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Sample records for brachial plexus cases

  1. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  2. Complete Brachial Plexus Injury - An Amputation Dilemma. A Case Report

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    Choong CYL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries with intact yet flail limb presents with problems of persistent neuropathic pain and recurrent shoulder dislocations, that render the flail limb a damn nuisance. As treating surgeons, we are faced with the dilemma of offering treatment options, bearing in mind the patient’s functional status and expectations. We present a case of a 55-year old housewife with complete brachial plexus injury begging for surgical amputation of her flail limb, 6 years post-injury. Here we discuss the outcome of transhumeral amputation and the possibility of offering early rather than delayed amputations in this group of patients.

  3. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brachial Plexus Injuries Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that conducts signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, ...

  4. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, Sho; Hara, Yuki; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Hara, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tanefumi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enla...

  5. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brachial plexus injuries may heal without treatment. Many children who are injured during birth improve or recover by 3 to 4 months of age. Treatment includes physical therapy and, in some cases, surgery. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  6. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  7. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

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    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  8. Brachial Plexus Lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick

    and "Burners" or "Stingers" (usually associated with sports-related brachial plexus injuries). The. "stinger" or "burner" syndrome is classically characterized by unilateral weakness and a burning sensation that radiates down an upper extremity. The condition may last less than a minute or as long as 2 weeks, with the latter ...

  9. Neuromuscular hamartoma arising in the brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, P.H.; Chen, C.; Yeh, L.R.; Pan, H.B.; Ho, J.T.; Hsu, S.S.; Lin, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    We report a case brachial plexus neuromuscular hamartoma (choristoma) in a 28-year-old man who complained of numbness of the left hand and forearm for several years. MRI revealed a circumscribed, rounded mass in the left brachial plexus. The patient is well 2 years after surgery, with no neurological deficit. (orig.)

  10. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Brachial Plexus Blocker Prototype

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    Stéphanie Coelho Monteiro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the area of surgical simulation has been the subject of study in recent years, it is still necessary to develop artificial experimental models with a perspective to dismiss the use of biological models. Since this makes the simulators more real, transferring the environment of the health professional to a physical or virtual reality, an anesthetic prototype has been developed, where the motor response is replicated when the brachial plexus is subjected to a proximal nervous stimulus. Using action-research techniques, with this simulator it was possible to validate that the human nerve response can be replicated, which will aid the training of health professionals, reducing possible risks in a surgical environment.

  12. A Case of Horner's Syndrome following Ultrasound-Guided Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walid, Trabelsi; Mondher, Belhaj Amor; Mohamed Anis, Lebbi; Mustapha, Ferjani

    2012-01-01

    Horner's syndrome results from paralysis of the ipsilateral sympathetic cervical chain (stellate ganglion) caused by surgery, drugs (mainly high concentrations of local anesthetics), local compression (hematoma or tumor), or inadequate perioperative positioning of the patient. It occurs in 100% of the patients with an interscalene block of the brachial plexus and can also occur in patients with other types of supraclavicular blocks.In this case report, we presented a case of Horner's syndrome after performing an ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block with 15 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%. It appeared 40 minutes after the block with specific triad (ptosis, miosis, and exophtalmia) and quickly disappears within 2 hours and a half without any sequelae. Horner's syndrome may be described as an unpleasant side effect because it has no clinical consequences in itself. For this reason anesthesiologists should be aware of this syndrome, and if it occurs patients should be reassured and monitored closely.

  13. Radial to axillary nerve neurotization for brachial plexus injury in children: a combined case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Eli, Ilyas M; Shah, Manish N; Bradley, Nadine; Stutz, Christopher M; Park, Tae Sung; Wellons, John C

    2014-11-01

    Axillary nerve palsy, isolated or as part of a more complex brachial plexus injury, can have profound effects on upper-extremity function. Radial to axillary nerve neurotization is a useful technique for regaining shoulder abduction with little compromise of other neurological function. A combined experience of this procedure used in children is reviewed. A retrospective review of the authors' experience across 3 tertiary care centers with brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injury in children (younger than 18 years) revealed 7 cases involving patients with axillary nerve injury as part of an overall brachial plexus injury with persistent shoulder abduction deficits. Two surgical approaches to the region were used. Four infants (ages 0.6, 0.8, 0.8, and 0.6 years) and 3 older children (ages 8, 15, and 17 years) underwent surgical intervention. No patient had significant shoulder abduction past 15° preoperatively. In 3 cases, additional neurotization was performed in conjunction with the procedure of interest. Two surgical approaches were used: posterior and transaxillary. All patients displayed improvement in shoulder abduction. All were able to activate their deltoid muscle to raise their arm against gravity and 4 of 7 were able to abduct against resistance. The median duration of follow-up was 15 months (range 8 months to 5.9 years). Radial to axillary nerve neurotization improved shoulder abduction in this series of patients treated at 3 institutions. While rarely used in children, this neurotization procedure is an excellent option to restore deltoid function in children with brachial plexus injury due to birth or accidental trauma.

  14. Pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia following lightning: A rare case report.

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    Patnaik, Ashis; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Menka

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications following lightning are rare and occur in form of temporary neurological deficits of central origin. Involvement of peripheral nervous system is extremely rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Isolated unilateral pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia has never been reported in the literature. Steroids have long been used for treatment of neuropraxia. However, their use in lightning neural injury is unique and requires special mention. We report a rare case of lightning-induced unilateral complete flaccid paralysis along with sensory loss in a young patient. Lightning typically causes central nervous involvement in various types of motor and sensory deficit. Surprisingly, the nerve conduction study showed the involvement of peripheral nervous system involvement. Steroids were administered and there was significant improvement in neurological functions within a short span of days. Patients' functions in the affected limb were normal in one month. Our case was interesting since it is the first such case in the literature where lightning has caused such a rare instance of unilateral pan-brachial plexus lesion. Such cases when seen, raises the possibility of more common central nervous system pathology rather than peripheral involvement. However, such lesions can be purely benign forms of peripheral nerve neuropraxia, which can be managed by steroid treatment without leaving any long-term neurological deficits.

  15. Severe brachial plexus injuries in rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, F; Mannan, K; Bharania, P; Sewell, M D; Di Mascio, L; Sinisi, M

    2012-03-01

    We describe the mechanisms, pattern of injuries, management and outcomes of severe injuries to the brachial plexus sustained during the play of rugby. Thirteen cases of severe injury to the brachial plexus caused by tackles in rugby had detailed clinical assessment, and operative exploration of the brachial plexus. Seventeen spinal nerves were avulsed, two were ruptured and there were traction lesions in continuity of 24 spinal nerves. The pattern of nerve lesion was related to the posture of the neck and the forequarter at the moment of impact. Early repair by nerve transfer enabled some functional recovery, and decompression of lesions in continuity was followed by recovery of nerve function and relief of pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of the DEKA Arm for amputees with brachial plexus injury: A case series.

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    Linda Resnik

    Full Text Available Patients with upper limb amputation and brachial plexus injuries have high rates of prosthesis rejection. Study purpose is to describe experiences of subjects with transhumeral amputation and brachial plexus injury, who were fit with, and trained to use, a DEKA Arm.This was a mixed-methods study utilizing qualitative (e.g. interview, survey and quantitative data (e.g. self-report and performance measures. Subject 1, a current prosthesis user, had a shoulder arthrodesis. Subject 2, not a prosthesis user, had a subluxed shoulder. Both were trained in laboratory and participated in a trial of home use. Descriptive analyses of processes and outcomes were conducted.Subject 1 was fitted with the transhumeral configuration (HC DEKA Arm using a compression release stabilized socket. He had 12 hours of prosthetic training and participated in all home study activities. Subject 1 had improved dexterity and prosthetic satisfaction with the DEKA Arm and reported better quality of life (QOL at the end of participation. Subject 2 was fit with the shoulder configuration (SC DEKA Arm using a modified X-frame socket. He had 30 hours of training and participated in 3 weeks of home activities. He reported less functional disability at the end of training as compared to baseline, but encountered personal problems and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms and withdrew from home use portion at 3 weeks. Both subjects reported functional benefits from use, and expressed a desire to receive a DEKA Arm in the future.This paper reported on two different strategies for prosthetic fitting and their outcomes. The advantages and limitations of each approach were discussed.Use of both the HC and SC DEKA Arm for patients with TH amputation and brachial plexus injury was reported. Lessons learned may be instructive to clinicians considering prosthetic choices for future cases.

  17. Use of the DEKA Arm for amputees with brachial plexus injury: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Fantini, Christopher; Latlief, Gail; Phillips, Samuel; Sasson, Nicole; Sepulveda, Eve

    2017-01-01

    Patients with upper limb amputation and brachial plexus injuries have high rates of prosthesis rejection. Study purpose is to describe experiences of subjects with transhumeral amputation and brachial plexus injury, who were fit with, and trained to use, a DEKA Arm. This was a mixed-methods study utilizing qualitative (e.g. interview, survey) and quantitative data (e.g. self-report and performance measures). Subject 1, a current prosthesis user, had a shoulder arthrodesis. Subject 2, not a prosthesis user, had a subluxed shoulder. Both were trained in laboratory and participated in a trial of home use. Descriptive analyses of processes and outcomes were conducted. Subject 1 was fitted with the transhumeral configuration (HC) DEKA Arm using a compression release stabilized socket. He had 12 hours of prosthetic training and participated in all home study activities. Subject 1 had improved dexterity and prosthetic satisfaction with the DEKA Arm and reported better quality of life (QOL) at the end of participation. Subject 2 was fit with the shoulder configuration (SC) DEKA Arm using a modified X-frame socket. He had 30 hours of training and participated in 3 weeks of home activities. He reported less functional disability at the end of training as compared to baseline, but encountered personal problems and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms and withdrew from home use portion at 3 weeks. Both subjects reported functional benefits from use, and expressed a desire to receive a DEKA Arm in the future. This paper reported on two different strategies for prosthetic fitting and their outcomes. The advantages and limitations of each approach were discussed. Use of both the HC and SC DEKA Arm for patients with TH amputation and brachial plexus injury was reported. Lessons learned may be instructive to clinicians considering prosthetic choices for future cases.

  18. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  19. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K.; Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.)

  20. Axillary artery injury combined with delayed brachial plexus palsy due to compressive hematoma in a young patient: a case report

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    Yajima Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Axillary artery injury in the shoulder region following blunt trauma without association with either shoulder dislocation or fracture of the humeral neck has been previously reported. Axillary artery injury might also be accompanied with brachial plexus injury. However, delayed onset of brachial plexus palsy caused by a compressive hematoma associated with axillary injury after blunt trauma in the shoulder region has been rarely reported. In previous reports, this condition only occurred in old patients with sclerotic vessels. We present a case of a young patient who suffered axillary artery injury associated with brachial plexus palsy that occurred tardily due to compressive hematoma after blunt trauma in the shoulder region without association of either shoulder dislocation or humeral neck fracture. Case presentation A 16-year-old male injured his right shoulder in a motorbike accident. On initial physical evaluation, the pulses on the radial and ulnar arteries in the affected arm were palpable. Paralysis developed later from 2 days after the injury. Functions in the right arm became significantly impaired. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the axillary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass measuring 4 × 5 cm that was suspected to be a hematoma compressing the brachial plexus in a space between the subscapular muscle and the pectoralis minor muscle. Surgery was performed on the third day after injury. In intraoperative observations, the axillary artery was occluded with thrombus along 5 cm; a subscapular artery was ruptured; the brachial plexus was compressed by the hematoma. After evacuation of the hematoma, neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and revascularization of the axillary artery, the patient had an excellent functional recovery of the affected upper limb, postoperatively. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that axillary artery injuries may even occur in young people after severe blunt

  1. Dorsal Scapular Artery Variations and Relationship to the Brachial Plexus, and a Related Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenna, Anne-Marie A; Alexandru, Daniela; Karimi, Afshin; Brown, Justin M; Bove, Geoffrey M; Daly, Frank J; Pastore, Anthony M; Pearson, Helen E; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-01-01

    Rationale  Knowledge of the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery (DSA) with the brachial plexus is limited. Objective  We report a case of a variant DSA path, and revisit DSA origins and under-investigated relationship with the plexus in cadavers. Methods  The DSA was examined in a male patient and 106 cadavers. Results  In the case, we observed an unusual DSA compressing the lower plexus trunk, that resulted in intermittent radiating pain and paresthesia. In the cadavers, the DSA originated most commonly from the subclavian artery (71%), with 35% from the thyrocervical trunk. Nine sides of eight cadavers (seven females) had two DSA branches per side, with one branch from each origin. The most typical DSA path was a subclavian artery origin before passing between upper and middle brachial plexus trunks (40% of DSAs), versus between middle and lower trunks (23%), or inferior (4%) or superior to the plexus (1%). Following a thyrocervical trunk origin, the DSA passed most frequently superior to the plexus (23%), versus between middle and lower trunks (6%) or upper and middle trunks (4%). Bilateral symmetry in origin and path through the brachial plexus was observed in 13 of 35 females (37%) and 6 of 17 males (35%), with the most common bilateral finding of a subclavian artery origin and a path between upper and middle trunks (17%). Conclusion  Variability in the relationship between DSA and trunks of the brachial plexus has surgical and clinical implications, such as diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome.

