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Sample records for brachial pressure index

  1. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  2. Association between different measurements of blood pressure variability by ABP monitoring and ankle-brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittke, Estefânia; Fuchs, Sandra C; Fuchs, Flávio D; Moreira, Leila B; Ferlin, Elton; Cichelero, Fábio T; Moreira, Carolina M; Neyeloff, Jeruza; Moreira, Marina B; Gus, Miguel

    2010-11-05

    Blood pressure (BP) variability has been associated with cardiovascular outcomes, but there is no consensus about the more effective method to measure it by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). We evaluated the association between three different methods to estimate BP variability by ABPM and the ankle brachial index (ABI). In a cross-sectional study of patients with hypertension, BP variability was estimated by the time rate index (the first derivative of SBP over time), standard deviation (SD) of 24-hour SBP; and coefficient of variability of 24-hour SBP. ABI was measured with a doppler probe. The sample included 425 patients with a mean age of 57 ± 12 years, being 69.2% women, 26.1% current smokers and 22.1% diabetics. Abnormal ABI (≤ 0.90 or ≥ 1.40) was present in 58 patients. The time rate index was 0.516 ± 0.146 mmHg/min in patients with abnormal ABI versus 0.476 ± 0.124 mmHg/min in patients with normal ABI (P = 0.007). In a logistic regression model the time rate index was associated with ABI, regardless of age (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 1.1- 42.1; P = 0.04). In a multiple linear regression model, adjusting for age, SBP and diabetes, the time rate index was strongly associated with ABI (P < 0.01). None of the other indexes of BP variability were associated with ABI in univariate and multivariate analyses. Time rate index is a sensible method to measure BP variability by ABPM. Its performance for risk stratification of patients with hypertension should be explored in longitudinal studies.

  3. Association between different measurements of blood pressure variability by ABP monitoring and ankle-brachial index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Leila B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood pressure (BP variability has been associated with cardiovascular outcomes, but there is no consensus about the more effective method to measure it by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM. We evaluated the association between three different methods to estimate BP variability by ABPM and the ankle brachial index (ABI. Methods and Results In a cross-sectional study of patients with hypertension, BP variability was estimated by the time rate index (the first derivative of SBP over time, standard deviation (SD of 24-hour SBP; and coefficient of variability of 24-hour SBP. ABI was measured with a doppler probe. The sample included 425 patients with a mean age of 57 ± 12 years, being 69.2% women, 26.1% current smokers and 22.1% diabetics. Abnormal ABI (≤ 0.90 or ≥ 1.40 was present in 58 patients. The time rate index was 0.516 ± 0.146 mmHg/min in patients with abnormal ABI versus 0.476 ± 0.124 mmHg/min in patients with normal ABI (P = 0.007. In a logistic regression model the time rate index was associated with ABI, regardless of age (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 1.1- 42.1; P = 0.04. In a multiple linear regression model, adjusting for age, SBP and diabetes, the time rate index was strongly associated with ABI (P Conclusion Time rate index is a sensible method to measure BP variability by ABPM. Its performance for risk stratification of patients with hypertension should be explored in longitudinal studies.

  4. Effects of the ankle-brachial blood pressure index and skin perfusion pressure on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Yumi; Otsubo, Shigeru; Kimata, Naoki; Takano, Mari; Abe, Takayuki; Okajima, Tomoki; Miwa, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku; Akiba, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Clinically, the ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) and skin perfusion pressure (SPP) are used to screen for subclinical peripheral artery disease. However, the association between the SPP and mortality in hemodialysis patients has not been previously reported. We investigated these factors and compared the ABI and SPP in patients receiving hemodialysis. A total of 102 patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled in this study. The ABI was determined using an ABI-form (Colin, Japan). The SPP was measured using a SensiLase(TM) PAD3000 (Kaneka, Osaka, Japan). The mean follow-up period was 3.2 ± 1.4 years. A multivariate Cox analysis identified a low ABI (p=0.019) and a low SPP (p=0.047) as being independent predictors of mortality. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the ABI revealed a cutoff point of 1.1 and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79, with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 62%. A ROC analysis of the SPP revealed a cutoff point of 54.0 mmHg and an AUC of 0.71, with a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 84%. Both low ABI and SPP values were found to be independent risk factors for mortality among hemodialysis patients. The cutoff point for ABI as a predictor of mortality was 1.1, while that for SPP was 54.0 mmHg.

  5. The variability of ankle-arm blood pressure difference and ankle-brachial index in treated hypertensive patients.

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    Cao, Kaiwu; Xu, Jinsong; Sun, Hanjun; Li, Ping; Li, Juxiang; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Su, Hai

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ankle-arm blood pressure (BP) difference (An-a) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) are consistent in treated hypertensive patients with obvious BP variation. This study enrolled 414 hypertensive patients (200 males; mean age, 61.3 ± 13.3 years) admitted to our hospital. BP of four limbs was simultaneously measured using four automatic BP measurement devices on the day of admission, and three and six day after admission. The An-a differences on systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean artery pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) in both sides were calculated, respectively. The relative decrease amplitude (RDA) of BP was calculated using the formula: RDA = (BP1 - BPn)/BP1. The ABI of the right side was calculated. From the first to the third measurement, arm SBP and DBP levels of both arms significantly decreased (right arm: SBP: 163.7 ± 18.4, 147.7 ± 15.3 vs. 135.4 ± 11.7 mm Hg; P differences on SBP, DBP, PP, and MAP are generally consistent, but sABI is associated with underlying SBP levels.

  6. Reliability of Doppler and stethoscope methods of determining systolic blood pressures: considerations for calculating an ankle-brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesbro, Steven B; Asongwed, Elmira T; Brown, Jamesha; John, Emmanuel B

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) identify the interrater and intrarater reliability of systolic blood pressures using a stethoscope and Doppler to determine an ankle-brachial index (ABI), and (2) to determine the correlation between the 2 methods. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States, and nearly half of those with this disease are asymptomatic. Early detection and prompt treatment of PAD will improve health outcomes. It is important that clinicians perform tests that determine the presence of PAD. Two individual raters trained in ABI procedure measured the systolic blood pressures of 20 individuals' upper and lower extremities. Standard ABI measurement protocols were observed. Raters individually recorded the systolic blood pressures of each extremity using a stethoscope and a Doppler, for a total of 640 independent measures. Interrater reliability of Doppler measurements to determine SBP at the ankle was very strong (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.93-0.99) compared to moderate to strong reliability using a stethoscope (ICC, 0.64-0.87). Agreement between the 2 devices to determine SBP was moderate to very weak (ICC, 0.13-0.61). Comparisons of the use of Doppler and stethoscope to determine ABI showed weak to very weak intrarater correlation (ICC, 0.17-0.35). Linear regression analysis of the 2 methods to determine ABI showed positive but weak to very weak correlations (r2 = .013, P = .184). A Doppler ultrasound is recommended over a stethoscope for accuracy in systolic pressure readings for ABI measurements.

  7. Clinical significance of inter-arm pressure difference and ankle-brachial pressure index in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yuko; Chikamori, Taishiro; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Nagao, Tadashi; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Although measuring blood pressure at the bilateral brachia is common in medical practice, its clinical significance in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been fully clarified. The method of this study was to define the significance of inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference in patients with suspected CAD, and to assess the relationship between inter-arm pressure difference and CAD, simultaneous brachial and ankle blood pressure measurements and stress myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed in 386 consecutive patients with suspected CAD, excluding those with previous myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization. Subclavian artery stenosis, defined as ≥15 mmHg inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference, was found in 27 patients (7%). Age (65±12 vs 65±11 years), male sex (21/27 vs 244/359), prevalence of hypertension (63% vs 56%), hypercholesterolemia (63% vs 62%), diabetes mellitus (33% vs 38%), cigarette smoking (44% vs 41%) and family history of CAD (15% vs 12%) were similar between patients with subclavian artery stenosis and those without. The incidence of decreased ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) was higher (37% vs 12%, p=0.001), and percentage ischemic myocardium as assessed by SPECT was greater (9.0±8.5% vs 5.6±6.6%, p=0.05) in patients with subclavian artery stenosis than in those without. Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between inter-arm pressure difference and percentage ischemic myocardium (r=0.13; p=0.01), and ABI (r=-0.26, p<0.0001). Among 386 patients, 283 underwent coronary angiography, and 63% of those who had inter-arm blood pressure difference had CAD. Furthermore, 83% of those CAD patients had multi-vessel CAD, which is regarded as a high-risk subset for subsequent cardiac events. Inter-arm pressure difference is often found in patients with suspected CAD, and is associated with significant CAD and peripheral artery disease. Thus, inter

  8. Heel blood flow during loading and off-loading in bedridden older adults with low and normal ankle-brachial pressure index: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Nami; Sugama, Junko; Okuwa, Mayumi; Inagaki, Misako; Matsuo, Junko; Nakatani, Tosio; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in heel blood flow during loading and off-loading in bedridden adults older than 65 years. The patients were divided into three groups based on ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) and transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO₂): (1) patients with an ABI ≥ 0.8 (Group A); (2) patients with an ABI < 0.8 and heel tcPO₂ ≥ 10 mmHg (Group B); and (3) patients with an ABI < 0.8 and heel tcPO₂ < 10 mmHg (Group C). Heel blood flow was monitored using tcPO₂ sensors. Data were collected with the heel (1) suspended above the bed surface (preload), (2) on the bed surface for 30 min (loading), and (3) again suspended above the bed surface for 60 min (off-loading). Heel blood flow during off-loading was assessed using three parameters: oxygen recovery index (ORI), total tcPO₂ for the first 10 min, and change in tcPO₂ after 60 min of off-loading. ORI in Group C (n = 8) was significantly shorter than in Groups A (n = 22) and B (n = 15). Total tcPO₂ for the first 10 min of off-loading in Group C was significantly less than that in Groups A and B. Change in tcPO₂ after 60 min of off-loading in Group C was less than in Group A. Based on these findings, additional preventive care against heel blood flow decrease in older adults with an ABI < 0.8 and heel tcPO₂ < 10 mmHg might be necessary after loading.

  9. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  10. [The ankle brachial index in type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumerová, B; Rosolová, H; Ferda, J; Sifalda, P; Sípová, I; Sefrna, F

    2011-03-01

    The ankle brachial index (ABI), i.e. the ratio of systolic blood pressure (SBP) on the ankle and on the arm, is diagnostic for peripheral occlusive artery disease and a marker of cardiovascular (CV) risk. The association between the low ABI 101) or according to the global CV Risk Score > or = 5% (SCORE). Wilcoxon's unpaired test, chi2 test, multiple logistic regression. The ABI homocystein (17.2 +/- 7.1 micromol/L) (p or = 0.9 (age 66 +/- 9 years, CAC 234 +/- 458, total cholesterol 5.0 +/- 0.9, total homocystein 14.3 +/- 78). Many CV risk factors correlated positively with the low ABI homocystein and CAC (p < 0.05). Low ABI < 0.9 predicted ischemic stroke in subjects with T2DM and manifest CV diseases in the further 3 years. There was no correlation between the ABI and the ultrasensitive C-reactive protein. Low ABI < 0.9 was in a strong association with the CV risk. The ABI measurement is a simple, noninvasive, time-nonconsuming and inexpensive method for subclinical atherosclerosis detection; the ABI can supply standard methods for the CV risk prediction.

  11. Pitfalls in the ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ato D

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dai Ato Gakujutsu Shien Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Background: The ankle-brachial index (ABI and pulse wave velocity (PWV are indices of atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. The Japan-made measuring devices of those indices have spread widely because of their convenience and the significance of the parameters. However, studies that comprehensively discuss the various pitfalls in using these indices are not available.Methods: This study presents several representative pitfalls in using the ABI and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV by showing the result sheets of the device, “the Vascular Profiler”. Furthermore, some considerations when utilizing these indices in the future are also discussed.Results: Several diseases such as arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO, arterial calcification in the lower limb, arterial stenosis in the right upper-limb, aortic valve diseases, arterial stenosis in the upper-limb of the contralateral side of the hemodialysis access, are the representative pitfalls when evaluating ABI and baPWV. Moreover, a measurement error is found to actually exist. Furthermore, same phenomena are considered most likely to occur when using other similar indices and devices.Conclusion: The ABI and baPWV are the useful and significant biomarkers. Nevertheless, caution is sometimes necessary when interpreting them. Moreover, rigorous patient exclusion criteria should be considered when using those indices in the severely conditioned patient population. And the results of this study can be applied to enhance the literacy using other indices, such as the cardio-ankle vascular index and other similar devices. Keywords: ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, peripheral arterial disease, aortic valve disease, hemodialysis

  12. Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes: results from the Action for Health in Diabetes movement and memory study.

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    Espeland, Mark A; Beavers, Kristen M; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Johnson, Karen C; Hughes, Timothy M; Baker, Laura D; Jakicic, John; Korytkowski, Mary; Miller, Marsha; Bray, George A

    2015-10-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and interartery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The ABI and maximum interartery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered 4 to 5 years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p = 0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p ≤ 0.05), processing speed (both p ≤ 0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p cognitive function 4-5 years later. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines...

  14. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines...

  15. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Distributions of the Ankle-Brachial Index among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaruddoza Doza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of present study is to observe the association between the levels of ankle-brachial index (ABI and cardiovascular risk factors among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in north India. A cross-sectional study was carried out at a centre for heart and diabetic clinic in the state of Punjab on 1121 subjects (671 males and 450 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. History of symptoms related to cardiovascular diseases was noted, and blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Ankle-brachial index (ABI was measured using ultrasonic Doppler flow detector. Subjects with ABI ≤0.9 and ≥1.30 were classified as having low and high ABI, respectively. Females had a higher BMI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (<0.001. Whereas, males had higher diastolic blood pressure and duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The differences of systolic blood pressure and ankle-brachial index were not found significant between the sexes. The prevalence of low ABI (<0.9 was 4.47% in men and 4.67% in women and high ABI (≥1.30 was prevalent in 14% of men and 10.45% of women. Age, BMI, baPWV, and blood pressures were significantly associated with ABI value in both sexes. The results suggested that the ABI might be used as a strong indicator for cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  16. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  17. Models of brachial to finger pulse wave distortion and pressure decrement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gizdulich, P.; Prentza, A.; Wesseling, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To model the pulse wave distortion and pressure decrement occurring between brachial and finger arteries. Distortion reversion and decrement correction were also our aims. Methods: Brachial artery pressure was recorded intra-arterially and finger pressure was recorded non-invasively by

  18. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

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    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  19. Ankle-brachial index by automated method and renal function

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    Ricardo Pereira Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The Ankle-brachial index (ABI is a non-invasive method used for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD. Aims To determine the clinical features of patients submitted to ABI measurement by automatic method. To investigate association between ABI and renal function. Methods The present is a cross-sectional study. The study was performed in a private clinic in the city of Fortaleza (Ce- Brazil. For ABI analysis, we utilized automatic methodology using a Microlife device. Data collection took place from March 2012 to January 2016. During this period, ABI was measured in 375 patients aged >50 years, who had a diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes or vascular disease. Results Of the 375 patients, 18 were categorized as having abnormal ABI (4.8 per cent and 357 were normal ABI (95.2 per cent. Patients with abnormal ABI showed older mean age when compared to patients with normal ABI. Among patients with normal renal function, only 0.95 per cent showed abnormal ABI; among patients with abnormal renal function, 6 per cent showed abnormal ABI. Conclusion 1 No differences were observed when comparing the groups regarding gender or the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia or CAD. 2 Group with abnormal ABI had renal function greater impairment.

  20. Brachial index does not reflect upper extremity functionality following surgery for vascular trauma

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    Erdal Simsek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vascular injuries to the upper extremities requiring surgical repair are common after accidents. However, neither postoperative functionality nor hemodynamic status of the extremity are routinely described. We evaluated the postoperative functional and hemodynamic status of patients with vascular traumas in the upper extremities. METHODS: 26 patients who suffered penetrating vascular traumas in the upper extremities from November 2008 to December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. Data on first approach, surgical technique employed and early postoperative outcomes were recorded. Further data on the post-discharge period, including clinical functional status of the arm, Doppler ultrasonography and brachial-brachial index were also evaluated. RESULTS: Average follow up was 33.5±10.8 months. Right (1.05±0.09 and left (1.04±0.08 brachial indexes were measured during follow up,. Doppler ultrasonography showed arterial occlusion in 4 patients (15%. Near-normal brachial-brachial indexes was observed in all four of these patients with occlusion of one of the upper extremity arteries, even though they exhibited limited arm function for daily work. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the postoperative outcomes of this small series of patients with penetrating vascular traumas in the upper extremity revealed that 15% of them suffered occlusion of one artery of the upper extremity. Artery occlusion did not correlate with brachial-brachial Doppler index, probably due to rich collateral circulation, but occlusion was associated with an extremity that was dysfunctional for the purposes of daily work. The result of the brachial-brachial index does not therefore correlate with functionality.

  1. Aortic-Brachial Pulse Wave Velocity Ratio: A Measure of Arterial Stiffness Gradient Not Affected by Mean Arterial Pressure.

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    Fortier, Catherine; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2018-03-01

    Aortic stiffness, measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), is used for the prediction of cardiovascular risk. This mini-review describes the nonlinear relationship between cf-PWV and operational blood pressure, presents the proposed methods to adjust for this relationship, and discusses a potential place for aortic-brachial PWV ratio (a measure of arterial stiffness gradient) as a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular aging. PWV is inherently dependent on the operational blood pressure. In cross-sectional studies, PWV adjustment for mean arterial pressure (MAP) is preferred, but still remains a nonoptimal approach, as the relationship between PWV and blood pressure is nonlinear and varies considerably among individuals due to heterogeneity in genetic background, vascular tone, and vascular remodeling. Extrapolations from the blood pressure-independent stiffness parameter β (β 0 ) have led to the creation of stiffness index β, which can be used for local stiffness. A similar approach has been used for cardio-ankle PWV to generate a blood pressure-independent cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). It was recently demonstrated that stiffness index β and CAVI remain slightly blood pressure-dependent, and a more appropriate formula has been proposed to make the proper adjustments. On the other hand, the negative impact of aortic stiffness on clinical outcomes is thought to be mediated through attenuation or reversal of the arterial stiffness gradient, which can also be influenced by a reduction in peripheral medium-sized muscular arteries in conditions that predispose to accelerate vascular aging. Arterial stiffness gradient, assessed by aortic-brachial PWV ratio, is emerging to be at least as good as cf-PWV for risk prediction, but has the advantage of not being affected by operating MAP. The negative impacts of aortic stiffness on clinical outcomes are proposed to be mediated through attenuation or reversal of arterial stiffness gradient

  2. Models of brachial to finger pulse wave distortion and pressure decrement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizdulich, P; Prentza, A; Wesseling, K H

    1997-03-01

    To model the pulse wave distortion and pressure decrement occurring between brachial and finger arteries. Distortion reversion and decrement correction were also our aims. Brachial artery pressure was recorded intra-arterially and finger pressure was recorded non-invasively by the Finapres technique in 53 adult human subjects. Mean pressure was subtracted from each pressure waveform and Fourier analysis applied to the pulsations. A distortion model was estimated for each subject and averaged over the group. The average inverse model was applied to the full finger pressure waveform. The pressure decrement was modelled by multiple regression on finger systolic and diastolic levels. Waveform distortion could be described by a general, frequency dependent model having a resonance at 7.3 Hz. The general inverse model has an anti-resonance at this frequency. It converts finger to brachial pulsations thereby reducing average waveform distortion from 9.7 (s.d. 3.2) mmHg per sample for the finger pulse to 3.7 (1.7) mmHg for the converted pulse. Systolic and diastolic level differences between finger and brachial arterial pressures changed from -4 (15) and -8 (11) to +8 (14) and +8 (12) mmHg, respectively, after inverse modelling, with pulse pressures correct on average. The pressure decrement model reduced both the mean and the standard deviation of systolic and diastolic level differences to 0 (13) and 0 (8) mmHg. Diastolic differences were thus reduced most. Brachial to finger pulse wave distortion due to wave reflection in arteries is almost identical in all subjects and can be modelled by a single resonance. The pressure decrement due to flow in arteries is greatest for high pulse pressures superimposed on low means.

  3. Transcutaneous oximetry compared to ankle-brachial-index measurement in the evaluation of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Wolf, Oliver; Weiss, Wolfgang; Berger, Hermann; Lutzenberger, Werner; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Heider, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate transcutaneous oximetry as parameter of the microcirculation is correlated to ankle-brachial-index as parameter of the macrocirculation after peripheral angioplasty procedures. Design: Prospective study. Materials and methods: 60 patients suffering from intermittent claudication were scheduled for angioplasty treatment. 45 patients were considered as eligible for angioplasty after angiographic evaluation, 15 patients underwent angiography only. Transcutaneous oximetry measurements were performed before the procedure, at the end of intervention, 24 h as well as 2 and 4 weeks after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Ankle-brachial-indices were obtained before intervention, 24 h as well as 2 and 4 weeks later. Results: Ankle-brachial-indices increased significantly at 24 h after angioplasty in patients being treated with angioplasty. Transcutaneous oximetry values dropped significantly at the end of the procedure and returned close to the baseline levels at 2 and 4 weeks after angioplasty. Ankle-brachial-indices and transcutaneous oximetry were positively correlated before (r = 0.3833, p = 0.009) as well as 4 weeks after angioplasty (r = 0.4596, p = 0.001). Immediately after radiological interventions, ankle-brachial-indices and transcutaneous oximetry are not positively correlated. In patients undergoing angiography only, transcutaneous oximetry levels drop significantly immediately after angiography and remain at decreased levels even at 4 weeks after intervention. Conclusion: Transcutaneous oximetry as parameter of the microcirculation is positively correlated with ankle-brachial-index as parameter of the macrocirculation before and at 4 weeks after angioplasty. Intraarterial angiography leads to a sudden decrease in skin microcirculation without affecting macrocirculation. As indicated by a lack of recovery in transcutaneous oximetry levels after 4 weeks, angiography alone results in a prolonged impaired microcirculation which may

  4. Relation of blood pressure and organ damage: comparison between feasible, noninvasive central hemodynamic measures and conventional brachial measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Annika S; Langén, Ville L; Kantola, Ilkka; Salomaa, Veikko; Juhanoja, Eeva P; Sivén, Sam S; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Niiranen, Teemu J

    2018-06-01

    The present cross-sectional study investigated whether central SBP and pulse pressure (PP) measured noninvasively with a novel cuff-based stand-alone monitor are more strongly associated with hypertensive end-organ damage than corresponding brachial measures. We investigated the cross-sectional association of central versus brachial SBP and PP with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index (LVMI), LV hypertrophy (LVH), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), and increased IMT (IMT ≥ 75th percentile) among 246 participants drawn from the general population (mean age 57.2 years, 55.3% women). All blood pressure (BP) measures were positively correlated with LVMI and IMT (P area under curve (AUC) for SBP: 0.74 versus 0.76, P = 0.16; AUC for PP: 0.75 versus 0.73, P = 0.35] and IMT (AUC for SBP: 0.61 versus 0.61, P = 0.67; AUC for PP: 0.63 versus 0.61, P = 0.29). Our findings suggest that central SBP and PP measured with a stand-alone noninvasive BP monitor do not improve diagnostic accuracy for end-organ damage over corresponding brachial measures.

  5. Inter-Arm Difference in Brachial Blood Pressure in the General Population of Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo Mi; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Shim, Jee-Seon; Lee, Myung Ha; Choi, Dong Phil

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the inter-arm difference in blood pressure of the general Korean population to identify associated factors. A total of 806 participants aged 30 to 64 years without history of major cardiovascular disease were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. They participated in the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Etiology Research Center cohort study that began in 2013. Brachial blood pressure was measured simultaneously for both arms using an automated oscillometric device equipped with two cuffs in seated position. After five minutes of rest, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured three times. The average of the three measurements was used for analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with inter-arm differences in blood pressure. The mean inter-arm difference was 3.3 mmHg for SBP and 2.0 mmHg for DBP. Large inter-arm differences (≥10 mmHg) in SBP and in DBP were found in 3.7% and 0.9% of subjects, respectively. A large inter-arm difference in SBP was associated with mean SBP (p=0.002) and C-reactive protein (p=0.014) while a large inter-arm different in DBP was only associated with body mass index (p=0.015). Sex, age, and anti-hypertensive medication use were not associated with differences in inter-arm blood pressure. Large inter-arm difference in blood pressure is only present in a small portion of healthy Korean adults. Our findings suggest that high SBP, chronic inflammation, and obesity may be associated with larger difference in inter-arm blood pressure.

  6. Severe aortic coarctation in an adult patient with normal brachial blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, Tina H; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Mølgaard, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The present case shows that a normal brachial blood pressure (BP) does not exclude severe coarctation and should be considered in normotensive patients presenting with a systolic murmur and/or unexplained severe left ventricular hypertrophy. Congenital coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing of t...... originating below the area of coarctation, explaining the equally low BP in both upper extremities....

  7. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX AND NUM-BER OF INVOLVED CORONARIES IN PATIENTS WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vascular disease which can involve peripheral and/or cardiac vessels. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible link between Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI and coronary vessel involvement in patients with stable angina.    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 on 120 individuals who were hospitalized in Chamran Heart Center and underwent coronary angiography. A questionnaire was completed to obtain demographic information, history of previous heart disease and smoking. Body height and weight, as blood pressure on hand and foot were measured. The patients underwent angiography and the extent of coronary involvement (> 75% was determined. After12-14-hour of fasting, blood sugar was obtained to measure total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. The Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABI was calculated as the ratio of the blood pressure in the ankles to the blood pressure in the arms. The data were analyzed by SPSS-15 using ANOVA, T-Student test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and discriminant analysis.    RESULTS: Samples were 46 women (38.33% and 74 men (61.67% with a mean age of 55.50 ± 10.49. Mean and SD of ABI in men and women was 0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.80 ± 0.19 with no significant difference (p = 0.012. The correlation between ABI and extent of coronary involvement was 0.47 (p < 0.0001. The group with lower ABI had the highest levels of coronary involvement (triple vessel, p < 0.05.     CONCLUSION: ABI had a significant relationship with the degree of coronary involvement and a significant predictive value. Therefore ABI seems to be a reliable indicator of high coronary risk.      Keywords: Ankle to brachial index, Coronary involvement, Stable angina.  

  8. Prognostic value of low and high ankle-brachial index in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Leonella; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Pirro, Matteo; Vaudo, Gaetano; Leli, Christian; Colella, Renato; Innocente, Salvatore; Ciuffetti, Giovanni; Mannarino, Elmo

    2012-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is frequently underdiagnosed in the clinical practice, leading to a lack of opportunity to detect subjects at a high risk for cardiovascular (CV) death. The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) represents a noninvasive, objective tool to diagnose PAD and to predict adverse outcome. ABI was determined by means of Doppler velocimetry, in 707 patients, aged 50 years or older, consecutively hospitalized in an internal medicine ward, who were followed-up for at least 12 months in order to assess all-cause and CV mortality. Symptomatic PAD affected 8% of the population while the prevalence of PAD, defined as ABI 1.40) was found in 8% of the patients. After a mean follow-up period of 1.6 years, both low and high ABI were independently associated with CV mortality with a hazard ratio of 1.99 (p=0.016) for low and 2.13 (p=0.04) for high ABI, compared with normal ABI (0.90-1.40). High ABI also independently predicted all-cause mortality with a hazard ratio of 1.77 (p=0.04). ABI measurement reveals a large number of individuals with asymptomatic PAD among those hospitalized in an internal medicine department. An increased mortality was observed in patients with both low and high ABI. Hospital admission for any reason may serve as an opportunity to detect PAD and start appropriate preventive actions. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A pilot study of the relationship between Doppler-estimated carotid and brachial artery flow and cardiac index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, U; Glassford, N J; Eastwood, G M; Bellomo, R; Hilton, A K

    2015-10-01

    We measured carotid and brachial artery blood flow by Doppler ultrasound in 11 human volunteers, and related these to cardiac index and to each other. The median (IQR [range]) carotid arterial blood flow was 0.334 (0.223-0.381 [0.052-0.563]) l.min(-1) on the right and 0.315 (0.223-0.369 [0.061-0.690]) l.min(-1) on the left. The brachial arterial blood flow was 0.049 (0.033-0.062 [0.015-0.204]) l.min(-1) on the right and 0.039 (0.027-0.054 [0.011-0.116]) on the left. Cardiac index was 3.2 (2.8-3.5 [1.9-5.4]) l.min(-1) .m(-2) . There was a moderate to good correlation between right-and left-sided flows (brachial: ρ = 0.45; carotid: ρ = 0.567). Brachial and carotid flow had no or a negative correlation with cardiac index (right brachial: ρ = -0.145, left brachial: ρ = -0.349; right carotid: ρ = -0.376, left carotid: ρ = -0.285). In contrast to some previous studies, we found that Doppler-estimated peripheral arterial blood flows only show a weak correlation with cardiac index and cannot be used to provide non-invasive estimates of cardiac index in man. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Casein improves brachial and central aortic diastolic blood pressure in overweight adolescents: a randomised, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2013-01-01

    of water, skimmed milk, whey or casein for 12 weeks. The milk-based test drinks contained 35 g protein/l. The effects were compared with the water group and a pretest control group consisting of thirty-two of the adolescents followed 12 weeks before the start of the intervention. Outcomes were brachial...... and central aortic BP, pulse wave velocity and augmentation index, serum C-reactive protein and blood lipids. Brachial and central aortic diastolic BP (DBP) decreased by 2·7% (P= 0·036) and 2·6% (P = 0·048), respectively, within the casein group and the changes were significantly different from those...... stiffness or blood lipid concentrations. A high intake of casein improves DBP in overweight adolescents. Thus, casein may be beneficial for younger overweight subjects in terms of reducing the longterm risk of CVD. In contrast, whey protein seems to increase BP compared with drinking water; however, water...

  11. Central hemodynamics in risk assessment strategies: additive value over and above brachial blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Rinaldi, Elisa R; Zhang, Yi; Protogerou, Athanassios D; Safar, Michel E; Blacher, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Although the clinical relevance of brachial blood pressure (BP) measurement for cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification is nowadays widely accepted, this approach can nevertheless present several limitations. Pulse pressure (PP) amplification accounts for the notable increase in PP from central to peripheral arterial sites. Target organs are more greatly exposed to central hemodynamic changes than peripheral organs. The pathophysiological significance of local BP pulsatility, which has a role in the pathogenesis of target organ damage in both the macro- and the microcirculation, may therefore not be accurately captured by brachial BP as traditionally evaluated with cuff measurements. The predictive value of central systolic BP and PP over brachial BP for major clinical outcomes has been demonstrated in the general population, in elderly adults and in patients at high CV risk, irrespective of the invasive or non-invasive methods used to assess central BP. Aortic stiffness, timing and intensity of wave reflections, and cardiac performance appear as major factors influencing central PP. Great emphasis has been placed on the role of aortic stiffness, disturbed arterial wave reflections and their intercorrelation in the pathophysiological mechanisms of CV diseases as well as on their capacity to predict target organ damage and clinical events. Comorbidities and age-related changes, together with gender-related specificities of arterial and cardiac parameters, are known to affect the predictive ability of central hemodynamics on individual CV risk.

  12. Associations between ankle-brachial index and cognitive function: results from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). SETTING: Eight US academic ce...

  13. Ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity are risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes is increasing. While brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV and ankle-brachial index (ABI are known to be associated with ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, whether these measures predict the risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in diabetic patients remains unclear. 117 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study. According to the results of head magnetic resonance imaging, the patients were divided into a diabetes-only group (n = 55 and a diabetes and ischemic stroke group (n = 62. We then performed ABI and BaPWV examinations for all patients. Compared with the diabetes-only group, we found decreased ABI and increased BaPWV in the diabetes and ischemic stroke group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BaPWV and ABI were risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our findings indicate that decreased ABI and increased BaPWV are objective indicators of increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Índice tornozelo-braço em pacientes hemodialíticos Ankle-brachial index in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Torres Uchôa

    2012-12-01

    . The ankle-brachial index was calculated for each artery of the lower limb. It was considered normal ankle-brachial index from 0.9 to 1.3. RESULTS: We diagnosed peripheral arterial disease and poorly compressible arteries in 26.9 and 30.8% of hemodialysis patients and in 33 and 22.7% of the Control Group. In hemodialysis patients, we found abnormal ankle-brachial index in 75% of symptomatic patients (p=0.005, in 67.3% of men and 31% of women (p<0.005, in 78.6% of the elderly, 34.8% of young adults (p<0.01, and 76.9% of diabetics (p<0.005 versus nondiabetic. These patients had a higher prevalence of severe peripheral arterial disease than the Control Group. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal ankle-brachial index was very prevalent in the groups studied; however, hemodialysis patients had more severe changes, when compared to the Control Group. Diabetes mellitus, male gender, and advanced age were important risk factors for abnormal ankle-brachial index in hemodialysis patients. The ankle-brachial index was a good method of screening for the studied changes; therefore, we suggest the routine use in the management of hemodialysis patients.

  15. Cross-sectional study of the ankle-brachial index and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchowski, Paweł; Dereziński, Tadeusz; Migdalski, Arkadiusz; Woda, Łukasz; Wąsikowska, Beata; Jakubowski, Grzegorz; Jawień, Arkadiusz

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and cardiovascular (CV) events in the female population has been on the increase. To analyse the risk factors of a CV event and PAD in women and to assess the usefulness of the ankle-brachial index (ABI). Evaluation of selected parameters in a cohort of 365 women living in the same district. The following data were prospectively recorded: weight, height, waist size, hip circumference, smoking, the intima-media complex, ABI value, and laboratory results. PAD symptoms, CV events and neurological events were noted. ABI was analysed assuming pathology for values: ≤ 0.9 or ≤ 1.0. Age, plasma glucose level, atrial fibrillation, and nicotine addiction were correlated independently with CV disease and stroke (p < 0.001). The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, height, and systolic blood pressure were correlated independently with ABI values (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between the occurrence of a CV event in the past and the ABI, irrespective of the cut-off point for the reference value (p = NS). There is no evidence that stricter criteria for the assessment of ABI better represent the vascular status in the female population.

  16. Ankle-brachial index as indicator of chronic arterial insufficiency of the lower extremities and renal artery stenosis CT/DS angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, A.; Chervenkov, L.; Karadon, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim is to validate the measurements of ankle -brachial index (ABI), as part of routine examination algorithm in conducting CTA/DSA of the extremities in patients suffering from PAD. Correlations between ABI values and renal artery stenosis. The present study includes 200 patients (138 men and 62 women, aged between 60 and 75 years). 130 of them were examined by a computer- tomography angiography - 95 men and 32 women. 70 patients were examined by digital subtraction angiography - 50 men and 20 women. Measurements of ankle-brachial index (ABI) were performed on all patients by measuring the systolic blood pressure on both brachial arteries and determine the peak pressure in both aa. dorsalis pedis. Statistical data processing. There are no patients in the study with ABI values above 0.7 that have established renal artery stenosis. All patients with severe atherosclerotic changes have values of the ABI below 0.7, and those with the most severe changes below 0.5. This fully corresponds to global data showing that values below 0.9 ABI show mild engagement, below 0.7 average, and below 0.5 severe involvement. According to the results of this survey sensitivity of ABI for renal arteries below 0.7 equals 100% and its specificity = 67.5%. For values of ABI below 0.5: Sensitivity =100%; Specificity = 83.85%. By determining ABI values both symptomatic and asymptomatic form of a PAD can be diagnosed. the method is fast, non-invasive, inexpensive and applicable everywhere. No special preparation of the patient is needed. The method can be used not only to assess the degree of commitment of the vessels of the lower limbs, but also as an indicator for the state of renal arteries in those patients

  17. 24-hour aortic blood pressure variability showed a stronger association with carotid damage than 24-hour brachial blood pressure variability: The SAFAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shikai; Chi, Chen; Protogerou, Athanase D; Safar, Michel E; Blacher, Jacques; Argyris, Antonis A; Nasothimiou, Efthimia G; Sfikakis, Petros P; Papaioannou, Theodore G; Xu, Henry; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yawei

    2018-03-01

    We aim to compare 24-hour aortic blood pressure variability (BPV) with brachial BPV in relation to carotid damage as estimated by carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and cross-sectional area (CCSA). Four hundred and forty five individuals received brachial and aortic 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring with a validated device (Mobil-O-Graph). Systolic BPV was estimated by average real variability (ARV) and time-weighted standard deviation (wSD). In multiple logistic regression analysis, CIMT > 900 μm was significantly and independently associated with aortic ARV (OR = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.04-1.84), aortic wSD (OR = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.19-2.29) and brachial ARV (OR = 1.53; 95% CI: 1.07-2.18), but not with brachial wSD. CCSA > 90th percentile was significantly and independently associated with aortic ARV (OR = 1.50; 95% CI: 1.07-2.10) and wSD (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.12-2.56), but not with brachial BPVs. In receiver operator characteristics curve analysis, aortic wSD identified CCSA > 90th percentile better than brachial wSD (AUC: 0.73 vs 0.68, P < .01). In conclusion, aortic 24-hour systolic BPV showed a slightly stronger association with carotid damage than brachial BPV. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Outcome of patients with reduced ankle brachial index undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyborg, Matthias; Abdi-Tabari, Zila; Hoffmeier, Andreas; Engelbertz, Christiane; Lüders, Florian; Freisinger, Eva; Malyar, Nasser M; Martens, Sven; Reinecke, Holger

    2016-05-01

    In open heart surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass, perfusion of the lower extremities is markedly reduced which may induce critical ischaemia in patients with pre-existing peripheral artery disease. Whether these patients have an increased risk for amputation and should better undergo peripheral revascularization prior to surgery remains unclear. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010, 785 consecutive patients undergoing open heart surgery were retrospectively included. In 443 of these patients, preoperative ankle brachial index (ABI) measurements were available. The cohort was divided into four groups: (i) ABI heart surgery showed more wound-healing disturbances, and higher long-term mortality compared with those with normal ABIs. However, no perioperative ischaemia requiring amputation occurred. Thus, reduced ABIs were not associated with increased peripheral risks in open heart surgery but ABI may be helpful in selecting the site for saphenectomy to potentially avoid delayed healing of related wounds in legs with severely impaired arterial perfusion. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Training to Perform Ankle-Brachial Index: Systematic Review and Perspectives to Improve Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudru, S; de Müllenheim, P-Y; Le Faucheur, A; Kaladji, A; Jaquinandi, V; Mahé, G

    2016-02-01

    To conduct a systematic review focusing on the impact of training programs on ankle-brachial index (ABI) performance by medical students, doctors and primary care providers. Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease affecting ∼202 million people worldwide. ABI is an essential component of medical education because of its ability to diagnose PAD, and as it is a powerful prognostic marker for overall and cardiovascular related mortality. A systematic search was conducted (up to May 2015) using Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases. Five studies have addressed the impact of a training program on ABI performance by either medical students, doctors or primary care providers. All were assigned a low GRADE system quality. The components of the training vary greatly either in substance (what was taught) or in form (duration of the training, and type of support which was used). No consistency was found in the outcome measures. According to this systematic review, only few studies, with a low quality rating, have addressed which training program should be performed to provide the best way of teaching how to perform ABI. Future high quality researches are required to define objectively the best training program to facilitate ABI teaching and learning. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peripheral artery questionnaire improves ankle brachial index screening in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B-H; Cho, K-I; Spertus, J; Park, Y-H; Je, H-G; Shin, M-S; Lee, J-H; Jang, J-S

    2014-12-01

    The peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) is a disease-specific health status measure of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Whether the PAQ scores are associated with a PAD diagnosis among patients with symptoms suspicious for PAD is unknown and could help increase the pretest probability of ankle brachial index (ABI) screening among patients with suspicious symptoms. The PAQ was completed by 567 patients evaluated for potential intermittent claudication at six tertiary centres. Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings and the PAQ domain scores were compared with ABI. A diagnostic threshold PAQ scores. The correlation between the PAQ Summary Score and ABI was also calculated. The PAQ Summary Score was significantly lower in patients with low ABI as compared with those having a normal ABI (37.6 ± 19.0 vs. 70.1 ± 22.7, p PAQ Summary Score and ABI were highly correlated (r = 0.56, p PAQ Summary Score for predicting low ABI was 50.3 (AUC = 0.86, sensitivity 80.3%, specificity 78.3%). The PAQ Summary Score was associated with an increased likelihood of PAD in patients with suspected PAD symptoms, and a low summary score (≤ 50.3) was an optimal threshold for predicting PAD among patients referred for ABI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Blood urea level and diabetes duration are independently associated with ankle-brachial index in type 2 diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosevski, M.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors of ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a population of patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

    Material and methods

    370 patients (mean age 60.3 ± 8.3 years and diabetes duration 8.6 ± 6.2 years) with type 2

  2. Non-invasive assessment of peripheral arterial disease: Automated ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume analysis compared to duplex scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jane Ea; Williams, Paul; Davies, Jane H

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to individually and cumulatively compare sensitivity and specificity of the (1) ankle brachial index and (2) pulse volume waveform analysis recorded by the same automated device, with the presence or absence of peripheral arterial disease being verified by ultrasound duplex scan. Patients (n=205) referred for lower limb arterial assessment underwent ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume waveform recording using volume plethysmography, followed by ultrasound duplex scan. The presence of peripheral arterial disease was recorded if ankle brachial index 50% was evident with ultrasound duplex scan. Outcome measure was agreement between the measured ankle brachial index and interpretation of pulse volume waveform for peripheral arterial disease diagnosis, using ultrasound duplex scan as the reference standard. Sensitivity of ankle brachial index was 79%, specificity 91% and overall accuracy 88%. Pulse volume waveform sensitivity was 97%, specificity 81% and overall accuracy 85%. The combined sensitivity of ankle brachial index and pulse volume waveform was 100%, specificity 76% and overall accuracy 85%. Combining these two diagnostic modalities within one device provided a highly accurate method of ruling out peripheral arterial disease, which could be utilised in primary care to safely reduce unnecessary secondary care referrals.

  3. The reliability of the ankle-brachial index in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study (FHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catellier Diane J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A low ankle-brachial index (ABI is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and death. Regression model parameter estimates may be biased due to measurement error when the ABI is included as a predictor in regression models, but may be corrected if the reliability coefficient, R, is known. The R for the ABI computed from DINAMAP™ readings of the ankle and brachial SBP is not known. Methods A total of 119 participants in both the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study (FHS had repeat ABIs taken within 1 year, using a common protocol, automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices, and technician pool. Results The estimated reliability coefficient for the ankle systolic blood pressure (SBP was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.77 and for the brachial SBP was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.62, 0.83. The reliability for the ABI based on single ankle and arm SBPs was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50, 0.70 and the reliability of the ABI computed as the ratio of the average of two ankle SBPs to two arm SBPs was estimated from simulated data as 0.70. Conclusion These reliability estimates may be used to obtain unbiased parameter estimates if the ABI is included in regression models. Our results suggest the need for repeated measures of the ABI in clinical practice, preferably within visits and also over time, before diagnosing peripheral artery disease and before making therapeutic decisions.

  4. Repeated Remote Ischemic Conditioning Effect on Ankle-brachial Index in Diabetic Patients - A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Shahvazian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC is a phenomenon where a short period of ischemia in one organ protects against further ischemia in the other organs. We hypothesized that RIPC occurring in diabetic patients with ankle brachial index (ABI between 0.70 and 0.90 were included with peripheral arterial disease, would make the better coronary flow resulted in the increasing ABI. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was done in the Afshar Cardiovascular Hospital in Yazd between 2013 and 2014. Sixty participants were randomly divided into two groups (intervention and control groups. The intervention group was undergoing RIPC, and the control group was tested without RIPC. RIPC was stimulated by giving three cycles of 5 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion of both upper arms using a blood pressure cuff inflated to 200 mm Hg (n = 30. This was compared with no RIPC group which consisted of placing a deflated blood pressure cuff on the upper limbs (n = 30. Results: The mean of ABI level before intervention in the RIPC and control group group was 0.82 ± 0.055 and 0.83 ± 0.0603 (P = 0.347 respectively, with no significant difference. It was 0.86 ± 0.066 in the RIPC group compared the control 0.83 ± 0.0603 (P = 0.046. So levels of ABI were greater after intervention in the RIPC group. The mean of ABI level increase from 0.82 ± 0.05 to 0.86 ± 0.06 in RIPC group (P = 0.008. So the intervention group showed a significant increase in ABI. Conclusions: RIPC through using a simple, noninvasive technique, composing three cycles of 5 min-ischemia of both upper arms, showing a significant increase in ABI level in diabetic patients.

  5. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M., E-mail: sehgalc@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Section of Vascular Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  6. ANNUAL FORECAST IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE: ROLE OF PATHOLOGICAL ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Sumin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the factors associated with a poor annual prognosis in patients with acute stroke and prognostic role of pathological ankle-brachial index (ABI.Material and methods. The study included 345 patients (age 63.6±7.8 years, 181 males and 164 females with ischemic stroke that were observed for 1 year. All patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 included patients with favorable annual outcome of stroke; Group 2 included patients that during a year had any clinical events including death. All patients underwent a standard neurological and instrumental examination including assessment of peripheral arteries status by sphygmomanometry.Results. Both groups did not differ by age and sex. The frequency of unfavorable outcomes (death, re-stroke, cardiovascular events 1 year after ischemic stroke was 29.5%. Chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, previous cardiovascular events, presence of peripheral atherosclerosis, overweight were identified most commonly in Group 2. Patients of Group 2 initially had a rough neurological deficit. The pathological ABI was detected in 70.7% of patients in Group 2 vs 33.8% of patients in Group 1 (p=0.000001. A strong relationship of pathological ABI with a poor outcome of stroke was found by regression analysis.Conclusions. Detection of pathological ABI in patients with ischemic stroke makes it possible to reveal peripheral atherosclerosis and to carry out the targeted preventive measures in these patients. Risk stratification can contribute to more individual and effective secondary prevention in patients with cerebrovascular disease. 

  7. Ankle brachial index, MRI markers and cognition: The Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Muhammad Amin; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien Yin; Vrooman, Henri; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Hilal, Saima; Chen, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies showed an independent association of low ankle-brachial index (ABI) with cognitive impairment. However, the association between low ABI and cognition in the presence of both cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) and neurodegeneration is lacking. We aimed at investigating a) the association of low ABI with markers of CeVD and cortical thickness, and b) whether the association of low ABI with cognition is influenced by these markers. Data was drawn from the Epidemiology of Dementia In Singapore (EDIS) study where all participants (n = 832) underwent neuropsychological tests and 3T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess CeVD markers as well as cortical thicknesses. Cognitive function was expressed as a global composite z-score and domain-specific z-scores of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Multivariate analyses showed low ABI to be independently associated with intracranial stenosis [odds ratios (OR): 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI):1.23-1.87] and lacunar infarcts [OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06-1.57]. A low ABI was also independently associated with smaller cortical thickness globally [β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.27-0.16] as well as with the limbic [β: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03-0.17], temporal [β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.02-0.15], parietal [β: 0.08; 95% CI: 0.02-0.15], and occipital [β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.03-0.16] lobes. Low ABI was associated with worse performance in verbal memory [β: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01-0.12], which became attenuated in the presence of MRI markers. A low ABI is associated with MRI markers, and affects cognition in the presence of CeVD and neurodegeneration. Atherosclerosis should be targeted as a potentially modifiable risk factor to prevent cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Can we measure the ankle-brachial index using only a stethoscope? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, G A L; Mandil, A; Nascimento, B R; Arantes, B D; Bittencourt, J C; Falqueto, E B; Ribeiro, A L

    2009-02-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) is an excellent method for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) when it is performed with Doppler. However, this device is not always available for primary care physicians. The ABI measured with stethoscope is an easy alternative approach, but have not been proved to be useful. To assess the accuracy of the ABI measured using a stethoscope comparatively to that of the current eligible method for the diagnosis of PAD, the Doppler ABI, and describe the characteristics of this new approach. We conducted a diagnostic study of ABI measured with a stethoscope and a Doppler probe and compared the results. Eighty-eight patients were accessed by both methods. Mean stethoscope ABI, 1.01 +/- 0.15, and mean Doppler ABI, 1.03 +/- 0.20, (P = 0.047) displayed a good correlation. Measurements of stethoscope ABI diagnostic accuracy in recognizing a Doppler ABI are described. The comparison of this data with the current gold standard method results gave a sensitivity of 71.4% [95% confidence interval (CI), 41.9-91.6] and specificity of 91.0% (95% CI, 81.5-96.6), with predictive positive value of 62.5% (95% CI, 38.6-81.5) and negative predictive value of 93.8% (95% CI, 85.2-97.6). The study accuracy was 87.7%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.895 (95% CI, 0.804-0.986, P stethoscope ABI is a useful method to detect PAD and it may be suitable for its screening in the primary care setting.

  9. Ankle-brachial index and cardiovascular outcomes in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, J Dawn; Lombardero, Manuel S; Barsness, Gregory W; Pena-Sing, Ivan; Buitrón, L Virginia; Singh, Premranjan; Woodhead, Gail; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Kelsey, Sheryl F

    2012-10-01

    Peripheral arterial disease increases cardiovascular risk in many patient populations. The risks associated with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) in patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease have not been well described with respect to thresholds and types of cardiovascular events. We examined 2,368 patients in the BARI 2D trial who underwent ABI assessment at baseline. Death and major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction and stroke) during follow-up (average 4.3 years) were assessed across the ABI spectrum and by categorized ABI: low (≤0.90), normal (0.91-1.3), high (>1.3), or noncompressible. A total of 12,568 person-years were available for mortality analysis. During follow-up, 316 patients died, and 549 had major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounders, with normal ABI as the referent group, a low ABI conferred an increased risk of death (relative risk [RR] 1.6, CI 1.2-2.2, P = .0005) and major cardiovascular events (RR 1.4, CI 1.1-1.7, P = .004). Patients with a high ABI had similar outcomes as patients with a normal ABI, but risk again increased in patients with a noncompressible ABI with a risk of death (RR 1.9, CI 1.3-2.8, P = .001) and major cardiovascular event (RR 1.5, CI 1.1-2.1, P = .01). In patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes, ABI screening and identification of ABI abnormalities including a low ABI (<1.0) or noncompressible artery provide incremental prognostic information. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceptions of the ankle brachial index amongst podiatrists registered in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pamela Y

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ankle brachial index (ABI is an objective diagnostic tool that is widely used for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. Despite its usefulness, it is evident within the literature that many practitioners forgo using this screening tool due to limiting factors such as time. There is also no recommended technique for ABI measurement. The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceptions of the use of ABI clinically among Western Australian podiatrists. Methods This study was a cross sectional survey which evaluated the perceptions of the ABI amongst registered podiatrists in Western Australia. The study sample was obtained from the register of podiatrists listed with the Podiatrists Registration Board of Western Australia. Podiatrists were contacted by telephone and invited to participate in a telephone questionnaire. Chi-square tests were performed to determine if there was a statistically significant relationship between use of the ABI and podiatrists’ profile which included: sector of employment; geographical location; and length of time in practice. Results There is a statistically significant relationship (p=0.004 between podiatrists’ profile and the use of ABI, with higher usage in the tertiary hospital setting than in private practice. Length of time spent in practice had no significant impact on ABI usage (p=0.098. Time constraints and lack of equipment were key limiting factors to performing the ABI, and no preferred technique was indicated. Conclusion Western Australian podiatrists agree that the ABI is a useful tool for lower limb vascular assessment, however, various factors influence uptake in the clinical setting. This study suggests that a podiatrists’ profile has a significant influence on the use of the ABI, which may be attributed to different patient types across the various settings. The influence of time spent in practice on ABI usage may be attributed to differences in clinical

  11. Rejection index for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, A.B.; Meneley, D.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish a set of criteria (or Rejection Index) which could be used to decide whether a zirconium-2 1/2 w/o niobium pressure tube in a CANDU reactor should be removed from service due to in-service degradation. A critique of key issues associated with establishing a realistic rejection index was prepared. Areas of uncertainty in available information were identified and recommendations for further analysis and laboratory testing made. A Rejection Index based on the following limits has been recommended: 1) Limits related to design intent and normal operation: any garter spring must remain within the tolerance band specified for its design location; the annulus gas system must normally be operated in a circulating mode with a procedure in place for purging to prevent accumulation of deuterium. It must remain sensitive to leaks into any part of the systems; and pressure tube dimensions and distortions must be limited to maintain the fuel channels within the original design intent; 2) Limits related to defect tolerance: adequate time margins between occurrence of a leaking crack and unstable failure must be demonstrated for all fuel channels; long lap-type flaws are unacceptable; crack-like defects of any size are unacceptable; and score marks, frat marks and other defects with contoured profiles must fall below certain depth, length and stress intensity limits; and 3) Limits related to property degradation: at operating temperature each pressure tube must be demonstrated to have a critical length in excess of a stipulated value; the maximum equivalent hydrogen level in any pressure tube should not exceed a limit which should be defined taking into account the known history of that tube; the maximum equivalent hydrogen level in any rolled joint should not exceed a limit which is presently recommended as 200 ppm equivalent hydrogen; and the maximum diametral creep strain should be limited to less than 5%

  12. Different methods of calculating ankle-brachial index in mid-elderly men and women: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miname, M; Bensenor, I M; Lotufo, P A

    2016-01-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis related to health-adverse outcomes. ABI is inexpensive compared to other indexes, such as coronary calcium score and determination of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Our objective was to identify how the ABI can be applied to primary care. Three different methods of calculating the ABI were compared among 13,921 men and women aged 35 to 74 years who were free of cardiovascular diseases and enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The ABI ratio had the same denominator for the three categories created (the highest value for arm systolic blood pressure), and the numerator was based on the four readings for leg systolic blood pressure: the highest (ABI-HIGH), the mean (ABI-MEAN), and the lowest (ABI-LOW). The cut-off for analysis was ABI20% without the inclusion of ABI<1.0 was 4.9%. For ABI-HIGH, ABI-MEAN and ABI-LOW, the increase in percentage points was 0.3, 0.7, and 2.3%, respectively, and the relative increment was 6.1, 14.3, and 46.9%. In conclusion, all methods were acceptable, but ABI-LOW was more suitable for prevention purposes.

