu, Dongping

    2018-01-01

    A pulse-modulated argon surface wave plasma generated at atmospheric pressure is characterized by means of temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The temporal evolution of the gas temperature, the electron temperature and density, the radiative species of atomic Ar, and the molecular band of OH(A) and N2(C) are investigated experimentally by altering the instantaneous power, pulse repetitive frequency, and duty ratio. We focused on the physical phenomena occurring at the onset of the time-on period and after the power interruption at the start of the time-off period. Meanwhile, the results are discussed qualitatively for an in-depth insight of its dynamic evolution.

  9. Applicability of the polynomial chaos expansion method for personalization of a cardiovascular pulse wave propagation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberts, W; Donders, W P; Delhaas, T; van de Vosse, F N

    2014-12-01

    Patient-specific modeling requires model personalization, which can be achieved in an efficient manner by parameter fixing and parameter prioritization. An efficient variance-based method is using generalized polynomial chaos expansion (gPCE), but it has not been applied in the context of model personalization, nor has it ever been compared with standard variance-based methods for models with many parameters. In this work, we apply the gPCE method to a previously reported pulse wave propagation model and compare the conclusions for model personalization with that of a reference analysis performed with Saltelli's efficient Monte Carlo method. We furthermore differentiate two approaches for obtaining the expansion coefficients: one based on spectral projection (gPCE-P) and one based on least squares regression (gPCE-R). It was found that in general the gPCE yields similar conclusions as the reference analysis but at much lower cost, as long as the polynomial metamodel does not contain unnecessary high order terms. Furthermore, the gPCE-R approach generally yielded better results than gPCE-P. The weak performance of the gPCE-P can be attributed to the assessment of the expansion coefficients using the Smolyak algorithm, which might be hampered by the high number of model parameters and/or by possible non-smoothness in the output space. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Applanation tonometry: a reliable technique to assess aortic pulse wave velocity in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, K D; Hubli, M; Krassioukov, A V

    2014-04-01

    Within-subject repeated measures. To determine the intra- and inter-tester reliability of aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) measurements collected using applanation tonometry in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Inpatient Rehabilitation Centre and outpatient Clinic in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Fifteen men and three women with traumatic SCI (age: 46±16 years; C3-L1; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A-D; 2-284 months post injury) participated in two testing sessions separated by an average of 2 days. During each testing session, aPWV measurements were collected in the supine position following 10 min of rest. Arterial blood pressure waveforms were collected simultaneously by two trained raters at the carotid and femoral arterial sites using applanation tonometry. Heart rate was continuously measured using a single-lead electrocardiogram, whereas brachial blood pressures were measured at 5-min intervals using an automated device. Intra- and inter-tester aPWV measurements demonstrated almost perfect reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.98 (Pblood pressure between intra- and inter-testing sessions. Applanation tonometry measurements of aPWV are reliable in individuals with SCI. In addition, the SDDs were smaller than a clinically relevant value, suggesting that this measurement is suitable for repeated measures study designs in SCI.

  11. ABCA1-dependent serum cholesterol efflux capacity inversely correlates with pulse wave velocity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favari, Elda; Ronda, Nicoletta; Adorni, Maria Pia; Zimetti, Francesca; Salvi, Paolo; Manfredini, Matteo; Bernini, Franco; Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to induce cell cholesterol efflux is considered one of its main antiatherogenic properties. Little is known about the impact of such HDL function on vascular physiology. We investigated the relationship between ABCA1-dependent serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC), an HDL functionality indicator, and pulse wave velocity (PWV), an indicator of arterial stiffness. Serum of 167 healthy subjects was used to conduct CEC measurement, and carotid-femoral PWV was measured with a high-fidelity tonometer. J774 macrophages, labeled with [(3)H]cholesterol and stimulated to express ABCA1, were exposed to sera; the difference between cholesterol efflux from stimulated and unstimulated cells provided specific ABCA1-mediated CEC. PWV is inversely correlated with ABCA1-dependent CEC (r = -0.183; P = 0.018). Moreover, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, mean arterial pressure, serum LDL, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose, PWV displays a significant negative regression on ABCA1-dependent CEC (β = -0.204; 95% confidence interval, -0.371 to -0.037). The finding that ABCA1-dependent CEC, but not serum HDL cholesterol level (r = -0.002; P = 0.985), is a significant predictor of PWV in healthy subjects points to the relevance of HDL function in vascular physiology and arterial stiffness prevention.

  12. Double-path acquisition of pulse wave transit time and heartbeat using self-mixing interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingbin; Huang, Wencai; Wei, Zheng; Zhang, Jie; An, Tong; Wang, Xiulin; Xu, Huizhen

    2017-06-01

    We present a technique based on self-mixing interferometry for acquiring the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) and heartbeat. A signal processing method based on Continuous Wavelet Transform and Hilbert Transform is applied to extract potentially useful information in the self-mixing interference (SMI) signal, including PWTT and heartbeat. Then, some cardiovascular characteristics of the human body are easily acquired without retrieving the SMI signal by complicated algorithms. Experimentally, the PWTT is measured on the finger and the toe of the human body using double-path self-mixing interferometry. Experimental statistical data show the relation between the PWTT and blood pressure, which can be used to estimate the systolic pressure value by fitting. Moreover, the measured heartbeat shows good agreement with that obtained by a photoplethysmography sensor. The method that we demonstrate, which is based on self-mixing interferometry with significant advantages of simplicity, compactness and non-invasion, effectively illustrates the viability of the SMI technique for measuring other cardiovascular signals.

  13. Cystatin C is better than albuminuria as a predictor of pulse wave velocity in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Akpinar, Timur Selcuk; Tufan, Fatih; Kaya, Omer; Bozbey, Hamza Ugur; Atas, Riza; Toz, Bahtiyar; Atay, Kadri; Yilmaz, Emre; Besiroglu, Mehmet; Nas, Kamil; Hadrovic, Nur; Illyés, Miklós; Ecder, Tevfik

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is important in the evaluation of the cardiovascular risk in both general population and hypertensive patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the associations of both serum cystatin C levels and albuminuria with arterial stiffness in healthy controls and hypertensive patients. Seventy-six healthy controls (male/female = 44/32) and 76 hypertensive patients (male/female = 43/33) were enrolled. Arterial stiffness parameters such as augmentation index (AIx) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were non-invasively measured with the Arteriograph (Tensiomed Ltd., Budapest, Hungary). AIx (31.92 ± 14.31 vs. 27.95 ± 11.03, p = 0.03) and PWV (9.84 ± 1.62 vs. 8.87 ± 2.04, p albuminuria was significantly associated with PWV in hypertensive patients. Serum cystatin C may be better than albuminuria as a predictor of arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients.

  14. Effects of Obesity and Hypertension on Pulse Wave Velocity in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsum-Mecci, Nazia; Goss, Charles; Kozel, Beth A; Garbutt, Jane M; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Dharnidharka, Vikas R

    2017-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a biomarker of arterial stiffness. Findings from prior studies are conflicting regarding the impact of obesity on PWV in children. The authors measured carotid-femoral PWV in 159 children aged 4 to 18 years, of whom 95 were healthy, 25 were obese, 15 had hypertension (HTN), and 24 were both obese and hypertensive. Mean PWV increased with age but did not differ by race or sex. In adjusted analyses in children 10 years and older (n=102), PWV was significantly higher in children with hypertension (PWV±standard deviation, 4.9±0.7 m/s), obesity (5.0±0.9 m/s), and combined obesity-hypertension (5.2±0.6 m/s) vs healthy children (4.3±0.7 m/s) (each group, Pobesity and HTN both significantly and independently increased PWV, while African American children did not have a higher PWV than Caucasian children. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Study of characteristic point identification and preprocessing method for pulse wave signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tang, Ning; Jiang, Guiping

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics in pulse wave signals (PWSs) include the information of physiology and pathology of human cardiovascular system. Therefore, identification of characteristic points in PWSs plays a significant role in analyzing human cardiovascular system. Particularly, the characteristic points show personal dependent features and are easy to be affected. Acquiring a signal with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and integrity is fundamentally important to precisely identify the characteristic points. Based on the mathematical morphology theory, we design a combined filter, which can effectively suppress the baseline drift and remove the high-frequency noise simultaneously, to preprocess the PWSs. Furthermore, the characteristic points of the preprocessed signal are extracted according to its position relations with the zero-crossing points of wavelet coefficients of the signal. In addition, the differential method is adopted to calibrate the position offset of characteristic points caused by the wavelet transform. We investigated four typical PWSs reconstructed by three Gaussian functions with tunable parameters. The numerical results suggested that the proposed method could identify the characteristic points of PWSs accurately.

  16. A 1D pulse wave propagation model of the hemodynamics of calf muscle pump function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, J M T; Leguy, C A D; Huberts, W; Narracott, A J; Rittweger, J; van de Vosse, F N

    2015-07-01

    The calf muscle pump is a mechanism which increases venous return and thereby compensates for the fluid shift towards the lower body during standing. During a muscle contraction, the embedded deep veins collapse and venous return increases. In the subsequent relaxation phase, muscle perfusion increases due to increased perfusion pressure, as the proximal venous valves temporarily reduce the distal venous pressure (shielding). The superficial and deep veins are connected via perforators, which contain valves allowing flow in the superficial-to-deep direction. The aim of this study is to investigate and quantify the physiological mechanisms of the calf muscle pump, including the effect of venous valves, hydrostatic pressure, and the superficial venous system. Using a one-dimensional pulse wave propagation model, a muscle contraction is simulated by increasing the extravascular pressure in the deep venous segments. The hemodynamics are studied in three different configurations: a single artery-vein configuration with and without valves and a more detailed configuration including a superficial vein. Proximal venous valves increase effective venous return by 53% by preventing reflux. Furthermore, the proximal valves shielding function increases perfusion following contraction. Finally, the superficial system aids in maintaining the perfusion during the contraction phase and reduces the refilling time by 37%. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Serum cystatin C is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yu Kyung; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Kye Whon; Cho, Ryu Kyoung; Chung, Seung Min; Moon, Jun Sung; Yoon, Ji Sung; Won, Kyu Chang; Lee, Hyoung Woo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the serum cystatin C level and cardiovascular disease risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We studied 523 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and calculated estimated 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (%). Subclinical atherosclerosis was defined as brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity ⩾1700 ms, indicating the presence of arterial stiffness. Cystatin C level was significantly higher in the subclinical atherosclerosis group (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity ⩾ 1700 ms) than in the non-subclinical atherosclerosis group (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity diabetes and cystatin C level, but not by serum creatinine, 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease score and estimated glomerular filtration rate in the multiple linear regression analysis. In addition, an increase in cystatin C level was independently associated with the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, hypertension, 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk score, serum creatinine level, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and haemoglobin A1c (odds ratio = 1.200, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.38, p = 0.011). Serum cystatin C level was significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. This result suggests that an increase in cystatin C level could be a valuable surrogate marker for the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Numerical modeling of the pulse wave propagation in large blood vessels based on liquid and wall interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rup, K.; Dróżdż, A.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop a non-linear, one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in the arterial cardiovascular system. The model includes partial differential equations resulting from the balance of mass and momentum for the fluid-filled area and the balance equation for the area of the wall and vessels. The considered mathematical model of pulse wave propagation in the thoracic aorta section takes into account the viscous dissipation of fluid energy, realistic values of parameters describing the physicochemical properties of blood and vessel wall. Boundary and initial conditions contain the appropriate information obtained from in vivo measurements. As a result of the numerical solution of the mass and momentum balance equations for the blood and the equilibrium equation for the arterial wall area, time- dependent deformation, respective velocity profiles and blood pressure were determined.

  19. A Clinical Study of the Pulse Wave Characteristics at the Three Pulse Diagnosis Positions of Chon, Gwan and Cheok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J. Jeon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we analyze the baseline, signal strength, aortic augmentation index (AIx, radial AIx, time to reflection and P_T2 at Chon, Gwan, and Cheok, which are the three pulse diagnosis positions in Oriental medicine. For the pulse measurement, we used the SphygmoCor apparatus, which has been widely used for the evaluation of the arterial stiffness at the aorta. By two-way repeated measures analysis of variance, we tested two independent measurements for repeatability and investigated their mean differences among Chon, Gwan and Cheok. To characterize further the parameters that were shown to be different between each palpation position, we carried out Duncan's test for the multiple comparisons. The baseline and signal strength were statistically different (<.05 among Chon, Gwan and Cheok, respectively, which supports the major hypothesis of Oriental medicine that all of the three palpation positions contain different clinical information. On the other hand, aortic AIx and time to reflection were found to be statistically different between Chon and the others, and radial AIx and P_T2 did not show any difference between pulse positions. In the clinical sense, however, the aortic AIx at each palpation position was found to fall within the 90% confidence interval of normal arterial compliance. The results of the multiple comparisons indicate that the parameters of arterial stiffness were independent of the palpation positions. This work is the first attempt to characterize quantitatively the pulse signals at Chon, Gwan and Cheok with some relevant parameters extracted from the SphygmoCor apparatus.

  20. Indices of cardiovascular function derived from peripheral pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry: a measurement repeatability study

    OpenAIRE

    Crilly, Mike; Coch, Christoph; Bruce, Margaret; Clark, Hazel; Williams, David

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Pulse wave analysis (PWA) using applanation tonometry is a non-invasive technique for assessing cardiovascular function. It produces three important indices: ejection duration index (ED%), augmentation index adjusted for heart rate (AIX@75), and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR%). The aim of this study was to assess within- and between-observer repeatability of these measurements. After resting supine for 15 minutes, 20 ambulant patients (16 male) in sinus rhythm under...

  1. ABCA1-dependent serum cholesterol efflux capacity inversely correlates with pulse wave velocity in healthy subjects[S

    OpenAIRE

    Favari, Elda; Ronda, Nicoletta; Adorni, Maria Pia; Zimetti, Francesca; Salvi, Paolo; Manfredini, Matteo; Bernini, Franco; Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F. G.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to induce cell cholesterol efflux is considered one of its main antiatherogenic properties. Little is known about the impact of such HDL function on vascular physiology. We investigated the relationship between ABCA1-dependent serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC), an HDL functionality indicator, and pulse wave velocity (PWV), an indicator of arterial stiffness. Serum of 167 healthy subjects was used to conduct CEC measurement, and carotid-femoral PWV was measured with a...

  2. Performance assessment of Pulse Wave Imaging using conventional ultrasound in canine aortas ex vivo and normal human arteries in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X; Qaqish, William; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    The propagation behavior of the arterial pulse wave may provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique capable of mapping multiple wall motion waveforms along a short arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle, allowing for the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation uniformity to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to improve the clinical utility of PWI using a conventional ultrasound system. The tradeoff between PWI spatial and temporal resolution was evaluated using an ex vivo canine aorta (n = 2) setup to assess the effects of varying image acquisition and signal processing parameters on the measurement of the PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity r2. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of 10 healthy volunteers (24.8 ± 3.3 y.o.) to determine the waveform tracking feature that would yield the most precise PWV measurements and highest r2 values in vivo. The ex vivo results indicated that the highest precision for measuring PWVs ~ 2.5 - 3.5 m/s was achieved using 24-48 scan lines within a 38 mm image plane width (i.e. 0.63 - 1.26 lines/mm). The in vivo results indicated that tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveform would consistently yield the most precise PWV measurements and minimize the error in the propagation uniformity measurement. Such findings may help establish the optimal image acquisition and signal processing parameters that may improve the reliability of PWI as a clinical measurement tool.

  3. Reduction in lateral thermal damage using heat-conducting templates: a comparison of continuous wave and pulsed CO2 lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Nicole; Spector, Jared; Ellis, Darrel L; Reinisch, Lou

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of the continuous wave (c.w.) CO(2) laser are offset by the delay in laser wound healing secondary to thermal damage. We have developed novel heat-conducting templates to reduce laser thermal damage. Because shortened pulse durations also decrease thermal damage, we tested the effectiveness of heat-conducting templates with a c.w. CO(2) clinical laser and a short-pulsed CO(2) laser to determine the best method and mechanism to minimize thermal damage. Comparison of 0.2-second shuttered c.w. and 5-microsecond pulsed CO(2) lasers were made by doing incisions on 150 tissue samples from reduction mammoplasties and abdominoplasties. Copper, aluminum, glass, and Plexiglass heat-conducting templates were tested against no template (air) with both lasers. Histological samples were evaluated using computerized morphometrics analysis. Statistically significant reductions in lateral thermal damage were seen with the copper (50%) and aluminum (39%) templates used with the c.w. CO(2) laser. Only the copper template (39%) significantly reduced thermal damage when used with the pulsed CO(2) laser. Less thermal damage was seen using the pulsed CO(2) laser compared to the c.w. CO(2) laser with each template. Heat-conducting templates significantly reduced the amount of lateral thermal damage when used with the c.w. CO(2) laser (copper and aluminum) and short-pulsed CO(2) laser (copper). The c.w. CO(2) laser with the copper template compared favorably to the short-pulsed CO(2) laser without a template. Therefore, both heat conductive templates and short-pulse structure provide successful methods for reducing lateral thermal damage, and a combination of the two appears to provide optimal results.

  4. Factors related to pulse wave velocity and augmentation index in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Gülperi; Demirci, Meltem Sezis; Tumuklu, Murat; Ascı, Gulay; Sipahi, Savas; Toz, Huseyin; Bascı, Ali; Ok, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    Augmentation index (AIx) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) are early markers of atherosclerotic vascular changes and also have been shown to be predictive of cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between PWV and AIx-HR75, which is the corrected form of AIx according to a heart rate of 75 beats/min, echocardiographic parameters and biochemical parameters in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. AIx-HR75 and PWV were measured in 556 HD patients by applanation tonometry using the SphygmoCor device. The mean PWV and AIx-HR75 values of the study group were 10.2 ± 2.4 and 28.4 ± 10.2 m/s. A positive correlation was found between PWV and AIx-HR75 (r = 0.214, p = 0.000). AIx-HR75 correlated with age (r = 0.093, p = 0.028), body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.194, p = 0.000), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (r = 0.335, p = 0.000), pulse pressure (PP) (r = 0.212, p = 0.000), cardiothoracic index (r = 0.155, p = 0.016), and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (r = 0.152, p = 0.001). PWV correlated with MAP (r = 0.208, p = 0.000), PP (r = 0.098, r = 0.021), left ventricular mass (r = 0.105, p = 0.023), and predialysis sodium level (r = -0.105, p = 0.023). In the multivariate analyses, PWV was associated with MAP (t = 3.78, p = 0.000), presence of diabetes (t = 3.20, p = 0.001), and predialysis sodium level (t = -2.06, p = 0.040), and AIx-HR75 was associated with age (t = 2.48, p = 0.014), female sex (t = 3.98, p = 0.000), BSA (t = -2.15, p = 0.033), and MAP (t = 7.02, p = 0.000). There is a strong association between MAP and arterial stiffness parameters in HD patients. We feel that efficient control of blood pressure could lead to reduced arterial stiffness in HD patients.

  5. Measurement of regional pulse wave velocity using very high frame rate ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Hongo, Kazue; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the propagation velocity of the pressure wave along the artery due to the heartbeat. The PWV becomes faster with progression of arteriosclerosis and, thus, can be used as a diagnostic index of arteriosclerosis. Measurement of PWV is known as a noninvasive approach for diagnosis of arteriosclerosis and is widely used in clinical situations. In the traditional PWV method, the average PWV is calculated between two points, the carotid and femoral arteries, at an interval of several tens of centimeters. However, PWV depends on part of the arterial tree, i.e., PWVs in the distal arteries are faster than those in the proximal arteries. Therefore, measurement of regional PWV is preferable. To evaluate regional PWV in the present study, the minute vibration velocity of the human carotid arterial wall was measured at intervals of 0.2 mm at 72 points in the arterial longitudinal direction by the phased-tracking method at a high temporal resolution of 3472 Hz, and PWV was estimated by applying the Hilbert transform to those waveforms. In the present study, carotid arteries of three healthy subjects were measured in vivo. The PWVs in short segments of 14.4 mm in the arterial longitudinal direction were estimated to be 5.6, 6.4, and 6.7 m/s, which were in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, for one of the subjects, a component was clearly found propagating from the periphery to the direction of the heart, i.e., a well known component reflected by the peripheral arteries. By using the proposed method, the propagation speed of the reflection component was also separately estimated to be -8.4 m/s. The higher magnitude of PWV for the reflection component was considered to be the difference in blood pressure at the arrivals of the forward and reflection components. Such a method would be useful for more sensitive evaluation of the change in elasticity due to progression of arteriosclerosis by measuring the regional PWV

  6. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity in a healthy adult sample: The ELSA-Brasil study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Cunha, Roberto S; Molina, Maria Del Carmen B; Chór, Dora; Griep, Rosane H; Duncan, Bruce B; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Barreto, Sandhi M; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Mill, José Geraldo

    2018-01-15

    Aging declines essential physiological functions, and the vascular system is strongly affected by artery stiffening. We intended to define the age- and sex-specific reference values for carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) in a sample free of major risk factors. The ELSA-Brasil study enrolled 15,105 participants aged 35-74years. The healthy sample was achieved by excluding diabetics, those over the optimal and normal blood pressure levels, body mass index ≤18.5 or ≥25kg/m2, current and former smokers, and those with self-report of previous cardiovascular disease. After exclusions, the sample consisted of 2158 healthy adults (1412 women). Although cf-PWV predictors were similar between sex (age, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate), cf-PWV was higher in men (8.74±1.15 vs. 8.31±1.13m/s; adjusted for age and MAP, PBrasil population (n=15,105) increased by twice the age-related slope of cf-PWV growth, regardless of sex (0.0919±0.182 vs. 0.0504±0.153m/s per year for men, 0.0960±0.173 vs. 0.0606±0.139m/s per year for women). cf-PWV is different between men and women and even in an optimal and normal range of MAP and free of other classical risk factors for arterial stiffness, reference values for cf-PWV should take into account MAP levels. Also, the presence of major risk factors in the general population doubles the age-related rise in cf-PWV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ecocardiografia modo Doppler pulsado em gatos clinicamente sadios Pulsed wave Doppler echocardiography in clinically healthy cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.O. Carvalho

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o fluxo sangüíneo através das quatro valvas cardíacas em 30 gatos clinicamente sadios, com idade entre um e cinco anos e peso médio de 4,08kg, por meio da ecocardiografia modo Doppler pulsado. Foram medidas a velocidade máxima e a velocidade média dos fluxos, e realizou-se uma análise qualitativa dos seus perfis. Os animais foram sedados pela combinação de quetamina (12mg/kg e acepromazina (0,04mg/kg, aplicados por via intramuscular. Observou-se correlação positiva entre os parâmetros avaliados e a freqüência cardíaca, com exceção daqueles medidos no fluxo da valva aórtica. Não se observou correlação entre velocidades máxima e média e freqüência cardíaca e entre aquelas e peso corporal, e não houve diferença entre sexos.Pulsed wave Doppler echocardiography was used to study blood flow across the cardiac valves in 30 five-year-old cats (average body weight = 4.08kg. Animals were sedated using a combination of ketamin (12mg/kg, IM and acepromazin (0.04mg/kg, IM. Peak and mean velocities were determined, and blood flow patterns were recorded at the four cardiac valves. All variables, except those characterizing aortic valve flow, were positively correlated with heart rate. Blood flow variables were not correlated, however, with body weight; and there were no differences between males and females.

  8. Lack of circadian variation of pulse wave velocity measurements in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Luciano F; Diegues-Silva, Luzia; Diniz, Patrícia M; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Krieger, Eduardo M; Bortolotto, Luiz A

    2011-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent marker of cardiovascular events. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a validated method to detect arterial stiffness that can be influenced by several factors including age and blood pressure. However, it is not clear whether PWV could be influenced by circadian variations. In the present study, the authors measured blood pressure and carotid-femoral PWV measurements in 15 young healthy volunteers in 4 distinct periods: 8 am, noon, 4 pm, and 8 pm. No significant variations of systolic (P=.92), mean (P=.77), and diastolic (P=.66) blood pressure among 8 am (113±15, 84±8, 69±6 mm Hg), noon (114±13, 83±8, 68±6 mm Hg), 4 pm (114±13, 85±8, 70±7 mm Hg), and 8 pm (113±7, 83±10, 68±7 mm Hg), respectively, were observed. Similarly, carotid-femoral PWV did not change among the periods (8 am: 7.6 ± 1.4 m/s, noon: 7.4±1.1 m/s, 4 pm: 7.6±1.0 m/s, 8 pm, 7.6±1.3 m/s; P=.85). Considering all measurements, mean blood pressure significantly correlated with PWV (r=.31; P=.016). In young healthy volunteers, there is no significant circadian variation of carotid-femoral PWV. These findings support the concept that it does not appear mandatory to perform PWV measurements at exactly the same period of the day. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Temperature change in human muscle during and after pulsed short-wave diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, D O; Knight, K; Fujiwara, T; Castel, J C

    1999-01-01

    A time series design was used, with the dependent variable being gastrocnemius muscle temperature at a depth of 3 cm. To determine the rate of temperature rise and the rate of post-treatment temperature decline in skeletal muscle following the application of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD). Data on PSWD rate and longevity of heating are 20 years old and outdated. With the recent introduction of advanced diathermy equipment, results of our study would provide clinicians with much needed information regarding treatment duration. A 23-gauge thermistor was inserted into the center of the medial head of the anesthetized gastrocnemius muscle, 3 cm below the skin's surface of 20 subjects. The PSWD (27.12 MHz frequency) was applied using the following parameters: 800 bursts per second; 400 microseconds burst duration; 850 microseconds interburst interval; with a peak root mean square (RMS) amplitude of 150 W per burst and an average RMS output of 48 W. Temperature changes were documented every 5 minutes during the treatment and additionally at 5 and 10 minutes following treatment. The average baseline and peak temperatures were 35.84 +/- 0.93 degrees C and 39.80 +/- 0.83 degrees C, respectively. Mean temperature increases were: 1.36 +/- 0.90 degrees C (5 min); 2.87 +/- 1.44 degrees C (10 min); 3.78 +/- 1.19 degrees C (15 min); 3.49 +/- 1.13 degrees C (20 min). After the treatment terminated, intramuscular temperature dropped 0.97 +/- 0.68 degree C in 5 minutes and 1.78 +/- 0.69 degrees C in 10 minutes. PSWD is an effective modality if temperature elevation of deep tissue over a large area is the clinical objective.

  10. Negative ion rich plasmas in continuous and pulsed wave modes in a minimum-B magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Debaprasad; Pandey, Shail; Aneja, Jyoti; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Generation of hydrogen negative ion rich plasmas is investigated in continuous wave (CW) and pulse modulated (PM) wave modes of 2.45 GHz in a minimum-B magnetic field. The waves are launched directly into the plasma device and utilize wave particle resonances for high density plasma generation. In CW operation, the chamber is divided into two sections, namely, the source and downstream region, separated by a transverse magnetic field that allows only cold electrons ({approx}1 eV) into the downstream region helpful for the generation of negative ions. The H{sup -} density is measured by the second derivative beat method and is compared with the values obtained from a steady state model and the extracted current density. In the pulsed mode, temporal filtering generates negative ion rich plasmas in the afterglow phase. The H{sup -} density in the afterglow is estimated using saturation current ratio method and the results are compared with a time dependent model using particle balance equations. The essential idea in both the filtering techniques is to assist generation of negative ions and prevent its destruction by hot electrons.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Nikolai H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor hand area (M1-HAND, if the induced tissue current has a posterior-to-anterior (PA or anterior-to-posterior (AP direction. Here we tested whether similar direction-specific effects could be elicited in M1-HAND using TMS pulses with a half-sine wave configuration. Results In 10 young participants, we applied half-sine pulses to the right M1-HAND which elicited PA or AP currents with respect to the orientation of the central sulcus. Measurements of the motor evoked potential (MEP revealed that PA half-sine stimulation resulted in lower resting motor threshold (RMT than AP stimulation. When stimulus intensity (SI was gradually increased as percentage of maximal stimulator output, the stimulus–response curve (SRC of MEP amplitude showed a leftward shift for PA as opposed to AP half-sine stimulation. Further, MEP latencies were approximately 1 ms shorter for PA relative to AP half-sine stimulation across the entire SI range tested. When adjusting SI to the respective RMT of PA and AP stimulation, the direction-specific differences in MEP latencies persisted, while the gain function of MEP amplitudes was comparable for PA and AP stimulation. Conclusions Using half-sine pulse configuration, single-pulse TMS elicits consistent direction-specific effects in M1-HAND that are similar to TMS with monophasic pulses. The longer MEP latency for AP half-sine stimulation suggests that PA and AP half-sine stimulation preferentially activates different sets of cortical neurons that are involved in the generation of different corticospinal descending volleys.

  12. Picosecond pulses of coherent MM-wave radiation in a photoinjector-driven waveguide free-selected laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochs, S.N.; Le Sage, G.P.; Feng, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A 5 MeV, high repetition rate (2.142 GHz in burst mode), high brightness, tabletop photoinjector is currently under construction at the UC Davis Department of Applied Science, on the LLNL site. Ultrashort pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation can be generated by transversally accelerating the electron beam with a wiggler in either metallic or dielectric-loaded waveguide FEL structures. This interaction is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Subpicosecond photoelectron bunches will be produced in the photoinjector by irradiating a high quantum efficiency Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride) photocathode with a train of 100 UV (210 nm), ultra-short (250 fs) laser pulses. These bunches will be accelerated in a 1-1/2 cell {pi}-mode X-band RF gun e energized by a 20 MW, 8,568 GHz SLAC klystron. The peak current is 0.25 kA (0.25 nC, 1 ps), with a normalized beam emittance {epsilon}{sub n}<2.5 {pi} mm-mrad. This prebunched electron beam is then transversally accelerated in a cylindrical waveguide by a 30-mm period, 10 period long helical wiggler. The peak wiggler field is adjusted to 8.5 kG, so that the group velocity of the radiated electromagnetic waves matches the axial velocity of the electron bunch (grazing condition, zero slippage). Chirped output pulses in excess of 2 MW power are predicted, with an instantaneous bandwidth extending from 125 GHz to 225 GHz and a pulse duration of 15 ps (HWHM). To produce even shorter pulses, a dielectric-loaded waveguide can be used. The dispersion relation of this waveguide structure has an inflection point (zero group velocity dispersion). If the grazing condition is satisfied at this point, the final output pulse duration is no longer determined by slippage, or by group velocity dispersion and bandwidth, but by higher-order dispersive effects yielding transform-limited pulses.

  13. Association of pulse wave velocity with total lung capacity: A cross-sectional analysis of the BOLD London study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, André F S; Patel, Jaymini; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Jones, Meinir; Burney, Peter G J

    2015-12-01

    Low lung function, measured using spirometry, has been associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease, but whether this is explained by airflow obstruction or restriction is a question that remains unanswered. To assess the association of total lung capacity (TLC), forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) with several cardio-metabolic and inflammatory markers. In the follow up of the Burden of Lung Disease (BOLD) study in London, acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometric, pulse rate, pulse wave velocity and blood pressure data were obtained from 108 participants. Blood samples for measurement of cardio-metabolic and inflammatory markers were also collected from these participants. Association of lung function and volume with the different biomarkers was examined in multivariable linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Following adjustment for age, sex, height, and ethnicity, TLC (adjusted coefficient = -1.53; 95% CI: -2.57, -0.49) and FVC (adjusted coefficient = -2.66; 95% CI: -4.98, -0.34) were inversely associated with pulse wave velocity, and further adjustment for smoking status, pack-years and body mass index (BMI) did not materially change these results. FEV1 was inversely associated with systolic blood pressure, and adjustment for smoking status, pack-years and BMI made this association stronger (adjusted coefficient = -9.47; 95% CI: -15.62, -3.32). The inverse association of pulse wave velocity, which is a marker of cardiovascular disease, with TLC suggests that the association of the former with low FVC is independent of airflow obstruction. The association between FEV1 with systolic blood pressure after adjustment for FVC suggests an association with airflow obstruction rather than with restricted spirometry. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO2 laser beat-wave in GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Pigeon, J J; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the generation of a train of ~ 2 ps, 10 um laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO2 laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  15. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Shin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, si

  16. Noninvasive pulse wave analysis for the determination of central artery stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrock, Marc; Scholze, Alexandra; Compton, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    of the peripheral radial artery waveform with invasive measurements of the ratio of pulse-pressure-to-stroke-volume. A total of 112 invasive measurements of the ratio of pulse-pressure-to-stroke-volume and noninvasive determinations of central artery stiffness were performed in 49 patients on the intensive care...... a significant correlation between noninvasively obtained central artery stiffness and invasive measurements of the ratio of pulse-pressure-to-stroke-volume (Spearman r=0.40; p...