  2. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  3. Myelography in obstetric palsies of brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, E.; Crespi, R.; Cozzi, L.; Lazzati, L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of myelography in obstetric palsies of brachial plexus is aimed at diagnosing root avulsion.This kind of lesion appears as the disappearance of the slightly-transparent nerve roots which might be combined either with pseudo-meningocele or with deformation of radicular pouch. This study 69 operated patients who had previously undergone myelography have been considered. In 74.2% of cases mylographic findings were confirmed at surgery.False positives and false negatives were 9.7% and 3.2%, respectively. Uncorrect diagnoses were made in 12.9% of cases, because of misread lesions and uncorrect evaluation of their location, usually at the cervicol-dorsal junction.No side-effects were observed. Myelography appears thus to be extremely useful for both the preoperative evaluation and the choice of surgery in newborn children with obstetric palsy of the brachial plexus

  4. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

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    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  5. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

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    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  6. Inadvertent brachial plexus anesthesia associated with local anesthetic infiltration during internal jugular venous cannulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyik, L; Tezer, T

    2011-01-01

    In the development of neurological complications due to central venous cannulation, the properties of the anatomical region and the experience of the practitioner are important. In this case report, an inadvertent brachial plexus anesthesia after repeated local anesthetic infiltrations during failed attempts of internal jugular venous cannulation by an inexperienced practitioner in cardiovascular intensive care unit is described. The neurological complications due to central venous cannulation are reviewed in the light of actual literature data.

  7. Case report 388: Transient paralysis of the left hemidiaphragm secondary to blocking anesthesia of the intrascalene brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogdon, B.G.; Arcement, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiologists and clinicians should be aware of the phenomenon of transient, unilateral paralysis of the phrenic nerve, secondary to anesthesia performed in a block of the brachial plexus used in surgical procedures of the upper extremity and in manipulation of fractures and dislocations. The disorder is self-limited and requires no further investigation or treatment. This entity is well-illustrated and fully described in this case report. (orig.)

  8. Management of Intrathoracic Benign Schwannomas of the Brachial Plexus

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    Alessandro Bandiera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumours of the brachial plexus are rare entities. They usually present as extrathoracic masses located in the supraclavicular region. This report describes two cases of benign schwannomas arising from the brachial plexus with an intrathoracic growth. In the first case the tumour was completely intrathoracic and it was hardly removed through a standard posterolateral thoracotomy. In the second case the tumour presented as a cervicomediastinal lesion and it was resected through a one-stage combined supraclavicular incision followed by left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. A brachial plexus tumour should be suspected not only in patients with a supraclavicular or cervicomediastinal mass but also in those with intrathoracic apical lesions. A preoperative magnetic resonance imaging study of brachial plexus should be performed in such cases in order to plan the correct surgical approach.

  9. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  10. Qualitative dermatoglyphic traits in brachial plexus palsy.

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    Polovina, Svetislav; Milicić, Jasna; Cvjeticanin, Miljenko; Proloscić, Tajana Polovina

    2007-12-01

    It has been considered for many years that the cause of perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is excessive lateral traction applied to the fetal head at delivery, in association with anterior shoulder dystocia, but this do not explain all cases of brachial plexus palsy. The incidence found in several family members could be suggestive for inheritance with variable expression. The aim of this study was to prove early found confirmations of genetic predisposition for PBPP In the previous studies, the quantitative dermatoglyphic analysis showed some differences in digito-palmar dermatoglyphs between patients with PBPP and healthy controls. Now this qualitative analysis will try to determine hereditary of those diseases. We analyzed digito-palmar dermatoglyphics from 140 subjects (70 males and 70 females) diagnosed with PBPP and 400 phenotypically healthy adults (200 males and 200 females) from Zagreb area as control group. The results of Chi-square test showed statistically significant differences for frequencies of patterns on fingers in females between the groups observed. Statistically significant differences were found on palms in III and IV interdigital areas in both males and females and in thenar and I interdigital area only in females. As it was found in previous researches on quantitative dermatoglyphic traits, more differences are found between females with PBPP and control group, than between males. The fact, that the main presumed cause of PBPP is obstetrical trauma, it could be associated with congenital variability in formation of brachial plexus.

  11. Variations in brachial plexus and the relationship of median nerve with the axillary artery: a case report

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    Rao Vani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial Plexus innervates the upper limb. As it is the point of formation of many nerves, variations are common. Knowledge of these is important to anatomists, radiologists, anesthesiologists and surgeons. The presence of anatomical variations of the peripheral nervous system is often used to explain unexpected clinical signs and symptoms. Case Presentation On routine dissection of an embalmed 57 year old male cadaver, variations were found in the formation of divisions and cords of the Brachial Plexus of the right side. Some previously unreported findings observed were; direct branches to the muscles Pectoralis Minor and Latissimus dorsi from C6, innervation of deltoid by C6 and C7 roots and the origin of lateral pectoral nerve from the posterior division of upper trunk. The median nerve was present lateral to axillary artery. The left side brachial plexus was also inspected and found to have normal anatomy. Conclusion The probable cause for such variations and their embryological basis is discussed in the paper. It is also concluded that although these variations may not have affected the functioning of upper limb in this individual, knowledge of such variations is essential in evaluation of unexplained sensory and motor loss after trauma and surgical interventions to the upper limb.

  12. Bionic reconstruction to restore hand function after brachial plexus injury: a case series of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Roche, Aidan D; Salminger, Stefan; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hofer, Christian; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-30

    Brachial plexus injuries can permanently impair hand function, yet present surgical reconstruction provides only poor results. Here, we present for the first time bionic reconstruction; a combined technique of selective nerve and muscle transfers, elective amputation, and prosthetic rehabilitation to regain hand function. Between April 2011, and May 2014, three patients with global brachial plexus injury including lower root avulsions underwent bionic reconstruction. Treatment occurred in two stages; first, to identify and create useful electromyographic signals for prosthetic control, and second, to amputate the hand and replace it with a mechatronic prosthesis. Before amputation, the patients had a specifically tailored rehabilitation programme to enhance electromyographic signals and cognitive control of the prosthesis. Final prosthetic fitting was applied as early as 6 weeks after amputation. Bionic reconstruction successfully enabled prosthetic hand use in all three patients. After 3 months, mean Action Research Arm Test score increased from 5·3 (SD 4·73) to 30·7 (14·0). Mean Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure score improved from 9·3 (SD 1·5) to 65·3 (SD 19·4). Mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score improved from 46·5 (SD 18·7) to 11·7 (SD 8·42). For patients with global brachial plexus injury with lower root avulsions, who have no alternative treatment, bionic reconstruction offers a means to restore hand function. Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research & Economy, and European Research Council Advanced Grant DEMOVE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Schwanoma de plexo braquial: relato de dois casos Schwannoma of brachial plexus: report of two cases

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    Manoel Baldoíno Leal Filho

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwanomas, neurinomas ou neurilemomas são tumores benignos de nervos periféricos. Podem ocorrer em associação com a neurofibromatose tipo 2. Relatamos dois casos de tumor cervical originado em plexo braquial sem associação com neurofibromatose. Uma mulher, de 31 anos apresentando uma tumefação em região supraclavicular direita, dor irradiada para o membro ipsilateral e sinal de Tinel à percussão da região. Outra mulher, 52 anos, com cervicobraquialgia persistente à direita há um ano. Ambas foram submetidas a microcirurgia, com ressecção total da lesão. O estudo histopatológico foi compatível com schwanoma. As duas pacientes tiveram boa evolução neurológica, com desaparecimento dos sinais e sintomas.Schwannomas, neurinomas or neurilemmomas are benign peripheral nerve tumors. The literature report some cases associated with neurofibromatosis 2. We report two cases of cervical schwannoma originating from the brachial plexus unassociated with neurofibromatosis. A 31-year-old woman presented with a mass in the right supraclavicular region, irradiating pain and distal tingling to percussion (Tinel's sign for 6 months. And a 52-year-old woman presented with pain in the cervical region and right arm for one year. Both the patients underwent to a microsurgery with total resection of the lesion. Histology of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. Postoperatively, the patients had a good recovery.

  14. A stab wound to the axilla illustrating the importance of brachial plexus anatomy in an emergency context: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Diogo; Cunha, Teresa; Pais, Diogo; Iria, Inês; Angélica-Almeida, Maria; Millan, Gerardo; Videira-Castro, José; Goyri-O'Neill, João

    2017-01-04

    Although open injuries involving the brachial plexus are relatively uncommon, they can lead to permanent disability and even be life threatening if accompanied by vascular damage. We present a case report of a brachial plexus injury in which the urgency of the situation precluded the use of any ancillary diagnostic examinations and forced a rapid clinical assessment. We report a case of a Portuguese man who had a stabbing injury at the base of his left axilla. On observation in our emergency room an acute venous type of bleeding was present at the wound site and, as a result of refractory hypotension after initial management with fluids administered intravenously, he was immediately carried to our operating room. During the course of transportation, we observed that he presented hypoesthesia of the medial aspect of his arm and forearm, as well as of the ulnar side of his hand and of the palmar aspect of the last three digits and of the dorsal aspect of the last two digits. Moreover, he was not able to actively flex the joints of his middle, ring, and small fingers or to adduct or abduct all fingers. Exclusively relying on our anatomical knowledge of the axillary region, the site of the stabbing wound, and the physical neurologic examination, we were able to unequivocally pinpoint the place of the injury between the anterior division of the lower trunk of his brachial plexus and the proximal portion of the following nerves: ulnar, medial cutaneous of his arm and forearm, and the medial aspect of his median nerve. Surgery revealed a longitudinal laceration of the posterior aspect of his axillary vein, and confirmed a complete section of his ulnar nerve, his medial brachial and antebrachial cutaneous nerves, and an incomplete section of the ulnar aspect of his median nerve. All structures were repaired microsurgically. Three years after the surgery he showed a good functional outcome. We believe that this case report illustrates the relevance of a sound anatomical

  15. Neurotization of elements of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, A H

    1991-01-01

    Satisfactory therapy for an avulsion injury of the brachial plexus has yet to be described. Dorsal root entry zone lesions will usually mitigate the searing pain which is so disabling in some of these patients. Neurotization procedures are effective in restoring limited function to these patients. The most useful isolated movement of the upper extremity is elbow flexion, which is thus the primary target of neurotization procedures. Intercostal nerves and elements of the cervical plexus are the most commonly used donor nerves for neurotization procedures. From our experience and from a review of the literature, it appears that these procedures will be successful in approximately 50% of cases. It must be stressed that before performing a nerve transfer, the surgeon must be certain that the patient is not a candidate for a simple nerve graft.

  16. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    1997-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial

  17. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  18. Role of dexamethasone in brachial plexus block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to (lignocaine) on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from September 2009 to March 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients, who were scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were randomly allocated to group A in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of isotonic saline (0.9%) and group B in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg). Nerve stimulator with insulated needle for multiple stimulations technique was used to locate the brachial plexus nerves. After the injection onset of action and duration of sensory blockade of brachial plexus were recorded at 5 minutes and 15 minutes interval. Results: Group A showed the onset of action of 21.64 ± 2.30 min and in group B it was 15.42 ± 1.44 min (p< 0.001). Duration of nerve block was 115.08 ± 10.92 min in group A and 265.42 ± 16.56 min in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lignocaine solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory blockade significantly. (author)

  19. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus

  20. Modified Pectoralis Major Tendon Transfer for Reanimation of Elbow Flexion as a Salvage Procedure in Complete Brachial Plexus Injury: A Case Report

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    S Taran

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brachial plexus injuries rarely recover spontaneously and if the window period for neurotisation has elapsed, the only option for restoration of function lies in a salvage procedure. Many such salvage procedures have been described in the literature with variable functional results. We report the case of a 16-year-old boy who presented after unsuccessful treatment for a complete brachial plexus injury; we performed a pectoralis major tendon transfer to attain elbow flexion. Postoperatively, the elbow was splinted with flexion at 100°. After 4 weeks of immobilization the splint was removed and the patient could actively flex his elbow from 30° to 100°.

  1. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

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    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  2. [A case of brachial plexus neuropathy who presented with acute paralysis of the hand after sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Makiko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Ohizumi, Hideki; Fujishima, Kenji; Goto, Keigo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2002-09-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute paresis of the right hand and arm. She was well until when she noted a paresis and dysesthesia in her right hand in the morning. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the muscles which were supplied by lower cervical segments, with increased deep tendon reflexes in the right arm. Allen's test and Wright's test were positive. The nerve conduction studies disclosed a reduced CMAPs more severely by right median than ulnar nerve stimulation. The frequency and amplitude of the F waves was also reduced. Needle electromyogram showed a mild neurogenic pattern in the right hand muscles. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a tapering of the subclavian artery when the right arm was abducted. She underwent decompression surgery. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms was observed after surgery. Our patient suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy should be considered in the acute paresis of the hand after sleep, and that surgical procedure would lead to a successful outcome.