  13. Association between the severity of coronary artery stenosis and the combination of the difference in blood pressure between arms and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyase, Yuiko; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Shiga, Yuhei; Yano, Masaya; Suematsu, Yasunori; Adachi, Sen; Norimatsu, Kenji; Nakamura, Ayumi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    A difference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥10 mmHg between the arms is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality in high-risk patients. Four hundred and fourteen patients were divided into three groups according to the percent most severe luminal narrowing of a coronary artery as diagnosed by coronary computed tomography angiography: no or mild coronary stenosis (0-49%), moderate stenosis (50-69%) and severe stenosis (≥70%) groups. The relative difference in SBP between arms in the severe group was significantly lower than those in the no or mild and moderate groups. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) significantly increased as the severity of coronary stenosis increased. We confirmed that severe coronary stenosis was independently associated with both the relative difference in SBP between arms and baPWV, in addition to age, gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and ankle-brachial index by a logistic regression analysis. The group with a relative difference in SBP between arms of difference in SBP between arms and baPWV may be a more effective approach for the non-invasive assessment of the severity of CAD.

  14. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; den Heijer, Martin; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Doerr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R.; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O'Connell, Jeff; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Campbell, Harry; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Muenzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne B.; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Voelker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian; Dorr, M.; Munzel, T.; Volker, U.

    Background-Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.

  15. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murabito, Joanne M; White, Charles C; Kavousi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based coh...

  16. Ankle brachial index values, leg symptoms, and functional performance among community-dwelling older men and women in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prevalence and significance of low normal and abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) values in a community dwelling population of sedentary, older individuals is unknown. We describe the prevalence of categories of definite peripheral artery disease (PAD), borderline ABI, low-normal ABI and no PAD...

  17. Brachial cuff measurements of blood pressure during passive leg raising for fluid responsiveness prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, K; Ehrmann, S; Benzekri-Lefèvre, D; Runge, I; Legras, A; Dequin, P-F; Mercier, E; Wolff, M; Régnier, B; Boulain, T

    2012-05-01

    The passive leg raising maneuver (PLR) for fluid responsiveness testing relies on cardiac output (CO) measurements or invasive measurements of arterial pressure (AP) whereas the initial hemodynamic management during shock is often based solely on brachial cuff measurements. We assessed PLR-induced changes in noninvasive oscillometric readings to predict fluid responsiveness. Multicentre interventional study. In ICU sedated patients with circulatory failure, AP (invasive and noninvasive readings) and CO measurements were performed before, during PLR (trunk supine, not modified) and after 500-mL volume expansion. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were determined for fluid responsiveness (>10% volume expansion-induced increase in CO) prediction. In 112 patients (19% with arrhythmia), changes in noninvasive systolic AP during PLR (noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP) only predicted fluid responsiveness (cutoff 17%, n=21, positive likelihood ratio [LR] of 26 [18-38]), not unresponsiveness. If PLR-induced change in central venous pressure (CVP) was at least of 2 mm Hg (n=60), suggesting that PLR succeeded in altering cardiac preload, noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP performance was good: AUC of 0.94 [0.85-0.98], positive and negative LRs of 5.7 [4.6-6.8] and 0.07 [0.009-0.5], respectively, for a cutoff of 9%. Of note, invasive AP-derived indices did not outperform noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP. Regardless of CVP (i.e., during "blind PLR"), noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP more than 17% reliably identified fluid responders. During "CVP-guided PLR", in case of sufficient change in CVP, noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP performed better (cutoff of 9%). These findings, in sedated patients who had already undergone volume expansion and/or catecholamines, have to be verified during the early phase of circulatory failure (before an arterial line and/or a CO measuring device is placed). Copyright © 2012 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure measurement during both cuff inflation and cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Pan, Fan; Murray, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure (BP) measurements during cuff inflation and deflation. BP measurements were taken from each of 40 participants, with three repeat sessions under three randomized cuff deflation/inflation conditions. Cuff pressure was linearly deflated and inflated at a standard rate of 2-3 mmHg/s and also linearly inflated at a fast rate of 5-6 mmHg/s. Manual auscultatory systolic and diastolic BPs, and pulse pressure (SBP, DBP, PP) were measured. Automated BPs were determined from digitally recorded cuff pressures by fitting a polynomial model to the oscillometric pulse amplitudes. The BPs from cuff deflation and inflation were then compared. Repeatable measurements between sessions and between the sequential order of inflation/deflation conditions (all P > 0.1) indicated stability of arterial mechanical behaviour with repeat measurements. Comparing BPs obtained by standard inflation with those from standard deflation, manual SBP was 2.6 mmHg lower (P deflation suggest different arterial mechanical behaviour between arterial opening and closing during BP measurement. We have shown that the mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery during BP measurement differs between cuff deflation and cuff inflation.

  19. Cuff-Based Oscillometric Central and Brachial Blood Pressures Obtained Through ABPM are Similarly Associated with Renal Organ Damage in Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernández-Llama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Central blood pressure (BP has been suggested to be a better estimator of hypertension-associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-hour central BP, in comparison with 24-hour peripheral BP, with the presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. Methods: Brachial and central (calculated by an oscillometric system through brachial pulse wave analysis office BP and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM data and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV were measured in 208 hypertensive patients. Renal organ damage was evaluated by means of the albumin to creatinine ratio and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results: Fifty-four patients (25.9% were affected by renal organ damage, displaying either microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/g creatinine or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Compared to those without renal abnormalities, hypertensive patients with kidney damage had higher values of office brachial systolic BP (SBP and pulse pressure (PP, and 24-h, daytime, and nighttime central and brachial SBP and PP. They also had a blunted nocturnal decrease in both central and brachial BP, and higher values of aortic PWV. After adjustment for age, gender, and antihypertensive treatment, only ABPM-derived BP estimates (both central and brachial showed significant associations with the presence of renal damage. Odds ratios for central BP estimates were not significantly higher than those obtained for brachial BP. Conclusion: Compared with peripheral ABPM, cuff-based oscillometric central ABPM does not show a closer association with presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. More studies, however, need to be done to better identify the role of central BP in clinical practice.

  20. Cuff-Based Oscillometric Central and Brachial Blood Pressures Obtained Through ABPM are Similarly Associated with Renal Organ Damage in Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Pareja, Júlia; Yun, Sergi; Vázquez, Susana; Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Blanch, Pedro; Calero, Francesca; Sierra, Cristina; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) has been suggested to be a better estimator of hypertension-associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-hour central BP, in comparison with 24-hour peripheral BP, with the presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. Brachial and central (calculated by an oscillometric system through brachial pulse wave analysis) office BP and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured in 208 hypertensive patients. Renal organ damage was evaluated by means of the albumin to creatinine ratio and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Fifty-four patients (25.9%) were affected by renal organ damage, displaying either microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/g creatinine) or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Compared to those without renal abnormalities, hypertensive patients with kidney damage had higher values of office brachial systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP), and 24-h, daytime, and nighttime central and brachial SBP and PP. They also had a blunted nocturnal decrease in both central and brachial BP, and higher values of aortic PWV. After adjustment for age, gender, and antihypertensive treatment, only ABPM-derived BP estimates (both central and brachial) showed significant associations with the presence of renal damage. Odds ratios for central BP estimates were not significantly higher than those obtained for brachial BP. Compared with peripheral ABPM, cuff-based oscillometric central ABPM does not show a closer association with presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. More studies, however, need to be done to better identify the role of central BP in clinical practice. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Association of diabetes mellitus with decline in ankle-brachial index among patients on hemodialysis: A 6-year follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery occlusive disease is common among diabetes mellitus (DM and end-stage renal disease patients, and tends to progress faster and lead to worse outcomes. This study compared the association of DM with the decline in ankle-brachial index (ABI among patients on hemodialysis (HD. This was a longitudinal analysis of ABI in HD patients from 2009 to 2015. Medical records and yearly ABI values were obtained. A longitudinal mixed-model analysis was used to evaluate ABI changing trends while accounting for within-patients correlation. There were 296 patients on HD in the period of 2009-2015. In a 6-year follow-up, those with DM had a more rapid ABI decline compared to non-DM patients (slopes: -0.014 vs. 0.010 per year, interaction p < 0.001. In DM patients, female sex, high pulse pressure, high triglyceride, low creatinine, and high uric acid were associated with a decrease in ABI. In non-DM patients, old age, high pulse pressure, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high uric acid were associated with a decreased in ABI. There were 49.6% of patients with a normal ABI experienced a decrease at least 0.1 of ABI from baseline, and 35.3% had a final ABI < 0.9 in patients with a baseline ABI ≥ 0.9 (n = 232. In this study, DM patients on HD tend to develop a more rapid decline in ABI than non-DM patients on HD. Age, sex, pulse pressure, lipid profile, creatinine, and uric acid are associated with a decreased in ABI.

  2. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Gon Je

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in quality of life (QoL is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD. The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ and ankle-brachial index (ABI, and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001. PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p’s < 0.001. As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001. ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15. Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization.

  3. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-05-18

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p's PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization.

  4. Derivation and validation of REASON: a risk score identifying candidates to screen for peripheral arterial disease using ankle brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rafel; Baena-Díez, Jose Miguel; Quesada, Miquel; Solanas, Pascual; Subirana, Isaac; Sala, Joan; Alzamora, Maite; Forès, Rosa; Masiá, Rafel; Elosua, Roberto; Grau, María; Cordón, Ferran; Pera, Guillem; Rigo, Fernando; Martí, Ruth; Ponjoan, Anna; Cerezo, Carlos; Brugada, Ramon; Marrugat, Jaume

    2011-02-01

    The recommendation of screening with ankle brachial index (ABI) in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The aims of the present study were to develop and validate a pre-screening test to select candidates for ABI measurement in the Spanish population 50-79 years old, and to compare its predictive capacity to current Inter-Society Consensus (ISC) screening criteria. Two population-based cross-sectional studies were used to develop (n = 4046) and validate (n = 3285) a regression model to predict ABI guidelines, and similar sensitivity. This resulted in fewer patients screened per diagnosis of ABI < 0.9 (10.6 vs. 8.75) and a lower proportion of the population aged 50-79 years candidate to ABI screening (63.3% vs. 55.0%). This model provides accurate ABI < 0.9 risk estimates for ages 50-79, with a better predictive capacity than that of ISC criteria. Its use could reduce possible harms and unnecessary work-ups of ABI screening as a risk stratification strategy in primary prevention of peripheral vascular disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accuracy of the ankle-brachial index using the SCVL®, an arm and ankle automated device with synchronized cuffs, in a population with increased cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available David Rosenbaum1,2, Sandra Rodriguez-Carranza1,3, Patrick Laroche4, Eric Bruckert1,2, Philippe Giral1,2, Xavier Girerd1,21Unité de Prévention Cardiovasculaire, Service d'Endocrinologie-Métabolisme, Assistance Publique/Hôpitaux de Paris, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière – Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 2Dyslipoproteinemia and Atherosclerosis Research Unit, National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM and Pierre et Marie Curie University (UPMC – Paris VI, Paris, France; 3Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán Departamento de Endocrinología y Metabolismo, Delegación Tlalpan, México Distrito Federal; 4STACTIS, Paris, FranceObjective: To evaluate the accuracy of the ankle brachial index (ABI measured with the SCVL® (“screening cardiovascular lab”; GenNov, Paris, France, an automated device with synchronized arm and ankle cuffs with an automatic ABI calculation.Methods: Patients were consecutively included in a cardiovascular prevention unit if they presented with at least two cardiovascular risk factors. ABI measurements were made using the SCVL, following a synchronized assessment of brachial and ankle systolic pressure. These values were compared to the ABI obtained with the usual Doppler-assisted method.Results: We included 157 patients. Mean age was 59.1 years, 56.8% had hypertension, 22.3% had diabetes mellitus, and 17.6% were current smokers. An abnormal ABI was observed in 17.2% with the SCVL and in 16.2% with the Doppler. The prevalence rates of an abnormal ABI by patient measured with each device, ie, 15.7% (confidence interval [CI] 0.95: [11.8; 20.4] or 14.3% (CI 0.95: [10.7; 18.9], did not differ. The coefficient of variation of Doppler and SCVL measures was 15.8% and 15.1%, respectively. The regression line between the two measurement methods was statistically significant. The value-to-value comparison also shows a difference of mean equal to 0.010 (CI 0.95: [–0

  6. Association between temporal mean arterial pressure and brachial noninvasive blood pressure during shoulder surgery in the beach chair position during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplet, Jacob J; Lonetta, Christopher M; Everding, Nathan G; Moor, Molly A; Levy, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of cerebral perfusion pressure during elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position is regularly performed by noninvasive brachial blood pressure (NIBP) measurements. The relationship between brachial mean arterial pressure and estimated temporal mean arterial pressure (eTMAP) is not well established and may vary with patient positioning. Establishing a ratio between eTMAP and NIBP at varying positions may provide a more accurate estimation of cerebral perfusion using noninvasive measurements. This prospective study included 57 patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. All patients received an interscalene block and general anesthesia. After the induction of general anesthesia, values for eTMAP and NIBP were recorded at 0°, 30°, and 70° of incline. A statistically significant, strong, and direct correlation between NIBP and eTMAP was found at 0° (r = 0.909, P ≤ .001), 30° (r = 0.874, P Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Number of distal limb and brachial pressure measurements required when diagnosing peripheral arterial disease by laser Doppler flowmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Høyer, C; Biurrun Manresa, J A; Petersen, L J

    2013-01-01

    We examine the reliability of single and repeated blood pressure measurements at ankle, toe, and arm levels for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) by laser Doppler flowmetry. Segmental pressures were measured in 200 patients with known or suspected PAD. Segmental indices were calculated using (1) one measurement [M-1], two measurements [M-2], or by a predefined reproducibility criterion (RC) as well as (2) by using one brachial blood-pressure (BBP-one) or correspondent to each segmental pressure (BBP-all) as reference. The agreement in diagnosis of PAD by Cohen's Kappa was κ = 0.930 when comparing RC to M-1, and κ = 0.977 when comparing RC to M-2. The same comparison showed excellent relative reliability for segmental indices (all intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) ≥ 0.980). Diagnostic classification agreement for BBP-all versus BBP-one were κ = 0.831 for RC, κ = 0.804 for M-1, and κ = 0.847 for M-2. The relative reliability analysis showed excellent correlation in segmental indices (all ICC ≥ 0.957). The study shows minimal difference in segmental indices and diagnostic classification when comparing calculations based on the listed strategies. However, the study indicated that it is important to measure BBPs correspondent to each segmental pressure. (paper)

  8. The relation between ankle-brachial index (ABI and coronary artery disease severity and risk factors: an angiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2011-07-01

    .Keywords: Ankle–Brachial Index, Angiography, Atherosclerotic Risk Factors.

  9. Association between functional performance and executive cognitive functions in an elderly population including patients with low ankle–brachial index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Naomi Vidal; Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; da Costa, Danielle Irigoyen; dos Santos, Fernando; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral arterial disease, as measured by the ankle–brachial index (ABI), is prevalent among the elderly, and is associated with functional performance, assessed by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Executive cognitive function (ECF) impairments are also prevalent in this population, but no existing study has investigated the association between ECF and functional performance in an elderly population including individuals with low ABI. Aim To investigate the association between functional performance, as measured by the 6MWT, and loss in ECF, in an elderly sample including individuals with low ABI. Method The ABI group was formed by 26 elderly individuals with low ABI (mean ABI: 0.63±0.19), and the control group was formed by 40 elderly individuals with normal ABI (mean ABI: 1.08±0.07). We analyzed functional performance using the 6MWT, global cognition using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and ECF using the Digit Span for assessing attention span and working memory, the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) for assessing information processing speed and inhibitory control/impulsivity, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) for assessing semantic verbal fluency and phonemic verbal fluency. We also used a factor analysis on all of the ECF tests (global ECF). Results Before adjustment, the ABI group performed worse on global cognition, attention span, working memory, inhibitory control/impulsivity, semantic verbal fluency, and phonemic verbal fluency. After adjustment, the ABI group performance remained worse for working memory and semantic verbal fluency. In a simple correlation analysis including all of the subjects, the 6MWT was associated with global cognition, attention span, working memory, information processing speed, inhibitory control/impulsivity, semantic verbal fluency, and global ECF. After adjustment, all the associations remained statistically significant. Conclusion This study found an independent association between

  10. Lower Mitochondrial Energy Production of the Thigh Muscles in Patients With Low-Normal Ankle-Brachial Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Zane, Ariel; Oberdier, Matt; Canepa, Marco; Studenski, Stephanie; Simonsick, Eleanor; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth; Reiter, David; Lakatta, Edward G; McDermott, Mary M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-08-30

    Lower muscle mitochondrial energy production may contribute to impaired walking endurance in patients with peripheral arterial disease. A borderline ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.91 to 1.10 is associated with poorer walking endurance compared with higher ABI. We hypothesized that in the absence of peripheral arterial disease, lower ABI is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production. We examined 363 men and women participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40. Muscle mitochondrial energy production was assessed by post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant ( k PCr) measured by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the left thigh. A lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant reflects decreased mitochondria energy production.The mean age of the participants was 71±12 years. A total of 18.4% had diabetes mellitus and 4% were current and 40% were former smokers. Compared with participants with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40, those with an ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 had significantly lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (19.3 versus 20.8 ms -1 , P =0.015). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and cholesterol levels ( P =0.028). Similarly, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant was linearly associated with ABI as a continuous variable, both in the ABI ranges of 0.90 to 1.40 (standardized coefficient=0.15, P =0.003) and 1.1 to 1.4 (standardized coefficient=0.12, P =0.0405). An ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production compared with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40. These data demonstrate adverse associations of lower ABI values with impaired mitochondrial activity even within the range of a clinically accepted definition of a normal ABI. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions in persons with ABIs of 0.90 to 1.10 can prevent

  11. [Ankle brachial index: motivations, training, and practices among 165 general practitioners in Île-de-France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D; Bureau, J-M; Vu Tri, D

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is under-diagnosed despite its predictive value for cardiovascular mortality. The ankle brachial index (ABI), a simple reliable measure recommended by the French health authorities to detect and evaluate the severity of PAD, is used by too few general practitioners (GPs). This study aimed at identifying motivations and barriers for using ABI in general practice. A representative, descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst 165 GPs practicing in Île-de-France who were interviewed using stratified quotas. Although 1 out of 5 GPs considered ABI to be an irrelevant indicator, most had a favorable opinion about its use (OR: 4.9 [CI 95 %: 4.2-5.7]). Only 42 % (CI 95 %: 34 %-49 %) of GPs knew ABI was recommended by the health authorities. This information had a critical impact on the acceptance of ABI relevancy (OR: 3.7 [CI 95 %: 3.2-4.2]). Training reinforced acceptance (OR: 5.0 [CI 95 %: 4.4-5.6]) and pre-residency education provided a better understanding of ABI (OR: 2.8 [CI 95 %: 2.3-3.4]). Time needed to measure ABI was the main barrier (OR: 0.6 [CI 95 %: 0.6-0.7]). A Doppler-calculation kit (OR: 11.8 [CI 95 %: 8.9-15.6]), equipment cost≤300Euros (OR: 3.4 [CI 99 %: 3.0-3.9]), a specific fee in addition to the regular consultation fee (OR: 2.6 [CI 95 %: 2.3-3.0]) and inclusion of ABI in the GP's evaluation scheme (OR: 2.6 [CI 95 %: 2.3-2.9]) would motivate more GPs. Seven out of 10 GPs agreed that ABI has a positive impact on patient adherence to treatment and follow-up, but ABI remained underexploited for symptomatic patients (OR: 0.4 [CI 95 %: 0.3-0.4]). Better communication and training together with an upgraded status for ABI would provide motivation for GPs to measure ABI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Central aortic systolic blood pressure can predict prolonged QTc duration better than brachial artery systolic blood pressure in rural community residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Tang, Songtao; Chen, Ji-Yan; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jie; Cai, An-Ping; Feng, Yingqing

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that prolonged electrocardiogram QTc duration was independent risk factor for both increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, but there was no dating about the relationship between central aortic systolic blood pressure (CASP) and QTc duration. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between CASP and QTc duration, and assess whether CASP can predict prolonged QTc duration more than BSBP. A total of 500 patients were enrolled in this study, central and brachial aortic blood pressure and electrocardiogram QTc duration were measured. Pearson correlation was assessed for determining the associations of QTc duration with clinical conditions. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the independent predictor of prolonged QTc duration. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the utility of blood pressure for prolonged QTc duration. We found QTc durations were significantly positive with CASP (r = 0.308, p AUC: 0.771 vs. 0.646, p < 0.001) BSBP. Our results suggested that the non-invasive CASP is independently correlated with QTc duration, and CASP can predict prolonged QTc duration more than BSBP.

  13. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F; Tison, Geoffrey H; Olgin, Jeffrey; Alley, Hugh F; Owens, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, laboratory-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound flow-mediated dilation (uFMD). We find significant correlation (r  =  0.55, p  =0.003, N  =  27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5 min cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. (paper)

  14. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brachial Plexus Injuries Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that conducts signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, ...

  15. Ankle Brachial Index <0.9 Underestimates the Prevalence of Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease Assessed with Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstroem, J.; Hansen, T.; Johansson, L.; Lind, L.; Ahlstroem, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. Purpose: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. Material and Methods: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. Results: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one ≥50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a ≥ 50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. Conclusion: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population

  16. The prevalence and predictors of an abnormal ankle-brachial index in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Premranjan P; Abbott, J Dawn; Lombardero, Manuel S; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Woodhead, Gail; Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Tsapatsaris, Nicholas P; Piemonte, Thomas C; Lago, Rodrigo M; Rutter, Martin K; Nesto, Richard W

    2011-02-01

    To examine ankle-brachial index (ABI) abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD). An ABI was obtained in 2,240 patients in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial. ABIs were classified as: normal, 0.91-1.3; low, ≤ 0.9; high, >1.3; or noncompressible artery (NC). Baseline characteristics were examined according to ABI and by multivariate analysis. RESULTS ABI was normal in 66%, low in 19%, and high in 8% of patients, and 6% of patients had NC. Of the low ABI patients, 68% were asymptomatic. Using normal ABI as referent, low ABI was independently associated with smoking, female sex, black race, hypertension, age, C-reactive protein, diabetes duration, and lower BMI. High ABI was associated with male sex, nonblack race, and higher BMI; and NC artery was associated with diabetes duration, higher BMI, and hypertension. ABI abnormalities are common and often asymptomatic in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD.

  17. Differential identification of atypical pneumonia pathogens in aorta and internal mammary artery related to ankle brachial index and walking distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriz, Erkan; Cirak, Meltem Yalinay; Zor, Mustafa Hakan; Engin, Doruk; Oktar, Levent; Unal, Yusuf

    2013-08-01

    We studied the existence of agents in aorta biopsies, such as Chlamydia pneumoniae, cytomegalovirus, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, that are thought to have a role in atherosclerosis etiopathogenesis role, and their association with peripheral artery disease. We examined aorta wall and internal mammarian artery (IMA) biopsies taken from two different places in 63 patients in whom coronary artery bypass was performed. In these biopsies, we evaluated the deoxyribonuclease (DNA) of these microorganisms using polymerase chain reaction. From the same patients, we recorded the ankle brachial index, road walking distance information, lipid profile, C-reactive proteins, blood parameters such as fibrinogen, and the patient's operation data. In the nine aorta biopsies taken from 63 patients, we isolated C pneumoniae DNA. In IMA biopsies taken from the same patients, we detected no microorganism DNA (P artery disease. In the development of atherosclerosis with C pneumoniae, there may be a determinant pathogen in both the aorta and the peripheral arteries. The nonexistence of C pneumoniae DNA in the IMA biopsies may indicate infectious agents because of the predominant endothelial functions in this artery, and thus its resistance to atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High Central Aortic Rather than Brachial Blood Pressure is Associated with Carotid Wall Remodeling and Increased Arterial Stiffness in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Gonzalo; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Marota, Marco; Castro, Juan; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina

    2017-03-01

    In adults, central blood pressure (cBP) is reported to associate target organ damages (TODs) rather than peripheral blood pressure (pBP). However, data regarding the association of pre-clinical TODs with cBP and pBP in pediatric populations are scarce. To evaluate in children and adolescents the importance of cBP and pBP levels, in terms of their association with hemodynamic and vascular changes. 315 subjects [age (mean/range) 12/8-18 years] were included. pBP (oscillometry, Omron-HEM433INT and Mobil-O-Graph), cBP levels and waveforms (oscillometry, Mobil-O-Graph; applanation tonometry, SphygmoCor), aortic wave reflection-related parameters, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid (elastic modulus, stiffness-index) and aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV). Four groups were defined considering pBP and cBP percentiles (th): cBP ≥90th, cBP th, pBP ≥90th, pBP th. In each group, haemodynamic and vascular parameters were compared for subgroups defined considering the level of the remaining blood pressure (cBP or pBP). Subgroups were matched for anthropometric and cardiovascular risk factors (propensity matching-score). Subjects with high cBP showed a worse cardiovascular risk profile in addition to worse peripheral hemodynamic conditions. The CIMT, carotid and aortic stiffness levels were also higher in those subjects. CIMT and carotid stiffness remained statistically higher when subjects were matched for pBP and other cardiovascular risk factors. There were no differences in arterial properties when subjects were analyzed (compared) considering similar pBP levels, during normal and high cBP conditions. Compared with pBP, the cBP levels show a greater association with vascular alterations (high CIMT and arterial stiffness), in children and adolescents.

  19. Relationship between blood pressure, body mass index and health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Globally, studies have shown that the trend of overweight and obesity has increased astronomically and there is a close link between body mass index and blood pressure. This study determined the link between the body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and health promoting practices of women in rural and ...

  20. Índice Tornozelo-Braquial (ITB determinado por esfigmomanômetros oscilométricos automáticos Assessing Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI by using automated oscillometric devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kawamura

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Índice Tornozelo-Braquial (ITB é essencial na prática clínica, mas dificuldades técnicas na sua execução pelo padrão de referência Doppler vascular (DV tornam-no ainda pouco utilizado. OBJETIVO: Avaliar aplicabilidade da determinação do ITB com uso de esfigmomanômetros oscilométricos automáticos (EOA e sugerir a utilização dos índices delta-Bráquio-Braquial (delta-BB e delta-ITB como marcadores de risco cardiovascular. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo e observacional de 247 pacientes ambulatoriais (56,2% feminino, média 62,0 anos submetidos à determinação do ITB com aferição simultânea da pressão arterial (PA em membros superiores (MMSS e inferiores (MMII utilizando-se dois EOA (OMRON-HEM705CP. Nos casos em que não foi possível aferir PA em pelo menos um dos MMII utilizou-se DV. Os pacientes divididos em Grupo N (ITB normal: 0,91 a 1,30 e Grupo A (ITB alterado: 1,30 tiveram comparados entre si os valores de delta-ITB (diferença absoluta ITB/MMII e delta-BB (diferença absoluta PAS/MMSS. RESULTADOS: Utilizando-se EOA foi possível determinar ITB em 90,7%. Com dados do Grupo N determinaram-se valores de referência (VR no percentil 95 de delta-ITB (0-0,13 e delta-BB (0-8 mmHg. Quando comparado com o Grupo N, o Grupo A apresentou prevalência mais elevada tanto de delta-ITB (30/52 contra 10/195; Razão de Chances: 25,23; pBACKGROUND: Assessing Ankle-Brachial Index is an essential procedure in clinical settings, but since its measurement by the gold standard Doppler Ultrasonic (DU technique is impaired by technical difficulties, it is underperformed. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of an automated oscillometric device (AOD by performing Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI assessments and to suggest delta brachial-brachial (delta-BB and delta-ABI as markers of cardiovascular risk. METHODS: In this observational and descriptive study, 247 patients (56.2% females, mean age 62.0 years had their

  1. Ankle brachial index and cognitive function among Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarraf, Wassim; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Matthew A; Wright, Clinton B; Fornage, Myriam; Daviglus, Martha; Kaplan, Robert C; Davis, Sonia; Conceicao, Alan S; González, Hector M

    2018-04-01

    The Ankle-Brachial index (ABI) is a well-accepted measure of peripheral artery disease (arterial stenosis and stiffness) and has been shown to be associated with cognitive function and disorders; however, these associations have not been examined in Hispanics/Latinos. Therefore, we sought to examine relationships between ABI and cognitive function among diverse middle-age and older Hispanics/Latinos. We used cross-sectional data on n = 7991 participants aged 45-74 years, without stroke or coronary heart disease, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Our primary outcome, global cognition (GC), was a continuous composite score of four cognitive domains (verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, executive function, and mental status). Secondary outcomes were the individual tests representing these domains. The ABI was analyzed continuously and categorically with standard clinical cut-points. We tested associations using generalized survey regression models incrementally adjusting for confounding factors. Age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia moderations were examined through interactions with the primary exposure. In age, sex, and education adjusted models, continuous ABI had an inverse u-shape association with worse GC. We found similar associations with measures of verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, executive function, but not with low mental status. The associations were attenuated, but not completely explained, by accounting for the confounders and not modified by age, sex, education, and vascular disease risks. In addition to being a robust indicator of arterial compromise, our study suggests that abnormal ABI readings may also be useful for early signaling of subtle cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Associations of work hours with carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Luenda E; Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Fujishiro, Kaori; Landsbergis, Paul; Diez Roux, Ana V; Macdonald, Leslie; Foy, Capri G; Andrew, Michael E; Stukovsky, Karen H; Baron, Sherry

    2012-10-01

    Long working hours may be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective was to investigate cross-sectional associations of work hours with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Participants were 1694 women and 1868 men from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. CIMT and ABI were measured using standard protocols. Information on work hours was obtained from questionnaires. Mean values of CIMT and ABI were examined across five categories of hours worked per week (≤20, 21-39, 40, 41-50 and >50) using analysis of variance/analysis of covariance. p Values for trend were obtained from linear regression models. Mean age of participants was 56.9±8.4 years; 52.4% were men. Distinct patterns of association between work hours and the subclinical CVD biomarkers were found for women and men, although this heterogeneity by gender was not statistically significant. Among women only, work hours were positively associated with common (but not internal) CIMT (p=0.073) after full risk factor adjustment. Compared with women working 40 h, those working >50 h were more likely to have an ABI work hours and ABI were inversely associated (p=0.046). There was some evidence that the association between work hours and ABI was modified by occupational category (interaction p=0.061). Among persons classified as management/professionals, longer work hours was associated with lower ABI (p=0.015). No significant associations were observed among other occupational groups. Working longer hours may be associated with subclinical CVD. These associations should be investigated using longitudinal studies.

  3. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p =0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p =0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy.

  4. Index Driven Price Pressure in Corporate Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens

    Inclusion and exclusion of bonds from major indices are information-free, monthly events. At these events, liquidity providers get a significant abnormal return by trading against index trackers. The return is highest for bonds that are excluded because of a recent downgrade with a one-day return...

  5. Association between functional performance and executive cognitive functions in an elderly population including patients with low ankle–brachial index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira NV

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Naomi Vidal Ferreira,1 Paulo Jannuzzi Cunha,2 Danielle Irigoyen da Costa,3 Fernando dos Santos,1 Fernando Oliveira Costa,1 Fernanda Consolim-Colombo,4 Maria Cláudia Irigoyen1 1Heart Institute, Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Neuroimaging in Psychiatry Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; 4Medical School, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP, Brazil Introduction: Peripheral arterial disease, as measured by the ankle–brachial index (ABI, is prevalent among the elderly, and is associated with functional performance, assessed by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT. Executive cognitive function (ECF impairments are also prevalent in this population, but no existing study has investigated the association between ECF and functional performance in an elderly population including individuals with low ABI.Aim: To investigate the association between functional performance, as measured by the 6MWT, and loss in ECF, in an elderly sample including individuals with low ABI.Method: The ABI group was formed by 26 elderly individuals with low ABI (mean ABI: 0.63±0.19, and the control group was formed by 40 elderly individuals with normal ABI (mean ABI: 1.08±0.07. We analyzed functional performance using the 6MWT, global cognition using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, and ECF using the Digit Span for assessing attention span and working memory, the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT for assessing information processing speed and inhibitory control/impulsivity, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT for assessing semantic verbal fluency and phonemic verbal fluency. We also used a factor analysis on all of the ECF tests (global ECF.Results: Before adjustment, the ABI group performed worse on global cognition, attention span, working

  6. Association of albumin-creatinine ratio and cystatin C with change in ankle-brachial index: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Pranav S; Ix, Joachim H; Katz, Ronit; Shlipak, Michael G; Criqui, Michael H; Siscovick, David S; Kramer, Holly; Sibley, Christopher T; Sarnak, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Low ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a reflection of atherosclerotic disease, and high ABI is an indicator of calcified vessels. The associations of albuminuria and cystatin C level with incidence of either low or high ABI are unknown. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) enrolled community-dwelling adults (N=6,814) aged 45-84 years who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Baseline albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum cystatin C level. Development of low (high (>1.40) ABI using multinomial regression among persons with ABI of 0.90-1.40 at baseline. During 9.8 years of follow-up, 221 and 89 participants progressed to low and high ABIs, respectively. Baseline ACR and cystatin C level were higher among progressors compared with nonprogressors. In multivariable analyses, doubling of ACR was associated with increased risk of progression to low (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20) and high (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.32) ABIs. Compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ACR had a significantly increased risk of progression to low (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.12) and high (OR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.32-5.77) ABIs. Higher cystatin C levels were associated with progression to low (OR per 1-SD greater, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26) but not high (OR per 1-SD greater, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.81-1.25) ABI, but the highest quintile of cystatin C was not associated independently with either outcome. Single measure of albuminuria and low number of progressors to high ABI. In adults free of clinical cardiovascular disease, albuminuria was a strong independent risk factor for the development of both high and low ABIs, important and different measures of peripheral artery disease. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Femoral Artery Atherosclerosis Is Associated With Physical Function Across the Spectrum of the Ankle-Brachial Index: The San Diego Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassel, Christina L; Ellis, Alicia M; Suder, Natalie C; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Rifkin, Dena E; Forbang, Nketi I; Denenberg, Julie O; Marasco, Antoinette M; McQuaide, Belinda J; Jenny, Nancy S; Allison, Matthew A; Ix, Joachim H; Criqui, Michael H

    2017-07-20

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is inadequate to detect early-stage atherosclerotic disease, when interventions to prevent functional decline may be the most effective. We determined associations of femoral artery atherosclerosis with physical functioning, across the spectrum of the ABI, and within the normal ABI range. In 2007-2011, 1103 multiethnic men and women participated in the San Diego Population Study, and completed all components of the summary performance score. Using Doppler ultrasound, superficial and common femoral intima media thickness and plaques were ascertained. Logistic regression was used to assess associations of femoral atherosclerosis with the summary performance score and its individual components. Models were adjusted for demographics, lifestyle factors, comorbidities, lipids, and kidney function. In adjusted models, among participants with a normal-range ABI (1.00-1.30), the highest tertile of superficial intima media thickness was associated with lower odds of a perfect summary performance score of 12 (odds ratio=0.56 [0.36, 0.87], P =0.009), and lower odds of a 4-m walk score of 4 (0.34 [0.16, 0.73], P =0.006) and chair rise score of 4 (0.56 [0.34, 0.94], P =0.03). Plaque presence (0.53 [0.29, 0.99], P =0.04) and greater total plaque burden (0.61 [0.43, 0.87], P =0.006) were associated with worse 4-m walk performance in the normal-range ABI group. Higher superficial intima media thickness was associated with lower summary performance score in all individuals ( P =0.02). Findings suggest that use of femoral artery atherosclerosis measures may be effective in individuals with a normal-range ABI, especially, for example, those with diabetes mellitus or a family history of peripheral artery disease, when detection can lead to earlier intervention to prevent functional declines and improve quality of life. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. Effect of sodium nitrite on renal function, sodium and water excretion and brachial and central blood pressure in healthy subjects. A dose-response study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, Jeppe Bakkestroem; Therwani, Safa Al; Jensen, Janni Majgaard

    2017-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is converted to nitric oxide (NO) in vivo and has vasodilatory and natriuretic effects. Our aim was to examine the effects of NaNO2 on hemodynamics, sodium excretion and GFR. In a single-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, we infused placebo (0.9% NaCl) or 0.58, ....... The lack of increase in cGMP accompanying the increase in NO2(-), suggests a direct effect of nitrite or nitrate on the renal tubules and vascular bed with little or no systemic conversion to NO.......Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is converted to nitric oxide (NO) in vivo and has vasodilatory and natriuretic effects. Our aim was to examine the effects of NaNO2 on hemodynamics, sodium excretion and GFR. In a single-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, we infused placebo (0.9% NaCl) or 0.58, 1.......74, or 3.48 μmol NaNO2/kg/hour for two hours in twelve healthy subjects, after four days standard diet. Subjects were supine and water-loaded. We measured brachial and central blood pressure (BP), plasma concentrations of renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (P-AVP), and plasma nitrite...

  9. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. Methods: A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT and hypertensive (HT groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905 and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505. However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P Conclusion: Plasma renalase may not be associated with BP and baPWV in Chinese subjects with normal renal function.

  10. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Lv, Yong-Bo; Chu, Chao; Wang, Man; Xie, Bing-Qing; Wang, Lan; Yang, Fan; Yan, Ding-Yi; Yang, Rui-Hai; Yang, Jun; Ren, Yong; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT) and hypertensive (HT) groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905) and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505). However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P function. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Sedentary Behavior and Light Physical Activity Are Associated with Brachial and Central Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerage, A. M.; Benedetti, T. R. B.; Farah, B. Q.

    2015-01-01

    of this study was to investigate the association between the time spent in physical activities of different intensities and blood pressure levels, arterial stiffness and autonomic modulation in hypertensive patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 87 hypertensive patients (57.5 +/- 9.9 years of age) had...... are associated with lower blood pressure, without affecting arterial stiffness and cardiac autonomic modulation in hypertensive patients.......Background Physical activity is recommended as a part of a comprehensive lifestyle approach in the treatment of hypertension, but there is a lack of data about the relationship between different intensities of physical activity and cardiovascular parameters in hypertensive patients. The purpose...

  12. Physical activity, body mass index and blood pressure in primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lack of physical activity contributes to overweight and obesity. It is recommended that children accumulate at least one hour of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity daily. Objective: The level of physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP) were evaluated in pupils attending private ...

  13. Simultaneously Measured Interarm Blood Pressure Difference and Stroke: An Individual Participants Data Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Mastumoto, Chisa; Kario, Kazuomi; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kita, Yoshikuni; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Maeda, Yasutaka; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Watada, Hirotaka; Munakata, Masanori; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ito, Norihisa; Nakamura, Michinari; Shoji, Tetsuo; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Yamashina, Akira

    2018-06-01

    We conducted individual participant data meta-analysis to examine the validity of interarm blood pressure difference in simultaneous measurement as a marker to identify subjects with ankle-brachial pressure index blood pressure difference >5 mm Hg as being associated with a significant odds ratio for the presence of ankle-brachial pressure index blood pressure difference >15 mm Hg was associated with a significant Cox stratified adjusted hazard ratio for subsequent stroke (hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.60; P blood pressure differences, measured simultaneously in both arms, may be associated with vascular damage in the systemic arterial tree. These differences may be useful for identifying subjects with an ankle-brachial pressure index of blood pressure in both arms at the first visit. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. A comparison between brachial and echocardiographic systolic time intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Systolic time interval (STI is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP and brachial ejection time (bET were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP and ejection time (ET were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r = 0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r  = 0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r = 0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  15. Body mass index and blood pressure measurement during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The accurate measurement of blood pressure requires the use of a large cuff in subjects with a high mid-arm circumference (MAC). This prospective study examined the need for a large cuff during pregnancy and its correlation with maternal obesity. METHODS: Maternal body mass index (BMI), fat mass, and MAC were measured. RESULTS: Of 179 women studied, 15.6% were obese. With a BMI of level 1 obesity, 44% needed a large cuff and with a BMI of level 2 obesity 100% needed a large cuff. CONCLUSION: All women booking for antenatal care should have their MAC measured to avoid the overdiagnosis of pregnancy hypertension.

  16. A novel clinical index for the assessment of RVD in acute pulmonary embolism: Blood pressure index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Hale; Ates, Ihsan; Kundi, Harun; Arikan, Mehmet Fettah; Yilmaz, Fatma Meric

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of the blood pressure index (BPI), which is a new index that we developed, in detection of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in acute pulmonary embolism (APE). A total of 539 patients, (253 males and 286 females), diagnosed with APE using computer tomography pulmonary angiography were included in the study. The BPI was obtained by dividing systolic blood pressure (SBP) by diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Mean DBP (75±11mmHg vs 63±15mmHg; p<0.001, respectively) was found to be higher in RVD patients compared to those without RVD, whereas BPI (1.5±0.1 vs 1.9±0.2; p<0.001, respectively) was lower. Examining the performance of BPI in prediction of RVD using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (area under curve±SE=0.975±0.006; p<0.001), it was found that BPI could predict RVD with very high sensitivity (92.8%) and specificity (100%) and had a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 42.1%. According to the analysis, the highest youden index for the optimal prediction value was found to be 0.478 and the BPI≤1.4 was found to predict mortality 68.6% sensitivity and 80.8% specificity (Area under curve±SE=0.777±0.051; p<0.001). We found that BPI was an index with high positive predictive value and low negative predictive value in detection of RVD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Brachial Plexus Blocker Prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphanie Coelho Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Although the area of surgical simulation has been the subject of study in recent years, it is still necessary to develop artificial experimental models with a perspective to dismiss the use of biological models. Since this makes the simulators more real, transferring the environment of the health professional to a physical or virtual reality, an anesthetic prototype has been developed, where the motor response is replicated when the brachial plexus is subjected to a proximal nervous stimulus....

  18. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  19. Comparison of ankle-brachial index measured by an automated oscillometric apparatus with that by standard Doppler technique in vascular patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korno, M.; Eldrup, N.; Sillesen, H.

    2009-01-01

    was calculated twice using both the methods on both legs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested the automated oscillometric blood pressure device, CASMED 740, for measuring ankle and arm blood pressure and compared it with the current gold standard, the hand-held Doppler technique, by the Bland-Altman analysis....... RESULTS: Using the Doppler-derived ABI as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of the oscillometric method for determining an ABI Udgivelsesdato: 2009/11...

  20. Adult traumatic brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankine, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Injury to the brachial plexus in the adult is usually a closed injury and the result of considerable traction to the shoulder. Brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques have improved the outlook for patients with brachial plexus injuries. The choice of surgical procedure depends on the level of the injury and the radiologist has an important role in guiding the surgeon to the site of injury. This article will describe the anatomy and pathophysiology of traction brachial plexus injury in the adult. The neurosurgical options available will be described with emphasis on the information that the surgeon wants from imaging studies of the brachial plexus. The relative merits of MRI and CT myelography are discussed

  1. Evaluation of the cerebrovascular pressure reactivity index using non-invasive finapres arterial blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasprowicz, M; Kim, D J; Haubrich, C; Czosnyka, Z; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M; Schmidt, E

    2010-01-01

    A pressure reactivity index (PRx) can be assessed in patients with continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) as a moving correlation coefficient between slow fluctuations of these two signals within a low frequency bandwidth. The study aimed to investigate whether the invasive ABP monitoring can be replaced with non-invasive measurement of ABP using a Finapres plethysmograph (fABP) to calculate the fPRx. There is a well-defined group of patients, suffering from hydrocephalus and undergoing CSF pressure monitoring, which may benefit from such a measurement. 41 simultaneous day-by-day monitoring of ICP, ABP and fABP were performed for about 30 min in 10 head injury patients. A Bland–Altman assessment for agreement was used to compare PRx and fPRx calculations. Performance metrics and the McNemary test were used to determine whether fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functioning and disturbed cerebrovascular pressure reactivity. The fPRx correlated with PRx (R Spearman = 0.92, p < 0.001; bias = −0.04; lower and upper limits of agreement: −0.26 and 0.17, respectively). The fPRx distinguished between active and passive reactivity in more than 89% cases. The fPRx can be used with care for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in patients for whom invasive ABP measurement is not feasible. The fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functional and deranged reactivity

  2. Influence of body mass index on the outcome of brachial plexus surgery: are there any differences between elbow and shoulder results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Martins, Roberto S; Di Masi, Gilda; Bonilla, Gonzalo; Siqueira, Mario G

    2014-12-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has recently been identified as a predictor of outcomes following reconstructive surgery of shoulder palsies. In this study, we sought to determine if the same holds true for the reconstruction of elbow flexion. Forty patients who had undergone partial ulnar-to-biceps nerve transfer (Oberlin's procedure) for shoulder palsy were assessed and compared against 18 previously reported patients who had undergone reconstruction for elbow palsies. The British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale and an index dividing shoulder abduction strength in the affected arm by healthy arm were recorded. All patients had undergone surgery within 12 months of injury and had ≥ 12 months of follow-up. M4 or M3 biceps strength was obtained in 90 % of patients. Final strength on the affected side averaged 5.8 kg, versus 20.2 kg on the normal side, for a mean recovery index score of 0.30. In this sample of 40 patients, BMI did not predict percentage strength or BMRC grade recovery. Neither did age, number of roots involved, the affected side, nor time to surgery. Comparing patients with elbow versus shoulder reconstruction, there were no differences, except that patients undergoing Oberlin's procedure had a statistically longer duration of time between injury and surgical repair (7.4 vs 5.1 months, p surgery.

  3. Brachial Plexus Blocker Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Coelho Monteiro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the area of surgical simulation has been the subject of study in recent years, it is still necessary to develop artificial experimental models with a perspective to dismiss the use of biological models. Since this makes the simulators more real, transferring the environment of the health professional to a physical or virtual reality, an anesthetic prototype has been developed, where the motor response is replicated when the brachial plexus is subjected to a proximal nervous stimulus. Using action-research techniques, with this simulator it was possible to validate that the human nerve response can be replicated, which will aid the training of health professionals, reducing possible risks in a surgical environment.

  4. Peripheral artery disease assessed by ankle-brachial index in patients with established cardiovascular disease or at least one risk factor for atherothrombosis - CAREFUL Study: A national, multi-center, cross-sectional observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabak Omur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD via the ankle brachial index (ABI in patients with known cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular diseases or with at least one risk factor for atherothrombosis. Methods Patients with a history of atherothrombotic events, or aged 50-69 years with at least one cardiovascular risk factor, or > = 70 years of age were included in this multicenter, cross-sectional, non-interventional study (DIREGL04074. Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings, and physician awareness of PAD were analyzed. The number of patients with low ABI ( Results A total of 530 patients (mean age, 63.4 ± 8.7 years; 50.2% female were enrolled. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were present in 88.7% and 65.5% of patients, respectively. PAD-related symptoms were evident in about one-third of the patients, and at least one of the pedal pulses was negative in 6.5% of patients. The frequency of low ABI was 20.0% in the whole study population and 30% for patients older than 70 years. Older age, greater number of total risk factors, and presence of PAD-related physical findings were associated with increased likelihood of low ABI (p Conclusion Our results indicate that advanced age, greater number of total risk factors and presence of PAD-related physical findings were associated with increased likelihood of low ABI. These findings are similar to those reported in similar studies of different populations, and document a fairly high prevalence of PAD in a Mediterranean country.

  5. Prediction of Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome with Velocity Blood Pressure Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Chao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is an important complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA. An >100% increase in middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV after CEA is used to predict the cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS development, but the accuracy is limited. The increase in blood pressure (BP after surgery is a risk factor of CHS, but no study uses it to predict CHS. This study was to create a more precise parameter for prediction of CHS by combined the increase of MCAV and BP after CEA. Methods: Systolic MCAV measured by transcranial Doppler and systematic BP were recorded preoperatively; 30 min postoperatively. The new parameter velocity BP index (VBI was calculated from the postoperative increase ratios of MCAV and BP. The prediction powers of VBI and the increase ratio of MCAV (velocity ratio [VR] were compared for predicting CHS occurrence. Results: Totally, 6/185 cases suffered CHS. The best-fit cut-off point of 2.0 for VBI was identified, which had 83.3% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity, 62.5% positive predictive value and 99.4% negative predictive value for CHS development. This result is significantly better than VR (33.3%, 97.2%, 28.6% and 97.8%. The area under the curve (AUC of receiver operating characteristic: AUC VBI = 0.981, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-0.995; AUC VR = 0.935, 95% CI 0.890-0.966, P = 0.02. Conclusions: The new parameter VBI can more accurately predict patients at risk of CHS after CEA. This observation needs to be validated by larger studies.

  6. Prediction of Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome with Velocity Blood Pressure Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Bao; Chen, Yu; Ni, Leng; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2015-06-20

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is an important complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). An >100% increase in middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV) after CEA is used to predict the cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) development, but the accuracy is limited. The increase in blood pressure (BP) after surgery is a risk factor of CHS, but no study uses it to predict CHS. This study was to create a more precise parameter for prediction of CHS by combined the increase of MCAV and BP after CEA. Systolic MCAV measured by transcranial Doppler and systematic BP were recorded preoperatively; 30 min postoperatively. The new parameter velocity BP index (VBI) was calculated from the postoperative increase ratios of MCAV and BP. The prediction powers of VBI and the increase ratio of MCAV (velocity ratio [VR]) were compared for predicting CHS occurrence. Totally, 6/185 cases suffered CHS. The best-fit cut-off point of 2.0 for VBI was identified, which had 83.3% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity, 62.5% positive predictive value and 99.4% negative predictive value for CHS development. This result is significantly better than VR (33.3%, 97.2%, 28.6% and 97.8%). The area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic: AUC(VBI) = 0.981, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-0.995; AUC(VR) = 0.935, 95% CI 0.890-0.966, P = 0.02. The new parameter VBI can more accurately predict patients at risk of CHS after CEA. This observation needs to be validated by larger studies.

  7. The effect of an apple polyphenol extract rich in epicatechin and flavan-3-ol oligomers on brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatory function in volunteers with elevated blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarenhovi, Maria; Salo, Pia; Scheinin, Mika; Lehto, Jussi; Lovró, Zsófia; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Lehtinen, Markus J; Junnila, Jouni; Hasselwander, Oliver; Tarpila, Anneli; Raitakari, Olli T

    2017-10-27

    The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that an orally ingested apple polyphenol extract rich in epicatechin and flavan-3-ol oligomers improves endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) in volunteers with borderline hypertension. The secondary aim of the study was to test whether the investigational product would improve endothelium-independent nitrate-mediated vasodilatation (NMD). This was a single centre, repeated-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 60 otherwise healthy subjects (26 men, 34 women; aged 40-65 years) with borderline hypertension (blood pressure 130-139/85-89 mmHg) or unmedicated mild hypertension (blood pressure 140-165/90-95 mmHg). The subjects were randomised to receive placebo or the apple polyphenol extract to provide a daily dose of 100 mg epicatechin for 4 weeks, followed by a four to five-week wash-out period, and then 4 weeks intake of the product that they did not receive during the first treatment period. FMD and NMD of the left brachial artery were investigated with ultrasonography at the start and end of both treatment periods, and the per cent increase of the arterial diameter (FMD% and NMD%) was calculated. With the apple extract treatment, a significant acute improvement was detected in the mean change of maximum FMD% at the first visit 1.16 (p = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.04; 2.28), last visit 1.37 (p = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.22; 2.52) and for both visits combined 1.29 (p effect of apple extract on FMD% was not different from placebo. No statistically significant differences between the apple extract and placebo treatments were observed for endothelium-independent NMD. A significant acute improvement in maximum FMD% with apple extract administration was found. However, superiority of apple extract over placebo was not statistically significant in our study subjects with borderline hypertension or mild hypertension. The study raised no safety concerns regarding the

  8. MR imaging of brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, A.; Ciccotosto, C.; Dragani, M.; Manes, L.; Bonomo, L.

    1991-01-01

    The brachial plexus is a difficult region to evaluate with radiological techniques. MR imaging has great potentials for the depiction of the various anatomical structures of the branchial plexus - i.e., spinal ganglion, ventral nerve rami root exit of the neural foramina, trunks an cordes. Moreover, MR imaging, thanks to its direct multiplanarity, to its excellent soft-tissue contrast, and to its lack of motion artifacts, allows good evaluation of pathologic conditions in the branchial plexus, especially traumas and cancers. On the contrary CT, in spite of its high spatial resolution and good contrast, cannot demonstrate the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus. US detects superficials structures, and conventional radiographs depict only indirect changes in the adjacent lung apex and skeletal structures. From November 1989 to May 1990, 20 normal volunteers (15 males and 5 females; average age: 35 years) were studied with MR imaging. Multisection technique was employed with a dedicated coil and a primary coil. The anatomical structures of the brachial plexus were clearly demonstrated by T1-weighted sequences on the sagittal and axial planes. T2-weighted pulse sequences on the coronal plane were useful for the anatomical definition of the brachial plexus and for eventual tissue characterization. The correct representation of the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus allowed by MR imaging with author's standard technique makes MR imaging the most appropriate exam for the diagnosis of pathologic conditions in the brachial plexus, although its use must be suggested by specific clinical questions

  9. Oscillometric blood pressure measurement: a simple method in screening for peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels; Bruce, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Blood pressure at the ankle level is a reliable indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) is a useful non-invasive screening tool for the early detection of atherosclerosis. In the first part of the study, systolic blood pressures obtained by oscillometry...... of PAD was sufficiently high in subjects over the age of 60 years to warrant screening. The ankle brachial index based on measurements with an oscillometric device was shown reliable in the exclusion of PAD, thereby fulfilling an important criterion for the use in screening....