  17. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Miura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES.

  18. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES.

  19. Pulse-wave encephalopathy: a comparative study of the hydrodynamics of leukoaraiosis and normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, G.A. [Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    There is a strong association between the occurrence of leukoaraiosis and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Venous compression secondary to alterations in craniospinal compliance is implicated in the pathogenesis of NPH, and venous pathology has also been implicated in leukoaraiosis. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the blood-flow and fluid-pulsatility characteristics of these conditions. I initially studied 18 subjects without pathology, with MRI flow-quantification studies of the cerebral arteries and veins, to define the range of normality. The main study involved 10 patients with idiopathic dementia but no leukoaraiosis who served as controls, 50 with idiopathic dementia with varying degrees of leukoaraiosis and 18 with NPH. I compared blood-flow volumes, vascular pulse-wave amplitudes and velocities. There was no significant difference in blood flow across the dementia patients. In patients with moderate leukoaraiosis, arterial pulsatility was 69%, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation 104%, sagittal sinus pulsatility 48% and cortical vein pulsatility 34% higher than in demented patients without leukoaraiosis. Patients with NPH showed similar results with arterial pulsatility increased by 56% and sagittal sinus pulsatility by 70%. By contrast, the NPH patients' CSF pulse was 42% and the pulse wave delay at the sagittal sinus 50% less than in moderate leukoaraiosis. Thus, leukoaraiosis and NPH share increased arterial and sinus pulsatility. In leukoaraiosis cortical vein compliance is initially increased but in severe leukoaraiosis and NPH it is reduced. (orig.)

  20. Polarization evolution of vector wave amplitudes in twisted fibers pumped by single and paired pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanee, M; Haus, J W; Armas-Rivera, I; Beltrán-Pérez, G; Ibarra-Escamilla, B; Duran-Sanchez, M; Álvarez-Tamayo, R I; Kuzin, E A; Bracamontes-Rodríguez, Y E; Pottiez, O

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear polarization dynamics of single and paired pulses in twisted fibers is experimentally and numerically studied. Accompanying a dramatic difference in the output spectrum when a single- or double-amplified soliton pulse is launched in the fiber, the output polarization for the two cases also reveals very different characteristics.

  1. A study of the realizability and performance of focused-wave pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, G. D.

    An investigation is conducted of Ziolkowski's (1989) simulation of EM directed-energy pulse trains (EDEPTs), in the context diffraction limits. Simulation results are compared with those obtained for a single Gaussian pulse of similar frequency content. Possible applications of EDEPTs technology encompass high-resolution radar, high energy weapons, remote sensing, and secure communications. Attention is given to array-launched EDEPTs.

  2. Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO) Using a Self-Organizing Scheme for Energy-Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanapi, Zurina Mohd; Othman, Mohamed; Zukarnain, Zuriati Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Pulse Coupled Oscillator (PCO)-based travelling waves have attracted substantial attention by researchers in wireless sensor network (WSN) synchronization. Because WSNs are generally artificial occurrences that mimic natural phenomena, the PCO utilizes firefly synchronization of attracting mating partners for modelling the WSN. However, given that sensor nodes are unable to receive messages while transmitting data packets (due to deafness), the PCO model may not be efficient for sensor network modelling. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposed a new scheme called the Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO). For this, the study used a self-organizing scheme for energy-efficient WSNs that adopted travelling wave biologically inspired network systems based on phase locking of the PCO model to counteract deafness. From the simulation, it was found that the proposed TWPCO scheme attained a steady state after a number of cycles. It also showed superior performance compared to other mechanisms, with a reduction in the total energy consumption of 25%. The results showed that the performance improved by 13% in terms of data gathering. Based on the results, the proposed scheme avoids the deafness that occurs in the transmit state in WSNs and increases the data collection throughout the transmission states in WSNs. PMID:28056020

  3. Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO Using a Self-Organizing Scheme for Energy-Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyad Ghaleb Al-Mekhlafi

    Full Text Available Recently, Pulse Coupled Oscillator (PCO-based travelling waves have attracted substantial attention by researchers in wireless sensor network (WSN synchronization. Because WSNs are generally artificial occurrences that mimic natural phenomena, the PCO utilizes firefly synchronization of attracting mating partners for modelling the WSN. However, given that sensor nodes are unable to receive messages while transmitting data packets (due to deafness, the PCO model may not be efficient for sensor network modelling. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposed a new scheme called the Travelling Wave Pulse Coupled Oscillator (TWPCO. For this, the study used a self-organizing scheme for energy-efficient WSNs that adopted travelling wave biologically inspired network systems based on phase locking of the PCO model to counteract deafness. From the simulation, it was found that the proposed TWPCO scheme attained a steady state after a number of cycles. It also showed superior performance compared to other mechanisms, with a reduction in the total energy consumption of 25%. The results showed that the performance improved by 13% in terms of data gathering. Based on the results, the proposed scheme avoids the deafness that occurs in the transmit state in WSNs and increases the data collection throughout the transmission states in WSNs.

  4. Propagation Dynamics of Nonspreading Cosine-Gauss Water-Wave Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-12-18

    Linear gravity water waves are highly dispersive; therefore, the spreading of initially short wave trains characterizes water surface waves, and is a universal property of a dispersive medium. Only if there is sufficient nonlinearity does this envelope admit solitary solutions which do not spread and remain in fixed forms. Here, in contrast to the nonlinear localized wave packets, we present both theoretically and experimentally a new type of linearly nondispersive water wave, having a cosine-Gauss envelope, as well as its higher-order Hermite cosine-Gauss variations. We show that these waves preserve their width despite the inherent dispersion while propagating in an 18-m wave tank, accompanied by a slowly varying carrier-envelope phase. These wave packets exhibit self-healing; i.e., they are restored after bypassing an obstacle. We further demonstrate that these nondispersive waves are robust to weakly nonlinear perturbations. In the strong nonlinear regime, symmetry breaking of these waves is observed, but their cosine-Gauss shapes are still approximately preserved during propagation.

  5. PULSE WAVE VELOCITY AND CENTRAL AORTIC PRESSURE IN OBESE CHILDREN ACCORDING TO THE NON-INVASIVE ARTERIOGRAPHY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kozhevnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents information value of non-invasive arteriography, which reveals early signs of cardiovascular pathology formation in children, using a large number of trials in children. The authors examined predictors of cardiovascular catastrophes’ development, confirmed in adults: aortic wall’s stiffness, central aortic pressure and pulse pressure – that have not been sufficiently studied in children yet. The article shows that the high-technology method of non-invasive arteriography allows revealing changes of these parameters in children on the preclinical stage. It also shows their correlation with body mass index, fatty hepatosis, direct correlation of weight gain with connection of pulse wave velocity and central blood pressure and importance of follow-up evaluation of these parameters. Heterogeneity of the group of obese children in terms of these parameters is a premise for development of individual approach to control and prevention of cardiovascular complications’ development risk in childhood.

  6. Mechanistic investigation of doxycycline photosensitization by picosecond-pulsed and continuous wave laser irradiation of cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, C.R.; Hefetz, Y.; Gillies, R.; Wimberly, J.; Dalickas, G.; Hasan, T. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-04-15

    In order to elucidate the photophysical mechanisms of cellular phototoxicity sensitized by doxycycline, MGH-U1 human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro were treated with 20.7 microM doxycycline and irradiated with either a pulsed (lambda = 355 nm, pulse duration = 24 ps) or a continuous wave (lambda = 351 nm) laser. Cumulative radiant exposure and irradiance were systematically varied in experiments with both lasers. Phototoxicity was assessed by epifluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells using rhodamine 123 labeling of mitochondria. With the continuous wave source, the cumulative radiant exposure required for induction of phototoxic injury was independent of irradiance. With the 24-ps-pulsed source, a significantly lower cumulative radiant exposure was required to induce the phototoxicity when the peak irradiance was 5.8 x 10(7) or 1.3 x 10(8) watts cm-2 compared with when peak irradiance was either lower (6.0 x 10(6) watts cm-2) or higher (7.6 x 10(8) watts cm-2). The measured fluorescence lifetimes of doxycycline in buffered saline solution were longer than the laser pulse duration of 24 ps. The increased efficiency of photosensitization at the optimal peak irradiance in the ps domain appears to result from sequential multiphoton absorption involving higher excited states of the singlet manifold. At the highest irradiance studied, on the other hand, reduced efficiency of photosensitization is attributed to increased photodegradation of doxycycline from higher excited states by processes such as photoionization. A model consistent with these observations is presented along with calculations, based on simple rate equations, that fit the essentials of the proposed model.

  7. Pulse transit time by R-wave-gated infrared photoplethysmography: review of the literature and personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naschitz, Jochanan E; Bezobchuk, Stanislas; Mussafia-Priselac, Renata; Sundick, Scott; Dreyfuss, Daniel; Khorshidi, Igal; Karidis, Argyro; Manor, Hagit; Nagar, Mihael; Peck, Elisabeth Rubin; Peck, Shannon; Storch, Shimon; Rosner, Itzhak; Gaitini, Luis

    2004-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is the time it takes a pulse wave to travel between two arterial sites. A rela tively short PTT is observed with high blood pressure (BP), aging, arteriosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Most methods used for measuring the PTT are cumbersome and expensive. In contrast, the interval between the peak of the R-wave on the electrocardiogram and the onset of the corresponding pulse in the finger pad measured by photoplethysmography can be easily measured. We review herein the literature and impart the experience at our institution on clinical applications of R-wave-gated photo-plethysmography (RWPP) as measurement of PTT. The MEDLINE data base on clinical applications of RWPP was reviewed. In addition, studies performed in the author's institution are presented. When used as a surrogate for beat-to-beat BP monitoring, RWPP did not meet the level of accuracy required for medical practice (two studies). RWPP produced accurate and reproducible signals when utilized as a surrogate for intra-thoracic pressure changes in obstructive sleep apnea, as well as BP arousals which accompany central sleep apnea (five studies). In estimation of arterial stiffness, RWPP was unsatisfactory (one study). In assessment of cardiovascular reactivity, abnormal values of RWPP were noted in autonomic failure (one study), while disease-specific reactivity patterns were identified utilizing a method involving RWPP (two studies). In clinical practice, sleep-apnea may be accurately monitored by RWPP. RWPP seems to reflect autonomic influences and may be particularly well-suited for the study of vascular reactivity. Thus, further descriptions of disease-specific cardiovascular reactivity patterns may be possible with techniques based on RWPP. Other clinical uses of RWPP are investigational.

  8. Comparative Study on the Pulse Wave Variables and Sasang Constitution in Cerebral Infarction Patients and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko KiDuk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine whether a pulse analyzer was useful 1 to characterize the variables of pulse wave of cerebral infarction patieno (CI, compared with those of healthy subjects, as well as 2 to determine Sasang Constitution in CI and healthy subjects. 1. Calibrated in Gwan, the amount of energy(Energy, height of main peak(H1, height of aorticvalley(H2, height of aortic peak(H3, total area of pulse wave(At, and area of main peak width(Aw of the CI group were higher than those of the healthy group. 2. Calibrated in Cheek, Energy, H1, H2, H3, height of valve valley(H4, At, Aw, and main peak angle(MPA of the CI group were higher than those of the healthy group. 3. Among the healthy (subjects group, Taeumin showed the highest contact pressure(CP and height of valve peak(H5 calibrated in Chon. The main peak width divided by whole time of pulse wave(MPW/T calibrated in Gwan and Cheok, was highest in Soyangin and was lowest in Taeumin. The H3 divided by H1(H3/H1 and the time to valve valley minus the time to main peak and divided by T[(T4-T1/T] calibrated in Cheek were highest in Soyangin. The time to main peak(T1 was longest in Soumin. 4. Among the CI group, At calibrated in Chon was widest in Taeumin and was narrowest in Soumin The time to aortic peak(T3 calibrated in Cheek was longest in Soumin and was shortest in Soyangin. The time to valve peak(T5 was shortest in Soyangin. 5. There were main effects of cerebral infarction in the area of systolic period(As and area of diastolic period(Ad calibrated in Chon, Energy calibrated in Cwan, and Energy, H1, H2, H3, (H4+H5/Hl, and MPA calibrated in Cheek. 6. There were main effects of Sasang Constitution in (T4-T1/T, area of systolic period(As, and Ad calibrated in Chon. 7. The interactions between the cerebral infarction and Sasang Constitution were observed in H5/H1 , T, At, As, Ad, and MPA calibrated in Chon, H4, T4, (T4-T1/T, As, and Ad calibrated in Cwan, and 74,75, and MPW calibrated

  9. Diurnal Variation of Pulse Wave Velocity Assessed Non-Invasively by Applanation Tonometry in Young Healthy Men

    OpenAIRE

    Bodlaj, Gerd; Berg, Joerg; Biesenbach, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is at least partially controlled by vascular tone. Vascular tone and underlying physiological processes such as sympathetic activity, plasma catecholamin, and cortisol levels have been shown to follow diurnal variations. Materials and Methods Carotid-to-radial PWV was non-invasively assessed by applanation tonometry in 21 young (26.5 ? 2.3 years) healthy men at three different time points (8:00hr, 12:00hr, 17:00hr) during a day. Additionally, heart rate, syst...

  10. Mapping of coherent and decohering nuclear wave-packet dynamics in D+2 with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2003-06-01

    Fast ionization of D2 leads to the coherent population of many vibrational states of D+2. Usually, only the squared absolute values of the vibrational state amplitudes, known as Franck-Condon factors, are observed since insufficient experimental time resolution averages out all coherence effects. We propose a Coulomb explosion imaging method to visualize the coherent motion of bound wave packets using ultrashort (5 fs), intense pump-probe laser pulses. With this type of experiment decoherence times in the fs to ps range may become directly observable and provide essential information for coherent control.

  11. Measurement method of time jitter between pump laser pulse and RF wave by the charge change in photo-injector

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Sheng Guang; Wang Ming Kai

    2002-01-01

    In photo-cathode RF gun, the Schottky effect in process of photoemission and electron longitudinal accelerating process bring forth a linear work range in which electron charge out of gun is linear proportion to laser injection phase. According to the result, the authors develop a method that can be used to measure time jitter between laser pulse and RF wave. The method can attain to high precision and small error. On general photo-injector condition, the precision is almost 1.15 fs, the error is almost 0.23 fs

  12. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, L.; Skala, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  13. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  14. [The effect of low-intensity pulsed sound waves delivered by the Exogen device on Staphylococcus aureus morphology and genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayan, Irfan; Aslan, Gönül; Cömelekoğlu, Ulkü; Yilmaz, Nejat; Colak, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed sound waves delivered by the Exogen device, which is recommended for the treatment of delayed union and nonunion in orthopedic surgery, on the colony number, antimicrobial susceptibility, bacterial morphology, and genetics of Staphylococcus aureus, which is a frequent pathogen in orthopedic infections. Thirty tubes containing 0.5 McFarland suspensions of S. aureus (ATCC 25923) were used. Fifteen tubes forming the test group were subjected to low-intensity sound waves by the Exogen device for 20 minutes. The remaining 15 tubes were untreated as controls. The two groups were then compared with respect to colony number, antibiotic susceptibility, and genotypic properties. The tubes were examined histologically by electron microscopy. The test tubes treated with sound waves showed a significantly lower number of bacteria colonies compared to the control tubes (psound waves may be beneficial as a prophylactic measure to prevent infections in primary orthopedic operations and as an adjuvant therapy for infected nonunions.

  15. Mapping the longitudinal wall stiffness heterogeneities within intact canine aortas using Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Narayanan, Prathyush; Li, Ronny X; Qaqish, William W; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-07-26

    The aortic stiffness has been found to be a useful independent indicator of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and aneurysms. Existing methods to estimate the aortic stiffness are either invasive, e.g. catheterization, or yield average global measurements which could be inaccurate, e.g., tonometry. Alternatively, the aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to be a reliable marker for estimating the wall stiffness based on the Moens-Korteweg (M-K) formulation. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a relatively new, ultrasound-based imaging method for noninvasive and regional estimation of PWV. The present study aims at showing the application of PWI in obtaining localized wall mechanical properties by making PWV measurements on several adjacent locations along the ascending thoracic to the suprarenal abdominal aortic trunk in its intact vessel form. The PWV estimates were used to calculate the regional wall modulus based on the M-K relationship and were compared against conventional mechanical testing. The findings indicated that for the anisotropic aortic wall, the PWI estimates of the modulus are smaller than the circumferential modulus by an average of -32.22% and larger than the longitudinal modulus by an average of 25.83%. Ongoing work is focused on the in vivo applications of PWI in normal and pathological aortas with future implications in the clinical applications of the technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  17. Highly site-selective transvascular drug delivery by the use of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced photomechanical waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shunichi; Yoshida, Ken; Kawauchi, Satoko; Hosoe, Kazue; Akutsu, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Norihiro; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-28

    Photomechanical waves (PMWs), which were generated by irradiation of a light-absorbing material (laser target) with nanosecond laser pulses, were used for targeted transvascular drug delivery in rats. An Evans blue (EB) solution was injected into the tail vein, and laser targets were placed on the skin, muscle and brain. Each laser target was irradiated with a laser pulse(s) and 4h later, the rat was perfused and the distribution of EB fluorescence in the targeted tissues was examined. We observed laser fluence-dependent and hence PMW pressure-dependent extravasation of EB selectively in the tissues that had been exposed to a PMW(s). Uptake of leaked EB into cells in extravascular space was also observed in the targeted tissues. Tissue damage or hemorrhage was not apparent except in the brain exposed to the highest laser fluence used. The results for the brain indicated opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reverse-order (PMW application before EB injection) experiments showed that the BBB was closed in the duration from 8h to 12h after PMW application at a laser fluence of 0.5J/cm(2). Since EB molecules are strongly bound with serum albumin in blood, the results indicate that the present method can be applied not only to small molecules but also to macromolecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of arterial stiffness by finger-toe pulse wave velocity: optimization of signal processing and clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Hasan; Khettab, Hakim; Marais, Louise; Hallab, Magid; Laurent, Stéphane; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) (cf-PWV) is the gold standard for measuring aortic stiffness. Finger-toe PWV (ft-PWV) is a simpler noninvasive method for measuring arterial stiffness. Although the validity of the method has been previously assessed, its accuracy can be improved. ft-PWV is determined on the basis of a patented height chart for the distance and the pulse transit time (PTT) between the finger and the toe pulpar arteries signals (ft-PTT). The objective of the first study, performed in 66 patients, was to compare different algorithms (intersecting tangents, maximum of the second derivative, 10% threshold and cross-correlation) for determining the foot of the arterial pulse wave, thus the ft-PTT. The objective of the second study, performed in 101 patients, was to investigate different signal processing chains to improve the concordance of ft-PWV with the gold-standard cf-PWV. Finger-toe PWV (ft-PWV) was calculated using the four algorithms. The best correlations relating ft-PWV and cf-PWV, and relating ft-PTT and carotid-femoral PTT were obtained with the maximum of the second derivative algorithm [PWV: r = 0.56, P signal processing chain. Selecting the maximum of the second derivative algorithm for detecting the foot of the pressure waveform, and combining it with an optimized signal processing chain, improved the accuracy of ft-PWV measurement in the current population sample. Thus, it makes ft-PWV very promising for the simple noninvasive determination of aortic stiffness in clinical practice.

  19. Generation and Amplification of Tunable Multicolored Femtosecond Laser Pulses by Using Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Transparent Bulk Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed the generation and amplification of wavelength-tunable multicolored femtosecond laser pulses using cascaded four-wave mixing (CFWM in transparent bulk media, mainly concentrating on our recent work. Theoretical analysis and calculations based on the phase-matching condition could explain well the process semi-quantitatively. The experimental studies showed: (1 as many as fifteen spectral up-shifted and two spectral down-shifted sidebands were obtained simultaneously with spectral bandwidth broader than 1.8 octaves from near ultraviolet (360 nm to near infrared (1.2 μm; (2 the obtained sidebands were spatially separated well and had extremely high beam quality with M2 factor better than 1.1; (3 the wavelengths of the generated multicolor sidebands could be conveniently tuned by changing the crossing angle or simply replacing with different media; (4 as short as 15-fs negatively chirped or nearly transform limited 20-fs multicolored femtosecond pulses were obtained when one of the two input beams was negatively chirped and the other was positively chirped; (5 the pulse energy of the sideband can reach a μJ level with power stability better than 1% RMS; (6 broadband two-dimensional (2-D multicolored arrays with more than ten periodic columns and more than ten rows were generated in a sapphire plate; (7 the obtained sidebands could be simultaneously spectra broadened and power amplified in another bulk medium by using cross-phase modulation (XPM in conjunction with four-wave optical parametric amplification (FOPA. The characterization showed that this is interesting and the CFWM sidebands generated by this novel method have good enough qualities in terms of power stability, beam quality, and temporal features suited to various experiments such as ultrafast multicolor time-resolved spectroscopy and multicolor-excitation nonlinear microscopy.

  20. Modeling of Beam Wave Pulse Propagation in Vegetation Using Transport Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitman, Gerald M; Schwering, Felix K; Yu-Chi Wu, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The scalar time-dependent equation of radiative transfer in cylindrical coordinates was used to develop several new theories- both rigorous and approximate- for propagation and scattering of beam wave...

  1. Comparison of an Oscillometric Method with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for the Analysis of Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Reinstadler, Sebastian J.; Klug, Gert; Kremser, Christian; Seidner, Benjamin; Esterhammer, Regina; Schocke, Michael F.; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the proposed gold-standard for the assessment of aortic elastic properties. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV determined by a recently developed oscillometric device with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods PWV was assessed in 40 volunteers with two different methods. The oscillometric method (PWVOSC) is based on a transfer function from the brachial pressure waves determined by oscillometric blood pressure measurements with a common cuff (Mobil-O-Graph, I.E.M. Stolberg, Germany). CMR was used to determine aortic PWVCMR with the use of the transit time method based on phase-contrast imaging at the level of the ascending and abdominal aorta on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Results The median age of the study population was 34 years (IQR: 24–55 years, 11 females). A very strong correlation was found between PWVOSC and PWVCMR (r = 0.859, p < 0.001). Mean PWVOSC was 6.7 ± 1.8 m/s and mean PWVCMR was 6.1 ± 1.8 m/s (p < 0.001). Analysis of agreement between the two measurements using Bland-Altman method showed a bias of 0.57 m/s (upper and lower limit of agreement: 2.49 m/s and -1.34 m/s). The corresponding coefficient of variation between both measurements was 15%. Conclusion Aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by transformation of the brachial pressure waveform showed an acceptable agreement with the CMR-derived transit time method. PMID:25612307

  2. Comparison of an oscillometric method with cardiac magnetic resonance for the analysis of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Josef Feistritzer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Pulse wave velocity (PWV is the proposed gold-standard for the assessment of aortic elastic properties. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV determined by a recently developed oscillometric device with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR. METHODS: PWV was assessed in 40 volunteers with two different methods. The oscillometric method (PWVOSC is based on a transfer function from the brachial pressure waves determined by oscillometric blood pressure measurements with a common cuff (Mobil-O-Graph, I.E.M. Stolberg, Germany. CMR was used to determine aortic PWVCMR with the use of the transit time method based on phase-contrast imaging at the level of the ascending and abdominal aorta on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany. RESULTS: The median age of the study population was 34 years (IQR: 24-55 years, 11 females. A very strong correlation was found between PWVOSC and PWVCMR (r = 0.859, p < 0.001. Mean PWVOSC was 6.7 ± 1.8 m/s and mean PWVCMR was 6.1 ± 1.8 m/s (p < 0.001. Analysis of agreement between the two measurements using Bland-Altman method showed a bias of 0.57 m/s (upper and lower limit of agreement: 2.49 m/s and -1.34 m/s. The corresponding coefficient of variation between both measurements was 15%. CONCLUSION: Aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by transformation of the brachial pressure waveform showed an acceptable agreement with the CMR-derived transit time method.

  3. An Analysis of Pulsed Wave Ultrasound Systems for Blood Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    of the received signal. The time evolution and distribution of velocity can then be found by using samples from a number of pulse-echo lines. Making a short-time Fourier transform of the data reveals the velocity distribution in the range gate over time. Such systems are called Doppler ultrasound systems implying...

  4. Investigation of a diode-pumped intracavity optical parametric oscillator in pulsed and continuous wave operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Skettrup, Torben; Balle-Petersen, O.

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given. CW and pulsed compact tunable laser sources in the infrared have widespread scientific, medical and industrial applications. Such a laser source can be obtained by use of a diode-pumped intracavity optical parametric oscillator (IOPO). We report on a IOPO based on a Yb...

  5. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  6. Long-range non-contact imaging photoplethysmography: cardiac pulse wave sensing at a distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.; Piasecki, Alyssa M.; Bowers, Margaret A.; Klosterman, Samantha L.

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses photo-optical sensors to measure variations in light absorption, caused by blood volume pulsations, to assess cardiopulmonary parameters including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, and respiration rate. Recently, researchers have studied the applications and methodology of imaging photoplethysmography. Basic research has examined some of the variables affecting data quality and accuracy of imaging photoplethysmography including signal processing, imager parameters (e.g. frame rate and resolution), lighting conditions, subject motion, and subject skin tone. This technology may be beneficial for long term or continuous monitoring where contact measurements may be harmful (e.g. skin sensitivities) or where imperceptible or unobtrusive measurements are desirable. Using previously validated signal processing methods, we examined the effects of imager-to-subject distance on one-minute, windowed estimates of pulse rate. High-resolution video of 22, stationary participants was collected using an enthusiast-grade, mirrorless, digital camera equipped with a fully-manual, super-telephoto lens at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters with simultaneous contact measurements of electrocardiography, and fingertip photoplethysmography. By comparison, previous studies have usually been conducted with imager-to-subject distances of up to only a few meters. Mean absolute error for one-minute, windowed, pulse rate estimates (compared to those derived from gold-standard electrocardiography) were 2.0, 4.1, and 10.9 beats per minute at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters, respectively. Long-range imaging presents several unique challenges among which include decreased, observed light reflectance and smaller regions of interest. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate that accurate pulse rate measurements can be obtained from over long imager-to-participant distances given these constraints.

  7. Comparison of an oscillometric method with cardiac magnetic resonance for the analysis of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Reinstadler, Sebastian J; Klug, Gert; Kremser, Christian; Seidner, Benjamin; Esterhammer, Regina; Schocke, Michael F; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the proposed gold-standard for the assessment of aortic elastic properties. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV determined by a recently developed oscillometric device with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). PWV was assessed in 40 volunteers with two different methods. The oscillometric method (PWVOSC) is based on a transfer function from the brachial pressure waves determined by oscillometric blood pressure measurements with a common cuff (Mobil-O-Graph, I.E.M. Stolberg, Germany). CMR was used to determine aortic PWVCMR with the use of the transit time method based on phase-contrast imaging at the level of the ascending and abdominal aorta on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The median age of the study population was 34 years (IQR: 24-55 years, 11 females). A very strong correlation was found between PWVOSC and PWVCMR (r = 0.859, p wave velocity assessed by transformation of the brachial pressure waveform showed an acceptable agreement with the CMR-derived transit time method.

  8. Thermally induced transparency for short spin wave pulses in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez Romero, Cesar Leonardo; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Gomez Arista, Ivan; Qureshi, Naser; Monsiváis Galindo, Guillermo; Vargas Hernández, Hesiquio

    2014-03-01

    The compensation of spin wave propagation losses plays a very important role in the development of novel magnonic devices. Up to now, however, most of the known amplification methods present relative narrow frequency bandwidths due to their resonant nature. In this work, we present compensation of the propagation losses or pseudo-amplification of travelling spin waves by tailoring the bias magnetic field profile. The thermally-induced non-uniform profile of the magnetization introduced on an Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) thin film by a localized spot of a cw argon-ion laser creates the conditions to observe the complete compensation of the spin wave propagation losses. The spin wave evolution was mapped with a time and spaced resolved inductive magneto-dynamic prove system. The experiment was carried out using a uniform sample of single-crystal YIG film grown on a gallium-gadolinium garnet (GGG) substrate. The 2mm-wide, 20mm-long and 6microns-thick YIG strip was saturated with an external magnetic field enabling the set up for the propagation of magneto-static surface waves. This work was supported by the UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT IA100413.

  9. Emission of terahertz waves in the interaction of a laser pulse with clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, A. A., E-mail: frolov@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    A theory of generation of terahertz radiation in the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with a spherical cluster is developed for the case in which the density of free electrons in the cluster plasma exceeds the critical value. The spectral, angular, and energy characteristics of the emitted terahertz radiation are investigated, as well as its spatiotemporal structure. It is shown that the directional pattern of radiation has a quadrupole structure and that the emission spectrum has a broad maximum at a frequency nearly equal to the reciprocal of the laser pulse duration. It is found that the total radiated energy depends strongly on the cluster size. Analysis of the spatiotemporal profile of the terahertz signal shows that it has a femtosecond duration and contains only two oscillation cycles.

  10. Visible continuous-wave laser transitions in Pr(3+):YLF and femtosecond pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, J M; French, P M; Taylor, J R; Chai, B H

    1996-06-01

    Fourteen new cw, visible laser transitions have been observed in Pr(3+):YLF, several of which have exhibited modest tunability. The (3)P(0) - (3)H(6) transition near 613 nm has been shown to have a tunable linewidth of ~1 nm, which, for the first time to our knowledge, has permitted the direct production of femtosecond pulses in the visible from a cw solid-state laser by Kerr-lens mode locking.

  11. Asymmetric Ultrasonic Pulse Radiation Using Electromagnetic-Induction Transducer and PZT(Pb(Zr-Ti)O3) Transducer with Wave Synthesis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Koji

    1993-05-01

    In medical applications, especially in urology, we use a fragmentation calculus technique with shock waves. This technique is very profitable because of no abdominal surgery for a human being. Large negative sound amplitude pulses, however, can cause problems such as internal hemorrhage or pain in the human body. The final goal of this study is to develop a means to project an intense positive unipolar pulse without negative sound pressure. We improved a composite transducer consisting of an electromagnetic-induction-type (EMI) transducer and PZT (Pb(Zr-Ti)O3) transducers. An EMI transducer consisting of a metal coil and vibration membrane can project intense sound pulses into water. In order to suppress its negative sound pressure, we project a compensation pulse with PZT transducers using an inverse filtering method. An asymmetric pulse whose P+ to P- amplitude ratio was very high was projected in water.

  12. Multivariate optimization of differential pulse polarographic–catalytic hydrogen wave technique for the determination of nickel(II) in real samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchi, S.; Sabela, M.I.; Singh, P.; Bisetty, K.

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate optimized experimental conditions were established for the determination of nickel(II) in 92 grape samples after complexation with ammonium piperidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and ammonium morpholine dithiocarbamate (AMDC). Differential pulse polarographic (DPP) studies of the wave characteristics indicated that it is of the catalytic hydrogen wave (CHW) type sensitive to pH, concentration and scan rates. A single, sharp peak obtained at −1.22 V allowed for the trace determination ...