  3. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia improves arteriovenous fistula flow characteristics in end-stage renal disease patients. Shyam Meenaa*, Virendra Aryaa, Indu Sena, Mukut Minza and Mahesh Prakasha. aDepartment of Anaesthesia, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, ...

  4. [Microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, R

    1985-01-01

    From 1975 till today we observed 170 injuries of the brachial plexus, mostly following motorcycle accidents (n = 146). Many of the injured were of young, age (15 to 25 years) and suffered from polytraumatism. 129 patients underwent microsurgical repair of the nerve lesion. Two years after surgery 96 had a follow-up: 27 very good, 33 satisfying and 28 bad = without functional success.

  5. Disturbed function of the brachial plexus after irradiation for a malignant disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauser, H.W.; Eijckeler, M.J.H. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1982-10-30

    In reference to the case history of a woman aged 26 years in whom approx. 7 years after irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, lesions of the upper roots of the brachial plexus (Erb-Duchenne type) developed, the differential diagnosis is discussed of brachial plexus lesions in the presence of a recurrent malignant disease or as the consequence of irradiation.

  6. Bilateral brachial plexus injury following acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mounia; Belaidi, Halima; Benabdeljlil, Maria; Bouchhab, Wafa; El Jazouli, Nadia; El Brini, Asmae; Aidi, Saadia; Ouazzani, Reda M; El Alaoui Faris, Mustapha

    2013-12-07

    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is a leading cause of severe neuropsychological impairments. Peripheral nerve injury has rarely been reported. It consists usually in a demyelinating polyneuropathy or mononeuropathy affecting mainly the lower limbs. Isolated involvement of both upper extremities has been described in only 4 patients related to root damage. We report the first case of bilateral brachial plexus injury following CO poisoning and review all previous CO-induced neuropathy described in literature. After being unconscious for three hours, a 42 years old man experienced bilateral brachial weakness associated with edema of the face and the upper limbs. Neurological examination showed a brachial diplegia, distal vibratory, thermic and algic hypoesthesia, deep tendon areflexia in upper limbs. There was no sensory or motor deficit in lower extremities. No cognitive disturbances were detected. Creatine kinase was elevated. Electroneuromyogram patterns were compatible with the diagnosis of bilateral C5 D1 brachial axonal plexus injury predominant on the left side. Clinical course after hyperbaric oxygen therapy was marked by a complete recovery of neurological disorders. Peripheral neuropathy is an unusual complication of CO intoxication. Bilateral brachial plexus impairment is exceptional. Various mechanisms have been implicated including nerve compression secondary to rhabdomyolysis, nerve ischemia due to hypoxia and direct nerve toxicity of carbon monoxide. Prognosis is commonly excellent without any sequelae.

  7. A case study and literature review of surgical treatment for brachial plexus pain caused by Pancoast syndrome

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    Xian Hang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus-associated intractable pain caused by Pancoast syndrome, along with the associated literature review, based on a patient we attended to in April 2011. A full examination was performed after his admission, and neurolysis was conducted on the right brachial plexus of lower trunk. Follow-ups and treatment evaluations were carried out 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after the initial neurolysis procedure, which was followed by a radiation therapy two months later. The patient’s pain symptoms were relieved and he partially regained sense awareness and movement of his right hand. We found that early clinical manifestations of Pancoast syndrome are atypical and are sometimes difficult to detect. It is very similar to brachial plexus injury-related pain, and the patient must be referred to an orthopaedics or hand surgery specialist for treatment. Therefore, improving medical practitioners’ general understanding of this disease is essential in order to avoid potential misdiagnoses.

  8. Bilateral brachial plexus injury following acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani, Mounia; Belaidi, Halima; Benabdeljlil, Maria; Bouchhab, Wafa; El Jazouli, Nadia; El Brini, Asmae; Aidi, Saadia; Ouazzani, Reda M; El Alaoui Faris, Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is a leading cause of severe neuropsychological impairments. Peripheral nerve injury has rarely been reported. It consists usually in a demyelinating polyneuropathy or mononeuropathy affecting mainly the lower limbs. Isolated involvement of both upper extremities has been described in only 4 patients related to root damage. We report the first case of bilateral brachial plexus injury following CO poisoning and review all previous CO-induced neuropa...

  9. hoarseness and Horner's after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to compressive effects on the axillary fascial sheath. However, further studies are required to prove this. Keywords: combined incidence, Horner's syndrome, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Introduction. Supraclavicular block is performed at the level of divisions of the brachial plexus.

  10. Muscle and joint sequelae in brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnisveld, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury is caused by traction on the brachial plexus during delivery or due to a high-energy road traffic accident in young adults. Muscle denervation and subsequent muscle degeneration results in functional limitations of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand including contractures

  11. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pattern and prevalence of variations that occur in the supraclavicular part of the brachial plexus in a. Kenyan population. Study design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Materials and methods: Ninety-four brachial plexuses from forty-seven formalin fixed cadavers were displayed by gross

  12. Brachial plexus lesions: Anatomical knowledge as an essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical examination showed paralysis of all terminal nerves of the brachial plexus and the collateral branches of both anterior and posterior brachial plexus. The second patient showed paralysis of all muscles of the shoulder and muscles of the anterior compartment of the arm. This clinical feature is in accordance of the ...

  13. Clinical outcome of shoulder muscle transfer for shoulder deformities in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: A study of 150 cases

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    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Residual muscle weakness, cross-innervation (caused by misdirected regenerating axons, and muscular imbalance are the main causes of internal rotation contractures leading to limitation of shoulder joint movement, glenoid dysplasia, and deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Muscle transfers and release of antagonistic muscles improve range of motion as well as halt or reverse the deterioration in the bony architecture of the shoulder joint. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of shoulder muscle transfer for shoulder abnormalities in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients of obstetric brachial plexus palsy with shoulder deformity underwent shoulder muscle transfer along with anterior shoulder release at our institutions from 1999 to 2007. Shoulder function was assessed both preoperatively and postoperatively using aggregate modified Mallet score and active and passive range of motion. The mean duration of follow-up was 4 years (2.5-8 years. Results: The mean preoperative abduction was 45° ± 7.12, mean passive external rotation was 10° ± 6.79, the mean active external rotation was 0°, and the mean aggregate modified Mallet score was 11.2 ± 1.41. At a mean follow-up of 4 years (2.5-8 years, the mean active abduction was 120° ± 18.01, the mean passive external rotation was 80° ± 10.26, while the mean active external rotation was 45° ± 3.84. The mean aggregate modified Mallet score was 19.2 ± 1.66. Conclusions: This procedure can thus be seen as a very effective tool to treat internal rotation and adduction contractures, achieve functional active abduction and external rotation, as well as possibly prevent glenohumeral dysplasia, though the long-term effects of this procedure may still have to be studied in detail clinico-radiologically to confirm this hypothesis. Level of evidence: Therapeutic level IV

  14. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  15. Axillary nerve neurotization with the anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose; Rajmohan, Bennet

    2012-09-01

    Combined neurotization of both axillary and suprascapular nerves in shoulder reanimation has been widely accepted in brachial plexus injuries, and the functional outcome is much superior to single nerve transfer. This study describes the surgical anatomy for axillary nerve relative to the available donor nerves and emphasize the salient technical aspects of anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries. Fifteen patients with brachial plexus injury who had axillary nerve neurotizations were evaluated. Five patients had complete avulsion, 9 patients had C5, six patients had brachial plexus injury pattern, and one patient had combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The long head of triceps branch was the donor in C5,6 injuries; nerve to brachialis in combined nerve injury and intercostals for C5-T1 avulsion injuries. All these donors were identified through the anterior approach, and the nerve transfer was done. The recovery of deltoid was found excellent (M5) in C5,6 brachial plexus injuries with an average of 134.4° abduction at follow up of average 34.6 months. The shoulder recovery was good with 130° abduction in a case of combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The deltoid recovery was good (M3) in C5-T1 avulsion injuries patients with an average of 64° shoulder abduction at follow up of 35 months. We believe that anterior approach is simple and easy for all axillary nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comparison of Two Techniques of Brachial Plexus Block for Upper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared trans-arterial approach and mid-humeral technique of axillary brachial plexus block in terms of the clinical benefit of each method; adequacy of block, onset of sensory and motor block, duration of block and complications. .In a prospective randomized study, axillary plexus block was carried out in 50 ...

  17. Are all brachial plexus injuries caused by shoulder dystocia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouchtsis, Stergios K; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam

    2009-09-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), is an injury of the brachial plexus at childbirth affecting the nerve roots of C5-6 (Erb-Duchenne palsy-nearly 80% of cases) or less frequently the C8-T1 nerve roots (Klumpke palsy). OBPP often has medicolegal implications. In the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland the incidence is 0.42, in the United States 1.5, and in other western countries 1 to 3 per 1000 live births. Most infants with OBPP have no known risk factors. Shoulder dystocia increases the risk for OBPP 100-fold. The reported incidence of OBPP after shoulder dystocia varies widely from 4% to 40%. Other risk factors include birth weight >4 kg, maternal diabetes mellitus, obesity or excessive weight gain, prolonged pregnancy, prolonged second stage of labor, persistent fetal malposition, operative delivery, and breech extraction of a small baby. OBPP after caesarean section accounts for 1% to 4% of cases. Historically, OBPPs have been considered to result from excessive lateral traction and forceful deviation of the fetal head from the axial plane of the fetal body, usually in association with shoulder dystocia, which increases the necessary applied peak force and time to deliver the fetal shoulders. Direct compression of the fetal shoulder on the symphysis pubis may also cause injury. However a significant proportion of OBPPs occurs in utero, as according to some studies more than half of the cases are not associated with shoulder dystocia. Possible mechanisms of intrauterine injury include the endogenous propulsive forces of labor, intrauterine maladaptation, or failure of the shoulders to rotate, and impaction of the posterior shoulder behind the sacral promontory. Uterine anomalies, such as fibroids, an intrauterine septum, or a bicornuate uterus may also result in OBPP. It is not possible to reliably predict which fetuses will experience OBPP. Future research should be directed in prospective evaluation of the mechanisms of injury, to enable

  18. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  19. Oberlin transfer and partial radial to axillary nerve neurotization to repair an explosive traumatic injury to the brachial plexus in a child: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph H; Garber, Sarah T; McCormick, Don E; Eskandari, Ramin; Walker, Marion L; Rizk, Elias; Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C

    2013-11-01

    Explosive injuries to the pediatric brachial plexus are exceedingly rare and as such are poorly characterized in the medical literature. Herein, we describe an 8-year-old who was struck in the neck by a piece of shrapnel and suffered multiple vascular injuries in addition to a suspected avulsion of the cervical 5 and 6 ventral rami. The patient had a complete upper brachial plexus palsy and failed to demonstrate any clinical improvement at 6-months follow-up. He was taken to the operating from for a partial ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve neurotization as well as a partial radial to axillary nerve neurotization. The patient's motor exam improved from a Medical Research Council scale 1 to 4+ for biceps brachii and 0 to 4 deltoid function with greater than 90° of shoulder abduction. This outcome supports complex neurotization techniques as viable treatment options for persistent motor deficits following an upper brachial plexus injury in older, non-infant age, children.

  20. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

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    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  1. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  2. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia.

  3. Can bilateral bronchospasm be a sign of unilateral phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks facilitate ambulatory anesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Unilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common complication after interscalene brachial plexus block, rather than the supraclavicular block. We report a case of severe respiratory distress and bilateral bronchospasm following ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patient did not have clinical features of pneumothorax or drug allergy and was managed with oxygen therapy and salbutamol nebulization. Chest X-ray revealed elevated right hemidiaphragm confirming unilateral phrenic nerve paresis.

  4. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  5. Use Of Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Facilitates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report the successful use of continuous axillary brachial plexus block in the assessment of muscle functions during tendon repair. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife between November 2006 and December 2007. The study included ...

  6. Obstetrical brachial plexus injuries: incidence, natural course and shoulder contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, A. F.; Wolf, H.; Oei, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) was investigated and the natural course of this disorder and the frequency of shoulder contracture described. Between 1988 and 1997 13,366 children with a gestational age of 30 weeks or more, were born at the Academic Medical Center,

  7. Anatomical variations of the brachial plexus terminal branches in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical variations are clinically significant, but many are inadequately described or quantified. Variations in anatomy of the brachial plexus are important to surgeons and anesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. It is also important for radiologists who interpret plain and ...

  8. Ultrasound of the cervical roots and brachial plexus in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Semmekrot, B.; Meulstee, J.; Verrips, A.; Alfen, N. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this exploratory study we investigated whether ultrasound can visualize the neonatal cervical roots and brachial plexus. METHODS: In 12 healthy neonates <2 days old, the neck region was studied unilaterally with ultrasound using a small-footprint 15-7-MHz transducer. RESULTS: The

  9. Brachial Plexus Blocks for Upper Extremity Surgeries in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Different techniques of brachial plexus blocks are in use to provide surgical anaesthesia from the shoulder to the fingertips. However, they are perceived as time-consuming and unreliable as the sole anaesthetic for surgical procedures. Until recently (July 2008), only general anaesthesia was employed in our ...