  10. Associations between body mass index, ambulatory blood pressure findings, and changes in cardiac structure: relevance of pulse and nighttime pressures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedecostante, M.; Spannella, F.; Giulietti, F.; Espinosa, E.; Dessi-Fulgheri, P.; Sarzani, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is central in the management of hypertension. Factors related to BP, such as body mass index (BMI), may differently affect particular aspects of 24-hour ABPM profiles. However, the relevance of BMI, the most used index of adiposity, has been

  11. Physical activity, body mass index and blood pressure in primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institute of Child Health, University of Benin, PMB 1154, Benin City, Nigeria. Abstract. Background: Lack of physical activity contributes to overweight and obesity. ..... and treatment of high blood pressure in children and ad- olescents.

  12. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I 2  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The weighted

  13. An optimal frequency range for assessing the pressure reactivity index in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Tim; Johnson, Ulf; McKelvey, Tomas; Enblad, Per

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the optimal frequency range for computing the pressure reactivity index (PRx). PRx is a clinical method for assessing cerebral pressure autoregulation based on the correlation of spontaneous variations of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Our hypothesis was that optimizing the methodology for computing PRx in this way could produce a more stable, reliable and clinically useful index of autoregulation status. The patients studied were a series of 131 traumatic brain injury patients. Pressure reactivity indices were computed in various frequency bands during the first 4 days following injury using bandpass filtering of the input ABP and ICP signals. Patient outcome was assessed using the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSe). The optimization criterion was the strength of the correlation with GOSe of the mean index value over the first 4 days following injury. Stability of the indices was measured as the mean absolute deviation of the minute by minute index value from 30-min moving averages. The optimal index frequency range for prediction of outcome was identified as 0.018-0.067 Hz (oscillations with periods from 55 to 15 s). The index based on this frequency range correlated with GOSe with ρ=-0.46 compared to -0.41 for standard PRx, and reduced the 30-min variation by 23%.

  14. Pressure dependence of the refractive index in wurtzite and rocksalt indium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, R. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Científiques (CSIC), Lluís Solé i Sabarís s.n., 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); MALTA-Consolider Team, Departament de Física Aplicada, ICMUV, Universitat de València, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Segura, A. [MALTA-Consolider Team, Departament de Física Aplicada, ICMUV, Universitat de València, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Ibáñez, J., E-mail: jibanez@ictja.csic.es; Artús, L. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Científiques (CSIC), Lluís Solé i Sabarís s.n., 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We have performed high-pressure Fourier transform infrared reflectance measurements on a freestanding InN thin film to determine the refractive index of wurtzite InN and its high-pressure rocksalt phase as a function of hydrostatic pressure. From a fit to the experimental refractive-index curves including the effect of the high-energy optical gaps, phonons, free carriers, and the direct (fundamental) band-gap in the case of wurtzite InN, we obtain pressure coefficients for the low-frequency (electronic) dielectric constant ε{sub ∞}. Negative pressure coefficients of −8.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} and −14.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} are obtained for the wurtzite and rocksalt phases, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the electronic band structure and the compressibility of both phases.

  15. Pressure dependence of the refractive index in wurtzite and rocksalt indium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, R.; Segura, A.; Ibáñez, J.; Artús, L.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed high-pressure Fourier transform infrared reflectance measurements on a freestanding InN thin film to determine the refractive index of wurtzite InN and its high-pressure rocksalt phase as a function of hydrostatic pressure. From a fit to the experimental refractive-index curves including the effect of the high-energy optical gaps, phonons, free carriers, and the direct (fundamental) band-gap in the case of wurtzite InN, we obtain pressure coefficients for the low-frequency (electronic) dielectric constant ε ∞ . Negative pressure coefficients of −8.8 × 10 −2  GPa −1 and −14.8 × 10 −2  GPa −1 are obtained for the wurtzite and rocksalt phases, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the electronic band structure and the compressibility of both phases

  16. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Than, Khoi D.; Mummaneni, Praveen V.; Smith, Zachary A.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. Methods: A retrospective case-series study of 12?903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy....

  17. Cerebral Pulsatility Index Is Elevated in Patients with Elevated Right Atrial Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Shouri; Schlick, Konrad H; Padrick, Matthew M; Rinsky, Brenda; Gonzalez, Nestor; Jones, Heather; Mayer, Stephan A; Lyden, Patrick D

    2018-01-01

    Extracerebral venous congestion can precipitate intracranial hypertension due to obstruction of cerebral blood outflow. Conditions that increase right atrial pressure, such as hypervolemia, are thought to increase resistance to jugular venous outflow and contribute to cerebro-venous congestion. Cerebral pulsatility index (CPI) is considered a surrogate marker of distal cerebrovascular resistance and is elevated with intracranial hypertension. Thus, we sought to test the hypothesis that elevated right atrial pressure is associated with increased CPI compared to normal right atrial pressure. We retrospectively reviewed 61 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. We calculated CPI from transcranial Doppler studies and correlated these with echocardiographic measures of right atrial pressure. CPIs were compared from patients with elevated and normal right atrial pressure. There was a significant difference between CPI obtained from all patients with elevated right atrial pressure compared to those with normal right atrial pressure (P right and left hemispheric CPI from patients with both elevated and normal right atrial pressure. Patients with elevated right atrial pressure had significantly higher CPI compared to patients with normal right atrial pressure. These findings suggest that cerebro-venous congestion due to impaired jugular venous outflow may increase distal cerebrovascular resistance as measured by CPI. Since elevated CPI is associated with poor outcome in numerous neurological conditions, future studies are needed to elucidate the significance of these results in other populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. A Comparison of Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, and Acanthosis Nigricans in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Debra E.; Wang, Xiaohui; Tijerina, Sandra L.; Reyna, Maria Elena; Farooqi, Mohammad I.; Shelton, Margarette L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective quantitative study was to examine the relationships among acanthosis nigricans (AN), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), school grade, and gender in children attending elementary school located in South West Texas. Data were collected by attending school district nurses. Researchers reviewed 7,026…

  19. Arterial compliance in patients with cirrhosis: stroke volume-pulse pressure ratio as simplified index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E

    2001-01-01

    Arterial function may be altered in patients with cirrhosis. We determined compliance of the arterial tree (C(1)) in relation to systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic derangement and clinical variables. C(1) and the stroke volume-pulse pressure index (SV/PP) were significantly higher (+62% and +40%...... predictors of SV/PP (P abnormalities in the arterial compliance of these patients....

  20. Changes in cardiac index and blood pressure on positioning children prone for scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Z E; Görges, M; Cooke, E; Malherbe, S; Dumont, G A; Ansermino, J M

    2013-07-01

    In this prospective observational study we investigated the changes in cardiac index and mean arterial pressure in children when positioned prone for scoliosis correction surgery. Thirty children (ASA 1-2, aged 13-18 years) undergoing primary, idiopathic scoliosis repair were recruited. The cardiac index and mean arterial blood pressure (median (IQR [range])) were 2.7 (2.3-3.1 [1.4-3.7]) l.min(-1).m(-2) and 73 (66-80 [54-91]) mmHg, respectively, at baseline; 2.9 (2.5-3.2 [1.7-4.4]) l.min(-1).m(-2) and 73 (63-81 [51-96]) mmHg following a 5-ml.kg(-1) fluid bolus; and 2.5 (2.2-2.7 [1.4-4.8]) l.min(-1).m(-2) and 69 (62-73 [46-85]) mmHg immediately after turning prone. Turning prone resulted in a median reduction in cardiac index of 0.5 l.min(-1).m(-2) (95% CI 0.3-0.7 l.min(-1).m(-2), p=0.001), or 18.5%, with a large degree of inter-subject variability (+10.3% to -40.9%). The changes in mean arterial blood pressure were not significant. Strategies to predict, prevent and treat decreases in cardiac index need to be developed. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Targets Individualized to Pressure-Reactivity Index in Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Edward; McFadyen, Charles; Newcombe, Virginia; Synnot, Anneliese J; Czosnyka, Marek; Menon, David

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently triggers a disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) at which autoregulation is optimal ("CPPopt") varies between individuals, and can be calculated based on fluctuations between arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure. This review assesses the effect of individualizing CPP targets to pressure reactivity index (a measure of autoregulation) in patients with TBI. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE®, Embase, and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched in March 2015 for studies assessing the effect of targeting CPPopt in TBI. We included all studies that assessed the impact of targeting CPPopt on outcomes including mortality, neurological outcome, and physiological changes. Risk of bias was assessed using the RTI Item Bank and evidence quality was considered using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Eight cohort studies (based on six distinct data sets) assessing the association between CPPopt and mortality, Glasgow Outcome Scale and physiological measures in TBI were included. The quality of evidence was deemed very low based on the GRADE criteria. Although the data suggest an association between variation from CPPopt and poor clinical outcome at 6 months, the quality of evidence prevents firm conclusions, particularly regarding causality, from being drawn. Available data suggest that targeting CPPopt might represent a technique to improve outcomes following TBI, but currently there is insufficient high-quality data to support a recommendation for use in clinical practice. Further prospective, randomized controlled studies should be undertaken to clarify its role in the acute management of TBI.

  2. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Khoi D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. A retrospective case-series study of 12 903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy. A literature review of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) database was conducted to identify articles pertaining to brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery. In our total population of 12 903 patients, only 1 suffered from postoperative brachial plexopathy. The overall prevalence rate was thus 0.01%, but the prevalence rate at the site where this complication occurred was 0.07%. Previously reported risk factors for postoperative brachial plexopathy include age, anterior surgical procedures, and a diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The condition can also be due to patient positioning during surgery, which can generally be detected via the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring. Brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery is rare and merits further study.

  3. Interferometric determination of electron density in a high pressure hydrogen arc. 1. Calculation of refraction index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, R; Guenther, K; Ulbricht, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik

    1980-01-14

    The refraction index of a hydrogen plasma in LTE was calculated as a function of the wavelength of observation, temperature and pressure, taking into account bound-bound and bound-free transitions of the neutral atom. According to the present calculation, the influence of excited states at higher temperatures is smaller than indicated by Baum et al (Plasma Phys.; 17: 79 (1975)) for argon. Using the calculations presented here, the interferometric investigation of a high pressure hydrogen arc should allow the determination of the electron density with an accuracy of the order of 1%.

  4. Choice of marker for assessment of RV dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism : NT-proBNP, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, or blood pressure index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, H; Ates, I; Kundi, H; Yilmaz, F M

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to examine the value of NT-proBNP, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), blood pressure index (BPI), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the determination of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). A total of 547 patients diagnosed with APE were included in the study. Demographic characteristics and comorbid conditions of patients were recorded in patient files. For blood pressure measurement, a calibrated digital blood pressure monitor was used at regular intervals. Blood samples were taken from patients at the time of admission for hemogram, biochemical, and hemostasis blood tests. Echocardiography was performed on all patients to detect RVD and evaluate pulmonary artery pressure. PASP (p blood pressure (p blood cell (p AUC ± SE = 0.975 ± 0.006; p < 0.001) was found to be the best predictor of RVD with a higher sensitivity (92.8%) and specificity (100%). We found that BPI had a better diagnostic discrimination for RVD compared with PASP and NT-proBNP.

  5. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  6. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering 'excellent' and 'good' muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  7. Cardiac index and pulmonary arterial blood pressure during exercise in cases of suspected latent heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, A.A.; Berzak, N.V.; Vladimirov, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The results studying hemodynamics during maximum physical load (veloeriometry when sitting) for 24 patients examined to avoid heart failure are presented. 19 patients were subjected to coronaroangiography and contrast ventriculography, and 12 patients - to myocardium scintigraphy with 99m Tc-pyrophosphate. It is shown that registration of diaslotic pressure in a pulmonary artery and in a cardiac index permits to diagnose failure in the miocardic function of patients with different heart diseases

  8. [Relation of the blood pressure, lipids and body mass index by smoking status among adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Young Soon; Lee, Hea Shoon

    2007-10-01

    This study was to investigate the relationship between blood pressure, lipids and body mass index by smoking status among adolescents. This study was designed as a descriptive correlational study. General and smoking characteristics were collected using a questionnaire. The smoking group consisted of 42 (33%) students and the non smoking group 85 (67%) students. Blood pressure, lipids, height and weight were measured, and body mass index was calculated to kg/m2. The collected data was analyzed by the n(%), chi2-test, t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient (SPSS 12.0). 1. The smoking level was different between grade, smoking status among the family, the contentment of their relationship with their parents, school life and teachers. 2. The smoking group's systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and body mass index were higher than those of the non smoking group. 3. The smoking amount had a significant positive correlation between total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. The result of this study offered basic data to develop intervention programs to prevent hypertension and hyperlipidemia in smoking adolescents.

  9. Right brachial angiography with compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, G.; Dalbuono, S.; Tampieri, D.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for performing right brachial anigography by compressing the right anterior-inferior part of the neck is proposed, as a result of studying the left carotid circulation without puncturing the left carotid artery. A success was obtained in about 75% of cases. The success of the technique depends mainly on the anatomical nature of the innominate artery. When the technique is successful both left carotid arteries in the neck and their intracranial branches can be satisfactorily visualized. In some cases visualization of the left vertebral artery was also otbained. Attention is drawn also on the increased diagnostic possibilities of studying the vessels in the neck with a greater dilution of the contrast medium. (orig.)

  10. An environmental pressure index proposal for urban development planning based on the analytic network process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Navarro, Tomas; Garcia-Melon, Monica; Acuna-Dutra, Silvia; Diaz-Martin, Diego

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new approach to prioritize urban planning projects according to their environmental pressure in an efficient and reliable way. It is based on the combination of three procedures: (i) the use of environmental pressure indicators, (ii) the aggregation of the indicators in an Environmental Pressure Index by means of the Analytic Network Process method (ANP) and (iii) the interpretation of the information obtained from the experts during the decision-making process. The method has been applied to a proposal for urban development of La Carlota airport in Caracas (Venezuela). There are three options which are currently under evaluation. They include a Health Club, a Residential Area and a Theme Park. After a selection process the experts chose the following environmental pressure indicators as ANP criteria for the project life cycle: used land area, population density, energy consumption, water consumption and waste generation. By using goal-oriented questionnaires designed by the authors, the experts determined the importance of the criteria, the relationships among criteria, and the relationships between the criteria and the urban development alternatives. The resulting data showed that water consumption is the most important environmental pressure factor, and the Theme Park project is by far the urban development alternative which exerts the least environmental pressure on the area. The participating experts coincided in appreciating the technique proposed in this paper is useful and, for ranking ordering these alternatives, an improvement from traditional techniques such as environmental impact studies, life-cycle analysis, etc.

  11. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  12. E/e' Ratio: An Index of LV Filling Pressures Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif F. Nagueh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a clinical need for the assessment of cardiac function in patients who present with symptoms and signs of pulmonary and systemic congestion. Echocardiography has been utilized over the years to answer this question. It is possible to study left ventricular (LV systolic and diastolic function as well as pulmonary artery pressures and right ventricular function using this technique. With respect to LV diastolic function, an ideal assessment includes evaluation of LV relaxation and LV filling pressures. There are several parameters that when properly acquired and analyzed can predict the 2 fundamental aspects noted above of LV diastolic function. The mitral annulus early diastolic recoil velocity (e’ recorded by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI was introduced as an index of LV relaxation. Further, e’ velocity is combined with mitral peak velocity E to predict LV filling pressures1. I will discuss the supporting literature for the last statement and point to the limitations in its application.

  13. The impact of hydraulic flow unit & reservoir quality index on pressure profile and productivity index in multi-segments reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Al-Rbeawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is studying the impact of the hydraulic flow unit and reservoir quality index (RQI on pressure profile and productivity index of horizontal wells acting in finite reservoirs. Several mathematical models have been developed to investigate this impact. These models have been built based on the pressure distribution in porous media, depleted by a horizontal well, consist of multi hydraulic flow units and different reservoir quality index. The porous media are assumed to be finite rectangular reservoirs having different configurations and the wellbores may have different lengths. Several analytical models describing flow regimes have been derived wherein hydraulic flow units and reservoir quality index have been included in addition to rock and fluid properties. The impact of these two parameters on reservoir performance has also been studied using steady state productivity index.It has been found that both pressure responses and flow regimes are highly affected by the existence of multiple hydraulic flow units in the porous media and the change in reservoir quality index for these units. Positive change in the RQI could lead to positive change in both pressure drop required for reservoir fluids to move towards the wellbore and hence the productivity index.

  14. Dermatoglyphs and brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovina, Svetislav; Cvjeticanin, Miljenko; Milicić, Jasna; Proloscić, Tajana Polovina

    2006-09-01

    Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a handicap quite commonly encountered in daily routine. Although birth trauma is considered to be the major cause of the defect, it has been observed that PBPP occurs only in some infants born under identical or nearly identical conditions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of genetic predisposition for PBPP. It is well known that digito-palmar dermatoglyphs can be used to determine hereditary roots of some diseases. Thus, we found it meaningful to do a study analysis of digito-palmar dermatoglyphs in this disease as well, conducting it on 140 subjects (70 males and 70 females) diagnosed with PBPP. The control group was composed of fingerprints obtained from 400 adult and phenotypically healthy subjects (200 males and 200 females) from the Zagreb area. The results of multivariate and univariate analysis of variance have shown statistically significant differences between the groups observed. In spite of lower percentage of accurately classified female subjects by discriminant analysis, the results of quantitative analysis of digito-palmar dermatoglyphs appeared to suggest a genetic predisposition for the occurrence of PBPP.

  15. Concurrent validity of an automated algorithm for computing the center of pressure excursion index (CPEI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Michelle A; Gibbons, Mandi W; Song, Jinsup; Hillstrom, Howard J; Choe, Kersti H; Pasquale, Maria R

    2018-01-01

    Center of Pressure Excursion Index (CPEI), a parameter computed from the distribution of plantar pressures during stance phase of barefoot walking, has been used to assess dynamic foot function. The original custom program developed to calculate CPEI required the oversight of a user who could manually correct for certain exceptions to the computational rules. A new fully automatic program has been developed to calculate CPEI with an algorithm that accounts for these exceptions. The purpose of this paper is to compare resulting CPEI values computed by these two programs on plantar pressure data from both asymptomatic and pathologic subjects. If comparable, the new program offers significant benefits-reduced potential for variability due to rater discretion and faster CPEI calculation. CPEI values were calculated from barefoot plantar pressure distributions during comfortable paced walking on 61 healthy asymptomatic adults, 19 diabetic adults with moderate hallux valgus, and 13 adults with mild hallux valgus. Right foot data for each subject was analyzed with linear regression and a Bland-Altman plot. The automated algorithm yielded CPEI values that were linearly related to the original program (R 2 =0.99; Pcomputation methods. Results of this analysis suggest that the new automated algorithm may be used to calculate CPEI on both healthy and pathologic feet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of dexamethasone in brachial plexus block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to (lignocaine) on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from September 2009 to March 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients, who were scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were randomly allocated to group A in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of isotonic saline (0.9%) and group B in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg). Nerve stimulator with insulated needle for multiple stimulations technique was used to locate the brachial plexus nerves. After the injection onset of action and duration of sensory blockade of brachial plexus were recorded at 5 minutes and 15 minutes interval. Results: Group A showed the onset of action of 21.64 ± 2.30 min and in group B it was 15.42 ± 1.44 min (p< 0.001). Duration of nerve block was 115.08 ± 10.92 min in group A and 265.42 ± 16.56 min in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lignocaine solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory blockade significantly. (author)

  17. Severe brachial plexus injuries in rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, F; Mannan, K; Bharania, P; Sewell, M D; Di Mascio, L; Sinisi, M

    2012-03-01

    We describe the mechanisms, pattern of injuries, management and outcomes of severe injuries to the brachial plexus sustained during the play of rugby. Thirteen cases of severe injury to the brachial plexus caused by tackles in rugby had detailed clinical assessment, and operative exploration of the brachial plexus. Seventeen spinal nerves were avulsed, two were ruptured and there were traction lesions in continuity of 24 spinal nerves. The pattern of nerve lesion was related to the posture of the neck and the forequarter at the moment of impact. Early repair by nerve transfer enabled some functional recovery, and decompression of lesions in continuity was followed by recovery of nerve function and relief of pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A PRESSURE ULCER AND FALL RATE QUALITY COMPOSITE INDEX FOR ACUTE CARE UNITS: A MEASURE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardhana, Ananda; Burman, Mary E.; Dunton, Nancy E.; Staggs, Vincent S.; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Gajewski, Byron J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Composite indices are single measures that combine the strengths of two or more individual measures and provide broader, easy-to-use measures for evaluation of provider performance and comparisons across units and hospitals to support quality improvement. Objective The study objective was to develop a unit-level inpatient composite nursing care quality performance index – the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index. Design Two-phase measure development study. Settings 5,144 patient care units in 857 United States hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indictors® during the year 2013. Methods The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index was developed in two phases. In Phase 1 the formula was generated using a utility function and generalized penalty analysis. Experts with experience in healthcare quality measurement provided the point of indicator equivalence. In Phase 2 initial validity evidence was gathered based on hypothesized relationships between the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index and other variables using two-level (unit, hospital) hierarchical linear mixed modeling. Results The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index = 100 − PUR − FR, where PUR is pressure ulcer rate and FR is total fall rate. Higher scores indicate better quality. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated agreement between pairs of experts and provided evidence for inter-rater reliability of the formula. The validation process demonstrated that higher registered nurse skill mix, higher percent of registered nurses with a baccalaureate in nursing or higher degree, higher percent of registered nurses with national specialty certification, and lower percent of hours supplied by agency staff were significantly associated with higher Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index scores. Higher percentages of unit patients at risk for a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer and higher unit rates of

  19. Indexed

    CERN Document Server

    Hagy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Jessica Hagy is a different kind of thinker. She has an astonishing talent for visualizing relationships, capturing in pictures what is difficult for most of us to express in words. At indexed.blogspot.com, she posts charts, graphs, and Venn diagrams drawn on index cards that reveal in a simple and intuitive way the large and small truths of modern life. Praised throughout the blogosphere as “brilliant,” “incredibly creative,” and “comic genius,” Jessica turns her incisive, deadpan sense of humor on everything from office politics to relationships to religion. With new material along with some of Jessica’s greatest hits, this utterly unique book will thrill readers who demand humor that makes them both laugh and think.

  20. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  1. Nonlinear intersubband absorption and refractive index changes in square and graded quantum well modulated by temperature and Hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Emine; Sokmen, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the linear and nonlinear intersubband transitions and the refractive index changes in the conduction band of square and graded quantum well (QW) are theoretically calculated within the framework of effective mass approximation. Results obtained show that the energy levels in different QWs and intersubband properties can be modified and controlled by the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The modulation of the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes which can be suitable for good performance optical modulators and various infrared optical device applications can be easily obtained by tuning the temperature and the hydrostatic pressure. - Highlights: ► Linear and nonlinear optical processes can be changed by pressure and temperature. ► Magnitude and energy of absorption peaks decrease as pressure increases. ► Refractive index changes in magnitude and energy decrease by increasing pressure. ► Energy differences are dependent on pressure, temperature and QW shapes. ► By increasing pressure we can obtain redshift in the optical transitions. ► For SQW, the absorption spectrum shows blueshift as the temperature increases. ► For GQW, the absorption spectrum shows redshift by temperature.

  2. Brachial artery approach for outpatient arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jai Kyung; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jae Hwan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brachial approach arteriography for outpatients, with particular regard to safety and image quality. The angiographic findings and follow-up medical records of 131 brachial approach arteriographies in 121 outpatients were retrospectively analysed. 5 F pigtail catheters were used in 125 cases and 5-F OCU-A catheters were used in three cases of renal arteriography, and three of upper extremity arteriography without catheter. Except for three cases of brachial artery puncture failure, all procedures were performed successfully. One hundred and fifteen of 119 lower extremity arteriographies were visualized down to the level of the tibioperoneal artery. The non-visualized cases were three in which there was multiple obstruction at the distal common iliac artery and one with insufficient contrast amount due to renal failure In four cases there were complications : two involved arterial thrombosis, one was an intramuscular hematoma, and one an A-V fistula. For outpatients, brachial approach arteriography can replace the femoral approach. Its image quality is excellent, there are time-cost benefits, and the rate of complications is relatively low

  3. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K.; Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.)

  4. Changes of brachial arterial doppler waveform during immersion of the hand of young men in ice-cold water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Goo

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the changes of brachial arterial Doppler waveform during immersion of the hand of young men in ice-cold water. Doppler waveforms of brachial arteries in 11 young male patients were recorded before and during immersion of ipsilateral hand in ice-cold water(4-5 .deg. C). The procedure was repeated on separate days. Patterns of waveform during immersion were compared with the changes of pulsatility index. Four men showed high impedance waveforms, and 5 men showed low impedance waveforms during immersion both at the first and at the second study. Two men, however, showed high impedance waveforms at the first study and tow impedance waveforms at the second study. The pulsatility index rose and fell in high and low impedance waveforms, respectively. The changes of brachial arterial Doppler waveforms could be classified into high and low impedance patterns, probably reflecting the acute changes in downstream impedance during immersion of hand in ice-cold water

  5. Measurement of the refractive index of air in a low-pressure regime and the applicability of traditional empirical formulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, René; Walkov, Alexander; Voigt, Michael; Bartl, Guido

    2018-06-01

    The refractive index of air is a major limiting factor in length measurements by interferometry, which are mostly performed under atmospheric conditions. Therefore, especially in the last century, measurement and description of the air refractive index was a key point in order to achieve accuracy in the realisation of the length by interferometry. Nevertheless, interferometric length measurements performed in vacuum are much more accurate since the wavelength of the light is not affected by the air refractive index. However, compared with thermal conditions in air, in high vacuum heat conduction is missing. In such a situation, dependent on the radiative thermal equilibrium, a temperature distribution can be very inhomogeneous. Using a so-called contact gas instead of high vacuum is a very effective way to enable heat conduction on nearly the same level as under atmospheric pressure conditions whereby keeping the effect of the air refractive index on a small level. As physics predicts, and as we have demonstrated previously, helium seems like the optimal contact gas because of its large heat conduction and its refractive index that can be calculated from precisely known parameters. On the other hand, helium gas situated in a vacuum chamber could easily be contaminated, e.g. by air leakage from outside. Above the boiling point of oxygen (‑183 °C) it is therefore beneficial to use dry air as a contact gas. In such an approach, the air refractive index could be calculated based on measured quantities for pressure and temperature. However, existing formulas for the air refractive index are not valid in the low-pressure regime. Although it seems reasonable that the refractivity (n  ‑  1) of dry air simply downscales with the pressure, to our knowledge there is no experimental evidence for the applicability of any empirical formula. This evidence is given in the present paper which reports on highly accurate measurements of the air refractive index for the

  6. Refractive index of r-cut sapphire under shock pressure range 5 to 65 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiuxia; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Li, Xuhai; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Wenjun; Meng, Chuanmin; Zhou, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    High-pressure refractive index of optical window materials not only can provide information on electronic polarizability and band-gap structure, but also is important for velocity correction in particle-velocity measurement with laser interferometers. In this work, the refractive index of r-cut sapphire window at 1550 nm wavelength was measured under shock pressures of 5–65 GPa. The refractive index (n) decreases linearly with increasing shock density (ρ) for shock stress above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL): n = 2.0485 (± 0.0197) − 0.0729 (± 0.0043)ρ, while n remains nearly a constant for elastic shocks. This behavior is attributed to the transition from elastic (below HEL) to heterogeneous plastic deformation (above HEL). Based on the obtained refractive index-density relationship, polarizability of the shocked sapphire was also obtained

  7. Dynamic airway pressure-time curve profile (Stress Index): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terragni, Pierpaolo; Bussone, Guido; Mascia, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of respiratory mechanics at the bedside is necessary in order to identify the most protective ventilatory strategy. Indeed in the last 20 years, adverse effects of positive ventilation to the lung structures have led to a reappraisal of the objectives of mechanical ventilation. The ventilator setting requires repeated readjustment over the period of mechanical ventilation dependency and careful respiratory monitoring to minimize the risks, preventing further injury and permitting the lung and airways healing. Among the different methods that have been proposed and validated, the analysis of dynamic P-t curve (named Stress Index, SI) represents an adequate tool available at the bedside, repeatable and, therefore, able to identify the amount of overdistension occurring in the daily clinical practice, when modifying positive end-expiratory pressure. In this review we will analyze the evidence that supports respiratory mechanics assessment at the bedside and the application of the dynamic P/t curve profile (SI) to optimize protective ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure.

  8. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  9. Subscapularis slide correction of the shoulder internal rotation contracture after brachial plexus birth injury: technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Valencia, Herbert; DiTaranto, Patricia; DelSole, Edward M; Glait, Sergio; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2013-03-01

    Internal rotation contracture is the most common shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth injury. The purpose of this investigation is to describe the indications, technique, and results of the subscapularis slide procedure. The technique involves the release of the subscapularis muscle origin off the scapula, with preservation of anterior shoulder structures. A standard postoperative protocol is used in all patients and includes a modified shoulder spica with the shoulder held in 60 degrees of external rotation and 30 degrees of abduction, aggressive occupational and physical therapy, and subsequent shoulder manipulation under anesthesia with botulinum toxin injections as needed. Seventy-one patients at 2 institutions treated with subscapularis slide between 1997 and 2010, with minimum follow-up of 39.2 months, were identified. Patients were divided into 5 groups based on the index procedure performed: subscapularis slide alone (group 1); subscapularis slide with a simultaneous microsurgical reconstruction (group 2); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide (group 3); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide combined with tendon transfers for shoulder external rotation (group 4); and subscapularis slide with simultaneous tendon transfers, with no prior brachial plexus surgery (group 5). Full passive external rotation equivalent to the contralateral side was achieved in the operating room in all cases. No cases resulted in anterior instability or internal rotation deficit. Internal rotation contracture of the shoulder after brachial plexus birth injury can be effectively managed with the technique of subscapularis slide.

  10. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L.; Shah, Apurva S.

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically req...

  11. A predictive model for pressure ulcer outcome: the Wound Healing Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Barrett, Ryan S; Fife, Caroline E; Thomson, Brett

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this learning activity is to provide information regarding the creation of a risk-stratification system to predict the likelihood of the healing of body and heel pressure ulcers (PrUs). This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Explain the need for a PrU risk stratification tool.2. Describe the purpose and methodology of the study.3. Delineate the results of the study and development of the Wound Healing Index. : To create a validated system to predict the healing likelihood of patients with body and heel pressure ulcers (PrUs), incorporating only patient- and wound-specific variables. The US Wound Registry data were examined retrospectively and assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, and so on). Significant variables were identified with bivariate analyses. Multivariable logistic regression models were created based on significant factors (P wound clinics in 24 states : A total of 7973 body PrUs and 2350 heel PrUs were eligible for analysis. Not applicable : Healed PrU MAIN RESULTS:: Because of missing data elements, the logistic regression development model included 6640 body PrUs, of which 4300 healed (64.8%), and the 10% validation sample included 709 PrUs, of which 477 healed (67.3%). For heel PrUs, the logistic regression development model included 1909 heel PrUs, of which 1240 healed (65.0%), and the 10% validation sample included 203 PrUs, of which 133 healed (65.5%). Variables significantly predicting healing were PrU size, PrU age, number of concurrent wounds of any etiology, PrU Stage III or IV, evidence of bioburden/infection, patient age, being nonambulatory, having renal transplant, paralysis, malnutrition, and/or patient hospitalization for any reason. Body and heel PrU Wound Healing Indices are comprehensive, user-friendly, and validated predictive models for

  12. Blood pressure levels and body mass index in Brazilian adults with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Pucci

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Increased life expectancy among people with Down syndrome (DS has introduced new environmental factors that may affect blood pressure (BP and/or lead to obesity in this population. The aim here was to investigate BP levels and body mass index (BMI in adults with DS, correlating these data with the patients' sex and age. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional observational study conducted in special schools in Curitiba (PR, Brazil. METHODS: 97 adult patients were included. BP was measured in accordance with the established guidelines. BMI was calculated by dividing the weight by the height squared (kg/m2. RESULTS: Sex had no influence on BMI; nor did systolic BP (SBP or diastolic BP (DBP. The age range was from 18 to 56 years. No correlation was observed between increasing age and greater BMI or BP. Eighty-six individuals (88.7% presented normal BP, eleven (11.3% prehypertension and none hypertension. Twenty patients (20.4% presented BP lower than 90 × 60 mmHg. BMI ranged from 18 to 48 kg/m2 (mean of 28.8 ± 3.92 kg/m2: 21.9% had normal weight; 40.7% were overweight; and 25.3% had obesity class I, 9.9% class II and 2.2% class III. Higher BMI was associated with significantly greater SBP and DBP (P = 0.0175 and P = 0.0015. CONCLUSION: Sex and age did not influence SBP, DBP or BMI in Brazilian adults with DS. Higher BMI was associated with greater BP (both systolic and diastolic.

  13. Longitudinal relationship of parental hypertension with body mass index, blood pressure, and cardiovascular reactivity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongling; Alpert, Bruce S; Walker, Sammie S; Somes, Grant W

    2007-05-01

    To investigate whether parental hypertension (HTN) affects children's body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) over time. A longitudinal study of 315 students (black: 23 females, 19 males; white: 142 females, 131 males) was conducted in the public schools of Obion County, Tennessee, between 1987 and 1992. BMI and BMI z scores were calculated. The CVR task was a series of video games (taking approximately 10 minutes to play) given to the same students in their third-, fourth-, fifth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade years. CVR was defined as the change in blood pressure (delta_BP) or heart rate (delta_HR) between before playing and while playing the video game. Positive parental history of HTN (27.6%) was defined as at least 1 parent with HTN. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to estimate the effects of parental HTN on children's BMI and CVR over time. Children with parental HTN had significant higher BMI, BMI z score, and R_BP than did children without parental HTN (BMI: 21.6 vs 19.9, P = .001; BMI z score: 1.6 vs 1.1, P = .003; R_SBP: 112.6 vs 110.4 mm Hg, P = .01; R_DBP 62.7 vs 60.6 mm Hg, P = .003) after adjustment for covariates. Increased CVR was observed in children with parental HTN compared with children without parental HTN but was statistically significant only for SBP (delta_SBP: 17.2 vs 14.9 mm Hg; P = .01) after adjustment for covariates. Parental HTN independently predicted children's BMI, BMI z score, resting BP, and BP reactivity.

  14. Brachial edema after treatment of mammary carcinoma. Significance of phlebography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botsch, H; Soerensen, R [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.). Klinik fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Physikalische Therapie

    1977-01-01

    The frequency of thromboses or of obstacles to the venous flow in brachial or axillary regions has been examined by a phlebographic survey of 102 patients who were treated surgically and radiotherapeutically because of cancers of the breast. Thromboses or venous obstruction were found in the 86 patients with brachial edema. Ten of the patients with brachial edema had thromboses. Further 15 suffered from an obstruction to the venous flow. The results are discussed in detail, and compared with the rather contradictory data in literature. As a consequence of this study an indication for brachial phlebography would be justified on a larger scale with patients having been treated surgically because of mammary carcinoma.

  15. Use of short-radius centrifugation to augment ankle-brachial indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenon, S Marlene; Mateus, Jaime; Hsiang, York; Sidhu, Ravi; Young, Laurence; Gagnon, Joel

    2009-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is mainly caused by atherosclerosis and is characterized by decreased circulation, lower blood pressure, and insufficient tissue perfusion in the lower extremities. The hemodynamics of standing and altered gravity environments have been well studied relative to arm blood pressures but are less well understood for ankle pressures. Because regional blood pressure depends, in part, on the gravitational pressure gradient, we hypothesized that artificial gravity exposure on a short-arm centrifuge with the center of rotation above the head would increase blood pressure in the lower extremities. Cardiovascular parameters for 12 healthy subjects were measured during exposure to supine short-arm centrifugation at 20, 25, and 30 revolutions per minute (rpm), corresponding to centripetal accelerations of 0.94, 1.47, and 2.11 Gz at the foot level, respectively. Systolic ankle blood pressure significantly increased at all levels of centrifugation. Ankle-brachial indices (the ratio of systolic ankle to arm blood pressures) increased significantly from 1.17 +/- 0.03 to 1.58 +/- 0.03 at 0.94 Gz (P blood pressure significantly increased at 2.11 Gz, but heart rate did not change significantly. All parameters returned to normal after cessation of centrifugation. We demonstrated that short-radius centrifugation leads to an increase in ankle-brachial indices. This could have potential implications for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease.

  16. Brachial blood flow under relative levels of blood flow restriction is decreased in a nonlinear fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouser, J Grant; Ade, Carl J; Black, Christopher D; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2018-05-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR), the application of external pressure to occlude venous return and restrict arterial inflow, has been shown to increase muscular size and strength when combined with low-load resistance exercise. BFR in the research setting uses a wide range of pressures, applying a pressure based upon an individual's systolic pressure or a percentage of occlusion pressure; not a directly determined reduction in blood flow. The relationship between relative pressure and blood flow has not been established. To measure blood flow in the arm under relative levels of BFR. Forty-five people (18-40 years old) participated. Arterial occlusion pressure in the right arm was measured using a 5-cm pneumatic cuff. Blood flow in the brachial artery was measured at rest and at pressures between 10% and 90% of occlusion using ultrasound. Blood flow decreased in a nonlinear, stepped fashion. Blood flow decreased at 10% of occlusion and remained constant until decreasing again at 40%, where it remained until 90% of occlusion. The decrease in brachial blood flow is not proportional to the applied relative pressure. The prescription of blood flow restriction should take into account the stimulus provided at each relative level of blood flow. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Impact of body mass index on high blood pressure among obese children in the western region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E; Mahjoub, Areej O

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on high blood pressure among obese children and adolescents in western region, Saudi Arabia.  Methods: Cross-sectional data were obtained from 306 (female: 140, male: 166) child, between August 2016 and March 2017. A questioner was filled by health professionals at ambulatory pediatric clinic followed by waist-hip circumference, height, weight, and blood pressure measurement. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were adjusted to gender, height, and age. World Health Organization growth standards were used to calculate BMI z-scores. Results: The mean age of subjects was 10.1 years. Body mass index increased SBP by 1.722 mmHg (p=0.001), and DBP by 0.901 mmHg (p=0.006) in boys, and 0.969 mmHg (p=0.036), and DBP by 0.704 mmHg (p=0.045) in girls. Waist hip ratio showed significant difference p=0.041, (p=0.0001) between male and female. Of the baseline characteristics, age greater than 11 years showed significant difference. Symptomatic manifestation of high blood pressure, family history of hypertension, level of activity, income level and post-secondary education in parents, did not show any significant results. Conclusion: Elevated BMI is associated with significantly increased diastolic and systolic blood pressure in obese children, especially in children older than 11 years.

  18. Impact of body mass index on high blood pressure among obese children in the western region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmoein E. Al-Agha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the impact of body mass index (BMI on high blood pressure among obese children and adolescents in western region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Cross-sectional data were obtained from 306 (female: 140, male: 166 child, between August 2016 and March 2017. A questioner was filled by health professionals at ambulatory pediatric clinic followed by waist-hip circumference, height, weight, and blood pressure measurement. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP and systolic blood pressure (SBP were adjusted to gender, height, and age. World Health Organization growth standards were used to calculate BMI z-scores. Results: The mean age of subjects was 10.1 years. Body mass index increased SBP by 1.722 mmHg (p=0.001, and DBP by 0.901 mmHg (p=0.006 in boys, and 0.969 mmHg (p=0.036, and DBP by 0.704 mmHg (p=0.045 in girls. Waist hip ratio showed significant difference p=0.041, (p=0.0001 between male and female. Of the baseline characteristics, age greater than 11 years showed significant difference. Symptomatic manifestation of high blood pressure, family history of hypertension, level of activity, income level and post-secondary education in parents, did not show any significant results. Conclusion: Elevated BMI is associated with significantly increased diastolic and systolic blood pressure in obese children, especially in children older than 11 years.

  19. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result

  20. Automated method to compute Evans index for diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on brain CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Ohmura, Tomomi; Matsuyama, Eri; Toyoshima, Hideto

    2017-03-01

    The early diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) considered as a treatable dementia is important. The iNPH causes enlargement of lateral ventricles (LVs). The degree of the enlargement of the LVs on CT or MR images is evaluated by using a diagnostic imaging criterion, Evans index. Evans index is defined as the ratio of the maximal width of frontal horns (FH) of the LVs to the maximal width of the inner skull (IS). Evans index is the most commonly used parameter for the evaluation of ventricular enlargement. However, manual measurement of Evans index is a time-consuming process. In this study, we present an automated method to compute Evans index on brain CT images. The algorithm of the method consisted of five major steps: standardization of CT data to an atlas, extraction of FH and IS regions, the search for the outmost points of bilateral FH regions, determination of the maximal widths of both the FH and the IS, and calculation of Evans index. The standardization to the atlas was performed by using linear affine transformation and non-linear wrapping techniques. The FH regions were segmented by using a three dimensional region growing technique. This scheme was applied to CT scans from 44 subjects, including 13 iNPH patients. The average difference in Evans index between the proposed method and manual measurement was 0.01 (1.6%), and the correlation coefficient of these data for the Evans index was 0.98. Therefore, this computerized method may have the potential to accurately compute Evans index for the diagnosis of iNPH on CT images.

  1. Design and methodology for calculating the environmental pressure index as a tool for environmental land planning: the case of Cundinamarca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho O, Juana; Burgos S, Javier Dario

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a practical tool to carry out environmental planning and management processes regarding the use of space, in a complex way including not only biophysical but socioeconomic criteria. In the context of river basin management the Environmental Social Pressure Index was created. This paper presents an Environmental Planning and Management definition, based on the Ecological Supporting Structure, as well as one of sustainability, worked out of several authors. This work offers the methodological sequence to design and calculate a customized Environmental Social Pressure Index according to the specific features of any given territory, using the conceptual framework developed earlier and the multivariate analysis and power laws tools. Finally we present an exercise to illustrate this process, developed for Cundinamarca for 1995

  2. Exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement has good sensitivity and specificity to detect lower extremity arterial stenosis assessed by computed tomography angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Caroline; Chauve, Emmanuel; Chaudru, S?gol?ne; Le Faucheur, Alexis; Jaquinandi, Vincent; Mah?, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease diagnosed by the use of ankle-brachial index (ABI) at rest. In some clinical conditions (diabetes, renal insufficiency, advanced age), ABI can be falsely normal and other tests are required for the PAD diagnosis (American Heart Association statement). This study was conducted to determine the accuracy of exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement (exercise-TcPo2) in detection of arterial stenosis ?50% using comput...

  3. Anomalous patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    block Background: Structural variations in the patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial plexus have drawn attentions both in anatomy and anaesthesia. Method: An observational study. Results: The brachial plexus was carefully inspected in both the right and left arms in 90 Nigerian cadavers, comprising of 74 ...

  4. Muscle and joint sequelae in brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnisveld, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury is caused by traction on the brachial plexus during delivery or due to a high-energy road traffic accident in young adults. Muscle denervation and subsequent muscle degeneration results in functional limitations of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand including contractures

  5. Brachial plexopathy: recurrent cancer or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, R.J.; Wilbourn, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    We reviewed clinical and electrodiagnostic features of 16 patients with neoplastic brachial plexopathy (NBP) and 17 patients with radiation-induced plexopathy (RBP). The groups were similar in symptom-free interval after cancer diagnosis and location of the plexus lesions. NBP patients had pain and Horner's syndrome; RBP patients had paresthesias, but rarely Horner's. NBP patients presented earlier after symptom onset and had a shorter course. RBP patients more frequently had abnormal sensory and normal motor nerve conduction studies and characteristically had fasciculations or myokymia on EMG

  6. Blood Pressure and Its Association with Gender, Body Mass Index, Smoking, and Family History among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein H. Alhawari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we will assess the frequency of hypertension among healthy university students and its association with gender, body mass index, smoking, and family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. We screened healthy university students ranging from 18 to 26 years of age. For each participant, we performed blood pressure measurements using a previously validated device and obtained demographic data, body mass index (BMI, smoking status, and family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Out of the total number of 505 participants included in this study, 35.2% have blood pressure between 130/80 and 139/89, and 13.5% have blood pressure of more than 140/90. We found significant gender differences in both systolic pressure (p = 0.003 with mean difference = 18.08 mmHg (CI: 16.13 to 19.9 and diastolic pressure (p = 0.011 with mean difference = 3.6 mmHg (CI: 2.06 to 5.14, higher in males than in females. Upon comparing the mean difference in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure with BMI, we found significant differences in both systolic (p < 0.001 and diastolic (p = 0.002 blood pressure. We also found that smokers have significantly (p = 0.025 higher systolic blood pressure (mean difference = 4.2 mmHg, CI: 3.2 mmHg to 8.8 mmHg, but no significant difference for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.386, compared to nonsmokers. First-degree family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases affected systolic but not diastolic blood pressure. Taking into account the adverse short- and long-term effect of hypertension, we recommend adopting an awareness program highlighting the importance of screening blood pressure in young adolescent populations, keeping in mind that both high BMI and smoking are important modifiable factors.

  7. The effect of moderate running on foot posture index and plantar pressure distribution in male recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Martínez, Elena; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Gómez-Martín, Beatriz; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Fernández-Seguín, Lourdes María

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue due to running has been shown to contribute to changes in plantar pressure distribution. However, little is known about changes in foot posture after running. We sought to compare the foot posture index before and after moderate exercise and to relate any changes to plantar pressure patterns. A baropodometric evaluation was made, using the FootScan platform (RSscan International, Olen, Belgium), of 30 men who were regular runners and their foot posture was examined using the Foot Posture Index before and after a 60-min continuous run at a moderate pace (3.3 m/sec). Foot posture showed a tendency toward pronation after the 60-min run, gaining 2 points in the foot posture index. The total support and medial heel contact areas increased, as did pressures under the second metatarsal head and medial heel. Continuous running at a moderate speed (3.3 m/sec) induced changes in heel strike related to enhanced pronation posture, indicative of greater stress on that zone after physical activity. This observation may help us understand the functioning of the foot, prevent injuries, and design effective plantar orthoses in sport.

  8. Effects of iodinated contrast media on common carotid and brachial artery blood flow and wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irace, C.; Tamburini, S.; Bertucci, B.; Franceschi, M.S. de; Gnasso, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the intravenous contrast media iomeprol on wall shear stress, blood flow and vascular parameters in the common carotid and brachial artery. Thirty outpatients undergoing thoracic or abdominal spiral CT scans were studied. The internal diameter and flow velocity of the common carotid and brachial artery were evaluated by ultrasound, and blood viscosity was measured before and after low osmolality iomeprol (Iomeron 350) injection. The wall shear stress, blood flow and pulsatility index were calculated. To test the differences between groups, the Wilcoxon rank test and Mann Whitney U test were applied. Blood viscosity decreased slightly, but significantly after contrast media (4.6±0.7 vs. 4.5±0.7 mPa.s, P=0.02). Contrarily, blood flow and wall shear stress did not change in the common carotid artery, but significantly decreased in the brachial artery (0.9±0.4 vs. 0.6±0.3 ml/s, P<0.0001, and 41.5±13.9 vs. 35.3±11.0 dynes/cm2, P<0.002, respectively), whereas the pulsatility index significantly increased in the brachial artery (5.0±3.3 vs. 7.5±5.3, P<0.001). Iomeprol injection causes blood flow and wall shear stress reduction of the brachial artery; the rise in the pulsatility index suggests an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. Further investigation is needed to evaluate whether these modifications can be clinically relevant. (orig.)

  9. The Relationship Between Oxygen Reserve Index and Arterial Partial Pressure of Oxygen During Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Richard L; Dorotta, Ihab L; Wells, Briana; Juma, David; Applegate, Patricia M

    2016-09-01

    The use of intraoperative pulse oximetry (SpO2) enhances hypoxia detection and is associated with fewer perioperative hypoxic events. However, SpO2 may be reported as 98% when arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) is as low as 70 mm Hg. Therefore, SpO2 may not provide advance warning of falling arterial oxygenation until PaO2 approaches this level. Multiwave pulse co-oximetry can provide a calculated oxygen reserve index (ORI) that may add to information from pulse oximetry when SpO2 is >98%. This study evaluates the ORI to PaO2 relationship during surgery. We studied patients undergoing scheduled surgery in which arterial catheterization and intraoperative arterial blood gas analysis were planned. Data from multiple pulse co-oximetry sensors on each patient were continuously collected and stored on a research computer. Regression analysis was used to compare ORI with PaO2 obtained from each arterial blood gas measurement and changes in ORI with changes in PaO2 from sequential measurements. Linear mixed-effects regression models for repeated measures were then used to account for within-subject correlation across the repeatedly measured PaO2 and ORI and for the unequal time intervals of PaO2 determination over elapsed surgical time. Regression plots were inspected for ORI values corresponding to PaO2 of 100 and 150 mm Hg. ORI and PaO2 were compared using mixed-effects models with a subject-specific random intercept. ORI values and PaO2 measurements were obtained from intraoperative data collected from 106 patients. Regression analysis showed that the ORI to PaO2 relationship was stronger for PaO2 to 240 mm Hg (r = 0.536) than for PaO2 over 240 mm Hg (r = 0.0016). Measured PaO2 was ≥100 mm Hg for all ORI over 0.24. Measured PaO2 was ≥150 mm Hg in 96.6% of samples when ORI was over 0.55. A random intercept variance component linear mixed-effects model for repeated measures indicated that PaO2 was significantly related to ORI (β[95% confidence interval] = 0

  10. Central aortic blood pressure and augmentation index: comparison between Vasotens® and SphygmoCor® technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogoza AN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Anatoliy N Rogoza,1 Aleksandr A Kuznetsov21Cardiology Research Complex, Moscow, Russian Federation; 2Therapy Research Institute, Siberian branch of Russian Academy of Medical Science, Novosibirsk, Russian FederationIntroduction: The aim of this study is the comparison of Vasotens® technology as used in a device with an oscillometric method of blood pressure measurement (BPLab, Petr Telegin Ltd, Nizhny Novgorod, Russian Federation against the validated tonometric system (SphygmoCor®, AtCor Medical Pty Ltd, West Ryde, Australia.Methods: The examinations were carried out in two medical centers. Exclusion criteria included atrial fibrillation, severe cardiac anomalies, heart failure, arrhythmia, decompensated diabetes, the presence of an artificial pacemaker, pregnancy, and BMI > 30. Overall, 160 patients and healthy volunteers were examined. Central aortic systolic blood pressure (aSBP and augmentation index (aAIx were obtained by means of applanation tonometry and the oscillometric method was compared.Results: aSBP and aAIx measured using the BPLab device equates significantly with the same parameters measured by SphygmoCor.Conclusion: This finding allows the recommendation of Vasotens technology, which can be used with the 24-hour BPLab monitoring system for wide clinical use.Keywords: central aortic blood pressure, augmentation index, validation, Vasotens®, BPLab®

  11. Stress index development for piping with trunnion attachment under pressure and moment loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. H.; Kim, J. M.; Park, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    A finite element analysis of a trunnion pipe anchor is presented. The structure is analyzed for the case of internal pressure and moment loadings. The stress results are categorized into the average (membrane) stress, the linearly varying (bending) stress and the peak stress through the thickness. The resulting stresses are interpreted per section III of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code from which the Primary (B 1 ), Secondary (C 1 ) and Peak (K 1 ) stress indices for pressure, the Primary (B 2 ), Secondary (C 2 ) and Peak (K 2 ) stress indices for moment are developed. Based on the comparison between stress value by stress indices derived in this paper and stress value represented by the ASME Code Case N-391-1, the empirical equations for stress indices are effectively used in the piping stress analysis. Therefore, the use of empirical equations can simplify the procedure of evaluating the local stress in the piping design stage. (author)

  12. Comparison of Regression Analysis and Transfer Function in Estimating the Parameters of Central Pulse Waves from Brachial Pulse Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Rui; Xu, Li-Sheng; Yao, Yang; Hao, Li-Ling; Qi, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed ascending branch slope (A_slope), dicrotic notch height (Hn), diastolic area (Ad) and systolic area (As) diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), pulse pressure (PP), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR), waveform parameter (k), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and peripheral resistance (RS) of central pulse wave invasively and non-invasively measured. Invasively measured parameters were compared with parameters measured from brachial pulse waves by regression model and transfer function model. Accuracy of parameters estimated by regression and transfer function model, was compared too. Findings showed that k value, central pulse wave and brachial pulse wave parameters invasively measured, correlated positively. Regression model parameters including A_slope, DBP, SEVR, and transfer function model parameters had good consistency with parameters invasively measured. They had same effect of consistency. SBP, PP, SV, and CO could be calculated through the regression model, but their accuracies were worse than that of transfer function model.

  13. Effect of beta-1-blocker, nebivolol, on central aortic pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soanker, Radhika; Naidu, M U R; Raju, Sree Bhushan; Prasad, A Krishna; Rao, T Ramesh Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) reduction is the major determinant of benefit provided by antihypertensive treatment. Although different drugs reduce peripheral BP to some extent, there may be a significant difference in their effect on central BP reduction. It has been shown that beta-blockers are efficient in reducing peripheral, but not central BP. This study was done to assess the effect of beta-1-blocker, nebivolol, in patients with essential hypertension on central aortic pressures and arterial stiffness. In this single arm, open-labeled study, 13 patients were given nebivolol, 5 mg orally once daily for 15 days. Primary outcome was change in central aortic pressure, and other measures of efficacy included changes in brachial BP, augmentation index (AIx%), AIx%@75 HR, augmentation pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVcf). Nebivolol 5 mg significantly reduced central aortic pressures [systolic BP, 131.5-111.6 mmHg; diastolic BP, 96.3-81.7 mmHg; Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), 111.3-94.0 mmHg (all PPressure (PP), 35.2-29.7 mmHg (Plost to followup. Nebivolol 5 mg demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy in patients with essential hypertension by reducing not only peripheral brachial pressures, but also significantly reducing central aortic pressures, augmentation index, and carotid femoral pulse wave velocity, which is the marker of arterial stiffness.