  13. The test ability of an adaptive pulse wave for ADC testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheng, Xiaoqin; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    In the conventional ADC production test method, a high-quality analogue sine wave is applied to the Analogue-to-Digital Converter (ADC), which is expensive to generate. Nowadays, an increasing number of ADCs are integrated into a system-on-chip (SoC) platform design, which usually contains a digital

  14. Theory and experiment of Fourier-Bessel field calculation and tuning of a pulsed wave annular array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Paul D; Cheng, Jiqi; Luc, Jian-yu

    2003-05-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) Fourier-Bessel series method for computing and tuning (beamforming) the linear lossless field of flat pulsed wave annular arrays is developed and supported with both numerical simulation and experimental verification. The technique represents a new method for modeling and tuning the propagated field by linking the quantized surface pressure profile to a known set of limited diffraction Bessel beams propagating into the medium. This enables derivation of an analytic expression for the field at any point in space and time in terms of the transducer surface pressure profile. Tuning of the field then also follows by formulating a least-squares design for the transducer surface pressure with respect to a given desired field in space and time. Simulated and experimental results for both field computation and tuning are presented in the context of a 10-ring annular array operating at a central frequency of 2.5 MHz in water.

  15. Theory and experiment of Fourier-Bessel field calculation and tuning of a pulsed wave annular array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.; Jiqi, Cheng; Jian-yu, Lu

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) Fourier-Bessel series method for computing and tuning (beamforming) the linear lossless field of flat pulsed wave annular arrays is developed and supported with both numerical simulation and experimental verification. The technique represents a new method for modeling...... and tuning the propagated field by linking the quantized surface pressure profile to a known set of limited diffraction Bessel beams propagating into the medium. This enables derivation of an analytic expression for the field at any point in space and time in terms of the transducer surface pressure profile....... Tuning of the field then also follows by formulating a least-squares design for the transducer surface pressure with respect to a given desired field in space and time. Simulated and experimental results for both field computation and tuning are presented in the context of a 10-ring annular array...

  16. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  17. The role of vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary prevention. A position paper from the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripheral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Aboyans, Victor

    2015-01-01

    as a substitute for a clinical endpoint. In order to be considered as a surrogate endpoint of cardiovascular events, a biomarker should satisfy several criteria, such as proof of concept, prospective validation, incremental value, clinical utility, clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, ease of use...... that fulfill most of the criteria and, therefore, are close to being considered a clinical surrogate endpoint are carotid ultrasonography, ankle-brachial index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity; biomarkers that fulfill some, but not all of the criteria are brachial ankle pulse wave velocity, central...

  18. Improved septal contraction and coronary flow velocity after cardiac resynchronization therapy elucidated by strain imaging and pulsed wave Doppler echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayano, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Kawamata, Tomoaki; Miyoshi, Fumito; Toshida, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Norikazu; Hirano, Yuichi; Kawamura, Mitsuharu; Asano, Taku; Kou, Shyhaku; Tanno, Kaoru; Ozawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Youichi; Katagiri, Takashi

    2006-02-01

    The effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with various atrioventricular conduction delay settings were investigated on cardiac hemodynamic changes involved in coronary flow velocity using color and pulsed wave Doppler modalities and myocardial regional contractility using a novel echocardiographic technique (strain imaging). Seven patients with advanced heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction or = 140 msec) were treated with CRT. Color and pulsed wave Doppler imaging were performed from the apical four-chamber view to examine the cardiac functions such as stroke volume, cardiac output, mitral regurgitant volume and coronary flow velocity. Strain imaging was performed to quantify the asynchrony of both intraventricular and interventricular time delay between the septum and left ventricular free wall (posterior wall) and to assess the regional contractile function. Wall motion was also evaluated. Intraventricular and interventricular asynchrony were improved from 173 +/- 18 to 60 +/- 6 msec, and 69 +/- 25 to 12 +/- 3 msec, respectively. Stroke volume (55.2 +/- 6.2 to 76.8 +/- 10.8 ml; 39% up), cardiac output (3.9 +/- 0.3 to 5.4 +/- 0.5 I/min; 38% up) and coronary flow velocity (24 +/- 3 to 36 +/- 5 cm/sec; 50% up) were greatly increased and mitral regurgitant volume (59.7 +/- 18.0 to 38.9 +/- 11.3 ml; 35% down)was clearly decreased. Septal wall shortening was greatly increased from 10.2 +/- 2.3% to 17.0 +/- 1.8% and septal wall motion (radial thickening)was also improved simultaneously. Atrioventricular interval settings influenced all above parameters. CRT improved the cardiac hemodynamics involved in coronary flow significantly due to both resynchronization of inter and intra asynchrony, and improvement of the regional myocardial contraction in patients with severe congestive heart failure and complete left bundle branch block.

  19. Normal values of aortic dimensions, distensibility, and pulse wave velocity in children and young adults: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voges Inga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic enlargement and impaired bioelasticity are of interest in several cardiac and non-cardiac diseases as they can lead to cardiovascular complications. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is increasingly accepted as a noninvasive tool in cardiovascular evaluation. Assessment of aortic anatomy and bioelasticity, namely aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV, by CMR is accurate and reproducible and could help to identify anatomical and bioelastic abnormalities of the aorta. However, normal CMR values for healthy children and young adults are lacking. Methods Seventy-one heart-healthy subjects (age 16.4 ± 7.6 years, range 2.3 - 28.3 years were examined using a 3.0 Tesla CMR scanner. Aortic cross-sectional areas and aortic distensibility were measured at four positions of the ascending and descending thoracic aorta. PWV was assessed from aortic blood flow velocity measurements in a aortic segment between the ascending aorta and the proximal descending aorta. The Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS method was used to obtain percentile curves for aortic cross-sectional areas, aortic distensibility and PWV according to age. Results Aortic areas, PWV and aortic distensibility (aortic cross-sectional areas: r = 0.8 to 0.9, p  Conclusions This study provides percentile curves for cross-sectional areas, distensibility and pulse wave velocity of the thoracic aorta in children and young adolescents between their 3rd and 29th year of life. These data may serve as a reference for the detection of pathological changes of the aorta in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Impact of ADMA, endothelial progenitor cells and traditional cardiovascular risk factors on pulse wave velocity among prediabetic individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protopsaltis Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central arterial stiffness represents a well-established predictor of cardiovascular disease. Decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, increased asymmetric dimethyl-arginine (ADMA levels, traditional cardiovascular risk factors and insulin resistance have all been associated with increased arterial stiffness. The correlations of novel and traditional cardiovascular risk factors with central arterial stiffness in prediabetic individuals were investigated in the present study. Methods The study population consisted of 53 prediabetic individuals. Individuals were divided into groups of isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG, isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and combined IGT-IFG. Age, sex, family history of diabetes, smoking history, body mass index (BMI, waist to hip ratio (WHR, waist circumference (WC, blood pressure, lipid profile, levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, and history of antihypertensive or statin therapy were obtained from all participants. Insulin resistance was evaluated using the Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA-IR. Carotid -femoral pulse wave velocity was used as an index of arterial stiffness. Circulating EPC count and ADMA serum levels were also determined. Results Among studied individuals 30 (56.6% subjects were diagnosed with isolated IFG, 9 (17% with isolated IGT (17% and 14 with combined IFG-IGT (26.4%. In univariate analysis age, mean blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and ADMA levels positively correlated with pulse-wave velocity while exercise and GFR correlated negatively. EPC count did not correlate with PWV. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis PWV correlated independently and positively with LDL-Cholesterol (low density lipoprotein and ADMA levels and negatively with exercise. Conclusions Elevated ADMA and LDL-C levels are strongly associated with increased arterial stiffness among

  1. Uncertainty quantification of inflow boundary condition and proximal arterial stiffness-coupled effect on pulse wave propagation in a vascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Antoine; Dumas, Laurent; Lucor, Didier

    2017-10-01

    This work aims at quantifying the effect of inherent uncertainties from cardiac output on the sensitivity of a human compliant arterial network response based on stochastic simulations of a reduced-order pulse wave propagation model. A simple pulsatile output form is used to reproduce the most relevant cardiac features with a minimum number of parameters associated with left ventricle dynamics. Another source of significant uncertainty is the spatial heterogeneity of the aortic compliance, which plays a key role in the propagation and damping of pulse waves generated at each cardiac cycle. A continuous representation of the aortic stiffness in the form of a generic random field of prescribed spatial correlation is then considered. Making use of a stochastic sparse pseudospectral method, we investigate the sensitivity of the pulse pressure and waves reflection magnitude over the arterial tree with respect to the different model uncertainties. Results indicate that uncertainties related to the shape and magnitude of the prescribed inlet flow in the proximal aorta can lead to potent variation of both the mean value and standard deviation of blood flow velocity and pressure dynamics due to the interaction of different wave propagation and reflection features. Lack of accurate knowledge in the stiffness properties of the aorta, resulting in uncertainty in the pulse wave velocity in that region, strongly modifies the statistical response, with a global increase in the variability of the quantities of interest and a spatial redistribution of the regions of higher sensitivity. These results will provide some guidance in clinical data acquisition and future coupling of arterial pulse wave propagation reduced-order model with more complex beating heart models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Comparison of echotracking and magnetic resonance assessment of abdominal aorta distensibility and relationships with pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannattasio, Cristina; Cesana, Francesca; Maestroni, Silvia; Salvioni, Alessandra; Maloberti, Alessandro; Nava, Stefano; Cairo, Matteo; Madotto, Fabiana; Zerboni, Filippo; Sironi, Sandro; Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Arterial distensibility can be measured either by echotracking or by nuclear magnetic resonance (MRI). Little information, however, is available on the comparison between the two methods and on the relationships between the results obtained with the two approaches and the arterial stiffness gold standard measurement, i.e., pulse wave velocity (PWV). In 28 normotensive subjects (age 33.0 ± 10.4 years, mean ± SD) we measured aortic diameter 1 cm above iliac bifurcation, aortic pulse pressure by tonometry and calculated arterial distensibility via the Reneman formulae for both methods. Aortic diameter and aortic distensibility were not superimposable and higher values were systematically detected with the MRI approach than with the ultrasound one. However, PWV showed a significant correlation with aortic distensibility values obtained by both methods (r = 0.50 and r = 0.49, p < 0.05). These data provide evidence that MRI-measured distensibility value is higher than that obtained via echotracking. The significant correlation with PWV, however, suggests that both methods can be regarded as valuable approaches. Considering the greater economic cost and the lower availability in daily clinical and research practice of MRI, echotracking ultrasonography can be regarded as a reliable and feasible method to assess aortic distensibility. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Remote Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Raman Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants and Toxic Industrial Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rivera, William; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2010-09-01

    This study describes the design, assembly, testing and comparison of two Remote Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) systems intended for standoff detection of hazardous chemical liquids. Raman spectra of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants (CWAS) and Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) were measured in the laboratory at a 6.6 m source-target distance using continuous wave (CW) laser detection. Standoff distances for pulsed measurements were 35 m for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection and 60, 90 and 140 m for cyclohexane detection. The prototype systems consisted of a Raman spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector (for CW measurements) and an I-CCD camera with time-gated electronics (for pulsed laser measurements), a reflecting telescope, a fiber optic assembly, a single-line CW laser source (514.5, 488.0, 351.1 and 363.8 nm) and a frequency-doubled single frequency Nd:YAG 532 nm laser (5 ns pulses at 10 Hz). The telescope was coupled to the spectrograph using an optical fiber, and filters were used to reject laser radiation and Rayleigh scattering. Two quartz convex lenses were used to collimate the light from the telescope from which the telescope-focusing eyepiece was removed, and direct it to the fiber optic assembly. To test the standoff sensing system, the Raman Telescope was used in the detection of liquid TIC: benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and carbon disulfide. Other compounds studied were CWAS: dimethylmethyl phosphonate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-(butylamino)-ethanethiol. Relative Raman scattering cross sections of liquid CWAS were measured using single-line sources at 532.0, 488.0, 363.8 and 351.1 nm. Samples were placed in glass and quartz vials at the standoff distances from the telescope for the Remote Raman measurements. The mass of DMMP present in water solutions was also quantified as part of the system performance tests.

  4. Crude Oil Remote Sensing, Characterization and Cleaning with ContinuousWave and Pulsed Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-23

    interferometry (HILI); laser induced fluorescence; ContinuousWave Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UU 12 Sonia Gallegos (228) 688-4867 Reset After...Unclassi X X X Richard L. Crout, 7330 Ruth H. Preller, 7300 1231 1008.3 E. R. Franchi, 7000 Sonia C. Gallegos , 7331 1. REFERENCES AND ENCLOSURES 2. TYPE OF...classified. 1. Paper or abstract was released. 2. A copy is filed in this office. Nickolai Kukhtarev Tatiana Kukhtareva Sonia C. Gallegos Areadi

  5. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Maik Pflugradt; Kai Geissdoerfer; Matthias Goernig; Reinhold Orglmeister

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depen...

  6. A fast multimodal ectopic beat detection method applied for blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity measurements in wearable sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geißdörfer, Kai; Görnig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depen...

  7. Spectral pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging lateral-to-septal delay fails to predict clinical or echocardiographic outcome after cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.I.I. Soliman (Osama Ibrahim Ibrahim); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); M.L. Geleijnse (Marcel); A. Nemes (Attila); K. Caliskan (Kadir); W.B. Vletter (Wim); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAims: The current study sought to assess if pre-implantation lateral-to-septal delay (LSD) ≥60 ms assessed by spectral pulsed-wave myocardial tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI) could predict successful long-term outcome after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results

  8. Determinants of pulse wave velocity in healthy people and in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors: 'establishing normal and reference values'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine Willum

    2010-01-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), a direct measure of aortic stiffness, has become increasingly important for total cardiovascular (CV) risk estimation. Its application as a routine tool for clinical patient evaluation has been hampered by the absence of reference values. The aim of the ...

  9. Continuous-wave to pulse regimes for a family of passively mode-locked lasers with saturable nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikandé, Alain M.; Voma Titafan, J.; Essimbi, B. Z.

    2017-10-01

    The transition dynamics from continuous-wave to pulse regimes of operation for a generic model of passively mode-locked lasers with saturable absorbers, characterized by an active medium with non-Kerr nonlinearity, are investigated analytically and numerically. The system is described by a complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a general m:n saturable nonlinearity (i.e {I}m/{(1+{{Γ }}I)}n, where I is the field intensity and m and n are two positive numbers), coupled to a two-level gain equation. An analysis of stability of continuous waves, following the modulational instability approach, provides a global picture of the self-starting dynamics in the system. The analysis reveals two distinct routes depending on values of the couple (m, n), and on the dispersion regime: in the normal dispersion regime, when m = 2 and n is arbitrary, the self-starting requires positive values of the fast saturable absorber and nonlinearity coefficients, but negative values of these two parameters for the family with m = 0. However, when the spectral filter is negative, the laser can self-start for certain values of the input field and the nonlinearity saturation coefficient Γ. The present work provides a general map for the self-starting mechanisms of rare-earth doped figure-eight fiber lasers, as well as Kerr-lens mode-locked solid-state lasers.

  10. Coupled-mode theory for electromagnetic pulse propagation in dispersive media undergoing a spatiotemporal perturbation: Exact derivation, numerical validation, and peculiar wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present an extension of the canonical coupled-mode theory of electromagnetic waves to the case of pulses and spatiotemporal perturbations in complex media. Unlike previous attempts to derive such a model, our approach involves no approximation, and it does not impose any restriction on the spatiotemporal profile. Moreover, the effect of modal dispersion on mode evolution and on the coupling to other modes is fully taken into account. Thus, our approach can yield any required accuracy by retaining as many terms in the expansion as needed. It also avoids various artifacts of previous derivations by introducing the correct form of the solution. We then validate the coupled-mode equations with exact numerical simulations, and we demonstrate the wide range of possibilities enabled by spatiotemporal perturbations of pulses, including pulse shortening or broadening or more complex shaping. Our formulation is valid across the electromagnetic spectrum, and it can be applied directly also to other wave systems.

  11. Real temperature calculation of shock wave driven by sub-nanosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Mahdieh, M H

    2003-01-01

    Time history of thermal band emission of a shock front, when breakout from aluminium target into vacuum, has been calculated numerically. It is assumed that the shock is produced by irradiation of high intensity sub-nanosecond pulsed laser on the surface of aluminium planar targets in vacuum. The opacity of dense plasma at the shock front and in the vacuum-aluminium interface, and its effects on thermal emissions was considered in these calculations. Using the results of an experiment that was recently reported and those of our model, the real temperature of the shock front was estimated. In that experiment simultaneous measurements of the colour temperature of dense plasma in a shock front, and the shock velocity at the time of shock breakout from the aluminium targets into the vacuum were reported for the study of the equation of state (EOS). The results of the model show a good agreement with the SESAME library EOS.

  12. Coupling electromagnetic pulse-shaped waves into wire-like interconnection structures with a non-linear protection – Time domain calculations by the PEEC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wollenberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An interconnection system whose loads protected by a voltage suppressor and a low-pass filter against overvoltages caused by coupling pulse-shaped electromagnetic waves is analyzed. The external wave influencing the system is assumed as a plane wave with HPM form. The computation is provided by a full-wave PEEC model for the interconnection structure incorporated in the SPICE code. Thus, nonlinear elements of the protection circuit can be included in the calculation. The analysis shows intermodulation distortions and penetrations of low frequency interferences caused by intermodulations through the protection circuits. The example examined shows the necessity of using full-wave models for interconnections together with non-linear circuit solvers for simulation of noise immunity in systems protected by nonlinear devices.

  13. Combined effect of pulsed electromagnetic field and sound wave on In vitro and In vivo neural differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee-Hoon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Cho, Hyunjin; Jeong, Jong-Seob; Kim, Soo-Chan; Park, Jung-Keug

    2017-01-01

    Biophysical wave stimulus has been used as an effective tool to promote cellular maturation and differentiation in the construction of engineered tissue. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and sound waves have been selected as effective stimuli that can promote neural differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic effect of PEMFs and sound waves on the neural differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). In vitro, neural-related genes in hBM-MSCs were accelerated by the combined exposure to both waves more than by individual exposure to PEMFs or sound waves. The combined wave also up-regulated the expression of neural and synaptic-related proteins in a three-dimensional (3-D) culture system through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase. In a mouse model of photochemically induced ischemia, exposure to the combined wave reduced the infarction volume and improved post-injury behavioral activity. These results indicate that a combined stimulus of biophysical waves, PEMFs and sound can enhance and possibly affect the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. Our study is meaningful for highlighting the potential of combined wave for neurogenic effects and providing new therapeutic approaches for neural cell therapy. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:201-211, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Pulse Wave Velocity as Marker of Preclinical Arterial Disease: Reference Levels in a Uruguayan Population Considering Wave Detection Algorithms, Path Lengths, Aging, and Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Farro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV has emerged as the gold standard for non-invasive evaluation of aortic stiffness; absence of standardized methodologies of study and lack of normal and reference values have limited a wider clinical implementation. This work was carried out in a Uruguayan (South American population in order to characterize normal, reference, and threshold levels of PWV considering normal age-related changes in PWV and the prevailing blood pressure level during the study. A conservative approach was used, and we excluded symptomatic subjects; subjects with history of cardiovascular (CV disease, diabetes mellitus or renal failure; subjects with traditional CV risk factors (other than age and gender; asymptomatic subjects with atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries; patients taking anti-hypertensives or lipid-lowering medications. The included subjects (n=429 were categorized according to the age decade and the blood pressure levels (at study time. All subjects represented the “reference population”; the group of subjects with optimal/normal blood pressures levels at study time represented the “normal population.” Results. Normal and reference PWV levels were obtained. Differences in PWV levels and aging-associated changes were obtained. The obtained data could be used to define vascular aging and abnormal or disease-related arterial changes.

  15. A 4 MA, 500 ns pulsed power generator CQ-4 for characterization of material behaviors under ramp wave loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Luo, Binqiang; Zhang, Xuping; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Chong, Tao; Mo, Jianjun; Wu, Gang; Tao, Yanhui

    2013-01-01

    A pulsed power generator CQ-4 was developed to characterize dynamic behaviors of materials under ramp wave loading, and to launch high velocity flyer plates for shock compression and hypervelocity impact experiments of materials and structures at Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics. CQ-4 is composed of twenty capacitor and primary discharge switch modules with total capacitance of 32 μF and rated charging voltage of 100 kV, and the storage energy is transmitted by two top and bottom parallel aluminum plates insulated by twelve layers of polyester film with total thickness of 1.2 mm. Between capacitor bank and chamber, there are 72 peaking capacitors with total capacitance of 7.2 μF and rated voltage of 120 kV in parallel, which are connected with the capacitor bank in parallel. Before the load, there is a group of seven secondary self-breaking down switches connected with the total circuit in series. The peaking capacitors and secondary switches are used to shape the discharging current waveforms. For short-circuit, the peak current of discharging can be up to 3 ~ 4 MA and rise time varies from 470 ns to 600 ns when the charging voltages of the generator are from 75 kV to 85 kV. With CQ-4 generator, some quasi-isentropic compression experiments under ramp wave loadings are done to demonstrate the ability of CQ-4 generator. And some experiments of launching high velocity flyer plates are also done on CQ-4. The experimental results show that ramp wave loading pressure of several tens of GPa on copper and aluminum samples can be realized and the velocity of aluminum flyer plate with size of 10 mm × 6 mm × 0.35 mm can be accelerated to about 11 km/s and the velocity of aluminum flyer plate with size of 10 mm × 6 mm × 0.6 mm can be up to about 9 km/s, which show that CQ-4 is a good and versatile tool to realize ramp wave loading and shock compression for shock physics.

  16. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  17. An inductive narrow-pulse RFID telemetry system for gastric slow waves monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan-Khoskholgh, Amir; Abukhalaf, Zaid; Ji Li; Miller, Larry S; Kiani, Mehdi; Farajidavar, Aydin

    2016-08-01

    We present a passive data telemetry system for real-time monitoring of gastric electrical activity of a living subject. The system is composed of three subsystems: an implantable unit (IU), a wearable unit (WU), and a stationary unit (SU). Data communication between the IU and WU is based on a radio-frequency identification (RFID) link operating at 13.56 MHz. Since wireless power transmission and reverse data telemetry system share the same inductive interface, a load shift keying (LSK)-based differential pulse position (DPP) coding data communication with only 6.25% duty cycle is developed to guarantee consistent wireless downlink power transmission and uplink high data transfer rate, simultaneously. The clock and data are encoded into one signal by an MSP430 microcontroller (MCU) at the IU side. This signal is sent to the WU through the inductive link, where decoded by an MSP432 MCU. Finally, the retrieved data at the WU are transmitted to the SU connected to a PC via a 2.4 GHz transceiver for real-time display and analysis. The results of the measurements on the implemented test bench, demonstrate IU-WU 125 kb/s and WU-SU 2 Mb/s data transmission rate with no observed mismatch, while the data stream was randomly generated, and matching between the transmitted data by the IU and received by the SU verified by a custom-made automated software.

  18. A study on micro hydroforming using shock wave of 355 nm UV-pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Gyeongju; Malka, Dror; Kim, Hyesu; Hong, Sungmoo; Shin, Bosung

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new manufacturing technology of micro hydroforming using 355 nm ultraviolet(UV)-pulsed laser. Hydroforming is known as a well-established technology to manufacture metallic parts, in particular for mass production of sheet metal, for several industrial applications such as automobiles, battery and military products. In addition laser shock processing(LSP) has been developed as the expanded applications of electrical and mechatronic devices. When the material was exposed to laser beam, multiple phenomena like the photochemical, the photothermal and the photomechanical effect are simultaneously occurred at the spot area. Especially, the photothermal effect due to laser heat transfer makes it hard to improve the accuracy of laser processing. To reduce the thermal effect and to enhance the photomechanical effect, the laser was irradiated under water in this paper. Strong forming pressure of LSP was provided by the higher density of water than air, which could help directly manufacture the thin sheet metal materials like as laser direct writing. We also conducted computer simulation using finite element method(FEM) to demonstrate its deformation behaviour with and without the strain rate effect of 104-105 (sec-1). Compared with conventional processing technology, this new method can provide high selectivity, excellent hydroforming efficiency and lower cost to achieve micro grooving pattern on the surface of thin metal sheet.

  19. Indices of cardiovascular function derived from peripheral pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry: a measurement repeatability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Mike; Coch, Christoph; Bruce, Margaret; Clark, Hazel; Williams, David

    2007-08-01

    Pulse wave analysis (PWA) using applanation tonometry is a non-invasive technique for assessing cardiovascular function. It produces three important indices: ejection duration index (ED%), augmentation index adjusted for heart rate (AIX@75), and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR%). The aim of this study was to assess within- and between-observer repeatability of these measurements. After resting supine for 15 minutes, 20 ambulant patients (16 male) in sinus rhythm underwent four PWA measurements on a single occasion. Two nurses (A & B) independently and alternately undertook PWA measurements using the same equipment (Omron HEM-757; SphygmoCor with Millar hand-held tonometer) blind to the other nurse's PWA measurements. Within- and between-observer differences were analysed using the Bland-Altman ;limits of agreement' approach (mean difference +/- 2 standard deviations, 2SD). Mean age was 56 (blood pressure, BP 136/79; pulse rate 64). BP/PWA measurements remained stable during assessment. Based on the average of two PWA measurements the mean +/- 2SD between-observer difference in ED% was 0.3 +/- 2.0; AIX@75 1.0 +/- 3.9; and SEVR% 1.7 +/- 14.2. Based on a single PWA measurement the between-observer difference was ED% 0.3 +/- 3.3; AIX@75 1.7 +/- 6.9; and SEVR% 0.6 +/- 22.6. Within-observer differences for nurse-A were ED% 0.0 +/- 5.4; AIX@75 1.5 +/- 7.0; and SEVR% 1.7 +/- 39.0 (nurse-B: 0.1 +/- 3.8; 0.1 +/- 8.0; and 0.6 +/- 23.3, respectively). PWA demonstrates high levels of repeatability even when used by relatively inexperienced staff and has the potential to be included in the routine cardiovascular assessment of ambulant patients.

  20. Age-related changes of regional pulse wave velocity in the descending aorta using Fourier velocity encoded M-mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviani, Valentina; Hickson, Stacey S; Hardy, Christopher J; McEniery, Carmel M; Patterson, Andrew J; Gillard, Jonathan H; Wilkinson, Ian B; Graves, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an independent determinant of cardiovascular risk. Although aortic stiffening with age is well documented, the interaction between aging and regional aortic PWV is still a debated question. We measured global and regional PWV in the descending aorta of 56 healthy subjects aged 25-76 years using a one-dimensional, interleaved, Fourier velocity encoded pulse sequence with cylindrical excitation. Repeatability across two magnetic resonance examinations (n = 19) and accuracy against intravascular pressure measurements (n = 4) were assessed. The global PWV was found to increase nonlinearly with age. The thoracic aorta was found to stiffen the most with age (PWV [thoracic, 20-40 years] = 4.7 ± 1.1 m/s; PWV [thoracic, 60-80 years] = 7.9 ± 1.5 m/s), followed by the mid- (PWV [mid-abdominal, 20-40 years] = 4.9 ± 1.3 m/s; PWV [mid-abdominal, 60-80 years] = 7.4 ± 1.9 m/s) and distal abdominal aorta (PWV [distal abdominal, 20-40 years] = 4.8 ± 1.4 m/s; PWV [distal abdominal, 60-80 years] = 5.7 ± 1.4 m/s). Good agreement was found between repeated magnetic resonance measurements and between magnetic resonance PWVs and the gold-standard. Fourier velocity encoded M-mode allowed to measure global and regional PWV in the descending aorta. There was a preferential stiffening of the thoracic aorta with age, which may be due to progressive fragmentation of elastin fibers in this region. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. CSF in the ventricles of the brain behaves as a relay medium for arteriovenous pulse wave phase coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Butler

    Full Text Available The ventricles of the brain remain perhaps the largest anatomic structure in the human body without established primary purpose, even though their existence has been known at least since described by Aristotle. We hypothesize that the ventricles help match a stroke volume of arterial blood that arrives into the rigid cranium with an equivalent volume of ejected venous blood by spatially configuring cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to act as a low viscosity relay medium for arteriovenous pulse wave (PW phase coupling. We probe the hypothesis by comparing the spatiotemporal behavior of vascular PW about the ventricular surfaces in piglets to internal observations of ventricle wall motions and adjacent CSF pressure variations in humans. With wavelet brain angiography data obtained from piglets, we map the travel relative to brain pulse motion of arterial and venous PWs over the ventricle surfaces. We find that arterial PWs differ in CF phase from venous PWs over the surfaces of the ventricles consistent with arteriovenous PW phase coupling. We find a spatiotemporal difference in vascular PW phase between the ventral and dorsal ventricular surfaces, with the PWs arriving slightly sooner to the ventral surfaces. In humans undergoing neuroendoscopic surgery for hydrocephalus, we measure directly ventricle wall motions and the adjacent internal CSF pressure variations. We find that CSF pressure peaks slightly earlier in the ventral Third Ventricle than the dorsal Lateral Ventricle. When matched anatomically, the peri-ventricular vascular PW phase distribution in piglets complements the endo-ventricular CSF PW phase distribution in humans. This is consistent with a role for the ventricles in arteriovenous PW coupling and may add a framework for understanding hydrocephalus and other disturbances of intracranial pressure.

  2. Eplerenone attenuates pulse wave reflection in chronic kidney disease stage 3-4--a randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Boesby

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity associated with increased arterial stiffness. Plasma aldosterone levels are increased in CKD, and aldosterone has been found to increase vascular inflammation and fibrosis. It was hypothesized that aldosterone receptor inhibition with eplerenone could reduce arterial stiffness in CKD stage 3-4.The design was randomized, open, parallel group. Measurements of arterial stiffness markers were undertaken at weeks 1 and 24.24 weeks of add-on treatment with 25-50 mg eplerenone or standard medication.Primary outcome parameter was carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV. Secondary outcomes were augmentation index (AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and urinary albumin excretion.Fifty-four CKD patients (mean eGFR 36 mL/min/1.73 m(2, SD 11 were randomized. Forty-six patients completed the trial. The mean difference in cfPWV changes between groups was 0.1 m/s (95%CI: -1.0, 1.3, P = 0.8. The mean difference in AIx changes between groups was 4.4% (0.1, 8.6, P = 0.04. AASI was unchanged in both groups. The ratio of change in urinary albumin excretion in the eplerenone group compared to the control was 0.61 (0.37, 1.01, P = 0.05. Four patients were withdrawn from the eplerenone group including three because of possible side effects; one was withdrawn from the control group. Mild hyperkalemia was seen on three occasions and was easily managed.The full planned number of patients was not attained. The duration of the trial may have been too short to obtain full effect of eplerenone on the arteries.Add-on treatment with eplerenone in CKD stage 3-4 did not significantly reduce cfPWV. There may be beneficial vascular effects leading to attenuated pulse wave reflection. Treatment was well-tolerated.ClinicalTrials.govNCT01100203.