  10. Results of latissimus dorsi transfer in obstetrical brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, E.O.; Fortuin, S.; Winters, H.A.H.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.; Sluijs, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on 9 patients with obstetrical brachial plexus injury who underwent a latissimus dorsi (LD) transfer to reconstruct external rotation of the upper extremity. Transfer of the LD to the rotator cuff is widely used for restoring shoulder abduction and external rotation in patients

  11. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anomalous origin of some trunks and unusual communications have also been noted in some studies (3,8-11). Apart from causing confusion in the assessment of upper limb nerve injuries, these anatomical variations can be responsible for failure of some brachial plexus nerve blocks or complications following these blocks.

  12. brachial plexus blocks for upper extremity surgeries in a nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... A. RUKEWE, A. FATIREGUN, O. P. A. ARIKAWE and T. O. ALONGE. ABSTRACT. Background: Different techniques of brachial plexus blocks are in use to provide surgical anaesthesia from the shoulder to the fingertips. However, they are perceived as time-consuming and unreliable as the sole anaesthetic ...

  13. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  14. Recent advances in the management of brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Singh Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of brachial plexus injury is a demanding field of hand and upper extremity surgery. With currently available microsurgical techniques, functional gains are rewarding in upper plexus injuries. However, treatment options in the management of flail and anaesthetic limb are still evolving. Last three decades have witnessed significant developments in the management of these injuries, which include a better understanding of the anatomy, advances in the diagnostic modalities, incorporation of intra-operative nerve stimulation techniques, more liberal use of nerve grafts in bridging nerve gaps, and the addition of new nerve transfers, which selectively neurotise the target muscles close to the motor end plates. Newer research works on the use of nerve allografts and immune modulators (FK 506 are under evaluation in further improving the results in nerve reconstruction. Direct reimplantation of avulsed spinal nerve roots into the spinal cord is another area of research in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  15. Sex-related macrostructural organization of the deer's brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, S R; Gonçalves, A F N; de Castro Sasahara, T H; Fioretto, E T; Gerbasi, S H; Machado, M R F; Guimarães, G C; Ribeiro, A A C M

    2007-08-01

    We describe the morphological organization of the deer brachial plexus in order to supply data to veterinary neuroclinics and anaesthesiology. The deer (Mazama gouazoubira) brachial plexus is composed of four roots: three cervical (C6, C7 and C8) and one thoracic (T1). Within each sex group, no variations are observed between the left and the right brachial plexus, though sex-related differences are seen especially in its origin. The origin of axillary and radial nerves was: C6, C7, C8 and T1 in males and C8-T1 (radial nerve) and C7, C8 and T1 (axillary nerve) in females; musculocutaneous nerve was: C6-C7 (males) and C8-T1 (females); median and ulnar nerves was: C8-T1 (males) and T1 (females); long thoracic nerve was: C7 (males) and T1 (females); lateral thoracic nerve was: C6, C7, C8 and T1 (males) and T1 (females); thoracodorsal nerve was: C6, C7, C8 and T1 (males) and C8-T1 (females); suprascapular nerve was: C6-C7 (males) and C6 (females) and subscapular nerve was: C6-C7 (males) and C7 (females). This study suggests that in male deer the origin of the brachial plexus is more cranial than in females and the origin of the brachial plexus is slightly more complex in males, i.e. there is an additional number of roots (from one to three). This sexual dimorphism may be related to specific biomechanical functions of the thoracic limb and electrophysiological studies may be needed to shed light on this morphological feature.

  16. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  17. Brachial plexus compression due to subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm from internal jugular vein catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T N Mol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein (IJV catheterization has become the preferred approach for temporary vascular access for hemodialysis. However, complications such as internal carotid artery puncture, vessel erosion, thrombosis, and infection may occur. We report a case of brachial plexus palsy due to compression by right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm as a result of IJV catheterization in a patient who was under maintenance hemodialysis.

  18. Radiation-included brachial plexus injury; Follow-up of two different fractionation schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, S.; Cooke, J.; Parsons, C. (Royal Marsden Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-07-01

    All 449 breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy to the breast and lymph nodes between 1982 and 1984 have been followed for 3-5.5 years. In this group two different fractionation schedules were used, one five times a fortnight and one daily, both over 6 weeks. The calculated dose to the brachial plexus was 45 Gy in 15 fractions or 5e Gy in 30 fractions. These schedules are equivalent doses using the standard NSD formula. The diagnosis of a brachial plexus injury was made clinically and computed tomography from recurrent disease. The actuarial incidence of a radiation-induced brachial plexus injury for the whole group was 4.9% at 5.5 years. No cases were seen in the first 10 months following radiotherapy. The incidence rises between 1 and 4 years and then starts to plateau. When the large fraction size group is compared with the small fraction size group the incidence at 5.5 years is 5.9% and 1.0%, respectively (p 0.09). Two different treatment techniques were used in this group but were not found to contribute to the probability of developing a brachial plexud injury. It is suggested that radiation using large doses per fraction are less well tolerated by the brachial plexus than small doses per fraction; a commonly used fractionation schedule such as 45 Gy in 15 fractions may give unacceptably high brachial plexus morbidity; and the of small doses per fraction or avoiding lymphatic irradiation is advocated. (author). 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab.

  19. Addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir

    2017-06-26

    Research is ongoing to determine the lowest dose of local anesthetics in brachial plexus block that provides adequate anesthesia and postoperative analgesia and reduces complications related to local anesthetics. Patients 18-65 years of age who underwent upper limb surgery and who received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block at the Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine Hospital between February 2014 and January 2015 were included in the study (n=50). Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks were performed on Group B cases by adding 30 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and on Group BD cases by adding 15 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and 1 µg / kg dexmedetomidine. Block success was evaluated by the onset and block duration of motor and sensory block and the duration of analgesia. The block success of Group B and Group BD was 92.6% and 89.3%, respectively (P = 1.000). Onset time of sensory block, degree of sensory block, duration of sensory block, onset time of motor block, degree of motor block and duration of motor block were similar in both groups in the intergroup comparison (P > 0.05). Duration of analgesia and the operative conditions of groups were similar (P > 0.05). In the implementation of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block, block success, sensory and motor block and analgesia duration were similar for patients anaesthetized with 30 ml of bupivacaine in comparison with dexmedetomidine+bupivacaine (when the bupivacaine dose was reduced by 50% by the addition of the adjuvant).

  20. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system due to brachial plexus injury: a case report; Siderose superficial do sistema nervoso central por lesao do plexo braquial: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setogutti, Enio Tadashi; Cassuriaga, Jefferson; Valduga, Simone Gianella [Fundacao Universitaria de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Cardiologia. Setor de Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mails: pesquisa@cardiologia.org.br; editoracao-pc@cardiologia.org.br; Lorenzzoni, Pablo Longhi; Severgnini, Giancarlo Muraro [Fundacao Universitaria de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Cardiologia; Feldman, Carlos Jader [Fundacao Universitaria de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Cardiologia. Setor de Radiologia

    2005-10-15

    Superficial siderosis can be caused by hemosiderin deposition o the leptomeninges and subpial layers of the neuro-axis due to recurrent subarachnoid haemorrhage. Probable intrathecal bleeding sites must be investigated. In ut t 50% of the patients the bleeding source may be identified and the progression of the disease can be interrupted. In this study, the authors present a case of superficial siderosis of the central nervous system developed two decades after a traumatic lesion of the brachial plexus.(author)

  1. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  2. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, MCB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk. PMID:23716772

  3. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  4. The usefulness of MR myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Yukio; Niitsu, Mamoru

    2002-01-01

    Myelography has been the most popular and reliable method for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury. However, it is invasive because it requires the use of contrast medium, dural puncture and exposure to radiation. In addition, it has a fault. When a nerve rootlet is not filled with contrast medium, it is impossible to evaluate it. It has sometimes been a problem in the injury to upper roots. Recently, MRI also has been used for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. But it was not until recently that it has had a high resolution to detect affected nerve rootlets. We have used MR myelography with high resolution for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of it. MR myelography was preoperatively performed in 14 cases, consisting of 13 traumatic brachial plexus injuries and an obstetrical palsy. In them, 12 cases had root avulsion injuries and 2 cases had infraclavicular injuries. A 1.5 Tesla MR system (Philips) and a cervical coil were used. Coronal sections with 2 mm-overcontiguous thickness were obtained by heavily T2-weighted sequence fast spin echo (TR/TE=3000/450). The fat signal was suppressed by a presaturation inversion-pulse. The scanning time was about five minutes. The three-dimensional image was reconstructed by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. MIP images and individual coronal images were used for evaluation for root avulsion. In evaluation the shape of a nerve sleeve and nerve rootlets was compared on both sides. The abnormal shape of a nerve sleeve or the defect of nerve rootlets was diagnosed as root avulsion. The brachial plexus lesions were exposed operatively and examined with electrophysiologic methods (SEP and/or ESCP) in all cases. Operative findings were compared with MR myelography. Twenty-four roots had been diagnosed as normal and 46 roots had been diagnosed as root avulsion with MR myelography preoperatively. In the former only one root was

  5. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  6. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, J.A.; Beckerman, H.; de Groot, V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Method: Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the

  7. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Moayeri, N.; Bruhn, J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Chan, V.W.; Groen, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  8. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  9. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  10. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  11. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the...

  13. The importance of a double team in brachial plexus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubier, J-N; Teboul, F; Khalifa, H

    2010-06-01

    Brachial plexus surgery constitutes a long and complex procedure. The aim of our study is to assess the interest of having a double operating team throughout the duration of this surgery. Seventeen patients with brachial plexus palsy underwent surgery operated by a double team. The operating time corresponding to each step of the procedure and the total operating time were measured for each patient. The separate values were added so as to obtain a simulation of the total duration value for a single surgeon. The operative time of this virtual group of patients (Group I) was compared to that of the real group operated by the double team (Group II). Both values were compared to assess any statistical significance. The mean operating time was 259 min with surgery operated by a double team and 371 min in the group I, a difference found to be statistically significant (pteam versus 132 min in the group I (pteam allows the reduction of the operating time and thus minimizes the drawbacks associated with lengthy surgery such as perioperative bleeding and infection. Microsurgical suturing which is the crucial part of the surgery is easier when performed at the end of a shortened intervention and shared by two senior surgeons with, subsequently, less fatigue. This new organization that improves the operating conditions guarantees best results. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Traumatic Pseudoaneurysm of Axillary Artery Combined with Brachial Plexus Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Peng, Feng; Wang, Tao; Chen, Desong; Yang, Jianyun

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the axillary artery combined with brachial plexus injury is extremely rare. The factors that influence the symptoms and functional recovery related to this condition are unclear. Nine patients who had sustained this trauma were surgically treated at our unit between June 1999 and November 2010. The cause of trauma, symptoms, signs and examinations of neurological and vascular deficits, and the surgical findings of the involved nerves and vessels were recorded in detail. The functional recovery of vessels and nerves, as well as the extent of pain, were evaluated, respectively. The average length of patient follow-up was 4.5 years (range, 24 months to 11.3 years). After vessel repair, whether by endovascular or operative treatment, the distending, constant, and pulsating pain was relieved in all patients. Furthermore, examination of the radial artery pulse on the repaired side appeared normal at last follow-up. All patients showed satisfactory sensory recovery, with motor recovery rated as good in five patients and fair in four patients. The symptom characteristics varied with the location of the damage to the axillary artery. Ultrasound examination and computed tomography angiography are useful to evaluate vascular injury and provide valuable information for operative planning. Surgical exploration is an effective therapy with results related to the nerve injury condition of the brachial plexus. PMID:25412426

  15. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of axillary artery combined with brachial plexus injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the axillary artery combined with brachial plexus injury is extremely rare. The factors that influence the symptoms and functional recovery related to this condition are unclear. Nine patients who had sustained this trauma were surgically treated at our unit between June 1999 and November 2010. The cause of trauma, symptoms, signs and examinations of neurological and vascular deficits, and the surgical findings of the involved nerves and vessels were recorded in detail. The functional recovery of vessels and nerves, as well as the extent of pain, were evaluated, respectively. The average length of patient follow-up was 4.5 years (range, 24 months to 11.3 years. After vessel repair, whether by endovascular or operative treatment, the distending, constant, and pulsating pain was relieved in all patients. Furthermore, examination of the radial artery pulse on the repaired side appeared normal at last follow-up. All patients showed satisfactory sensory recovery, with motor recovery rated as good in five patients and fair in four patients. The symptom characteristics varied with the location of the damage to the axillary artery. Ultrasound examination and computed tomography angiography are useful to evaluate vascular injury and provide valuable information for operative planning. Surgical exploration is an effective therapy with results related to the nerve injury condition of the brachial plexus.