  14. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  15. Neurotization of elements of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, A H

    1991-01-01

    Satisfactory therapy for an avulsion injury of the brachial plexus has yet to be described. Dorsal root entry zone lesions will usually mitigate the searing pain which is so disabling in some of these patients. Neurotization procedures are effective in restoring limited function to these patients. The most useful isolated movement of the upper extremity is elbow flexion, which is thus the primary target of neurotization procedures. Intercostal nerves and elements of the cervical plexus are the most commonly used donor nerves for neurotization procedures. From our experience and from a review of the literature, it appears that these procedures will be successful in approximately 50% of cases. It must be stressed that before performing a nerve transfer, the surgeon must be certain that the patient is not a candidate for a simple nerve graft.

  16. Relationship Between 24-Hour Ambulatory Central Systolic Blood Pressure and Left Ventricular Mass: A Prospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Rodilla, Enrique; Ablasser, Cornelia; Jankowski, Piotr; Lorenza Muiesan, Maria; Giannattasio, Cristina; Mang, Claudia; Wilkinson, Ian; Kellermair, Jörg; Hametner, Bernhard; Pascual, Jose Maria; Zweiker, Robert; Czarnecka, Danuta; Paini, Anna; Salvetti, Massimo; Maloberti, Alessandro; McEniery, Carmel

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between left ventricular mass and brachial office as well as brachial and central ambulatory systolic blood pressure in 7 European centers. Central systolic pressure was measured with a validated oscillometric device, using a transfer function, and mean/diastolic pressure calibration. M-mode images were obtained by echocardiography, and left ventricular mass was determined by one single reader blinded to blood pressure. We studied 289 participants (137 women) free from antihypertensive drugs (mean age: 50.8 years). Mean office blood pressure was 145/88 mm Hg and mean brachial and central ambulatory systolic pressures were 127 and 128 mm Hg, respectively. Mean left ventricular mass was 93.3 kg/m 2 , and 25.6% had left ventricular hypertrophy. The correlation coefficient between left ventricular mass and brachial office, brachial ambulatory, and central ambulatory systolic pressure was 0.29, 0.41, and 0.47, respectively ( P =0.003 for comparison between brachial office and central ambulatory systolic pressure and 0.32 for comparison between brachial and central ambulatory systolic pressure). The results were consistent for men and women, and young and old participants. The areas under the curve for prediction of left ventricular hypertrophy were 0.618, 0.635, and 0.666 for brachial office, brachial, and central ambulatory systolic pressure, respectively ( P =0.03 for comparison between brachial and central ambulatory systolic pressure). In younger participants, central ambulatory systolic pressure was superior to both other measurements. Central ambulatory systolic pressure, measured with an oscillometric cuff, shows a strong trend toward a closer association with left ventricular mass and hypertrophy than brachial office/ambulatory systolic pressure. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01278732. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a cervicomediastinal ... Her voice was hoarse but there was no eye signs suggestive of thyrotoxicosis. ... A presumptive diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma with retrosternal extension was made.

  18. Inflammation and neuropathic attacks in hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C; Dyck, P; Friedenberg, S; Burns, T; Windebank, A; Dyck, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of mechanical, infectious, and inflammatory factors inducing neuropathic attacks in hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy (HBPN), an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by attacks of pain and weakness, atrophy, and sensory alterations of the shoulder girdle and upper limb muscles. Methods: Four patients from separate kindreds with HBPN were evaluated. Upper extremity nerve biopsies were obtained during attacks from a person of each kindred. In situ hybridisation for common viruses in nerve tissue and genetic testing for a hereditary tendency to pressure palsies (HNPP; tomaculous neuropathy) were undertaken. Two patients treated with intravenous methyl prednisolone had serial clinical and electrophysiological examinations. One patient was followed prospectively through pregnancy and during the development of a stereotypic attack after elective caesarean delivery. Results: Upper extremity nerve biopsies in two patients showed prominent perivascular inflammatory infiltrates with vessel wall disruption. Nerve in situ hybridisation for viruses was negative. There were no tomaculous nerve changes. In two patients intravenous methyl prednisolone ameliorated symptoms (largely pain), but with tapering of steroid dose, signs and symptoms worsened. Elective caesarean delivery did not prevent a typical postpartum attack. Conclusions: Inflammation, probably immune, appears pathogenic for some if not all attacks of HBPN. Immune modulation may be useful in preventing or reducing the neuropathic attacks, although controlled trials are needed to establish efficacy, as correction of the mutant gene is still not possible. The genes involved in immune regulation may be candidates for causing HBPN disorders. PMID:12082044

  19. Hyperspectral imaging and ankle: brachial indices in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Saraf, Lida; Gordon, Ian L

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the correlation between ankle:brachial indices (ABI) and visible light reflectance spectroscopy hyperspectral imaging (HSI) determinations of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHgb and deoxyHgb) levels in the skin of the distal lower extremity. This is a prospective, open, comparator trial which took place at the Vascular laboratory of a Veterans Administration Hospital in Long Beach, USA. Fifty-eight patients (85 limbs) were referred for routine vascular laboratory studies including ABI had concomitant HSI. Limbs with noncompressible pedal signals were excluded from the analysis. ABI was determined with continuous wave Doppler ultrasound and leg blood pressure cuffs. A commercial HSI system (Oxu-Vu(R), Hypermed, Inc.) was used to measure oxyHgb, deoxyHgb, and percent oxygenated hemoglobin (%oxyHgb) in the dorsum of the foot and ankle. HSI measurements of volar forearm skin were also obtained to normalize the lower extremity HSI measurements in a manner comparable with ABI. For purposes of comparison, data sets were divided into 3 groups: ABI > 0.9 (n = 53), 0.45 failed to show a clinically useful correlation between HSI measurements of oxyHgb levels, further evaluation of this novel technology is warranted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Increased augmentation index and central systolic arterial pressure are associated with lower school and motor performance in young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogrin, Bernarda; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Mičetić-Turk, Dušanka

    2017-12-01

    Objective In adults, improper arterial function has been linked to cognitive impairment. The pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx) and other vascular parameters are useful indicators of arterial health. In our study, we monitored arterial properties, body constitution, school success, and motor skills in young adolescents. We hypothesize that reduced cognitive and motor abilities have a vascular origin in children. Methods We analysed 81 healthy school children aged 11-16 years. Anthropometry central systolic arterial pressure, body mass index (BMI), standard deviation scores (SDS) BMI, general school performance grade, and eight motor tests were assessed. PWV, AIx, and central systolic arterial pressure (SBPao) were measured. Results AIx and SBPao correlated negatively with school performance grades. Extremely high AIx, PWV and SBPao values were observed in 5% of children and these children had average to low school performance. PWV correlated significantly with weight, height, and waist and hip circumference. AIx, PWV, school success, and BMI correlated strongly with certain motor functions. Conclusions Increased AIx and SBPao are associated with lower school and motor performance in children. PWV is influenced by the body's constitution.

  1. Brachial artery aneurysm and thrombosis secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Louise Jones, MBBS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromuscular dysplasia is a pathologic process causing stenosis and dilation of medium-caliber arteries of unknown etiology. It most commonly affects the renal and carotid arteries; however, it has been described in virtually all anatomic areas, including, rarely, the brachial artery. We describe a case of brachial artery aneurysm and thrombosis in a 29-year-old man secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia, treated surgically with excision, embolectomy, interposed vein graft, and anticoagulation.

  2. Nerve Transfers for Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury: Advantages and Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Hems, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In recent years nerve transfers have been increasingly used to broaden reconstructive options for brachial plexus reconstruction. Nerve transfer is a procedure where an expendable nerve is connected to a more important nerve in order to reinnervate that nerve. This article outlines the experience of the Scottish National Brachial Plexus Injury Service as our use of nerve transfers has increased. Outcomes have improved for reconstruction of the paralysed shoulder using transfer of the accessor...

  3. Time Course of Changes in Extravascular Lung Water Index, Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Acute Cerebral Circulatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the time course of changes in extravascular lung water index (ELWI and intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (ICP and CPP and to determine their possible relationships in acute cerebral circulatory disorders (ACCD. Subject and methods. ELWI, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI, ICP, CPP, and central hemodynamics were studied by transpulmonary thermodilution and current X-ray studies were conducted in 18 patients on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of ACCD. Results. Examinations revealed a supratentorial dislocation of the brain in 6 persons; its subtento-rial dislocation was found in 1 case; supra- and subtentorial dislocations were seen in 6. In patients, ELWI and PVPI increased from days 1 and 5, respectively. The high baseline ICP increased over time. CPP remained unchanged. Preserved left ventricular contractility, enhanced myocardial one, a significant direct correlation between ELWI and PVPI, as well as their increase confirmed that the noncardiogenic genesis was responsible for increased ELWI. A direct significant correlation was found between ICP and ELWI, ICP and PVPI. Against this background, acute respiratory distress syndrome developed in 14 patients with pneumonia evolving in its presence in 7 patients. Conclusion. In ACCD, ELWI increases in the first 24 hours of the acute period. One of its causes is, along with others, primary and/or secondary damage to the brainstem structures with elevated ICP and progressive brain dislocation. The determination of ICP, unlike CPP, is crucial in the diagnosis and treatment of primary/secondary brain injuries and in prognosis. Key words: acute cerebral circulatory disorder, extravascular lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. Decrease in blood pressure, body mass index and glycemia after aerobic training in elderly women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Luciana Zaranza; Fiani, Cássio Ricardo Vaz; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Foss, Milton César

    2010-10-01

    The aging process is associated with the development of several diseases, which can be attenuated by the practice of physical activities. Aerobic training is an effective method to maintain and improve cardiovascular function. Additionally, it has a crucial role in the prevention and treatment of several chronic-degenerative diseases, especially diabetes mellitus. } To verify the effect of a 13-week aerobic training program on blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI) and glycemia levels in elderly women with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Eleven sedentary elderly women with DM2, aged 61.0 ± 9.1 years, were submitted a 13-week aerobic training program, constituting group G2. Eleven controlled elderly women (aged 60.2 ± 6.8 years) were not submitted to the aerobic training, constituting the control group (G1). G1 attended educational lectures once a week, whereas G2 walked three times a week. Both groups presented a significant decrease in glycemia and diastolic blood pressure levels. No significant decreases in BMI were observed after the aerobic training in either group. The 13-week aerobic training program was enough to promote significant decrease in the diastolic blood pressure and glycemia levels; therefore, this type of exercise training decreases the risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  5. The diagnostic accuracy of 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging for detecting root avulsions in traumatic adult brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie G; Itte, Vinay; Rankine, James J; Ridgway, John P; Bourke, Grainne

    2018-03-01

    Identification of root avulsions is of critical importance in traumatic brachial plexus injuries because it alters the reconstruction and prognosis. Pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging is gaining popularity, but there is limited and conflicting data on its diagnostic accuracy for root avulsion. This cohort study describes consecutive patients requiring brachial plexus exploration following trauma between 2008 and 2016. The index test was magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla and the reference test was operative exploration of the supraclavicular plexus. Complete data from 29 males was available. The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 79%. The diagnostic accuracy of a pseudomeningocoele as a surrogate marker of root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 68%. We conclude that pseudomeningocoles were not a reliable sign of root avulsion and magnetic resonance imaging has modest diagnostic accuracy for root avulsions in the context of adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries. III.

  6. Effects of acute dietary nitrate supplementation on aortic blood pressure and aortic augmentation index in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William E; Ueda, Kenichi; Treichler, David P; Casey, Darren P

    2016-09-30

    Aging is associated with elevated blood pressure (peripheral and aortic; BP) and aortic augmentation index (AIx) which may contribute to aortic BP. Although inorganic nitrate consumption reduces peripheral BP in both young and older adults, the effects of nitrate consumption on aortic BP and wave reflection in young and older adults is unknown. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effects of nitrate consumption on aortic BP and AIx in young and older adults. Noninvasive aortic pressure waveforms were synthesized from high-fidelity radial pressure waveforms via applanation tonometry before and following (60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min) consumption of a nitrate-rich beetroot juice in 26 healthy adults (young: 25 ± 4 years, n = 14; older: 64 ± 5 years, n = 12). Aortic BP and indices of aortic wave reflection (AIx and AIx normalized for heart rate; AIx@75bpm) were calculated from the generated aortic pressure waveform. Nitrate consumption increased plasma nitrite in both groups 60-180 min following beetroot consumption (P young and older adults (P age groups. Conversely, indices of aortic wave reflection were reduced only in young adults following nitrate consumption (range of change from baseline over time: AIx@75bpm, -4.3 to -8.8%, P adults. Taken together, our results suggest that acute dietary nitrate supplementation reduces peripheral and aortic BP similarly in young and older adults despite differential effects on aortic AIx between age groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Relationship Between Different Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Ankle Brachial Index A Region%某区2型糖尿病视网膜病变不同分期与踝肱指数ABI的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      目的观察2型糖尿病患者视网膜微血管病变不同分期与踝肱指数ABI之间的相互关系。方法收集我院内分泌科2010年6月至2012年9月经确诊的203例2型糖尿病住院患者,经踝肱比值(ABI)测定,将其分为ABI正常组(1.0<ABI<1.3),ABI异常组ABI<1.0或ABI>1.3),观察糖尿病视网膜病变(DR)不同分期情况下与ABI之间的关系。结果 ABI异常组的2型糖尿病患者中,DR检出率为94.1%,约是正常组的1.6倍,两者比较差异有显著性(P=0.000);单因素Logistic回归分析显示,DR I期(P=0.01,OR=0.04,95% CI:0.00~0.38);DR II期(P=0.22,OR=0.28,95% CI:0.04~2.18);DR III期(P=0.91,OR=0.89,95% CI:0.11~6.93)。结论 DR I期对ABI来说,是其微弱的保护因素(95%CI<1),DR II-III期与ABI之间无统计学差异(P值>0.05),即DR II、III期不是ABI的危险因素(尽管III期时95%CI>1)。尽管本实验,未能发现2型糖尿病视网膜病变不同分期与ABI之间有直接线性关系,但在2TDM患者中DR的检出率仍偏高,建议行ABI检测的糖尿病患者,尽早行眼底病变筛查,这对预防糖尿病大血管及微血管并发症均有重要意义。%Objective To observe the relationship between T2DM with diabetic retinopathy (DR) at the different stages and the ankle-brachial index (ABI). Methods To Collect 203 cases which had diagnosed T2DM patients from June 2010 to September 2012 at department of Endocrinology in our hospital, divided into normal ABI group (1.01.3), and to observe the relationship between each other .Results In ABI abnormal group of patients with type 2 diabetes, the detection rate of diabetic retinopathy was 94.1% ,which about 1.6 times more than the normal group. And the difference had a statistically significant (P=0.000); the Univariate Logistic regression analysis showed that DR I (P=0.01, OR=0.04, 95% CI:0.00~0.38); DR II (P=0.22, OR=0

  8. Risk Factors for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louden, Emily; Marcotte, Michael; Mehlman, Charles; Lippert, William; Huang, Bin; Paulson, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Over the course of decades, the incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) has increased despite advances in healthcare which would seem to assist in decreasing the rate. The aim of this study is to identify previously unknown risk factors for BPBI and the risk factors with potential to guide preventative measures. A case control study of 52 mothers who had delivered a child with a BPBI injury and 132 mothers who had delivered without BPBI injury was conducted. Univariate, multivariable and logistic regressions identified risk factors and their combinations. The odds of BPBI were 2.5 times higher when oxytocin was used and 3.7 times higher when tachysystole occurred. The odds of BPBI injury are increased when tachysystole and oxytocin occur during the mother’s labor. Logistic regression identified a higher risk for BPBI when more than three of the following variables (>30 lbs gained during the pregnancy, stage 2 labor >61.5 min, mother’s age >26.4 years, tachysystole, or fetal malpresentation) were present in any combination. PMID:29596309

  9. Risk Factors for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Louden

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of decades, the incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI has increased despite advances in healthcare which would seem to assist in decreasing the rate. The aim of this study is to identify previously unknown risk factors for BPBI and the risk factors with potential to guide preventative measures. A case control study of 52 mothers who had delivered a child with a BPBI injury and 132 mothers who had delivered without BPBI injury was conducted. Univariate, multivariable and logistic regressions identified risk factors and their combinations. The odds of BPBI were 2.5 times higher when oxytocin was used and 3.7 times higher when tachysystole occurred. The odds of BPBI injury are increased when tachysystole and oxytocin occur during the mother’s labor. Logistic regression identified a higher risk for BPBI when more than three of the following variables (>30 lbs gained during the pregnancy, stage 2 labor >61.5 min, mother’s age >26.4 years, tachysystole, or fetal malpresentation were present in any combination.

  10. Interaction between body mass index and serum uric acid in relation to blood pressure in community-dwelling Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Senzaki, Kensuke; Kumagi, Teru

    2018-01-01

    Few data is available on the association between body mass index (BMI), serum uric acid (SUA) levels and blood pressure (BP) categories in the disease continuum, when efforts for its prevention may be applicable. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the association between BMI, SUA and BP in a community-dwelling sample of Japanese men. Individuals not on antihypertensive and uric acid lowering medications, and aged 50 to 90 years [817men aged 66 ± 9 (mean ± standard deviation) years] were recruited for the survey during a community based annual medical check-up. The main outcome was the presence of prehypertension [systolic BP (SBP) 120-139 mmHg and/or diastolic BP (DBP) 80-89 mmHg] and hypertension [SBP ≥ 140 and /or DBP ≥ 90]. In participants with a BMI of dwelling men.

  11. Quantitative analysis of replication-related mutation and selection pressures in bacterial chromosomes and plasmids using generalised GC skew index

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    Suzuki Haruo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to their bi-directional replication machinery starting from a single finite origin, bacterial genomes show characteristic nucleotide compositional bias between the two replichores, which can be visualised through GC skew or (C-G/(C+G. Although this polarisation is used for computational prediction of replication origins in many bacterial genomes, the degree of GC skew visibility varies widely among different species, necessitating a quantitative measurement of GC skew strength in order to provide confidence measures for GC skew-based predictions of replication origins. Results Here we discuss a quantitative index for the measurement of GC skew strength, named the generalised GC skew index (gGCSI, which is applicable to genomes of any length, including bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. We demonstrate that gGCSI is independent of the window size and can thus be used to compare genomes with different sizes, such as bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. It can suggest the existence of different replication mechanisms in archaea and of rolling-circle replication in plasmids. Correlation of gGCSI values between plasmids and their corresponding host chromosomes suggests that within the same strain, these replicons have reproduced using the same replication machinery and thus exhibit similar strengths of replication strand skew. Conclusions gGCSI can be applied to genomes of any length and thus allows comparative study of replication-related mutation and selection pressures in genomes of different lengths such as bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. Using gGCSI, we showed that replication-related mutation or selection pressure is similar for replicons with similar machinery.

  12. Relation between respiratory function and arterial stiffness assessed using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in healthy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomoto, Atsushi; Fukuda, Rika; Deguchi, Junko; Toyonaga, Toshihiro

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] Current studies report that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may also have arteriosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between respiratory function and arterial stiffness in healthy workers using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). [Subjects and Methods] This study included 104 male Japanese workers without COPD. We collected participant information and measured hemodynamics, body composition, and respiratory function. [Results] In the correlation analysis, baPWV showed a significant positive correlation with age, smoking index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate, and a significant negative correlation with height, fat free mass, lower limb muscle mass, forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). In multiple regression analysis using factors other than baPWV and respiratory function as adjustment variables, both FVC and FEV1 showed a significant negative relationship with baPWV (p=0.009 and p=0.027, respectively). FEV1/FVC was not significantly related to baPWV (p=0.704). [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that FEV1/FVC and the proportion of FEV1 predicted, which are indicators of airflow limitation, are not predictors of baPWV in workers without airflow limitation. However, since baPWV showed a significant negative relationship with FVC and FEV 1, the reduction in respiratory function that does not cause airflow limitation, such as FVC or FEV1 decline, may be related to an increase in the risk of arterial stiffness.

  13. The Influence of Body Mass Index, Sex, & Muscle Activation on Pressure Distribution During Lateral Falls on the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Steven P; Martel, Daniel R; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-12-01

    Hip fracture incidence rates are influenced by body mass index (BMI) and sex, likely through mechanistic pathways that influence dynamics of the pelvis-femur system during fall-related impacts. The goal of this study was to extend our understanding of these impact dynamics by investigating the effects of BMI, sex, and local muscle activation on pressure distribution over the hip region during lateral impacts. Twenty participants underwent "pelvis-release experiments" (which simulate a lateral fall onto the hip), including muscle-'relaxed' and 'contracted' trials. Males and low-BMI individuals exhibited 44 and 55% greater peak pressure, as well as 66 and 56% lower peripheral hip force, compared to females and high-BMI individuals, respectively. Local muscle activation increased peak force by 10%, contact area by 17%, and peripheral hip force by 11% compared to relaxed trials. In summary, males and low-BMI individuals exhibited more concentrated loading over the greater trochanter. Muscle activation increased peak force, but this force was distributed over a larger area, preventing increased localized loading over the greater trochanter. These findings suggest potential value in incorporating sex, gender, and muscle activation-specific force distributions as inputs into computational tissue-level models, and have implications for the design of personalized protective devices including wearable hip protectors.

  14. Recovery of brachial plexus lesions resulting from heavy backpack use: A follow-up case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pihlajamäki Harri K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial plexus lesions as a consequence of carrying a heavy backpack have been reported, but the typical clinical course and long-term consequences are not clear. Here we evaluated the clinical course and pattern of recovery of backpack palsy (BPP in a large series of patients. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients with idiopathic BPP were identified from our population of 193,450 Finnish conscripts by means of computerised register. A physiotherapist provided instructions for proper hand use and rehabilitative exercises at disease onset. The patients were followed up for 2 to 8 years from the diagnosis. We also searched for genetic markers of hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to analyze continuous data. The Fischer's exact test was used to assess two-way tables. Results Eighty percent of the patients recovered totally within 9 months after the onset of weakness. Prolonged symptoms occurred in 15% of the patients, but daily activities were not affected. The weight of the carried load at the symptom onset significantly affected the severity of the muscle strength loss in the physiotherapeutic testing at the follow-up. The initial electromyography did not predict recovery. Genetic testing did not reveal de novo hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Conclusions The prognosis of BPP is favorable in the vast majority of cases. Electromyography is useful for diagnosis. To prevent brachial plexus lesions, backpack loads greater than 40 kg should be avoided.

  15. Prognostic value of thumb pain sensation in birth brachial plexopathy

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    Carlos O. Heise

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of absent thumb pain sensation in newborns and young infants with birth brachial plexopathy. METHODS: We evaluated 131 patients with birth brachial plexopathy with less than two months of age. Pain sensation was evoked by thumb nail bed compression to evaluate sensory fibers of the upper trunk (C6. The patients were followed-up monthly. Patients with less than antigravity elbow flexion at six months of age were considered to have a poor outcome. RESULTS: Thirty patients had absent thumb pain sensation, from which 26 showed a poor outcome. Sensitivity of the test was 65% and specificity was 96%. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of thumb pain sensation should be included in the clinical assessment of infants with birth brachial plexopathy.

  16. Reversible brachial plexopathy following primary radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salner, A.L.; Botnick, L.E.; Herzog, A.G.; Goldstein, M.A.; Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    Reversible brachial plexopathy has occurred in very low incidence in patients with breast carcinoma treated definitively with radiation therapy. Of 565 patients treated between January 1968 and December 1979 with moderate doses of supervoltage radiation therapy (average axillary dose of 5000 rad in 5 weeks), eight patients (1.4%) developed the characteristic symptoms at a median time of 4.5 months after radiation therapy. This syndrome consists of paresthesias in all patients, with weakness and pain less commonly seen. The symptom complex differs from other previously described brachial plexus syndromes, including paralytic brachial neuritis, radiation-induced injury, and carcinoma. A possible relationship to adjuvant chemotherapy exists, though the etiology is not well-understood. The cases described demonstrate temporal clustering. Resolution is always seen

  17. Central venous pressure and shock index predict lack of hemodynamic response to volume expansion in septic shock: a prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanspa, Michael J; Brown, Samuel M; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Grissom, Colin K

    2012-12-01

    Volume expansion is a common therapeutic intervention in septic shock, although patient response to the intervention is difficult to predict. Central venous pressure (CVP) and shock index have been used independently to guide volume expansion, although their use is questionable. We hypothesize that a combination of these measurements will be useful. In a prospective, observational study, patients with early septic shock received 10-mL/kg volume expansion at their treating physician's discretion after brief initial resuscitation in the emergency department. Central venous pressure and shock index were measured before volume expansion interventions. Cardiac index was measured immediately before and after the volume expansion using transthoracic echocardiography. Hemodynamic response was defined as an increase in a cardiac index of 15% or greater. Thirty-four volume expansions were observed in 25 patients. A CVP of 8 mm Hg or greater and a shock index of 1 beat min(-1) mm Hg(-1) or less individually had a good negative predictive value (83% and 88%, respectively). Of 34 volume expansions, the combination of both a high CVP and a low shock index was extremely unlikely to elicit hemodynamic response (negative predictive value, 93%; P = .02). Volume expansion in patients with early septic shock with a CVP of 8 mm Hg or greater and a shock index of 1 beat min(-1) mm Hg(-1) or less is unlikely to lead to an increase in cardiac index. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  19. Complete Brachial Plexus Injury - An Amputation Dilemma. A Case Report

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    Choong CYL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries with intact yet flail limb presents with problems of persistent neuropathic pain and recurrent shoulder dislocations, that render the flail limb a damn nuisance. As treating surgeons, we are faced with the dilemma of offering treatment options, bearing in mind the patient’s functional status and expectations. We present a case of a 55-year old housewife with complete brachial plexus injury begging for surgical amputation of her flail limb, 6 years post-injury. Here we discuss the outcome of transhumeral amputation and the possibility of offering early rather than delayed amputations in this group of patients.

  20. Surgical treatment of adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries: an overview

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    Mario G. Siqueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries to the brachial plexus in adults are severely debilitating. They generally affect young individuals. A thorough understanding of the anatomy, clinical evaluation, imaging and electrodiagnostic assessments, treatment options and proper timing of surgical interventions will enable nerve surgeons to offer optimal care to patients. Advances in microsurgical technique have improved the outcome for many of these patients. The treatment options offer patients with brachial plexus injuries the possibility of achieving elbow flexion, shoulder stability with limited abduction and the hope of limited but potentially useful hand function.

  1. Long-term results of obstetric brachial plexus surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kirjavainen , Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) most often occurs as a result of foetal-maternal disproportion. The C5 and C6 nerve roots of the brachial plexus are most frequently affected. In contrast, roots from the C7 to Th1 that result in total injury together with C5 and C6 injury, are affected in fewer than half of the patients. BPBP was first described by Smellie in 1764. Erb published his classical description of the injury in 1874 and his name became linked with the paralysis that is...

  2. Blood pressure-independent effect of candesartan on cardio-ankle vascular index in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome

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    Kanako Bokuda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Kanako Bokuda1, Atsuhiro Ichihara1,2, Mariyo Sakoda1, Asako Mito1, Kenichiro Kinouchi1, Hiroshi Itoh11Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Endocrinology and Anti-Aging Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs are known to reduce the cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. This study was designed to examine the effect of an ARB candesartan on subclinical atherosclerosis assessed by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI in comparison with calcium channel blockers (CCBs alone in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS. A total of 53 consecutive hypertensive patients with MetS were randomly assigned to the candesartan group, in which candesartan was added on, or the CCBs group, in which CCBs were added on. Clinical and biological parameters were obtained before and after the 12-month treatment period. The primary measure of efficacy was the %change in CAVI. When treated with candesartan, but not CCBs, CAVI significantly decreased from 8.7 to 7.7 by 11%. Blood pressure (BP significantly decreased with both treatments, but the differences between groups were not significant. The changes in other parameters remained unchanged in both the groups. Analysis of covariance found that both the BP reduction and the therapy difference contributed to the decrease in CAVI, but the BP reduction was not involved in the decrease in CAVI caused by the difference in the therapy. Candesartan may be a better antihypertensive drug than CCBs to that subclinical atherosclerosis of patients with MetS.Keywords: albuminuria, ambulatory blood pressure, calcium channel blockers, carotid ­intima-media thickness

  3. Body mass index and waist-to-height ratio cut-offs as predictors of high blood pressure in adolescents

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    Kurnia Febriana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is associated with increased risk for high blood pressure (BP. Although a routine BP measurement is indicated for all children visiting pediatric practice, recognition of children particularly at risk may save times. The aim of this study was to assess the cut-off point for body mass index (BMI and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR to predict high BP in adolescents. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 928 children aged 11 to 16 years in Yogyakarta. BP were measured using standard technique described by The Fourth Report on The Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. BMI was adjusted for age and sex using the WHO 2007 growth reference. WHtR was ratio of waist circumference related to height in centimeters. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to estimate the best cut-offs. Results: The best cut-off point for BMI-for-age Z-score (BMIZ to predict high BP was 0.51 with sensitivity and specificity of 82% (95% CI = 78-86 and 76% (95% CI = 67-78 for systolic BP and sensitivity and specificity of 82% (95% CI = 78-86 and 72% (95% CI = 68-76 for diastolic BP. The best cut-off point for WHtR was 0.45, with sensitivity of 76% (95% CI = 67-78 and specificity of 74% (95% CI = 71-79 for systolic BP and sensitivity of 76% (95% CI = 72-80 and specificity of 70% (95% CI = 61-75 for diastolic BP.Conclusion: BMIZ of 0.51 and WHtR of 0.45 are the best cut-off point to predict high BP in adolescents.

  4. Association of Interarm Systolic Blood Pressure Difference with Atherosclerosis and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ho-Ming; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Hsien; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Chee-Siong; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    An interarm systolic blood pressure (SBP) difference of 10 mmHg or more have been associated with peripheral artery disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. We investigated whether an association exists between this difference and ankle-brachial index (ABI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and echocardiographic parameters. A total of 1120 patients were included in the study. The bilateral arm blood pressures were measured simultaneously by an ABI-form device. The values of ABI and baPWV were also obtained from the same device. Clinical data, ABIdifference ≥10 mmHg were compared and analyzed. We performed two multivariate forward analyses for determining the factors associated with an interarm SBP difference ≥10 mmHg [model 1: significant variables in univariate analysis except left ventricular mass index (LVMI); model 2: significant variables in univariate analysis except ABIdifference ≥10 mmHg. Female, hypertension, and high body mass index were also associated with an interarm SBP difference ≥10 mmHg. Our study demonstrated that ABIdifference of 10 mmHg or more. Detection of an interarm SBP difference may provide a simple method of detecting patients at increased risk of atherosclerosis and left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:22927905

  5. A quantitative index of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution in normal pressure hydrocephalus using an MRI-based processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, A; Mitsuoka, H; Sato, K; Kanayama, S

    2000-06-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume components using an original MRI-based segmentation technique and to investigate whether a CSF volume index is useful for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We studied 59 subjects: 16 patients with NPH, 14 young and 13 elderly normal volunteers, and 16 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Images were acquired on a 1.5-T system, using a 3D-fast asymmetrical spin-echo (FASE) method. A region-growing method (RGM) was used to extract the CSF spaces from the FASE images. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured, and a VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Mean VV and VV/ICV ratio were higher in the NPH group than in the other groups, and the differences were statistically significant, whereas the mean ICV value in the NPH group was not significantly increased. Of the 16 patients in the NPH group, 13 had VV/ICV ratios above 30%. In contrast, no subject in the other groups had a VV/ICV ratios higher than 30%. We conclude that these CSF volume parameters, especially the VV/ICV ratio, are useful for the diagnosis of NPH.

  6. A quantitative index of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution in normal pressure hydrocephalus using an MRI-based processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, A.; Mitsuoka, H.; Sato, K.; Kanayama, S.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume components using an original MRI-based segmentation technique and to investigate whether a CSF volume index is useful for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We studied 59 subjects: 16 patients with NPH, 14 young and 13 elderly normal volunteers, and 16 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Images were acquired on a 1.5-T system, using a 3D-fast asymmetrical spin- echo (FASE) method. A region-growing method (RGM) was used to extract the CSF spaces from the FASE images. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured, and a VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Mean VV and VV/ICV ratio were higher in the NPH group than in the other groups, and the differences were statistically significant, whereas the mean ICV value in the NPH group was not significantly increased. Of the 16 patients in the NPH group, 13 had VV/ICV ratios above 30%. In contrast, no subject in the other groups had a VV/ICV ratios higher than 30%. We conclude that these CSF volume parameters, especially the VV/ICV ratio, are useful for the diagnosis of NPH. (orig.)

  7. A quantitative index of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution in normal pressure hydrocephalus using an MRI-based processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunoda, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, 10-47-1 Higashikoshigaya, Koshigaya City, Saitama 343-0023 (Japan); Mitsuoka, H.; Sato, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Juntendo University (Japan); Kanayama, S. [Research and Development Centre, Toshiba Corporation (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume components using an original MRI-based segmentation technique and to investigate whether a CSF volume index is useful for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We studied 59 subjects: 16 patients with NPH, 14 young and 13 elderly normal volunteers, and 16 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Images were acquired on a 1.5-T system, using a 3D-fast asymmetrical spin- echo (FASE) method. A region-growing method (RGM) was used to extract the CSF spaces from the FASE images. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured, and a VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Mean VV and VV/ICV ratio were higher in the NPH group than in the other groups, and the differences were statistically significant, whereas the mean ICV value in the NPH group was not significantly increased. Of the 16 patients in the NPH group, 13 had VV/ICV ratios above 30%. In contrast, no subject in the other groups had a VV/ICV ratios higher than 30%. We conclude that these CSF volume parameters, especially the VV/ICV ratio, are useful for the diagnosis of NPH. (orig.)

  8. Predictive utility of blood pressure, waist circumference and body mass index for metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjono, Milawaty; Lee, Jimmy

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to examine and compare the predictive utility of blood pressure (BP), waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI), and to determine optimal cut-off values in prediction of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with chronic schizophrenia. About 100 patients with chronic schizophrenia were recruited. BMI and BP were measured and laboratory tests to evaluate patients' high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels were performed. Presence of MetS was examined according to AHA/NHLBI guidelines. Predictive utility of BP, WC and BMI was examined using receiver operating curve and discriminant indices were determined accordingly. Forty-six (46%) patients were identified to have MetS. BMI of ≥23 kg m(-2) was most accurate (AUC = 0.83, P < 0.001), with sensitivity of 93.5%, specificity of 48.1%, positive predictive value of 60.6% and negative predictive value of 92.9% in identifying MetS. This finding has immediate and significant clinical implications in the local population with schizophrenia. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Investigation of Peak Pressure Index Parameters for People with Spinal Cord Injury Using Wheelchair Tilt-in-Space and Recline: Methodology and Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wen Lung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the sensel window’s location and size when calculating the peak pressure index (PPI of pressure mapping with varying degrees of wheelchair tilt-in-space (tilt and recline in people with spinal cord injury (SCI. Thirteen power wheelchair users were recruited into this study. Six combinations of wheelchair tilt (15°, 25°, and 35° and recline (10° and 30° were used by the participants in random order. Displacements of peak pressure and center of pressure were extracted from the left side of the mapping system. Normalized PPI was computed for three sensel window dimensions (3 sensels × 3 sensels, 5 × 5, and 7 × 7. At least 3.33 cm of Euclidean displacement of peak pressures was observed in the tilt and recline. For every tilt angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between 10° and 30° recline, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different (P<.05. For each recline angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between pairs of 15°, 25°, and 35° tilt, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different between 15° versus 35° and 25° versus 35°. Our study showed that peak pressure displacement occurs in response to wheelchair tilt and recline, suggesting that the selected sensel window locations used to calculate PPI should be adjusted during changes in wheelchair configuration.

  10. Investigation of peak pressure index parameters for people with spinal cord injury using wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline: methodology and preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Yang, Tim D; Crane, Barbara A; Elliott, Jeannette; Dicianno, Brad E; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the sensel window's location and size when calculating the peak pressure index (PPI) of pressure mapping with varying degrees of wheelchair tilt-in-space (tilt) and recline in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirteen power wheelchair users were recruited into this study. Six combinations of wheelchair tilt (15°, 25°, and 35°) and recline (10° and 30°) were used by the participants in random order. Displacements of peak pressure and center of pressure were extracted from the left side of the mapping system. Normalized PPI was computed for three sensel window dimensions (3 sensels × 3 sensels, 5 × 5, and 7 × 7). At least 3.33 cm of Euclidean displacement of peak pressures was observed in the tilt and recline. For every tilt angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between 10° and 30° recline, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different (P < .05). For each recline angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between pairs of 15°, 25°, and 35° tilt, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different between 15° versus 35° and 25° versus 35°. Our study showed that peak pressure displacement occurs in response to wheelchair tilt and recline, suggesting that the selected sensel window locations used to calculate PPI should be adjusted during changes in wheelchair configuration.

  11. Brachial artery responses to ambient pollution, temperature, and humidity in people with type 2 diabetes: a repeated-measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Horton, Edward S; Cohen, Allison; Coull, Brent A; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schwartz, Joel D; Mittleman, Murray A; Li, Yongsheng; Stone, Peter H; de Souza, Celine; Lamparello, Brooke; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R

    2014-03-01

    Extreme weather and air pollution are associated with increased cardiovascular risk in people with diabetes. In a population with diabetes, we conducted a novel assessment of vascular brachial artery responses both to ambient pollution and to weather (temperature and water vapor pressure, a measure of humidity). Sixty-four 49- to 85-year-old Boston residents with type 2 diabetes completed up to five study visits (279 repeated measures). Brachial artery diameter (BAD) was measured by ultrasound before and after brachial artery occlusion [i.e., flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] and before and after nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD). Ambient concentrations of fine particulate mass (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, particle number, and sulfate were measured at our monitoring site; ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone were obtained from state monitors. Particle exposure in the home and during each trip to the clinic (home/trip exposure) was measured continuously and as a 5-day integrated sample. We used linear models with fixed effects for participants, adjusting for date, season, temperature, and water vapor pressure on the day of each visit, to estimate associations between our outcomes and interquartile range increases in exposure. Baseline BAD was negatively associated with particle pollution, including home/trip-integrated BC (-0.02 mm; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.003, for a 0.28 μg/m3 increase in BC), OC (-0.08 mm; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.03, for a 1.61 μg/m3 increase) as well as PM2.5, 5-day average ambient PM2.5, and BC. BAD was positively associated with ambient temperature and water vapor pressure. However, exposures were not consistently associated with FMD or NMD. Brachial artery diameter, a predictor of cardiovascular risk, decreased in association with particle pollution and increased in association with ambient temperature in our study population of adults with type 2 diabetes. Zanobetti A, Luttmann

  12. Midazolam with Bupivacaine for Improving Analgesia Quality in Brachial Plexus Block for Upper Limb Surgeries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiq, N.; Khan, M.N.; Khan, S.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the onset, duration and postoperative pain scores of supraclavicular block with bupivacaine alone and bupivacaine-midazolam combination. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 50 ASA-I or II adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 each. Patients in group A were administered 30 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with midazolam 50 micro g kg/sup -1/. Hemodynamic variables (heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, oxygen saturation), pain scores, rescue analgesic requirements and sedation score were recorded for 24 hours postoperatively, and compared using ANOVA with significance at p <0.05. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block was significantly faster and longer in group B compared to group A (p < 0.001). Pain scores were significantly lower in group B for 24 hours postoperatively (p < 0.001). Demand for rescue analgesic were significantly less in group B. Hemodynamics and sedation scores did not differ between the groups in the studied period. Bupivacaine (0.5%) in combination with Midazolam (50 micro g kg/sup -1/) quickened the onset as well as prolonged the duration of sensory and motor blockade of the brachial plexus for upper limb surgery. It improved postoperative analgesia without producing any adverse events compared to plain bupivacaine (0.5%) in equal volume. (author)

  13. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  14. Unilateral high bifurcation of brachial artery: a case report | Auwal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Profunda Brachii, Superior Ulnar Collateral and Inferior Ulnar Collateral arteries arose from the relatively short brachial arterial trunk. Although the documented incidence of this anatomical variation is low in Nigeria, its concomitant widespread documentation in other parts of the world makes it a sufficiently important ...

  15. Brachial plexus injury in anterior dislocation of shoulder -case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brachial plexus injury in anterior dislocation of shoulder -case report and literature review. D Dhar. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma Vol. 6 () 2007: pp. 37-38. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  16. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  17. Parental body mass index and blood pressure are associated with higher body mass index and blood pressure in their adult offspring: a cross-sectional study in a resource-limited setting in northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Sal Y Rosas, Víctor G; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Cárdenas, María K; Gilman, Robert H; Miranda, J Jaime

    2018-05-01

    High body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP) are major contributors to the high burden of non-communicable diseases in adulthood. Individual high-risk and population approaches for prevention require newer strategies to target these risk factors and focusing on the family to introduce prevention initiatives appears as a promising scenario. Characterisation of the relationship between BMI and BP among the adult members of a given family merits evaluation. We conducted a secondary analysis of an implementation study in Tumbes, Peru, benefiting from data derived from families with at least one adult offspring. The exposures of interest were the BMI, systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) of the mother and father. The outcomes were the BMI, SBP and DBP of the offspring. Mixed-effects linear regression models were conducted. The mean age of the offspring, mothers and fathers was 29 (SD: 9.5), 54 (SD: 11.8) and 59 (SD: 11.6) years, respectively. Father's BMI was associated with a quarter-point increase in offspring BMI, regardless of the sex of the offspring. Mother's BMI had a similar effect on the BMI of her sons, but had no significant effect on her daughters'. Mother's SBP was associated with almost one-tenth of mmHg increase in the SBP of the adult offspring. There was no evidence of an association for DBP. In families with adult members, the higher the parents' BMI and SBP, the higher their adult offspring's levels will be. © 2018 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of diameter distension waveforms as an alternative for tonometric pressure to assess carotid blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kips, Jan; Mahieu, Dries; Fabry, Isabelle; Van Bortel, Luc; Vanmolkot, Floris; De Hoon, Jan; Vermeersch, Sebastian; Segers, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Proper non-invasive assessment of carotid artery pressure ideally uses waveforms recorded at two anatomical locations: the brachial and the carotid artery. Calibrated diameter distension waveforms could provide a more widely applicable alternative for local arterial pressure assessment than applanation tonometry. This approach might be of particular use at the brachial artery, where the feasibility of a reliable tonometric measurement has been questioned. The aim of this study was to evaluate an approach based on distension waveforms obtained at the brachial and carotid arteries. This approach will be compared to traditional pulse pressures obtained through tonometry at both the carotid and brachial arteries (used as a reference) and the more recently proposed approach of combining tonometric readings at the brachial artery with linearly or exponentially calibrated distension curves at the carotid artery. Local brachial and carotid diameter distension and tonometry waveforms were recorded in 148 subjects (119 women; aged 19–59 years). The morphology of the waveforms was compared by the form factor and the root-mean-squared error. The difference between the reference carotid PP and the PP obtained from brachial and carotid distension waveforms was smaller (0.9 (4.9) mmHg or 2.3%) than the difference between the reference carotid PP and the estimates obtained using a tonometric and a distension waveform (−4.8 (2.5) mmHg for the approach using brachial tonometry and linearly scaled carotid distension, and 2.7 (6.8) mmHg when using exponentially scaled carotid distension waves). We therefore recommend to stick to one technique on both the brachial and the carotid artery, either tonometry or distension, when assessing carotid blood pressure non-invasively

  20. An Adaptive Monitoring Scheme for Automatic Control of Anaesthesia in dynamic surgical environments based on Bispectral Index and Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Ning; Doctor, Faiyaz; Fan, Shou-Zen; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2018-04-13

    During surgical procedures, bispectral index (BIS) is a well-known measure used to determine the patient's depth of anesthesia (DOA). However, BIS readings can be subject to interference from many factors during surgery, and other parameters such as blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) can provide more stable indicators. However, anesthesiologist still consider BIS as a primary measure to determine if the patient is correctly anaesthetized while relaying on the other physiological parameters to monitor and ensure the patient's status is maintained. The automatic control of administering anesthesia using intelligent control systems has been the subject of recent research in order to alleviate the burden on the anesthetist to manually adjust drug dosage in response physiological changes for sustaining DOA. A system proposed for the automatic control of anesthesia based on type-2 Self Organizing Fuzzy Logic Controllers (T2-SOFLCs) has been shown to be effective in the control of DOA under simulated scenarios while contending with uncertainties due to signal noise and dynamic changes in pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) effects of the drug on the body. This study considers both BIS and BP as part of an adaptive automatic control scheme, which can adjust to the monitoring of either parameter in response to changes in the availability and reliability of BIS signals during surgery. The simulation of different control schemes using BIS data obtained during real surgical procedures to emulate noise and interference factors have been conducted. The use of either or both combined parameters for controlling the delivery Propofol to maintain safe target set points for DOA are evaluated. The results show that combing BIS and BP based on the proposed adaptive control scheme can ensure the target set points and the correct amount of drug in the body is maintained even with the intermittent loss of BIS signal that could otherwise disrupt an automated control system.

  1. Real-time feedback of dynamic foot pressure index for gait training of toe-walking children with spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Weiyan; Fan, Xiaoya; Chen, Wei; Li, Shuyu; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether and how real-time feedback of dynamic foot pressure index (DFPI) could be used to correct toe-walking gait in spastic diplegic children with dynamic equinus. Thirteen spastic diplegic children with dynamic equinus were asked to wear a monitoring device to record their ambulation during daily gait, conventional training gait, and feedback training gait. Parameters based on their DFPI and stride duration were compared among the three test conditions. The results with feedback training were significantly better for all DFPI parameters in comparison to patients' daily gait and showed significant improvements in DFPI for toe-walking gait and percentage of normal gait in comparison to conventional training methods. Moreover, stride duration under two training gaits was longer than patient's daily gait, but there was no significant difference between the two training gaits. Although the stride duration for the two training gaits was similar, gait training with real-time feedback of DFPI did produce noticeably superior results by increasing heel-loading impulse of toe-walking gait and percentage of normal gait in comparison to convention training methods. However, its effectiveness was still impacted by the motion limitations of diplegic children. Implications for Rehabilitation The DFPI-based gait training feedback system introduced in this study was shown to be more effective at toe-walking gait rehabilitation training over conventional training methods. The feedback system accomplished superior improvement in correcting toe-walking gait, but its effectiveness in an increasing heel-loading impulse in normal gait was still limited by the motion limitations of diplegic children. Stride duration of normal gait and toe-walking gait was similar under conventional and feedback gait training.

  2. The inter-arm blood pressure difference and peripheral vascular disease: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher E; Campbell, John L; Powell, Roy J; Thompson, John F

    2007-10-01

    A blood pressure (BP) difference between the upper limbs is often encountered in primary care. Knowledge of its prevalence and importance in the accurate measurement of BP is poor, representing a source of error. Current hypertension guidelines do not emphasize this. To establish the prevalence of an inter-arm blood pressure difference (IAD) and explore its association with other indicators of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in a hypertensive primary care population. This was a cross-sectional study. Primary care, one rural general practice, was the setting of the study. The methods were controlled simultaneous measurement of brachial BPs, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and tiptoe stress testing in 94 subjects. In all, 18 of 94 [19%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 11-27%] subjects had mean systolic inter-arm difference (sIAD) > or =10 mmHg and seven of 94 (7%, 95% CI 2-12%) had mean diastolic inter-arm difference (dIAD) > or =10 mmHg. Nineteen of 91 (20%, 95% CI 12-28%) had a reduced ABPI pressure drop > or =20%. An IAD and asymptomatic PVD are common in a primary care hypertensive population. Magnitude of the IAD is inversely correlated with ABPI, supporting the hypotheses that IADs are causally linked to PVD, and that IAD is a useful marker for the presence of PVD. Consequently, detection of an IAD should prompt the clinician to screen subjects for other signs of vascular disease and target them for aggressive cardiovascular risk factor modification.

  3. Brachial neuropraxia in Canadian Atlantic University sport football players: what is the incidence of "stingers"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Rebecca M E; McVeigh, Sonja A; Thompson, Kara

    2012-11-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the incidence of brachial neuropraxia (stingers) among varsity football players during the 2010 season; (2) to determine if associations exist between sustaining a stinger and previous history of stingers, years played, equipment, age, body mass index (BMI), and conditioning; and (3) to provide descriptive statistics regarding stingers and position played, symptoms, activity during injury, mechanism of tackling, and reporting of stingers. Retrospective. Canadian Atlantic University Sport football league. Two hundred forty-four players. Two written questionnaires. Number of players experiencing stingers that occurred during the 2010 season. The incidence was 26% (64 of 244). A multivariate analysis revealed that previous history of a stinger (P football and are underreported to medical staff. Education of players at increased risk is needed.

  4. Clinical research of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating brachial plexus injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun-Ming; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Shen-Yu; Zhao, Xin

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injury is one of the difficult medical problems in the world. The aim of this study was to observe the clinical therapeutic effect of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury. Forty-three cases of dysfunction after brachial plexus injury were divided into two groups randomly. The treatment group, which totaled 21 patients (including 14 cases of total brachial plexus injury and seven cases of branch brachial plexus injury), was treated with comprehensive rehabilitation including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, mid-frequency electrotherapy, Tuina therapy, and occupational therapy. The control group, which totaled 22 patients (including 16 cases of total brachial plexus injury and six cases of branch brachial plexus injury), was treated with home-based electrical nerve stimulation and occupational therapy. Each course was of 30 days duration and the patients received four courses totally. After four courses, the rehabilitation effect was evaluated according to the brachial plexus function evaluation standard and electromyogram (EMG) assessment. In the treatment group, there was significant difference in the scores of brachial plexus function pre- and post-treatment (P injury. The scores of two "total injury" groups had statistical differences (P injury" groups had statistical differences (P brachial plexus injury than nonintegrated rehabilitation.

  5. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  6. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROPIVACAINE V/S ROPIVACAINE WITH MAGNESIUM SULPHATE FOR BRACHIAL PLUXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna Reddy

    2015-09-01

    .92±1.51 and Group II ( 4.86±1.58 ,There was no significant difference in onset of motor blockade between Group I (14.82±2.32 and Group II (13.7±2.82 ,When the duration of analgesia is compared, it is significantly longer in Group II ( 855.8 ± 73.66 than Group I ( 676 ± 89.55 , The changes in pulse rate were not significant between the two groups at various times o f recording., The changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressures are similar in both the groups., No complications were recorded during the procedure and also afterwards. CONCLUSION : Based on the present clinical comparative study addition of Magnesium Sulphate to Ropivacaine is a better choice than plain Ropivacaine for Brachial Plexus Block for upper limb surgeries.

  7. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  8. Delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy by newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries represent a low percentage of delivery complications. Most newborns fully recover from the injury, very few retain a permanent neurological deficit whereas some remain unnoticed. An objective of this study was to establish delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics and relation between the deficits with length of delivery, the length of delivery periods, induction of delivery and surgical interventions at delivery. The analysed group involved 90 newborn babies with an injury of brachial plexus made at the delivery in the period between 01.01.1996 and 31.12.2005. The controlled group included 90 newborns randomly selected. The comparison was made using an χ2 test. The incidence of injuries of plexus brachialis was 1.72 per 1,000 newborns. Analysing the length of delivery there was no difference found between the analysed and controlled group (p > 0.05. In the group of newborns with the injury of brachial plexus it was found that the second delivery period was significantly shorter (p < 0.01. In the analysed group 89 (98.8% newborn babies were delivered vaginally and one (1.2% was delivered by the cesarean section. 13 newborns (14.4% from the analysed group were delivered with application of vacuum extractor and in the controlled group it was the case with one (1.2% newborn baby (p < 0.01. The delivery of 98.8% newborns from the analysed group started spontaneously and two deliveries (1.2% were induced. Risk factors for injuries of plexus brachialis in newborns at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the University Clinical Centre Tuzla include shortened second delivery period and completion of deliveries applying the vacuum extractor.

  9. Delayed radiation-induced damage to the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, R J

    1978-01-01

    Three patients are described who developed a brachial plexus neuropathy following radiation treatment for cancer of the breast. The clinical features consisted of a painless, slowly progressive sensory motor disturbance, affecting especially the hand. The latent period between the radiation therapy and the onset of the neuropathy was exceptionally long, being 8, 15 and 15 years respectively. Two patients were initially incorrectly diagnosed as having a carpal tunnel syndrome. The possible mechanisms of the insidious neuropathy are discussed.

  10. Delayed presentation of a traumatic brachial artery pseudoaneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, James C

    2009-09-01

    Delayed presentation of a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm following penetrating trauma is infrequently reported. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented three months following a penetrating trauma to his antecubital fossa with a sudden exacerbation of swelling and tenderness of his elbow. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography arteriography confirmed the presence of a large pseudoaneurysm. Surgical reconstruction was performed using the long saphenous vein as an interposition vein graft, restoring normal arterial circulation.

  11. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan C; Geannette, Christian; Wolfe, Scott W; Feinberg, Joseph H; Sneag, Darryl B

    2017-08-01

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed-and consequently scar tethered-the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy.

  12. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Geannette, Christian; Sneag, Darryl B.; Wolfe, Scott W.; Feinberg, Joseph H.

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed - and consequently scar tethered - the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy. (orig.)

  13. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury:pathological and biomechanical analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Yang; Min Luo; Peng Li; Hai Jin

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Imme-diately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were signiifcantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treat-ment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Susan C.; Geannette, Christian; Sneag, Darryl B. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Wolfe, Scott W. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Hand and Upper Extremity, Department of Orthopedics, New York, NY (United States); Feinberg, Joseph H. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed - and consequently scar tethered - the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy. (orig.)