  3. Repeatability of central aortic blood pressures measured non-invasively using radial artery applanation tonometry and peripheral pulse wave analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Mike; Coch, Christoph; Bruce, Margaret; Clark, Hazel; Williams, David

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the repeatability of radial pulse wave analysis (PWA) in measuring central systolic and diastolic blood pressures (cSBP/cDBP), pulse pressure (cPP), augmentation pressure (cAP) and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). After 15 min supine rest, 20 ambulant patients (aged 27-82 years; four female) underwent four SphygmoCor PWA measurements on a single occasion. Two nurses independently undertook two measurements in alternate order, blind to their colleague's measurements. Analysis was by Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LOA). Heart rate and brachial blood pressure (BP) were stable during assessment. Based on the average of two PWA measurements between-observer differences (LOA, mean difference +/- 2SD) were small (cSBP 1.5 +/- 10.9 mmHg; cDBP 0.4 +/- 5.2 mmHg; cAP 0.5 +/- 4.5 mmHg; cPP 1.1 +/- 10.5 mmHg; PPA -0.5% +/- 5.6%). Between-observer differences were much greater for single/initial PWA measurement (cSBP 3.6 +/- 15.9 mmHg; cDBP 2.8 +/- 8.8 mmHg; cAP 0.7 +/- 5.8 mmHg; cPP 0.8 +/- 13.6 mmHg; PPA -1.2 +/- 9.4%). Within-observer LOA were very similar for both nurse A (cSBP -4.2 +/- 14.1 mmHg; cDBP -4.6 +/- 13.1 mmHg; cAP -0.4 +/- 4.4 mmHg; cPP 0.5 +/- 11.0 mmHg; PPA 0.7% +/- 9.0%) and nurse B (cSBP 0.0 +/- 12.1 mmHg; cDBP 0.2 +/- 8.5 mmHg; cAP -0.1 +/- 4.4 mmHg; cPP -0.2 +/- 11.9 mmHg; PPA -0.7% +/- 10.6%). Non-invasive assessment of central aortic pressures using PWA on a single occasion is highly repeatable in ambulant patients even when used by relatively inexperienced staff.

  4. The venous manifestations of pulse wave encephalopathy: windkessel dysfunction in normal aging and senile dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Grant A; Levi, Christopher R; Schofield, Peter; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C

    2008-06-01

    Cerebral arterial, venous and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations are closely coupled and this produces pulsation dampening or the windkessel effect. Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a manifestation of the breakdown of this windkessel effect with altered CSF and venous pulsations being noted. The aim of this study was to show that dysfunction of the windkessel mechanism is also a component of normal aging and senile dementia. The study group comprised 24 patients classified as either early senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) or vascular dementia (VaD). The patients with dementia were compared with 12 age-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects, and 12 normal young individuals were compared with the normal aging group. MRI flow quantification was used to measure the nonpulsatile and pulsatile components of blood flow as well as the pulsation at the tentorial incisura. With normal aging blood flow decreased but arterial pulsations increased in volume by 49% (P=0.003). The CSF vented via the tentorial incisura does not change significantly with age and therefore increased venous pulsation is necessary. In patients with VaD the arterial pulse volume was higher by 24% and the straight sinus pulsation was higher by 57% than in normal aging subjects (P=0.05 and P=0.03, respectively). In patients with SDAT the total venous pulsation volumes were similar to those in normal aging subjects but there was less basal sinus pulsation. Normal aging, SDAT and VaD are associated with alterations in venous pulsation due to a breakdown of the windkessel effect.

  5. The venous manifestations of pulse wave encephalopathy: windkessel dysfunction in normal aging and senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Grant A. [Locked Bag 1, Newcastle Region Mail Center, Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Levi, Christopher R.; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C. [Hunter Medical Research Institute, Clinical Neurosciences Program, Newcastle (Australia); Schofield, Peter [James Fletcher Hospital, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Newcastle (Australia)

    2008-06-15

    Cerebral arterial, venous and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations are closely coupled and this produces pulsation dampening or the windkessel effect. Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a manifestation of the breakdown of this windkessel effect with altered CSF and venous pulsations being noted. The aim of this study was to show that dysfunction of the windkessel mechanism is also a component of normal aging and senile dementia. The study group comprised 24 patients classified as either early senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) or vascular dementia (VaD). The patients with dementia were compared with 12 age-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects, and 12 normal young individuals were compared with the normal aging group. MRI flow quantification was used to measure the nonpulsatile and pulsatile components of blood flow as well as the pulsation at the tentorial incisura. With normal aging blood flow decreased but arterial pulsations increased in volume by 49% (P = 0.003). The CSF vented via the tentorial incisura does not change significantly with age and therefore increased venous pulsation is necessary. In patients with VaD the arterial pulse volume was higher by 24% and the straight sinus pulsation was higher by 57% than in normal aging subjects (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). In patients with SDAT the total venous pulsation volumes were similar to those in normal aging subjects but there was less basal sinus pulsation. Normal aging, SDAT and VaD are associated with alterations in venous pulsation due to a breakdown of the windkessel effect. (orig.)

  6. Mechanical stimulation (pulsed electromagnetic fields "PEMF" and extracorporeal shock wave therapy "ESWT" and tendon regeneration: a possible alternative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eRosso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of tendon degeneration and tendinopathy is still partially unclear. However, an active role of metalloproteinases (MMP, growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and a crucial role of inflammatory elements and cytokines was demonstrated. Mechanical stimulation may play a role in regulation of inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that both pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine such as interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10. Moreover ESWT increases the expression of growth factors, such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1, as well as the synthesis of collagen I fibers. These pre-clinical results, in association with several clinical studies, suggest a potential effectiveness of ESWT for tendinopathy treatment. Recently PEMF gained popularity as adjuvant for fracture healing and bone regeneration. Similarly to ESWT, the mechanical stimulation obtained using PEMFs may play a role for treatment of tendinopathy and for tendon regeneration, increasing in-vitro TGF-beta production, as well as scleraxis and collagen I gene expression. In this manuscript the rational of mechanical stimulations and the clinical studies on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave (ESW and PEMF will be discussed. However, no clear evidence of a clinical value of ESW and PEMF has been found in literature with regards to the treatment of tendinopathy in human, so further clinical trials are needed to confirm the promising hypotheses concerning the effectiveness of ESWT and PEMF mechanical stimulation.

  7. Superluminal pulse propagation and amplification without inversion of microwave radiation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini Sabegh, Z.; Vafafard, A.; Maleki, M. A.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the interaction of the microwave fields with an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. It is shown that the different four-level configurations i.e. cascade, N-type, diamond, Y-type and inverted Y-type systems can be obtained in the superconducting phase quantum circuits by keeping the third order of the Josephson junction potential expansion whereas by dropping the third order term, just the cascade configuration can be established. We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system, which is realized in an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. We find that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in an array of many superconducting phase quantum circuits. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  8. A prospective study on pulse wave velocity (PWV) and response to anti-hypertensive treatments: PWV determines BP control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Meili; Huo, Yong; Wang, Xiaobin; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Fan, Fangfang; Li, Jianping; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Yang, Xinchun; Chen, Yundai; Qian, Geng

    2015-01-15

    Recent data indicate that hypertension is not well controlled in many populations throughout the world. The factors that influence individual response to anti-hypertensive treatment need to be clarified. Pulse wave velocity (PWV), as a marker of arterial stiffness, has been demonstrated to have important relationships with BP progression; however, little information is available on the role of PWV in blood pressure (BP) control. We aimed to assess BP control during the run-in treatment period in the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT). These analyses included a total of 3056 treated hypertensive subjects (age: 59.6±7.5years, male/female 1339/1717) with PWV measured at baseline. The average BP at enrollment was 166/95mmHg, and declined to 141/85mmHg after short-term antihypertensive treatment (a median follow-up of 20days). There was an inverse relationship between PWV level and BP reduction during the treatment, most notably for systolic BP (with estimated coefficients of -9.01 (Panti-hypertensive treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ABCA1-dependent serum cholesterol efflux capacity inversely correlates with pulse wave velocity in healthy subjects[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favari, Elda; Ronda, Nicoletta; Adorni, Maria Pia; Zimetti, Francesca; Salvi, Paolo; Manfredini, Matteo; Bernini, Franco; Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F. G.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to induce cell cholesterol efflux is considered one of its main antiatherogenic properties. Little is known about the impact of such HDL function on vascular physiology. We investigated the relationship between ABCA1-dependent serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC), an HDL functionality indicator, and pulse wave velocity (PWV), an indicator of arterial stiffness. Serum of 167 healthy subjects was used to conduct CEC measurement, and carotid-femoral PWV was measured with a high-fidelity tonometer. J774 macrophages, labeled with [3H]cholesterol and stimulated to express ABCA1, were exposed to sera; the difference between cholesterol efflux from stimulated and unstimulated cells provided specific ABCA1-mediated CEC. PWV is inversely correlated with ABCA1-dependent CEC (r = −0.183; P = 0.018). Moreover, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, mean arterial pressure, serum LDL, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose, PWV displays a significant negative regression on ABCA1-dependent CEC (β = −0.204; 95% confidence interval, −0.371 to −0.037). The finding that ABCA1-dependent CEC, but not serum HDL cholesterol level (r = −0.002; P = 0.985), is a significant predictor of PWV in healthy subjects points to the relevance of HDL function in vascular physiology and arterial stiffness prevention. PMID:23103472

  10. Comparison between continuous non-invasive estimated cardiac output by pulse wave transit time and thermodilution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ashish C; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Grewal, Navneet; Aman, Mansoor; Dubowitz, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement is essential for many therapeutic decisions in anesthesia and critical care. Most available non-invasive CO measuring methods have an invasive component. We investigate "pulse wave transit time" (estimated continuous cardiac output [esCCO]) a method of CO measurement that has no invasive component to its use. After institutional ethical committee approval, 14 adult (21-85 years) patients undergoing surgery and requiring pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) for measuring CO, were included. Postoperatively CO readings were taken simultaneously with thermodilution (TD) via PAC and esCCO, whenever a change in CO was expected due to therapeutic interventions. Both monitoring methods were continued until patients' discharge from the Intensive Care Unit and observer recording values using TD method was blinded to values measured by esCCO system. Three hundred and one readings were obtained simultaneously from both methods. Correlation and concordance between the two methods was derived using Bland-Altman analysis. Measured values showed significant correlation between esCCO and TD ( r = 0.6, P gold standard) with the present degree of error its utility for clinical/therapeutic decision-making is questionable.

  11. Study of Key Non-dimensional Parameters for Wave Drag Reduction with High-Frequency Repetitive Laser Pulse Energy Depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zexu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wave drag reduction with high-frequency repetitive laser pulse energy depositions is multivariable. Three key non-dimensional parameters, non-dimensional energy, non-dimensional depositing position and Mach number, were constructed from a number of original variables by using Buckingham pi theorem. Influences of these non-dimensional parameters on energy deposition performance, namely drag reduction and energy deposition efficiency, were investigated numerically by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with an upwind scheme. Optimizing method of non-dimensional energy and non-dimensional depositing position is proposed. Drag reduction and energy deposition efficiency have exponential relationships with non-dimensional energy; Drag reduction and energy deposition efficiency have quadratic relationships with non-dimensional depositing position. Drag reduction has exponential relationship with freestream Mach number and energy deposition efficiency has quadratic relationship with Mach number. Non-dimensional laser energy and non-dimensional depositing position should be optimized synthetically for a given freestream.

  12. The effect of workplace smoking bans on heart rate variability and pulse wave velocity of non-smoking hospitality workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Wellenius, Gregory A; Bauer, Georg F; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Moeller, Alexander; Röösli, Martin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of a change in second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure on heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), this study utilized a quasi-experimental setting when a smoking ban was introduced. HRV, a quantitative marker of autonomic activity of the nervous system, and PWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, were measured in 55 non-smoking hospitality workers before and 3-12 months after a smoking ban and compared to a control group that did not experience an exposure change. SHS exposure was determined with a nicotine-specific badge and expressed as inhaled cigarette equivalents per day (CE/d). PWV and HRV parameters significantly changed in a dose-dependent manner in the intervention group as compared to the control group. A one CE/d decrease was associated with a 2.3% (95% CI 0.2-4.4; p = 0.031) higher root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), a 5.7% (95% CI 0.9-10.2; p = 0.02) higher high-frequency component and a 0.72% (95% CI 0.40-1.05; p < 0.001) lower PWV. PWV and HRV significantly improved after introducing smoke-free workplaces indicating a decreased cardiovascular risk.

  13. A comparative study of the plasmon effect in nanoelectrode THz emitters: Pulse vs. continuous-wave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Eui Su; Lee, Il-Min; Han, Sang-Pil; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Park, Kyung Hyun, E-mail: khp@etri.re.kr [Terahertz Basic Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeongyong [Metal-Insulator Transition Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghun [Optical Internet Components Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Plasmonic field enhancement in terahertz (THz) generation is one of the recently arisen techniques in the THz field that has attracted considerable interest. However, the reported levels of enhancement of THz output power in the literature are significantly different from each other, from less than two times to about two orders of magnitude of enhancement in power, which implies the existence of other major limiting factors yet to be revealed. In this work, the contribution of the plasmonic effect to the power enhancement of THz emitters is revisited. We show that the carrier collection efficiency in a THz emitter with plasmonic nanostructures is more critical to the device performance than the plasmonic field enhancement itself. The strong reverse fields induced by the highly localized plasmonic carriers in the vicinity of the nanoelectrodes screen the carrier collections and seriously limit the power enhancement. This is supported by our experimental observations of the significantly enhanced power in a plasmonic nanoelectrode THz emitter in continuous-wave radiation mode, while the same device has limited enhancement with pulsed radiation. We hope that our study may provide an intuitive but practical guideline in adopting plasmonic nanostructures with an aim of enhancing the efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  14. Determination of testicular blood flow in camelids using vascular casting and color pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzler, Michelle; Tyson, Reid; Grimes, Monica; Timm, Karen

    2011-01-01

    We describe the vasculature of the camelid testis using plastic casting. We also use color pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography to measure testicular blood flow and compare the differences between testicular blood flow in fertile and infertile camelids. The testicular artery originates from the ventral surface of the aorta, gives rise to an epididymal branch, and becomes very tortuous as it approaches the testis. Within the supratesticular arteries, peak systolic velocity (PSV) was higher in fertile males compared to infertile males (P = 0.0004). In addition, end diastolic velocity (EDV) within the supratesticular arteries was higher for fertile males when compared to infertile males (P = 0.0325). Within the marginal arteries, PSV was also higher in fertile males compared to infertile males (P = 0.0104). However, EDV within the marginal arteries was not significantly different between fertile and infertile males (P = 0.121). In addition, the resistance index was not significantly different between fertile and infertile males within the supratesticular (P = 0.486) and marginal arteries (P = 0.144). The significance of this research is that in addition to information obtained from a complete reproductive evaluation, a male camelid's fertility can be determined using testicular blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography.

  15. Determination of Testicular Blood Flow in Camelids Using Vascular Casting and Color Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kutzler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the vasculature of the camelid testis using plastic casting. We also use color pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography to measure testicular blood flow and compare the differences between testicular blood flow in fertile and infertile camelids. The testicular artery originates from the ventral surface of the aorta, gives rise to an epididymal branch, and becomes very tortuous as it approaches the testis. Within the supratesticular arteries, peak systolic velocity (PSV was higher in fertile males compared to infertile males (P=0.0004. In addition, end diastolic velocity (EDV within the supratesticular arteries was higher for fertile males when compared to infertile males (P=0.0325. Within the marginal arteries, PSV was also higher in fertile males compared to infertile males (P=0.0104. However, EDV within the marginal arteries was not significantly different between fertile and infertile males (P=0.121. In addition, the resistance index was not significantly different between fertile and infertile males within the supratesticular (P=0.486 and marginal arteries (P=0.144. The significance of this research is that in addition to information obtained from a complete reproductive evaluation, a male camelid's fertility can be determined using testicular blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography.

  16. Comparison between multi-channel LDV and PWI for measurement of pulse wave velocity in distensible tubes: Towards a new diagnostic technique for detection of arteriosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Adriaan; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Apostolakis, Jason; Waz, Adam; Nauleau, Pierre; Abramski, Krzysztof; Dirckx, Joris; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work, was to compare pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements using Laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) and the more established ultrasound-based pulse wave imaging (PWI) in smooth vessels. Additionally, it was tested whether changes in phantom structure can be detected using LDV in vessels containing a local hardening of the vessel wall. Results from both methods showed good agreement illustrated by the non-parametric Spearman correlation analysis (Spearman-ρ = 1 and pmarkers and larger distances between beams. In further studies, more LDV beams will be used to allow detection of local changes in arterial wall dynamics due to e.g. small inclusions or local hardenings of the vessel wall.

  17. Exposure of the thorax to a sublethal blast wave causes a hydrodynamic pulse that leads to perivenular inflammation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J Marc; Pampori, Adam; Keledjian, Kaspar; Tosun, Cigdem; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2014-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by an explosive blast (blast-TBI) is postulated to result, in part, from transvascular transmission to the brain of a hydrodynamic pulse (a.k.a., volumetric blood surge, ballistic pressure wave, hydrostatic shock, or hydraulic shock) induced in major intrathoracic blood vessels. This mechanism of blast-TBI has not been demonstrated directly. We tested the hypothesis that a blast wave impacting the thorax would induce a hydrodynamic pulse that would cause pathological changes in the brain. We constructed a Thorax-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (TOBIA) and a Jugular-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (JOBIA). TOBIA delivered a collimated blast wave to the right lateral thorax of a rat, precluding direct impact on the cranium. JOBIA delivered a blast wave to the fluid-filled port of an extracorporeal intravenous infusion device whose catheter was inserted retrograde into the jugular vein, precluding lung injury. Long Evans rats were subjected to sublethal injury by TOBIA or JOBIA. Blast injury induced by TOBIA was characterized by apnea and diffuse bilateral hemorrhagic injury to the lungs associated with a transient reduction in pulse oximetry signals. Immunolabeling 24 h after injury by TOBIA showed up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha, ED-1, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein in veins or perivenular tissues and microvessels throughout the brain. The perivenular inflammatory effects induced by TOBIA were prevented by ligating the jugular vein and were reproduced using JOBIA. We conclude that blast injury to the thorax leads to perivenular inflammation, Sur1 up-regulation, and reactive astrocytosis resulting from the induction of a hydrodynamic pulse in the vasculature.

  18. Increased Range of Motion and Function in an Individual with Breast Cancer and Necrotizing Fasciitis—Manual Therapy and Pulsed Short-Wave Diathermy Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Johnson; Draper, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia affecting those predisposed to immune system compromise. It is a life threatening condition; mortality can be reduced by rapid diagnosis, adequate early surgical debridement and antibiotic ointment. In this case report we present the use of manual therapy (MT) techniques, joint and soft tissue mobilization, following a regimen of pulsed short wave diathermy (PSWD) in the treatment of a woman 3 years ...

  19. Elimination of self-mode-locking pulses in high-power continuous-wave Yb-doped fiber lasers with external feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyang; Jiang, Man; Zhou, Pu; Zhao, Guomin; Gu, Xijia

    2017-11-10

    Sustained self-pulsing and self-mode-locking (SML) are detrimental to the performance of continuous-wave (CW) fiber lasers. We demonstrate an all-fiber method to eliminate SML pulsing by employing a low-reflectivity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) outside of a laser cavity to provide feedback. A narrow-bandwidth FBG is used to form an external cavity with the output coupler FBG, which suppresses the SML up to a certain output power level, at which point, the laser emission linewidth is still within the bandwidth of the FBG. On the other hand, a broad-bandwidth FBG forms a chirped cavity with the output coupler FBG, which can suppress the SML at a much higher power level, tested up to 50 W. This method provides a simple effective all-fiber solution for suppressing self-pulsing in CW fiber lasers at high pump levels with no need to change the laser configuration.

  20. SIMULATION OF FORWARD AND BACKWARD WAVES EVOLUTION OF FEW-CYCLE PULSES PROPAGATING IN AN OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE WITH DISPERSION AND CUBIC NONLINEARITY OF ELECTRONIC AND ELECTRONIC-VIBRATION NATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Konev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical method for calculation of forward and backward waves of intense few-cycle laser pulses propagating in an optical waveguide with dispersion and cubic nonlinearity of electronic and electronic-vibration nature is described. Simulations made with the implemented algorithm show that accounting for Raman nonlinearity does not lead to qualitative changes in behavior of the backward wave. Speaking about quantitative changes, the increase of efficiency of energy transfer from the forward wave to the backward wave is observed. Presented method can be also used to simulate interaction of counterpropagating pulses.

  1. Identifying Coronary Artery Disease in Asymptomatic Middle-Aged Sportsmen: The Additional Value of Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs L Braber

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular screening may benefit middle-aged sportsmen, as coronary artery disease (CAD is the main cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death. Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, may help identify sportsmen with subclinical CAD. We examined the additional value of PWV measurements to traditional CAD risk factors for identifying CAD.From the Measuring Athlete's Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC cohort of asymptomatic, middle-aged sportsmen who underwent low-dose Cardiac CT (CCT after routine sports medical examination (SME, 193 consecutive sportsmen (aged 55 ± 6.6 years were included with additional PWV measurements before CCT. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of PWV values (>8.3 and >7.5 m/s assessed by Arteriograph were used to identify CAD (coronary artery calcium scoring ≥ 100 Agatston Units or coronary CT angiography luminal stenosis ≥ 50% and to assess the additional diagnostic value of PWV to established cardiovascular risk factors.Forty-seven sportsmen (24% had CAD on CCT. They were older (58.9 vs. 53.8 years, p8.3m/s respectively >7.5 m/s sensitivity to detect CAD on CT was 43% and 74%, specificity 69% and 45%, positive predictive value 31% and 30%, and negative predictive value 79% and 84%. Adding PWV to traditional risk factor models did not change the area under the curve (from 0.78 (95% CI = 0.709-0.848 to AUC 0.78 (95% CI 0.710-0.848, p = 0.99 for prediction of CAD on CCT.Limited additional value was found for PWV on top of established risk factors to identify CAD. PWV might still have a role to identify CAD in middle-aged sportsmen if risk factors such as cholesterol are unknown.

  2. REFERENCE VALUES OF AORTIC PULSE WAVE VELOCITY IN A LARGE HEALTHY POPULATION AGED BETWEEN 3 AND18 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsebet Valeria Hidvegi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The measurement of aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao is an accepted marker in stratifying individual cardiovascular risk in adults. There is an increasing volume of evidence concerning impaired vascular function in different diseases in paediatric populations, but, unfortunately, only a few studies are available on the measurement of normal PWVao values in children. The aim of our study was to determine the reference values of PWVao in a large healthy population using a newly developed technique. Methods: Three thousand, three hundred and seventyfour healthy individuals (1802 boys aged 3–18 years were examined by an invasively validated, occlusive, oscillometric device. Results: The mean PWVao values increased from 5.5_0.3 to 6.5_0.3 m/s (P<0.05 in boys and from 5.6_0.3 to 6.4_0.3 m/s (P<0.05 in girls. The increase, however, was not constant, and the values exhibited a flat period between the ages of 3 and 8 years in both sexes. The first pronounced increase occurred at the age of 12.1 years in boys and 10.4 years in girls. Moreover, between the ages of 3 and 8 years, the brachial SBP and mean blood pressures increased continuously and gradually, whereas the PWVao remained unchanged. By contrast, beyond the age of 9 years, blood pressure and aortic stiffness trends basically moved together. Conclusion: Our study provides the largest database to date concerning arterial stiffness in healthy children and adolescents between the ages of 3 and 18 years, and the technology adopted proved easy to use in large paediatric populations, even at a very young age.  

  3. Identifying coronary artery disease in men with type 2 diabetes: osteoprotegerin, pulse wave velocity, and other biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with type 2 diabetes, high serum levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular events. However, it remains unclear how well OPG performs when compared with traditional biomarkers of cardiovascular risk such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Furthermore, OPG levels are also high in the presence of diabetes-related microvascular disease, and it is unclear whether OPG can distinguish microvascular disease from large-vessel atherosclerosis. The first aim of this study was to compare OPG levels against other biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in the identification of patients with documented multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). The second aim was to compare OPG levels in patients with microvascular complications (microalbuminuria) against those with established CAD. METHODS: Three groups of male patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited: patients without microvascular complications or large-vessel atherosclerosis (n = 24), patients with microalbuminuria only (n = 23), and patients with microalbuminuria and documented multivessel CAD (n = 25). OPG, hsCRP, interleukin 6, urate, and pulse wave velocity were measured. RESULTS: Serum OPG levels were significantly higher in patients with a combination of microalbuminuria and CAD than in those with microalbuminuria alone. There were no significant differences in any of the other biomarkers between the groups. CONCLUSION: OPG was found to be superior to the other biomarkers studied in identifying patients with documented CAD. The presence of CAD was a greater determinant of serum OPG levels than microalbuminuria in our population. These findings support the use of OPG as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk.

  4. Comparison between continuous non-invasive estimated cardiac output by pulse wave transit time and thermodilution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish C Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Cardiac output (CO measurement is essential for many therapeutic decisions in anesthesia and critical care. Most available non-invasive CO measuring methods have an invasive component. We investigate "pulse wave transit time" (estimated continuous cardiac output [esCCO] a method of CO measurement that has no invasive component to its use. Materials and Methods: After institutional ethical committee approval, 14 adult (21-85 years patients undergoing surgery and requiring pulmonary artery catheter (PAC for measuring CO, were included. Postoperatively CO readings were taken simultaneously with thermodilution (TD via PAC and esCCO, whenever a change in CO was expected due to therapeutic interventions. Both monitoring methods were continued until patients′ discharge from the Intensive Care Unit and observer recording values using TD method was blinded to values measured by esCCO system. Results: Three hundred and one readings were obtained simultaneously from both methods. Correlation and concordance between the two methods was derived using Bland-Altman analysis. Measured values showed significant correlation between esCCO and TD ( r = 0.6, P < 0.001, 95% confidence limits of 0.51-0.68. Mean and (standard deviation for bias and precision were 0.13 (2.27 L/min and 6.56 (2.19 L/min, respectively. The 95% confidence interval for bias was - 4.32 to 4.58 L/min and for precision 2.27 to10.85 L/min. Conclusions: Although, esCCO is the only true non-invasive continuous CO monitor available and even though its values change proportionately to TD method (gold standard with the present degree of error its utility for clinical/therapeutic decision-making is questionable.

  5. Improved aortic pulse wave velocity assessment from multislice two-directional in-plane velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, Jos J M; de Roos, Albert; Grotenhuis, Heynric B; Steendijk, Paul; Hendriksen, Dennis; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; van der Geest, Rob J; Bax, Jeroen J; Jukema, J Wouter; Reiber, Johan H C

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment by in-plane velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 14 patients selected for cardiac catheterization on suspicion of coronary artery disease and 15 healthy volunteers, PWV was assessed with multislice two-directional in-plane velocity-encoded MRI (PWV(i.p.)) and compared with conventionally assessed PWV from multisite one-directional through-plane velocity-encoded MRI (PWV(t.p.)). In patients, PWV was also obtained from intraarterially acquired pressure-time curves (PWV(pressure)), which is considered the gold standard reference method. In volunteers, PWV(i.p.) and PWV(t.p.) were obtained in duplicate in the same examination to test reproducibility. In patients, PWV(i.p.) showed stronger correlation and similar variation with PWV(pressure) than PWV(t.p.) (Pearson correlation r = 0.75 vs. r = 0.58, and coefficient of variation [COV] = 10% vs. COV = 12%, respectively). In volunteers, repeated PWV(i.p.) assessment showed stronger correlation and less variation than repeated PWV(t.p.) (proximal aorta: r = 0.97 and COV = 10% vs. r = 0.69 and COV = 17%; distal aorta: r = 0.94 and COV = 12% vs. r = 0.90 and COV = 16%; total aorta: r = 0.97 and COV = 7% vs. r = 0.90 and COV = 13%). PWV(i.p.) is an improvement over conventional PWV(t.p.) by showing higher agreement as compared to the gold standard (PWV(pressure)) and higher reproducibility for repeated MRI assessment. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Effective transvascular drug delivery to glioma in rats by using a pulsed laser-induced photomechanical wave (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yusuke; Sato, Shunichi; Tomiyama, Arata; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Mori, Kentaro; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is one of the most aggressive cancers, for which efficacy of conventional chemotherapy is often limited due to the blood-tumor barrier (BTB). Thus, the development of a method for enhancing the BTB permeability is strongly desired. In this study, we applied a photomechanical wave (PMW), which was generated by the irradiation of a light-absorbing material with a nanosecond laser pulse, to transiently open the BTB in a rat intracranial glioma model using C6 cells. A tumor was grown in the both hemispheres, and a solution of Evans blue (EB), as a test drug, was injected into the tail vein. Thereafter, we applied a PMW generated at a laser fluence of 0.2 J/cm2 (averaged peak pressure, ~27 MPa), 0.4 J/cm2 (~54 MPa) or 0.6 J/cm2 (~78MPa), to one hemisphere through the cranial window, while the other hemisphere served as a control. Four hours later, the rat was perfused, and we compared intensity distributions of EB fluorescence between the both hemispheres. Intensities of EB fluorescence both in the peritumoral and tumor core regions were increased with increasing the laser fluence, but hemorrhage was observed at the highest fluence. Thus, 0.4 J/cm2 would be optimum for efficient and safe BTB opening. On the basis of fluorescence microscopy with the use of enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing C6 cells, we confirmed that a drug was delivered into targeted glioma cells in the peritumoral region. These results show the validity of the present transvascular drug delivery method to glioma.

  7. Age-related cerebral white matter changes and pulse-wave encephalopathy: observations with three-dimensional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Feugeas, Marie Cécile; De Marco, Giovanni; Peretti, Ilana Idy; Godon-Hardy, Sylvie; Fredy, Daniel; Claeys, Elisabeth Schouman

    2005-11-01

    Our purpose was to investigate leukoaraïosis (LA) using three-dimensional MR imaging combined with advanced image-processing technology to attempt to group signal abnormalities according to their etiology. Coronal T2-weighted fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequences and three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo sequences were used to examine cerebral white matter changes in 75 elderly people with memory complaint but no dementia. They were otherwise healthy, community-dwelling subjects. Three subtypes of LA were defined on the basis of their shape, geography and extent: the so-called subependymal/subpial LA, perivascular LA and "bands" along long white matter tracts. Subependymal changes were directly contiguous with ventricular spaces. They showed features of "water hammer" lesions with ventricular systematisation and a more frequent location around the frontal horns than around the bodies (P=.0008). The use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contiguity criterion allowed a classification of splenial changes in the subpial group. Conversely, posterior periventricular lesions in the centrum ovale as well as irregular and extensive periventricular lesions were not directly contiguous with CSF spaces. The so-called perivascular changes showed features of small-vessel-associated disease; they surrounded linear CSF-like signals that followed the direction of perforating vessels. Distribution of these perivascular changes appeared heterogeneous (P ranging from .04 to 5.10(-16)). These findings suggest that subependymal/subpial LA and subcortical LA may be separate manifestations of a single underlying pulse-wave encephalopathy.

  8. NON-INVASIVE PULSE WAVE ANALYSIS IN A THROMBUS-FREE ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM AFTER IMPLANTATION OF A NITINOL AORTIC ENDOGRAFT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios eGeorgakarakos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular Aneurysm Repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV. This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall and the intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early postoperative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm of no intraluminal thrombus, no medical history and absence of peripheral arterial disease. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased postoperatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6m/sec to 10.6 and 10.9 at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the augmentation index decreased from 28% to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The augmentation pressure decreased gradually from 15- to 6- and 4mmHg. The wave reflection magnitude dropped from 68% to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn×sec×cm−5. Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the wave reflection in aorta without causing significant alterations in PWV.

  9. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  10. Potential Role of Vegetarianism on Nutritional and Cardiovascular Status in Taiwanese Dialysis Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsiang Ou

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death for patients on chronic dialysis. End stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis imposed to reduce phosphorus intake, which likely contributes to development of vegetarian diet behaviors. Vegetarian diets are often lower in protein content, in contradiction to the recommendation that a high protein diet is followed by patients undergoing dialysis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a vegetarian diet on the nutritional and cardiovascular status of dialysis patients.A study of 21 vegetarian dialysis patients and 42 age- and sex-matched non-vegetarian dialysis patients selected as controls was conducted in the Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and biochemistry data including total homocysteine levels, serum lipid profiles, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, vitamin D levels, albumin, and normalized protein catabolic rate were measured.Compared with the non-vegetarian control group, vegetarian subjects had lower body weight, body mass index, serum phosphate, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, vitamin D, uric acid, albumin, and normalized protein catabolic rate (p < 0.05. The vegetarian group showed higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity than the non-vegetarian group (1926.95 ± 456.45 and 1684.82 ± 309.55 cm/sec, respectively, p < 0.05. After adjustment for age, albumin, pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure, and duration of dialysis, vegetarian diet remained an independent risk factor for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.The present study revealed that patients on dialysis who follow vegetarian diets may experience subclinical protein malnutrition and vitamin D deficiency that could offset the beneficial cardiovascular effects of vegetarianism.