  16. Visuospatial ability and novice brachial plexus sonography performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duce, N A; Gillett, L; Descallar, J; Tran, M T; Siu, S C M; Chuan, A

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge on the type and influence of visuospatial ability on sonography performance relevant for ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia remains incomplete. The aim of this study was to determine whether four different factors of visuospatial ability are important in determining proficiency and procedure time of novices performing brachial plexus sonography. These factors were spatial visualisation, flexibility of closure, spatial relations and speed of closure. Thirty-three ultrasound novices were recruited in this prospective, observational trial. Five cognitive tests, from a standardised battery that assesses all four visuospatial factors, were administered to each participant at the start of the study. Each novice then performed brachial plexus sonography on a human model at baseline and final exams, separated by a discovery learning session. Novices were examined in their sonography performance by blinded assessors who scored proficiency, technique, image quality, and time taken to perform at both baseline and final scans. Novices with intermediate and high visuospatial ability in spatial visualisation, spatial relations and speed of closure were significantly more proficient and efficient compared with their peers stratified into low-ability cohorts (P Visuospatial ability testing can identify novices who will require extra assistance in learning ultrasound relevant for regional anaesthesia. ( Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry 12614000819628). © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case demonstrates an excellent result of an Oberlin's nerve transfer for restoration of flexion of the elbow joint in Erb's birth palsy. However, at this time partial ulnar nerve transfer for Erb's birth palsy is an optional procedure; a larger number of cases will need to be studied for it to be widely accepted as a standard procedure for Erb's palsy at birth.

  18. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  19. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  20. [Free functional gracilis muscle transplantation for reconstruction of active elbow flexion in posttraumatic brachial plexus lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Alfred; Hierner, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Reconstruction of powerful active elbow flexion. Reconstruction of missing muscle unit by neurovascular pedicled functional muscle transplantation. Treatment of last choice for --secondary reconstruction of active elbow flexion in case of complete lesion of the brachial plexus or musculocutaneous nerve (M0 muscle function = replacement indication), partial but incomplete lesion of the brachial plexus or musculocutaneous nerve (M1-(3) muscle function = augmentation indication); --replacement of the elbow flexor muscles in case of primary muscle loss (tumor, trauma). Concomitant lesions of the axillary artery. No adequate donor nerve. Relative: no sensibility at all at the forearm and hand. Free functional biarticular myocutaneous transplantation of gracilis muscle. A myocutaneous gracilis flap is raised at the thigh. At the upper arm the flap is fixed proximally to the coracoid process or the lateral clavicle. The distal insertion is sutured to the distal biceps tendon. Vascular anastomoses are carried out in end-to-side fashion with the brachial artery and vein. Nerval coaptation is done in end-to-end technique using the muculocutaneous nerve. Complete immobilization for 6 weeks. Dorsal upper arm splint until sufficient muscle power (M(4)). Progressive increase of active range of motion for another 6 weeks. Continuation of physiotherapy for 12-18 months. Postoperative standardized compression therapy, combined with scar therapy (silicone sheet). Functionally useful results can be expected in 60-75% of patients, especially if there is some residual function (M1 or M2) left ("augmentation indication"). Early free functional muscle transplantation shows best results in patients with direct muscle defect, because all vascular and neuronal structures are still available, and no secondary changes such as fibrosis or joint stiffness are present yet. There are inconsistent results for patients with neurologic insufficiency (i.e., total brachial plexus palsy) or mixed

  1. Influence of arm position on ultrasound visibility of the axillary brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frkovic, Vedran; Ward, Catherine; Preckel, Benedikt; Lirk, Phillip; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Wegener, Jessica T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contemporary axillary brachial plexus block is performed by separate injections targeting radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerve. These nerves are arranged around the axillary artery, making ultrasound visualisation sometimes challenging. In particular, the radial nerve can be

  2. Medical and legal issues related to brachial plexus injuries in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAbee, Gary N; Ciervo, Carman

    2006-04-01

    Injuries to the brachial plexus in neonates present a malpractice dilemma not only for physicians who provide obstetric care, but also for those who administer immediate postnatal treatment for newborns who have these injuries and comorbid medical conditions. Although trauma remains the probable etiology for many brachial plexus injuries, other, nontraumatic etiologies need to be considered. The authors review current medical and legal principles related to brachial plexus injuries-principles that are of concern to all practitioners who provide obstetric and newborn care. They also make a number of recommendations for practitioners to reduce the risk of malpractice lawsuits related to these injuries. Among these recommendations are increasing one's awareness of nontraumatic origins; making sure that appropriate testing (eg, electromyography) is performed for infants whose conditions fail to improve within several months after birth; and taking a proactive role in discussing brachial plexus injuries with patients' families.

  3. The level and influencing factors of quality of life in patients with brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shen

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: A brachial plexus injury significantly compromises an individual's quality of life. Multiple factors influence this quality, which should be targeted to augment the physical and psychological care provided.

  4. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  5. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  6. Karakteristik dan Faktor Risiko Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy pada Bayi Baru Lahir

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Vincent Handoyo; Yoyos Dias Ismiarto

    2010-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) is an injury of entire or part of brachial plexus correlated with delivery process. Incidence in developing countries is around 0.15%. Risk factors include intrapartum and intrauterine. Three types of OBPP are Duchenne Erb, Klumpke, and whole arm palsy. This was a retrospective study of characteristic and risk factors of OBPP in Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, period January 2002-April 2007. Data were collected from perinatology ward medical records, ...

  7. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Minko Minkov; Maria Vankova; Radoslav Minkov; Stefaniya Terzieva; Toni Dimitrov; Iskren Velikov

    2012-01-01

    A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the c...

  8. Comparison between isotropic linear-elastic law and isotropic hyperelastic law in the finite element modeling of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruisseau-Carrier, A; Bahlouli, N; Bierry, G; Vernet, P; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    Augmented reality could help the identification of nerve structures in brachial plexus surgery. The goal of this study was to determine which law of mechanical behavior was more adapted by comparing the results of Hooke's isotropic linear elastic law to those of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic law, applied to a biomechanical model of the brachial plexus. A model of finite elements was created using the ABAQUS ® from a 3D model of the brachial plexus acquired by segmentation and meshing of MRI images at 0°, 45° and 135° of shoulder abduction of a healthy subject. The offset between the reconstructed model and the deformed model was evaluated quantitatively by the Hausdorff distance and qualitatively by the identification of 3 anatomical landmarks. In every case the Hausdorff distance was shorter with Ogden's law compared to Hooke's law. On a qualitative aspect, the model deformed by Ogden's law followed the concavity of the reconstructed model whereas the model deformed by Hooke's law remained convex. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that the behavior of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic mechanical model was more adapted to the modeling of the deformations of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Geannette, Christian; Sneag, Darryl B.; Wolfe, Scott W.; Feinberg, Joseph H.

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed - and consequently scar tethered - the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy. (orig.)

  10. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Susan C.; Geannette, Christian; Sneag, Darryl B. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Wolfe, Scott W. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Hand and Upper Extremity, Department of Orthopedics, New York, NY (United States); Feinberg, Joseph H. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed - and consequently scar tethered - the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy. (orig.)

  11. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan C; Geannette, Christian; Wolfe, Scott W; Feinberg, Joseph H; Sneag, Darryl B

    2017-08-01

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed-and consequently scar tethered-the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy.

  12. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  13. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  14. Three-tesla magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus in cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    There have been no reports of the use of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (3T MRN) to characterize cervical radiculopathy. In particular, there are no reports of MRN of brachial plexus involvement in patients with cervical radiculopathy. We reviewed retrospectively 12 consecutive patients with cervical radiculopathy who underwent 3T MRN. The median age was 54.5 years. Eleven of 12 patients were men. The distribution of nerve-root signal abnormality was correlated with intervertebral foraminal stenosis and the presence of muscles that exhibited weakness and/or signs of denervation on electromyography. MRN abnormalities were found to extend into the distal part of the brachial plexus in 10 patients. This study demonstrates that MRN is potentially useful for diagnosis in patients with suspected cervical radiculopathy. Moreover, the finding of brachial plexus involvement on MRN may indicate a possible pathophysiological relationship between cervical radiculopathy and brachial plexopathy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  16. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Rehabilitation of patients following traction lesions of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn Parry, C B

    1984-01-01

    The management of patients with brachial plexus lesions requires a multidisciplinary approach. We insist on admission to our rehabilitation ward for a full assessment by the physiotherapist, occupational therapist, rehabilitation officer, and social worker when necessary. We confirm the diagnosis by clinical, electrophysiologic, and radiologic techniques and set out a plan of action, either involving definitive surgery or a conservative program involving functional splintage, relief of pain when possible, and return to work. We insist on regular follow-ups to check that the pain is still being relieved. At subsequent reviews it may become clear that spontaneous recovery is not going to occur, and a program of reconstructive surgery can be instituted. In general terms, three years or more should have elapsed before accepting that elbow flexion is not going to return. In patients with C5-C6 lesions, where elbow flexion is permanently paralyzed, the simple elbow lock splint may be perfectly satisfactory, but in some patients it may be wise to advise reconstructive procedure. In our experience the most satisfactory means of restoring elbow flexion is the Steindler flexor plasty, advancing the origins of the extensors and flexors of the forearm up the humerus. If present, latissimus dorsi can be transferred to replace the biceps. The pectoralis major transfer is useful but almost always requires an external rotation osteotomy, as there is too much adduction when the patient flexes the elbow. Finally, triceps can be transferred to biceps, but this is an operation that we do not like, as elbow extension is so useful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [Treatment of residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with tendon transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, Mehmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Uysal, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the results of the correction of adduction and internal rotation deformities of the shoulder associated with residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) by the transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff. In order to correct adduction and internal rotation deformities associated with residual OBPP, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females; mean age 8.1 years; range 4 to 19 years) underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff and lengthening of the pectoralis major tendon with Z-plasty. The right and left extremities were affected in seven and three patients, respectively. Involvement of the C5-C6 nerve roots was detected in four, and C5-C6-C7 nerve roots in six patients. In two patients with a positive Putti sign, axillary roentgenograms showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and magnetic resonance and computed tomography scans revealed type III glenohumeral deformity. Functional evaluations were made using a 5-point scoring system proposed by Mallet. The mean follow-up was 23.6 months (range 5 to 42 months). Postoperatively, the mean abduction and external rotation were 134.5 degrees (range 95 degrees to 170 degrees ) and 70 degrees (range 45 degrees to 90 degrees ), respectively. The mean global abduction score was 4, external rotation score was 4.2, and the scores assigned to the ability to move hand to the neck and mouth were 3.5. Of two patients with type III glenohumeral deformity, whose ages were four and 19 years, abduction and external rotation were 150 degrees and 45 degrees in the former, 135 degrees and 70 degrees in the latter, respectively. The transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons is a necessary procedure to restore external rotation and abduction functions of paralysed shoulders. Compared to other techniques employed, it offers obvious advantages in terms of ease and cost, as well.

  19. Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; Pijl, A. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain due to tumor growth near the brachial plexus is often treated with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and oral or transdermal opioids. We propose placement of a catheter along the brachial plexus using a

  20. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  1. Brachial plexus neuropathy - a rare manifestation of osteoarticular infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moutinho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial palsy is a rare condition beyond the neonatal period. Usually it is caused by physical mechanisms, but may be related with osteo-articular infections. There are few cases describing the association between these infections and true nerve paralysis. On the other hand, pseudo-paralysis or apparent weakness of a limb associated with septic arthritis or osteomyelitis is a well-documented phenomenon Case Report: We describe three cases of osteoarticular infection manifested by flaccid limb paralysis without the typical systemic signs of infection. The timing of rcognition differed among the cases, as well as the therapeutic interventions and the outcome. Discussion: Osteo-articular infections may go unrecognized in infancy. We highlight this rare manifestation of osteo-articular infection to avoid the delay in diagnosis and associated sequelae.

  2. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  3. Successful Outcome of Triangle Tilt as Revision Surgery in a Pediatric Obstetric Brachial Plexus Patient with Multiple Previous Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul K. Nath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI occurs during the process of labor and childbirth. OBPI has been reported to be associated with shoulder dystocia, macrosomia, and breech delivery. Its occurrence in uncomplicated delivery is possible as well. Case Presentation. The patient in the present report is a 6.5-year-old girl, who suffered a severe brachial plexus injury at birth and had many reconstructive surgical procedures at an outside brachial plexus center before presenting to us. Discussion. The traditional surgical treatments by other surgical groups were unsuccessful and therefore the patient came to our clinic for further treatment. She had triangle tilt surgery with us, as a salvage procedure. Conclusion. The OBPI patient in this study clearly showed noticeable clinical and functional improvements after triangle tilt surgical management. The posture of the arm at rest was greatly improved to a more normal position, and hand to mouth movement was improved as well. Triangle tilt surgery should be conducted as a first choice treatment for medial rotation contracture of the shoulder in OBPI patients.