  15. Neurolysis and myocutaneous flap for radiation induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirachi, Kazuhiko; Minami, Akio; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Yasuhiko; Ohnishi, Nobuki

    1998-01-01

    Surgical treatment for radiation induced brachial plexus neuropathy is difficult. We followed 9 patients of radiation induced brachial plexus neuropathy who were surgically treated with neurolysis and myocutaneous flap coverage. Their ages ranged from 29 to 72 years old. Their diagnoses were breast cancer in 6 patients, lingual cancer in 1, thyroid cancer in 1 and malignant lymphoma in 1. Total dose of radiation ranged from 44 to 240 Gy. Interval from radiation therapy to our surgery ranged from 1 to 18 years (mean 6.7 years). Chief complaints were dysesthesia in 9 patients, motor weakness in 7 patients and dullach in scar formation of radiated skin in 7 patients. Preoperative neural functions were slight palsy in 1, moderate palsy in 5 and complete palsy in 3. In surgical treatment, neurolysis of the brachial plexus was done and it was covered by latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. We evaluated about dysesthesia and motor recovery after treatment for neuropathy. Follow up periods ranged from 1 to 11 years (average in 5 years). Dysesthesia improved in 6 patients and got worse in 3 patients. Motor weakness recovered in only 2 patients and got worse in 7 patients. From our results, intolerable dysesthesia which was first complaint of these patients improved. But motor function had not recovered. Our treatment was thought to be effective for extraneural factor like an compression neuropathy by scar formation and poor vascularity. But it was not effective for intraneural damage by radiation therapy. (author)

  16. Treatment of a radiation-induced brachial plexopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ichirou; Harashina, Takao; Inoue, Takeo; Ueda, Kouichi; Hatoko, Mituo; Shidara, Yukinobu; Ito, Yoshiyasu.

    1990-01-01

    A radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a mastectomy causes severe pain and numbness, as well as motor and sensory disorders. Severe pain is often resistant to analgesic blocks, and in most instances, the effect of neurolysis is only temporary. We have treated two such patients with microsurgical neurolysis and then have covered the nerve by transferred muscles. In one case, the exposed brachial plexus was covered with a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap, and in the other, with a free rectus abdominis muscle flap. Pain and numbness were markedly improved in these two patients soon after the surgery, and the improvement in the sensory function also was relatively satisfactory. In one case, the motor function also improved. These patients have had no recurrence of pain or numbness for 4 years and 2 months and 4 years and 7 months after surgery, respectively. Further, their sensory and motor disorders did not advance. Surgical indications for a radiation-induced brachial plexopathy remain controversial, since the operation does not always ensure a marked improvement in the sensory and motor functions. Further, the operation is ineffective for patients with advanced nerve degeneration. Taking these factors into consideration, the preoperative predication of beneficial effects from this surgery is difficult. Despite our limited experience, however, our surgical method has been thought to be effective because it achieves a marked improvement in the numbness and pain experienced in the arms, which are usually the patients' chief complaints. (author)

  17. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy--management and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lynda J-S

    2014-06-01

    Successful treatment of patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) begins with a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the brachial plexus and of the pathophysiology of nerve injury via which the brachial plexus nerves stretched in the perinatal period manifest as a weak or paralyzed upper extremity in the newborn. NBPP can be classified by systems that can guide the prognosis and the management as these systems are based on the extent and severity of nerve injury, anatomy of nerve injury, and clinical presentation. Serial physical examinations, supplemented by a thorough maternal and perinatal history, are critical to the formulation of the treatment plan that relies upon occupational/physical therapy and rehabilitation management but may include nerve reconstruction and secondary musculoskeletal surgeries. Adjunctive imaging and electrodiagnostic studies provide additional information to guide prognosis and treatment. As research improves not only the technical aspects of NBPP treatment but also the ability to assess the activity and participation as well as body structure and function of NBPP patients, the functional outcomes for affected infants have an overall optimistic prognosis, with the majority recovering adequate functional use of the affected arm. Of importance are (i) early referral to interdisciplinary specialty clinics that can provide up-to-date advances in clinical care and (ii) increasing research/awareness of the psychosocial and patient-reported quality-of-life issues that surround the chronic disablement of NBPP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  19. Comparison of Intracranial Pressure and Pressure Reactivity Index Obtained Through Pressure Measurements in the Ventricle and in the Parenchyma During and Outside Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage Episodes in a Manipulation-Free Patient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Samuel Patrick; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Callebaut, Ina; Depreitere, Bart

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the effect of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage on the intracranial pressure (ICP) signal measured in the parenchyma and the ventricle as well as the effect on the pressure reactivity index (PRx) calculated from both signals.  Ten patients were included in this prospective study. All patients received a parenchymal ICP sensor and an external ventricular drain (EVD) for CSF drainage. ICP signals (ICP-p and ICP-evd) were captured. Part of the study was a period of 90 min during which the patient was free from any manipulation, consisting of 30 min of drainage (O1), 30 min EVD closed (C) and 30 min of drainage (O2).  Mean ICP-evd and mean AMP-evd increased (3.03 and 0.46 mmHg) from O1 to C and decreased (2.12 and 0.43 mmHg) from C to O2. ICP-p and AMP-p changes were less pronounced (closing EVD: +0.81 mmHg/+0.22 mmHg; opening EVD: -0.22 mmHg/-0.05 mmHg). Mean difference between PRx-evd and PRx-p was 0.12 for O1, 0.02 for C and -0.02 for O2. The intraclass correlation coefficient for absolute agreement of single measures was 0.66 for O1, 0.77 for C and 0.69 for O2. Mean PRx differences demonstrated a significant difference between O1 versus C and O1 versus O2 but not between C versus O2.  Drainage of CSF reduces ICP magnitude and amplitude through the EVD. This effect was only marginal in parenchymal ICP measurements. In manipulation-free circumstances, agreement of PRx obtained through parenchymal and ventricular measurements was moderate to good, depending on the statistical method, and was not necessarily influenced by drainage.

  20. A STUDY ON THE RISK FACTORS FOR OBSTETRICAL BRACHIAL PLEXUS PALSY

    OpenAIRE

    Farah ASHRAFZADEH; Hasan BOSKABADI; Mohammad FARAJI RAD; Parisa SEYYED HOSSEINEE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveConsiderable medical and legal debates have surrounded the prognosis and outcome of obstetrical brachial plexus injuries and obstetricians are oftenconsidered responsible for the injury. In this study, we assessed the factors related to the outcome of brachial plexus palsy.Material & MethodsDuring 24 months, 21 neonates with obstetrical brachial plexus injuries were enrolled.Electrophysiology studies were done at the age of three weeks. They received physiotherapy and occupational th...

  1. Relationship between resistant hypertension and arterial stiffness assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung CM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chang-Min Chung,1,2 Hui-Wen Cheng,2 Jung-Jung Chang,2 Yu-Sheng Lin,2 Ju-Feng Hsiao,2 Shih-Tai Chang,1 Jen-Te Hsu2,31School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 2Division of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 3Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan County, TaiwanBackground: Resistant hypertension (RH is a common clinical condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in older patients. Several factors and conditions interfering with blood pressure (BP control, such as excess sodium intake, obesity, diabetes, older age, kidney disease, and certain identifiable causes of hypertension are common in patients resistant to antihypertensive treatment. Arterial stiffness, measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, is increasingly recognized as an important prognostic index and potential therapeutic target in hypertensive patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between RH and arterial stiffness. Methods: This study included 1,620 patients aged ≥65 years who were referred or self-referred to the outpatient hypertension unit located at a single cardiovascular center. They were separated into normotensive, controlled BP, and resistant hypertension groups. Home BP, blood laboratory parameters, echocardiographic studies and baPWV all were measured. Results: The likelihood of diabetes mellitus was significantly greater in the RH group than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 2.114, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.194–3.744, P=0.010. Systolic BP was correlated in the RH group significantly more than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 1.032, 95% CI 1.012–1.053, P=0.001. baPWV (odds ratio 1.084, 95% CI 1.016–1.156, P=0.015 was significantly correlated with the presence of RH. The other factors were negatively correlated with the existence of RH.Conclusion: In

  2. The association of physical activity, body mass index and the blood pressure levels among urban poor youth in Accra, Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afrifa-Anane, Ernest; Agyemang, Charles; Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; de-Graft Aikins, Ama

    2015-01-01

    Globally, there is an increasing prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP) among adults and youth. However, the mechanisms of how the risk factors (physical inactivity and obesity) relate with blood pressure (BP) are not well known especially among the urban poor youth in low and middle income

  3. Regression analysis and transfer function in estimating the parameters of central pulse waves from brachial pulse wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai Rui; Li Si-Man; Xu Li-Sheng; Yao Yang; Hao Li-Ling

    2017-07-01

    This study mainly analyzed the parameters such as ascending branch slope (A_slope), dicrotic notch height (Hn), diastolic area (Ad) and systolic area (As) diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), pulse pressure (PP), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR), waveform parameter (k), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and peripheral resistance (RS) of central pulse wave invasively and non-invasively measured. These parameters extracted from the central pulse wave invasively measured were compared with the parameters measured from the brachial pulse waves by a regression model and a transfer function model. The accuracy of the parameters which were estimated by the regression model and the transfer function model was compared too. Our findings showed that in addition to the k value, the above parameters of the central pulse wave and the brachial pulse wave invasively measured had positive correlation. Both the regression model parameters including A_slope, DBP, SEVR and the transfer function model parameters had good consistency with the parameters invasively measured, and they had the same effect of consistency. The regression equations of the three parameters were expressed by Y'=a+bx. The SBP, PP, SV, CO of central pulse wave could be calculated through the regression model, but their accuracies were worse than that of transfer function model.

  4. Increase in body mass index and waist circumference is associated with high blood pressure in children and adolescents in Mexico city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel; Reyes de la Cruz, Lorenzo; Santos, José Ignacio

    2009-04-01

    Currently, obesity has become a worldwide health problem affecting even children and yet little is known about its role as a determinant of high blood pressure in this age group. The aim of this epidemiological study was to determine the relationship between the increment of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in children and teenagers. The study was performed in Mexico City schools. Overweight was established if BMI ranged from >or=85(th) to th) percentiles and obesity if BMI was >or=95(th) percentile. WC was classified in two categories, one ranging between the 75(th) and 89.9(th) percentiles and >90(th) percentile. Blood pressure was measured four times during one visit by the auscultatory method. High blood pressure was defined if the levels were >or=90(th) percentile according to the guidelines of the 2004 North American Task Force. Ages of the study population ranged from 5-8 (n = 474), 9-12 (n = 643) and 13-17 (n = 912) years, respectively. The levels of blood pressure and prevalence of high blood pressure were higher in overweight and obese children and adolescents. In both genders, the prevalence of SBP and DBP increased directly correlated with increments in age, BMI and WC, although prevalence and odd ratios of high blood pressure were higher in individuals with increased WC in comparison to BMI. Increases in WC and BMI are parameters directly associated with high blood pressure in children and adolescents.

  5. Body mass index predicts risk for complications from transtemporal cerebellopontine angle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantravadi, Avinash V; Leonetti, John P; Burgette, Ryan; Pontikis, George; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    To determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk for specific complications from transtemporal cerebellopontine angle (CPA) surgery for nonmalignant disease. Case series with chart review. Tertiary-care academic hospital. Retrospective review of 134 consecutive patients undergoing transtemporal cerebellopontine angle surgery for nonmalignant disease from 2009 to 2011. Data were collected regarding demographics, body mass index, intraoperative details, hospital stay, and complications including cerebrospinal fluid leak, wound complications, and brachial plexopathy. One hundred thirty-four patients were analyzed with a mean preoperative body mass index of 28.58. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant difference in body mass index between patients with a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and those without (P = .04), as well as a similar significant difference between those experiencing postoperative brachial plexopathy and those with no such complication (P = .03). Logistical regression analysis confirmed that body mass index is significant in predicting both postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak (P = .004; odds ratio, 1.10) and brachial plexopathy (P = .04; odds ratio, 1.07). Elevated body mass index was not significant in predicting wound complications or increased hospital stay beyond postoperative day 3. Risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak and brachial plexopathy is increased in patients with elevated body mass index undergoing surgery of the cerebellopontine angle. Consideration should be given to preoperative optimization via dietary and lifestyle modifications as well as intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential monitoring of the brachial plexus to decrease these risks.

  6. Effects of exercise on central aortic pressure before and after treatment with renin-angiotensin system blockade in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Peter S; Brunel, Patrick; Baschiera, Fabio; Botha, Jaco; Williams, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Brachial blood pressure increases with exercise and an excessive rise predicts increased cardiovascular risk. Measurement of brachial blood pressure alone may exaggerate the true blood pressure elevation due to exercise-induced change to pressure amplification. Whether blood pressure-lowering treatment modulates pressure amplification during exercise is unknown. Thirty-two participants with stage 1-2 hypertension (mean age 59.2 years) received eight weeks' blood pressure lowering with either aliskiren (300mg, n=16) or valsartan (320mg, n=16). Brachial and central aortic pressure (CASP) were measured non-invasively during treadmill exercise (Bruce protocol) at baseline, after eight weeks' treatment and 48 hours following treatment withdrawal. The rise in brachial blood pressure with exercise exceeded the rise in CASP, indicative of enhanced pressure amplification. Eight weeks' treatment elicited similar reductions in brachial blood pressure and CASP which did not differ between rest and peak exercise (p>0.05). The exercise-induced increase in systolic pressure amplification did not differ between baseline and following eight weeks' treatment (p>0.05). These effects remained unchanged following treatment withdrawal. Blood pressure lowering does not directly influence the relationship between aortic and brachial pressure either at rest or during exercise in patients with hypertension, other than through proportionate lowering of both pressures. These effects remained unchanged 48 hours after a simulated missed medication dose. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  8. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  9. Child neurology: Brachial plexus birth injury: what every neurologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina B; Kratz, Johannes R; Jelin, Angie C; Gelfand, Amy A

    2011-08-16

    While most often transient, brachial plexus birth injury can cause permanent neurologic injury. The major risk factors for brachial plexus birth injury are fetal macrosomia and shoulder dystocia. The degree of injury to the brachial plexus should be determined in the neonatal nursery, as those infants with the most severe injury--root avulsion--should be referred early for surgical evaluation so that microsurgical repair of the plexus can occur by 3 months of life. Microsurgical repair options include nerve grafts and nerve transfers. All children with brachial plexus birth injury require ongoing physical and occupational therapy and close follow-up to monitor progress.

  10. [Prevalence of high blood pressure and their association with body mass index in children between 5 and 11 years of Nahbalam, Yucatan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saury-Paredes, Leonel Alejandro

    To determine the prevalence of high blood pressure in children aged between 5-11 years in the community of Nahbalam, Yucatan, and its association with the body mass index. A transversal study with children of the primary school "Lazaro Cardenas del Rio" was performed, measuring blood pressure, height, and weight of 259 girls and boys; systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure equal or greater than percentile 95 for gender, age, and height at three measures was considered as hypertension; prehypertension was considered as blood pressure equal or greater than percentile 90 but lower than percentile 95. A prevalence of 11.9% prehypertension and 6.1% hypertension was found. There is an association between hypertension and overweight and obesity (p ≤ 0.001). The prevalence of high blood pressure in children of the community of Nahbalam, Yucatan, is 18%. The children with overweight and obesity have an almost tenfold greater risk of hypertension than the eutrophic children (OR: 9.896; 95% CI: 2.738-35.764).

  11. Limited accuracy of the hyperbaric index, ambulatory blood pressure and sphygmomanometry measurements in predicting gestational hypertension and preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebregt, Karlijn Corien; Gisolf, Janneke; Guelen, Ilja; Boer, Kees; van Montfrans, Gert; Wolf, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to validate the hyperbaric index (HBI) for first trimester prediction of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. Methods Participants were low-risk and high-risk nulliparous women and high-risk multiparous women, and were recruited between April 2004 and June

  12. Simultaneous inter-arm and inter-leg systolic blood pressure differences to diagnose peripheral artery disease: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz-Adillo, Ángel; Soriano-Cano, Alba; Martínez-Hortelano, José Alberto; Garrido-Miguel, Miriam; Mariana-Herráiz, Julián Ángel; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2018-04-01

    Inter-arm systolic blood pressure differences (IASBPD) and inter-leg systolic blood pressure differences (ILSBPD) have arisen as potential tools to detect peripheral artery disease (PAD) and individuals at high cardiovascular risk. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of IASBPD and ILSBPD to detect PAD, and whether IASBPD or ILSBPD improves diagnostic accuracy of the oscillometric ankle-brachial index (ABI). In this prospective study, eligible for inclusion were consecutive adults, with at least one of the following cardiovascular risk factors: diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking habit or age ≥65. IASBPD, ILSBPD and ankle-brachial index (ABI) were measured in all participants through four-limb simultaneous oscillometric measurements and compared with Doppler ABI (reference test, positive cut-off: ≤ 0.9). Of 171 subjects included, PAD was confirmed in 23 and excluded in 148. Thirteen and 38 subjects had IASBPD and ILSBPD ≥10 mmHg, respectively. Pearson correlation with Doppler ABI of IASBPD and ILSBPD was 0.073 (P = .343) and -0.628 (P blood pressure measurements in upper limbs are not possible.

  13. Body mass index, triglycerides, glucose, and blood pressure as predictors of type 2 diabetes in a middle-aged Norwegian cohort of men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjellvik, Vidar; Sakshaug, Solveig; Strøm, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). We wanted to assess the risk associated with these three factors alone and in combination, and the relative importance of these and several other risk factors (eg, nonfasting glucose) as predictors of T2D. Risk factors in a Norwegian population (n = 109,796) aged 40-45 years were measured in health studies in 1995-1999. Blood glucose-lowering drugs dispensed in 2004-2009 were used to estimate the incidence of T2D. Groups based on combinations of body mass index (BMI), diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides were defined by using the 50% and 90% quantiles for each variable for men and women. The relative importance of BMI, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, blood pressure, and year of birth for predicting T2D was assessed using deviance from univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Height, weight, and blood pressure were measured. All biomarkers were measured in nonfasting blood samples. In the various groups of BMI, triglycerides, and diastolic blood pressure, the incidence of T2D ranged from 0.5% to 19.7% in men and from 0.15% to 21.8% in women. BMI was the strongest predictor of incident T2D, followed by triglyceride levels in women and glucose levels in men. The inclusion of risk factors other than BMI, glucose, triglycerides, and blood pressure in multivariate models only marginally improved the prediction. BMI was the strongest predictor of type 2 diabetes. At defined levels of BMI, the incidence of T2D varied substantially with triglyceride levels and blood pressure. Thus, controlling triglycerides and blood pressure in middle-aged individuals should be targeted to prevent later onset of T2D.

  14. Association of particulate air pollution and secondhand smoke on endothelium-dependent brachial artery dilation in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine the association of particulate matters with endothelial function, measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, in children with or without exposure to secondhand smoke. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to March 2011 in Isfahan, which is the second large and air-polluted city in Iran. The areas of the city with lowest and highest air pollution were determined, and in each area, 25 prepubescent boys with or without exposure to daily tobacco smoke in home were selected, i.e. 100 children were studied in total. Results: FMD was significantly smaller in those living in high-polluted area and those exposed to secondhand smoke. Multiple linear regression analysis, adjusted for age and body mass index, showed that both passive smoking status and living area in terms of particulate air pollution were effective determinants of the brachial artery diameter. The standardized coefficient of passive smoking status was –0.36 (SD = 0.09, P < 0.0001 showing negative association with percent increase in FMD. Likewise, the percent increase in brachial artery diameter was lower in passive smoker children. Similar relationship was documented for PM 10 concentration with a regression coefficient of –0.32 (SD = 0.04, P < 0.0001. Without considering passive smoking variable, PM 10 concentration has significant independent effect on FMD level. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence on the association of environmental factors on endothelial dysfunction from early life. Studying such associations among healthy children may help identify the underlying mechanisms. The clinical implications of environmental factors on early stages of atherosclerosis should be confirmed in longitudinal studies.

  15. Case report: Iatrogenic brachial artery dissection with complete anterograde occlusion during elective arterial line placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Weinberg

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: We review our diagnostic pathway and treatment of this rare complication. Recommendations to minimise the risks of complications from brachial arterial line insertion are also overviewed. We recommend the routine utilization of ultrasound-guided technique and regular post-insertion neurovascular monitoring for the prevention and early recognition of complications from brachial artery catheter insertion.

  16. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  17. Anatomical study of prefixed versus postfixed brachial plexuses in adult human cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guday, Edengenet; Bekele, Asegedech; Muche, Abebe

    2017-05-01

    The brachial plexus is usually formed by the fusion of anterior primary rami of the fifth to eighth cervical and the first thoracic spinal nerves. Variations in the formation of the brachial plexus may occur. Variations in brachial plexus anatomy are important to radiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. These variations may lead to deviation from the expected dermatome distribution as well as differences in the motor innervation of muscles of the upper limb. This study is aimed to describe the anatomical variations of brachial plexus in its formation among 20 Ethiopian cadavers. Observational based study was conducted by using 20 cadavers obtained from the Department of Human Anatomy at University of Gondar, Bahir Dar, Addis Ababa, Hawasa, Hayat Medical College and St Paul Hospital Millennium Medical College. Data analysis was conducted using thematic approaches. A total of 20 cadavers examined bilaterally for the formation of brachial plexus. Of the 40 sides, 30 sides (75%) were found normal, seven sides (17.5%) prefixed, three sides (7.5%) postfixed and one side of the cadaver lacks cord formation. The brachial plexus formation in most subjects is found to be normal. Among the variants, the numbers of the prefixed brachial plexuses are greater than the postfixed brachial plexuses. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  19. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  20. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Artery - Its Morphology, Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    KS, Siddaraju; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Sharma, Ashish; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of variation pattern of the major arteries of upper limb is of considerable practical importance in the conduct of reparative surgery in the arm, forearm and hand however brachial artery and its terminal branches variations are less common. Aim: Accordingly the present study was designed to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial artery and its morphology, embryogenesis and clinical implications. Materials and Methods: In an anatomical study 140 upper limb specimens of 70 cadavers (35 males and 35 females) were used and anatomical variations of the brachial artery have been documented. Results: Accessory brachial artery was noted in eight female cadavers (11.43%). Out of eight cadavers in three cadavers (4.29%) an unusual bilateral accessory brachial artery arising from the axillary artery and it is continuing in the forearm as superficial accessory ulnar artery was noted. Rare unusual variant unilateral accessory brachial artery and its reunion with the main brachial artery in the cubital fossa and its variable course in relation to the musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve were also noted in five cadavers (7.14%). Conclusion: As per our knowledge such anatomical variations of brachial artery and its terminal branches with their relation to the surrounding structures are not reported in the modern medical literature. An awareness of such a presence is valuable for the surgeons and radiologists in evaluation of angiographic images, vascular and re-constructive surgery or appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies. PMID:25653931

  1. Unusual cause of brachial palsy with diaphragmatic palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Pandita, Aakash; Panghal, Astha; Hassan, Neha

    2018-05-12

    We report a preterm neonate born with respiratory distress. The neonate was found to have diaphragmatic palsy and brachial palsy. The neonate was born by caesarean section and there was no history of birth trauma. On examination, there was bilateral congenital talipes equinovarus and a scar was present on the forearm. The mother had a history of chickenpox during the 16 weeks of pregnancy for which no treatment was sought. On investigation, PCR for varicella was found to be positive in the neonate. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Postirradiation lesions of the brachial plexus. Results of surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeQuang, C.

    1989-01-01

    In a series of 103 cases of postirradiation lesions of the brachial plexus operated on between 1978 and 1986--of which 60 patients have been reviewed with a follow up from 2 to 9 years--the surgical results are analyzed according to an anatomic classification, a clinical classification, and the surgical procedures. We conclude that the radiation plexitis should be treated surgically and at the earliest possible time after the onset of paresthesias. Also, the surgical procedure which gives the best results is neurolysis with pedicled omentoplasty

  3. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of early nerve repair on experimental brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Gráinne; McGrath, Aleksandra M; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikov, Lev N

    2018-03-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus injury refers to injury observed at the time of delivery, which may lead to major functional impairment in the upper limb. In this study, the neuroprotective effect of early nerve repair following complete brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats was examined. Brachial plexus injury induced 90% loss of spinal motoneurons and 70% decrease in biceps muscle weight at 28 days after injury. Retrograde degeneration in spinal cord was associated with decreased density of dendritic branches and presynaptic boutons and increased density of astrocytes and macrophages/microglial cells. Early repair of the injured brachial plexus significantly delayed retrograde degeneration of spinal motoneurons and reduced the degree of macrophage/microglial reaction but had no effect on muscle atrophy. The results demonstrate that early nerve repair of neonatal brachial plexus injury could promote survival of injured motoneurons and attenuate neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

  5. Combined resistance and endurance exercise training improves arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and muscle strength in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Arturo; Park, Song Y; Seo, Dae Y; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Baek, Yeong H

    2011-09-01

    Menopause is associated with increased arterial stiffness and reduced muscle strength. Combined resistance (RE) and endurance (EE) exercise training can decrease brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), an index of arterial stiffness, in young men. We tested the hypothesis that combined circuit RE and EE training would improve baPWV, blood pressure (BP), and muscle strength in postmenopausal women. Twenty-four postmenopausal women (age 47-68 y) were randomly assigned to a "no exercise" control (n = 12) or to combined exercise training (EX; n = 12) group. The EX group performed concurrent circuit RE training followed by EE training at 60% of the predicted maximal heart rate (HR) 3 days per week. Brachial systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, baPWV, HR, and dynamic and isometric muscle strength were measured before and after the 12-week study. Mean ± SE baPWV (-0.8 ± 0.2 meters/s), systolic BP (-6.0 ± 1.9 mm Hg), diastolic BP (-4.8 ± 1.7 mm Hg), HR (-4.0 ± 1.0 beats/min), and mean arterial pressure (-5.1 ± 1.6 mm Hg) decreased (P hypertension and frailty in postmenopausal women.

  6. Male sex, height, weight, and body mass index can increase external pressure to calf region using knee-crutch-type leg holder system in lithotomy position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Ju; Takahashi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Well-leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is one of the catastrophic complications related to prolonged surgical procedures performed in the lithotomy position, using a knee-crutch-type leg holder (KCLH) system, to support the popliteal fossae and calf regions. Obesity has been implicated as a risk factor in the lithotomy position-related WLCS during surgery. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the external pressure (EP) applied to the calf region using a KCLH system in the lithotomy position and selected physical characteristics. Twenty-one young, healthy volunteers (21.4±0.5 years of age, eleven males and ten females) participated in this study. The KCLH system used was Knee Crutch(®). We assessed four types of EPs applied to the calf region: box pressure, peak box pressure, contact pressure, and peak contact pressure, using pressure-distribution measurement system (BIG-MAT(®)). Relationships between these four EPs to the calf regions of both lower legs and a series of physical characteristics (sex, height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]) were analyzed. All four EPs applied to the bilateral calf regions were higher in males than in females. For all subjects, significant positive correlations were observed between all four EPs and height, weight, and BMI. EP applied to the calf region is higher in males than in females when the subject is supported by a KCLH system in the lithotomy position. In addition, EP increases with the increase in height, weight, and BMI. Therefore, male sex, height, weight, and BMI may contribute to the risk of inducing WLCS.

  7. Distinguishing Different Stages of Parkinson’s Disease Using Composite Index of Speed and Pen-Pressure of Sketching a Spiral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Zham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The speed and pen-pressure while sketching a spiral are lower among Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with higher severity of the disease. However, the correlation between these features and the severity level (SL of PD has been reported to be 0.4. There is a need for identifying parameters with a stronger correlation for considering this for accurate diagnosis of the disease. This study has proposed the use of the Composite Index of Speed and Pen-pressure (CISP of sketching as a feature for analyzing the severity of PD. A total of 28 control group (CG and 27 PD patients (total 55 participants were recruited and assessed for Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS. They drew guided Archimedean spiral on an A3 sheet. Speed, pen-pressure, and CISP were computed and analyzed to obtain their correlation with severity of the disease. The correlation of speed, pen-pressure, and CISP with the severity of PD was −0.415, −0.584, and −0.641, respectively. Mann–Whitney U test confirmed that CISP was suitable to distinguish between PD and CG, while non-parametric k-sample Kruskal–Wallis test confirmed that it was significantly different for PD SL-1 and PD SL-3. This shows that CISP during spiral sketching may be used to differentiate between CG and PD and between PD SL-1 and PD SL-3 but not SL-2.

  8. The brain plasticity in patients with brachial plexus root avulsion after contralateral C7 nerve-root transfer: a FDG-PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, C.T.; Guan, Y.H.; Xu, W.D.; Zhao, J.; Sun, G.X.; Lin, X.T.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To study FDG-PET for imaging the brain plasticity in patients with brachial plexus root avulsion after contralateral C7 nerve-root transfer. Methods: One male patient with left brachial plexus root avulsion underwent a two-stage procedure (first phase: C7 root → ulnar nerve; second phase: ulnar nerve → recipient nerve) 4 years ago; Another with right brachial plexus root avulsion also underwent a two-stage procedure 3 years ago. First two patients underwent basic FDG-PET imaging, the next day FDG-PET scans were performed after initiative or passive limb movement. Using ROI and MPI tools to evaluate the images. The ratios of sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami to white matter were used as the semiquantitive index. Results: Whether brain plasticity had occurred was determined by whether the affected limb can perform initiative movement. The increases in glucose metabolism of left sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami in patient with left brachial plexus root avulsion were 40.1%, 37.9%, 48.3%, 31.9% after initiative movement, the right corresponding brain regions were 39.4%, 34.3%, 48.5%,35.4% respectively. However, the increases in glucose metabolism of left sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami in patient with right brachial plexus root avulsion were increased by 12.6%, 9.6%, 10.7%, 5.3% after passive movement, the right corresponding brain regions were respectively 17.9%, 12.9%, 15.4%, 10.1%. It was founded that the metabolism of bilateral sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami increased after initiative movement, while the metabolism of right sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami increased more obviously than that of the left brain regions when using MPI tool to substract the images before and after the affected limb movement. Conclusions: Sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami were necessary to the initiative movement. After being activated by movement, the metabolisms of plasticised brain regions increased obviously. However, the

  9. Heel ulcers - Pressure ulcers or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease? An exploratory matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilley, Heidi; Jones, Sarahjane

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and determine the feasibility of conducting a statistically powered matched case control study. Evidence indicates a relationship between chronic leg ulcers and vascular disease. The relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and vascular disease is less well established. A matched case control study. Data were collected between March 2014 and January 2015. 15 patients identified as having a grade 2, 3 or 4 pressure ulcer of the heel were compared with 15 matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel. The primary clinical outcome measure was the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), where an ABPI 1.3 was considered clinically indicative of PAD. The primary feasibility outcome measure was the rate of recruitment. Eighty seven patients were reported as having foot and heel ulcers; 36 of whom were identified as having pressure ulcers of the heel, 15 (42%) of whom were recruited to the study. Patients presenting with pressure ulcers of the heel were significantly more likely to simultaneously have previously undiagnosed PAD compared with age, gender and ethnicity matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel (odds ratio: 11, 95% confidence interval 1.99-60.57). The formation of pressure ulcers of the heel could, in some patients, be related to the presence of PAD rather than a consequence of poor quality care. Healthcare professionals should assess the patient to exclude or confirm PAD. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of statin therapy on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics: principal results of the Conduit Artery Function Evaluation-Lipid-Lowering Arm (CAFE-LLA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bryan; Lacy, Peter S; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Collier, David; Hughes, Alun D; Stanton, Alice; Thom, Simon; Thurston, Herbert

    2009-01-06

    Statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in people with hypertension. This benefit could arise from a beneficial effect of statins on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics. The Conduit Artery Function Evaluation-Lipid-Lowering Arm (CAFE-LLA) study, an Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) substudy, investigated this hypothesis in a prospective placebo-controlled study of treated patients with hypertension. CAFE-LLA recruited 891 patients randomized to atorvastatin 10 mg/d or placebo from 5 centers in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Radial artery applanation tonometry and pulse-wave analysis were used to derive central aortic pressures and hemodynamic indices at repeated visits over 3.5 years of follow-up. Atorvastatin lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 32.4 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], 28.6 to 36.3) and total cholesterol by 35.1 mg/dL (95% confidence interval, 30.9 to 39.4) relative to placebo. Time-averaged brachial blood pressure was similar in CAFE-LLA patients randomized to atorvastatin or placebo (change in brachial systolic blood pressure, -0.1 mm Hg [95% CI, -1.8 to 1.6], P=0.9; change in brachial pulse pressure, -0.02 mm Hg [95% CI, -1.6 to 1.6], P=0.9). Atorvastatin did not influence central aortic pressures (change in aortic systolic blood pressure, -0.5 mm Hg [95% CI, -2.3 to 1.2], P=0.5; change in aortic pulse pressure, -0.4 mm Hg [95% CI, -1.9 to 1.0], P=0.6) and had no influence on augmentation index (change in augmentation index, -0.4%; 95% CI, -1.7 to 0.8; P=0.5) or heart rate (change in heart rate, 0.25 bpm; 95% CI, -1.3 to 1.8; P=0.7) compared with placebo. The effect of statin or placebo therapy was not modified by the blood pressure-lowering treatment strategy in the factorial design. Statin therapy sufficient to significantly reduce cardiovascular events in treated hypertensive patients in ASCOT did not influence central aortic blood pressure or hemodynamics in a large representative cohort of ASCOT

  11. Left atrium volume index is influenced by aortic stiffness and central pulse pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a hemodynamic and echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolski, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Andrzej

    2013-03-04

    Left atrial volume index (LAVI) has recently emerged as a useful biomarker for risk stratification and risk monitoring in many clinical settings. Many hemodynamic factors such as preload and afterload have an effect on evaluating left atrium function. This study was performed to investigate the relationship between LAVI and aortic stiffness index (ASI) and selected markers characterizing hemodynamic state in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The study population consisted of 100 patients (56 men, 44 women), 67.2 (±10.9) years old DM2, scheduled for routine coronary angiography. Standard transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure parameters needed for calculation of LAVI and ASI. During invasive procedures, central pulse pressure (CPP) in the ascendens aorta and left ventricle end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were recorded. Selected laboratory parameters were obtained, including lipidogram, serum uric acid, hs-CRP, fibrinogen, cTnT, myoglobin, BNP, HbA1C, creatinine, and GFR. Both LAVI and ASI were greater and CPP and LVEDP were markedly elevated in DM2 patients compared to controls. The independent predictors of LAVI were ASI (ß=0.331; p=0.011), CPP (ß=0.312; p=0.020), LVEDP (ß=0.381; p=0.006), HbA1C (ß=0.379; p=0.008), and BNP (ß=0,423; pDM2 patients.

  12. Body-mass index, blood pressure, and cause-specific mortality in India: a prospective cohort study of 500 810 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajalakshmi, Vendhan; Lacey, Ben; Kanimozhi, Vendhan; Sherliker, Paul; Peto, Richard; Lewington, Sarah

    2018-07-01

    The association between cause-specific mortality and body-mass index (BMI) has been studied mainly in high-income countries. We investigated the relations between BMI, systolic blood pressure, and mortality in India. Men and women aged 35 years or older were recruited into a prospective study from the general population in Chennai, India between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2001. Participants were interviewed (data collected included age, sex, education, socioeconomic status, medical history, tobacco smoking, and alcohol intake) and measured (height, weight, and blood pressure). Deaths were identified by linkage to Chennai city mortality records and through active surveillance by household visits from trained graduate non-medical fieldworkers. After the baseline survey, households were visited once in 2002-05, then biennially until 2015. During these repeat visits, structured narratives of any deaths that took place before March 31, 2015, were recorded for physician coding. During 2013-14, a random sample of participants was also resurveyed as per baseline to assess long-term variability in systolic blood pressure and BMI. Cox regression (standardised for tobacco, alcohol, and social factors) was used to relate mortality rate ratios (RRs) at ages 35-69 years to systolic blood pressure, BMI, or BMI adjusted for usual systolic blood pressure. 500 810 participants were recruited. After exclusion of those with chronic disease or incomplete data, 414 746 participants aged 35-69 years (mean 46 [SD 9]; 45% women) remained. At recruitment, mean systolic blood pressure was 127 mm Hg (SD 15), and mean BMI was 23·2 kg/m 2 (SD 3·8). Correlations of resurvey and baseline measurements were 0·50 for systolic blood pressure and 0·88 for BMI. Low BMI was strongly associated with poverty, tobacco, and alcohol. Of the 29 519 deaths at ages 35-69 years, the cause was vascular for 14 935 deaths (12 504 cardiac, 1881 stroke, and 550 other). Vascular mortality was strongly

  13. Body-mass index, blood pressure, and cause-specific mortality in India: a prospective cohort study of 500 810 adults

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    Vendhan Gajalakshmi, PhD

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: The association between cause-specific mortality and body-mass index (BMI has been studied mainly in high-income countries. We investigated the relations between BMI, systolic blood pressure, and mortality in India. Methods: Men and women aged 35 years or older were recruited into a prospective study from the general population in Chennai, India between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2001. Participants were interviewed (data collected included age, sex, education, socioeconomic status, medical history, tobacco smoking, and alcohol intake and measured (height, weight, and blood pressure. Deaths were identified by linkage to Chennai city mortality records and through active surveillance by household visits from trained graduate non-medical fieldworkers. After the baseline survey, households were visited once in 2002–05, then biennially until 2015. During these repeat visits, structured narratives of any deaths that took place before March 31, 2015, were recorded for physician coding. During 2013–14, a random sample of participants was also resurveyed as per baseline to assess long-term variability in systolic blood pressure and BMI. Cox regression (standardised for tobacco, alcohol, and social factors was used to relate mortality rate ratios (RRs at ages 35–69 years to systolic blood pressure, BMI, or BMI adjusted for usual systolic blood pressure. Findings: 500 810 participants were recruited. After exclusion of those with chronic disease or incomplete data, 414 746 participants aged 35–69 years (mean 46 [SD 9]; 45% women remained. At recruitment, mean systolic blood pressure was 127 mm Hg (SD 15, and mean BMI was 23·2 kg/m2 (SD 3·8. Correlations of resurvey and baseline measurements were 0·50 for systolic blood pressure and 0·88 for BMI. Low BMI was strongly associated with poverty, tobacco, and alcohol. Of the 29 519 deaths at ages 35–69 years, the cause was vascular for 14 935 deaths (12 504 cardiac, 1881

  14. [Ultrasonographic evaluation of selected parameters of the endothelial function in brachial arteries and IMT measurements in carotid arteries in children with diabetes type 1 using personal insulin pumps--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tołwińska, Joanna; Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Urban, Mirosława; Florys, Bozena; Peczyńska, Jadwiga

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a known risk factor for arterial atherosclerosis. The first symptoms can be found even in childhood. The ultrasonographic measurements of intimal plus medial thickness in carotid arteries (IMT) and flow mediated dilatation (FMD) evaluated in brachial arteries, play a known role in the detection in these cases. The diabetes treatment intensification is an important factor in delaying early atherosclerotic changes. Currently, intensive treatment of children's diabetes with use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with personal insulin pumps is gaining more and more popularity. THE AIM OF THIS STUDY was the evaluation of IMT and FMD indexes in children suffering from type 1 diabetes in the context of treatment intensification (multidose insulin injections v. personal insulin pumps). We examined 64 children (29 boys and 35 girls) in the mean age 15.5 years treated with the multidose insulin injections method and 10 children using personal insulin pumps (4 girls and 6 boys) in the mean age 14.5 years. Using high resolution ultrasonography we evaluated IMT values in carotid arteries and FMD parameters in brachial arteries. In our analysis we estimated the blood concentration of lipid parameters, values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the age of diabetes onset, duration time of the illness and the values of HbA1c as a marker of metabolic control. We noticed significantly higher FMD values in patients treated with personal insulin pumps (13.7 vs. 5.5%, p=0.001). IMT values were similar in both groups (0.52 vs. 0.5 mm, p=0. 41). The level of HDL cholesterol was higher and triglycerides lower in the group with treatment intensification. The metabolic control was the same in both groups. In patients treated by the multidose insulin injections IMT correlated with systolic blood pressure values. We didn't notice any correlation between IMT and FMD in any group. 1. Treatment intensification (personal insulin pumps) influences better vascular

  15. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Arya; Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56–87.5 Gy; 1.5–2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade ≥2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4–37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512–67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm 3 of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966–24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267–17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future

  16. Dietary modification, Body Mass Index (BMI), Blood Pressure (BP) and cardiovascular risk in medical students of a government medical college of Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, S.; Sheikh, M.A.; Hussain, M.F.A.; Siddiqui, S.E.; Muhammad, R.; Aziz, S.; Qamar, S.; Saleem, M.A.; Waki, N.; Faruqi, H.; Zia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of major risk factors including dietary modification, Body Mass Index (BMI), Blood Pressure (BP) and physical activity in medical students of government teaching hospitals of Karachi. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on students of Dow Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan through a structured pre-tested questionnaire. Non-probability purposive sampling was used. Smoking, hypertension, family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), overweight and low physical activity levels are risk factors the presence of which can lead to development of CVD. Prevalence of these risk factors was determined by asking appropriate questions and through measurement of BMI and blood pressure for overweight and hypertension respectively. Awareness of risk factors was determined through knowledge of the effect of various food substances on development of CVD and of adoption of dietary changes keeping in mind the risk of developing CVD. SPSS 16.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 132 medical students were included in the study of which 57 (43.2%) and 75 (56.8%) were male and female respectively with mean age of 20.85 +- 1.21 years. About 15.9% of students had elevated blood pressure i.e. > 140/90 mmHg. Twenty eight percent of the total students were found to be underweight and 17.4% were overweight, 5% had some history of CVD, 56.8% had family history of CVD, 9.4% were smokers and 29.5% had high physical activity level. About 87.1% had modified their diet for preventing CVD. Most of the students had adequate knowledge about the cardiovascular risk factors Conclusion: Majority of students were not overweight. A high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; family history and elevated blood pressure was present. Awareness in terms of knowledge was satisfactory but implementation in terms of diet modification and adequate physical activity was lacking. (author)

  17. Physical exercise, fitness and dietary pattern and their relationship with circadian blood pressure pattern, augmentation index and endothelial dysfunction biological markers: EVIDENT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Eguskiñe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthy lifestyles may help to delay arterial aging. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship of physical activity and dietary pattern to the circadian pattern of blood pressure, central and peripheral blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness and biological markers of endothelial dysfunction in active and sedentary individuals without arteriosclerotic disease. Methods/Design Design: A cross-sectional multicenter study with six research groups. Subjects: From subjects of the PEPAF project cohort, in which 1,163 who were sedentary became active, 1,942 were sedentary and 2,346 were active. By stratified random sampling, 1,500 subjects will be included, 250 in each group. Primary measurements: We will evaluate height, weight, abdominal circumference, clinical and ambulatory blood pressure with the Radial Pulse Wave Acquisition Device (BPro, central blood pressure and augmentation index with Pulse Wave Application Software (A-Pulse and SphymgoCor System Px (Pulse Wave Analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV with SphymgoCor System Px (Pulse Wave Velocity, nutritional pattern with a food intake frequency questionnaire, physical activity with the 7-day PAR questionnaire and accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X, physical fitness with the cycle ergometer (PWC-170, carotid intima-media thickness by ultrasound (Micromax, and endothelial dysfunction biological markers (endoglin and osteoprotegerin. Discussion Determining that sustained physical activity and the change from sedentary to active as well as a healthy diet improve circadian pattern, arterial elasticity and carotid intima-media thickness may help to propose lifestyle intervention programs. These interventions could improve the cardiovascular risk profile in some parameters not routinely assessed with traditional risk scales. From the results of this study, interventional approaches could be obtained to delay vascular aging that combine physical

  18. Lack of evidence of the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants (under the age of two years) diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Gelding, Bronwyn

    2006-12-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, which occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births, results from traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus in utero, during descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that range in extent of damage and severity and can lead to a lifelong impairment and functional difficulties associated with the use of the affected upper limb. Most infants diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy receive treatment, such as surgery to the brachial plexus, physiotherapy or occupational therapy, within the first months of life. However, there is controversy regarding the most effective form of management. This review follows on from our previous systematic review which investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management in infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. This systematic review focuses on the effects of primary surgery. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess and collate all available evidence on effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 13 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, the Australian Digital Thesis program. Those studies that were reported in English and published between July 1992 to June 2004 were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion into this review. This excluded studies where infants were solely managed conservatively or with pharmacological agents, or underwent surgery for the management of

  19. Hand-arm vibration syndrome with distal brachial artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladyslava Bazylevska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract             Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS is a complex disorder of the peripheral extremities that is associated with occupational or recreational exposure to hand-transmitted vibration. Digital artery occlusion in HAVS is a common finding; however, proximal involvement is less likely.  We present a case of HAVS with the initial presentation of acute limb ischemia and with thrombus burden extending from the distal brachial artery and into the ulnar and radial arteries. To our knowledge, no case of HAVS syndrome of similar severity has been previously described. This case emphasizes the potential dangers of HAVS and the necessity for proper prophylactic interventions at the workplace.

  20. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  1. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  2. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  3. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  4. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  5. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  6. Psychometric Evaluation of the Brachial Assessment Tool Part 1: Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Bridget; Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; Ferris, Scott; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate reproducibility (reliability and agreement) of the Brachial Assessment Tool (BrAT), a new patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). Prospective repeated-measure design. Outpatient clinics. Adults with confirmed traumatic BPI (N=43; age range, 19-82y). People with BPI completed the 31-item 4-response BrAT twice, 2 weeks apart. Results for the 3 subscales and summed score were compared at time 1 and time 2 to determine reliability, including systematic differences using paired t tests, test retest using intraclass correlation coefficient model 1,1 (ICC 1,1 ), and internal consistency using Cronbach α. Agreement parameters included standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, and limits of agreement. BrAT. Test-retest reliability was excellent (ICC 1,1 =.90-.97). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach α=.90-.98). Measurement error was relatively low (standard error of measurement range, 3.1-8.8). A change of >4 for subscale 1, >6 for subscale 2, >4 for subscale 3, and >10 for the summed score is indicative of change over and above measurement error. Limits of agreement ranged from ±4.4 (subscale 3) to 11.61 (summed score). These findings support the use of the BrAT as a reproducible patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic BPI with evidence of appropriate reliability and agreement for both individual and group comparisons. Further psychometric testing is required to establish the construct validity and responsiveness of the BrAT. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Differences in Brain Adaptive Functional Reorganization in Right and Left Total Brachial Plexus Injury Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun-Tao; Liu, Han-Qiu; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Shen, Yun-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Total brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) results in the total functional loss of the affected limb and induces extensive brain functional reorganization. However, because the dominant hand is responsible for more cognitive-related tasks, injuries on this side induce more adaptive changes in brain function. In this article, we explored the differences in brain functional reorganization after injuries in unilateral BPAI patients. We applied resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning to 10 left and 10 right BPAI patients and 20 healthy control subjects. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), which is a resting-state index, was calculated for all patients as an indication of the functional activity level of the brain. Two-sample t-tests were performed between left BPAI patients and controls, right BPAI patients and controls, and between left and right BPAI patients. Two-sample t-tests of the ALFF values revealed that right BPAIs induced larger scale brain reorganization than did left BPAIs. Both left and right BPAIs elicited a decreased ALFF value in the right precuneus (P right BPAI patients exhibited increased ALFF values in a greater number of brain regions than left BPAI patients, including the inferior temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, calcarine sulcus, and fusiform gyrus. Our results revealed that right BPAIs induced greater extents of brain functional reorganization than left BPAIs, which reflected the relatively more extensive adaptive process that followed injuries of the dominant hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Brachial Artery Flow-mediated Dilation Following Exercise with Augmented Oscillatory and Retrograde Shear Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Blair D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute doses of elevated retrograde shear rate (SR appear to be detrimental to endothelial function in resting humans. However, retrograde shear increases during moderate intensity exercise which also enhances post-exercise endothelial function. Since SR patterns differ with the modality of exercise, it is important to determine if augmented retrograde SR during exercise influences post-exercise endothelial function. This study tested the hypothesis that (1 increased doses of retrograde SR in the brachial artery during lower body supine cycle ergometer exercise would attenuate post-exercise flow-mediated dilation (FMD in a dose-dependent manner, and (2 antioxidant vitamin C supplementation would prevent the attenuated post-exercise FMD response. Methods Twelve men participated in four randomized exercise sessions (90 W for 20 minutes on separate days. During three of the sessions, one arm was subjected to increased oscillatory and retrograde SR using three different forearm cuff pressures (20, 40, 60 mmHg (contralateral arm served as the control and subjects ingested placebo capsules prior to exercise. A fourth session with 60 mmHg cuff pressure was performed with 1 g of vitamin C ingested prior to the session. Results Post-exercise FMD following the placebo conditions were lower in the cuffed arm versus the control arm (arm main effect: P P > 0.05. Following vitamin C treatment, post-exercise FMD in the cuffed and control arm increased from baseline (P P > 0.05. Conclusions These results indicate that augmented oscillatory and retrograde SR in non-working limbs during lower body exercise attenuates post-exercise FMD without an evident dose–response in the range of cuff pressures evaluated. Vitamin C supplementation prevented the attenuation of FMD following exercise with augmented oscillatory and retrograde SR suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to the adverse effects of oscillatory and

  9. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, Sridhar; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication

  10. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  11. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  12. Profile of children with new-born brachial plexus palsy managed in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: New-born Brachial Plexus Palsy (NBPP) is birth injury resulting from ... NBPP located from the database of the Physiotherapy department were retrieved in order to assess .... child and maternal characteristics and this were noted.

  13. Estimation of brachial artery volume flow by duplex ultrasound imaging predicts dialysis access maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sae Hee; Bandyk, Dennis F; Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Barleben, Andrew; Lane, John

    2015-06-01

    This study validated duplex ultrasound measurement of brachial artery volume flow (VF) as predictor of dialysis access flow maturation and successful hemodialysis. Duplex ultrasound was used to image upper extremity dialysis access anatomy and estimate access VF within 1 to 2 weeks of the procedure. Correlation of brachial artery VF with dialysis access conduit VF was performed using a standardized duplex testing protocol in 75 patients. The hemodynamic data were used to develop brachial artery flow velocity criteria (peak systolic velocity and end-diastolic velocity) predictive of three VF categories: low (800 mL/min). Brachial artery VF was then measured in 148 patients after a primary (n = 86) or revised (n = 62) upper extremity dialysis access procedure, and the VF category correlated with access maturation or need for revision before hemodialysis usage. Access maturation was conferred when brachial artery VF was >600 mL/min and conduit imaging indicated successful cannulation based on anatomic criteria of conduit diameter >5 mm and skin depth 800 mL/min was predicted when the brachial artery lumen diameter was >4.5 mm, peak systolic velocity was >150 cm/s, and the diastolic-to-systolic velocity ratio was >0.4. Brachial artery velocity spectra indicating VF 800 mL/min. Duplex testing to estimate brachial artery VF and assess the conduit for ease of cannulation can be performed in 5 minutes during the initial postoperative vascular clinic evaluation. Estimation of brachial artery VF using the duplex ultrasound, termed the "Fast, 5-min Dialysis Duplex Scan," facilitates patient evaluation after new or revised upper extremity dialysis access procedures. Brachial artery VF correlates with access VF measurements and has the advantage of being easier to perform and applicable for forearm and also arm dialysis access. When brachial artery velocity spectra criteria confirm a VF >800 mL/min, flow maturation and successful hemodialysis are predicted if anatomic criteria

  14. The association of birth order with later body mass index and blood pressure: a comparison between prospective cohort studies from the United Kingdom and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, L D; Hallal, P C; Matijasevich, A; Wells, J C; Santos, I S; Barros, A J D; Lawlor, D A; Victora, C G; Smith, G D

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have found greater adiposity and cardiovascular risk in first born children. The causality of this association is not clear. Examining the association in diverse populations may lead to improved insight. We examine the association between birth order and body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) in the 2004 Pelotas cohort from southern Brazil and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) from Bristol, south-west England, restricting analysis to families with two children in order to remove confounding by family size. No consistent differences in BMI, SBP or DBP were observed comparing first and second born children. Within the Pelotas 2004 cohort, first born females were thinner, with lower SBP and DBP; for example, mean difference in SBP comparing first with second born was -0.979 (95% confidence interval -2.901 to 0.943). In ALSPAC, first born females had higher BMI, SBP and DBP. In both cohorts, associations tended to be in the opposite direction in males, although no statistical evidence for gender interactions was found. The findings do not support an association between birth order and BMI or blood pressure. Differences to previous studies may be explained by differences in populations and/or confounding by family size in previous studies.

  15. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungan, F.; Restrepo, R.L.; Mora-Ramos, M.E.; Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications

  16. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungan, F., E-mail: fungan@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Restrepo, R.L. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-02-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications.

  17. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Minko Minkov; Maria Vankova; Radoslav Minkov; Stefaniya Terzieva; Toni Dimitrov; Iskren Velikov

    2012-01-01

    A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the c...

  18. Assessment tools used by occupational therapists in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Thaianny Taís Dantas de Brito; Carolinne Linhares Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP) is a result of brachial plexus injury at birth and may cause dysfunction of the affected upper limb, reflecting significantly in the child’s life. When evaluating a child with OBPP the occupational therapist can use evaluation tools, and has to have knowledge to choose and apply the most appropriate instrument. Objective: This review aimed to analyze the literature on the use of evaluation tools by occupational therapists in...

  19. Systolic Sac Pressure Index for the Prediction of Persistent Type II Endoleak for 12 Months After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikoma, Akira, E-mail: yfb04322@nifty.com; Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio, E-mail: morisato@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Hirotatsu, E-mail: kuppa1220@yahoo.co.jp; Minamiguchi, Hiroki, E-mail: hiromina4@hotmail.com; Sonomura, Tetsuo, E-mail: sonomura@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Departments of Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshiharu, E-mail: nishim-y@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Okamura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: y-ok@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between the systolic sac pressure index (SPI) and the presence of endoleaks 12 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and MethodsWe performed a single-center prospective trial of consecutively treated patients. SPI (calculated as systolic sac pressure/systolic aortic pressure) was measured by catheterization immediately after EVAR. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was scheduled 12 months after EVAR to detect possible endoleaks.ResultsData were available for 34 patients who underwent EVAR for an AAA. Persisting type II endoleak was found in 8 patients (endoleak-positive group) but not in the other 26 patients (endoleak-negative group). The mean ± standard deviation SPI was significantly greater in the endoleak-positive group than in the endoleak-negative group (0.692 ± 0.048 vs. 0.505 ± 0.081, respectively; P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that an SPI of 0.638 was the optimum cutoff value for predicting a persistent endoleak at 12 months with high accuracy (0.971; 33/34), sensitivity (1.00), and specificity (0.962) values. The mean change in AAA diameter was −4.28 ± 5.03 mm and 2.22 ± 4.54 mm in patients with SPI of <0.638 or ≥0.638, respectively (P = .002).ConclusionPatients with an SPI of ≥0.638 immediately after EVAR were more likely to have a persistent type II endoleak at 12 months with an accuracy of 0.971, and showed increases in aneurysm sac diameter compared with patients with an SPI of <0.638.