  11. Potential Role of Vegetarianism on Nutritional and Cardiovascular Status in Taiwanese Dialysis Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shih-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Yin; Huang, Chien-Wei; Chen, Nai-Ching; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Chou, Kang-Ju; Lee, Po-Tsang; Fang, Hua-Chang; Chen, Chien-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death for patients on chronic dialysis. End stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis imposed to reduce phosphorus intake, which likely contributes to development of vegetarian diet behaviors. Vegetarian diets are often lower in protein content, in contradiction to the recommendation that a high protein diet is followed by patients undergoing dialysis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a vegetarian diet on the nutritional and cardiovascular status of dialysis patients. A study of 21 vegetarian dialysis patients and 42 age- and sex-matched non-vegetarian dialysis patients selected as controls was conducted in the Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and biochemistry data including total homocysteine levels, serum lipid profiles, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, vitamin D levels, albumin, and normalized protein catabolic rate were measured. Compared with the non-vegetarian control group, vegetarian subjects had lower body weight, body mass index, serum phosphate, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, vitamin D, uric acid, albumin, and normalized protein catabolic rate (p vegetarian group showed higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity than the non-vegetarian group (1926.95 ± 456.45 and 1684.82 ± 309.55 cm/sec, respectively, p vegetarian diet remained an independent risk factor for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. The present study revealed that patients on dialysis who follow vegetarian diets may experience subclinical protein malnutrition and vitamin D deficiency that could offset the beneficial cardiovascular effects of vegetarianism.

  12. Investigation of acoustic waves generated in an elastic solid by a pulsed ion beam and their application in a FIB based scanning ion acoustic microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmadaliev, C.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the acoustic wave generation by pulsed and periodically modulated ion beams in different solid materials depending on the beam parameters and to demonstrate the possibility to apply an intensity modulated focused ion beam (FIB) for acoustic emission and for nondestructive investigation of the internal structure of materials on a microscopic scale. The combination of a FIB and an ultrasound microscope in one device can provide the opportunity of nondestructive investigation, production and modification of micro- and nanostructures simultaneously. This work consists of the two main experimental parts. In the first part the process of elastic wave generation during the irradiation of metallic samples by a pulsed beam of energetic ions was investigated in an energy range from 1.5 to 10 MeV and pulse durations of 0.5-5 {mu}s, applying ions with different masses, e.g. oxygen, silicon and gold, in charge states from 1{sup +} to 4{sup +}. The acoustic amplitude dependence on the ion beam parameters like the ion mass and energy, the ion charge state, the beam spot size and the pulse duration were of interest. This work deals with ultrasound transmitted in a solid, i.e. bulk waves, because of their importance for acoustic transmission microscopy and nondestructive inspection of internal structure of a sample. The second part of this work was carried out using the IMSA-100 FIB system operating in an energy range from 30 to 70 keV. The scanning ion acoustic microscope based on this FIB system was developed and tested. (orig.)

  13. Beneficial effects on arterial stiffness and pulse-wave reflection of combined enalapril and candesartan in chronic kidney disease--a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Frimodt-Møller

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensinsystem (RAS in hypertension causes differential effects on central and brachial blood pressure (BP, which has been translated into improved outcome. The objective was to examine if a more complete inhibition of RAS by combining an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI and an angiotensin receptor antagonist (ARB compared to monotherapy has an additive effect on central BP and pulse-wave velocity (PWV, which are known markers of CVD.Sixty-seven CKD patients (mean GFR 30, range 13-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2 participated in an open randomized study of 16 weeks of monotherapy with either enalapril or candesartan followed by 8 weeks of dual blockade aiming at a total dose of 16 mg candesartan and 20 mg enalapril o.d. Pulse-wave measurements were performed at week 0, 8, 16 and 24 by the SphygmoCor device.Significant additive BP independent reductions were found after dual blockade in aortic PWV (-0.3 m/s, P<0.05 and in augmentation index (-2%, P<0.01 compared to monotherapy. Furthermore pulse pressure amplification was improved (P<0.05 and central systolic BP reduced (-6 mmHg, P<0.01.Dual blockade of the RAS resulted in an additive BP independent reduction in pulse-wave reflection and arterial stiffness compared to monotherapy in CKD patients.Clinical trial.gov NCT00235287.

  14. Unified model of plasma formation, bubble generation and shock wave emission in water for fs to ns laser pulses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Paltauf, Günther; Zhang, Zhenxi; Vogel, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    We developed modeling tools for optical breakdown events in water that span various phases reaching from breakdown initiation via solvated electron generation, through laser induced-plasma formation and temperature evolution in the focal spot to the later phases of cavitation bubble dynamics and shock wave emission and applied them to a large parameter space of pulse durations, wavelengths, and pulse energies. The rate equation model considers the interplay of linear absorption, photoionization, avalanche ionization and recombination, traces thermalization and temperature evolution during the laser pulse, and portrays the role of thermal ionization that becomes relevant for T > 3000 K. Modeling of free-electron generation includes recent insights on breakdown initiation in water via multiphoton excitation of valence band electrons into a solvated state at Eini = 6.6 eV followed by up-conversion into the conduction band level that is located at 9.5 eV. The ability of tracing the temperature evolution enabled us to link the model of laser-induced plasma formation with a hydrodynamic model of plasma-induced pressure evolution and phase transitions that, in turn, traces bubble generation and dynamics as well as shock wave emission. This way, the amount of nonlinear energy deposition in transparent dielectrics and the resulting material modifications can be assessed as a function of incident laser energy. The unified model of plasma formation and bubble dynamics yields an excellent agreement with experimental results over the entire range of investigated pulse durations (femtosecond to nanosecond), wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulse energies.

  15. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Delvendahl, Igor; Pechmann, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor...

  17. Receiver Signal to Noise Ratios for IPDA Lidars Using Sine-wave and Pulsed Laser Modulation and Direct Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    seeder lasers, one on-line and one offline that are intensity modulated by two different frequency sine-waves signals before being amplified by a common laser amplifier. The receiver uses narrowband amplitude demodulation, or lock-in, Signal processing at the given laser modulation frequencies [3,4]. The laser transmitter operates in a quasi CW mode with the peak power equal to twice the average power. The on-line and off-line lasers can be transmitted at the same time without interference. Another direct detection technique uses a low duty cycle pulsed laser modulation [5,6] with the laser wavelengths alternating between on-line and off-line on successive pulses. The receiver uses time resolved detection and can also provide simultaneous target range measurement. With a lower laser duty cycle it requires a much higher peak laser power for the same average power.

  18. Fast retrospectively triggered local pulse-wave velocity measurements in mice with CMR-microscopy using a radial trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Patrick; Kampf, Thomas; Helluy, Xavier; Gutjahr, Fabian T; Meyer, Cord B; Rommel, Null; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Jakob, Peter M; Herold, Volker

    2013-10-01

    The aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. In recent studies MRI methods have been developed to measure this parameter noninvasively in mice. Present techniques require additional hardware for cardiac and respiratory gating. In this work a robust self-gated measurement of the local PWV in mice without the need of triggering probes is proposed. The local PWV of 6-months-old wild-type C57BL/6J mice (n=6) was measured in the abdominal aorta with a retrospectively triggered radial Phase Contrast (PC) MR sequence using the flow-area (QA) method. A navigator signal was extracted from the CMR data of highly asymmetric radial projections with short repetition time (TR=3 ms) and post-processed with high-pass and low-pass filters for retrospective cardiac and respiratory gating. The self-gating signal was used for a reconstruction of high-resolution Cine frames of the aortic motion. To assess the local PWV the volume flow Q and the cross-sectional area A of the aorta were determined. The results were compared with the values measured with a triggered Cartesian and an undersampled triggered radial PC-Cine sequence. In all examined animals a self-gating signal could be extracted and used for retrospective breath-gating and PC-Cine reconstruction. With the non-triggered measurement PWV values of 2.3±0.2 m/s were determined. These values are in agreement with those measured with the triggered Cartesian (2.4±0.2 m/s) and the triggered radial (2.3±0.2 m/s) measurement. Due to the strong robustness of the radial trajectory against undersampling an acceleration of more than two relative to the prospectively triggered Cartesian sampling could be achieved with the retrospective method. With the radial flow-encoding sequence the extraction of a self-gating signal is feasible. The retrospective method enables a robust and fast measurement of the local PWV without the need of additional trigger hardware.

  19. Differential effects of vitamin D receptor activators on aortic calcification and pulse wave velocity in uraemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, William; Koch, Kristin; Nakane, Masaki; Ma, Junli; Dixon, Doug; Bolin, Antoinette; Reinhart, Glenn

    2008-12-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with an increase in cardiovascular mortality in stage 5 chronic kidney disease. To determine if vitamin D receptor activators (VDRAs) have differential effects in the pathogenesis of aortic calcification, we assessed the effects of paricalcitol and doxercalciferol in vivo using 5/6 nephrectomized (NX) rats. To quantify the functional consequences of vascular calcification, pulse wave velocity (PWV), an aortic compliance index, was measured. NX rats were fed a diet containing 0.9% phosphorous and 0.6% calcium 4 weeks prior to and throughout the study. On Day 0, rats received vehicle or VDRA (0.083, 0.167 and 0.333 microg/kg, i.p.) three times per week for 6 weeks. At Day 0 and Weeks 2 and 6, blood was drawn and PWV was measured by Doppler ultrasound. VDRAs (0.167 and 0.333 microg/kg) consistently lowered PTH at Weeks 2 and 6. All doses of paricalcitol increased serum calcium at Week 6 but not at Week 2, while the two higher doses of doxercalciferol increased serum calcium at both Weeks 2 and 6. Treatment with paricalcitol (0.333 microg/kg) increased serum phosphorus at Weeks 2 and 6; these changes were not different from those observed in 5/6 NX rats. All doses of doxercalciferol increased serum phosphorus at Week 6. Paricalcitol had no effect on Ca x P; however, the two highest doses of doxercalciferol increased Ca x P at Weeks 2 and 6 above that observed in the 5/6 NX vehicle-treated group. There were no differences in aortic calcium and phosphorus contents at the end of 6 weeks among SHAM-, 5/6 NX- and paricalcitol-treated rats. However, treatment with the two higher doses of doxercalciferol caused a significant elevation in aortic calcium and phosphorus contents. Measurements of PWV demonstrated differential effects of VDRAs on vascular compliance. Paricalcitol produced no effects on PWV, while the two highest doses of doxercalciferol increased PWV at Week 6. In uraemic rats with established secondary hyperparathyroidism, we

  20. Percentiles for central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in children and adolescents recorded with an oscillometric device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, Julia; Hulpke-Wette, Martin; Barta, Christiane; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Springer, Stephan; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2015-01-01

    In adults with arterial hypertension, measuring arterial stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV) can determine the extent of cardiovascular subclinical organ damage. PWV has independent predictive value for cardiovascular events, but there are currently no recommendations for measuring PWV in children. In addition, central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) strongly reflects vascular changes. The aim of this study was to establish percentiles for cSBP and PWV in children and adolescents to evaluate and classify altered vascular function in youths. We measured PWV and cSBP with an oscillometric device with inbuilt ARCSolver-algorithm (estimated by using the brachial waveform) and calculated smoothed reference percentiles for 1445 children and young adults (49.5% female; 13.41 ± 2.80 years, range 8-22 years; PWV 4.67 ± 0.34 m/s; cSBP 100.7 ± 8.9 mmHg) using the LMS-method based on age and height. PWV and cSBP increased with age and height, but slightly differently for girls and boys, possibly reflecting different growth patterns. Between 8 and 21 years, PWV increased from 4.29 ± 0.32 to 4.98 ± 0.33 m/s in girls and from 4.27 ± 0.18 to 5.22 ± 0.46 m/s in boys. While girls showed a minor increase in cSBP (91.2 ± 7.5 to 109.1 ± 8.6 mmHg), the cSBP in boys ranged from 90.0 ± 5.8 to 110.5 ± 9.6 mmHg with a more pronounced increase between 14 and 17 years. These percentiles for PWV and cSBP can help define arterial stiffness in youths and contribute to risk stratification for cardiovascular disease. For example, in children with prehypertension or isolated systolic hypertension, PWV and cSBP can provide additional information about the function of the vascular system, thereby strengthening intervention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Finite element method (FEM) model of the mechanical stress on phospholipid membranes from shock waves produced in nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald; Roth, Caleb C.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Beier, Hope; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation of phospholipid membranes by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsEP) remains unknown. The passage of a high electric field through a conductive medium creates two primary contributing factors that may induce poration: the electric field interaction at the membrane and the shockwave produced from electrostriction of a polar submersion medium exposed to an electric field. Previous work has focused on the electric field interaction at the cell membrane, through such models as the transport lattice method. Our objective is to model the shock wave cell membrane interaction induced from the density perturbation formed at the rising edge of a high voltage pulse in a polar liquid resulting in a shock wave propagating away from the electrode toward the cell membrane. Utilizing previous data from cell membrane mechanical parameters, and nsEP generated shockwave parameters, an acoustic shock wave model based on the Helmholtz equation for sound pressure was developed and coupled to a cell membrane model with finite-element modeling in COMSOL. The acoustic structure interaction model was developed to illustrate the harmonic membrane displacements and stresses resulting from shockwave and membrane interaction based on Hooke's law. Poration is predicted by utilizing membrane mechanical breakdown parameters including cortical stress limits and hydrostatic pressure gradients.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of shells conveying pulsatile flow with pulse-wave propagation. Theory and numerical results for a single harmonic pulsation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2017-05-01

    In deformable shells conveying pulsatile flow, oscillatory pressure changes cause local movements of the fluid and deformation of the shell wall, which propagate downstream in the form of a wave. In biomechanics, it is the propagation of the pulse that determines the pressure gradient during the flow at every location of the arterial tree. In this study, a woven Dacron aortic prosthesis is modelled as an orthotropic circular cylindrical shell described by means of the Novozhilov nonlinear shell theory. Flexible boundary conditions are considered to simulate connection with the remaining tissue. Nonlinear vibrations of the shell conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated taking into account the effects of the pulse-wave propagation. For the first time in literature, coupled fluid-structure Lagrange equations of motion for a non-material volume with wave propagation in case of pulsatile flow are developed. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian inviscid pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model based on the linear potential flow theory and considering the unsteady viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Contributions of pressure and velocity propagation are also considered in the pressure drop along the shell and in the pulsatile frictional traction on the internal wall in the axial direction. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior of a pressurized Dacron aortic graft conveying blood flow. A pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is considered by applying the first harmonic of the physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pulsatile pressure, considering the propagation of pressure and velocity changes inside the shell, is here presented via frequency-response curves, time histories, bifurcation

  3. Muscle contraction during electro-muscular incapacitation: A comparison between square-wave pulses and the TASER(®) X26 Electronic control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, James A; Jauchem, James R; Cox, D Duane; Crane, Carrie C; D'Andrea, John A

    2011-01-01

    Electronic control devices (including the Advanced TASER(®) X26 model produced by TASER International) incapacitate individuals by causing muscle contractions. To provide information relevant to development of future potential devices, effects of monophasic square waves with different parameters were compared with those of the X26 electronic control device, using two animal models (frogs and swine). Pulse power, electrical pulse charge, pulse duration, and pulse repetition frequency affected muscle contraction. There was no difference in the charge required, between the square waveform and the X26 waveform, to cause approximately the same muscle-contraction response (in terms of the strength-duration curve). Thus, on the basis of these initial studies, the detailed shape of a waveform may not be important in terms of generating electro-muscular incapacitation. More detailed studies, however, may be required to thoroughly test all potential waveforms to be considered for future use in ECDs. 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2010. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  4. Pulsed versus continuous wave low-level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome): a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta has been identified as a major player in the pathogenic process, where low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940 nm using millisecond pulsing and continuous wave (CW) modes on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Considerable functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with the best results seen with the pulsing mode. No adverse effects were noted. Pulsed LLLT represents a treatment alternative for osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome).

  5. Simultaneous recording of pulsed wave Doppler signals in the innominate vein and transverse aortic arch: a new technique to evaluate AV conduction and fetal heart rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Lisa W; Schuchardt, Eleanor; Park, Dawn; Gilbert, Lisa; Gruenwald, Jeanine; Cuneo, Bettina F

    2018-02-02

    Fetal heart rhythm abnormalities are common. Simultaneous pulsed Doppler interrogation of the superior vena cava (SVC) and ascending aorta (AAo) is widely used to analyze fetal arrhythmias. However, the SVC/AAo Doppler technique can be limited by a suboptimal angle of interrogation and poor visualization of atrial systole in the SVC. We present our experience with a novel Doppler technique using simultaneously recorded pulsed wave Doppler signals in the innominate vein (InnV) and transverse aortic arch (Ao) from an axial view of the fetal thorax. Advantages of the InnV/Ao Doppler technique include improved acquisition feasibility and a near 0-degree angle of insonation of the InnV, improving visualization of atrial systolic events. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative effects of pulsed and continuous short wave diathermy on pain and selected physiological parameters among subjects with chronic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslim, Onigbinde Ayodele; Adebowale, Adenle Charles; Ojoawo, Adesola Ojo; Sunday, Odejide Akinwole; Bosede, Arilewola

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the effects of pulsed and continuous short wave diathermy on pain, range of motion, pulse rate and skin temperature in subjects with chronic knee osteoarthritis. 24 Participants with grade 111 OA of the knee were randomly selected into CSWD and PSWD groups. Pre and post treatment parameters were recorded at onset and the end of 4th week. ANO VA, independent, paired t-test and chi-square were used to analyze the data. The pain experienced by participants in the CSWD group was significantly lower than that of the PSWD groups (P effective than PSWD in alleviating pain and in increasing knee flexion range of motion among subjects with chronic knee OA. Also, a mild elevation of skin temperature was able to elicit physiological effects that could exert therapeutic effects.

  7. Ability of pulse wave transit time to detect changes in stroke volume and to estimate cardiac output compared to thermodilution technique in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, H; Chambers, J P

    2017-04-26

    To evaluate the ability of pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to detect changes in stroke volume (SV) and to estimate cardiac output (CO) compared with the thermodilution technique in isoflurane-anaesthetized dogs. Prospective, experimental study. Eight adult laboratory dogs. The dogs were anaesthetized with isoflurane and mechanically ventilated. Reference CO (TDCO) was measured via a pulmonary artery catheter using the thermodilution technique and reference SV (TDSV) was calculated. PWTT was calculated as the time from the electrocardiogram R-wave peak to the rise point of the pulse oximeter wave. Estimated CO (esCO) was derived from PWTT after calibration with arterial pulse pressure (both non-invasive and invasive methods) and TDCO. Haemodynamic changes were induced by administration of phenylephrine (vasoconstriction), high isoflurane (vasodilatation and negative inotropy) and dobutamine (vasodilatation and positive inotropy). Trending between percentage change in PWTT and TDSV was assessed using concordance analysis and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve. The agreement between esCO and TDCO was evaluated using the Bland-Altman method. The direction of percentage change between consecutive PWTT and the corresponding TDSV showed a concordance rate of 95%, with correlation coefficients of -0.86 (pblood pressure showed a bias (precision of agreement) of 0.58 (1.54) and 0.57 (1.59) L minute(-1) with a percentage error of ±61% and ±63%, respectively. In isoflurane-anaesthetized dogs, PWTT showed a good trending ability to detect 15% changes in SV. This technique is easy to use, inexpensive, non-invasive and could become routine anaesthetic monitoring. However, the agreement between absolute esCO and TDCO was unacceptable. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery's Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; Un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery's pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University's Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. This

  9. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  10. Quantum-Phase Resolved Mapping of Ground-State Vibrational D2 Wave Packets via Selective Depletion in Intense Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergler, Th.; Feuerstein, B.; Rudenko, A.; Zrost, K.; Schröter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2006-09-01

    Applying 7 fs pump-probe pulses (780nm, 4×1014W/cm2) we observe electronic ground-state vibrational wave packets in neutral D2 with a period of T=11.101(70)fs by following the internuclear separation (R-)dependent ionization with a sensitivity of Δ⟨R⟩≤0.02Å. The absolute phase of the wave packet’s motion provides evidence for R-dependent depletion of the ground state by nonlinear ionization, to be the dominant preparation mechanism. A phase shift of about π found between pure ionization (D2+) and dissociation (D++D) channels opens a pathway of quantum control.

  11. CALCULATION-EXPERIMENTAL METHOD OF RESEARCH IN A METALLIC CONDUCTOR WITH THE PULSE CURRENT OF ELECTRONIC WAVEPACKAGES AND DE BROGLIE ELECTRONIC HALF-WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of calculation-experimental method for a discovery and study of electronic wavepackages (EWP and of de Broglie electronic half-waves in a metallic conductor with the pulse axial-flow current of high density. Methodology. Theoretical bases of the electrical engineering, bases of quantum physics, electrophysics bases of technique of high voltage and large pulsecurrents, and also bases of technique of measuring of permanent and variable electric value. Results. On the basis of generalization of results of research of features of the longitudinal wave periodic distributing of negatively charged transmitters of electric current of conductivity in the thin round continuous zincked steel wire offered and approved in the conditions of high-voltage laboratory method for a discovery and direct determination in him of geometrical parameters of «hot» and «cold» longitudinal areas quantized periodic longitudinal EWP and accordingly the mediated determination of values of the quantized lengths formative their de Broglie electronic half-waves. It is shown that results of close quantum mechanical calculations of EWP and quantized lengths λenz/2 of longitudinal de Broglie half-waves for the probed wire long l0 well comport with the results of the executed high temperature experiments on the powerful high-voltage generator of homopolar large pulse current of millisecond duration. Originality. First calculation-experimental a way the important for the theory of electricity fact of existence is set in a round metallic explorer with the impulsive axial-flow current of the quantized coherent de Broglie electronic half-waves, amplitudes of which at the quantum number of n=1,3,9 correspond the middles of «hot» longitudinal areas of EWP. Calculation quantum mechanical correlation of type of λenz/2=l0/n got experimental confirmation, in obedience to which on length of l0 conductor the integer of quantized electronic half-waves is always laid

  12. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of pulsed short-wave diathermy on pain and function of subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee: a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Y; Zilberman, R; Porat, R; Nahir, A M

    2005-05-01

    To examine the effects of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD), delivered at an intensity sufficient to induce a thermal sensation and at an athermal intensity, in comparison with a placebo short-wave diathermy treatment, on reported pain, stiffness and functional ability and on mobility performance of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. A placebo-controlled double-blind trial with sequential allocation of patients to different treatment groups. Outpatient physiotherapy department. One hundred and three consecutive patients, mean age 73.7 (+/-6.6) years with osteoarthritis of one or both knees for at least three months. All participants received three 20-min-long treatments per week for three weeks. One group received PSWD with mean power of 18 W (thermal effect), one group received PSWD with mean power of 1.8 W (athermal effect), and one group received sham short-wave diathermy treatment. Patients were assessed before the initial treatment, immediately following the last treatment, and at a three-month follow-up. Outcome measures included the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, which assessed reported pain, stiffness, and functional ability, and four measures of mobility performance: Timed Get Up and Go test (TGUG), stair-climbing, stair, descending and a 3-min walk. A difference across time was observed for the pain and stiffness categories of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (p = 0.033 and p = 0.008, respectively), with no differences between groups. No other significant differences across time or between groups were observed in any of the other measures. The findings do not demonstrate pulsed short-wave diathermy, as it is utilized in clinical settings, to be effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

  14. Comparison Study between RMS and Edge Detection Image Processing Algorithms for a Pulsed Laser UWPI (Ultrasonic Wave Propagation Imaging)-Based NDT Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changgil; Zhang, Aoqi; Yu, Byoungjoon; Park, Seunghee

    2017-05-26

    In this study, a non-contact laser ultrasonic propagation imaging technique was applied to detect the damage of plate-like structures. Lamb waves were generated by an Nd:YAG pulse laser system, while a galvanometer-based laser scanner was used to scan the preliminarily designated area. The signals of the structural responses were measured using a piezoelectric sensor attached on the front or back side of the plates. The obtained responses were analyzed by calculating the root mean square (RMS) values to achieve the visualization of structural defects such as crack, corrosion, and so on. If the propagating waves encounter the damage, the waves are scattered at the damage and the energy of the scattered waves can be expressed by the RMS values. In this study, notch and corrosion were artificially formed on aluminum plates and were considered as structural defects. The notches were created with different depths and angles on the aluminum plates, and the corrosion damage was formed with different depths and areas. To visualize the damage more clearly, edge detection methodologies were applied to the RMS images and the feasibility of the methods was investigated. The results showed that most of the edge detection methods were good at detecting the shape and/or the size of the damage while they had poor performance of detecting the depth of the damage.

  15. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-14

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations' vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  16. Consequences of the magnetic field, sonic and radiofrequency waves and intense pulsed light on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Patricia Froes; Costa, Iris do Ceu Clara; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Adenilson de Souza da Fonseca; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Ariel Ronzio, Oscar [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonelli, Ludmila [Universidade Salgado de Oliveira, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    Sources of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and pulsed light have been used in physiotherapy to treat different disorders. In nuclear medicine, blood constituents(Bl-Co) are labeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) are used. This study evaluated the consequences of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and intense pulsed light sources on the labeling of Bl-Co with {sup 99m}Tc. Blood from Wistar rats was exposed to the cited sources. The labeling of Bl-Co with {sup 99m}Tc was performed. Blood not exposed to the physical agents was used(controls). Data showed that the exposure to the different studied sources did not alter significantly (p>0.05) the labeling of Bl-Co. Although the results were obtained with animals, the data suggest that no alteration on examinations performed with Bl-Co labeled with {sup 99m}Tc after exposition to the cited agents. The biological consequences associated with these agents would be not capable to interfere with some properties of the Bl-Co. (author)

  17. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Pflugradt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG. Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  18. Multicenter study verifying a method of noninvasive continuous cardiac output measurement using pulse wave transit time: a comparison with intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashige; Tsutsui, Masato; Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sato, Tetsufumi; Akazawa, Toshimasa; Sato, Nobukazu; Yamashita, Koichi; Ishihara, Hironori; Takeda, Junzo

    2012-07-01

    Many technologies have been developed for minimally invasive monitoring of cardiac output. Estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) measurement using pulse wave transit time is one noninvasive method. Because it does not require any additional sensors other than those for conducting 3 basic forms of monitoring (electrocardiogram, pulse oximeter wave, and noninvasive (or invasive) arterial blood pressure measurement), esCCO measurement is potentially useful in routine clinical circulatory monitoring for any patient including low-risk patients. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive esCCO using pulse wave transit time in this multicenter study. We compared esCCO and intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output (TDCO) in 213 patients, 139 intensive care units (ICUs), and 74 operating rooms (ORs), at 7 participating institutions. We performed electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, TDCO, and arterial blood pressure measurements in patients in ICUs and ORs; a single calibration was performed to measure esCCO continuously. TDCO measurement was performed once daily for ICU patients and every hour for OR patients, and just before the removal of the pulmonary arterial catheter from patients in both the ICU and OR. We evaluated esCCO against TDCO with correlation analysis and Bland and Altman analysis and also assessed the change of bias over time. Furthermore, we inspected the impact of change in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) on change in bias because abnormal SVR was assumed to be a factor contributing to the change of the bias. From among 588 esCCO and TDCO datasets (excluding calibration points), 587 datasets were analyzed for 213 patients. The analysis results show a correlation coefficient of 0.79 (P < 0.0001, 95% confidence limits of 0.756-0.819), a bias (mean difference between esCCO and TDCO) of 0.13 L/min (95% confidence interval of bias 0.04-0.22 L/min), and a precision (1 SD) of 1.15 L/min (95% prediction interval was -2.13 to 2.39 L/min). There were no

  19. Pressure and stress waves in a spallation neutron source mercury target generated by high-power proton pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Futakawa, M; Conrad, H; Stechemesser, H

    2000-01-01

    The international ASTE collaboration has performed a first series of measurements on a spallation neutron source target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in Brookhaven. The dynamic response of a liquid mercury target hit by high-power proton pulses of about 40 ns duration has been measured by a laser Doppler technique and compared with finite elements calculations using the ABAQUS code. It is shown that the calculation can describe the experimental results for at least the time interval up to 100 mu s after the pulse injection. Furthermore, it has been observed that piezoelectric pressure transducers cannot be applied in the high gamma-radiation field of a spallation target.

  20. Statistics of Acoustic Pulse Signals Through Nonlinear Internal Waves on the Continental Shelf of the Northeastern South China Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reeves, Justin M

    2008-01-01

    ...) was conducted from 13 - 15 April 2005 on the continental shelf in the northeast portion of the South China Sea to study the effects of nonlinear internal waves on the transmission of a 400-Hz signal...

  1. Time-resolved observation of coherent excitonic nonlinear response with a table-top narrowband THz pulse wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hirori, H., E-mail: hirori@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Aoki, T. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Technology, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Wolpert, C.; Tamaya, T. [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mochizuki, T.; Kim, C.; Yoshita, M.; Akiyama, H. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, and JST-CREST, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    By combining a tilted-pulse-intensity-front scheme using a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal and a chirped-pulse-beating method, we generated a narrowband intense terahertz (THz) pulse, which had a maximum electric field of more than 10 kV/cm at around 2 THz, a bandwidth of ∼50 GHz, and frequency tunability from 0.5 to 2 THz. By performing THz-pump and near-infrared-probe experiments on GaAs quantum wells, we observed that the resonant excitation of the intraexcitonic 1s-2p transition induces a clear and large Autler-Townes splitting. Our time-resolved measurements show that the splitting energy observed in the rising edge region of electric field is larger than in the constant region. This result implies that the splitting energy depends on the time-averaged THz field over the excitonic dephasing time rather than that at the instant of the exciton creation by a probe pulse.

  2. Time-resolved observation of coherent excitonic nonlinear response with a table-top narrowband THz pulse wave

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, K; Aoki, T; Wolpert, C; Tamaya, T; Tanaka, K; Mochizuki, T; Kim, C; Yoshita, M; Akiyama, H; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2015-01-01

    By combining a tilted-pulse-intensity-front scheme using a LiNbO3 crystal and a chirped-pulse-beating method, we generated a narrowband intense terahertz (THz) pulse, which had a maximum electric field of more than 10 kV/cm at around 2 THz, a bandwidth of about 50 GHz,and frequency tunability from 0.5 to 2 THz. By performing THz-pump and near-infrared-probe experiments on GaAs quantum wells, we observed that the resonant excitation of the intraexcitonic 1s-2p transition induces a clear and large Autler-Townes splitting. Our time-resolved measurements show that the splitting energy observed in the rising edge region of electric field is larger than in the constant region. This result implies that the splitting energy depends on the time-averaged THz field over the excitonic dephasing time rather than that at the instant of the exciton creation by a probe pulse.

  3. Determinants of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hsin Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available High prevalences of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD and increased arterial stiffness have been reported in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, these have not been assessed in Taiwan where the prevalence of CKD is high. The aim of this study was to investigate the determinants of PAOD and arterial stiffness in patients with CKD in southern Taiwan. We enrolled 169 patients with stage 3–5 CKD in one regional hospital. Ankle-brachial index (ABI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were measured using an ABI-form device (Colin VP1000. In multivariate analysis, ABI < 0.9 was positively correlated with the presence of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.014 and negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (p = 0.049, and increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was correlated with increased age, diabetes mellitus, increased systolic blood pressure, decreased pulse pressure and decreased eGFR. This study identified determinants of PAOD and arterial stiffness in patients with CKD in one hospital in southern Taiwan. In addition to the traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, decreased eGFR was also correlated with PAOD and increased arterial stiffness in these patients.