  4. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus–associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6–135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus–associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose–response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  5. Preoperative diagnosis of tumors of the brachial plexus by use of computed tomography in three dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, R.J.; Feeney, D.A.; Lipowitz, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Three dogs with forelimb lameness of 3 months' to 1 year's duration were examined by computed tomography and determined to have a tumor of the brachial plexus. In each case, the clinician had been unable to determine the cause of lameness by other means, and in 2 dogs, surgery had been performed on the affected limb for unrelated conditions prior to diagnosis of the tumor. Computed tomography was performed by use of a third-generation scanner, with dogs under general anesthesia and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Intravenous contrast enhancement with iodinated contrast material was used to help differentiate vascular structures, and a 5-mm scanning width allowed detection of small tumors. In all dogs, approximate tumor location in the transverse plane, invasiveness, and relationship to surrounding structures compared favorably between computed tomographic images and surgical findings

  6. C8 cross transfer for the treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Carozzo, Claude; Thibaut, Jean-Laurent; Escriou, Catherine; Hidalgo, Antoine; Blot, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical nerve 8 cross-transfer technique (C8CT) as a part of surgical treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) in the dog. Case series. Client-owned dogs suspected to have caudal BPA based on neurological examination and electrophysiological testing (n = 3). The distal stump of the surgically transected contralateral C8 ventral branch (donor) was bridged to the proximal stump of the avulsed C8 ventral branch (recipient) and secured with 9-0 polypropylene suture under an operating microscope. A carpal panarthrodesis was performed on the injured limb after C8CT. Surgical exploration confirmed avulsion of nerve roots C7, C8, and T1 in all cases. There was no evidence of an iatrogenic effect on the donor forelimb. Gradual improvement in function of the affected forelimb occurred in all dogs, with eventual recovery of voluntary elbow extension. Reinnervation was evident in EMG recordings 6 months postoperatively in all three dogs. Stimulation of the donor C8 ventral branch led to motor evoked potentials in the avulsed side triceps brachialis and radial carpus extensor muscles. Variable functional outcome was observed in the 3 dogs during clinical evaluation 3-4 years after surgery. Digital abrasion wounds, distal interphalangeal infectious arthritis, and self-mutilation necessitated distal phalanx amputation of digits 3 and 4 in 2 dogs. C8CT provided partial reconnection of the donor C8 ventral branch to the avulsed brachial plexus in the 3 dogs of this series. Reinnervation resulted in active elbow extension and promoted functional recovery in the affected limb. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. La prise en charge de la paralysie obstétricale du plexus brachial du ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report a retrospective study obtained from the analysis of 35 medical records of children with obstetrical paralysis of brachial plexus in the out-patient department of the Yaounde Gyneco-Obstetric and paediatric Hospital within a period of three years. The clinical and epidemiological aspects were identical as in ...

  8. Luxation de l’épaule compliquée de paralysie du plexus brachial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; EL Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'une paralysie totale du plexus brachial survenue trois mois après un épisode de luxation antéro-interne sous coracoïdienne associée à une fracture du trochiter chez une patiente âgée de 88 ans. PMID:25426187

  9. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  10. Ultrasound Guided Low Approach Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Upper Limb Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Kyung; Sung, Min Ha; Suh, Hae Jin; Choi, Yun Suk

    2016-01-01

    The interscalene brachial plexus block is widely used for pain control and anesthetic purposes during shoulder arthroscopic surgeries and surgeries of the upper extremities. However, it is known that interscalene brachial plexus block is not appropriate for upper limb surgeries because it does not affect the lower trunk (C8-T1, ulnar nerve) of the brachial plexus. A low approach, ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (LISB) was performed on twenty-eight patients undergoing surgery of the upper extremities. The patients were assessed five minutes and fifteen minutes after the block for the degree of block in each nerve and muscle as well as for any complications. At five minutes and fifteen minutes after the performance of the block, the degree of the block in the ulnar nerve was found to be 2.8 ± 2.6 and 1.1 ± 1.8, respectively, based on a ten-point scale. Motor block occurred in the median nerve after fifteen minutes in 26 of the 28 patients (92.8%), and in all of the other three nerves in all 28 patients. None of the patients received additional analgesics, and none experienced complications. The present study confirmed the achievement of an appropriate sensory and motor block in the upper extremities, including the ulnar nerve, fifteen minutes after LISB, with no complications.

  11. Does the Addition of Tramadol and Ketamine to Ropivacaine Prolong the Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Can Senel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of tramadol and ketamine, 50 mg, added to ropivacaine in brachial plexus anesthesia. Methods. Thirty-six ASA physical statuses I and II patients, between 18 and 60 years of age, scheduled for forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were allocated to 3 groups. Group R received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL, group RT received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg tramadol, and group RK received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg ketamine for axillary brachial plexus block. The onset times and the duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events (nausea, vomiting, and feeling uncomfortable were recorded. Results. The onset time of sensorial block was the fastest in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of sensorial and motor block was the shortest in the ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Conclusion. We conclude that when added to brachial plexus analgesia at a dose of 50 mg, tramadol extends the onset and duration time of the block and improves the quality of postoperative analgesia without any side effects.

  12. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraiman, D.; Miranda, M.F.; Erthal, F.; Buur, P.F.; Elschot, M.; Souza, L.; Rombouts, S.A.; Schimmelpenninck, C.A.; Norris, D.G.; Malessy, M.J.; Galves, A.; Vargas, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting

  13. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  14. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  15. Shoulder muscle atrophy and its relation to strength loss in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Christelle; Sheehan, Frances T; Im, Hyun Soo; Brochard, Sylvain; Alter, Katharine E

    2017-10-01

    Treatment/prevention of shoulder muscle strength imbalances are major therapeutic goals for children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The study aims were to characterize muscle atrophy in children/adolescents with unilateral obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, to quantify the agonist-antagonist muscle volume balance and the association between muscle volume and strength. Eight boys and four girls (age=12.1, standard deviation=3.3) participated in this case-control study. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance images of both shoulders were acquired. The unimpaired shoulder served as a reference. Volumes of deltoid, pectoralis major, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, subscapularis were calculated based on 3D models, derived through image segmentation. Maximal isometric torques were collected in six directions. All the major muscles studied were significantly atrophied. The teres major demonstrated the biggest difference in atrophy between groups (51 percentage points), the pectoralis major was the least atrophied (23 percentage points). The muscle volume distribution was significantly different between shoulders. Muscle volume could predict maximal voluntary isometric torques, but the regression coefficients were weaker on the impaired side (72% to 91% of the strength could be predicted in the uninvolved side and 24% to 90% in the involved side and external rotation strength could not be predicted). This study demonstrates muscle atrophy varied across all the main shoulder muscles of the glenohumeral joint, leading to significant muscle volume imbalances. The weaker coefficients of determination on the impaired side suggest that other variables may contribute to the loss of strength in addition to atrophy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4h after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R(2): 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4h. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Secondary to Brachial Plexus Piercing Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Caldwell, Gregory; Goh, Mei; Reeder, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Structural variations of the thoracic outlet create a unique risk for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) that is difficult to diagnose clinically. Common anatomical variations in brachial plexus (BP) branching were recently discovered in which portions of the proximal plexus pierce the anterior scalene. This results in possible impingement of BP nerves within the muscle belly and, therefore, predisposition for nTOS. We hypothesized that some cases of disputed nTOS result from these BP branching variants. We tested the association between BP piercing and nTOS symptoms, and evaluated the capability of ultrasonographic identification of patients with clinically relevant variations. Eighty-two cadaveric necks were first dissected to assess BP variation frequency. In 62.1%, C5, superior trunk, or superior + middle trunks pierced the anterior scalene. Subsequently, 22 student subjects underwent screening with detailed questionnaires, provocative tests, and BP ultrasonography. Twenty-one percent demonstrated atypical BP branching anatomy on ultrasound; of these, 50% reported symptoms consistent with nTOS, significantly higher than subjects with classic BP anatomy (14%). This group, categorized as a typical TOS, would be missed by provocative testing alone. The addition of ultrasonography to nTOS diagnosis, especially for patients with BP branching variation, would allow clinicians to visualize and identify atypical patient anatomy. PMID:28677632

  18. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block for the management of inadvertent intraarterial drug administration after arterial insertion of a venous cannula during ultrasound-guided venous cannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Anne-Marie; Mislovic, Branislav

    2014-09-15

    This case report documents the inadvertent placement of an arterial cannula despite using realtime ultrasound to insert a peripheral venous cannula in a child with difficult venous access. The resultant limb ischemia was treated with an infraclavicular ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block as sympatholytic treatment.

  19. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  20. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. The role of elective amputation in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-03-01

    Despite undergoing complex brachial plexus, surgical reconstructions, and rehabilitation, some patients request an elective amputation. This study evaluates the role of elective amputation after brachial plexus injury. A retrospective chart review was performed for all the 2140 patients with brachial plexus injuries treated with elective amputation between 1999 and 2012 at a single institution. Analysis was conducted on the potential predisposing factors for amputation, amputation level, and postamputation complications. Patients were evaluated using pre- and postamputation Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and hand scores in addition to visual analog pain scores. The following three conditions were observed in all nine patients who requested an elective amputation: (1) Pan-plexus injury; (2) non-recovery (mid-humeral amputation) or elbow flexion recovery only (forearm amputation) 1 year after all other surgical options were performed; and (3) at least one chronic complication (chronic infection, nonunion fractures, full-thickness burns, chronic neck pain with arm weight, etc.). Pain improvement was found in five patients. Subjective patient assessments and visual analog pain scores before and after amputation did not show a statistically significant improvement in Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand Scores. However, four patients reported that their shoulder pain felt "better" than it did before the amputation, and two patients indicated they were completely cured of chronic pain after surgery. Elective amputation after brachial plexus injury should be considered as an option in the above circumstances. When the informed and educated decision is made, patients can have satisfactory outcomes regarding amputation. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Ultrasound guidance is the safe and effective method for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  3. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  4. Use of brachial plexus blockade and medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane anaesthesia for repair of radio-ulna fracture in an adult cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimeli, Peter; Mogoa, Eddy M; Mwangi, Willy E; Kipyegon, Ambrose N; Kirui, Gilbert; Muasya, Daniel W; Mande, John D; Kariuki, Edward; Mijele, Dominic

    2014-10-10

    Regional anaesthetic techniques have been used in combination with systemic analgesics during small animal surgery to provide multimodal analgesia. Brachial plexus nerves block using local anaesthetics provides analgesia of the thoracic limb through desensitization of the nerves that provide sensory and motor innervation. This has been shown to reduce intra-operative anesthetic requirements and provide postoperative pain relief. Decreasing the doses of general anaesthetics allows more stable cardiopulmonary function during anaesthesia and the development of less side effects. The present case reports a successful use of brachial plexus blockade to supplement medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane anaesthesia for repair of radio-ulna fracture in an adult cheetah (acinonyx jubatus). An adult male Cheetah weighing about 65 kg was presented with a history of leg carrying lameness of the left forelimb sustained following a car accident a week earlier. Clinical examination under general anaesthesia revealed slight dehydration and a swelling with a wound on the caudo-medial aspect of the left radio-ulna region. Crepitation was present on manipulation and radiography confirmed a complete transverse radio-ulna fracture of the left forelimb, which required open reduction and internal fixation. Brachial plexus blockade using lignocaine hydrochloride was used to supplement medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane anaesthesia for the surgical procedure. Isoflurane anaesthesia was maintained at 0.5 - 2.0% throughout the surgical procedure, which was uneventful. Temperature and cardio-pulmonary parameters remained stable intra-operatively. Limb paralysis extended for 5 hours post-operatively, suggesting prolonged anaesthesia. To the researchers' knowledge, this is the first reported case of the use of brachial plexus blockade to supplement general anaesthesia to facilitate forelimb surgery in an adult cheetah. The use of brachial plexus block with a light plane of general anaesthesia proved to

  5. Elective amputation of the upper limb is an option in the treatment of traumatic injuries of the brachial plexus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Mário Gilberto; Martins, Roberto Sérgio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Foroni, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of complete post-traumatic brachial plexus palsy resulting in a flail shoulder and upper extremity remains a challenge to peripheral nerve surgeons. The option of upper limb amputation is controversial and scarcely discussed in the literature. We believe that elective amputation still has a role in the treatment of select cases. The pros and cons of the procedure should be intensely discussed with the patient by a multidisciplinary team. Better outcomes are usually achieved in active patients who strongly advocate for the procedure.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in children with brachial plexus birth palsy

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    Gudinchet, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Maeder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Oberson, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Schnyder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Five patients suffering from Erb-Duchenne brachial plexus birth palsy were prospectively studied with MRI. A group of 11 healthy children was used as a control to understand the MRI anatomy of the normal growing glenohumeral joint. A hypoplastic and flattened posterior part of the glenoid fossa and a blunt posterior labrum were found in all patients. Four patients had a blunt anterior labrum and a flattened humeral head. Three patients presented with a posterior subluxation of the humeral head. These results suggest that MRI provides a non-ionising and non-invasive method of demonstrating the early abnormalities of the shoulder associated with obstetrical brachial plexus paralysis, which may prompt orthopaedic correction. (orig.)