  20. Predicting mortality among older adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia: an enhanced confusion, urea, respiratory rate and blood pressure score compared with pneumonia severity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abisheganaden, John; Ding, Yew Yoong; Chong, Wai-Fung; Heng, Bee-Hoon; Lim, Tow Keang

    2012-08-01

    Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) predicts mortality better than Confusion, Urea >7 mmol/L, Respiratory rate >30/min, low Blood pressure: diastolic blood pressure blood pressure 65 years (CURB-65) for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) but is more cumbersome. The objective was to determine whether CURB enhanced with a small number of additional variables can predict mortality with at least the same accuracy as PSI. Retrospective review of medical records and administrative data of adults aged 55 years or older hospitalized for CAP over 1 year from three hospitals. For 1052 hospital admissions of unique patients, 30-day mortality was 17.2%. PSI class and CURB-65 predicted 30-day mortality with area under curve (AUC) of 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-0.80) and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.66-0.74) respectively. When age and three co-morbid conditions (metastatic cancer, solid tumours without metastases and stroke) were added to CURB, the AUC improved to 0.80 (95% CI: 0.77-0.83). Bootstrap validation obtained an AUC estimate of 0.78, indicating negligible overfitting of the model. Based on this model, a clinical score (enhanced CURB score) was developed that had possible values from 5 to 25. Its AUC was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83) and remained similar to that of PSI class. An enhanced CURB score predicted 30-day mortality with at least the same accuracy as PSI class did among older adults hospitalized for CAP. External validation of this score in other populations is the next step to determine whether it can be used more widely. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  1. Primary benign brachial plexus tumors: an experience of 115 operated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ketan I

    2012-01-01

    Primary benign brachial plexus tumors are rare. They pose a great challenge to the neurosurgeon, because the majority of patients present with minimal or no neurological deficits. Radical to complete excision of the tumor with preservation of neurological function of the involved nerve is an ideal surgical treatment option with benign primary brachial plexus tumor surgery. We present a review article of our 10-year experience with primary benign brachial plexus tumors surgically treated at King Edward Memorial Hospital and P.D. Hinduja National Hospital from 2000 to 2009. The clinical presentations, radiological features, surgical strategies, and the eventual outcome following surgery are analyzed, discussed, and compared with available series in the world literature. Various difficulties and problems faced in the management of primary benign brachial plexus tumors are analyzed. Irrespective of the tumor size, the indications for surgical intervention are also discussed. The goal of our study was to optimize the treatment of patients with benign brachial plexus tumors with minimal neurological deficits. It is of paramount importance that brachial plexus tumors be managed by a peripheral nerve surgeon with expertise and experience in this field to minimize the neurological insult following surgery.

  2. Vascular patterns of upper limb: an anatomical study with accent on superficial brachial artery

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    David Kachlik

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the terminal segmentation of the axillary artery and to present four cases of anomalous branching of the axillary artery, the superficial brachial artery (arteria brachialis superficialis, which is defined as the brachial artery that runs superficially to the median nerve. Totally, 130 cadaveric upper arms embalmed by classical formaldehyde technique from collections of the Department of Anatomy, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, were macroscopically dissected with special focus on the branching arrangement of the axillary artery. The most distal part of the axillary artery (infrapectoral part terminated in four cases as a bifurcation into two terminal branches: the superficial brachial artery and profunda brachii artery, denominated according to their relation to the median nerve. The profunda brachii artery primarily gave rise to the main branches of the infrapectoral part of the axillary artery. The superficial brachial artery descended to the cubital fossa where it assumed the usual course of the brachial artery in two cases and in the other two cases its branches (the radial and ulnar arteries passed superficially to the flexors. The incidence of the superficial brachial artery in our study was 5% of cases. The reported incidence is a bit contradictory, from 0.12% to 25% of cases. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is of crucial importance for neurosurgeons and specialists using the radiodiagnostic techniques, particularly in cases involving traumatic injuries. The improved knowledge would allow more accurate diagnostic interpretations and surgical treatment.

  3. Concepts of nerve regeneration and repair applied to brachial plexus reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2006-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious condition that usually affects young adults. Progress in brachial plexus repair is intimately related to peripheral nerve surgery, and depends on clinical and experimental studies. We review the rat brachial plexus as an experimental model, together with its behavioral evaluation. Techniques to repair nerves, such as neurolysis, nerve coaptation, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, fascicular transfer, direct muscle neurotization, and end-to-side neurorraphy, are discussed in light of the authors' experimental studies. Intradural repair of the brachial plexus by graft implants into the spinal cord and motor rootlet transfer offer new possibilities in brachial plexus reconstruction. The clinical experience of intradural repair is presented. Surgical planning in root rupture or avulsion is proposed. In total avulsion, the authors are in favor of the reconstruction of thoraco-brachial and abdomino-antebrachial grasping, and on the transfer of the brachialis muscle to the wrist extensors if it is reinnervated. Surgical treatment of painful conditions and new drugs are also discussed.

  4. Perceived spatial stigma, body mass index and blood pressure: a global positioning system study among low-income housing residents in New York City

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    Dustin T. Duncan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has highlighted the salience of spatial stigma on the lives of low-income residents, but has been theoretical in nature and/or has predominantly utilised qualitative methods with limited generalisability and ability to draw associations between spatial stigma and measured cardiovascular health outcomes. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between perceived spatial stigma, body mass index (BMI, and blood pressure among a sample of low-income housing residents in New York City (NYC. Data come from the community-based NYC Low-income Housing, Neighborhoods and Health Study. We completed a crosssectional analysis with survey data, which included the four items on spatial stigma, as well objectively measured BMI and blood pressure data (analytic n=116; 96.7% of the total sample. Global positioning systems (GPS tracking of the sample was conducted for a week. In multivariable models (controlling for individual-level age, gender, race/ethnicity, education level, employment status, total household income, neighborhood percent non-Hispanic Black and neighborhood median household income we found that participants who reported living in an area with a bad neighborhood reputation had higher BMI (B=4.2, 95%CI: -0.01, 8.3, P=0.051, as well as higher systolic blood pressure (B=13.2, 95%CI: 3.2, 23.1, P=0.01 and diastolic blood pressure (B=8.5, 95%CI: 2.8, 14.3, P=0.004. In addition, participants who reported living in an area with a bad neighborhood reputation had increased risk of obesity/overweight [relative risk (RR=1.32, 95%CI: 1.1, 1.4, P=0.02 and hypertension/pre-hypertension (RR=1.66, 95%CI: 1.2, 2.4, P=0.007. However, we found no differences in spatial mobility (based GPS data among participants who reported living in neighborhoods with and without spatial stigma (P>0.05. Further research is needed to investigate how placebased stigma may be associated with impaired cardiovascular health among individuals

  5. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

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    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  6. INDEXING AND INDEX FUNDS

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    HAKAN SARITAŞ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of the efficient market hypothesis believe that active portfolio management is largely wasted effort and unlikely to justify the expenses incurred. Therefore, they advocate a passive investment strategy that makes no attempt to outsmart the market. One common strategy for passive management is indexing where a fund is designed to replicate the performance of a broad-based index of stocks and bonds. Traditionally, indexing was used by institutional investors, but today, the use of index funds proliferated among individual investors. Over the years, both international and domestic index funds have disproportionately outperformed the market more than the actively managed funds have.

  7. Blood pressure patterns and body mass index status in pregnancy: An assessment among women reporting for antenatal care at the Korle-Bu Teaching hospital, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, Mary; Ogum-Alangea, Deda; Modey-Amoah, Emefa; Ntumy, Michael Yao; Adanu, Richard M; Oppong, Samuel A

    2017-01-01

    Maternal obesity in pregnancy has been linked with increased risk of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). In some tertiary referral hospitals in Ghana, PIH is the leading cause of institutional maternal mortality. To evaluate blood pressure changes during pregnancy amongst different body mass index (BMI) groups and how this relates to the risk of developing PIH. Women who had a dating ultrasound before 20 weeks gestation and registering for antenatal care at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, between February and December 2013 and met the inclusion criteria were recruited into a cohort study. BMI was assessed at baseline. Blood pressure measurements were taken at (±2) 24, 28 and 36 weeks. Primary outcome measure of interest during follow-up was a diagnosis of PIH at these points. BP changes during follow up at the three points were measured. Descriptive analysis of baseline factors was carried out and compared for the BMI groups. Relative risk (RR) of PIH was estimated at 95% confidence interval. Mean (SD) age for the 361 women was 30.9 (4.8) years. Incidence of PIH amongst the cohort was 10.5% (95% CI: 7.45% - 14.45%) and 40.4% and 33.0% of them were overweight and obese respectively at baseline. Pregnant women who were obese at baseline had a three-fold increased risk of PIH compared to those with normal BMI [RR = 3.01 (1.06-8.52), p = 0.04]. Obese women have a significantly increased risk of PIH. Women should be screened at booking for obesity status. Antenatal protocols should have interventions for prevention or early detection of obesity and management of obesity to improve outcomes.

  8. Coronary interventionism for dissection of the artery brachial right

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde Cerdeira, Hector; Obregon Santos, Angel Gaspar; Aroche Aportela, Ronald; Dominguez Perez, Reyber Jesus

    2007-01-01

    A prospective, no controlled study was conducted from march 1 to December 31 of 2004. 23 patients were enrolled who made outpatients coronariography and were implanted coronary stents (25 lesions) by angioplasty with optimal results. Found 73,9% of male, stable angina 52,2%, mean age 55.1 + 8.9 years. Hypertension associates to smoke habits were most frequent risk factors. 80% receive 300 mg of clopidogrel during or immediately after procedure. Left anterior descending artery was most frequently treated (44%) and B2 type lessons (64%). The mid time procedure was 48 minutes. Reference diameter 2,87 + 0.42 mm, stenosis diameter 71,6 + 15.1 mm; minimal lumen diameter 0,97 + 0.64 mm; length lesson 14,72 + 5.6 mm; stent diameter 2,9 + 0.42 mm; stent length 16,8 + 5.44 mm; insufflation's time 36,4 + 7.3 seconds; atmospheres 13,56 + 1.7; acute gain 1,96 + 0.61 mm. Two patients had minor bleeding at dissection site (8.7%) and one a little haematoma (4,3%). The radial pulse from the arm's dissection was present in all patients event 24 hours after. We conclude brachial dissection ambulatory angioplasty stent in selected patients with optimal angiography results is feasible and safe

  9. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

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    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  10. Direct means of obtaining CAVI0-a corrected cardio-ankle vascular stiffness index (CAVI)-from conventional CAVI measurements or their underlying variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Mestanik, Michal; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Jurko, Alexander; Jurko, Tomas; Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark

    2017-09-21

    Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) as measured using the VaSera device (CAVI VS , Fukuda Denshi), has been proposed as a stiffness index that does not depend on blood pressure. We have recently shown theoretically that CAVI VS still exhibits blood pressure dependence, and proposed the corrected index CAVI 0 . The present study aims to establish a method of calculating [Formula: see text] either (i) from VaSera-reported values of cardiac-brachial and brachial-ankle pulse transit times (tb and tba, respectively) and blood pressure, or (ii) directly from CAVI VS . To derive this method, the relationship among CAVI VS and its scale constants a and b, tb, tba, and blood pressure has to be established. From data of 497 subjects, eight candidate CAVI parameters were defined and calculated, containing all combinations of left or right tb/tba/blood pressure. Candidates were evaluated through correlation with measured left and right CAVI VS . Correlations were compared statistically. Once the correct candidates were determined, two constants (a and b) required for converting CAVI VS to CAVI 0 were estimated through linear regression. Left and right CAVI VS are calculated using left and right tba; however, both left and right CAVI VS are calculated using right brachial blood pressures and right tb. Constants a and b for conversion of CAVI VS to CAVI 0 were estimated to be 0.842 [0.836 0.848] and 0.753 [0.721 0.786] (mean [95%CI]), respectively. Equations to estimate CAVI 0 from CAVI VS , and to directly calculate CAVI 0 from the VaSera output are provided in this paper, as well as in a directly usable spreadsheet supplement. Our results permit straightforward calculation of [Formula: see text] during a study, as well as retrospective estimation of [Formula: see text] from CAVI VS in already published studies or where the original transit time values are not available, paving the way for thorough comparison of CAVI 0 to CAVI VS in clinical and research settings. Novelty and

  11. Association of different electrocardiographic patterns with shock index, right ventricle systolic pressure and diameter, and embolic burden score in pulmonary embolism

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    Krća Bojana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Some electrocardiographic (ECG patterns are characteristic for pulmonary embolism but exact meaning of the different ECG signs are not well known. The aim of this study was to determine the association between four common ECG signs in pulmonary embolism [complete or incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB, S-waves in the aVL lead, S1Q3T3 sign and negative T-waves in the precordial leads] with shock index (SI, right ventricle diastolic diameter (RVDD and peak systolic pressure (RVSP and embolic burden score (EBS. Methods. The presence of complete or incomplete RBBB, S waves in aVL lead, S1Q3T3 sign and negative T-waves in the precordial leads were determined at admission ECG in 130 consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a single tertiary medical center in a 5-year period. Echocardiography examination with measurement of RVDD and RVSP, multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography (MDCT-PA with the calculation of EBS and SI was determined during the admission process. Multivariable regression models were calculated with ECG parameters as independent variables and the mentioned ultrasound, MDCT-PA parameters and SI as dependent variables. Results. The presence of S-waves in the aVL was the only independent predictor of RVDD (F = 39.430, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.231 and systolic peak right ventricle pressure (F = 29.903, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.185. Negative T-waves in precordial leads were the only independent predictor for EBS (F = 24.177, p < 0.001; R2 = 0.160. Complete or incomplete RBBB was the independent predictor of SI (F = 20.980, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.134. Conclusion. In patients with pulmonary embolism different ECG patterns at admission correlate with different clinical, ultrasound and MDCT-PA parameters. RBBB is associated with shock, Swave in the aVL is associated with right ventricle pressure and negative T-waves with the thrombus burden in the pulmonary tree.

  12. Blood pressure, body mass index, heart rate and levels of blood cholesterol and glucose of volunteers during National Heart Weeks, 1995-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, K L; Tan, H; Liew, Y M; Sambhi, J S; Aljafri, A M; Hatijah, A

    2000-12-01

    The paper presents the results of a health screening programme conducted in 10 major centers in Malaysia--Kuala Lumpur, Penang, Ipoh, Johor Bahru, Alor Star, Kuala Terengganu, Malacca, Kota Bahru, Kuching and Kota Kinabalu during the National Heart Weeks, 1995-1997. There were 6,858 participants of both sexes aged between 6 years to 81 years old. The parameters involved in the screening programme were body mass index, blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol and glucose. The following are the results of the study:- 1. The mean and standard deviation for the body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), total cholesterol (TC) and non fasting (random) blood glucose (GL) of the volunteers studied were 24.3 +/- 4.0 kg/m2, 128.3 +/- 21.1 mmHg, 79.6 +/- 11.9 mmHg, 77.2 +/- 12.1 bpm, 5.33 +/- 1.37 mmol/l and 5.11 +/- 1.97 mmol/l respectively. 2. There was a rising trend for BMI, SBP, DBP, TC and GL with age. The HR was higher in the younger age group of those below 20 years. Males tended to have higher mean values than females except for HR which was similar in both sexes. 3. The Malays, Chinese and Indians seemed to have closely similar mean values for SBP, DBP and HR but the Indians possessed the highest BMI (25.62 +/- 3.90 kg/m2), TC (5.61 +/- 1.48 mmol/l) and GL (5.41 +/- 2.43 mmol/l) among the three major ethnic groups. While the Ibans had highest TC (6.07 + 1.09 mmol/l), their GL level was the lowest (4.76 +/- 1.15 mmol/l). The Kadazans had the lowest TC level (4.94 +/- 1.39 mmol/l) among all the ethnic groups. 4. Among the participants screened, 31.9% were overweight (BMI > or = 25), 7.6% were obese (BMI > or = 30); 26.8% had raised SBP (> or = 140 mmHg) and 19.3% had raised DBP (> or = 90 mmHg); 13.6% of the participants had increased HR (> or = 90 bpm), 22% had raised TC (> or = 6.20 mmol/l) and 2% had raised GL (> or = 11.00 mmol/l). There was a higher prevalence for abnormal values with increasing age

  13. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, L.S.; Yaylali, Ilker; Zurakowski, David; Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R.; Grossman, John A.I.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  14. Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, A.; Aranovich, D.; Greif, F.; Bachar, G.; Bartal, G.; Atar, E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications

  15. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  16. The prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Kawabata, Hidehiko

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy for predicting spontaneous motor recovery in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. We reviewed the records of 366 neonates with brachial plexus palsy. The clinical and follow-up data of patients with and without phrenic nerve palsy were compared. Of 366 newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, 21 (6%) had concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Sixteen of these neonates had upper-type palsy and 5 had total-type palsy. Poor spontaneous motor recovery was observed in 13 neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (62%) and in 129 without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (39%). Among neonates born via vertex delivery, poor motor recovery was observed in 7 of 9 (78%) neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy and 115 of 296 (39%) without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in neonates with brachial plexus palsy has prognostic value in predicting poor spontaneous motor recovery of the brachial plexus, particularly after vertex delivery. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining carotid artery pressure from scaled diameter waveforms: comparison and validation of calibration techniques in 2026 subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeersch, S J; Verdonck, P R; Segers, P; Rietzschel, E R; De Buyzere, M L; Gillebert, T C; De Bacquer, D; De Backer, G; Van Bortel, L M

    2008-01-01

    Calibrated diameter distension waveforms could provide an alternative for local arterial pressure assessment more widely applicable than applanation tonometry. We compared linearly and exponentially calibrated carotid diameter waveforms to tonometry readings. Local carotid pressures measured by tonometry and diameter waveforms measured by ultrasound were obtained in 2026 subjects participating in the Asklepios study protocol. Diameter waveforms were calibrated using a linear and an exponential calibration scheme and compared to measured tonometry waveforms by examining the mean root-mean-squared error (RMSE), carotid systolic blood pressure (SBP car ) and augmentation index (AIx) of calibrated and measured pressures. Mean RMSE was 5.2(3.3) mmHg (mean(stdev)) for linear and 4.6(3.6) mmHg for exponential calibration. Linear calibration yielded an underestimation of SBP car by 6.4(4.1) mmHg which was strongly correlated to values of brachial pulse pressure (PP bra ) (R = 0.4, P car by 1.9(3.9) mmHg, independent of PP bra . AIx was overestimated by linear calibration by 1.9(10.1)%, the difference significantly increasing with increasing AIx (R = 0.25, P < 0.001) and by exponential calibration by 5.4(10.6)%, independently of the value of AIx. Properly calibrated diameter waveforms offer a viable alternative for local pressure estimation at the carotid artery. Compared to linear calibration, exponential calibration significantly improves the pressure estimation

  18. Correspondence in relation to the case report "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note." published in May issue of Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakta Pradipta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comment on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008

  19. Impact of calibration on estimates of central blood pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soender, T K; Van Bortel, L M; Møller, J E; Lambrechtsen, J; Hangaard, J; Egstrup, K

    2012-12-01

    Using the Sphygmocor device it is recommended that the radial pressure wave is calibrated for brachial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). However it has been suggested that brachial-to-radial pressure amplification causes underestimation of central blood pressures (BPs) using this calibration. In the present study we examined if different calibrations had an impact on estimates of central BPs and on the clinical interpretation of our results. On the basis of ambulatory BP measurements, patients were categorized into patients with controlled, uncontrolled or resistant hypertension. We first calibrated the radial pressure wave as recommended and afterwards recalibrated the same pressure wave using brachial DBP and calculated mean arterial pressure. Recalibration of the pressure wave generated significantly higher estimates of central SBP (P=0.0003 and Plost in patients with resistant hypertension (P=0.15). We conclude that calibration with DBP and mean arterial pressure produces higher estimates of central BPs than recommended calibration. The present study also shows that this difference between the two calibration methods can produce more than a systematic error and has an impact on interpretation of clinical results.

  20. Brachial plexus endoscopic dissection and correlation with open dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, T; Masmejean, E; Bihel, T; Lafosse, L

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder endoscopy is evolving and becoming extra-articular. More and more procedures are taking place in the area of the brachial plexus (BP). We carried out an anatomical study to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the BP and the technique used to dissect and expose the BP endoscopically. Thirteen fresh cadavers were dissected. We first performed an endoscopic dissection of the BP, using classical extra-articular shoulder arthroscopy portals. Through each portal, we dissected as many structures as possible and identified them. We then did an open dissection to corroborate the endoscopic findings and to look for damage to the neighboring structures. In the supraclavicular area, we were able to expose the C5, C6 and C7 roots, and the superior and middle trunks in 11 of 13 specimens through two transtrapezial portals by following the suprascapular nerve. The entire infraclavicular portion of the BP (except the medial cord and its branches) was exposed in 11 of 13 specimens. The approach to the infraclavicular portion of the BP led directly to the lateral and posterior cords, but the axillary artery hid the medial cord. The musculocutaneous nerve was the first nerve encountered when dissecting medially from the anterior aspect of the coracoid process. The axillary nerve was the first nerve encountered when following the anterior border of the subscapularis medially from the posterior aspect of the coracoid process. Knowledge of the endoscopic anatomy of the BP is mandatory to expose and protect this structure while performing advanced arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Copyright © 2015 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of brachial plexus diseases

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    Okinaga, Shuji; Korenaga, Tateo; Tekemura, Atsushi; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Kawano, Ken-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted image (DWI) can specifically give running of nerve fibers as they have diffusion anisotropic property and DW whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) procedure, which being capable of imaging cervical and lumber nerve roots, is thus suggested to be useful for diagnosis of diseases related to brachial plexus (BP). The purpose of the present study is to confirm the usefulness of DWIBS by comparison of its images of the normal and sick plexuses. Subjects are 5 normal healthy males (27-36 y), 29 patients (19 M/10 F, 7-73 y) with BP diseases (10 cases of external injury, 6 of obstetric palsy, 2 of paralysis by dysfunctional position, 6 by Schwannoma, 2 by metastasis of breast cancer and 3 by radiation) and, to see the diagnostic specificity, 9 patients (M 7/F 2, 15-64 y) with severely reduced hand force by nervous causes other than BP ones. MRI with Philips Gyroscan INTERA 1.5T machine is conducted for DWIBS by DWI with single shot EPI (echo planar imaging) with the coil of either sensitivity encoding (SENSE) Cardiac, Flex-M or -S. Images are reconstructed 3D by a radiological technician possessing no information concerning patient's conditions, with Philips software Soap-bubble tool on the workstation, and are then evaluated by a radiologist and an orthopedist separately. It is found that BP disorders by injury, obstetric palsy and tumors, of which diagnosis has been difficult hitherto, can be imaged either negatively or positively depending on their history. In radiation paralysis, only 1/3 cases give a reduced signal intensity in the whole BP. DWIBS will be a new diagnostic mean for systemic peripheral nerve diseases as well as BP ones. (T.T.)

  2. Relationships between Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

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    Byung Kil Ha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV is known to be a good surrogate marker of clinical atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a major predictor for developing neuropathy. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between baPWV and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsA retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted involving 692 patients with type 2 diabetes. The correlation between increased baPWV and DPN, neurological symptoms, and neurological assessment was analyzed. DPN was examined using the total symptom score (TSS, ankle reflexes, the vibration test, and the 10-g monofilament test. DPN was defined as TSS ≥2 and an abnormal neurological assessment. Data were expressed as means±standard deviation for normally distributed data and as median (interquartile range for non-normally distributed data. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups, and a multiple logistic regression test was used to evaluate independent predictors of DPN. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test was used to adjust for age.ResultsPatients with DPN had higher baPWV and systolic blood pressure, and were more likely to be older and female, when compared to the control group. According to univariate analysis of risk factors for DPN, the odds ratio of the baPWV ≥1,600 cm/sec was 1.611 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.072 to 2.422; P=0.021 and the odds ratio in female was 1.816 (95% CI, 1.195 to 2.760; P=0.005.ConclusionIncreased baPWV was significantly correlated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; Pijl, A. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain due to tumor growth near the brachial plexus is often treated with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and oral or transdermal opioids. We propose placement of a catheter along the brachial plexus using a

  4. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  5. Carcinomatous versus radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, F.H.; Walsh, J.W.; Cady, B.; Salzman, F.A.; Oberfield, R.A.; Pazianos, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 18 women in whom ipsilateral brachial plexus neuropathy developed after treatment for carcinoma of the breast. In the absence of metastatic tumor elsewhere, the only distinguishing feature between carcinomatous neuropathy and radiation-induced neuropathy was the symptom-free interval after mastectomy and radiation therapy. Women with an interval of less than a year have radiation-induced neuropathy. Brachial plexus exploration in difficult diagnostic situations will permit early treatment and avoid debilitating loss of function. Brachial plexus exploration for biopsy is safe and free of complications if performed carefully. Treatment of carcinomatous neuropathy is most likely to succeed if the tumor is hormonally sensitive, but radiotherapy may also be effective. Treatment of radiation-induced neuropathy remains largely ineffective

  6. Stenting-plasty with brachial puncture in the treatment of subclavian steal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Quan; Jing Zaiping; Zhao Zhiqing; Feng Xiang; Lu Qingsheng; Mei Zhijun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical effect of stenting-plasty with retrograde brachial puncture for subclavian steal syndrome patients. Methods: To analyze the clinical results of stenting-plasty with retrograde brachial puncture in 15 patients with subclavian steal syndrome. Results: MRA or DSA showed the subclavian arteries with different degrees of stenosis (80%-100%) in all patients. Stenting-plasty with retrograde brachia] puncture was used in all patients. After placement of wall or polmaz stent, the pulse recovered and the syndrome disappeared. Postoperative angiography showed patency of the artery and stent. The patients were followed up for 3-30 months without recurrence of symptoms. Conclusions: Stenting-plasty with retrograde brachial puncture is a rather proper method to treat subclavian steal syndrome with more coincidence to the vascular anatomy, decrease the maneuver trouble and increase the successful rate. (authors)

  7. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

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    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  8. Brachial artery protected by wrapped latissimus dorsi muscle flap in high voltage electrical injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencel, E.; Eser, C.; Kokacya, O.; Kesiktas, E.; Yavuz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary High voltage electrical injury can disrupt the vascular system and lead to extremity amputations. It is important to protect main vessels from progressive burn necrosis in order to salvage a limb. The brachial artery should be totally isolated from the burned area by a muscle flap to prevent vessel disruption. In this study, we report the use of a wrap-around latissimus dorsi muscle flap to protect a skeletonized brachial artery in a high voltage electrical injury in order to salvage the upper extremity and restore function. The flap wrapped around the exposed brachial artery segment and luminal status of the artery was assessed using magnetic resonance angiography. No vascular intervention was required. The flap survived completely with good elbow function. Extremity amputation was not encountered. This method using a latissimus dorsi flap allows the surgeon to protect the main upper extremity artery and reconstruct arm defects, which contributes to restoring arm function in high voltage electrical injury. PMID:28149236

  9. The role of severity of obstructive sleep apnea measured by apnea-hypopnea index in predicting compliance with pressure therapy, a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madbouly, Essam M; Nadeem, Rashid; Nida, Mahwish; Molnar, Janos; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Loomba, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, and premature death. Positive airway pressure (PAP) is the mainstay of therapy. Despite its effective treatment with PAP therapy, noncompliance remains high. Many factors determine compliance. The role of severity of OSA measured by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) remains controversial. Meta-analysis of studies examining this role of AHI was performed. A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted using PubMed and Cochrane library by utilizing different combinations of key words: sleep apnea, AHI, compliance, and nonadherence. Inclusion criteria were English articles; Studies with adult population; with 2 groups of patients (compliant and noncompliant); Studies utilizing objective definition of compliance (PAP usage of >4 hours per night for 70% of days or usage >5 d/wk and for >4 hours per night). Studies were analyzed by standard methods of meta-analysis. The studies were heterogeneous for AHI; therefore, the random effect model was used. Six hundred forty-one manuscripts were found. Of these, 230 were found to be appropriate for full text evaluation. Thirty-one met inclusion criteria. Twelve of these studies used objective criteria for PAP compliance and were hence included in meta-analysis. All the subjects had OSA determined by polysomnography, for whom PAP was employed. Compliance to PAP therapy was evaluated after a period of time ranging from 4 weeks to 8 years. There were 1438 subjects included in the meta-analysis; 886 subjects were PAP compliant, whereas 552 subjects were noncompliant. A greater AHI was found in PAP compliant patients. The mean difference between compliant and noncompliant groups was 5.9 (95% confidence interval: 0.19-11.67, P compliance.

  10. Transitory increased blood pressure after upper airway surgery for snoring and sleep apnea correlates with the apnea-hypopnea respiratory disturbance index

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    M.T.M. Araújo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A transitory increase in blood pressure (BP is observed following upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome but the mechanisms implicated are not yet well understood. The objective of the present study was to evaluate changes in BP and heart rate (HR and putative factors after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and septoplasty in normotensive snorers. Patients (N = 10 were instrumented for 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, nocturnal respiratory monitoring and urinary catecholamine level evaluation one day before surgery and on the day of surgery. The influence of postsurgery pain was prevented by analgesic therapy as confirmed using a visual analog scale of pain. Compared with preoperative values, there was a significant (P < 0.05 increase in nighttime but not daytime systolic BP (119 ± 5 vs 107 ± 3 mmHg, diastolic BP (72 ± 4 vs 67 ± 2 mmHg, HR (67 ± 4 vs 57 ± 2 bpm, respiratory disturbance index (RDI characterized by apnea-hypopnea (30 ± 10 vs 13 ± 4 events/h of sleep and norepinephrine levels (22.0 ± 4.7 vs 11.0 ± 1.3 µg l-1 12 h-1 after surgery. A positive correlation was found between individual variations of BP and individual variations of RDI (r = 0.81, P < 0.01 but not between BP or RDI and catecholamines. The visual analog scale of pain showed similar stress levels on the day before and after surgery (6.0 ± 0.8 vs 5.0 ± 0.9 cm, respectively. These data strongly suggest that the cardiovascular changes observed in patients who underwent uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and septoplasty were due to the increased postoperative RDI.

  11. Radiation-included brachial plexus injury; Follow-up of two different fractionation schedules

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    Powell, S.; Cooke, J.; Parsons, C. (Royal Marsden Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-07-01

    All 449 breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy to the breast and lymph nodes between 1982 and 1984 have been followed for 3-5.5 years. In this group two different fractionation schedules were used, one five times a fortnight and one daily, both over 6 weeks. The calculated dose to the brachial plexus was 45 Gy in 15 fractions or 5e Gy in 30 fractions. These schedules are equivalent doses using the standard NSD formula. The diagnosis of a brachial plexus injury was made clinically and computed tomography from recurrent disease. The actuarial incidence of a radiation-induced brachial plexus injury for the whole group was 4.9% at 5.5 years. No cases were seen in the first 10 months following radiotherapy. The incidence rises between 1 and 4 years and then starts to plateau. When the large fraction size group is compared with the small fraction size group the incidence at 5.5 years is 5.9% and 1.0%, respectively (p 0.09). Two different treatment techniques were used in this group but were not found to contribute to the probability of developing a brachial plexud injury. It is suggested that radiation using large doses per fraction are less well tolerated by the brachial plexus than small doses per fraction; a commonly used fractionation schedule such as 45 Gy in 15 fractions may give unacceptably high brachial plexus morbidity; and the of small doses per fraction or avoiding lymphatic irradiation is advocated. (author). 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab.

  12. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  13. Impact of Short-Term Training Camp on Aortic Blood Pressure in Collegiate Endurance Runners

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    Tsubasa Tomoto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of short-term vigorous endurance training on aortic blood pressure (BP, pulse wave analysis was performed in 36 highly trained elite collegiate endurance runners before and after a 7-day intense training camp. Subjects participated three training sessions per day, which mainly consisted of long distance running and sprint training to reach the daily target distance of 26 km. After the camp, they were divided into two groups based on whether the target training was achieved. Aortic systolic BP, pulse pressure, and tension-time index (TTI, a surrogate index of the myocardial oxygen demand were significantly elevated after the camp in the accomplished group but not in the unaccomplished group, whereas the brachial BP remained unchanged in both groups. The average daily training distance was significantly correlated with the changes in aortic systolic BP (r = 0.608, p = 0.0002, pulse pressure (r = 0.415, p = 0.016, and TTI (r = 0.438, p = 0.011. These results suggest that aortic BP is affected by a short-term vigorous training camp even in highly trained elite endurance athletes presumably due to a greater training volume compared to usual.

  14. Bilateral Symmetrical Brachial Plexopathy in Association with Scrub Typhus: A Rare Presentation

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    Mittal M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a commonly encountered rickettsial disease of the Indian subcontinent caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. It can be associated with various neurological manifestations. We report a case of 50 year old man with bilateral symmetrical brachial plexopathy associated with scrub typhus from the Garhwal region of Uttarakhand state. The initial manifestations were fever, bodyaches and weakness in both upper limbs. Laboratory reports confirmed the diagnosis of scrub typhus. EMG and NCV were strongly suggestive of upper brachial plexopathy. Patient was discharged in satisfactory condition

  15. Brachial Artery Aneurysm as a Limb Threatening Condition: a Case Report

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    Farhad Heydari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Brachial artery aneurysms are rare but potentially limb threatening condition. The presented case here is a 52-year old male referred to the emergency department complaining a sudden onset and progressive pain with coldness of his right upper extremity during brushing. The right upper extremity was pulseless and three-dimensional computed tomography showed an aneurysm of the proximal right brachial artery associated with arterial occlusion in its distal branch. Embolectomy was done, the aneurysm resected, and the artery successfully re-vascularised by interposing a saphenous vein graft. 

  16. Can bilateral bronchospasm be a sign of unilateral phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block?

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    Souvik Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks facilitate ambulatory anesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Unilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common complication after interscalene brachial plexus block, rather than the supraclavicular block. We report a case of severe respiratory distress and bilateral bronchospasm following ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patient did not have clinical features of pneumothorax or drug allergy and was managed with oxygen therapy and salbutamol nebulization. Chest X-ray revealed elevated right hemidiaphragm confirming unilateral phrenic nerve paresis.

  17. Brachial plexus injury management through upper extremity amputation with immediate postoperative prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, J M; Leal, J M; Underwood, J; Childers, S J

    1982-02-01

    Management of patients with brachial plexus injuries requires a team approach so that all aspects of their care are addressed simultaneously. This report examines elective amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation in a patient with brachial plexus avulsion of the left arm. The best possibility for good prosthetic rehabilitation is the early application of prosthetic devices with intensive occupational therapy. Using this type of approach, we have achieved significant improvement in amputation rehabilitation of upper extremity amputees treated with immediate postoperative conventional electric and myoelectric prostheses.

  18. Simultaneously measured inter-arm and inter-leg systolic blood pressure differences and cardiovascular risk stratification: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhchain; Sethi, Ankur; Singh, Mukesh; Khosla, Kavia; Grewal, Navsheen; Khosla, Sandeep

    2015-08-01

    Association of inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (IASBPD) with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality remains controversial. We aimed to thoroughly examine all available evidence on inter-limb blood pressure (BP) difference and its association with CV risk and outcomes. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane library, and Ovid for studies reporting bilateral simultaneous BP measurements in arms or legs and risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, subclavian stenosis, or mortality. Random-effect meta-analysis was performed to compare effect estimates. Twenty-seven studies met inclusion criteria, but only 17 studies (18 cohorts) were suitable for analysis. IASBPD of 10 mmHg or more was associated with PAD (risk ratios, 2.22; 1.41-3.5; P = .0006; sensitivity 16.6%; 6.7-35.4; specificity 91.9%; 83.1-96.3; 8 cohorts; 4774 subjects), left ventricular mass index (standardized mean difference 0.21; 0.03-0.39; P = .02; 2 cohort; 1604 subjects), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) (one cohort). Association of PAD remained significant at cutoff of 15 mmHg (risk ratios, 1.91; 1.28-2.84; P = .001; 5 cohorts; 1914 subjects). We could not find statistically significant direct association of coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, CV, and all-cause mortality in subjects with IASBPD of 10 mmHg or more, 15 mmHg or more, and inter-leg systolic BP difference of 15 mmHg or more. Inter-leg BP difference of 15 mmHg or more was strong predictor of PAD (P = .0001) and brachial-ankle PWV (P = .0001). Two invasive studies showed association of IASBPD and subclavian stenosis (estimates could not be combined). In conclusion, inter-arm and leg BP differences are strong predictors of PAD. IASBPD may be associated with subclavian stenosis, high left ventricular mass effect, and higher brachial-ankle PWVs. Inter-leg BP difference may also be associated with high left ventricular mass effect and higher

  19. Central blood pressure variability is increased in hypertensive patients with target organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Pareja, Julia; Yun, Sergi; Acosta, Eva; Aiello, Francesco; Oliveras, Anna; Vázquez, Susana; Armario, Pedro; Blanch, Pedro; Sierra, Cristina; Calero, Francesca; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association of aortic and brachial short-term blood pressure variability (BPV) with the presence of target organ damage (TOD) in hypertensive patients. One-hundred seventy-eight patients, aged 57 ± 12 years, 33% women were studied. TOD was defined by the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiogram, microalbuminuria, reduced glomerular filtration rate, or increased aortic pulse wave velocity. Aortic and brachial BPV was assessed by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (Mobil-O-Graph). TOD was present in 92 patients (51.7%). Compared to those without evidence of TOD, they had increased night-to-day ratios of systolic and diastolic BP (both aortic and brachial) and heart rate. They also had significant increased systolic BPV, as measured by both aortic and brachial daytime and 24-hours standard deviations and coefficients of variation, as well as for average real variability. Circadian patterns and short-term variability measures were very similar for aortic and brachial BP. We conclude that BPV is increased in hypertensive-related TOD. Aortic BPV does not add relevant information in comparison to brachial BPV. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging for detecting root avulsions in traumatic adult brachial plexus injuries: protocol for a systematic review of diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie G; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Wormald, Justin C R; Ridgway, John P; Tanner, Steven; Rankine, James J; Bourke, Grainne

    2018-05-19

    Adult brachial plexus injuries (BPI) are becoming more common. The reconstruction and prognosis of pre-ganglionic injuries (root avulsions) are different to other types of BPI injury. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being used to identify root avulsions, but the evidence from studies of its diagnostic accuracy are conflicting. Therefore, a systematic review is needed to address uncertainty about the accuracy of MRI and to guide future research. We will conduct a systematic search of electronic databases alongside reference tracking. We will include studies of adults with traumatic BPI which report the accuracy of preoperative MRI (index test) against surgical exploration of the roots of the brachial plexus (reference standard) for detecting either of the two target conditions (any root avulsion or any pseudomeningocoele as a surrogate marker of root avulsion). We will exclude case reports, articles considering bilateral injuries and studies where the number of true positives, false positives, false negatives and true negatives cannot be derived. The methodological quality of the included studies will be assessed using a tailored version of the QUADAS-2 tool. Where possible, a bivariate model will be used for meta-analysis to obtain summary sensitivities and specificities for both target conditions. We will investigate heterogeneity in the performance of MRI according to field strength and the risk of bias if data permits. This review will summarise the current diagnostic accuracy of MRI for adult BPI, identify shortcomings and gaps in the literature and so help to guide future research. PROSPERO CRD42016049702 .

  1. Chronobiological analysis by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring of the hyperbaric and hypobaric indexes for evaluation of the antihypertensive effect of long-acting nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Shingo; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ohsawa, Shingo; Koga, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi; Kunoh, Mamoru; Imamoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Hidekazu; Takeda, Satoshi; Iwano, Keiji; Satoh, Chikashi; Kanae, Kiyoshi; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2005-10-01

    It has been suggested that chronobiology can provide new insights into the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular disease. In the present study the hyperbaric index (hyperBI) and hypobaric index (hypoBI) were compared with the mean blood pressure (BP) over 24 h to evaluate the antihypertensive effect of long-acting nifedipine on essential hypertension. Fourteen patients were treated with nifedipine CR (20-40 mg/day) for 6 months. Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed before and after treatment. The hyperBI (mmHg . h/day) was calculated as the integrated BP area above the conventional upper limit (140/90 mmHg for the daytime and 120/80 mmHg at night), and the hypoBI was calculated as the integrated BP area below the conventional lower limit (110/60 mmHg for the daytime and 100/50 mmHg at night). At baseline, both the systolic and diastolic 24-h hyperBI values closely correlated with the 24-h mean BP (r=0.994 and 0.935, p<0.0001). Treatment with nifedipine significantly lowered both the 24-h mean systolic and diastolic BP (143+/-14/89 +/-12 to 124+/-16/80+/-8 mmHg, p<0.001/p=0.001), as well as the casual BP (167+/-11/101 +/-8 to 140+/-13/86+/-10 mmHg, p<0.001/p<0.01). Reduction of both the systolic and diastolic hyperBI values was statistically significant over the 24-h period (274+/-266 to 90+/-155, p=0.009; 145+/-187 to 41+/-63, p=0.024), as well as during the daytime (200+/-181 to 66+/-116, p=0.014; 105+/-120 to 24+/-38, p=0.017) and at night (systolic, 74+/-106 to 24+/-52, p=0.021). The 24-h mean BP was normalized, but a small excess BP load persisted despite treatment. There was no significant increase of systolic hypoBI during the 24-h period (1+/-2 to 25+/-30, p=0.065), the daytime (0+/-0 to 14+/-38, p=0.20), or at night (1+/-3 to 11+/-19, p=0,052). Similar findings were obtained for diastolic hypoBI. Nifedipine CR improved the 24-h hyperBI and mean BP without causing excessive hypotension. These 2 parameters have a close relationship when assessment is

  2. [Relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Wu, Lei; Wang, Jian-hua; Yang, Shan-shan; Wang, Yi-yan; Li, Xiao-ying

    2014-06-18

    To evaluate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among the Chinese elderly and the gender difference. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in a representative urban area of Beijing, China. A sample of 2 102 community elderly (848 males, and 1 254 females) aged 60 to 95 years were included in the study. MetS was defined according to the 2009 harmonizing definition. The prevalence of MetS was 59.1% (50.1% in males and 65.2% in females, P<0.001). The baPWV value was between 8.2 to 45.6 (20.0 ± 4.4) m/s, and showed an increasing trend with age (P<0.001). The partial correlation showed baPWV was positively associated with BMI (r=0.076, P=0.037), systolic blood pressure (r=0.380, P<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (r=0.276, P<0.001), triglyceride (r=0.040, P=0.046), fasting blood glucose (r=0.140, P<0.001), 2-hour post-meal blood glucose (r=0.121, P<0.001), and negatively associated with HDL-C (r=-0.128, P=0.048). There was a strong association between baPWV and prevalence of MetS and its component number in females but not in males. Compared with the lowest quartile of baPWV, the adjusted ORs were 1.22 (95%CI 0.83-1.79), 1.32 (95%CI 0.90-1.93), 1.46(95%CI 1.00-2.14) in males and 1.28 (95%CI 0.93-1.77), 1.55 (95%CI 1.12-2.16), 1.86(95%CI 1.32-2.61) in females for the second, third and top quartiles. The prevalence of MetS increases substantially with increasing levels of baPWV among the Chinese elderly, especially in females.

  3. Prehospital shock index and pulse pressure/heart rate ratio to predict massive transfusion after severe trauma: Retrospective analysis of a large regional trauma database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottecher, Julien; Ageron, François-Xavier; Fauché, Clémence; Chemla, Denis; Noll, Eric; Duranteau, Jacques; Chapiteau, Laurent; Payen, Jean-François; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Early and accurate detection of severe hemorrhage is critical for a timely trigger of massive transfusion (MT). Hemodynamic indices combining heart rate (HR) and either systolic (shock index [SI]) or pulse pressure (PP) (PP/HR ratio) have been shown to track blood loss during hemorrhage. The present study assessed the accuracy of prehospital SI and PP/HR ratio to predict subsequent MT, using the gray-zone approach. This was a retrospective analysis (January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011) of a prospectively developed trauma registry (TRENAU), in which the triage scheme combines patient severity and hospital facilities. Thresholds for MT were defined as either classic (≥10 red blood cell units within the first 24 hours [MT1]) or critical (≥3 red blood cells within the first hour [MT2]). The receiver operating characteristic curves and gray zones were defined for SI and PP/HR ratio to predict MT1 and MT2 and faced with initial triage scheme. The TRENAU registry included 3,689 trauma patients, of which 2,557 had complete chart recovery and 176 (6.9%) required MT. In the whole population, PP/HR ratio and SI moderately and similarly predicted MT1 (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.77 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.70-0.84] and 0.80 [95% CI, 0.74-0.87], respectively, p = 0.064) and MT2 (0.71 [95% CI, 0.67-0.76] and 0.72 [95% CI, 0.68-0.77], respectively, p = 0.48). The proportions of patients in the gray zone for PP/HR ratio and SI were 61% versus 40%, respectively, to predict MT1 (p ratio outperformed SI to predict MT2 (0.72 [95% CI, 0.59-0.84] vs. 0.54 [95% CI, 0.33-0.74]; p ratio were moderately accurate in predicting MT. In the seemingly least severe patients, an improvement of prehospital undertriage for MT may be gained by using the PP/HR ratio. Epidemiolgic study, level III.

  4. Hypocaloric diet supplemented with probiotic cheese improves body mass index and blood pressure indices of obese hypertensive patients - a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Gut lactobacilli can affect the metabolic functions of healthy humans. We tested whether a 1500 kcal/d diet supplemented with cheese containing the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum TENSIA (Deutsche Sammlung für Mikroorganismen, DSM 21380) could reduce some symptoms of metabolic syndrome in Russian adults with obesity and hypertension. Methods In this 3-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel pilot study, 25 subjects ingested probiotic cheese and 15 ingested control cheese. Fifty grams of each cheese provided 175 kcal of energy. Blood pressure (BP), anthropometric characteristics, markers of liver and kidney function, metabolic indices (plasma glucose, lipids, and cholesterol), and urine polyamines were measured. Counts of fecal lactobacilli and L. plantarum TENSIA were evaluated using molecular methods. The data were analyzed by t-test for independent samples and Spearman’s partial correlation analysis. Results The probiotic L. plantarum TENSIA was present in variable amounts (529.6 ± 232.5 gene copies) in 16/25 (64%) study subjects. Body mass index (BMI) was significantly reduced (p = 0.031) in the probiotic cheese group versus the control cheese group. The changes in BMI were closely associated with the water content of the body (r = 0.570, p = 0.0007) when adjusted for sex and age. Higher values of intestinal lactobacilli after probiotic cheese consumption were associated with higher BMI (r = 0.383, p = 0.0305) and urinary putrescine content (r = 0.475, p = 0.006). In patients simultaneously treated with BP-lowering drugs, similar reductions of BP were observed in both groups. A positive association was detected between TENSIA colonization and the extent of change of morning diastolic BP (r = 0.617, p = 0.0248) and a trend toward lower values of morning systolic BP (r = −0.527, p = 0.0640) at the end of the study after adjusting for BMI, age, and sex. Conclusion In a pilot study of obese hypertensive patients, a hypocaloric

  5. Body Size Predicts Cardiac and Vascular Resistance Effects on Men's and Women's Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce M. Evans

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Key Points SummaryWe report how blood pressure, cardiac output and vascular resistance are related to height, weight, body surface area (BSA, and body mass index (BMI in healthy young adults at supine rest and standing.Much inter-subject variability in young adult's blood pressure, currently attributed to health status, may actually result from inter-individual body size differences.Each cardiovascular variable is linearly related to height, weight and/or BSA (more than to BMI.When supine, cardiac output is positively related, while vascular resistance is negatively related, to body size. Upon standing, the change in vascular resistance is positively related to size.The height/weight relationships of cardiac output and vascular resistance to body size are responsible for blood pressure relationships to body size.These basic components of blood pressure could help distinguish normal from abnormal blood pressures in young adults by providing a more effective scaling mechanism.Introduction: Effects of body size on inter-subject blood pressure (BP variability are not well established in adults. We hypothesized that relationships linking stroke volume (SV, cardiac output (CO, and total peripheral resistance (TPR with body size would account for a significant fraction of inter-subject BP variability.Methods: Thirty-four young, healthy adults (19 men, 15 women participated in 38 stand tests during which brachial artery BP, heart rate, SV, CO, TPR, and indexes of body size were measured/calculated.Results: Steady state diastolic arterial BP was not significantly correlated with any index of body size when subjects were supine. However, upon standing, the more the subject weighed, or the taller s/he was, the greater the increase in diastolic pressure. Systolic pressure strongly correlated with body weight and height both supine and standing. Diastolic and systolic BP were more strongly related to height, weight and body surface area than to body mass

  6. The pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine after four different techniques of brachial plexus blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, H.C.; Lerou, J.G.C.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Boersma, E.; Burm, A.G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were measured after brachial plexus blockade using four different approaches: lateral interscalene (Winnie), posterior interscalene (Pippa), axillary and vertical infraclavicular. Four groups of 10 patients were given a single 3.75 mg.kg(-1) injection of

  7. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  8. Neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injuries: an historical cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2004-01-01

    An historical cohort study was conducted to investigate the rate and extent of neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) and to identify possible prognostic factors in a cohort of children with OBPI from birth to 7 years. All children (n=56; 31 females, 25 males) with OBPI

  9. Perineural versus intravenous clonidine as an adjuvant to Bupivacaine in supraclavicular Brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bedi

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Addition of clonidine 2mcg/kg to 28 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in brachial plexus blocks results in a faster onset, increased duration of block and longer postoperative pain relief when compared to bupivacaine alone. These advantages are not observed when the same dose of clonidine is injected intravenously.

  10. Addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir

    2017-06-26

    Research is ongoing to determine the lowest dose of local anesthetics in brachial plexus block that provides adequate anesthesia and postoperative analgesia and reduces complications related to local anesthetics. Patients 18-65 years of age who underwent upper limb surgery and who received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block at the Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine Hospital between February 2014 and January 2015 were included in the study (n=50). Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks were performed on Group B cases by adding 30 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and on Group BD cases by adding 15 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and 1 µg / kg dexmedetomidine. Block success was evaluated by the onset and block duration of motor and sensory block and the duration of analgesia. The block success of Group B and Group BD was 92.6% and 89.3%, respectively (P = 1.000). Onset time of sensory block, degree of sensory block, duration of sensory block, onset time of motor block, degree of motor block and duration of motor block were similar in both groups in the intergroup comparison (P > 0.05). Duration of analgesia and the operative conditions of groups were similar (P > 0.05). In the implementation of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block, block success, sensory and motor block and analgesia duration were similar for patients anaesthetized with 30 ml of bupivacaine in comparison with dexmedetomidine+bupivacaine (when the bupivacaine dose was reduced by 50% by the addition of the adjuvant).

  11. Constraining the brachial plexus does not compromise regional control in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Mutter W; Wolden, Suzanne L; Lee, Nancy Y; Lok, Benjamin H; Dutta, Pinaki R; Riaz, Nadeem; Setton, Jeremy; Berry, Sean L; Goenka, Anuj; Zhang, Zhigang; Rao, Shyam S

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that brachial plexopathy following head and neck cancer radiotherapy may be underreported and that this toxicity is associated with a dose–response. Our purpose was to determine whether the dose to the brachial plexus (BP) can be constrained, without compromising regional control. The radiation plans of 324 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were reviewed. We identified 42 patients (13%) with gross nodal disease <1 cm from the BP. Normal tissue constraints included a maximum dose of 66 Gy and a D 05 of 60 Gy for the BP. These criteria took precedence over planning target volume (PTV) coverage of nodal disease near the BP. There was only one regional failure in the vicinity of the BP, salvaged with neck dissection (ND) and regional re-irradiation. There have been no reported episodes of brachial plexopathy to date. In combined-modality therapy, including ND as salvage, regional control did not appear to be compromised by constraining the dose to the BP. This approach may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing the long-term risk of brachial plexopathy

  12. Ultrasound-guided compression repair of pseudoaneurysms of brachial and femoral arteries - 2 cases-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Soo; Choi, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung A; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cho, Jae Min

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided compression repair of postcatherization pseudoaneurysm has been reported recently. We successfuly treated two cases of cardiac catherization-related pseudoaneurysms of brachial and femoral arteries with compression repair technique under color Doppler US-guidance. We regard US-guided compression repair as a saft and effective first-line treatment for catherization-related pseudoaneurysm

  13. Paravertebral and Brachial plexus block for Abdominal flap to cover the upper limb wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report where thoracic paravertebral block and brachial plexus block were used in a sick elderly patient with poor cardiopulmonary reserve, to cover a post traumatic raw area of the upper limb by raising flap from lateral abdominal wall. The residual raw area of abdomen was then covered with the split skin graft taken from thigh.

  14. Does the Addition of Tramadol and Ketamine to Ropivacaine Prolong the Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Can Senel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of tramadol and ketamine, 50 mg, added to ropivacaine in brachial plexus anesthesia. Methods. Thirty-six ASA physical statuses I and II patients, between 18 and 60 years of age, scheduled for forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were allocated to 3 groups. Group R received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL, group RT received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg tramadol, and group RK received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg ketamine for axillary brachial plexus block. The onset times and the duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events (nausea, vomiting, and feeling uncomfortable were recorded. Results. The onset time of sensorial block was the fastest in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of sensorial and motor block was the shortest in the ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Conclusion. We conclude that when added to brachial plexus analgesia at a dose of 50 mg, tramadol extends the onset and duration time of the block and improves the quality of postoperative analgesia without any side effects.