  4. Source duration of stress and water-pressure induced seismicity derived from experimental analysis of P wave pulse width in granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pulse widths of P waves in granite, measured in the laboratory, were analyzed to investigate source durations of rupture processes for water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. Much evidence suggests that fluids in the subsurface are intimately linked to faulting processes. Studies of seismicity induced by water injection are thus important for understanding the trigger mechanisms of earthquakes as well as for engineering applications such as hydraulic fracturing of rocks at depth for petroleum extraction. Determining the cause of seismic events is very important in seismology and engineering; however, water-pressure induced seismic events are difficult to distinguish from those induced by purely tectonic stress. To investigate this problem, we analyzed the waveforms of acoustic emissions (AEs) produced in the laboratory by both water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. We used a cylinder (50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length) of medium-grained granite. We applied a differential stress of about 70% of fracture strength, to the rock sample under 40 MPa confining pressure and held it constant throughout the experiment. When the primary creep stage and acoustic emissions (AEs) caused by the initial loading had ceased, we injected distilled water into the bottom end of the sample at a constant pressure of 17 MPa until macroscopic fracture occurred. We analysed AE waveforms produced by stress-induced AEs which occurred before the water-injection and by water-pressure induced AEs which occurred after the water-injection. Pulse widths were measured from the waveform traces plotted from the digital data. To investigate the source duration of the rupture process, we estimated the pulse width at the source and normalized by event magnitude to obtain a scaled pulse width at the source. After the effects of event size and hypocentral distance were removed from observed pulse widths, the ratio of the scaled source durations of water

  5. Measurement of the wave shapes of X-rays pulses with PZT ceramic; Determinacao da forma de onda de pulsos de raios-X com ceramicas de zirconato titanato de chumbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Aparecido A. [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica; Alter, Albert [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1996-12-31

    This paper shows that piezoelectric detectors can be used with a recorder equipment for recording the wave shapes of X-rays pulses. Pulses with exposure times from 0.8 to 6.0 s in the diagnostic range from 50 to 140 kVp, corresponding to an effective mean energy of 29 to 45 keV, were measured. The PZT detector response to a radiation pulse conforms to theoretical prediction based upon the thermal and electrical characteristics of the detector and its amplifier 2 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Plasma levels of the arterial wall protein fibulin-1 are associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2013-01-01

    -associated extracellular matrix protein, fibulin-1, was recently found in higher concentrations in the arterial wall and in plasma in patients with long duration type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, plasma fibulin-1 independently predicted total mortality and was associated with pulse pressure, an indirect measure of arterial...... stiffness. Whether plasma fibulin-1 is associated with arterial stiffness at earlier phases of type 2 diabetes has not been determined....

  7. Investigation of continuous wave and pulsed laser performance based on Nd3+:Gd0.6Y1.4SiO5 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Shen, Hongbin; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Qingpu; Fang, Jiaxiong; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xingyu

    2015-12-01

    We systematically investigated a laser diode (LD) pumped Nd:GYSO (Nd3+:Gd0.6Y1.4SiO5) laser. The output power of the continuous wave laser was as high as 3.5 W with a slope efficiency of 31.8%. In the Q-switched operation; the laser exhibited dual-wavelengths output (1073.6 nm and 1074.7 nm) synchronously with a Cr4+:YAG as the saturable absorber (SA). Additionally, a passively mode-locked laser was demonstrated using a semiconductor SA mirror with a maximum average output power of 510 mW at a central wavelength of 1074 nm, while the pulse width of the laser was as short as 5 ps. Our experiment proved that the Nd:GYSO mixed crystal was a promising material for a solid-state laser.

  8. Radiographic assessment of vascular calcification, aortic pulse wave velocity, ankle-brachial index and fibroblast growth factor-23 in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breznik, Silva; Ekart, Robert; Hren, Martin; Rupreht, Mitja; Balon, Breda Pečovnik

    2013-08-01

    Vascular calcification is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. In both the general population and patients with end stage renal disease, vascular calcification is related to arterial stiffness and is a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Various diagnostic methods are currently used to assess vascular calcification. There is a preference for simple, reliable methods that can be used in daily practice. Therefore, several imaging and laboratory methods are investigated. Twenty-eight patients with mean age of 62 years on chronic hemodialysis were enrolled in the study. The mean duration of hemodialysis treatment was 70 months (range 3 to 350 months). Vascular calcification was assessed with coronary computed tomography and lateral lumbar, pelvic and hand radiographs. Vascular stiffness was evaluated using aortic pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index measurements, and finally serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 were followed. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between all the following parameters: coronary artery calcification score, aortic pulse wave velocity, abdominal aortic calcification score, simple vascular calcification scores in pelvis and hand. A statistically significant correlation of ankle-brachial index >1.3 to coronary artery calcification score was found. There was no correlation between the previous parameters and fibroblast growth factor-23. The results of our study indicate that simple imaging methods could provide confident vascular damage assessment and therefore potentially guide therapy adjustments. An association between fibroblast growth factor-23 and the other diagnostic modalities in our study was not found. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  9. Factors associated with high brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity in non-hypertensive and appropriately treated hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ato D

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dai Ato,1 Toshitami Sawayama2 1Gakujutsu Shien (Academic Support Co., Ltd. Tokyo, 2Sawayama Clinic, Okayama, Japan Abstract: While pulse wave velocity (PWV correlates with blood pressure (BP, its extent differs between patients, and some cases of high PWV in normotensives are present. Moreover, PWV frequently remains high in hypertensive patients despite adequate BP control. The factors associated with such phenomena are yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the factors associated with brachial–ankle PWV (baPWV in 107 patients whose systolic BP was under 140 mmHg at their latest baPWV measurement. There were 64 controlled hypertensives and 43 normotensives. Multivariate regression analysis identified age, hypertension, body mass index (BMI, systolic BP, and heart rate (HR as independent factors for baPWV. Next, we divided the subjects into groups according to their age (in 5-year increments and calculated the mean and standard deviation (SD of the baPWV for each group. For each age group, we defined patients with a baPWV above the mean + SD baPWV for the group as the high-baPWV cohort. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that BMI, hypertension, and smoking were independent determinants of a high-baPWV subject. This represents the first study to report the existence of the hypertensive state itself as one of the independent predictors of high baPWV in normotensive and well-treated hypertensive patients. This finding implies that the hypertensive state itself possibly worsens arterial stiffness independently from aging in spite of adequate BP maintenance. To prevent the early progression of arterial stiffness, the application of an appropriate intervention during the early stages of hypertension is important and the continuation of an appropriate BP treatment is suggested. Keywords: arterial stiffness, brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity, heart failure, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease

  10. THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF PULSED WAVE TISSUE DOPPLER IMAGING IN ASYMPTOMATIC BETA- THALASSEMIA MAJOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS ; RELATION TO CHEMICAL BIOMARKERS OF LEFT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION AND IRON OVERLOAD .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seham Ragab

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac iron toxicity is the leading cause of death among  β-halassaemia major (TM  patients.  Once  heart failure becomes overt , it will be  difficult to reverse . Objectives: To investigate non overt cardiac dysfunctions  in TM patients using  pulsed wave Tissue Doppler  Imaging (TD I and its relation to the iron overload and brain natruritic peptide (BNP. Methods: Thorough  clinical , conventional echo and  pulsed  wave TDI  parameters were compared between  asymtomatic 25 β-TM  patients  and 20 age and gender matched individuals. Serum ferritin and plasma BNP  levels were assayed by  ELISA .  Results: TM patients had significant higher mitral inflow early diastolic (E wave and  non significant other conventional echo  parameters. Pulsed wave TDI revealed systolic and diastolic dysfunctions in the form of significant higher  isovolumetric contraction time (ICT , ejection time ( E T and  isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT with significantly lower  mitral annulus  early diastolic velocity E` (12.07 ±2.06 vs 15.04±2.65 ,P= 0.003  in patients compared to  controls. Plasma BNP was higher in patients compared to the controls.  Plasma BNP and serum ferritin had significant correlation with each other and with pulsed wave conventional and TDI indices of systolic and diastolic functions.  Patients with E/E` ≥ 8 had  significant higher  serum ferritin  and plasma BNP levels compared to those with E/E` ratio < 8 without difference in Hb levels .Conclusion:  Pulsed wave TDI  is an  important diagnostic tool for latent cardiac dysfunction in iron loaded TM patients and is related to iron overload and BNP .

  11. Evaluation of coating thickness by thermal wave imaging: A comparative study of pulsed and lock-in infrared thermography - Part I: Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ranjit; Kim, Wontae

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities of evaluating non-uniform coating thickness using thermal wave imaging method. A comparative study of pulsed thermography (PT) and lock-in thermography (LIT) based on evaluating the accuracy of predicted coating thickness is presented. In this study, a transient thermal finite element model was created in ANSYS 15. A single square pulse heating for PT and a sinusoidal heating at different modulation frequencies for LIT were used to stimulate the sample according to the experimental procedures. The response of thermally excited surface was recorded and data processing with Fourier transform was carried out to obtain the phase angle. Then calculated phase angle was correlated with the coating thickness. The method demonstrated potential in the evaluation of coating thickness and was successfully applied to measure the non-uniform top layers ranging from 0.1 mm to 0.6 mm; within an accuracy of 0.0003-0.0023 mm for PT and 0.0003-0.0067 mm for LIT. The simulation model enabled a better understanding of PT and LIT and provided a means of establishing the required experimental set-up parameters. This also led to optimization of experimental configurations, thus limiting the number of physical tests necessary.

  12. Ambulatory Pulse Wave Velocity Is a Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events and All-Cause Mortality Than Office and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Loutradis, Charalampos; Karpetas, Antonios; Tzanis, Georgios; Piperidou, Alexia; Koutroumpas, Georgios; Raptis, Vasilios; Syrgkanis, Christos; Liakopoulos, Vasilios; Efstratiadis, Georgios; London, Gérard; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-07-01

    Arterial stiffness and augmentation of aortic blood pressure (BP) measured in office are known cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis patients. This study examines the prognostic significance of ambulatory brachial BP, central BP, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and heart rate-adjusted augmentation index [AIx(75)] in this population. A total of 170 hemodialysis patients underwent 48-hour ambulatory monitoring with Mobil-O-Graph-NG during a standard interdialytic interval and followed-up for 28.1±11.2 months. The primary end point was a combination of all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke. Secondary end points included: (1) all-cause mortality; (2) cardiovascular mortality; and (3) a combination of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, resuscitation after cardiac arrest, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for heart failure. During follow-up, 37(21.8%) patients died and 46(27.1%) had cardiovascular events. Cumulative freedom from primary end point was similar for quartiles of predialysis-systolic BP (SBP), 48-hour peripheral-SBP, and central-SBP, but was progressively longer for increasing quartiles for 48-hour peripheral-diastolic BP and central-diastolic BP and shorter for increasing quartiles of 48-hour central pulse pressure (83.7%, 71.4%, 69.0%, 62.8% [log-rank P=0.024]), PWV (93.0%, 81.0%, 57.1%, 55.8% [log-rank Pambulatory PWV and AIx(75). In multivariate analysis, 48-hour PWV was the only vascular parameter independently associated with the primary end point (hazard ratios, 1.579; 95% confidence intervals, 1.187-2.102). Ambulatory PWV, AIx(75), and central pulse pressure are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality, whereas office and ambulatory SBP are not. These findings further support that arterial stiffness is the prominent cardiovascular risk factor in hemodialysis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Observation of Quantum Shock Waves Created with Ultra- Compressed Slow Light Pulses in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Zachary; Budde, Michael; Slowe, Christopher; Vestergaard Hau, Lene

    2001-07-01

    We have used an extension of our slow light technique to provide a method for inducing small density defects in a Bose-Einstein condensate. These sub- resolution, micrometer-sized defects evolve into large-amplitude sound waves. We present an experimental observation and theoretical investigation of the resulting breakdown of superfluidity, and we observe directly the decay of the narrow density defects into solitons, the onset of the ``snake'' instability, and the subsequent nucleation of vortices.

  14. Observation of Quantum Shock Waves Created with Ultra Compressed Slow Light Pulses in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, Zachary; Budde, Michael; Slowe, Christopher; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2001-01-01

    We have used an extension of our slow light technique to provide a method for inducing small density defects in a Bose-Einstein condensate. These sub-resolution, micron-sized defects evolve into large amplitude sound waves. We present an experimental observation and theoretical investigation of the resulting breakdown of superfluidity. We observe directly the decay of the narrow density defects into solitons, the onset of the `snake' instability, and the subsequent nucleation of vortices.

  15. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  16. Time-resolved processes in a pulsed electrical discharge in water generated with shock wave assistance in a plate-to-plate configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmashuk, V.

    2014-12-01

    Plate-to-plate geometry is not usually used for a discharge generation in water because of a low electric field that is insufficient for electrical breakdown between electrodes. In the present research, a new method of the generation of electrical discharge in water using plate electrodes is proposed. A high voltage pulse is applied to a pair of disc electrodes at a time when a shock wave is passing between them. This method allows for depositing a higher electrical energy than with the case of pin-to-pin electrodes (or pin-to-plate electrodes) without their destruction. This discharge initiation occurs in numerous cavitation bubbles generated by the shock wave. The discharge evolution was studied using a high-speed framing camera. Two interesting effects have been observed. Firstly, multiple streamers are incepted on a cathode, which is not typical for the symmetrical electrode configuration. Secondly, the plasma in the spark channel reveals not to be homogeneous. The dynamics of a vapour bubble generated by this spark were studied by a shadowgraph method. The bubble’s growth, collapse and rebound are discussed.

  17. Design of polarizers for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line on the large helical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, T; Kubo, S; Shimozuma, T; Kobayashi, S; Okada, K; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Ito, S; Mizuno, Y; Okada, K; Makino, R; Kobayashi, K; Goto, Y; Mutoh, T

    2015-02-01

    The polarizer is one of the critical components in a high-power millimeter-wave transmission line. It requires full and highly efficient coverage of any polarization states, high-power tolerance, and low-loss feature. Polarizers with rounded shape at the edge of the periodic groove surface are designed and fabricated by the machining process for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line of the electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the large helical device. The groove shape of λ/8- and λ/4-type polarizers for an 82.7 GHz transmission line is optimally designed in an integral method developed in the vector theories of diffraction gratings so that the efficiency to realize any polarization state can be maximized. The dependence of the polarization states on the combination of the two polarizer rotation angles (Φλ/8, Φλ/4) is examined experimentally in a low-power test with the newly developed polarization monitor. The results show that the measured polarization characteristics are in good agreement with the calculated ones.

  18. The pulsed dye laser versus the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S; Pensel, J; Engelhardt, R; Meyer, W; Hofstetter, A G

    1988-01-01

    To date, there are two fairly well-established alternatives for laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy in clinical practice. The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is distinguished by the high-stone selectivity of its coupler systems. The necessity of a coupler system and its fairly small conversion rate of light energy into mechanical energy present serious drawbacks. Furthermore, the minimal outer diameter of the transmission system is 1.8 mm. The pulsed-dye laser can be used with a highly flexible and uncomplicated 200-micron fiber. However, the laser system itself is more complicated than the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and requires a great deal of maintenance. Biological evaluation of damage caused by direct irradiation shows that both laser systems produce minor damage of different degrees. YAG laser lithotripsy with the optomechanical coupler was assessed in 31 patients with ureteral calculi. The instability and limited effectiveness of the fiber application system necessitated auxiliary lithotripsy methods in 14 cases. Dye-laser lithotripsy is currently being tested in clinical application. Further development, such as systems for blind application or electronic feedback mechanisms to limit adverse tissue effects, have yet to be optimized. Nevertheless, laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy has the potential to become a standard procedure in the endourologic management of stone disease.

  19. Rigorous 2D Model for Study of Pulsed and Monochromatic Waves Propagation Near the Earth’s Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seil S. Sautbekov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A model problem considered in the paper allows solving rather complex 2D problems of the electromagnetic wave propagation with a required accuracy using conventional personal computers. The problems are of great importance for the theory and practical applications. The association of FDTD schemes with exact absorbing conditions makes up the basis for constructing models of the kind. This approach reduces the original open initial boundary value problems to the equivalent closed problems which can be solved numerically using the standard grid methods.

  20. ELF wave generation in the ionosphere using pulse modulated HF heating: initial tests of a technique for increasing ELF wave generation efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Barr

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of a preliminary study to determine the effective heating and cooling time constants of ionospheric currents in a simulated modulated HF heating, `beam painting' configuration. It has been found that even and odd harmonics of the fundamental ELF wave used to amplitude modulate the HF heater are sourced from different regions of the ionosphere which support significantly different heating and cooling time constants. The fundamental frequency and its odd harmonics are sourced in a region of the ionosphere where the heating and cooling time constants are about equal. The even harmonics on the other hand are sourced from regions of the ionosphere characterised by ratios of cooling to heating time constant greater than ten. It is thought that the even harmonics are sourced in the lower ionosphere (around 65 km where the currents are much smaller than at the higher altitudes around 78 km where the currents at the fundamental frequency and odd harmonics maximise.Key words. Electromagnetics (antennae · Ionosphere (active experiments · Radio science (non linear phenomena

  1. Patterns of digital volume pulse waveform and pulse transit time in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Arterial wall changes underlie many disorders of aging and the complications of diseases like hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Analyzing the pulse wave is an easy, noninvasive method used to assess vessel wall stiffness and pulse changes. In this study the digital volume pulse wave and the pulse transit ...

  2. Comparative Study of Achievable Quality Cutting Carbon Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastics Using Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, S.; Jaeschke, P.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    Laser cutting of CFRP lightweight parts has the advantages of a contact-free, automatable and flexible processing for a prospective series production. For the development of strategies for laser cutting of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), different scientific approaches exist to achieve a process with small heat affected zones (HAZ), and high cutting rates. Within this paper a cw laser, a nanosecond and a picosecond laser source emitting in the near infrared range have been used in combination with a scanning system to cut CFRP with a thermoplastic matrix. The influence of the scanning speed on the size of the HAZ and the corresponding tensile strength were investigated for each laser source. Furthermore, the authors compared the achievable HAZ and the effective cutting speeds of the different setups in order to evaluate the efficiency and quality of the chosen strategies. The results show that a nanosecond pulsed laser source with high average power is a good trade-off between attainable quality and cutting rate.

  3. Modelling of the positive column of a medium-pressure Cs-Xe dc discharge affected by a millimetre wave pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, M. S.; Epstein, I. L.; Lebedev, Yu A.

    2013-10-01

    A time-dependent zero-dimensional kinetic model of the positive column (PC) of a medium-pressure Cs-Xe dc discharge was used to gain a better insight into the physical basics of plasma techniques for imaging and control of millimetre wave (MMW) beams. The model allowed one to study the effect of MMWs on the kinetic and electrical characteristics of the spatially homogeneous PC of a Cs-Xe dc discharge. We computed the PC plasma parameters for 30 Torr and 45 Torr xenon and discharge current densities of about 0.1 A cm-2. First, the dependences of the PC parameters on caesium density were calculated in the case of no MMWs incident on the PC plasma. Then, the temporal evolution of the parameters of the PC plasma affected by a long watt-scale Ka-band MMW pulse was modelled for caesium densities of about 3 × 1012 and 5 × 1012 cm-3. The calculations showed that the electron temperature in the PC plasma attained quasisteady-state values for about 1 µs after the beginning of the MMW pulse. The electron temperature rises by 0.2-0.3 eV as the MMW intensity increases from 0 to 1 W cm-2. The rise time of the electron density decreased with an increase in the MMW intensity W from about 1 ms for W = 0.15 W cm-2 to tens of microseconds for W > 1.5 W cm-2. The steady-state values of the electron density increased in proportion to W, if W 3 W cm-2 could be a cause of the microwave breakdown of the homogeneous PC plasma. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  4. Photobiomodulation with Pulsed and Continuous Wave Near-Infrared Laser (810 nm, Al-Ga-As Augments Dermal Wound Healing in Immunosuppressed Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav K Keshri

    Full Text Available Chronic non-healing cutaneous wounds are often vulnerable in one or more repair phases that prevent normal healing and pose challenges to the use of conventional wound care modalities. In immunosuppressed subject, the sequential stages of healing get hampered, which may be the consequences of dysregulated or stagnant wound inflammation. Photobiomodulation (PBM or low-level laser (light therapy (LLLT emerges as a promising drug-free, non-invasive biophysical approach for promoting wound healing, reduction of inflammation, pain and restoration of functions. The present study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the photobiomodulatory effects of 810 nm diode laser (40 mW/cm2; 22.6 J/cm2 with pulsed (10 and 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle and continuous wave on full-thickness excision-type dermal wound healing in hydrocortisone-induced immunosuppressed rats. Results clearly delineated that 810 nm PBM at 10 Hz was more effective over continuous and 100 Hz frequency in accelerating wound healing by attenuating the pro-inflammatory markers (NF-kB, TNF-α, augmenting wound contraction (α-SM actin, enhancing cellular proliferation, ECM deposition, neovascularization (HIF-1α, VEGF, re-epithelialization along with up-regulated protein expression of FGFR-1, Fibronectin, HSP-90 and TGF-β2 as compared to the non-irradiated controls. Additionally, 810 nm laser irradiation significantly increased CCO activity and cellular ATP contents. Overall, the findings from this study might broaden the current biological mechanism that could be responsible for photobiomodulatory effect mediated through pulsed NIR 810 nm laser (10 Hz for promoting dermal wound healing in immunosuppressed subjects.

  5. Photobiomodulation with Pulsed and Continuous Wave Near-Infrared Laser (810 nm, Al-Ga-As) Augments Dermal Wound Healing in Immunosuppressed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Gaurav K; Gupta, Asheesh; Yadav, Anju; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing cutaneous wounds are often vulnerable in one or more repair phases that prevent normal healing and pose challenges to the use of conventional wound care modalities. In immunosuppressed subject, the sequential stages of healing get hampered, which may be the consequences of dysregulated or stagnant wound inflammation. Photobiomodulation (PBM) or low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) emerges as a promising drug-free, non-invasive biophysical approach for promoting wound healing, reduction of inflammation, pain and restoration of functions. The present study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the photobiomodulatory effects of 810 nm diode laser (40 mW/cm2; 22.6 J/cm2) with pulsed (10 and 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle) and continuous wave on full-thickness excision-type dermal wound healing in hydrocortisone-induced immunosuppressed rats. Results clearly delineated that 810 nm PBM at 10 Hz was more effective over continuous and 100 Hz frequency in accelerating wound healing by attenuating the pro-inflammatory markers (NF-kB, TNF-α), augmenting wound contraction (α-SM actin), enhancing cellular proliferation, ECM deposition, neovascularization (HIF-1α, VEGF), re-epithelialization along with up-regulated protein expression of FGFR-1, Fibronectin, HSP-90 and TGF-β2 as compared to the non-irradiated controls. Additionally, 810 nm laser irradiation significantly increased CCO activity and cellular ATP contents. Overall, the findings from this study might broaden the current biological mechanism that could be responsible for photobiomodulatory effect mediated through pulsed NIR 810 nm laser (10 Hz) for promoting dermal wound healing in immunosuppressed subjects.

  6. Photoelectrocatalytic decomposition of ethylene using TiO{sub 2}/activated carbon fiber electrode with applied pulsed direct current square-wave potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Sheng-ying, E-mail: yesy@scau.edu.cn; Zheng, Sen-hong; Song, Xian-liang; Luo, Shu-can

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Ethylene was decomposed by a photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) process. • A pulsed direct current square-wave (PDCSW) potential was applied to the PEC cell. • An electrode of TiO{sub 2} or modified TiO{sub 2} and activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used. • TiO{sub 2}/ACF photocatalyst electrodes were modified by gamma radiolysis. • Efficiencies of the PEC process were higher than those of the process using DC. - Abstract: Removing ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) from the atmosphere of storage facilities for fruits and vegetable is one of the main challenges in their postharvest handling for maximizing their freshness, quality, and shelf life. In this study, we investigated the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) degradation of ethylene gas by applying a pulsed direct current DC square-wave (PDCSW) potential and by using a Nafion-based PEC cell. The cell utilized a titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) photocatalyst or γ-irradiated TiO{sub 2} (TiO{sub 2}{sup *}) loaded on activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a photoelectrode. The apparent rate constant of a pseudo-first-order reaction (K) was used to describe the PEC degradation of ethylene. Parameters of the potential applied to the PEC cell in a reactor that affect the degradation efficiency in terms of the K value were studied. These parameters were frequency, duty cycle, and voltage. Ethylene degradation by application of a constant PDCSW potential to the PEC electrode of either TiO{sub 2}/ACF cell or TiO{sub 2}{sup *}/ACF cell enhanced the efficiency of photocatalytic degradation and PEC degradation. Gamma irradiation of TiO{sub 2} in the electrode and the applied PDCSW potential synergistically increased the K value. Independent variables (frequency, duty cycle, and voltage) of the PEC cell fabricated from TiO{sub 2} subjected 20 kGy γ radiation were optimized to maximize the K value by using response surface methodology with quadratic rotation–orthogonal composite experimental design. Optimized conditions were as

  7. Effect of modest salt reduction on blood pressure, urinary albumin, and pulse wave velocity in white, black, and Asian mild hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Marciniak, Maciej; Visagie, Elisabeth; Markandu, Nirmala D; Anand, Vidya; Dalton, R Neil; MacGregor, Graham A

    2009-09-01

    A reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure. However, most previous trials were in whites with few in blacks and Asians. Salt reduction may also reduce other cardiovascular risk factors (eg, urinary albumin excretion, arterial stiffness). However, few well-controlled trials have studied these effects. We carried out a randomized double-blind crossover trial of salt restriction with slow sodium or placebo, each for 6 weeks, in 71 whites, 69 blacks, and 29 Asians with untreated mildly raised blood pressure. From slow sodium to placebo, urinary sodium was reduced from 165+/-58 (+/-SD) to 110+/-49 mmol/24 hours (9.7 to 6.5 g/d salt). With this reduction in salt intake, there was a significant decrease in blood pressure from 146+/-13/91+/-8 to 141+/-12/88+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001), urinary albumin from 10.2 (IQR: 6.8 to 18.9) to 9.1 (6.6 to 14.0) mg/24 hours (P<0.001), albumin/creatinine ratio from 0.81 (0.47 to 1.43) to 0.66 (0.44 to 1.22) mg/mmol (P<0.001), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity from 11.5+/-2.3 to 11.1+/-1.9 m/s (P<0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that the reductions in blood pressure and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were significant in all groups, and the decrease in pulse wave velocity was significant in blacks only. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, approximately the amount of the current public health recommendations, causes significant falls in blood pressure in all 3 ethnic groups. Furthermore, it reduces urinary albumin and improves large artery compliance. Although both could be attributable to the falls in blood pressure, they may carry additional benefits on reducing cardiovascular disease above that obtained from the blood pressure falls alone.

  8. Consequences of the magnetic field, sonic and radiofrequency waves and intense pulsed light on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Froes Meyer

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and pulsed light have been used in physiotherapy to treat different disorders. In nuclear medicine, blood constituents(Bl-Co are labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc are used. This study evaluated the consequences of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and intense pulsed light sources on the labeling of Bl-Co with 99mTc. Blood from Wistar rats was exposed to the cited sources. The labeling of Bl-Co with 99mTc was performed. Blood not exposed to the physical agents was used(controls. Data showed that the exposure to the different studied sources did not alter significantly (p>0.05 the labeling of Bl-Co. Although the results were obtained with animals, the data suggest that no alteration on examinations performed with Bl-Co labeled with 99mTc after exposition to the cited agents. The biological consequences associated with these agents would be not capable to interfere with some properties of the Bl-Co.Fontes de campo magnético, ondas sonoras audíveis e de radiofreqüência e luz intensa pulsada são usadas para o tratamento de doenças. Constituintes sangüíneos(CS marcados com tecnécio-99m(99mTc são utilizados na medicina nuclear. Esse trabalho avaliou as consequências de fontes de campo magnético, ondas sonoras audíveis e de radiofreqüência e luz intensa pulsada na marcação de CS com 99mTc. Sangue de ratos Wistar foi exposto às fontes citadas. A marcação de CS com 99mTc foi realizada. Sangue não exposto foram utilizadas(controle. Resultados mostraram que os agentes físicos estudados não alteraram significativamente (p>0.05 a radiomarcação de CS. Apesar terem sido obtidos com sangue de animais, os resultados sugerem que nenhuma alteração nos exames realizados com constituintes sangüíneos com 99mTc em medicina nuclear ocorreria após a exposição às fontes avaliadas. As consequências biológicas associadas a esses agentes não seriam

  9. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

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    Ju-Young Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMost type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.MethodsFor 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 µg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 µg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV, body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment.ResultsAfter 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively, while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289. In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively.ConclusionEffects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  10. Pulse-Wave Analysis of Optic Nerve Head Circulation Is Significantly Correlated with Kidney Function in Patients with and without Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Tomoaki Shiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine whether there is a significant correlation between the optic nerve head (ONH circulation determined by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG and kidney function. Materials. Seventy-one subjects were investigated. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR and serum creatinine, cystatin C, and urinary albumin excretion were measured. The ONH circulation was determined by an analysis of the pulse wave of LSFG, and this parameter was named blowout time (BOT. Chronic kidney disease (CKD was defined to be present when the estimated GFR was <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between the BOT and the kidney function. We also examined whether there were significant differences in all parameters in patients with and without CKD. Results. BOT was significantly correlated with the level of creatinine (r=-0.24, P=0.04, the estimated GFR (r=0.42, P=0.0003, cystatin C (r=-0.29, P=0.01, and urinary albumin excretion (r=-0.29, P=0.01. The BOT level in subjects with CKD was significantly lower than that in subjects without CKD (P=0.002. Conclusion. BOT in ONH by LSFG can detect the organ damage such as kidney dysfunction, CKD.

  11. Increased range of motion and function in an individual with breast cancer and necrotizing fasciitis-manual therapy and pulsed short-wave diathermy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Draper, David O

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia affecting those predisposed to immune system compromise. It is a life threatening condition; mortality can be reduced by rapid diagnosis, adequate early surgical debridement and antibiotic ointment. In this case report we present the use of manual therapy (MT) techniques, joint and soft tissue mobilization, following a regimen of pulsed short wave diathermy (PSWD) in the treatment of a woman 3 years post necrotizing fasciitis developed during chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. During her course of chemotherapy, she developed necrotizing fasciitis which was treated with extensive surgical debridement (8 linear feet of incisions) followed by debridement to both hips and the pelvis area. When we started working with her, we put her on a course of PSWD/MT. After six weeks of following this regimen, she gained 25 degrees of external rotation in both her left and right hips, 15 degrees of left hip flexion and 17 degrees of right hip flexion. The patient gained 10 degrees of right hip extension, yet there was no improvement in left hip extension. The treatments led to a dramatic reduction in pain and scarring from previous surgeries. The patient also returned to running.