  7. Brachial plexus injury with emphasis on axillary nerve paralysis after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Soon-Ho; Suk Choi, Matthew Seung

    2006-12-01

    Thoracic sympathicotomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with the use of 2 mm thoracoscope and instruments is a simple and safe procedure. Nerve paralysis of any type after thoracic sympathicotomy is an extremely rare event. We report a 44-year-old woman who developed brachial plexus injury of her left arm after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis. The lesion involved the whole arm. All nerves of the brachial plexus except the axillary nerve recovered quickly. An axillary nerve type lesion was observed for 7 weeks, until the patient fully recovered all functions of her arm. The mechanism is believed not to be caused by the procedure itself, but by dorsal overextension of the abducted arm during the operation.

  8. Posterior Approach for Double Nerve Transfer for Restoration of Shoulder Function in Upper Brachial Plexus Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of shoulder function is one of the most critical goals of treatment of brachial plexus injuries. Primary repair or nerve grafting of avulsion injuries of the upper brachial plexus in adults often leads to poor recovery. Nerve transfers have provided an alternative treatment with great potential for improved return of function. Many different nerves have been utilized as donor nerves for transfer to the suprascapular nerve and axillary nerve for return of shoulder function with variable results. As our knowledge of shoulder neuromuscular anatomy and physiology improves and our experience with nerve transfers increases, so evolve the specific transfer procedures. This article presents a technique and rationale for reconstructing shoulder function by transferring the distal spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve and the nerve branch to the medial head of the triceps to the axillary nerve, both through a posterior approach. PMID:18780028

  9. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  10. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Divisao de Radiologia; Dalto, Vitor Faeda, E-mail: fdalto@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao, Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Divisao de Radiologia; Crema, Michel Daoud [Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Waters, Peter M. [Orthopedic Center, Boston Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Gregio-Junior, Everaldo [Uniao Medica Radiologica Catanduva (UMERC), Catanduva, SP (Brazil); Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Ribeirao, Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and methods: we conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results: the mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6°, versus +1.6° for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion: the main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. (author)

  11. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Waters, Peter M.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and methods: we conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results: the mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6°, versus +1.6° for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion: the main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. (author)

  12. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duz Bulent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients.

  13. Ultrasound-guided retroclavicular approach infraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper extremity emergency procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftig, Josh; Mantuani, Daniel; Herring, Andrew A; Nagdev, Arun

    2017-05-01

    The America Society of Anesthesiology guidelines recommend multimodal analgesia that combines regional anesthetic techniques with pharmacotherapy to improve peri-procedural pain management and reduce opioid related complications. Commonly performed emergency procedures of the upper extremity such as fracture and dislocation reduction, wound debridement, and abscess incision and drainage are ideal candidates for ultrasound-guided (USG) regional anesthesia of the brachial plexus. However, adoption of regional anesthesia by emergency practitioners has been limited by concerns for potential complications and perceived technical difficulty. The Retroclavicular Approach to The Infraclavicular Region (RAPTIR) is a newly described USG brachial plexus block technique that optimizes sonographic needle visualization as a means of making regional anesthesia of the upper extremity safer and easier to perform. With RAPTIR a single well-visualized injection distant from key anatomic neck and thorax structures provides extensive upper extremity anesthesia, likely reducing the risk of complications such as diaphragm paralysis, central block, nerve injury, vascular puncture, and pneumothorax. Additionally, patient positioning for RAPTIR is well suited for the awake, acutely injured ED patient as the upper extremity remains adducted in a position of comfort at the patient's side. Thus, RAPTIR is a potentially ideal combination of infraclavicular targeting, excellent needle visualization, single injection, safety, comprehensive upper extremity analgesia, rapid performance, and comfortable patient positioning. Herein we present the first description of the RAPTIR utilized in the ED. Our initial experience suggests this is a promising new technique for brachial plexus regional anesthesia in the ED setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN BLUE-FRONTED PARROT (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758

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    Rayssa Marley Nóbrega da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetic procedures are commonly used in domestic and wild birds, because of its low cost and fast induction, as long as applied with great precision, which requires specific anatomical knowledge of the site of incision. This study aimed to establish the origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of the Blue-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva by anatomic dissection of the skin and musculature of 22 specimens (17 males and 5 females from the Wild Animals Screening Center of the Federal District after death by natural causes. The dissection work promoted the isolation of the forming roots of the brachial plexus, as well as its ramifications. The brachial plexus was formed by four trunks, including the ventral spinal cord rami segments from C9 to C10, C10 to C11, C11 to T1 and T1 to T2, which joined into a short common trunk, branched into dorsal and ventral cords. The thin nerves subcoracoideus and subscapularis and the branch to the scapulohumeralis muscle originated from the common trunk. The dorsal cord originated the anconeal, axillaris and radialis nerves, while the ventral cord gave origin for the pectoralis cranialis, pectoralis caudalis, coracobrachialis and medianoulnaris. These branches innervated the muscles of the extensor and flexor compartments of the forelimb, pectoral muscles and overlying skin.

  15. Risk Factors at Birth for Permanent Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury and Associated Osseous Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K.; Kumar, Nirupama; Avila, Meera B.; Nath, Devin K.; Melcher, Sonya E.; Eichhorn, Mitchell G.; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the most prevalent risk factors found in patients with permanent obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) to identify better predictors of injury. Methods. A population-based study was performed on 241 OBPI patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Results. Shoulder dystocia (97%) was the most prevalent risk factor. We found that 80% of the patients in this study were not macrosomic, and 43% weighed less than 4000 g at birth. The rate of instrument use was 41% , which is 4-fold higher than the 10% predicted for all vaginal deliveries in the United States. Posterior subluxation and glenoid version measurements in children with no finger movement at birth indicated a less severe shoulder deformity in comparison with those with finger movement. Conclusions. The average birth weight in this study was indistinguishable from the average birth weight reported for all brachial plexus injuries. Higher birth weight does not, therefore, affect the prognosis of brachial plexus injury. We found forceps/vacuum delivery to be an independent risk factor for OBPI, regardless of birth weight. Permanently injured patients with finger movement at birth develop more severe bony deformities of the shoulder than patients without finger movement. PMID:22518326

  16. A sledgehammer on the brachial plexus: thoracic outlet syndrome, subclavius posticus muscle, and traction in aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçakar, Levent; Güney, Mehmet Senol; Ozdağ, Fatih; Alay, Semih; Kiralp, Mehmet Zeki; Görür, Rauf; Saraçoğlu, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    Reported here is a 30-year-old man who was seen because of pain and weakness in the upper extremities after a tractional injury. Physical examination revealed significant atrophy in the left deltoid and right intrinsic hand muscles, generalized hypoesthesia, decreased deep tendon reflexes bilaterally, and decreased strength in various muscle groups. Roos (right) and hyperabduction (bilateral) tests were positive. Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with bilateral brachial plexopathy. Cervical radiographs showed long transverse process of C7 on the right side and a small rudimentary rib articulating with C7 on the left side. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an aberrant muscle and compressive brachial plexus injury on the left side. Surgery via transaxillary approach was performed on the left side. The occurrence of traumatic brachial plexopathy in the presence of underlying thoracic outlet syndrome and subclavius posticus muscle is discussed for the first time in the literature. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  18. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Conny; Beckerman, Heleen; Groot, Vincent de

    2015-01-01

    To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the VU University Medical Center in the past were invited to participate. Daily functioning was measured with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and the SF36, pain with VAS Pain Scales and arm-hand function with the Nine Hole Peg Test (9-HP-test) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Scores of the affected arm were compared to those of the non-affected arm or norm values for healthy controls. Twenty-seven persons (mean age 22, SD 4.2 years), of whom 10 men, participated. The ARAT and 9-HP-test scores for the affected arm were significantly worse than those for the non-affected arm. Moderate to severe pain in the affected arm, the non-affected arm or the back was reported by 50% of the participants. The DASH general, sports/music and SF36 physical functioning scores were significantly worse than norm values. The ARAT/9-HP-test and daily functioning showed little association. Low to moderate associations were found between pain and daily functioning. Many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Implications for Rehabilitation Obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) is caused by traction to the brachial plexus during labour, resulting in denervation of the muscles of the arm and shoulder girdle. Adults with OBPL are hardly seen in rehabilitation medicine. This study shows that many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Fifty percent of the participants complained about moderate or severe pain, which was located in the affected arm, the back and the non

  19. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

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    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  20. [Short-term efficacy of multiple nerves branch transfer for treating superior trunk brachial plexus in jury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiuzhou; Xu, Jianguang; Xu, Wendong; Xu, Lei; Gu, Shihui; Shen, Yundong; Zhao, Xin; Gu, Yudong

    2008-09-01

    To recover the loss of the shoulder and elbow function after superior trunks injury of brachial plexus through multiple nerves branch transfer simultaneously near the nerve entering points of recipient nerves. Four male patients (aged 21-39 years) with superior trunks injury of brachial plexus were treated from February to September 2007. All cases were injured in the traffic accident, left side in 1 case and right side in 3 cases, resulting in the loss of shoulder abduction, shoulder extorsion, shoulder lift and elbow flexion, and the increase of muscle strength of shoulder shrug, elbow extension and finger flexion to above or equal to 4th grade. Patients were hospitalized 3-11 months after injury. Electromyography showed that the functions of accessory nerve, ulnar nerve and the branch to long head of triceps brachii were good, but the function of median nerve was injured partially. The following multiple donor nerves transfer were performed under general anaesthesia, namely from posterior approach accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve, from triceps to axillary nerve, from the partial branch of ulnar nerve to the biceps and/or brachial is muscular branch of musculocutaneous nerve. All incisions healed by first intention. One case suffered postoperative numbness on the ulnar side of hand and was symptomatically relieved after expectant treatment, while 3 cases had no manifestation of the motor and sensory functional injury related to donor nerve. All patients were followed up for 7-12 months. All patients regained the shoulder abduction and the elbow flexion 3-4 months after operation and electromyography showed that there was the regenerative potential in 3 recipient muscles. The shoulder abduction, elbow flexion and the muscle strength of the patients was 30-65 degrees, 90-120 degrees and 3-4 grade, respectively, 6-7 months after operation. Twelve months after operation, the first patient's shoulder abduction, external rotation, superinduction and elbow flexion

  1. Role of ultrasound-guided continuous brachial plexus block in the management of neonatal ischemia in upper limb

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    Vrushali C Ponde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal upper limb ischemia due to accidental arterial damage remains a major concern, which can lead to devastating complications if untreated. The primary objective of this case report is to emphasize the role of continuous infraclavicular brachial plexus block, the issues related with block performance in an ischemic hand, and the importance of ultrasound guidance in this particular case scenario. A 1.1 kg infant suffered from distal forearm ischemia due to accidental arterial damage, which was treated with brachial plexus block. An ultrasound-guided single shot block with 0.5 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine was followed by ultrasound-guided catheter placement in the target area. A continuous infusion of 0.03% of bupivacaine at the rate of 0.5 mL/kg/hr (approx. 0.15 mg/kg/h of bupivacaine was administered for 36 h. This treatment resulted in reversal of ischemia. Permanent ischemic damage was eventually confined to the tips of 4 fingers. We conclude that ultrasound-guided continuous infraclavicular block has a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hand ischemia due to arterial damage and subsequent arterial spasm in neonates with added benefits.

  2. Anatomical study and clinical significance of the rami communicantes between cervicothoracic ganglion and brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhan-Feng; Sun, Mao-Min; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Xia, Chun-Lin

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a detailed characterization of the rami communicantes between the stellate (or cervicothoraic) ganglion (CTG) and brachial plexus (BP). Rami communicantes of 33 fixed adult cadavers were macroscopically observed, and connection between CTG and spinal nerves and branching was investigated. In all cases, except one, the hibateral medial rami communicantes was found to be positioned symmetrically between the CTG and C7, C8 spinal nerves. Gray rami communicantes arising from the CTG joined C8, C7, C6 nerve roots on 66, 63, and 6 sides, respectively, and branched from the rami communicantes to C7, C6, C5 nerve roots lying on 51, 41, and 2 sides, respectively. Forty-five sides of the branches from rami communicantes derived from CTG to C8 were observed to ascend through the transverse foramina of the C7 nerve. The branches from rami communicantes derived from CTG to C7 to the C6 nerve were observed ascending through the foramen transversarium of the six cervical vertebrae along with the vertebral artery and joining the C6 spinal nerve in 41 sides. Knowledge about the general distribution and individual variations of the rami communicantes between CTG and BP will be useful toward studies involving the inference of sympathetic nerve stimulation of the upper limbs and could be important for surgeons who perform surgical procedures in the cervical region or medical blockade of nerve fibers. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. [Bilateral axillary brachial plexus block guided by multiple nerve stimulation and ultrasound in a multiple trauma patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Pallardó, M A; Herranz, A; Peiró, C M; de Andrés, J A

    2006-01-01

    We present the case of a woman with multiple wounds and injuries after attempted suicide by jumping from a high place. She had multiple craniofacial injuries and fractures of both forearms requiring emergency osteosynthesis. The neurosurgeons requested that a level of consciousness be maintained for frequent assessment; therefore it was decided to provide a bilateral axillary brachial plexus block. The procedure was carried out with the aid of a nerve stimulator to locate a triple response in the left arm (radial, medial and musculocutaneous nerves) and with both ultrasound and double nerve stimulation in the right arm (medial and radial nerves). Surgery proceeded without adverse events. The location of nerves or nerve roots with both ultrasound and stimulators was highly useful in this patient in need of bilateral brachial plexus blockade. This combination, and ultrasound in particular, might be the technique of choice because it offers an image in real time and assessment of the least amount of anesthetic that seems to be needed for achieving a block.