  15. Ipsilateral Brachial Plexus Block and Hemidiaphragmatic Paresis as Adverse Effect of a High Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Steven H.; van Geffen, Geert J.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Gielen, Matthieu J.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    Background: Thoracic paravertebral block is regularly used for unilateral chest and abdominal surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Case Reports: We describe 2 patients with an ipsilateral brachial plexus block with Horner syndrome after a high continuous thoracic paravertebral

  16. A few attempts for brachial edema following postoperative irradiation of mammary cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, H; Hariu, T [Tohoku Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    1975-07-01

    Of 40 cases of pre- and postoperative irradiation of malignant tumor of the mammary gland (/sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, atmospheric dose more than 4000 R), the injection of low molecule dextran, which improves blood stream, and urokinase were combined in 15 cases with a longterm complaint of pain due to brachial edema, and was effective in 12 cases.

  17. The inter-arm diastolic blood pressure difference induced by one arm ischemia: a new approach to assess vascular endothelia function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weitong; Li, Juxiang; Su, Hai; Wang, Jiwei; Xu, Jinsong; Liu, Yanna; Huang, Ming; Cheng, Xiaoshu

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether inter-arm diastolic blood pressure difference (DBPl-r) induced by one arm ischemia correlates with flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). Bilateral arm BPs were simultaneously measured with two automatic devices and right brachial artery diameter (D) was measured by ultrasound technique in 108 subjects (56 hypertensives and 52 normotensives). Following baseline diameter (D0) and BP measurement, right brachial artery was occluded for 5 minutes. The diameter was measured at 1, 1.5 and 2 min, and bilateral BPs measured at 3, 4 and 5 min after occlusion release. Their averages were recorded as post-D and post-BP, respectively. The difference between post-D and D0 (ΔD) was calculated as the percentage increase of artery diameter (ΔD/D0). The BP difference between left and right arms was calculated as BPl-r, and the difference of post- BPl-r and baseline BPl-r was recorded as the net change of BPl-r (ΔBPl-r). At baseline, bilateral SBPs and DBPs were similar. Right arm ischemia induced significant DBP decline only in the right arm (68.8±12.7 vs 72.6±12.0 mmHg, Parm DBP difference induced by one arm ischemia may be a potential index for clinical evaluation of vascular endothelial function.

  18. Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability as a prognostic marker in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases--relationships and comparisons with vascular markers of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kui Kai; Wong, Yuen Kwun; Chan, Yap Hang; Teo, Kay Cheong; Chan, Koon Ho; Wai Li, Leonard Sheung; Cheung, Raymond Tak Fai; Siu, Chung Wah; Ho, Shu Leong; Tse, Hung Fat

    2014-07-01

    Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability (BPV) is a simple surrogate marker for the development of atherosclerotic diseases, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Nevertheless, the relative prognostic value of BPV in comparison with other established vascular assessments remain uncertain. We prospectively followed-up 656 high-risk patients with diabetes or established cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Baseline brachial endothelial function, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque burden, ankle-brachial index and arterial stiffness were determined. Visit-to-visit BPV were recorded during a mean 18 ± 9 outpatient clinic visits. After a mean 81 ± 12 month's follow-up, 123 patients (19%) developed MACEs. Patients who developed a MACE had significantly higher systolic BPV, more severe endothelial function, arterial stiffness and systemic atherosclerotic burden compared to patients who did not develop a MACE (all Parea under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) 0.69 ± 0.03, PAUC 0.65 ± 0.03, P<0.01). After adjustment of confounding factors, a high BPV remained a significant independent predictor of MACE (hazards ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval 1.14-2.43, P<0.01). Compared with established surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, visit-to-visit BPV provides similar prognostic information and may represent a new and simple marker for adverse outcomes in patients with vascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brachial and Cerebrovascular Functions Are Enhanced in Postmenopausal Women after Ingestion of Chocolate with a High Concentration of Cocoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Channa E; Carter, Howard H; Guelfi, Kym J; Smith, Kurt J; Pike, Kerryn E; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Background: Cocoa contains polyphenols that are thought to be beneficial for vascular health. Objective: We assessed the impact of chocolate containing distinct concentrations of cocoa on cerebrovascular function and cognition. Methods: Using a counterbalanced within-subject design, we compared the acute impact of consumption of energy-matched chocolate containing 80%, 35%, and 0% single-origin cacao on vascular endothelial function, cognition, and cerebrovascular function in 12 healthy postmenopausal women (mean ± SD age: 57.3 ± 5.3 y). Participants attended a familiarization session, followed by 3 experimental trials, each separated by 1 wk. Outcome measures included cerebral blood flow velocity (CBF v ) responses, recorded before and during completion of a computerized cognitive assessment battery (CogState); brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD); and hemodynamic responses (heart rate and blood pressure). Results: When CBF v data before and after chocolate intake were compared between conditions through the use of 2-factor ANOVA, an interaction effect ( P = 0.003) and main effects for chocolate ( P = 0.043) and time ( P = 0.001) were evident. Post hoc analysis revealed that both milk chocolate (MC; 35% cocoa; P = 0.02) and dark chocolate (DC; 80% cocoa; P = 0.003) induced significantly lower cerebral blood flow responses during the cognitive tasks, after normalizing for changes in arterial pressure. DC consumption also increased brachial FMD compared with the baseline value before chocolate consumption ( P = 0.002), whereas MC and white chocolate (0% cocoa) caused no change ( P- interaction between conditions = 0.034). Conclusions: Consumption of chocolate containing high concentrations of cocoa enhanced vascular endothelial function, which was reflected by improvements in FMD. Cognitive function outcomes did not differ between conditions; however, cerebral blood flow responses during these cognitive tasks were lower in those consuming MC and DC. These

  20. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 2005 ... Issue, Title. Vol 92, No 4 (2015), Blood Pressure and Obesity Index Assessment in a Typical Urban Slum in Enugu, Nigeria, Abstract. GI Ahaneku, CU Osuji, OC Oguejiofor, BC Anisiuba, VO Ikeh, JE Ahaneku. Vol 80, No 10 (2003):, Blood pressure control in a population where antihypertensives are ...

  2. Experimental investigation of gas flow rate and electric field effect on refractive index and electron density distribution of cold atmospheric pressure-plasma by optical method, Moiré deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanzadeh, Mohammad; Jamal, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mahdi

    2018-04-01

    Nowadays, cold atmospheric-pressure (CAP) helium plasma jets are widely used in material processing devices in various industries. Researchers often use indirect and spectrometric methods for measuring the plasma parameters which are very expensive. In this paper, for the first time, characterization of CAP, i.e., finding its parameters such as refractive index and electron density distribution, was carried out using an optical method, Moiré deflectometry. This method is a wave front analysis technique based on geometric optics. The advantages of this method are simplicity, high accuracy, and low cost along with the non-contact, non-destructive, and direct measurement of CAP parameters. This method demonstrates that as the helium gas flow rate decreases, the refractive index increases. Also, we must note that the refractive index is larger in the gas flow consisting of different flow rates of plasma comparing with the gas flow without the plasma.

  3. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  4. A computational analysis of the long-term regulation of arterial pressure [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1xq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Beard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The asserted dominant role of the kidneys in the chronic regulation of blood pressure and in the etiology of hypertension has been debated since the 1970s. At the center of the theory is the observation that the acute relationships between arterial pressure and urine production—the acute pressure-diuresis and pressure-natriuresis curves—physiologically adapt to perturbations in pressure and/or changes in the rate of salt and volume intake. These adaptations, modulated by various interacting neurohumoral mechanisms, result in chronic relationships between water and salt excretion and pressure that are much steeper than the acute relationships. While the view that renal function is the dominant controller of arterial pressure has been supported by computer models of the cardiovascular system known as the “Guyton-Coleman model”, no unambiguous description of a computer model capturing chronic adaptation of acute renal function in blood pressure control has been presented. Here, such a model is developed with the goals of: 1. capturing the relevant mechanisms in an identifiable mathematical model; 2. identifying model parameters using appropriate data; 3. validating model predictions in comparison to data; and 4. probing hypotheses regarding the long-term control of arterial pressure and the etiology of primary hypertension. The developed model reveals: long-term control of arterial blood pressure is primarily through the baroreflex arc and the renin-angiotensin system; and arterial stiffening provides a sufficient explanation for the etiology of primary hypertension associated with ageing. Furthermore, the model provides the first consistent explanation of the physiological response to chronic stimulation of the baroreflex.

  5. Dosimetric analysis of the brachial plexus among patients with breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy to the ipsilateral supraclavicular area: report of 3 cases of radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, San-Gang; Huang, Si-Juan; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Guo, Han; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin; He, Zhen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brachial plexus (BP) dose of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) to the ipsilateral supraclavicular (ISCL) area, and report the characteristics of radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy (RIBPN). The BP dose of 31 patients who received adjuvant PMRT to the ISCL area and chest wall using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and the records of 3 patients with RIBPN were retrospectively analyzed based on the standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-endorsed guidelines. The total dose to the ISCL area and chest wall was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients with a higher number of removed lymph nodes (RLNs) had a higher risk of RIBPN (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.189, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.005-1.406, p = 0.044). In 31 patients treated with 3DCRT, the mean dose to the BP without irradiation to the ISCL area was significantly less than that with irradiation to the ISCL area (0.97 ± 0.20 vs. 44.39 ± 4.13 Gy, t = 136.75, p <0.001). In the 3DCRT plans with irradiation to the ISCL area and chest wall, the maximum dose to the BP was negatively correlated with age (r = −0.40, p = 0.026), body mass index (BMI) (r = −0.44, p = 0.014), and body weight (r = −0.45, p = 0.011). Symptoms of the 3 patients with RIBPN occurred 37–65 months after radiotherapy, and included progressive upper extremity numbness, pain, and motor disturbance. After treatment, 1 patient was stable, and the other 2 patients’ symptoms worsened. The incidence of RIBPN was higher in patients with a higher number of RLNs after PMRT. The dose to the BP is primarily from irradiation of the ISCL area, and is higher in slim and young patients. Prevention should be the main focus of managing RIBPN, and the BP should be considered an organ-at-risk when designing a radiotherapy plan for the ISCL area

  6. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  7. A meta-analysis of the effect of angiotensin receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers on blood pressure, glycemia and the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Wei, Ri-bao; Xing, Yue; Tang, Lu; Zheng, Xiao-yong; Wang, Zi-cheng; Gao, Yu-wei; Li, Min-xia; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the efficacy of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in the effect of insulin resistance (IR) as assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in non-diabetic patients. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify studies published before December 2012 that investigated the use of ARBs and CCBs to determine the effect on the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetics. Parameters on IR and blood pressure were collected. Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 12.0 were used to perform the meta-analysis. Fixed and random effects models were applied to various aspects of the meta-analysis, which assessed the therapeutic effects of the two types of drug using the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetic patients. The meta-analysis included five clinical trials. Patient comparisons before and after treatment with ARBs and CCBs revealed that ARBs reduced the HOMA-IR index (weighted mean difference (WMD) -0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.93 to -0.38) and fasting plasma insulin (FPI) (WMD -2.01, 95% CI -3.27 to -0.74) significantly more than CCBs. No significant differences in the therapeutic effects of these two types of drug on blood pressure were observed. Given that there are no significant differences in the therapeutic effects of ARBs and CCBs on blood pressure, as ARBs are superior to CCBs in their effect on the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetics, they might be a better choice in hypertension patients without diabetes. © 2013.

  8. Types and severity of operated supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries caused by traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Radek; Waldauf, Petr; Haninec, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injuries occur in up to 5% of polytrauma cases involving motorcycle accidents and in approximately 4% of severe winter sports injuries. One of the criteria for a successful operative therapy is the type of lesion. Upper plexus palsy has the best prognosis, whereas lower plexus palsy is surgically untreatable. The aim of this study was to evaluate a group of patients with brachial plexus injury caused by traffic accidents, categorize the injuries according to type of accident, and look for correlations between type of palsy (injury) and specific accidents. A total of 441 brachial plexus reconstruction patients from our department were evaluated retrospectively(1993 to 2011). Sex, age, neurological status, and the type and cause of injury were recorded for each case. Patients with BPI caused by a traffic accident were assessed in detail. Traffic accidents were the cause of brachial plexus injury in most cases (80.7%). The most common type of injury was avulsion of upper root(s) (45.7%) followed by rupture (28.2%), complete avulsion (16.9%) and avulsion of lower root(s) (9.2%). Of the patients, 73.9% had an upper,22.7% had a complete and only 3.4% had a lower brachial plexus palsy. The main cause was motorcycle accidents(63.2%) followed by car accidents (23.5%), bicycle accidents(10.7%) and pedestrian collisions (3.1%) (paccidents had a higher percentage of lower avulsion (22.7%) and a lower percentage of upper avulsion (29.3%), whereas cyclists had a higher percentage of upper avulsion (68.6%) based on the data from the entire group of patients (paccidents (9.3%,paccidents),significantly more upper and fewer lower palsies were present. In the bicycle accident group, upper palsy was the most common (89%). Study results indicate that the most common injury was an upper plexus palsy. It was characteristic of bicycle accidents, and significantly more common in car and motorcycle accidents. The results also indicate that it is important to consider the

  9. The usefulness of MR myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Yukio; Niitsu, Mamoru

    2002-01-01

    Myelography has been the most popular and reliable method for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury. However, it is invasive because it requires the use of contrast medium, dural puncture and exposure to radiation. In addition, it has a fault. When a nerve rootlet is not filled with contrast medium, it is impossible to evaluate it. It has sometimes been a problem in the injury to upper roots. Recently, MRI also has been used for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. But it was not until recently that it has had a high resolution to detect affected nerve rootlets. We have used MR myelography with high resolution for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of it. MR myelography was preoperatively performed in 14 cases, consisting of 13 traumatic brachial plexus injuries and an obstetrical palsy. In them, 12 cases had root avulsion injuries and 2 cases had infraclavicular injuries. A 1.5 Tesla MR system (Philips) and a cervical coil were used. Coronal sections with 2 mm-overcontiguous thickness were obtained by heavily T2-weighted sequence fast spin echo (TR/TE=3000/450). The fat signal was suppressed by a presaturation inversion-pulse. The scanning time was about five minutes. The three-dimensional image was reconstructed by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. MIP images and individual coronal images were used for evaluation for root avulsion. In evaluation the shape of a nerve sleeve and nerve rootlets was compared on both sides. The abnormal shape of a nerve sleeve or the defect of nerve rootlets was diagnosed as root avulsion. The brachial plexus lesions were exposed operatively and examined with electrophysiologic methods (SEP and/or ESCP) in all cases. Operative findings were compared with MR myelography. Twenty-four roots had been diagnosed as normal and 46 roots had been diagnosed as root avulsion with MR myelography preoperatively. In the former only one root was

  10. The blind pushing technique for peripherally inserted central catheter placement through brachial vein puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Myeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Kim, Han Myun; Song, Myung Gyu; Song, Soon-Young; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective clinical trial evaluating the technical feasibility and short-term clinical outcome of the blind pushing technique for placement of pretrimmed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) through brachial vein access. Patients requiring PICC placement at any of the three participating institutions were prospectively enrolled between January and December 2016. The review boards of all participating institutions approved this study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. PICC placement was performed using the blind pushing technique and primary brachial vein access. The following data were collected from unified case report forms: access vein, obstacles during PICC advancement, procedure time, and postprocedural complications. During the 12-month study period, 1380 PICCs were placed in 1043 patients. Of these, 1092 PICCs placed in 837 patients were enrolled, with 834 PICCs (76%) and 258 PICCs (34%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. In both arms, obstacles were most commonly noted in the subclavian veins (n = 220) and axillary veins (n = 94). Successful puncture of the access vein was achieved at first try in 1028 PICCs (94%). The technical success rate was 99%, with 1055 PICCs (97%) placed within 120 seconds of procedure time and 1088 PICCs (99%) having the tip located at the ideal position. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound detected catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) for 18 PICCs in 16 patients and late symptomatic UEDVT for 16 PICCs in 16 patients (3.1%). Catheter-associated UEDVT was noted for 28 PICCs (82%) and 6 PICCs (18%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. The incidence of obstacles and the procedure time (pushing technique and primary brachial vein access is technically feasible and may represent an alternative to the conventional PICC placement technique, having low incidences of

  11. Gender differences in the relationships among obesity, adiponectin and brachial artery distensibility in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, E M; Khoury, P; Martin, L J; D'Alessio, D; Dolan, L M

    2009-10-01

    Obesity-related cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major cause of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Obesity-related reduction in vascular protective adipose-derived proteins, such as adiponectin (APN), has an important role. We compared brachial artery distensibility (BrachD) with APN, the level of adiposity and other CV risk factors (CVRFs) in 431 post-pubertal subjects (mean 17.9 years). Gender differences in average values were examined by t-tests. Correlations among BrachD, obesity and other CVRFs were examined. Regression analysis was performed to determine whether APN provided an independent contribution to BrachD, while controlling for obesity and other CVRFs. Male subjects had lower BrachD (5.72+/-1.37 vs 6.45+/-1.60% change per mm Hg, Pgender, APN*gender and BMI z-score predicted BrachD (r(2)=0.305). On the basis of gender difference, only BMI z-score was significant for male subjects (r(2)=0.080), whereas APN and BMI z-score contributed for female subjects (r(2)=0.242, all Pobesity in both male and female subjects. In female subjects, APN exerts an additional independent effect even after adjusting for blood pressure (BP), lipid levels and insulin. Differences in the effect of the APN-adiposity relationship on obesity-related vascular disease may be one reason for gender differences in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  12. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  13. The phrenic nerve transfer in the treatment of a septuagenarian with brachial plexus avulsion injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Lao, Jie

    2018-05-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer has been a well-established procedure for restoring elbow flexion function in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury. Concerning about probably detrimental respiratory effects brought by the operation, however, stirred up quite a bit of controversy. We present a case report of the successful application of phrenic nerve as donor to reinnervate the biceps in a septuagenarian with brachial plexus avulsion injury, not accompanied with significant clinical respiratory problem.

  14. An anatomical study of variations in termination of brachial artery, with its embryological basis and clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa T. K

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial artery is the main artery of the arm. It begins as the continuation of 3rd part of axillary artery, at the level of inferior border of teres major muscle. It ends at the level of the neck of radius by dividing into radial and ulnar arteries. In the present study we found higher division of brachial artery at mid arm level into its terminal branches with superficial course of radial artery. The present study was done on 51 cadavers from our dept. of Anatomy. The upper limbs of the cadaver were dissected and observed for any variations in the branching pattern of brachial artery. In the present study, a total number of 51 cadaver’s, 102 upper limbs were studied. In one male cadaver we found bilateral higher division of brachial artery, trifurcation on left side and bifurcation on right side brachial artery, with superficial course of radial artery. The knowledge of variation in origin and course of brachial artery is useful for orthopaedicians, physicians, radiologist, vascular and plastic surgeons.

  15. Brachial biceps tendon injuries in young female high-level tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Gillson, S

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate brachial biceps tendon lesions in four young female tennis players who complained about anterior shoulder pain on their dominant side. Medical and sport's activity history, palpation of the painful zone, Ghilchrist (palm-up) test, and brachial biceps contraction against resistance were performed. The two girls who suffered from mild tenderness in the bicipital groove and over the anterior aspect of the upper arm and the shoulder joint, had tendinitis of the long biceps head. The two girls who suffered from severe tenderness just under the groove, had a partial tear in the long head of the biceps. Ghilchrist test was positive in all girls. Tennis players can have shoulder pain without clear history of trauma. Pain occurred probably as a result of technical errors or use of inadequate equipment.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in children with brachial plexus birth palsy

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    Gudinchet, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Maeder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Oberson, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Schnyder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Five patients suffering from Erb-Duchenne brachial plexus birth palsy were prospectively studied with MRI. A group of 11 healthy children was used as a control to understand the MRI anatomy of the normal growing glenohumeral joint. A hypoplastic and flattened posterior part of the glenoid fossa and a blunt posterior labrum were found in all patients. Four patients had a blunt anterior labrum and a flattened humeral head. Three patients presented with a posterior subluxation of the humeral head. These results suggest that MRI provides a non-ionising and non-invasive method of demonstrating the early abnormalities of the shoulder associated with obstetrical brachial plexus paralysis, which may prompt orthopaedic correction. (orig.)

  17. A Case of Horner's Syndrome following Ultrasound-Guided Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walid, Trabelsi; Mondher, Belhaj Amor; Mohamed Anis, Lebbi; Mustapha, Ferjani

    2012-01-01

    Horner's syndrome results from paralysis of the ipsilateral sympathetic cervical chain (stellate ganglion) caused by surgery, drugs (mainly high concentrations of local anesthetics), local compression (hematoma or tumor), or inadequate perioperative positioning of the patient. It occurs in 100% of the patients with an interscalene block of the brachial plexus and can also occur in patients with other types of supraclavicular blocks.In this case report, we presented a case of Horner's syndrome after performing an ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block with 15 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%. It appeared 40 minutes after the block with specific triad (ptosis, miosis, and exophtalmia) and quickly disappears within 2 hours and a half without any sequelae. Horner's syndrome may be described as an unpleasant side effect because it has no clinical consequences in itself. For this reason anesthesiologists should be aware of this syndrome, and if it occurs patients should be reassured and monitored closely.

  18. Rehabilitation program for children with brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, L E; Zell, J P

    2000-03-01

    An aggressive and integrated physical and occupational therapy program is essential in the treatment of congenital brachial plexus injuries and other severe upper extremity nerve injuries. This article addresses the evaluation, identification of needs, establishment of goals, and the approaches to rehabilitation treatment for patients with brachial plexus palsy and other peripheral nerve injuries. Rehabilitative therapy can preserve and build on gains made possible by medical or surgical interventions; however, therapy is vital to these children regardless of whether surgery is indicated. The therapist uses a problem-solving approach to evaluate the patient and select appropriate occupational and physical therapy treatment modalities. Therapy is continually adjusted based on each child's unique needs. An understanding of the therapy principles aids in making appropriate referrals and prescriptions, and helps to coordinate care between the therapist, pediatrician, neurologist, and surgeon.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of the hemiplegic patient with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, J; Taft, G; Kaplan, P

    1981-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury was observed as a complication in 5 of 12 hemiplegic patients admitted over a 5-week period to an inpatient unit of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. These patients exhibited unusual patterns of muscle atrophy and return of function in the impaired upper extremity. Occupational therapists may play an important part in the diagnosis and treatment of this complication of hemiplegia by promptly recognizing its subtle clinical signs and instituting appropriate therapy. Electromyography may be recommended to confirm this diagnosis. The treatment of choice is to maintain correct positioning of the limb both day and night, to use facilitation techniques for specific muscles in order to prevent atrophy, and to maintain passive range of motion as much as possible. Prevention of brachial plexus injury depends largely on the education of patient, family, and staff as to the potential hazards to a frail extremity that has no protective responses.

  20. Effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Kurlowicz, Kirsty; Vladusic, Sharon; Grimmer, Karen

    2005-03-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, a complication of childbirth, occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births internationally. Traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus is thought to be the primary mechanism of injury and this may occur in utero, during the descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that vary in severity, extent of damage and functional use of the affected upper limb. Most infants receive treatment, such as conservative management (physiotherapy, occupational therapy) or surgery; however, there is controversy regarding the most appropriate form of management. To date, no synthesised evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of primary conservative management for obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 14 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Those studies that were reported in English and published over the last decade (July 1992 to June 2003) were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion in this review. This excluded studies that solely investigated the effect of primary surgery for these infants, management of secondary deformities and the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents, such as botulinum toxin. Data collection and analysis

  1. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  2. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of motor imbalance in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arad, Ehud; Stephens, Derek; Curtis, Christine G; Clarke, Howard M

    2013-06-01

    Residual muscle imbalance is a common problem affecting obstetrical brachial plexus palsy patients. The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) in improving this muscle imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed obstetrical brachial plexus palsy patients treated with Botox for muscle imbalance as an isolated procedure. Outcomes were the change in Active Movement Scale scores from pre-Botox scores to scores at 1 month after Botox and 1 year after Botox. Twenty-seven patients were included, 19 treated for shoulder imbalance and eight treated for elbow imbalance. Active Movement Scale scores (mean±SD) for shoulder external rotation improved from 0.6±1.0 before Botox to 2.6±2.14 (pimbalance produces improvement in external rotation that is not sufficiently sustained over time to be of clinical benefit. However, Botox for elbow movement imbalance produces a sustained and clinically useful improvement. Therapeutic, IV.

  3. Asymmetric Bilateral Variations in the Musculocutaneous and Median Nerves with High Branching of Brachial Artery

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    Vandana Tomar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial Plexus is formed by the union of the anterior rami of cervical 5, 6, 7, 8 and thoracic 1 nerves. These nerves unite and divide to form the key nerves innervating the upper limb. Variations in the course of these nerves are clinically important to anesthetists, neurologists and orthopedicians. We report bilateral variations in the arterial and neural structures in the upper limb of a 65 year old cadaver. The muscles of the arm on one side were innervated by the median nerve with absence of musculocutaneous. While on the other side the musculocutaneous nerve contributed to the formation of the median nerve. There was a presence of high bifurcation of brachial artery on both sides. Knowledge of such variations in the innervations of muscles and the arterial supply of the limbs are important to remember before performing any reconstructive procedures or interventions on the limb.

  4. Ultrasound-guided approach for axillary brachial plexus, femoral nerve, and sciatic nerve blocks in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoy, Luis; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J; Gleed, Robin D; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Raw, Robert M; Santare, Carrie L; Jay, Ariane R; Wang, Annie L

    2010-03-01

    To describe an ultrasound-guided technique and the anatomical basis for three clinically useful nerve blocks in dogs. Prospective experimental trial. Four hound-cross dogs aged 2 +/- 0 years (mean +/- SD) weighing 30 +/- 5 kg and four Beagles aged 2 +/- 0 years and weighing 8.5 +/- 0.5 kg. Axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic combined ultrasound/electrolocation-guided nerve blocks were performed sequentially and bilaterally using a lidocaine solution mixed with methylene blue. Sciatic nerve blocks were not performed in the hounds. After the blocks, the dogs were euthanatized and each relevant site dissected. Axillary brachial plexus block Landmark blood vessels and the roots of the brachial plexus were identified by ultrasound in all eight dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the four ventral nerve roots (C6, C7, C8, and T1) and the axillary vessels. Three roots (C7, C8, and T1) were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Femoral nerve block Landmark blood vessels (femoral artery and femoral vein), the femoral and saphenous nerves and the medial portion of the rectus femoris muscle were identified by ultrasound in all dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the femoral vessels, femoral nerve, and the rectus femoris muscle. The femoral nerves were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Sciatic nerve block. Ultrasound landmarks (semimembranosus muscle, the fascia of the biceps femoris muscle and the sciatic nerve) could be identified in all of the dogs. In the four Beagles, anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the biceps femoris muscle, the semimembranosus muscle, and the sciatic nerve. In the Beagles, all but one of the sciatic nerves were stained adequately. Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is an accurate method for depositing local anesthetic for axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic nerve blocks.

  5. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system due to brachial plexus injury: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setogutti, Enio Tadashi; Cassuriaga, Jefferson; Valduga, Simone Gianella; Lorenzzoni, Pablo Longhi; Severgnini, Giancarlo Muraro; Feldman, Carlos Jader

    2005-01-01

    Superficial siderosis can be caused by hemosiderin deposition o the leptomeninges and subpial layers of the neuro-axis due to recurrent subarachnoid haemorrhage. Probable intrathecal bleeding sites must be investigated. In ut t 50% of the patients the bleeding source may be identified and the progression of the disease can be interrupted. In this study, the authors present a case of superficial siderosis of the central nervous system developed two decades after a traumatic lesion of the brachial plexus.(author)

  6. Prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus for the early rehabilitation of children with posttraumatic elbow contractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Zabolotsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Improvement of surgical treatment outcomes in children with post-traumatic elbow contractures. Materials and methods. The study is based on the diagnostic findings of 48 children with post-traumatic elbow contractures who were treated at the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children’s Orthopedics. All children underwent complex rehabilitation after reconstructive intra-articular surgery to work out passive motions in the elbow using ARTROMOT-E2 device. The patients of the study group started rehabilitation in the first days after reconstructive intra-articular surgery in the background of prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus. In the control group, the rehabilitation was carried out traditionally on the 6th day after surgery without regional anesthesia. The patients of the study group were supplied with Contiplex SU perinural catheters for prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus using ultrasound (Edge SonoSite and neurostimulation (Stimuplex® HNS12 before surgery. For perioperative blockade of the brachial plexus we used intermittent injection of 0.5% ropivacaine (2 mg / kg. The severity of pain at the stages of rehabilitation was assessed using 10-point grading scale (FPS-R. The range of active and passive motions in the joints was evaluated by measuring the range of motions with a fleximeter. Results. Intermittent injection of ropivacaine before rehabilitation allowed to correct post-traumatic elbow contractures in children in the first days after surgery associated with the minimum subjective pain level and stable hemodynamic parameteres, accompanied with a significant increase of the elbow motion range in comparison with the group of the patients who were not performed regional anesthesia . Conclusion. Prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus in rehabilitation treatment of children with post-traumatic contractures provides appropriate analgesic and myoneural block components from the 1st day after intra

  7. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  8. Diaphragmatic height index: new diagnostic test for phrenic nerve dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Limthongthang, Roongsak; Vathana, Torpon; Kaewpornsawan, Kamolporn; Songcharoen, Panupan; Wongtrakul, Saichol

    2012-11-01

    The diaphragmatic height index (DHI) was developed to measure the difference in diaphragm levels. The purpose of this study was to set definite DHI values and test the accuracy of these values for use as a new diagnostic test for phrenic nerve dysfunction. All data for this study were obtained from medical charts and retrospectively reviewed. One hundred sixty-five patients with brachial plexus injury who had undergone nerve transfers between 2005 and 2008 were divided into Groups A and B. Group A consisted of 40 patients (mean age 28.0 years) who had sustained concomitant injury of the brachial plexus and phrenic nerves. Patients in Group A1 had right phrenic nerve injury and those in Group A2 had left phrenic nerve injury. Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve was considered the gold standard in assessing nerve function in all patients with brachial plexus injury. Group B consisted of 125 patients (mean age 28.7 years) with brachial plexus injury and normal phrenic nerve function. Group C, the control group, consisted of 80 patients with nonbrachial plexus injury (mean age 34.0 years) who had undergone other kinds of orthopedic operations between April and June 2009. Standard posteroanterior chest radiographs were blindly interpreted using the Siriraj inhouse picture archiving and communication system in all 245 patients in the study. First, a reference line (R line) was drawn along the inferior endplate of T-10. Then, 2 lines (lines A and B) were drawn through the highest point of each diaphragm and parallel to the R line. The difference between these 2 lines divided by the height of T-10 was defined as the DHI. The cutoff points of the DHI for diagnosing right and left phrenic nerve dysfunction were analyzed with a receiver operating characteristic curve. The accuracy of these DHI values was then evaluated. The DHI in Group C was 0.64 ± 0.44, slightly higher than the DHI in Group B, with no significant difference. Diaphragmatic

  9. Peripheral and central arterial pressure and its relationship to vascular target organ damage in carotid artery, retina and arterial stiffness. Development and validation of a tool. The Vaso risk study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patino-Alonso Maria C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM shows a better correlation to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality than office blood pressure. A loss of arterial elasticity and an increase in carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity-mortality. Tools have been developed that allow estimation of the retinal arteriovenous index but not all studies coincide and there are contradictory results in relation to the evolution of the arteriosclerotic lesions and the caliber of the retinal vessels. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between peripheral and central arterial pressure (clinic and ambulatory and vascular structure and function as evaluated by the carotid artery intima-media thickness, retina arteriovenous index, pulse wave velocity (PWV and ankle-brachial index in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. In turn, software is developed and validated for measuring retinal vessel thickness and automatically estimating the arteriovenous index. Methods/Design A cross-sectional study involving a control group will be made, with a posterior 4-year follow-up period in primary care. The study patients will be type 2 diabetics, with a control group of non-diabetic individuals. Consecutive sampling will be used to include 300 patients between 34-75 years of age and no previous cardiovascular disease, one-half being assigned to each group. Main measurements: age, gender, height, weight and abdominal circumference. Lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria, blood glucose, HbA1c, blood insulin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and endothelial dysfunction markers. Clinic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Carotid ultrasound to evaluate IMT, and retinography to evaluate the arteriovenous index. ECG to assess left ventricle hypertrophy, ankle-brachial index, and pulse wave analysis (PWA and pulse wave velocity (PWV with the Sphigmocor

  10. Differing Pattern of Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Very Elderly Men Expresses Dynamics in Atherosclerotic Load in the Senescence

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    Arkadiusz Siennicki-Lantz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess an impact of vascular risk factors on ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM in the elderly, we followed up a population-based cohort of men from 68 until 82 years, when 104 survivors underwent ABPM. Results. At age 68, hypertension and high clinic blood pressure (CBP did not predict ABPM level. Smoking and low ankle-brachial index (ABI predicted higher ABPM variability and pulse pressure (PP, but not absolute ABPM values. At age 82, hypertension, high or increasing CBP, strongly positively correlated with all variables of ABPM. Carotid stenosis, low or declining ABI during followup, correlated with higher nocturnal ABPM and PP. Concluding. Hypertension and vascular risk factors in a cohort of 68-year-old men do not result in higher ABPM at age 82, possibly due to inflection point in their pressure development. Higher ABPM reflects instead an increasing CBP and aggravating atherosclerosis during the preceding decade in that part of the cohort with previously favorable risk factor status.

  11. Resource Endowments and Responses to Regulatory Pressure: Publications of Economics, Management, and Political Science Departments of Turkish Universities in Indexed Journals, 2000-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Cetin; Kasapoglu-Onder, Rana

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates how differences in resource endowments of universities shape variation in their response to regulatory pressures. Earlier research on higher education institutions tends to conceive regulatory rules as the primary basis of action and does not attend to differences in the salient characteristics of universities. This paper…

  12. Reliability and accuracy assessment of radiation therapy oncology group-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus contouring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velde, Joris van de [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; Gersem, Werner de; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Vuye, Philippe; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan; Herde, Katharina d' ; Kerckaert, Ingrid; Hoof, Tom van [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    The goal of this work was to validate the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus (BP) contouring by determining the intra- and interobserver agreement. Accuracy of the delineation process was determined using anatomically validated imaging datasets as a gold standard. Five observers delineated the right BP on three cadaver computed tomography (CT) datasets. To assess intraobserver variation, every observer repeated each delineation three times with a time interval of 2 weeks. The BP contours were divided into four regions for detailed analysis. Inter- and intraobserver variation was verified using the Computerized Environment for Radiation Research (CERR) software. Accuracy was measured using anatomically validated fused CT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets by measuring the BP inclusion of the delineations. The overall kappa (κ) values were rather low (mean interobserver overall κ: 0.29, mean intraobserver overall κ: 0.45), indicating poor inter- and intraobserver reliability. In general, the κ coefficient decreased gradually from the medial to lateral BP regions. The total agreement volume (TAV) was much smaller than the union volume (UV) for all delineations, resulting in a low Jaccard index (JI; interobserver agreement 0-0.124; intraobserver agreement 0.004-0.636). The overall accuracy was poor, with an average total BP inclusion of 38 %. Inclusions were insufficient for the most lateral regions (region 3: 21.5 %; region 4: 12.6 %). The inter- and intraobserver reliability of the RTOG-endorsed BP contouring guidelines was poor. BP inclusion worsened from the medial to lateral regions. Accuracy assessment of the contours showed an average BP inclusion of 38 %. For the first time, this was assessed using the original anatomically validated BP volume. The RTOG-endorsed BP guidelines have insufficient accuracy and reliability, especially for the lateral head-and-neck regions. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN BLUE-FRONTED PARROT (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayssa Marley Nóbrega da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetic procedures are commonly used in domestic and wild birds, because of its low cost and fast induction, as long as applied with great precision, which requires specific anatomical knowledge of the site of incision. This study aimed to establish the origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of the Blue-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva by anatomic dissection of the skin and musculature of 22 specimens (17 males and 5 females from the Wild Animals Screening Center of the Federal District after death by natural causes. The dissection work promoted the isolation of the forming roots of the brachial plexus, as well as its ramifications. The brachial plexus was formed by four trunks, including the ventral spinal cord rami segments from C9 to C10, C10 to C11, C11 to T1 and T1 to T2, which joined into a short common trunk, branched into dorsal and ventral cords. The thin nerves subcoracoideus and subscapularis and the branch to the scapulohumeralis muscle originated from the common trunk. The dorsal cord originated the anconeal, axillaris and radialis nerves, while the ventral cord gave origin for the pectoralis cranialis, pectoralis caudalis, coracobrachialis and medianoulnaris. These branches innervated the muscles of the extensor and flexor compartments of the forelimb, pectoral muscles and overlying skin.

  14. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Timing of rehabilitation in children with obstetric upper trunk brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Volkan; Umay, Ebru; Tezel, Nihal; Gundogdu, Ibrahim

    2018-06-01

    The initiation timing of rehabilitation in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy is controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of rehabilitation timing to the functional outcomes of patients with obstetric upper trunk brachial plexus palsy. Twenty-nine patients, who did not previously received any rehabilitation programme but attended our outpatient clinic, were included for the study. The electrophysiological findings, obstetric characteristics, and demographic features of the patients were recorded. The range of motion (ROM) of shoulders, elbows, and wrists and the strength of the muscles associated with these joints were evaluated. Modified Mallet Scale (MMS) was used for functional evaluation. A 4-week rehabilitation programme was performed twice at 2-month intervals. Patients were divided into three groups according to their ages as follows: 1-3 years old (group 1), 3-5 years old (group 2), and 5-7 years old (group 3). The ROMs, muscle strengths, and MMS scores of the patients were all evaluated. Two out of 29 patients were female (6.9%) and 27 were male (93.1%). All 29 patients had right upper extremity palsy (100%). The MMS scores, ROMs, and muscle strength of the upper extremities had improved in all the groups following the standardized rehabilitation programme. A rehabilitation programme is the best choice of treatment before surgical procedures in patients with mild to moderate obstetric upper trunk brachial plexus palsy regardless of age and the initiation time.

  17. Transposition of branches of radial nerve innervating supinator to posterior interosseous nerve for functional reconstruction of finger and thumb extension in 4 patients with middle and lower trunk root avulsion injuries of brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Cong, Xiao-Bing; Huang, Qi-Shun; Ai, Fang-Xin; Liu, Yu-Tian; Lu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Jin; Weng, Yu-Xiong; Chen, Zhen-Bing

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reconstruction of the thumb and finger extension function in patients with middle and lower trunk root avulsion injuries of the brachial plexus. From April 2010 to January 2015, we enrolled in this study 4 patients diagnosed with middle and lower trunk root avulsion injuries of the brachial plexus via imaging tests, electrophysiological examinations, and clinical confirmation. Muscular branches of the radial nerve, which innervate the supinator in the forearm, were transposed to the posterior interosseous nerve to reconstruct the thumb and finger extension function. Electrophysiological findings and muscle strength of the extensor pollicis longus and extensor digitorum communis, as well as the distance between the thumb tip and index finger tip, were monitored. All patients were followed up for 24 to 30 months, with an average of 27.5 months. Motor unit potentials (MUP) of the extensor digitorum communis appeared at an average of 3.8 months, while MUP of the extensor pollicis longus appeared at an average of 7 months. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) appeared at an average of 9 months in the extensor digitorum communis, and 12 months in the extensor pollicis longus. Furthermore, the muscle strength of the extensor pollicis longus and extensor digitorum communis both reached grade III at 21 months. Lastly, the average distance between the thumb tip and index finger tip was 8.8 cm at 21 months. In conclusion, for patients with middle and lower trunk injuries of the brachial plexus, transposition of the muscular branches of the radial nerve innervating the supinator to the posterior interosseous nerve for the reconstruction of thumb and finger extension function is practicable and feasible.

  18. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  19. Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs: towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Launois, L.; Veslot, J.; Irz, P.; Argillier, C.

    2010-01-01

    1.Fish-based indices of biotic integrity (IBI) have been developed for many lotic systems but remain scarce for lakes. The goal of the present study was to assess the responses of lentic fish assemblages to anthropogenic pressures when environmental variability was controlled for, and to compare them between French natural lakes and reservoirs. 2.Environmental features, catchment-scale anthropogenic descriptors and fish data were collected from 30 natural lakes and 59 reservoirs throughout...

  20. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  1. [Discordance between mitral valve area (MVA) and pressure gradient in patients with mitral valve stenosis: mean transmitral valve gradient is a severity index or a tolerance index of severity of mitralss valve stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najih, Hayat; Arous, Salim; Laarje, Aziza; Baghdadi, Dalila; Benouna, Mohamed Ghali; Azzouzi, Leila; Habbal, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    between 60 and 100 bpm and no patient had decompensated heart failure. In group 2, 54% (13 patients) had a HR> 100 bpm and 7 of them (53%) had left decompensated heart failure. The analysis of systolic pulmonary artery pressure conducted in both groups of the study revealed the existence of a statistically significant correlation (R: 0,518 and P: 0,001) between systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) and MTG. Ventricular rhythm regularity and right ventricular function were not correlated with MTG (R: 0,038 and R: - 0,002 respectively). Mean transmitral gradient is a good indicator of mitral stenosis tolerance but it imperfectly reflects mitral stenosis severity as this depends on several hemodynamic parameters. True severe mitral stenosis may have mean transmitral gradient < 10mmHg, that is why the value of MTG should never be interpreted as single value.

  2. An Altimetry-Derived Index of the Offshore Forcing on the "Pressure Point" of the West Florida Shelf: Anomalous Upwelling and Its Influence on Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Weisberg, R. H.; Lenes, J. M.; Zheng, L.; Hubbard, K.; Walsh, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Gulf of Mexico Loop Current (LC) interactions with the West Florida Shelf (WFS) slope play an important role in shelf ecology through the upwelling of new inorganic nutrients across the shelf break. This is particularly the case when the LC impinges upon the shelf slope in the southwest portion of the WFS near the Dry Tortugas. By contacting shallow water isobaths at this "pressure point" the LC forcing sets the entire shelf into motion. Characteristic patterns of LC interactions with the WFS and their occurrences are identified from altimetry data using unsupervised neural network, self-organizing map. The duration of the occurrences of such LC patterns is used as an indicator of offshore forcing of anomalous upwelling. Consistency is found between the altimetry-derived offshore forcing and the occurrence and severity of WFS coastal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis: years without major blooms tend to have prolonged LC contact at the "pressure point," whereas years with major blooms tend not to have prolonged offshore forcing. Resetting the nutrient state of the shelf by the coastal ocean circulation in response to deep-ocean forcing demonstrates the importance of physical oceanography in shelf ecology. A satellite altimetry-derived seasonal predictor for major K. brevis blooms is also proposed.

  3. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C G van Bussel

    Full Text Available Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD, the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase, and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range. Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001 than the other indices (% given are relative reductions: %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074; Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074; FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016 and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038. Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv << 1, which (therefore does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  4. The Effect of HIV and the Modifying Effect of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART on Body Mass Index (BMI and Blood Pressure Levels in Rural South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B Feigl

    Full Text Available High BMI and blood pressure are leading chronic disease risk factors in South Africa. Longterm effects of HIV and ART on adiposity and blood pressure are poorly understood, and direct comparisons of risk factor trajectories in HIV- versus HIV+ populations are rare.In 2003 and 2010, height, weight, and blood pressure were recorded in a study population (n = 505 in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (30% adult HIV prevalence. We modeled change in BMI and BP longitudinally in HIV- individuals (n = 315, seroconverters (n = 32, HIV+ patients not on ART (HIV+ART-; n = 52, HIV+ patients on ART for 0-<2 years as of 2010 (HIV+ART0-<2 yrs; n = 18, patients on ART for 2-5 years (HIV+ART2-5yrs; n = 44, and a subgroup with unknown HIV status (n = 44. Difference-in-differences were assessed in reference to the HIV- population.Between 2003 and 2010, BMI increased significantly in the HIV- group, by 0.874 (95% CI 0.339, 1.41; p = 0.001, to 30.4. BMI drop was significantly greater in HIV+ART0-<2yrs than in HIV+ART2-5yrs (p = 0.005. DID in BMI in HIV+ART0-<2yrs versus the reference was -5.21 (95% CI -7.53, -2.90; p = 0.001, and DID in HIV+ART2-5yrs versus reference was -1.35 (95% CI -2.89, 0.189; p = 0.086. DID in SBP in HIV+ART-vs HIV- DID was -7.55 mmHg (95% CI -13.2 to -1.90; p = 0.009.Short-term ART (0-<2 years was associated with larger weight loss than either no ART or long-term ART. Once on ART for 2+ years, individuals 'caught up' on weight gain with the HIV- population. Our results showcase the importance of health system readiness to address the burgeoning double burden of disease in South Africa.

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 286 of 286 ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced ... the Hire Purchase and credit sale Act - An unnecessary duplication ? ... Vol 21 (2015), The Influence of Peer Pressure on Adolescents' Social Behaviour, Abstract PDF ... quality indexing for predicting variation of water quality over time ...

  6. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Ghadirian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg-1 (LID, n = 6, lidocaine (5 mg kg-1 with epinephrine 5 μg mL-1 (LIDEP, n = 6 or lidocaine (5 mg kg-1 with xylazine 0.05 mg kg-1 (LIDXY, n = 6. Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg-1 for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep.

  7. Phrenic nerve block caused by interscalene brachial plexus block: breathing effects of different sites of injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lars; Martini, Stefan; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Armbruster, Wolf; Notheisen, Thomas; Adamzik, Michael; Eichholz, Rϋdiger

    2016-07-29

    Interscalene brachial plexus (ISB) block is often associated with phrenic nerve block and diaphragmatic paresis. The goal of our study was to test if the anterior or the posterior ultrasound guided approach of the ISB is associated with a lower incidence of phrenic nerve blocks and impaired lung function. This was a prospective, randomized and single-blinded study of 84 patients scheduled for elective shoulder surgery who fullfilled the inclusion and exclusion critereria. Patients were randomized in two groups to receive either the anterior (n = 42) or the posterior (n = 42) approach for ISB. Clinical data were recorded. In both groups patients received ISB with a total injection volume of 15 ml of ropivacaine 1 %. Spirometry was conducted at baseline (T0) and 30 min (T30) after accomplishing the block. Changes in spirometrical variables between T0 and T30 were investigated by Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each puncture approach. The temporal difference between the posterior and the anterior puncture approach groups were again analyzed by the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. The spirometric results showed a significant decrease in vital capacity, forced expiratory volume per second, and maximum nasal inspiratory breathing after the Interscalene brachial plexus block; indicating a phrenic nerve block (p Wilcoxon signed-rank). A significant difference in the development of the spirometric parameters between the anterior and the posterior group could not be identified (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test). Despite the changes in spirometry, no cases of dyspnea were reported. A different site of injection (anterior or posterior) did not show an effect in reducing the cervical block spread of the local anesthetic and the incidence of phrenic nerve blocks during during ultrasound guided Interscalene brachial plexus block. Clinical breathing effects of phrenic nerve blocks are, however, usually well compensated, and subjective dyspnea did not occur in our patients. German

  8. [Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided or neurostimulator-guided bilateral axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C S; Zhao, X L; Zhou, H B; Qu, Z J; Yang, Q G; Wang, H J; Wang, G

    2017-10-17

    Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of bilateral axillary brachial plexus block under the guidance of ultrasound or neurostimulator. Methods: From February 2012 to April 2014, 120 patients undergoing bilateral hand/forearm surgery in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital were enrolled and anaesthetized with bilateral axillary brachial plexus block. All patients were divided into two groups randomly using random number table: the ultrasound-guided group (group U, n =60) and the neurostimulator-guidedgroup (group N, n =60). The block was performed with 0.5% ropivacaine. Patients' age, sex and operation duration were recorded. Moreover, success rate, performance time, onset of sensor and motor block, performance pain, patient satisfaction degree and the incidence of related complications were also documented. Venous samples were collected at selected time points and the total and the plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were analyzed with HPLC. Results: The performance time, the onset of sensor block and the onset of motor block of group U were (8.2±1.5), (14.2± 2.2)and (24.0±3.5)min respectively, which were markedly shorter than those in group N( (14.6±3.9), (19.9±3.8), (28.8±4.2)min, respectively), and the differences were statistically significant( t =11.74, 10.09, 6.73, respectively, all P 0.05). No analgesic was superadded and no other anesthesia methods were applied. No complications were detected perioperatively. Conclusions: The bilateral axillary brachial plexus block under the guidance of ultrasound or neurostimulator are both effective and safe for bilateral hand/forearm surgery. However, the ultrasound-guided block may be more clinically beneficial because of its shorter performance time, rapid onset and higher patient satisfaction degree.

  9. Skin perfusion pressure on the legs measured as the external pressure required for skin reddening after blanching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Nielsen, P.E.; Lund, P

    1980-01-01

    -187) compared to 80.8 mmHg (range 18-158) (P > 0.1). A normal material was obtained from twenty-four subjects measured on the thigh, calf and ankle; the average gradients between the auscultatory brachial mean blood pressure and the BTEP were: thigh 10.7 mmHg (SD 12.7); calf 4.0 mmHg (SD 12.1); ankle 5.1 mm...

  10. Body mass index, blood pressure, and glucose and lipid metabolism among permanent and fixed-term workers in the manufacturing industry: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Mariko; Minami, Masahide; Yano, Eiji

    2014-02-27

    Temporary employment, a precarious form of employment, is recognized as social determinant of poor health. However, evidence supporting precarious employment as a risk factor for health is mainly obtained from subjective data. Studies using objective clinical measurement data in the assessment of health status are limited. This study compared body mass index (BMI), lipid and glucose metabolism, and health-related lifestyle factors between permanent workers and fixed-term workers employed in the manufacturing industry. Data of 1,701 male manufacturing industry workers triglyceride levels were determined. For glucose metabolism, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age and lifestyle factors was performed. BMI was significantly higher in permanent workers (22.9 kg/m2) compared with fixed-term workers (22.4 kg/m2). The leaner population (BMI triglyceride (β = 11.147), fasting blood glucose (β = 2.218), and HbA1c (β = 0.107) compared with permanent workers (all p glucose metabolism, even when adjusted for age and lifestyle variables, although BMI of fixed-term workers were lower than permanent workers. Precarious work might contribute to a deteriorating health status even among less overweight populations.

  11. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  12. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach. A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazin, Mojgan; Jensen, Kenneth; Hjort, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniq...

  13. Unusual Branching Pattern of the Lateral Cord of the Brachial Plexus Associated with Neurovascular Compression; Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitendra K. Loh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus consists of a network of nerves that innervates the upper limbs and its musculature. We report a rare formation of the lateral cord of the brachial plexus observed during the dissection of a 47-year-old male cadaver at the Department of Anatomy, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, New Delhi, India, in 2016. The lateral cord was exceptionally long with twin lateral pectoral nerves and twin lateral roots of the median nerve. The proximal lateral root of the median nerve was thin in comparison to the medial root of the median nerve. The distal lateral root of the median nerve was thicker and followed an unusual course through the coracobrachialis muscle. In the lower third of the arm, the median nerve and the brachial artery—along with its vena comitans—spanned through the brachialis muscle. Surgeons, anaesthesiologists, radiologists and anatomists should be aware of such anatomical variations as they may result in neurovascular compression.

  14. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Conny; Beckerman, Heleen; Groot, Vincent de

    2015-01-01

    To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the VU University Medical Center in the past were invited to participate. Daily functioning was measured with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and the SF36, pain with VAS Pain Scales and arm-hand function with the Nine Hole Peg Test (9-HP-test) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Scores of the affected arm were compared to those of the non-affected arm or norm values for healthy controls. Twenty-seven persons (mean age 22, SD 4.2 years), of whom 10 men, participated. The ARAT and 9-HP-test scores for the affected arm were significantly worse than those for the non-affected arm. Moderate to severe pain in the affected arm, the non-affected arm or the back was reported by 50% of the participants. The DASH general, sports/music and SF36 physical functioning scores were significantly worse than norm values. The ARAT/9-HP-test and daily functioning showed little association. Low to moderate associations were found between pain and daily functioning. Many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Implications for Rehabilitation Obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) is caused by traction to the brachial plexus during labour, resulting in denervation of the muscles of the arm and shoulder girdle. Adults with OBPL are hardly seen in rehabilitation medicine. This study shows that many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Fifty percent of the participants complained about moderate or severe pain, which was located in the affected arm, the back and the non

  15. Use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Linda J; Louden, Emily J; Lippert, William C; Allgier, Allison J; Foad, Susan L; Mehlman, Charles T

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate functional outcomes and the impact on surgical interventions after the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) for muscle imbalance, cocontractions, or contractures with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. A retrospective cohort study. A brachial plexus center in a tertiary children's hospital. Fifty-nine patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (75 injection procedures, 91 muscles and/or muscle groups) received BoNT-A injections (mean age at injection, 36.2 months; range, 6-123 months; 31 boys; 30 right-sided injuries, 28 left-sided injuries, 1 bilateral injury). Data collected retrospectively from medical records, from procedure notes and clinic visits before BoNT-A use, at ≤6 months follow-up (BoNT-A active [BA]) and at ≥7 months follow-up (BoNT-A not active [BNA]) included demographics, injection indication, side, and site(s), previous surgical history, occupational therapy and/or physical therapy plan, and outcome measurements. Outcomes assessed before and after injections included active and passive range of motion, Mallet and Toronto scores, parent comments about arm function, preinjection surgical considerations, and postinjection surgical history. Injection procedures included 51 to shoulder internal rotators, 15 triceps, 15 pronator teres, 9 biceps, and 1 flexor carpi ulnaris. Active and passive shoulder external rotation (SER) range of motion improved after shoulder internal rotator injections (P = .0003 and P = .002, respectively), as did Mallet scores with BA; the latter were sustained with BNA. Surgical intervention was averted, modified, or deferred after BoNT-A in 45% (n = 20) under surgical consideration before BoNT-A. Active elbow flexion improved in 67% (P = .005), sustained BNA (P = .004) after triceps injections; 2 of 7 patients averted surgery. Active supination improved with BA (P = .002), with gains sustained BNA (P = .016). Passive elbow extension improved after biceps injections by an average 17° (P

  16. Right retrograde brachial cerebral angiography with simultaneous compression of the left carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, K.; Mosskin, M.