  12. Increased Range of Motion and Function in an Individual with Breast Cancer and Necrotizing Fasciitis—Manual Therapy and Pulsed Short-Wave Diathermy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Draper, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia affecting those predisposed to immune system compromise. It is a life threatening condition; mortality can be reduced by rapid diagnosis, adequate early surgical debridement and antibiotic ointment. In this case report we present the use of manual therapy (MT) techniques, joint and soft tissue mobilization, following a regimen of pulsed short wave diathermy (PSWD) in the treatment of a woman 3 years post necrotizing fasciitis developed during chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. During her course of chemotherapy, she developed necrotizing fasciitis which was treated with extensive surgical debridement (8 linear feet of incisions) followed by debridement to both hips and the pelvis area. When we started working with her, we put her on a course of PSWD/MT. After six weeks of following this regimen, she gained 25° of external rotation in both her left and right hips, 15° of left hip flexion and 17° of right hip flexion. The patient gained 10° of right hip extension, yet there was no improvement in left hip extension. The treatments led to a dramatic reduction in pain and scarring from previous surgeries. The patient also returned to running. PMID:20706546

  13. One-dimensional kinetic description of nonlinear traveling-pulse and traveling-wave disturbances in long coasting charged particle beams

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    Ronald C. Davidson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes use of a one-dimensional kinetic model to investigate the nonlinear longitudinal dynamics of a long coasting beam propagating through a perfectly conducting circular pipe with radius r_{w}. The average axial electric field is expressed as ⟨E_{z}⟩=-(∂/∂z⟨ϕ⟩=-e_{b}g_{0}∂λ_{b}/∂z-e_{b}g_{2}r_{w}^{2}∂^{3}λ_{b}/∂z^{3}, where g_{0} and g_{2} are constant geometric factors, λ_{b}(z,t=∫dp_{z}F_{b}(z,p_{z},t is the line density of beam particles, and F_{b}(z,p_{z},t satisfies the 1D Vlasov equation. Detailed nonlinear properties of traveling-wave and traveling-pulse (soliton solutions with time-stationary waveform are examined for a wide range of system parameters extending from moderate-amplitudes to large-amplitude modulations of the beam charge density. Two classes of solutions for the beam distribution function are considered, corresponding to: (i the nonlinear waterbag distribution, where F_{b}=const in a bounded region of p_{z}-space; and (ii nonlinear Bernstein-Green-Kruskal (BGK-like solutions, allowing for both trapped and untrapped particle distributions to interact with the self-generated electric field ⟨E_{z}⟩.

  14. Pulsed Wave Doppler Ultrasound Is Useful to Assess Vasomotor Response in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy and Well Correlated with Tilt Table Study

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    Ke-Vin Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to assess sympathetic vasomotor response (SVR by using pulsed wave Doppler (PWD ultrasound in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA and correlate with the tilt table study. We recruited 18 male patients and 10 healthy men as controls. The SVR of the radial artery was evaluated by PWD, using inspiratory cough as a provocative maneuver. The response to head-up tilt was studied by a tilt table with simultaneous heart rate and blood pressure recording. The hemodynamic variables were compared between groups, and were examined by correlation analysis. Regarding SVR, MSA patients exhibited a prolonged latency and less heart rate acceleration following inspiratory cough. Compared with the tilt table test, the elevation of heart rate upon SVR was positively correlated to the increase of heart rate after head-up tilt. The correlation analysis indicated that the magnitude of blood pressure drop from supine to upright was positively associated with the SVR latency but negatively correlated with the heart rate changes upon SVR. The present study demonstrated that blunted heart rate response might explain MSA's vulnerability to postural challenge. PWD may be used to predict cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress upon head-up tilt in MSA patients.

  15. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance. PMID:20410558

  16. Pulse wave analysis by digital photoplethysmography to record maternal hemodynamic effects of spinal anesthesia, delivery of the baby, and intravenous oxytocin during cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabow, Sofus; Olofsson, Per

    2017-04-01

    To investigate changes in maternal ECG ST index, blood pressure (BP), cardiac left ventricular (LV) ejection function and vascular tone/stiffness in large and small arteries occurring during elective cesarean section (CS) in spinal anesthesia. Twenty-six women were monitored with photoplethysmographic digital pulse wave (PW) analysis (DPA) before and after spinal anesthesia, after delivery of the baby, after 5 IU oxytocin bolus IV, and 5 min later. Statistics with Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank and Friedman tests at a p Oxytocin lowered BP, HR and ST index, increased LV ejection power and caused both large- and small-artery vasodilation. ST index and BP recovered after 5 min, but low HR and low vascular tone persisted. Spinal anesthesia and oxytocin caused arterial vasodilation and cardiac affection. Oxytocin caused a decrease in HR despite a fall in BP, indicating a direct negative chronotropic effect. Delivery of the baby caused momentous cardiovascular changes, possibly due to maternal emotions and auto-transfusion of blood from the uterus.

  17. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen; Rodríguez-Martín Carmela; Sánchez-Salgado Benigna; de Cabo-Laso Angela; Castaño-Sánchez Yolanda; Rodríguez-Sánchez Emiliano; Recio-Rodríguez José I; Gómez-Marcos Manuel A; Gómez-Sánchez Leticia; García-Ortiz Luis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortal...

  18. Tailoring giant magnetoimpedance effect of Co-based microwires for optimum efficiency by self-designed square-wave pulse current annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jingshun, E-mail: jingshun_liu@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Du, Zhaoxin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Jiang, Sida; Shen, Hongxian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Ze [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Xing, Dawei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Wen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China); Sun, Jianfei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we systematically studied the effect of a novel square-wave pulse current annealing (SPCA) on the magnetic properties and microstructure of Co-based melt-extracted amorphous wires, and efficiently tailored the related experimental parameters by using numerical calculation of transient temperature rise during SPCA process. We obtained the optimal SPCA treatment (at 50 Hz, with amplitude of 90 mA for 480 s) can remarkably enhance the GMI property of as-prepared wires. At 10 MHz, the maximum GMI ratio [ΔZ/Z{sub 0}]{sub max} and maxima response sensitivity ξ{sub max} of SPCA-treated wire increases to 202.60% and 305.74%/Oe, which is nearly two times and 1.5 times of 104.80% and 208.14%/Oe for as-cast wire, respectively. Especially, at 5 MHz, [ΔZ/Z{sub 0}]{sub max} of SPCA-treated wire increases to 185.81%, which is 2.5 times of 73.69% for as-cast wire, and ξ{sub max} of SPCA-treated wire increases to 346.65%/Oe by less than two times of 190.16%/Oe for as-cast wire. From mictrostructural perspective, the notably observed role of atomic order orientation regimes and circular magnetic domain during stress releasing or structural relaxation by the co-action of high-density pulse magnetic field energy and thermal activation energy determines the optimum efficiency of SPCA, further to enhance circumferential permeability. In conclusion, SPCA treatment is expected to effectively improve GMI property of microwires, which can be used as sensitive materials for potential sensor application in detecting weak magnetic field. - Highlights: • Annealing parameters are optimized by transient temperature rising calculation. • SPCA as a novel annealing treatment has larger GMI ratio and field sensitivity. • GMI effect is generally related to annealed microstructures identified by XRD. • Domain observed by MFM to explain the enhanced GMI property for SPCA-ed wires. • Results indicate SPCA-ed wires are useful for potential GMI sensor applications.

  19. Impact of Hot Yoga on Arterial Stiffness and Quality of Life in Normal and Overweight/Obese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Stacy D; Dhindsa, Mandeep S; Cunningham, Emily; Tarumi, Takashi; Alkatan, Mohammed; Nualnim, Nantinee; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is associated with arterial stiffening and diminished quality of life. Bikram yoga may be a feasible alternative to traditional exercise among obese individuals. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of Bikram yoga, a heated style of hatha yoga, on arterial stiffness in normal and overweight/obese adults. Forty-three (23 normal body mass index or BMI; 20 overweight/obese) apparently healthy participants completed an 8-week Bikram yoga intervention. Body composition was estimated via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, arterial stiffness was measured via brachialankle pulse wave velocity, and health-related quality of life was assessed via RAND 36-Item Short Form survey at baseline and at the end of the 8-week intervention. After the intervention, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity decreased (P Bikram yoga ameliorates arterial stiffness in overweight/obese adults and can positively impact quality of life regardless of BMI.

  20. Pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging of the myocardium of cats with induced thyrotoxicosis Doppler tecidual pulsado do miocárdio de gatos com tirotoxicose induzida

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    Daniel Capucho de Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular myocardial motion was quantified using pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI in nine adult cats before and after thyrotoxicosis induction. In order to induce thyrotoxicosis, all cats were given 150µg kg-1 of levothyroxine sodium as a single oral dose each day for 10 weeks. PW-TDI examinations were performed immediately before the induction and by the end of the experimental protocol. An increase in myocardial motion velocity was documented at the interventricular septum level, demonstrated by an elevation in systolic (Sa, and early (Ea and late (Aa diastolic waves (PA velocidade de movimentação miocárdica do ventrículo esquerdo foi quantificada por meio de exames ecocardiográficos com Doppler tecidual pulsado (PW-TDI em nove gatos adultos antes e após indução à tirotoxicose. Para indução da tirotoxicose, todos os gatos receberam doses diárias de 150mg kg-1 de levotiroxina sódica, por via oral, durante 10 semanas. Os exames de PW-TDI foram realizados imediatamente antes da indução e ao final do protocolo experimental. Uma elevação na velocidade de movimentação miocárdica foi documentada ao nível do septo interventricular, demonstrado por um aumento das ondas sistólica (Sa e diastólicas (Ea e Aa; P<0,05. No entanto, nenhuma alteração nos valores de Sa, Ea e Aa foi encontrada ao nível da parede livre do ventrículo esquerdo. A frequência cardíaca aumentou significativamente entre os momentos experimentais, sendo que três animais apresentaram fusão das ondas Aa e Ea ao final do experimento. O protocolo experimental utilizado neste estudo causou alterações na velocidade de movimentação do miocárdio ventricular esquerdo, mas sem causar danos à função diastólica do ventrículo esquerdo.

  1. Assessment of pulse rate variability by the method of pulse frequency demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Junichiro; Barros, Allan Kardec; Kamiya, Atsunori; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Yasuma, Fumihiko

    2005-01-01

    Background Due to its easy applicability, pulse wave has been proposed as a surrogate of electrocardiogram (ECG) for the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). However, its smoother waveform precludes accurate measurement of pulse-to-pulse interval by fiducial-point algorithms. Here we report a pulse frequency demodulation (PFDM) technique as a method for extracting instantaneous pulse rate function directly from pulse wave signal and its usefulness for assessing pulse rate variability (PRV). Methods Simulated pulse wave signals with known pulse interval functions and actual pulse wave signals obtained from 30 subjects with a trans-dermal pulse wave device were analyzed by PFDM. The results were compared with heart rate and HRV assessed from simultaneously recorded ECG. Results Analysis of simulated data revealed that the PFDM faithfully demodulates source interval function with preserving the frequency characteristics of the function, even when the intervals fluctuate rapidly over a wide range and when the signals include fluctuations in pulse height and baseline. Analysis of actual data revealed that individual means of low and high frequency components of PRV showed good agreement with those of HRV (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.997 and 0.981, respectively). Conclusion The PFDM of pulse wave signal provides a reliable assessment of PRV. Given the popularity of pulse wave equipments, PFDM may open new ways to the studies of long-term assessment of cardiovascular variability and dynamics. PMID:16259639

  2. Carotid arterial stiffness as a surrogate for aortic stiffness: relationship between carotid artery pressure-strain elastic modulus and aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Y; Fleg, J L; Kemper, M K; Rywik, T M; Earley, C J; Metter, E J

    1999-02-01

    Common carotid arterial (CCA) stiffness can be assessed during carotid ultrasonography, but its association with aortic stiffness, a well-defined cardiovascular risk factor, has not been clarified. This study examines the relationship between CCA and aortic stiffness. CCA pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep) and aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) were evaluated in 110 healthy volunteers (age 56.2 +/- 14.6 y) by B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography. CCA Ep increased linearly with age and was higher in men than in women (model r2 = 0.50, p < 0.001). APWV increased quadratically with age (model r2 = 0.54, p < 0.001), similarly for women and men. Both CCA Ep and APWV were linearly associated with systolic blood pressure (BP) (r = 0.53 and 0.46, respectively) but not with diastolic BP. A linear relationship was found between CCA Ep and APWV (APWV = 194.7 + 5.67 x Ep [model r2 = 0.42, p < 0.001]). CCA Ep was associated with APWV (p < 0.001) independent of age, gender, and BP (model r2 = 0.62, p < 0.001), and the most parsimonious model to explain APWV included CCA Ep and age (APWV = 601.73 - 15.64 x age + 0.223 x age2 + 2.69 x Ep [model r2 = 0.60, p < 0.001]). Thus, CCA Ep is moderately associated with APWV. CCA stiffness as assessed by B-mode may be useful as a surrogate for aortic stiffness.

  3. Vascular aging processes accelerate following a cubic kinetic: pulse wave velocity as an objective counterpart that time, as we age, goes by faster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabutti L

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Luca Gabutti, Rosaria Del Giorno Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology, Bellinzona Regional Hospital, Bellinzona, SwitzerlandArterial stiffness is a marker of vascular aging and is considered to be the most reliable parameter expressing, like an integral in mathematics, the cumulative consequences, on the vascular wall, of degenerative and adaptive changes occurring throughout life.1 The efficiency of the reparative processes, the cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF, and early life and genetic determinants, all play a relevant role.1 Among CVRF, the acceleration in arterial stiffness progression related to age is mainly influenced by hypertension.1 A pathological acceleration translates into the concept of early vascular aging, a concept that can be quantified calculating the gap between the subject’s chronological (estimated on the basis of the epidemiological data obtained in the normal population and effective vascular age.2 Data of subpopulations without active risk factors for accelerated vascular aging can be found mainly in three large epidemiological studies, performed respectively in Portugal,3 Argentina,4 and seven different European countries (Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, and UK gathered in a collaborative investigation.5 Those doing this secondary analysis were aware of the limitation related to the use of cross-sectional data to extrapolate longitudinal changes, and their aims were combining the abovementioned epidemiological data concerning the normal population to calculate with the highest possible accuracy 1 the age-related increase in acceleration of the pulse wave velocity (PWV and to estimate both 2 the age-specific relative amount of time equivalent to that necessary to progress 1 year in vascular age at 20, and 3 the cumulative relative age calculated in year equivalents. 

  4. Hall voltage drives pulsing counter-currents of the sliding charge density wave and of quantized normal carriers at self-filled Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Andrey P.; Sinchenko, Aleksander A.; Monceau, Pierre; Brazovskii, Serguei; Latyshev, Yuri I.

    2017-11-01

    Remnant pockets of carriers left over after formation of a charge density wave (CDW) were brought, by virtue of transverse electric and magnetic fields, to a current-carrying state at quantized Landau Levels. The generated Hall voltage polarizes and puts to sliding the flexible CDW background. The screening from the CDW allows for a so strong redistribution of normal electrons density under the action of the Lorentz force alone, that an integer filling of the lowest Landau level might be reached at one edge at the expense of the full depletion at another edge of the Hall bar. With the Hall field exceeding the sliding threshold, the regime of exactly compensated collective and normal counter-currents develops in the open-circuit direction across the bar. The annihilation of the two currents proceeds via a regular sequence of phase slips which are the space-time vortices of the CDW phase around the enforced amplitude nodes. The resulting spontaneous generation of coherent high ( GHz) frequency signals was detected by observations of multiple Shapiro steps. This picture results from studies of micron-sized Hall bars in crystals of NbSe3 prepared by means of focused ion beams. The interpretation is confirmed and illustrated by a numerical solution of the derived equations. The depinning pulse propagates from edges to the bulk and the sliding sets in, accompanied by the generation of periodic phase slips near the Hall bar edge where the CDW phase is advanced in steps of 2π at expense of the CDW amplitude passing through zero.

  5. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness indices by applanation tonometry and pulse wave analysis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with TNF-alpha blocker remicade (infliximab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypiene, Alma; Laucevicius, Aleksandras; Venalis, Algirdas; Ryliskyte, Ligita; Dadoniene, Jolanta; Petrulioniene, Zaneta; Kovaite, Milda; Laskova, Violetta; Gintautas, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is accompanied by long lasting inflammation, which may lead to arterial dysfunction and premature aging of the arteries. The purpose of this clinical work was to determine the modification of carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx) in young-aged RA patients and the influence of treatment with anti-TNF-alpha (infliximab) on these measures. We examined 68 RA patients (mean age 40.68 yrs) with moderate or high disease activity (DAS28 5.37 +/- 0.94) and 87 controls (mean age 38.10 yrs). PWV and AIx were assessed non-invasively by applanation tonometry. A blood test included serum lipid profile, and high-sensitivity CRP measurements. We found that in RA patients, AIx (p < 0.001) was significantly higher while PWV (p = 0.315) did not differ as compared to control. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of RA is an independent predictor for AIx (R2 = 0.718, adjusted R2 = 0.707; p < 0.001). Analysis (Mann-Whitney test) in 15 RA patients revealed lowering of PWV (p = 0.004) under infliximab therapy with no change in AIx (p = 0.573), suggesting the improvement of arterial wall function by anti-TNF-alpha therapy. We conclude that increased AIx is more prominent in RA patients as compared to the controls. PWV appears to be a less sensitive marker for the detection of enhanced development of arterial stiffness in relatively young-aged RA patients. However, PWV may serve as a good marker to discern effects of infliximab on artery elasticity.

  6. EFFECTS OF PULSED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THERAPY VERSUS EXTRA CORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE THERAPY ON PERIPHERAL CIRCULATION AND FUNCTIONAL BALANCE IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abdelaal Mohamed Abdelaal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy (DPN is an arousing problem that negatively affects body systems. Pulsed low frequency electromagnetic field (PLFEM and Extracorporeal shock waves (ESW are therapeutic modalities frequently used to treat varieties of pathological conditions. Objective of the study was to evaluate and compare effects of PLFEM and ESW on feet blood flow (maximum skin blood perfusion (SBP-max, minimum skin blood perfusion (SBP-min, and basal mean perfusion changes (BMCP (by Laser Doppler and functional balance (by Berg balance scale "BBS" in patients with DPN. Methods: Seventy patients with DPN were randomly assigned into PLFEM, ESW and control groups. PLFEMgroup received treatment twice weekly while ESW received treatment once weekly, for 12 weeks. Variables were evaluated prestudy (evaluation-1, post-study (evaluation-2 and 4-weeks post-treatment cessation (evaluation-3. Results: At evaluation-2 and 3; SBP-max, SBP-min, BMCP and BBS showed significant increase in both PLFEM and ESWgroups (P 0.5. At evaluation-2; SBPmax, SBP-min, BMCP and BBS mean values and percentages of change were [27.21±4.27(23.27 %, 10.51±2.32(50.004%, 16.15±2.22(24.45 %, 43.18±2.95(33.01 %], [24.74±3.33(10.62 %, 8.69±2.58(21.15 %, 14.48±2.35(11.66 %, 40.13±3.52(23.12 %] and [22.12(-0.05 %, 7.196(-0.1 %, 13.06±2.38(-0.09, 32.76(-0.1 %] for LFPEM, ESW and control groups respectively (P<0.05. Conclusion: While both PLFEM and ESW have significant long-term effects in improving lower extremity blood flow and functional balance in patients with DPN, but still PLFEM is more effective than ESW.

  7. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is associated with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin Y; Tai, Bee C; Foo, David C; Wong, Raymond C; Adabag, A Selcuk; Benditt, David G; Ling, Lieng H

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which conduit artery stiffness is associated with plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting National University Hospital, Singapore. Patients Cases (n=117) were patients with AF onset <65 years of age without heart failure or structural heart disease. Controls (n=274) were patients without AF who were seen at the general cardiology clinic. Interventions Transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) measured using applanation tonometry and blood draw for plasma NT-proBNP at enrolment for all patients. Main outcome measures Plasma NT-proBNP. Results In patients with AF, CFPWV was associated with NT-proBNP after adjusting for hypertension and factors that were univariately associated with NT-proBNP: age at enrolment, type of AF, body mass index, left ventricular mass index, left atrial volume index, mitral E/E′, mitral deceleration time and use of β-blockers (β=0.234; 95% CI 0.100 to 0.367; p=0.001). In contrast, CFPWV was not associated with NT-proBNP in controls. In patients with AF, the adjusted mean NT-proBNP level in the highest quartile of CFPWV (350 pg/ml; 95% CI 237 to 517 pg/ml) was fivefold higher than the lowest quartile (69 pg/ml; 95% CI 47 to 103 pg/ml) (p=0.001). Conclusions CFPWV is associated with NT-proBNP level in AF. Since elevated NT-proBNP is a marker of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, arterial stiffness may be associated with worse prognosis in patients with AF. PMID:27325994

  8. Photoelectrocatalytic decomposition of ethylene using TiO2/activated carbon fiber electrode with applied pulsed direct current square-wave potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sheng-ying; Zheng, Sen-hong; Song, Xian-liang; Luo, Shu-can

    2015-06-01

    Removing ethylene (C2H4) from the atmosphere of storage facilities for fruits and vegetable is one of the main challenges in their postharvest handling for maximizing their freshness, quality, and shelf life. In this study, we investigated the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) degradation of ethylene gas by applying a pulsed direct current DC square-wave (PDCSW) potential and by using a Nafion-based PEC cell. The cell utilized a titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst or γ-irradiated TiO2 (TiO2*) loaded on activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a photoelectrode. The apparent rate constant of a pseudo-first-order reaction (K) was used to describe the PEC degradation of ethylene. Parameters of the potential applied to the PEC cell in a reactor that affect the degradation efficiency in terms of the K value were studied. These parameters were frequency, duty cycle, and voltage. Ethylene degradation by application of a constant PDCSW potential to the PEC electrode of either TiO2/ACF cell or TiO2*/ACF cell enhanced the efficiency of photocatalytic degradation and PEC degradation. Gamma irradiation of TiO2 in the electrode and the applied PDCSW potential synergistically increased the K value. Independent variables (frequency, duty cycle, and voltage) of the PEC cell fabricated from TiO2 subjected 20 kGy γ radiation were optimized to maximize the K value by using response surface methodology with quadratic rotation-orthogonal composite experimental design. Optimized conditions were as follows: 358.36 Hz frequency, 55.79% duty cycle, and 64.65 V voltage. The maximum K value attained was 4.4 × 10-4 min-1.

  9. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. Method: The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Results: Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Conclusion: Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke. PMID:27741123

  10. [Dynamic pulse signal acquisition and processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Chou, Yongxin

    2012-03-01

    In order to obtain and process pulse signal in real-time, the integer coefficients notch, low-pass filters and an envelope filtering method were designed in consideration of the characteristics of disturbances in pulse signal and then were verified by MATLAB. The pulse signal was processed on DSP in time domain and frequency domain after simplifying the programming. The pulse wave height and pulse rate were calculated in real-time, and the pulse signal's spectrum was illustrated by FFT. The results show that the filters can effectively suppress the interference in pulse signal, and the system can detect and analyze the dynamic pulse signal in real-time.

  11. Plasma response to transient high voltage pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solitary electron and ion holes) is reviewed for a metallic electrode covered by a dielectric material. The wave excitation during and after the pulse withdrawal, excitation and propagation characteristics of various electrostatic plasma waves are ...

  12. Serum lipid level and lifestyles are associated with carotid femoral pulse wave velocity among adults: 4.4-year prospectively longitudinal follow-up of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, XiaoXiao; Wang, Hongyu; Bo, LiuJin; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Lihong; Zhou, Yingyan

    2017-10-16

    Lifestyle modifications are recommended as the initial treatment for high blood pressure. The influence of dyslipidemia might be via moderate arterial stiffness, which results in hypertension and cardiovascular disease. We used data from a subgroup of the lifestyle, level of serum lipids/carotid femoral-pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) Susceptibility BEST Study, a population-based study of community-dwelling adults aged 45-75 years. The serum lipid level and CF-PWV were measured at baseline, and lifestyle such as smoking status, sleeping habits, and the level of oil or salt intake was determined with the use of a validated questionnaire during follow-up. Arterial stiffness was determined as CF-PWV using an electrocardiogram after a mean follow-up of 4.4 years. Regression coefficients (95% CIs), adjusted for demographics, risk factors, cholesterol, and triglycerides (TGs), were calculated by linear regression. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the association between the variables with CF-PWV independently. In the results, glucose and total cholesterol (TC) were associated with higher CF-PWV (p = 0.000) and lower-destiny lipoprotein was associated with lower CF-PWV (p = 0.001) after adjustments for age, sex, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate. There were significant associations observed for current salt intake in relation to CF-PWV (p-trend = 0.038) without adjustment. This association was retained after adjustments for covariates and had statistical significance (p-trend = 0.048) in model 3, which adjusted age, sex, baseline CF-PWV, mean arterial pressure, heart rate waist circumference, education, smoking status, physical activity, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, TGs, antihypertensive medicine, nitrate medicine, and antiplatelet medicine. Linear regression showed statistically significant associations between LDL and CF-PWV in the fully adjusted

  13. Effects of contrast administration on cardiac MRI volumetric, flow and pulse wave velocity quantification using manual and software-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Amir; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R; Struthers, Allan D; Lipworth, Brian J; Houston, Graeme

    2018-01-19

    The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of gadolinium contrast agent on right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) volumetric, aortic flow and pulse wave velocity (PWV) quantification using manual, semi-automatic and fully automatic analysis techniques. 61 participants free from known cardiovascular disease were recruited. Cardiac MR was performed on a 3 T scanner. A balanced steady-state free precession stack was acquired of the ventricles with phase contrast imaging of the aorta performed pre- and post-administration of 10 ml 0.5 mmol ml -1 gadoterate meglumine. The images were analysed manually, and using a semi-automated and a fully automated technique. 54 completed the study. Gadolinium-based contrast administration significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pre: 830 ± 398 vs post: 1028 ± 540, p = 0.003) with no significant change in contrast-to-noise ratio (pre: 583 ± 302 vs post: 559 ± 346, p = 0.54). On LV analysis, post-contrast analysis yielded significantly higher end systolic volume (54 ± 20 vs 57 ± 18 ml, p = 0.04), and lower ejection fraction (59 ± 9 vs 57 ± 8%, p = 0.023). On RV analysis, gadolinium contrast resulted in no significant differences. Similar results were seen using the semi-automated and fully-automated techniques but with a larger magnitude of difference. Conversely, using both manual and software analysis aortic flow and PWV quantification proved robust to the effects of contrast agent producing only small non-significant differences. Gadolinium contrast administration significantly alters LV endocardial contour detection with this effect amplified when using semi-automated analysis techniques. In comparison, RV and PWV analysis is robust to these effects. Advances in knowledge: Contrast administration alters LV quantification but not flow analysis. However, these differences are small.

  14. Polymorphisms of COL4A1 gene are associated with arterial pulse wave velocity in healthy Han Chinese and Uygur subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi, Dilare; Xie, Xiang; Xiang, Yang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Yang, Yi-Ning; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Fen; Chen, Bang-Dang

    2015-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive index of arterial stiffness and an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. Type IV collagen is an important structural component of the vascular basement membrane, thus it is important for the integrity and functions of basement membrane. However, the relationship between genetic polymorphisms of COL4A1 gene and PWV in healthy Han Chinese and Uygur subjects remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between PWV and COL4A1 genetic polymorphisms in healthy Han Chinese and Uygur subjects. A total of 1533 subjects (909 Han, 624 Uygur) were selected from the Cardiovascular Risk Survey (CRS) study. Two SNPs (rs605143 and rs565470) were genotyped by using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length (PCR-RFLP) method. In the Uygur population, the two SNPs (rs605143 and rs565470) were associated with PWV by analyses of a recessive model (p = 0.002, p = 0.008, respectively), and the difference remained significant after multivariate adjustment (p = 0.004, p = 0.001, respectively); the AA genotype of rs605143 was associated with increased PWV value compared with the AG or GG genotype (1543.36 ± 324.79 cm/s vs. 1530.45 ± 314.24 cm/s and 1522.93 ± 316.00 cm/s); and the CC genotype of rs565470 was associated with increased PWV value compared with the CT or TT genotype (1647.90 ± 553.27 cm/s vs. 1506.8 ± 357.35 cm/s and 1488.4 ± 344.32 cm/s). But for healthy Han Chinese subjects, this association was not observed in rs605143 and rs565470 before and after multivariate adjustment. Both rs605143 and rs565470 in the COL4A1 gene are associated with PWV in healthy Uygur subjects, indicating that carriers of the A allele of rs605143 and the C allele of rs565470 have a high risk of Arterial stiffness. PMID:25932222

  15. Effect of Pulsed Wave Low-Level Laser Therapy on Tibial Complete Osteotomy Model of Fracture Healing With an Intramedullary Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavinia, Atarodalsadat; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Vasheghani Farahani, Mohammadmehdi; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Zandpazandi, Sara; Ghoreishi, Seyed Kamran; Abdollahifar, Mohammad Amin; Pouriran, Ramin; Bayat, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractures pose a major worldwide challenge to public health, causing tremendous disability for the society and families. According to recent studies, many in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown the positive effects of PW LLLT on osseous tissue. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of infrared pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PW LLLT) on the fracture healing process in a complete tibial osteotomy in a rat model, which was stabilized by an intramedullary pin. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. We performed complete tibial osteotomies in the right tibias for the population of 15 female rats. The rats were divided randomly into three different groups: I) Control rats with untreated bone defects; II) Rats irradiated by a 0.972 J/cm2 PW LLLT; and III) Rats irradiated by a 1.5 J/cm2 PW LLLT. The right tibias were collected six weeks following the surgery and a three-point bending test was performed to gather results. Immediately after biomechanical examination, the fractured bones were prepared for histological examinations. Slides were examined using stereological method. Results: PW LLLT significantly caused an increase in maximum force (N) of biomechanical repair properties for osteotomized tibias in the first and second laser groups (30.0 ± 15.9 and 32.4 ± 13.8 respectively) compared to the control group (8.6 ± 4.5) LSD test, P = 0.019, P = 0.011 respectively). There was a significant increase in the osteoblast count of the first and second laser groups (0.53 ± 0.06, 0.41 ± 0.06 respectively) compared to control group (0.31 ± 0.04) (LSD test, P = 0001, P = 0.007 respectively). Conclusions: This study confirmed the efficacy of PW LLLT on biomechanical strength, trabecular bone volume, callus volume, and osteoblast number of repairing callus in a complete tibial osteotomy animal model at a relatively late stage of the bone

  16. Gauge-invariant theory of quasiparticle and condensate dynamics in response to terahertz optical pulses in superconducting semiconductor quantum wells. II. (s +p )-wave superconductivity in the strong spin-orbit coupling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the quasiparticle and condensate dynamics in response to the terahertz (THz) optical pulses in the strong spin-orbit-coupled (s +p )-wave superconducting semiconductor quantum wells by using the gauge-invariant optical Bloch equations in the quasiparticle approximation. Both the dynamics of triplet and singlet superconductivity are studied in response to the THz optical pulses. Specifically, for the triplet superconductivity, we predict that in the (s +p )-wave superconducting (100) quantum wells, with the vector potential parallel to the quantum wells, the optical field can cause the total spin polarization of Cooper pairs, oscillating with the frequency of the optical field. The direction of the total Cooper-pair spin polarization is shown to be parallel to the vector potential. For the singlet superconductivity, we show that due to the large spin-orbit coupling in InSb (100) quantum wells, there exist two Fermi surfaces including the inner and outer ones. In this specific configuration, the superconducting momentum can be tuned to be larger than the inner Fermi momentum but smaller than the outer one. We find that in this regime, the dynamics of the Higgs mode and charge imbalance shows different features in comparison with the conventional s -wave case.

  17. Body mass index is inversely associated with arterial stiffness in Chinese adults with primary hypertension: results from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Mohetaboer; Li, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Fang-Fang; Xu, Xi-Ping; Xu, Xin; Wang, Bin-Yan; Yang, Wen-Bin; Xie, Li-Ling; Huo, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the presence of arterial stiffness in rural-dwelling Chinese adults with primary hypertension. Primary hypertension patients (n = 19,375) receiving an average of 4.5 years of antihypertension therapy were selected from the Chinese Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (mean age: 64.7 ± 7.4 years, male: 37.8%). Anthropometric, demographic, hemodynamic, and biochemical data were obtained. Arterial stiffness was assessed using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). BMI was inversely associated with baPWV after adjusting for gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, center, pulse, SBP, DBP, FBG, TC, TG, HDL-C, BUN, Scr, UA, HCY, antidiabetes treatment, lipid-lowing treatment, and antihypertensive treatment (β (SE): -10.72 (0.69), P antihypertension treatments, after adjusting for confounding factors.