    1981-01-01

    Right retrograde brachial angiography with simultaneous compression of the left common carotid artery was performed in 12 patients, invariably resulting in filling of the right vertebral and the basilar artery. In all but one patient, the right carotid artery and its branches were also filled. Retrograde filling of the left internal carotid artery occurred in 8 patients. Furthermore, retrograde filling of the intracranial part of the left vertebral artery was obtained in 5 of 12 patients. A complete four-vessel cranial angiography was thus obtained in one third of the patients. The method may be considered as a safe and valuable adjunct to other angiographic techniques. (Auth.)

  17. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, the Putti sign-obligatory tilt of the scapula with brachiothoracic adduction-suggests the presence of glenohumeral abduction contracture. In the present study, we utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify this glenohumeral abduction contracture and evaluate its relationship to shoulder joint deformity, muscle atrophy, and function. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs of the thorax and shoulders obtained before and after shoulder rebalancing surgery (internal rotation contracture release and external rotation tendon transfer) for twenty-eight children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Two raters measured the coronal positions of the scapula, thoracic spine, and humeral shaft bilaterally on coronal images, correcting trigonometrically for scapular protraction on axial images. Supraspinatus, deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscle atrophy was assessed, blinded to other measures. Correlations between glenohumeral abduction contracture and glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, and Mallet shoulder function before and after surgery were performed. MRI measurements were highly reliable between raters. Glenohumeral abduction contractures were present in twenty-five of twenty-eight patients, averaging 33° (range, 10° to 65°). Among those patients, abductor atrophy was present in twenty-three of twenty-five, with adductor atrophy in twelve of twenty-five. Preoperatively, greater abduction contracture severity correlated with greater Mallet global abduction and hand-to-neck function. Abduction contracture severity did not correlate preoperatively with axial measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia, but greater glenoid retroversion was associated with worse abduction contractures postoperatively. Surgery improved passive external rotation, active abduction, and hand-to-neck function, but did not change the abduction contracture. A majority of patients with persistent shoulder weakness

  18. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault.

  19. MR Imaging of Brachial Plexus and Limb-Girdle Muscles in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Agosta, Federica; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Pagani, Elisabetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Chaabane, Linda; Copetti, Massimiliano; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    To assess brachial plexus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities as signs of muscle denervation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study was approved by the local ethical committees on human studies, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects before enrollment. By using an optimized protocol of brachial plexus MR imaging, brachial plexus and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were evaluated in 23 patients with ALS and clinical and neurophysiologically active involvement of the upper limbs and were compared with MR images in 12 age-matched healthy individuals. Nerve root and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were visually evaluated by two experienced observers. A region of interest-based analysis was performed to measure nerve root volume and T2 signal intensity. Measures obtained at visual inspection were analyzed by using the Wald χ(2) test. Mean T2 signal intensity and volume values of the regions of interest were compared between groups by using a hierarchical linear model, accounting for the repeated measurement design. The level of interrater agreement was very strong (κ = 0.77-1). T2 hyperintensity and volume alterations of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots were observed in patients with ALS (P < .001 to .03). Increased T2 signal intensity of nerve roots was associated with faster disease progression (upper-limb Medical Research Council scale progression rate, r = 0.40; 95% confidence interval: 0.001, 0.73). Limb-girdle muscle alterations (ie, T2 signal intensity alteration, edema, atrophy) and fat infiltration also were found, in particular, in the supraspinatus muscle, showing more frequent T2 signal intensity alterations and edema (P = .01) relative to the subscapularis and infraspinatus muscles. Increased T2 signal intensity and volume of brachial nerve roots do not exclude a diagnosis of ALS and suggest involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the ALS pathogenetic cascade. MR

  20. Walkability Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Walkability Index dataset characterizes every Census 2010 block group in the U.S. based on its relative walkability. Walkability depends upon characteristics of the built environment that influence the likelihood of walking being used as a mode of travel. The Walkability Index is based on the EPA's previous data product, the Smart Location Database (SLD). Block group data from the SLD was the only input into the Walkability Index, and consisted of four variables from the SLD weighted in a formula to create the new Walkability Index. This dataset shares the SLD's block group boundary definitions from Census 2010. The methodology describing the process of creating the Walkability Index can be found in the documents located at ftp://newftp.epa.gov/EPADataCommons/OP/WalkabilityIndex.zip. You can also learn more about the Smart Location Database at https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/OP/Smart_Location_DB_v02b.zip.

  1. The effect of α1 -adrenergic blockade on post-exercise brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Hansen, Alex B; Howe, Connor A; Willie, Chris K; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J; Hoiland, Ryan L; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α 1 -adrenergic blockade. Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise. At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α 1 -adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and administration of α 1 -adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow-mediated dilatation. Our data indicate that post-exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high-altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate-intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α 1 -adrenergic pathway. In a double-blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo-controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal-exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi-recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α 1 -adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg  -1 ). These experiments were completed at both sea-level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography

  2. The effect of α1‐adrenergic blockade on post‐exercise brachial artery flow‐mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Joshua C.; Hansen, Alex B.; Howe, Connor A.; Willie, Chris K.; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J.; Hoiland, Ryan L.; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography), heart rate (electrocardiogram), oxygen saturation (pulse oximetry), and brachial artery blood flow and shear rate (ultrasound) were recorded before, during and following exercise. Endothelial function assessed by brachial artery flow‐mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured before, immediately following and 60 min after exercise. Our findings were: (1) at rest, FMD remained unchanged between sea level and high altitude (placebo P = 0.287; prazosin: P = 0.110); (2) FMD remained unchanged after maximal exercise at sea level and high altitude (P = 0.244); and (3) the 2.9 ± 0.8% (P = 0.043) reduction in FMD immediately after moderate‐intensity exercise at sea level was abolished via α1‐adrenergic blockade. Conversely, at high altitude, FMD was unaltered following moderate‐intensity exercise, and administration of α1‐adrenergic blockade elevated FMD (P = 0.032). Our results suggest endothelial function is differentially affected by exercise when exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. These findings have implications for understanding the chronic impacts of hypoxaemia on exercise, and the interactions between the α1‐adrenergic pathway and endothelial function. PMID:28032333

  3. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received ≥50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received ≤78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving ≥1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  4. STUDY & EVALUATE THE COMPARISON OF PLAIN LIGNOCAINE AND LIGNACAINE WITH SODIUM BICARBONATE EFFECTS IN SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS : supraclavicular brachial plexus block is usually used to anaesthetize the upper limb for the purpose of upper limb surgeries. Drugs like Lignocaine , Bupiv a caine are used for this block and some additives are added to prolong the duration and quality of bl ockade. The present study is aimed to evaluate the comparison of plain lignocaine and lign o caine with sodium bicarbonate in supraclavicular brachial plexus block by means of the onset time of sensory and motor blockade, the quality of sensory and motor blo ckade , and the duration of blockade . METHODS : Sixty patients aged between 18 and 60 years of physical status ASA 1 and 2 undergoing upper limb surgeries lasting more than 30 minutes were included in the study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block was performed after eliciting paraesthesia. The patients in Group I (n=30 received 25ml of 1% plain lignocaine (prepared by adding 12.5ml of distilled water to 12.5ml of 2% plain lignocaine. The patients in th e Group II (study group received 25ml of 1% alkalinized lignocaine (prepared by adding 3ml of 7.5% sodium bicarbonate and 9.5ml of distilled water to 12.5ml of 2% plain lignocaine. RESULTS : The present study entitled Comparison of effects of plain lignoc aine and lignocaine with sodium bicarbonate on brachial plexus block concludes that, the onset time of sensory and motor blockade is lesser with sodium bicarbonate added lignocaine (4.13, 11.1minutes when compared to plain lignocaine(9.73, 21.1minutes in supraclavicular brachial plexus block, the quality of sensory and motor blockade is better with sodium bicarbonate added lignocaine, the duration of motor and sensory blockade was significantly prolonged when lignocaine with sodium bicarbonate was used in supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  5. Effect of dexamethasone in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blinded randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Alarasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: With the use of ultrasound, a minimal effective volume of 20 ml has been described for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. However achieving a long duration of analgesia with this minimal volume remains a challenge. We aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of analgesia in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Material and Methods: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group C received saline (2 ml + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and Group D received dexamethasone (8 mg + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Hemodynamic variables and visual analog scale (VAS score were noted at regular intervals until 450 min. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block were measured. The incidence of "Halo" around brachial plexus was observed. Student′s t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly earlier in dexamethasone group (10.36 ± 1.99 and 12 ± 1.64 minutes compared to control group (12.9 ± 2.23 and 18.03 ± 2.41 minutes. The duration of sensory and motor block was significantly prolonged in dexamethasone group (366 ± 28.11 and 337.33 ± 28.75 minutes compared to control group (242.66 ± 26.38 and 213 ± 26.80 minutes. The VAS score was significantly lower in dexamethasone group after 210 min. "Halo" was present around the brachial plexus in all patients in both the groups. Conclusion: Dexamethasone addition significantly increases the duration of analgesia in patients receiving low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. No significant side-effects were seen in patients receiving dexamethasone as an adjunct.

  6. Exercise excess pressure and exercise-induced albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climie, Rachel E D; Srikanth, Velandai; Keith, Laura J; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced albuminuria is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in response to maximal exercise, but the response to light-moderate exercise is unclear. Patients with T2DM have abnormal central hemodynamics and greater propensity for exercise hypertension. This study sought to determine the relationship between light-moderate exercise central hemodynamics (including aortic reservoir and excess pressure) and exercise-induced albuminuria. Thirty-nine T2DM (62 ± 9 yr; 49% male) and 39 nondiabetic controls (53 ± 9 yr; 51% male) were examined at rest and during 20 min of light-moderate cycle exercise (30 W; 50 revolutions/min). Albuminuria was assessed by the albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and 30 min postexercise. Hemodynamics recorded included brachial and central blood pressure (BP), aortic stiffness, augmented pressure (AP), aortic reservoir pressure, and excess pressure integral (Pexcess). There was no difference in ACR between groups before exercise (P > 0.05). Exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM but not controls (1.73 ± 1.43 vs. 0.53 ± 1.0 mg/mol, P = 0.002). All central hemodynamic variables were significantly higher during exercise in T2DM (i.e., Pexcess, systolic BP and AP; P exercise Pexcess was associated with postexercise ACR (r = 0.51, P = 0.002), and this relationship was independent of age, sex, body mass index, heart rate, aortic stiffness, antihypertensive medication, and ambulatory daytime systolic BP (β = 0.003, P = 0.003). Light-moderate exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM, and this was independently associated with Pexcess, a potential marker of vascular dysfunction. These novel findings suggest that Pexcess could be important for appropriate renal function in T2DM. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 24, No 1 (2016), Kidney injury molecule-1 and microalbuminuria levels in Zambian ... with an ipsilateral brachial plexus injury (a case report with literature review) ... Vol 20, No 1 (2015), Knowledge and occupational hazards of barbers in the ... course therapy among final year medical students in South Western Nigeria ...

  8. Importance of Calibration Method in Central Blood Pressure for Cardiac Structural Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Kazuaki; Yang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Nolan, Mark T; Negishi, Tomoko; Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H; Sharman, James E

    2016-09-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) independently predicts cardiovascular risk, but calibration methods may affect accuracy of central systolic blood pressure (CSBP). Standard central systolic blood pressure (Stan-CSBP) from peripheral waveforms is usually derived with calibration using brachial SBP and diastolic BP (DBP). However, calibration using oscillometric mean arterial pressure (MAP) and DBP (MAP-CSBP) is purported to provide more accurate representation of true invasive CSBP. This study sought to determine which derived CSBP could more accurately discriminate cardiac structural abnormalities. A total of 349 community-based patients with risk factors (71±5years, 161 males) had CSBP measured by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph, IEM GmbH, Stolberg, Germany) using 2 calibration methods: MAP-CSBP and Stan-CSBP. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and left atrial dilatation (LAD) were measured based on standard guidelines. MAP-CSBP was higher than Stan-CSBP (149±20 vs. 128±15mm Hg, P curve analyses, MAP-CSBP significantly better discriminated LVH compared with Stan-CSBP (area under the curve (AUC) 0.66 vs. 0.59, P = 0.0063) and brachial SBP (0.62, P = 0.027). Continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI) (P AUC 0.63 vs. 0.56, P = 0.005) and conventional brachial SBP (0.58, P = 0.006), whereas Stan-CSBP provided no better discrimination than conventional brachial BP (P = 0.09). CSBP is calibration dependent and when oscillometric MAP and DBP are used, the derived CSBP is a better discriminator for cardiac structural abnormalities. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effects of gravity-induced upper-limb blood pressure changes on wave transmission and arterial radial waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Giacomo; Battista, Francesca; Anastasio, Fabio; Sanesi, Leandro; Gavish, Benjamin; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Schillaci, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Local blood pressure (BP) changes induced by arm tilting may influence pressure wave transmission and reflection. We investigated the effects of upper-limb tilting on radial augmentation index (rAIx) and related central measures [aortic augmentation index (aAIx)]. In 45 volunteers (age 49 ± 19 years), supine brachial BP and radial artery waveforms were obtained by applanation tonometry with the dominant arm stretched and gently supported in three different positions: at the heart level, with the BP cuff 15 cm above heart level (approximately +30°), and 15 cm below heart level (-30°). Brachial SBP/DBP was 120/68 ± 17/8 mmHg. Mean arterial pressure changed predictably with arm tilting (99 ± 12 mmHg at -30°, 88 ± 10 mmHg at 0°, 77 ± 11 mmHg at +30°, all P < 0.001). rAIx decreased at -30° (69 ± 22%), and increased at +30° (93 ± 20%) compared with 0° (82 ± 20%, all P less than 0.001). Changes in rAIx (value at +30° minus value at -30°) showed an inverse relationship with age (r = -0.32, P = 0.03). Heart rate, BP and rAIx did not change in the contralateral arm, which was held at the heart level during the examination. aAIx followed the same pattern as rAIx (123 ± 27% at -30°, 144 ± 33% at +30°, 136 ± 31% at 0°, all P less than 0.001); changes in rAIx and aAIx were strongly related each other (r = 0.82, P < 0.001). Acute gravitational upper-limb BP changes generate opposite, profound changes in rAIx, and major artifactual changes in aAIx. These findings provide a rationale for recommending to keep the upper limb at the heart level during radial waveform assessment.

  10. AP Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Planetary Amplitude index - Bartels 1951. The a-index ranges from 0 to 400 and represents a K-value converted to a linear scale in gammas (nanoTeslas)--a scale that...

  11. Direct measured systolic pressure gradients across the aorto-iliac segment in multiple-level-obstruction arteriosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Praestholm, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1981-01-01

    Patients with severe ischemia due to multi-level obstructions in the leg arteries both above and below the region were assessed preoperatively by intraarterial brachial and femoral artery pressure measurements. The systolic pressure drop along aorto-iliac obstructions was compared to the angiogra....... Due to large variations, however, the angiographic information was found to be useless in the individual patient. No difference in the pressure drop was found between cases in which rich and poor collateral networks were visualized....

  12. Ankle Brachial Index Compared With Different Lipid Ratios to Predict Coronary Events in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Nadia Hatmi

    2014-02-01

    Multivariable adjusted relations revealed that HDL-C and #8804;34 Mg/dl significantly increased the risk of future UA, HDL-C and #8804;53 Mg/dl and sedentary life style increased the risk of MI. CONCLUSION: Multivariate adjusted relationships revealed that HDL-C and #8804;34 Mg/dl was a strong predictor of unstable angina pectoris after 15 months of follow up period. HDL-C and #8804;53 Mg/dl and physical inactivity were associated with increased risk of MI after 15 months. Of the lipid ratios the strongest predictors for developing future MI and unstable angina were TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 29-36

  13. Correlation between peripheral arterial disease and coronary artery disease using ankle brachial index-a study in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmistha Sarangi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: There is a definite and strong correlation between PAD and CAD. Correct diagnosis and supervision of patients with PAD is important for preventing the local progression of the disease and effective secondary prevention of future coronary and cerebrovascular events.

  14. Evaluation of Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease by Ankle-brachial Index in Patients with Concomitant Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Vakili

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. As such, it is found that screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD improves risk assessment. Thus, intensive risk factor modification and medical treatment in these patients are necessary. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease in patients with concomitant coronary arterial disease. Methods: Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease was investigated in 400 patients (60% males, 40% females, aged 59.7± 11.3 with a documented coronary arterial disease. Results: Among patients with documented CAD, 12% had asymptomatic PAD with the ABI ratio of less than 0.9. Conclusions: It is advisable to screen for PAD not only as a disease but also as a risk assessment method for atherosclerosis.

  15. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong Jin; Hasan, Mohd Shahnaz; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-01-01

    A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5min for 60min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6±12.9min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2±13.9min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Luis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis, and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory. Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1% of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens.

  17. Outcomes associated with a structured prenatal counseling program for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Mary Veronica; Bender, Christina; Townsend, Kathryn E; Hamilton, Emily F

    2012-08-01

    We examined outcomes that were associated with a novel program to identify patients who are at high risk for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. The program included a checklist of key risk factors and a multifactorial algorithm to estimate risk of shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. We examined rates of cesarean delivery and shoulder dystocia in 8767 deliveries by clinicians who were enrolled in the program and in 11,958 patients of clinicians with no access to the program. Key risk factors were identified in 1071 of 8767 mothers (12.2%), of whom 40 of 8767 women (0.46%) had results in the high-risk category. The rate of primary cesarean delivery rate was stable (21.2-20.8%; P = .57). Shoulder dystocia rates fell by 56.8% (1.74-0.75%; P = .002). The rates of shoulder dystocia and cesarean birth showed no changes in the group with no access to the program. With the introduction of this program, overall shoulder dystocia rates fell by more than one-half with no increase in the primary cesarean delivery rate. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  19. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  20. Comprehensive approach to newborns and infants with brachial plexus impairment – proposal of Slovenian guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Groleger Sršen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of brachial plexus (IBP in the neonate and infant remains an important problem. Risk factors for IBP are well known, but the mechanisms of impairment are not yet fully understood. It is important to identify early signs of IBP and to evaluate the hand function. In the guidelines we propose to use the Toronto scale for evaluation of hand function. The newborn with IBP should be referred to physiotherapy, and then regularly followed-up once a month. If the arm and hand function, especially flexion of the elbow, is not improving at the age of two months, the infant should be referred to the tertiary level rehabilitation centre and to department for plastic surgery at the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana. When necessary, the reconstructive procedure should be done by the age of three to six months. After reconstruction of brachial plexus, the child needs a comprehensive therapy program, which involves passive stretching, sensory stimulation, exercises to promote the development of active voluntary movements, bimanual activities, and symmetrical posture and movement patterns.

  1. MR Neurography of Brachial Plexus at 3.0 T with Robust Fat and Blood Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinzeng; Harrison, Crystal; Mariappan, Yogesh K; Gopalakrishnan, Karthik; Chhabra, Avneesh; Lenkinski, Robert E; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) neurography of the brachial plexus with robust fat and blood suppression for increased conspicuity of nerves at 3.0 T in clinically feasible acquisition times. Materials and Methods This prospective study was HIPAA compliant, with institutional review board approval and written informed consent. A low-refocusing-flip-angle three-dimensional (3D) turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence was modified to acquire both in-phase and out-of-phase echoes, required for chemical shift (Dixon) reconstruction, in the same repetition by using partial echoes combined with modified homodyne reconstruction with phase preservation. This multiecho TSE modified Dixon (mDixon) sequence was optimized by using simulations and phantom studies and in three healthy volunteers. The sequence was tested in five healthy volunteers and was evaluated in 10 patients who had been referred for brachial plexopathy at 3.0 T. The images were evaluated against the current standard of care, images acquired with a 3D TSE short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) sequence, qualitatively by using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and quantitatively by using the Friedman two-way analysis of variance, with P 3.0 T. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  2. Experimental study of brachial plexus and vessel compression: evaluation of combined central and peripheral electrodiagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaoqun; Xu, Jianguang; Chen, Jie; Li, Shulin; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    We sought to investigate the reliability of a new electrodiagnostic method for identifying Electrodiagnosis of Brachial Plexus & Vessel Compression Syndrome (BPVCS) in rats that involves the application of transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TES-MEPs) combined with peripheral nerve stimulation compound muscle action potentials (PNS-CMAPs). The latencies of the TES-MEP and PNS-CMAP were initially elongated in the 8-week group. The amplitudes of TES-MEP and PNS-CMAP were initially attenuated in the 16-week group. The isolateral amplitude ratio of the TES-MEP to the PNS-CMAP was apparently decreased, and spontaneous activities emerged at 16 weeks postoperatively. Superior and inferior trunk models of BPVCS were created in 72 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats that were divided into six experimental groups. The latencies, amplitudes and isolateral amplitude ratios of the TES-MEPs and PNS-CMAPs were recorded at different postoperative intervals. Electrophysiological and histological examinations of the rats' compressed brachial plexus nerves were utilized to establish preliminary electrodiagnostic criteria for BPVCS.

  3. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies, clinical, radiological and neurophysiological findings from a tertiary centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the clinical characteristics, aetiology, neuro-physiological characteristics, imaging findings and other investigations in a cohort of patients with non-traumatic brachial plexopathy (BP). METHODS: A 3-year retrospective study of patients with non-traumatic BP identified by electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS). Clinical information was retrieved from patients\\' medical charts. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were identified. Causes of BP included neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) (48%), neoplastic (16%), radiation (8%), post infectious (12%), obstetric (4%), rucksack injury (4%), thoracic outlet syndrome (4%) and iatrogenic (4%). Patients with NA presented acutely in 50%. The onset was subacute in all others. Outcome was better for patients with NA. All patients with neoplastic disease had a previous history of cancer. MRI was abnormal in 3\\/16 patients (18.8%). PET scanning diagnosed metastatic plexopathy in two cases. CONCLUSIONS: NA was the most common cause of BP in our cohort and was associated with a more favourable outcome. The authors note potentially discriminating clinical characteristics in our population that aid in the assessment of patients with brachial plexopathies. We advise NCS and EMG be performed in all patients with suspected plexopathy. Imaging studies are useful in selected patients.

  4. Vasomotor wave and blood pressure response to erect posture after operation for aortic coarctation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sehested, J; Schultze, G

    1982-01-01

    Low frequency fluctuations (five to 10/min) in blood pressure, that is vasomotor waves, were recorded in the erect position in 18 patients operated upon for an isolated aortic coarctation six to eight and a half years previously, and compared with vasomotor waves in six age matched normotensive controls with respect to frequency and amplitude. The investigation was carried out by simultaneous intra-arterial blood pressure radiotelemetry recordings from the brachial and femoral arteries in all...

  5. Radioisotope method for assessing skin blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkowska, A.; Misiunia, P.; Woytowicz, A.; Olewinski, T.

    1979-01-01

    A method of measuring the skin blood pressure (SBP) evolved by Holstein and Lassen is described. The method is based on determination of the force of pressure causing blockade of Na 131 I clearance from the site of its intradermal injection. Using this method it was found that in the lower extremities in healthy subjects the SBP approached the diastolic pressure measured by the conventional method in the brachial artery. On the other hand in patients with obliterative arteriosclerosis and in Buerger's disease the SBP was considerably lower than the diastolic arterial pressure. The authors think that the method gives a good insight into the state of blood supply to the extremities in healthy subjects and in peripheral vascular failure. (author)

  6. The Vienna psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Antonia Hruby

    Full Text Available Global brachial plexopathies cause major sensory and motor deficits in the affected arm and hand. Many patients report of psychosocial consequences including chronic pain, decreased self-sufficiency, and poor body image. Bionic reconstruction, which includes the amputation and prosthetic replacement of the functionless limb, has been shown to restore hand function in patients where classic reconstructions have failed. Patient selection and psychological evaluation before such a life-changing procedure are crucial for optimal functional outcomes. In this paper we describe a psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with complete brachial plexopathies and present psychosocial outcome variables associated with bionic reconstruction.Between 2013 and 2017 psychosocial assessments were performed in eight patients with global brachial plexopathies. We conducted semi-structured interviews exploring the psychosocial adjustment related to the accident, the overall psychosocial status, as well as motivational aspects related to an anticipated amputation and expectations of functional prosthetic outcome. During the interview patients were asked to respond freely. Their answers were transcribed verbatim by the interviewer and analyzed afterwards on the basis of a pre-defined item scoring system. The interview was augmented by quantitative evaluation of self-reported mental health and social functioning (SF-36 Health Survey, body image (FKB-20 and deafferentation pain (VAS. Additionally, psychosocial outcome variables were presented for seven patients before and after bionic reconstruction.Qualitative data revealed several psychological stressors with long-term negative effects on patients with complete brachial plexopathies. 88% of patients felt functionally limited to a great extent due to their disability, and all of them reported constant, debilitating pain in the deafferented hand. After bionic reconstruction the physical

  7. The Vienna psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Laura Antonia; Pittermann, Anna; Sturma, Agnes; Aszmann, Oskar Christian

    2018-01-01

    Global brachial plexopathies cause major sensory and motor deficits in the affected arm and hand. Many patients report of psychosocial consequences including chronic pain, decreased self-sufficiency, and poor body image. Bionic reconstruction, which includes the amputation and prosthetic replacement of the functionless limb, has been shown to restore hand function in patients where classic reconstructions have failed. Patient selection and psychological evaluation before such a life-changing procedure are crucial for optimal functional outcomes. In this paper we describe a psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with complete brachial plexopathies and present psychosocial outcome variables associated with bionic reconstruction. Between 2013 and 2017 psychosocial assessments were performed in eight patients with global brachial plexopathies. We conducted semi-structured interviews exploring the psychosocial adjustment related to the accident, the overall psychosocial status, as well as motivational aspects related to an anticipated amputation and expectations of functional prosthetic outcome. During the interview patients were asked to respond freely. Their answers were transcribed verbatim by the interviewer and analyzed afterwards on the basis of a pre-defined item scoring system. The interview was augmented by quantitative evaluation of self-reported mental health and social functioning (SF-36 Health Survey), body image (FKB-20) and deafferentation pain (VAS). Additionally, psychosocial outcome variables were presented for seven patients before and after bionic reconstruction. Qualitative data revealed several psychological stressors with long-term negative effects on patients with complete brachial plexopathies. 88% of patients felt functionally limited to a great extent due to their disability, and all of them reported constant, debilitating pain in the deafferented hand. After bionic reconstruction the physical component summary

  8. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  9. AA Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The geomagnetic aa index provides a long climatology of global geomagnetic activity using 2 antipodal observatories at Greenwich and Melbourne- IAGA Bulletin 37,...

  10. Walkability Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Walkability Index dataset characterizes every Census 2010 block group in the U.S. based on its relative walkability. Walkability depends upon characteristics of...

  11. Diversity Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This map service summarizes racial and ethnic diversity in the United States in 2012.The Diversity Index shows the likelihood that two persons chosen at random from...

  12. AUTHOR INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a granitic terrain of southern India using factor analysis and GIS. 1059. Radhakrishna M see Dev Sheena V .... Landslide susceptibility analysis using Probabilistic. Certainty Factor ... index via entropy-difference analysis. 687. Yidana Sandow ...

  13. Operative treatment with nerve repair can restore function in patients with traction injuries in the brachial plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiasny, Jerzy; Birkeland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Brachial plexus injuries are usually a result of road traffic accidents and a cause of severe disability that typically affects young adult males. In 2010, a national centre was established for referral of these cases from Danish trauma centres. In this paper, we report on our...

  14. Ultrasound-guided training in the performance of brachial plexus block by the posterior approach: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Rettig, H.C.; Koornwinder, T.; Renes, S.H.; Gielen, M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The application of ultrasonography in guiding and controlling the path of the stimulating needle to the brachial plexus via the posterior approach (Pippa technique) was studied. In 21 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, scheduled for surgery of the shoulder or upper arm, needle insertion was

  15. Comparison between isotropic linear-elastic law and isotropic hyperelastic law in the finite element modeling of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruisseau-Carrier, A; Bahlouli, N; Bierry, G; Vernet, P; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    Augmented reality could help the identification of nerve structures in brachial plexus surgery. The goal of this study was to determine which law of mechanical behavior was more adapted by comparing the results of Hooke's isotropic linear elastic law to those of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic law, applied to a biomechanical model of the brachial plexus. A model of finite elements was created using the ABAQUS ® from a 3D model of the brachial plexus acquired by segmentation and meshing of MRI images at 0°, 45° and 135° of shoulder abduction of a healthy subject. The offset between the reconstructed model and the deformed model was evaluated quantitatively by the Hausdorff distance and qualitatively by the identification of 3 anatomical landmarks. In every case the Hausdorff distance was shorter with Ogden's law compared to Hooke's law. On a qualitative aspect, the model deformed by Ogden's law followed the concavity of the reconstructed model whereas the model deformed by Hooke's law remained convex. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that the behavior of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic mechanical model was more adapted to the modeling of the deformations of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspects of activities and participation of 7-8 year-old children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, E.; Ahmed, J.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; de Groot, V.; Beckerman, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) can experience problems in the performance of meaningful activities such as writing, bimanual activities, and participation in sports and leisure activities. Aims: To quantify the everyday functioning and participation of 7-8

  17. Percutaneous brachial artery catheterization for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions (pci): an encouraging experience of 100 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Z.U.; Maken, G.R.; Saif, M.; Khattak, Z.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the practicability and safety of the percutaneous transbrachial approach (TBA) for diagnostic coronary angiography and therapeutic percutaneous coronary interventions. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology- National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD) from March 2009 to May 2011. Patients and Methods: We collected data of 100 consecutive patients who underwent coronary catheterization by the percutaneous transbrachial approach. Transbrachial catheterization was performed only if the radial access failed or radial pulse was feeble. Study endpoints included successful brachial artery catheterization, vascular and neurological complications at access site and procedure success rate. Results: Mean age of the patients was 54 years (range 33-79 yrs) and 65(65%) were males and 35 (35%) were females. The right brachial artery was used in all of the cases. Procedural success was achieved in 100% of the patients. Coronary angiography was performed in 70 patients and percutaneous coronary interventions were done in 30 cases. Out of these 30 cases, PCI to left coronary arteries (LAD and LCX) were performed in 19 patients while 11 patients had PCI to right coronary artery (RCA). No case of vascular complications such as major access site bleeding, vascular perforation, brachial artery occlusion causing forearm ischemia, compartment syndrome, vascular spasm or failure to catheterize coronary arteries requiring alternate vascular access were observed. Conclusion: Brachial artery is a safe and easily accessible approach for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions. (author)

  18. Effectiveness of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing brachial plexus tumours in dogs – short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiak Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences that contribute to a quick and reliable diagnosis of brachial plexus tumours in dogs. The tumours were successfully diagnosed in 6 dogs by the MRI with the use of SE, FSE, STIR, Turbo 3 D, 3D HYCE, and GE sequences and the gadolinium contrast agent

  19. Intelligent indexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the relevance of artificial intelligence to the automatic indexing of natural language text. We describe the use of domain-specific semantically-based thesauruses and address the problem of creating adequate knowledge bases for intelligent indexing systems. We also discuss the relevance of the Hilbert space ι 2 to the compact representation of documents and to the definition of the similarity of natural language texts. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs

  20. Intelligent indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, J

    1993-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the relevance of artificial intelligence to the automatic indexing of natural language text. We describe the use of domain-specific semantically-based thesauruses and address the problem of creating adequate knowledge bases for intelligent indexing systems. We also discuss the relevance of the Hilbert space {iota}{sup 2} to the compact representation of documents and to the definition of the similarity of natural language texts. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shoulder area. These nerves provide the shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand with movement and sensation. ... Pectoral girdle and upper limb: overview and surface anatomy. In: Standring S, ed. Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis ...

  2. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  3. Threshold value of home pulse pressure predicting arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes: KAMOGAWA-HBP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Ushigome, Emi; Matsumoto, Shinobu; Oyabu, Chikako; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Yokota, Isao; Asano, Mai; Tanaka, Muhei; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Fukui, Michiaki

    2018-03-01

    This cross-sectional multicenter study was designed to evaluate the threshold value of home pulse pressure (PP) and home systolic blood pressure (SBP) predicting the arterial stiffness in 876 patients with type 2 diabetes. We measured the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and estimated the ability of home PP to identify arterial stiffness using Youden-Index defined cut-off point. The arterial stiffness was measured using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). AUC for arterial stiffness in morning PP was significantly greater than that in morning SBP (P AUC for arterial stiffness in evening PP was also significantly greater than that in evening SBP (P < .001). The optimal cut-off points for morning PP and evening PP, which predicted arterial stiffness, were 54.6 and 56.9 mm Hg, respectively. Our findings indicate that we should pay more attention to increased home PP in patients with type 2 diabetes. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus–associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6–135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus–associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose–response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  5. Effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective, randomised, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant A Biradar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used to prolong brachial plexus block. We performed a prospective, randomised, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus block as this is the most common type of brachial block performed in our institute. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologist′s physical status I and II patients undergoing elective hand, forearm and elbow surgery under brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of normal saline (group C, n=30 or 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg (group D, n=30. The block was performed using a nerve stimulator. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade were assessed. The sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated and recorded at 5, 10, 20, 120 min, and at every 30 min thereafter. Results: Two patients were excluded from the study because of block failure. The onset of sensory and motor blockade (13.4±2.8 vs. 16.0±2.3 min and 16.0±2.7 vs. 18.7±2.8 min, respectively were significantly more rapid in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. The duration of sensory and motor blockade (326±58.6 vs. 159±20.1 and 290.6±52.7 vs. 135.5±20.3 min, respectively were significantly longer in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline in supraclavicular brachial plexus block speeds the onset and prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  6. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Wiinberg, Niels; Hansen, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Intensive multifactorial treatment aimed at cardiovascular (CV) risk factor reduction in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria can diminish fatal and non-fatal CV. Plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP predicts CV mortality in diabetic patients but the utility of P-NT-proBNP in screening for ath......-media thickness (CIMT)>0.90 mm, ankle-brachial index...

  7. Fluid shifts, vasodilatation and ambulatory blood pressure reduction during long duration spaceflight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, Peter; Asmar, Ali; Damgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: Weightlessness in space induces initially an increase in stroke volume and cardiac output, accompanied by unchanged or slightly reduced blood pressure.It is unclear whether these changes persist throughout months of flight.Here, we show that cardiac output and stroke volume increase...... by 35–41% between 3 and 6 months on the International Space Station, which is more than during shorter flights.Twenty-four hour ambulatory brachial blood pressure is reduced by 8–10 mmHg by a decrease in systemic vascular resistance of 39%, which is not a result of the suppression of sympathetic nervous...... brachial arterial pressures were automatically recorded at 1–2 h intervals with portable equipment in eight male astronauts: once before launch, once between 85 and 192 days in space on the International Space Station and, finally, once at least 2 months after flight. During the same 24 h, cardiac output...

  8. Virginia ESI: INDEX (Index Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the boundaries of all hardcopy cartographic products produced as part of the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  9. High prevalence of cranial asymmetry exists in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Megan; Gorbutt, Kimberly A; Peethambaran, Ammanath; Yang, Lynda; Nelson, Virginia S; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu

    2016-11-30

    This study aimed to: 1) evaluate the prevalence of cranial asymmetry (positional plagiocephaly) in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP); 2) examine the association of patient demographics, arm function, and NBPP-related factors to positional plagiocephaly; and 3) determine percentage of spontaneous recovery from positional plagiocephaly and its association with arm function. Infants plagio group), including infants with resolved positional plagiocephaly (plagio-resolved subgroup); and 2) those who never had positional plagiocephaly (non-plagio group). Standard statistics were applied. Eighteen of 28 infants (64%) had positional plagiocephaly. Delivery type might be predictive for plagiocephaly. Infants in the non-plagio group exhibited more active range of motion than infants in the plagio group. All other factors had no significant correlations. A high prevalence of positional plagiocephaly exists among the NBPP population examined. Parents and physicians should encourage infants to use their upper extremities to change position and reduce chance of cranial asymmetry.

  10. Risk factors for brachial plexus injury in a large cohort with shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Katherine A; Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Caughey, Aaron B

    2016-11-01

    To examine birthweight and other predictors of brachial plexus injury (BPI) among births complicated by shoulder dystocia. A retrospective cohort study of term births complicated by shoulder dystocia in California between 1997 and 2006. Birthweight at time of delivery was stratified into 500-g intervals. Women were further stratified by diabetes status, parity, and race/ethnicity. The perinatal outcome of BPI was assessed. This study included 62,762 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia, of which 3168 (5 %) resulted in BPI. The association between birthweight and BPI remained significant regardless of confounders. Each increasing birthweight interval was associated with an increasing risk of BPI compared with 3000-3499-g birthweight. Race/ethnicity, diabetes, and parity were also independently associated with BPI. Increasing birthweight increases the risk of BPI among births with shoulder dystocia, independent of advanced maternal age, race, parity, gestational diabetes, or operative vaginal delivery.

  11. Hoarseness of voice after supraclavicular ultrasound-guided subclavian perivascular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block is ideal for surgical procedures at or distal to the elbow. Ultrasound (USG continues to grow in popularity as a method of nerve localization, and for the supraclavicular block, it has the advantage of allowing real-time visualization of the plexus, pleura, and vessels along with the needle and local anesthetic spread, but it may conversely create a false sense of security. The incidence of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN block occurring with supraclavicular approach is 1.3% of patients.[10] Incidence of RLN block with USG-guided supraclavicular block is not known. In this case report, we discuss a rare complication of RLN block which occurred while performing a supraclavicular perivascular block performed under USG guidance.

  12. Combined use of intraarterial digital subtraction angiography with conventional retrograde brachial vertebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Ogawa, Toshihide; Inugami, Atsushi; Kawata, Yasushi; Shishido, Fumio; Uemura, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    For 102 patients who had the examination of conventional bilaterally retrograde brachial vertebral angiography (retrograde VAG), intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was successively performed to investigate steno-occlusive lesions of proximal vertebral and subclavian arteries. All the patients had no complication due to the DSA procedure. In 50% of 72 ischemic stroke cases, positive findings were found either in the origin of the vertebral artery or in the subclavian artery. Stenosis of more than 50% of the lumen of the vertebral artery were found in 14% of the cases at the origin of the right one and also in 14% in the left one. Occlusion of the vertebral artery was found in 4% in the left side only. In 30 cases with non-ischemic brain diseases, positive findings were noted in 10%. Intraarterial DSA combined with retrograde VAG was thought to be useful, especially in the examination for ischemic stroke. (author)

  13. Contribution of denervated muscle to contractures after neonatal brachial plexus injury: not just muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Liangjun, Hu; Tuttle, Lori J; Weekley, Holly; Christopher, Wylie; Lieber, Richard L; Cornwall, Roger

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the contribution of muscle fibrosis to elbow flexion contractures in a murine model of neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI). Four weeks after NBPI, biceps and brachialis fibrosis were assessed histologically and compared with the timing of contracture development and the relative contribution of each muscle to contractures. Modulus of elasticity and hydroxyproline (collagen) content were measured and correlated with contracture severity. The effect of halofuginone antifibrotic therapy on fibrosis and contractures was investigated. Elbow contractures preceded muscle fibrosis development. The brachialis was less fibrotic than the biceps, yet contributed more to contractures. Modulus and hydroxyproline content increased in both elbow flexors, but neither correlated with contracture severity. Halofuginone reduced biceps fibrosis but did not reduce contracture severity. Contractures after NBPI cannot be explained solely by muscle fibrosis, arguing for investigation of alternate pathophysiologic targets for contracture prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Preoperative diagnosis of tumors of the brachial plexus by use of computed tomography in three dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, R.J.; Feeney, D.A.; Lipowitz, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Three dogs with forelimb lameness of 3 months' to 1 year's duration were examined by computed tomography and determined to have a tumor of the brachial plexus. In each case, the clinician had been unable to determine the cause of lameness by other means, and in 2 dogs, surgery had been performed on the affected limb for unrelated conditions prior to diagnosis of the tumor. Computed tomography was performed by use of a third-generation scanner, with dogs under general anesthesia and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Intravenous contrast enhancement with iodinated contrast material was used to help differentiate vascular structures, and a 5-mm scanning width allowed detection of small tumors. In all dogs, approximate tumor location in the transverse plane, invasiveness, and relationship to surrounding structures compared favorably between computed tomographic images and surgical findings

  15. Radiological Imaging Findings of a Case with Vertebral Osteoid Osteoma Leading to Brachial Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms.

  16. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho; Lee, Kun Moo

    2016-08-01

    Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P shoulder surgery.

  17. Effect of fascicle composition on ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve transfer (Oberlin transfer) in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon W; Chulski, Nicholas J; Little, Ann A; Chang, Kate W C; Yang, Lynda J S

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) continues to be a problematic occurrence impacting approximately 1.5 per 1000 live births in the United States, with 10%-40% of these infants experiencing permanent disability. These children lose elbow flexion, and one surgical option for recovering it is the Oberlin transfer. Published data support the use of the ulnar nerve fascicle that innervates the flexor carpi ulnaris as the donor nerve in adults, but no analogous published data exist for infants. This study investigated the association of ulnar nerve fascicle choice with functional elbow flexion outcome in NBPP. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective study of 13 cases in which infants underwent ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve transfer for NBPP at a single institution. They collected data on patient demographics, clinical characteristics, active range of motion (AROM), and intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) (using 4 ulnar nerve index muscles). Standard statistical analysis compared pre- and postoperative motor function improvement between specific fascicle transfer (1-2 muscles for either wrist flexion or hand intrinsics) and nonspecific fascicle transfer (> 2 muscles for wrist flexion and hand intrinsics) groups. RESULTS The patients' average age at initial clinic visit was 2.9 months, and their average age at surgical intervention was 7.4 months. All NBPPs were unilateral; the majority of patients were female (61%), were Caucasian (69%), had right-sided NBPP (61%), and had Narakas grade I or II injuries (54%). IONM recordings for the fascicular dissection revealed a donor fascicle with nonspecific innervation in 6 (46%) infants and specific innervation in the remaining 7 (54%) patients. At 6-month follow-up, the AROM improvement in elbow flexion in adduction was 38° in the specific fascicle transfer group versus 36° in the nonspecific fascicle transfer group, with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.93). CONCLUSIONS Both specific and

  18. Indexing mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.G.; Parker, G.E.; Berry, R.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the indexing mechanism described can be used in a nuclear reactor fuel element inspection rig. It comprises a tubular body adapted to house a canister containing a number of fuel elements located longtitudinally, and has two chucks spaced apart for displacing the fuel elements longitudinally in a stepwise manner, together with a plunger mechanism for displacing them successively into the chucks. A measuring unit is located between the chucks for measuring the diameter of the fuel elements at intervals about their circumferences, and a secondary indexing mechanism is provided for rotating the measuring unit in a stepwise manner. (U.K.)

  19. Karakteristik dan Faktor Risiko Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy pada Bayi Baru Lahir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Vincent Handoyo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP is an injury of entire or part of brachial plexus correlated with delivery process. Incidence in developing countries is around 0.15%. Risk factors include intrapartum and intrauterine. Three types of OBPP are Duchenne Erb, Klumpke, and whole arm palsy. This was a retrospective study of characteristic and risk factors of OBPP in Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, period January 2002-April 2007. Data were collected from perinatology ward medical records, and analyzed using binary logistic regression. OBPP incidence was 0.141%. All were Erb palsy and single pregnancy, 68.75% were head-occiput posterior presentation, 50% were spontaneous birth, 18.75% had meconeal staining, 62.5% had birth weight ≥3,500 g, 56.25% were male, 68.75% asphyxia, 12.5% shoulder dystocia, and 6.25% clavicle fracture. Risk factors significantly correlated were foot presentation (OR 9.357; 95%CI, transverse fetal position (OR 5.136; 95%CI, vacuum, forceps, breech/foot extraction (OR 5.240;95%CI, 4.320; 95%CI, 14.411; 95%CI, respectively, birth weight 3,500-3,999 g (OR 4.571;95%CI, birth weight ≥4,500 g (OR 57.759; 95%CI, asphyxia (ORs 5.992; 95%CI, and severe asphyxia (OR 6.094; 95%CI. Sectio cesarea tend to have protective effect {OR 0.244; 95%CI; p=0.062 (>0.05}. The important risk factors of OBPP are foot presentation, breech/foot extraction, and birth weight >4,500 g.

  20. C8 cross transfer for the treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Carozzo, Claude; Thibaut, Jean-Laurent; Escriou, Catherine; Hidalgo, Antoine; Blot, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical nerve 8 cross-transfer technique (C8CT) as a part of surgical treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) in the dog. Case series. Client-owned dogs suspected to have caudal BPA based on neurological examination and electrophysiological testing (n = 3). The distal stump of the surgically transected contralateral C8 ventral branch (donor) was bridged to the proximal stump of the avulsed C8 ventral branch (recipient) and secured with 9-0 polypropylene suture under an operating microscope. A carpal panarthrodesis was performed on the injured limb after C8CT. Surgical exploration confirmed avulsion of nerve roots C7, C8, and T1 in all cases. There was no evidence of an iatrogenic effect on the donor forelimb. Gradual improvement in function of the affected forelimb occurred in all dogs, with eventual recovery of voluntary elbow extension. Reinnervation was evident in EMG recordings 6 months postoperatively in all three dogs. Stimulation of the donor C8 ventral branch led to motor evoked potentials in the avulsed side triceps brachialis and radial carpus extensor muscles. Variable functional outcome was observed in the 3 dogs during clinical evaluation 3-4 years after surgery. Digital abrasion wounds, distal interphalangeal infectious arthritis, and self-mutilation necessitated distal phalanx amputation of digits 3 and 4 in 2 dogs. C8CT provided partial reconnection of the donor C8 ventral branch to the avulsed brachial plexus in the 3 dogs of this series. Reinnervation resulted in active elbow extension and promoted functional recovery in the affected limb. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. A Thematic Analysis of Online Discussion Boards for Brachial Plexus Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marie T; Daluiski, Aaron; Dy, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Patients with brachial plexus injury (BPI) and their family members contribute to Internet discussion groups dedicated to BPI. We hypothesized that a thematic analysis of posts from BPI Internet discussion groups would reveal common themes related to the BPI patient experience, providing topics for patient education and counseling. Internet discussion boards were identified using the search term "brachial plexus injury support group" in Google, Bing, and Yahoo! search engines. Two discussion boards had substantially more posts than other Web sites and were chosen for analyses. Posts from January 1, 2015, through January 1, 2016, were examined. Using an iterative and established process, 2 investigators (M.T.M. and C.J.D) independently analyzed each post using thematic analysis in 3 steps (open coding, axial coding, and selective coding) to determine common themes. In this process, each post was reviewed 3 times. A total of 328 posts from the 2 leading discussion boards were analyzed. Investigators reached a consensus on themes for all posts. One central theme focused on emotional aspects of BPI. Four other central themes regarding information support were identified: BPI disease, BPI treatment, recovery after BPI treatment, and process of seeking care for BPI. Examination of posts on Internet support groups for BPI revealed recurring concerns, questions, and opinions of patients and their family members. The most common themes related to disease information, treatment, recovery, and the emotional element of BPI. These findings provide a helpful starting point in refining topics for patient education and support that are targeted on patients' interests and concerns. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel rat model of brachial plexus injury with nerve root stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jintao; Yang, Jiantao; Yang, Yi; Li, Liang; Qin, Bengang; He, Wenting; Yan, Liwei; Chen, Gang; Tu, Zhehui; Liu, Xiaolin; Gu, Liqiang

    2018-02-01

    The C5-C6 nerve roots are usually spared from avulsion after brachial plexus injury (BPI) and thus can be used as donors for nerve grafting. To date, there are no appropriate animal models to evaluate spared nerve root stumps. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a rat model with spared nerve root stumps in BPI. In rupture group, the proximal parts of C5-T1 nerve roots were held with the surrounding muscles and the distal parts were pulled by a sudden force after the brachial plexus was fully exposed, and the results were compared with those of sham group. To validate the model, the lengths of C5-T1 spared nerve root stumps were measured and the histologies of the shortest one and the corresponding spinal cord were evaluated. C5 nerve root stump was found to be the shortest. Histology findings demonstrated that the nerve fibers became more irregular and the continuity decreased; numbers and diameters of myelinated axons and thickness of myelin sheaths significantly decreased over time. The survival of motoneurons was reduced, and the death of motoneurons may be related to the apoptotic process. Our model could successfully create BPI model with nerve root stumps by traction, which could simulate injury mechanisms. While other models involve root avulsion or rupturing by distal nerve transection. This model would be suitable for evaluating nerve root stumps and testing new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection through nerve root stumps in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Assessment tools used by occupational therapists in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaianny Taís Dantas de Brito

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP is a result of brachial plexus injury at birth and may cause dysfunction of the affected upper limb, reflecting significantly in the child’s life. When evaluating a child with OBPP the occupational therapist can use evaluation tools, and has to have knowledge to choose and apply the most appropriate instrument. Objective: This review aimed to analyze the literature on the use of evaluation tools by occupational therapists in children with OBPP. Method: The search for articles was performed in the databases Scirus, Cinahl, Medline, Psycinfo, Scopus and Lilacs using the following selection criteria: studies with 0-12 years old children with OBPP in English, Portuguese and Spanish, published in the last 10 years, with the occupational therapist as one of the authors and/or reporting the application of the instrument by this professional. Results: There were 15 studies from six countries that reported 17 evaluation instruments, five of which, recently developed, were specific to this clientele. The study did not identify the need to modify the non-specific instruments to the application in children with OBPP, demonstrating that they can be used in its original format, facilitating the use in the clinical practice. Most instruments included aspects related to occupational performance inserted in the field of Activity and Participation of the International Classification of Functioning, indicating the concern of this professional in suiting the assessment process of the child with the OBPP to the current paradigm of health understanding and occupational therapy field.

  4. Collagen nerve guides for surgical repair of brachial plexus birth injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, William W; Weatherly, Trisha; Park, Tae Sung

    2006-12-01

    Standard brachial plexus repair techniques often involve autologous nerve graft placement and neurotization. However, when performed to treat severe injuries, this procedure can sometimes yield poor results. Moreover, harvesting the autologous graft is time-consuming and exposes the patient to additional surgical risks. To improve surgical outcomes and reduce surgical risks associated with autologous nerve graft retrieval and placement, the authors use collagen matrix tubes (Neurogen) instead of autologous nerve graft material. Between 1991 and 2005, the authors surgically treated 65 infants who had suffered brachial plexus injury at birth. During this time, seven patients were treated using collagen matrix tubes (Neurogen). This study is a retrospective analysis of the initial five patients who were treated using the tubes. Two patients underwent tube placement recently and were excluded from the analysis because of the inadequate follow-up period. Four of the five patients experienced a good recovery (motor scale composite [MSC] > 0.6), and three exhibited an excellent recovery (MSC > 0.75) at 2 years postoperatively. The MSC improved by an average of 69 and 78% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The movement scores improved to greater than or equal to 50% range of motion in most patients, and the contractures were usually mild or moderate. Follow-up physical and occupational therapy evaluations confirm these patients' functional status. When last seen, four of five of these children could feed and dress themselves. Technically, the use of the collagen matrix tubes was straightforward and efficient, and there were no complications. The outcomes in this small series are encouraging.

  5. External evaluation of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group brachial plexus contouring protocol: several issues identified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Myo; Carruthers, Scott; Zanchetta, Lydia; Roos, Daniel; Keating, Elly; Shakeshaft, John; Baxi, Siddhartha; Penniment, Michael; Wong, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate interobserver variability in contouring the brachial plexus (BP) using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-approved protocol and to analyse BP dosimetries. Seven outliners independently contoured the BPs of 15 consecutive patients. Interobserver variability was reviewed qualitatively (visually by using planning axial computed-tomography images and anteroposterior digitally reconstructed radiographs) and quantitatively (by volumetric and statistical analyses). Dose–volume histograms of BPs were calculated and compared. We found significant interobserver variability among outliners in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. These were most pronounced for the T1 nerve roots on visual inspection and for the BP volume on statistical analysis. The BP volumes were smaller than those described in the RTOG atlas paper, with a mean volume of 20.8cc (range 11–40.7 cc) compared with 33±4cc (25.1–39.4cc). The average values of mean dose, maximum dose, V60Gy, V66Gy and V70Gy for patients treated with conventional radiotherapy and IMRT were 42.2Gy versus 44.8Gy, 64.5Gy versus 68.5Gy, 6.1% versus 7.6%, 2.9% versus 2.4% and 0.6% versus 0.3%, respectively. This is the first independent external evaluation of the published protocol. We have identified several issues, including significant interobserver variation. Although radiation oncologists should contour BPs to avoid dose dumping, especially when using IMRT, the RTOG atlas should be used with caution. Because BPs are largely radiologically occult on CT, we propose the term brachial-plexus regions (BPRs) to represent regions where BPs are likely to be present. Consequently, BPRs should in principle be contoured generously.

  6. Density, refractive index, interfacial tension, and viscosity of ionic liquids [EMIM][EtSO4], [EMIM][NTf2], [EMIM][N(CN)2], and [OMA][NTf2] in dependence on temperature at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröba, Andreas P; Kremer, Heiko; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-10-02

    The density, refractive index, interfacial tension, and viscosity of ionic liquids (ILs) [EMIM][EtSO 4] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate), [EMIM][NTf 2] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide), [EMIM][N(CN) 2] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanimide), and [OMA][NTf 2] (trioctylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) were studied in dependence on temperature at atmospheric pressure both by conve