  18. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Castaño-Sánchez, Yolanda; de Cabo-Laso, Angela; Sánchez-Salgado, Benigna; Rodríguez-Martín, Carmela; Castaño-Sánchez, Carmen; Gómez-Sánchez, Leticia; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2010-03-18

    Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for diabetes, arterial hypertension and hyperlipidemia will be registered, together

  19. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The

  20. Spin wave and percolation studies in epitaxial La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettayfi, A. [LPMMAT, Faculté des Sciences Ain chock, Université Hassan II de Casablanca, B.P. 5366 Casablanca (Morocco); Moubah, R., E-mail: reda.moubah@hotmail.fr [LPMMAT, Faculté des Sciences Ain chock, Université Hassan II de Casablanca, B.P. 5366 Casablanca (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Néel, CNRS, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Colis, S.; Lenertz, M.; Dinia, A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS), UMR 7504 UDS-CNRS (UDS-ECPM), 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Lassri, H. [LPMMAT, Faculté des Sciences Ain chock, Université Hassan II de Casablanca, B.P. 5366 Casablanca (Morocco)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the magnetic and transport properties of high quality La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction shows that the deposited films are epitaxial with the expected pseudo-cubic structure. Using the spin wave theory, the temperature dependence of magnetization was satisfactory modeled at low temperature, in which several fundamental magnetic parameters were obtained (spin wave stiffness, exchange constants, Fermi wave-vector, Mn–Mn interatomic distance). The transport properties were studied via the temperature dependence of electrical resistivity [ρ(T)], which shows a peak at Curie temperature due to metal to insulator transition. The percolation theory was used to simulate ρ(T) in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases. Reasonable agreement with the experimental data is reported. - Highlights: • The magnetic and transport properties of epitaxial La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin films are investigated. • The M(T) curve was modeled at low temperature, and several magnetic parameters were obtained using spin wave theory. • The percolation theory was used to simulate ρ(T) in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases.

  1. Pulse on Pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik; Carlson, Merete

    2012-01-01

    of the visitor’s beating heart to the blink of a fragile light bulb, thereby transforming each light bulb into a register of individual life. But at the same time the blinking light bulbs together produce a chaotically flickering light environment composed by various layers of repetitive rhythms, a vibrant...... and pulsating ‘room’. Hence, the visitors in Pulse Room are invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic ‘rhythm of life’) and instants of pure material processuality...... (flickering light bulbs; polyrhythmic layers). Taking our point of departure in a discussion of Gilles Deleuze’s concepts of modulation and signaletic material in relation to electronic media, we examine how the complex orchestration of pulsation between signification and material modulation produces...

  2. High speed, high current pulsed driver circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlen, Christopher R.

    2017-03-21

    Various technologies presented herein relate to driving a LED such that the LED emits short duration pulses of light. This is accomplished by driving the LED with short duration, high amplitude current pulses. When the LED is driven by short duration, high amplitude current pulses, the LED emits light at a greater amplitude compared to when the LED is driven by continuous wave current.

  3. Pulse growth dynamics in laser mode locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Mark; Gat, Omri

    2018-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and numerically the nonlinear process of pulse formation in mode-locked lasers, starting from a perturbation of a continuous wave. Focusing on weak-to-moderate dispersion systems, we show that pulse growth is initially slow, dominated by a cascade of energy from low to high axial modes, followed by fast strongly nonlinear growth, and finally relaxation to the stable pulse wave form. The pulse grows initially by condensing a fixed amount of energy into a decreasing time interval, with peak power growing toward a finite-time singularity that is checked when the gain bandwidth is saturated by the pulse.

  4. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  5. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Naoto Miura; Takashi Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between...

  6. Energetic mid-IR femtosecond pulse generation by self-defocusing soliton-induced dispersive waves in a bulk quadratic nonlinear crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Guo, Hairun; Bache, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Generating energetic femtosecond mid-IR pulses is crucial for ultrafast spectroscopy, and currently relies on parametric processes that, while efficient, are also complex. Here we experimentally show a simple alternative that uses a single pump wavelength without any pump synchronization...

  7. Development of a Cardiovascular Simulator for Studying Pulse Diagnosis Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken to develop a cardiovascular simulator for use in the study of pulse diagnosis. The physical (i.e., pulse wave transmission and reflection and physiological (i.e., systolic and diastolic pressure, pulse pressure, and mean pressure characteristics of the radial pulse wave were reproduced by our simulator. The simulator consisted of an arterial component and a pulse-generating component. Computer simulation was used to simplify the arterial component while maintaining the elastic modulus and artery size. To improve the reflected wave characteristics, a palmar arch was incorporated within the simulator. The simulated radial pulse showed good agreement with clinical data.

  8. STUCTURE OF PULSED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bokun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of pulsed layer is proposed which can be suggested as a state of particulates that is blown by intermittent gas flow with speed which has the force to start material moving. Layer during one cycle is in a suspension, falling down and immobile state resulting in changes of particles arrangement as well as ways of gas flowing through layer. Moreover, it allows carrying out effective interphase heat exchange even adamant real granulation.The process of formation of impact flows is considered aw well as their influence on formation of air bubbles in pulsed layer. At startup of air blast the balance between the force of hydro-dynamic resistance is broken, on one side, and forces of gravity, particles inertia and their links with walls on the other side. The layer is transferred in the state of pulsed pseudo-fluidization, and presents gas-disperse mixture, inside of which impulse of pressure increasing is spreading to all sides as pressure waves (compression. These waves are the sources of impact flows’ formation, the force of which is two times more than during the stationary flow.The waves of pressure are divided into weak and strong ones depending on movement velocity within gas-disperse system. Weak waves are moving with a sound speed and strong ones in active phase of pulsed layer are moving over the speed of sound limit within gas-disperse system. The peculiarity of strong wave is that parameters of system (pressure, density and others are changing in discrete steps.The article describes the regime of layer’s falling down in the passive stage of cycle, which begins after finishing of gas impulse action. And suspension layer of moving up granular material is transferred in the state of falling resulting in change of the layer structure.

  9. Interaction of solitary pulses in single mode optical fibres | Usman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interaction of solitary pulses in single mode optical fibres. A Usman, J Osman, DR Tilley. Abstract. We attempt to classify interaction of nonlinear optical pulses that propagate in form of solitary waves in single made optical fibres. Two solitary waves launched, by way of incidence, into an optical fibre from a single pulse if the ...

  10. Risk factors of accelerated progression of peripheral artery disease in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang-Reu; Su, Ho-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Su, Shin-Li; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2013-02-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) are markers for peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and arterial stiffness, respectively. The aims of this study were to assess whether PAOD and arterial stiffness progressed and to determine the risk factors for ABI and baPWV progression in patients on hemodialysis. This study enrolled 173 routine patients on hemodialysis. Both ABI and baPWV were measured by an ABI-form device at baseline and at 1 year of follow-up. Progression in ABI was defined as reduction in ABI exceeding 0.3, while baPWV measured at 1 year of follow-up exceeding that at baseline indicated baPWV progression. Comparison with baseline data showed increase in both prevalence of ABI hemodialysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Sensors and Methods for Electromagnetic Pulse Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel FIALA; Drexler, Petr

    2006-01-01

    There are some suitable methods for the measurement of ultra-short solitary electromagnetic pulses that can be generated by high power pulsed generators. The measurement methods properties have to correspond to the fact whether we want to measure pulses of voltage, current or free-space electromagnetic wave. The need for specific measurement methods occurred by the development of high power microwave pulse generator. Applicable methods are presented in this paper. The method utilizing Faraday...

  12. Nonlinear Waves in Transmission Lines Periodically Loaded with Tunneling Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Narahara, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews the pulse propagation characteristics of TD lines.We found that a pulse wave propagates on the line either by theunstable exponential-sinusoidal hybrid mode or stable exponential-exponential mode. Through thesepeculiar wave propagation properties, an input impulse experiences width shortening and an edge of the step pulse oscillates. These provide efficient methods for generating short pulses and continuous waves. Moreover, TD lines can be used to manage pulse amplitude a...

  13. Molecular orientation via a dynamically induced pulse-train: Wave packet dynamics of NaI in a static electric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquetand, P.; Materny, A.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2004-01-01

    We regard the rovibrational wave packet dynamics of NaI in a static electric field after femtosecond excitation to its first electronically excited state. The following quasibound nuclear wave packet motion is accompanied by a bonding situation changing from covalent to ionic. At times when...... the charge separation is present, i.e., when the bond-length is large, a strong dipole moment exists and rotational excitation takes place. Upon bond contraction, the then covalently bound molecule does not experience the external field. This scenario repeats itself periodically. Thus, the vibrational...

  14. Multicomponent supplement containing Chlorella decreases arterial stiffness in healthy young men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Kono, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella, a unicellular green alga, contains various antioxidants and other nutrients such as amino acids and fiber. Previous studies have reported that supplementation with multiple antioxidants reduces arterial stiffness, a well-established cardiovascular risk factor. We investigated the effects of Chlorella intake on arterial stiffness using a single-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study design. Fourteen young men took placebo or Chlorella tablets for four weeks, with a 12-week washout period between trials, in a randomized order. Before and after each trial, blood pressure, heart rate, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, an index of arterial stiffness, were measured. Treatment compliance was comparable between the two groups. There were no differences in blood pressure and heart rate before and after supplementation in both the placebo and Chlorella groups. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity decreased after Chlorella intake (before vs after intake; 11.6 ± 0.2 vs 11.1 ± 0.1 m/s, p = 0.01), but not after placebo intake (11.4 ± 0.2 vs 11.4 ± 0.2 m/s, p = 0.98). Multicomponent analysis of the Chlorella-containing tablet detected nutrients that can reduce arterial stiffness, such as antioxidant vitamins, arginine, potassium, calcium, and n-3 unsaturated fatty acids. These results suggest that intake of a Chlorella-containing multicomponent supplement can decrease arterial stiffness. PMID:24249971

  15. Evaluation of canine hepatic masses by use of triphasic computed tomography and B-mode, color flow, power, and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography and correlation with histopathologic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebie, Erin R; David, Frederic H; Ober, Christopher P; Feeney, Daniel A; Anderson, Kari L; Wuenschmann, Arno; Jessen, Carl R

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine clinical relevance for quantitative and qualitative features of canine hepatic masses evaluated by use of triphasic CT and B-mode, color flow, power, and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography and to compare diagnostic accuracy of these modalities for predicting mass type on the basis of histopathologic classification. ANIMALS 44 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs with histopathologic confirmation (needle core, punch, or excisional biopsy) of a hepatic mass were enrolled. Triphasic CT and B-mode, color flow, power, and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography of each hepatic mass were performed. Seventy quantitative and qualitative variables of each hepatic mass were recorded by 5 separate observers and statistically evaluated with discriminant and stepwise analyses. Significant variables were entered in equation-based predictions for the histopathologic diagnosis. RESULTS An equation that included the lowest delayed-phase absolute enhancement of the mass and the highest venous-phase mass conspicuity was used to correctly classify 43 of 46 (93.5%) hepatic masses as benign or malignant. An equation that included only the lowest delayed-phase absolute enhancement of the mass could be used to correctly classify 42 of 46 (91.3%) masses (with expectation of malignancy if this value was < 37 Hounsfield units). For ultrasonography, categorization of the masses with cavitations as malignant achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 80.4%. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Triphasic CT had a higher accuracy than ultrasonography for use in predicting hepatic lesion classification. The lowest delayed-phase absolute enhancement of the mass was a simple calculation that required 2 measurements and aided in the differentiation of benign versus malignant hepatic masses.

  16. [Pilot study of echocardiographic studies using color- and pulsed-wave spectral Doppler methods in blue-crowned amazons (Amazona ventralis) and blue-fronted amazons (Amazona a. aestiva)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pees, M; Straub, J; Schumacher, J; Gompf, R; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E

    2005-02-01

    Colour-flow and pulsed-wave spectral Doppler echocardiography was performed on 6 healthy, adult Hispaniolan amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) and 6 blue-fronted amazon parrots (Amazona a. aestiva) to establish normal reference values. Birds were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen and placed in dorsal recumbency. An electrocardiogram was recorded continuously and birds were imaged with a micro-phased-array scanner with a frequency of 7.0 MHz. After assessment of cardiac function in 2-D-echocardiography, blood flow across the left and the right atrioventricular valve and across the aortic valve was determined using color-flow and pulsed-wave spectral Doppler echocardiography. Diastolic inflow (mean value +/- standard deviation) into the left ventricle was 0.17 +/- 0.02 m/s (Hispaniolan amazons) and 0.18 +/- 0.03 m/s (Blue fronted amazons). Diastolic inflow into the right ventricle was 0.22 +/- 0.05 m/s (Hispaniolan amazons) and 0.22 +/- 0.04 m/s (Blue fronted amazons). Velocity across the aortic valve was 0.84 +/- 0.07 m/s (Hispaniolan amazons) and 0.83 +/- 0.08 m/s (Blue fronted amazons). Systolic pulmonary flow could not be detected in any of the birds in this study. No significant differences were evident between the two species examined. Results of this study indicate that Doppler echocardiography is a promising technique to determine blood flow in the avian heart. Further studies in other avian species are needed to establish reference values for assessment of cardiac function in diseased birds.

  17. A measurement method of time jitter of a laser pulse with respect to the radio-frequency wave phase in a photocathode radio-frequency gun

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Sheng Guang; Wang Ming Kai

    2002-01-01

    In a photo-cathode radio-frequency (rf) gun, the micro-bunched charge output from the gun is dependent linearly on the laser injection phase, due to the Scottay effect in the process of photoemission and the procedure of the electron longitudinal acceleration. Based on this principle, a new method is proposed, which should be utilized to measure the time jitter between the driving laser pulse and the rf phase with a very high resolution of a few tens of femto-seconds

  18. Analysis of pulsatile retinal movements by spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry: influence of age and glaucoma on the pulse wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Carolyne; Singh, Kanwarpal; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Lesk, Mark R; Costantino, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that ocular hemodynamics and eye tissue biomechanical properties play an important role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Nevertheless, better, non-invasive methods to assess these characteristics in vivo are essential for a thorough understanding of degenerative mechanisms. Here, we propose to measure ocular tissue movements induced by cardiac pulsations and study the ocular pulse waveform as an indicator of tissue compliance. Using a novel, low-cost and non-invasive device based on spectral-domain low coherence interferometry (SD-LCI), we demonstrate the potential of this technique to differentiate ocular hemodynamic and biomechanical properties. We measured the axial movement of the retina driven by the pulsatile ocular blood flow in 11 young healthy individuals, 12 older healthy individuals and 15 older treated glaucoma patients using our custom-made SD-OCT apparatus. The cardiac pulse was simultaneously measured through the use of an oximeter to allow comparison. Spectral components up to the second harmonic were obtained and analyzed. For the different cohorts, we computed a few parameters that characterize the three groups of individuals by analyzing the movement of the retinal tissue at two locations, using this simple, low-cost interferometric device. Our pilot study indicates that spectral analysis of the fundus pulsation has potential for the study of ocular biomechanical and vascular properties, as well as for the study of ocular disease.

  19. Analysis of pulsatile retinal movements by spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry: influence of age and glaucoma on the pulse wave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyne Dion

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that ocular hemodynamics and eye tissue biomechanical properties play an important role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Nevertheless, better, non-invasive methods to assess these characteristics in vivo are essential for a thorough understanding of degenerative mechanisms. Here, we propose to measure ocular tissue movements induced by cardiac pulsations and study the ocular pulse waveform as an indicator of tissue compliance. Using a novel, low-cost and non-invasive device based on spectral-domain low coherence interferometry (SD-LCI, we demonstrate the potential of this technique to differentiate ocular hemodynamic and biomechanical properties. We measured the axial movement of the retina driven by the pulsatile ocular blood flow in 11 young healthy individuals, 12 older healthy individuals and 15 older treated glaucoma patients using our custom-made SD-OCT apparatus. The cardiac pulse was simultaneously measured through the use of an oximeter to allow comparison. Spectral components up to the second harmonic were obtained and analyzed. For the different cohorts, we computed a few parameters that characterize the three groups of individuals by analyzing the movement of the retinal tissue at two locations, using this simple, low-cost interferometric device. Our pilot study indicates that spectral analysis of the fundus pulsation has potential for the study of ocular biomechanical and vascular properties, as well as for the study of ocular disease.

  20. Pulse detection by gated synchronous demodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Efthymiou, Spyros; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous demodulation (SD) is the signal recovery method of choice when the input envelope signal is modulated by either a pure sine wave or a square wave. SD is less efficient for pulsed periodic signals with a low duty factor. For the latter signals, we introduce data processing that applies gating on a part of the signal period to achieve optimum conditions for recovering the pulse amplitude by quadrature SD. The proposed method is evaluated for signal-to-noise performance against Boxca...

  1. The Effect of Combined Pulsed Wave Low-Level Laser Therapy and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium on Open Skin Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouriran, Ramin; Piryaei, Abbas; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Zandpazandi, Sara; Hendudari, Farzane; Amini, Abdollah; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The nobility of this scientific study was to investigate the combined effects of pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PWLLLT) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (hBM-MSC-CM) on the biomechanical parameters of wounds in an experimental model for diabetes mellitus (DM). PWLLLT exhibited biostimulatory effects on wounds in diabetic animals. Secretomes can be administered into wounds by the use of BM-MSC-CM. Type I DM was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ). Two wounds were made on proximal and distal parts in the dorsal region of each rat. Rats were divided into four groups. The first group was considered as the control group. The second group received hBM-MSC-CM. The third group received PWLLLT. The fourth group received hBM-MSC-CM+LASER. hBM-MSC-CM was administrated twice intraperitoneally. The proximal wounds in the third and fourth groups were treated with a pulsed laser by 890 nm wavelength, 80 Hz frequency, and 0.2 J/cm(2) energy densities. On the 15th day, a standard sample from each healing wound was submitted for biomechanical examination. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance test. PWLLLT and hBM-MSC-CM, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomechanical parameters within the healing wounds. However, PWLLLT was statistically more effective compared with the hBM-MSC-CM. In the third and fourth groups, the numbers of wound closures were significantly enhanced in proximal part, contrary to the control ones. It was magnificently attained that PWLLLT significantly accelerated the wound healing process in the experimental model for STZ-induced type I DM rats.

  2. Pulse Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people need more oxygen when asleep than when awake. Some need more oxygen with activity than when ... oxygen saturation levels (below 80%) or with very dark skin. When should I use a pulse oximeter? ...

  3. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  4. Gauge-invariant theory of quasiparticle and condensate dynamics in response to terahertz optical pulses in superconducting semiconductor quantum wells. I. s -wave superconductivity in the weak spin-orbit coupling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the quasiparticle and condensate dynamics in response to the terahertz optical pulses in the weak spin-orbit-coupled s -wave superconducting semiconductor quantum wells by using the gauge-invariant optical Bloch equations in the quasiparticle approximation. Specifically, in the Bloch equations, not only can the microscopic description for the quasiparticle dynamics be realized, but also the dynamics of the condensate is included, with the superfluid velocity and the effective chemical potential naturally incorporated. We reveal that the superfluid velocity itself can contribute to the pump of quasiparticles (pump effect), with its rate of change acting as the drive field to drive the quasiparticles (drive effect). We find that the oscillations of the Higgs mode with twice the frequency of the optical field are contributed dominantly by the drive effect but not the pump effect as long as the driven superconducting momentum is less than the Fermi momentum. This is in contrast to the conclusion from the Liouville or Bloch equations in the literature, in which the drive effect on the anomalous correlation is overlooked with only the pump effect considered. Furthermore, in the gauge-invariant optical Bloch equations, the charge neutrality condition is consistently considered based on the two-component model for the charge, in which the charge imbalance of quasiparticles can cause the fluctuation of the effective chemical potential for the condensate. It is predicted that during the optical process, the quasiparticle charge imbalance can be induced by both the pump and drive effects, leading to the fluctuation of the chemical potential. This fluctuation of the chemical potential is further demonstrated to directly lead to a relaxation channel for the charge imbalance even with the elastic scattering due to impurities. This is very different from the previous understanding that in the isotropic s -wave superconductivity, the impurity scattering cannot cause

  5. Pulsed and continuous wave electron nuclear double resonance patterns of aquo protons coordinated in frozen solution to high spin MN2 +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoling; Bernardo, Marcelino; Thomann, Hans; Scholes, Charles P.

    1993-04-01

    For the water protons that coordinate to Mn2+, the frozen solution ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance) spectra are made complex by the anisotropic electron-proton hyperfine interaction and by multiple contributions of the electron spin 5/2 manifold. A spin 5/2 Mn2+ ion having magnetic quantum numbers Ms=±1/2, ±3/2, ±5/2 and small zero-field splittings has overlapping electron spin EPR transitions. Proton hyperfine couplings to each of these electron spin states have yielded overlapping ENDOR patterns whose interpretation is nontrivial, even in so simple a system as Mn2+ ion having hexaaquo coordination. We have experimentally obtained and theoretically explained these proton ENDOR patterns and in so doing have laid the foundation for interpreting and sorting out frozen solution ENDOR patterns in more complex (enzyme) environments. Pulsed and cw ENDOR experiments showed features of metal-coordinated water protons occurring not only within a few MHz of the free proton frequency (as will happen for an electron spin 1/2 system) but extending over a range of up to 35 MHz. The EPR line of the Mn2+ S=5/2 manifold was broadened by zero-field splitting for hundreds of Gauss away from g=2.00, and the relative intensity of different ENDOR features reflected couplings to differing Ms spin states at varying fields across this EPR line. An expression was derived to show the dependence of proton ENDOR frequencies on the electron spin quantum number, Ms, upon the principal values of the intrinsic proton hyperfine tensor, upon the direction of the magnetic field, and upon the free proton frequency. This expression provided the starting point for powder simulations of the overall ENDOR pattern. These ENDOR powder pattern simulations were not elementary extensions of first-order theory as often applied to single-crystallike ENDOR spectra obtained at frozen solution EPR extrema. These simulations addressed the interpretation and the conditions for obtaining consistent

  6. Stimulated angiogenesis for fracture healing augmented by low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration in a rat model-evaluation of pulsed-wave doppler, 3-D power Doppler ultrasonography and micro-CT microangiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Sun, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Chu, Winnie Chiu-Wing; Leung, Andraay Hon-Chi; Qin, Ling; Wei, Fang-Yuan; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) treatment on angiogenesis and blood flow for enhancement of fracture healing. Nine-month-old ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (Sham) rats received closed fractures creation at the femora and were randomized into LMHFV treatment (Sham-V, OVX-V) or control (Sham-C, OVX-C) groups. Pulsed-wave Doppler indicated an increase in blood flow velocity of the femoral artery at weeks 2 (OVX pair: p = 0.030) and 4 (OVX pair: p = 0.012; Sham pair: p = 0.020) post-treatment. Significantly enhanced vascular volume (VV) at the fracture site in the vibration groups was demonstrated by 3-D high-frequency power Doppler at week 2 (Sham pair: p = 0.021) and micro-computed tomography (microCT) microangiography at weeks 2 (OVX pair: p = 0.009) and 4 (OVX pair: p = 0.034), which echoed the osteogenesis findings by radiographic and microCT analysis. VV in the OVX groups was inferior to the Sham groups. However, OVX-V showed higher percentages of angiogenic enhancement than Sham-V. Despite impaired neo-angiogenesis in osteoporotic fractures, LMHFV could increase blood flow and angiogenesis in both normal and osteoporotic fractures, thus enhancing fracture healing. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of folded pulse forming line operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, M. T.; Watrous, J.; Parker, J. V.; Cavazos, T.; Slenes, K.; Heidger, S.; Brown, D.; Wilson, D.

    2014-09-01

    A compact pulse forming line (CPFL) concept based on a folded transmission line and high-breakdown strength dielectric was explored through an effort combining proof-of-principle experiments with electromagnetic modeling. A small-scale folded CPFL was fabricated using surface-mount ceramic multilayer capacitors. The line consisted of 150 capacitors close-packed in parallel and delivered a 300 ns flat-top pulse. The concept was carried to a 10 kV class device using a polymer-ceramic nanocomposite dielectric with a permittivity of 37.6. The line was designed for a 161 ns FWHM length pulse into a matched load. The line delivered a 110 ns FWHM pulse, and the pulse peak amplitude exceeded the matched load ideal. Transient electromagnetic analysis using the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC was conducted to examine the nature of the unexpected pulse shortening and distortion. Two-dimensional analysis failed to capture the anomalous behavior. Three-dimensional analysis replicated the pulse shape and revealed that the bends were largely responsible for the pulse shortening. The bends not only create the expected reflection of the incident TEM wave but also produce a non-zero component of the Poynting vector perpendicular to the propagation direction of the dominant electromagnetic wave, resulting in power flow largely external to the PFL. This analysis explains both the pulse shortening and the amplitude of the pulse.

  8. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  9. Highly Supersonic Ion Pulses in a Collisionless Magnetized Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Schrittwieser, R.

    1982-01-01

    The initial transient response of a collisionless plasma to a high positive voltage step is investigated. Four different pulses are observed. An electron plasma wave pulse is followed by an ion burst. The latter is overtaken and absorbed by a highly supersonic ion pulse. Thereafter, an ion...

  10. Group velocity and pulse lengthening of mismatched laser pulses in plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-07

    Analytic solutions are presented to the non-paraxial wave equation describing an ultra-short, low-power, laser pulse propagating in aplasma channel. Expressions for the laser pulse centroid motion and laser group velocity are derived, valid for matched and mismatchedpropagation in a parabolic plasma channel, as well as in vacuum, for an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. The group velocity of amismatched laser pulse, for which the laser spot size is strongly oscillating, is found to be independent of propagation distance andsignificantly less than that of a matched pulse. Laser pulse lengthening of a mismatched pulse owing to laser mode slippage isexamined and found to dominate over that due to dispersive pulse spreading for sufficiently long pulses. Analytic results are shown tobe in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the full Maxwell equations coupled to the plasma response. Implications for plasmachannel diagnostics are discussed.

  11. A Study of New Pulse Auscultation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yun Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine’s pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called “cun”, “guan” and “chi” of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g, searching (125 g and pressing (150 g actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners’ objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  12. Two-Dimensional Pulse Propagation without Anomalous Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M.; Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J.; Sarkar, Sarben; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2017-09-01

    Anomalous dispersion is a surprising phenomenon associated with wave propagation in an even number of space dimensions. In particular, wave pulses propagating in two-dimensional space change shape and develop a tail even in the absence of a dispersive medium. We show mathematically that this dispersion can be eliminated by considering a modified wave equation with two geometric spatial dimensions and, unconventionally, two timelike dimensions. Experimentally, such a wave equation describes pulse propagation in an optical or acoustic medium with hyperbolic dispersion, leading to a fundamental understanding and new approaches to ultrashort pulse shaping in nanostructured metamaterials.

  13. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2012-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  14. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2013-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  15. The resonant multi-pulse ionization injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, Paolo; De Nicola, Sergio; Labate, Luca; Londrillo, Pasquale; Fedele, Renato; Terzani, Davide; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2017-10-01

    The production of high-quality electron bunches in Laser Wake Field Acceleration relies on the possibility to inject ultra-low emittance bunches in the plasma wave. In this paper, we present a new bunch injection scheme in which electrons extracted by ionization are trapped by a large-amplitude plasma wave driven by a train of resonant ultrashort pulses. In the Resonant Multi-Pulse Ionization injection scheme, the main portion of a single ultrashort (e.g., Ti:Sa) laser system pulse is temporally shaped as a sequence of resonant sub-pulses, while a minor portion acts as an ionizing pulse. Simulations show that high-quality electron bunches with normalized emittance as low as 0.08 mm × mrad and 0.65% energy spread can be obtained with a single present-day 100TW-class Ti:Sa laser system.

  16. Tango waves in a bidomain model of fertilization calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Xian

    2003-12-01

    Fertilization of an egg cell is marked by one or several Ca 2+ waves that travel across the intra-cellular space, called fertilization Ca 2+ waves. Patterns of Ca 2+ waves observed in mature or immature oocytes include traveling fronts and pulses as well as concentric and spiral waves. These patterns have been studied in other excitable media in physical, chemical, and biological systems. Here, we report the discovery of a new wave phenomenon in the numerical study of a bidomain model of fertilization Ca 2+ waves. This wave is a front that propagates in a back-and-forth manner that resembles the movement of tango dancers, thus is called a tango wave. When the medium is excitable, a forward-moving tango wave can generate traveling pulses that propagate down the space without reversal. The study shows that the occurrence of tango waves is related to spatial inhomogeneity in the local dynamics. This is tested and confirmed by simulating similar waves in a medium with stationary spatial inhomogeneity. Similar waves are also obtained in a FitzHugh-Nagumo system with a linear spatial ramp. In both the bidomain model of Ca 2+ waves and the FitzHugh-Nagumo system, the front is stable when the slope of a linear ramp is large. As the slope decreases beyond a critical value, front oscillations occur. The study shows that tango waves facilitate the dispersion of localized Ca 2+. Key features of the bidomain model underlying the occurrence of tango waves are revealed. These features are commonly found in egg cells of a variety of species. Thus, we predict that tango waves can occur in real egg cells provided that a slowly varying inhomogeneity does occur following the sperm entry. The observation of tango wave-like waves in nemertean worm and ascidian eggs seems to support such a prediction.

  17. Wave propagation and impact in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Anisotropic waves in composites are considered, taking into account wave speeds, wave surfaces, flexural waves in orthotropic plates, surface waves, edge waves in plates, and waves in coupled composite plates. Aspects of dispersion in composites are discussed, giving attention to pulse propagation and dispersion, dispersion in rods and plates, dispersion in a layered composite, combined material and structural dispersion, continuum theories for composites, and variational methods for periodic composites. The characteristics of attenuation and scattering processes are examined and a description is given of shock waves and impact problems in composites. A number of experiments are also reported.

  18. Electromagnetic wave dynamics in matter-wave superradiant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, L; Payne, M G; Hagley, E W

    2010-02-05

    We present a small-signal wave propagation theory on matter-wave superradiant scattering. We show, in a longitudinally excited condensate, that the backward-propagating, superradiantly generated optical field propagates with ultraslow group velocity and that the small-signal gain profile has a Bragg resonance. We further show a unidirectional suppression of optical superradiant scattering, and explain why matter-wave superradiance can occur only when the pump laser is red detuned. This is the first analytical theory on field propagation in matter-wave superradiance that can explain all matter-wave superradiance experiments to date that used a single-frequency, long-pulse, red-detuned laser.

  19. Travelling waves in models of neural tissue: from localised structures to periodic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; Coombes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We consider travelling waves (fronts, pulses and periodics) in spatially extended one dimensional neural field models. We demonstrate for an excitatory field with linear adaptation that, in addition to an expected stable pulse solution, a stable anti-pulse can exist. Varying the adaptation strength

  20. The Attenuation of Torsional Strain Wave in a PMMA Rod

    OpenAIRE

    田辺, 裕治; 前川, 一郎; 半田, 晋一; 原, 利昭; Tanabe, Yuji; Maekawa, Ichiro; Handa, Shinichi; Hara, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    In order to clarify the strain attenuation during shear wave propagation, impact torsion experiments are carried out using a PMMA rod specimen. The strain pulses measured by strain gages are complicated due to the superposition of many reflected and transmitted waves from the supported end of the specimen. To obtain data from such pulses for determining a viscoelastic model, a method which modifies the pulse form is developed taking into account wave propagation behavior in the experimental s...