  4. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach. A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazin, Mojgan; Jensen, Kenneth; Hjort, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniq...

  5. Sensory restoration by lateral antebrachial cutaneous to ulnar nerve transfer in children with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Price, Andrew E; Valencia, Herbert; Ramos, Lorna E; Grossman, John A I

    2010-12-01

    Selective peripheral nerve transfers represent an emerging reconstructive strategy in the management of both pediatric and adult brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries. Transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the forearm into the distal ulnar nerve is a useful means to restore sensibility to the ulnar side of the hand when indicated. This technique is particularly valuable in the management of global brachial plexus birth injuries in children for which its application has not been previously reported. Four children ages 4 to 9 years who sustained brachial plexus birth injury with persistent absent sensibility on the unlar aspect of the hand underwent transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve to the distal ulnar nerve. In three patients, a direct transfer with a distal end-to-side repair through a deep longitudinal neurotomy was performed. In a single patient, an interposition nerve graft was required. Restoration of sensibility was evaluated by the "wrinkle test."

  6. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, the Putti sign-obligatory tilt of the scapula with brachiothoracic adduction-suggests the presence of glenohumeral abduction contracture. In the present study, we utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify this glenohumeral abduction contracture and evaluate its relationship to shoulder joint deformity, muscle atrophy, and function. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs of the thorax and shoulders obtained before and after shoulder rebalancing surgery (internal rotation contracture release and external rotation tendon transfer) for twenty-eight children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Two raters measured the coronal positions of the scapula, thoracic spine, and humeral shaft bilaterally on coronal images, correcting trigonometrically for scapular protraction on axial images. Supraspinatus, deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscle atrophy was assessed, blinded to other measures. Correlations between glenohumeral abduction contracture and glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, and Mallet shoulder function before and after surgery were performed. MRI measurements were highly reliable between raters. Glenohumeral abduction contractures were present in twenty-five of twenty-eight patients, averaging 33° (range, 10° to 65°). Among those patients, abductor atrophy was present in twenty-three of twenty-five, with adductor atrophy in twelve of twenty-five. Preoperatively, greater abduction contracture severity correlated with greater Mallet global abduction and hand-to-neck function. Abduction contracture severity did not correlate preoperatively with axial measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia, but greater glenoid retroversion was associated with worse abduction contractures postoperatively. Surgery improved passive external rotation, active abduction, and hand-to-neck function, but did not change the abduction contracture. A majority of patients with persistent shoulder weakness

  7. Sonographic Guidance for Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Blocks: Single vs. Double Injection Cluster Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ju; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Jung, Wol Seon; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Mi Geum

    2017-09-01

    The cluster approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SC-BPB) can be easily performed but may result in asymmetric local anesthetic (LA) spread. The authors hypothesized that the use of a cluster approach in each of the 2 planes would achieve better 3-dimensional LA distribution than the traditional single cluster approach. The purpose of the present study was to compare a double injection (DI) in 2 planes (one injection in each plane) with the traditional single injection (SI) cluster approach for ultrasound-guided SC-BPB. A randomized, controlled trial. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center. In the SI group (n = 18), 30 mL of LA was injected into the main neural cluster after penetrating the brachial plexus sheath laterally. In the DI group (n = 18), the needle penetrated the sheath in a downward direction at the first skin puncture, and 15 mL of LA was injected, and at the second skin puncture (behind the initial puncture site), the needle penetrated the sheath in an upward direction, and 15 mL was again injected. Ultrasound-guided SC-BPB was evaluated from immediately after the block every 5 minutes to 30 minutes by sensory and motor testing. The main outcome variables were procedural time; onset time (time for complete sensory and motor block of the median, radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves); and rate of blockage of all 4 nerves. Procedure times (medians [interquartile range]) were similar in the DI and SI groups (5.5 [4.75 - 8] vs. 5 [4 - 7] minutes, respectively; P = 0.137). Block onset time in the DI group was not significantly different from that in the SI group (10 [5 - 17.5] vs. 20 [6.25 - 30] minutes, P = 0.142). However, the rate of blockage of all 4 nerves was significantly higher in the DI group (94% vs. 67%, P = 0.035). Although the results of this study indicate LA distribution in the DI group was more evenly spread within brachial plexus sheaths than in the SI group, this was not

  8. Constraining the brachial plexus does not compromise regional control in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Mutter W; Wolden, Suzanne L; Lee, Nancy Y; Lok, Benjamin H; Dutta, Pinaki R; Riaz, Nadeem; Setton, Jeremy; Berry, Sean L; Goenka, Anuj; Zhang, Zhigang; Rao, Shyam S

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that brachial plexopathy following head and neck cancer radiotherapy may be underreported and that this toxicity is associated with a dose–response. Our purpose was to determine whether the dose to the brachial plexus (BP) can be constrained, without compromising regional control. The radiation plans of 324 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were reviewed. We identified 42 patients (13%) with gross nodal disease <1 cm from the BP. Normal tissue constraints included a maximum dose of 66 Gy and a D 05 of 60 Gy for the BP. These criteria took precedence over planning target volume (PTV) coverage of nodal disease near the BP. There was only one regional failure in the vicinity of the BP, salvaged with neck dissection (ND) and regional re-irradiation. There have been no reported episodes of brachial plexopathy to date. In combined-modality therapy, including ND as salvage, regional control did not appear to be compromised by constraining the dose to the BP. This approach may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing the long-term risk of brachial plexopathy

  9. Outcome following spinal accessory to suprascapular (spinoscapular) nerve transfer in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Ramos, Lorna E; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, Agatha; Grossman, John A I

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5-30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable option for shoulder reinnervation in

  10. Role of еlectromyography in assessing prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury in practice of a specialized center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Novikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of current publication – to present our own experience in use of electromyographic examination in prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury to practical neurologists and neurophysiologists. Review of literature shows that common approaches to electrotrophysiological diagnosis of obstetric brachial plexus injury do not exist. The aim of this study– to evaluate retrospectively electrophysiological and sonographic parameters of obstetric brachial plexus injury in children, determining the most informative variables. Since 2007 to 2014 we examined 218 children, 74 of them were operated. Electrophysiological investigation in young children have difficulties in performance.We present our algorithm of diagnostic of obstetric brachial plexus injury: 1 testing main muscles, which perform basic movementsin upper limb (needle EMG of supra- and infraspinatus muscles and cutaneous EMG of biceps muscles; 2 localization of injury (paralysis or Duchenne – Erb palsy and electrophysiological criteria of spinal cord root avulsion. We found out that the most crucial role in assessing prognosis plays an examination of motor unit potentials (MUPs duration. Absence of MUPs within needle EMG from supraspinatus muscle and absence of interference curve from biceps muscle during first 6 months have poor prognosis. After 6 months careful, dynamic study of MUPs duration in infraspinatus muscle and co-contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles is needed. To decide whether reconstructive surgery in a patient with obstetric brachial plexus injury is necessary, surgeon must analyze clinical and instrumental data. The possibility of usage of the ultrasonogrophy in brachial plexus injury requires further investigation.

  11. STUDY & EVALUATE THE COMPARISON OF PLAIN LIGNOCAINE AND LIGNACAINE WITH SODIUM BICARBONATE EFFECTS IN SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS : supraclavicular brachial plexus block is usually used to anaesthetize the upper limb for the purpose of upper limb surgeries. Drugs like Lignocaine , Bupiv a caine are used for this block and some additives are added to prolong the duration and quality of bl ockade. The present study is aimed to evaluate the comparison of plain lignocaine and lign o caine with sodium bicarbonate in supraclavicular brachial plexus block by means of the onset time of sensory and motor blockade, the quality of sensory and motor blo ckade , and the duration of blockade . METHODS : Sixty patients aged between 18 and 60 years of physical status ASA 1 and 2 undergoing upper limb surgeries lasting more than 30 minutes were included in the study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block was performed after eliciting paraesthesia. The patients in Group I (n=30 received 25ml of 1% plain lignocaine (prepared by adding 12.5ml of distilled water to 12.5ml of 2% plain lignocaine. The patients in th e Group II (study group received 25ml of 1% alkalinized lignocaine (prepared by adding 3ml of 7.5% sodium bicarbonate and 9.5ml of distilled water to 12.5ml of 2% plain lignocaine. RESULTS : The present study entitled Comparison of effects of plain lignoc aine and lignocaine with sodium bicarbonate on brachial plexus block concludes that, the onset time of sensory and motor blockade is lesser with sodium bicarbonate added lignocaine (4.13, 11.1minutes when compared to plain lignocaine(9.73, 21.1minutes in supraclavicular brachial plexus block, the quality of sensory and motor blockade is better with sodium bicarbonate added lignocaine, the duration of motor and sensory blockade was significantly prolonged when lignocaine with sodium bicarbonate was used in supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  12. Effect of dexamethasone in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blinded randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Alarasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: With the use of ultrasound, a minimal effective volume of 20 ml has been described for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. However achieving a long duration of analgesia with this minimal volume remains a challenge. We aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of analgesia in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Material and Methods: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group C received saline (2 ml + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and Group D received dexamethasone (8 mg + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Hemodynamic variables and visual analog scale (VAS score were noted at regular intervals until 450 min. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block were measured. The incidence of "Halo" around brachial plexus was observed. Student′s t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly earlier in dexamethasone group (10.36 ± 1.99 and 12 ± 1.64 minutes compared to control group (12.9 ± 2.23 and 18.03 ± 2.41 minutes. The duration of sensory and motor block was significantly prolonged in dexamethasone group (366 ± 28.11 and 337.33 ± 28.75 minutes compared to control group (242.66 ± 26.38 and 213 ± 26.80 minutes. The VAS score was significantly lower in dexamethasone group after 210 min. "Halo" was present around the brachial plexus in all patients in both the groups. Conclusion: Dexamethasone addition significantly increases the duration of analgesia in patients receiving low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. No significant side-effects were seen in patients receiving dexamethasone as an adjunct.

  13. Thalamic deep brain stimulation for neuropathic pain after amputation or brachial plexus avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Boccard, Sandra G; Linhares, Paulo; Chamadoira, Clara; Rosas, Maria José; Abreu, Pedro; Rebelo, Virgínia; Vaz, Rui; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2013-09-01

    Fifteen hundred patients have received deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat neuropathic pain refractory to pharmacotherapy over the last half-century, but few during the last decade. Deep brain stimulation for neuropathic pain has shown variable outcomes and gained consensus approval in Europe but not the US. This study prospectively evaluated the efficacy at 1 year of DBS for phantom limb pain after amputation, and deafferentation pain after brachial plexus avulsion (BPA), in a single-center case series. Patient-reported outcome measures were collated before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) score, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and University of Washington Neuropathic Pain Score (UWNPS). Twelve patients were treated over 29 months, receiving contralateral, ventroposterolateral sensory thalamic DBS. Five patients were amputees and 7 had BPAs, all from traumas. A postoperative trial of externalized DBS failed in 1 patient with BPA. Eleven patients proceeded to implantation and gained improvement in pain scores at 12 months. No surgical complications or stimulation side effects were noted. In the amputation group, after 12 months the mean VAS score improved by 90.0% ± 10.0% (p = 0.001), SF-36 by 57.5% ± 97.9% (p = 0.127), UWNPS by 80.4% ± 12.7% (p stimulation demonstrated efficacy at 1 year for chronic neuropathic pain after traumatic amputation and BPA. Clinical trials that retain patients in long-term follow-up are desirable to confirm findings from prospectively assessed case series.

  14. A Population-Based Analysis of Time to Surgery and Travel Distances for Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Baty, Jack; Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Osei, Daniel A

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of timely evaluation for patients with brachial plexus injuries (BPIs), in clinical practice we have noted delays in referral. Because the published BPI experience is largely from individual centers, we used a population-based approach to evaluate the delivery of care for patients with BPI. We used statewide administrative databases from Florida (2007-2013), New York (2008-2012), and North Carolina (2009-2010) to create a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for BPI (exploration, repair, neurolysis, grafting, or nerve transfer). Emergency department and inpatient records were used to determine the time interval between the injury and surgical treatment. Distances between treating hospitals and between the patient's home ZIP code and the surgical hospital were recorded. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictors for time from injury to surgery exceeding 365 days. Within the 222 patients in our cohort, median time from injury to surgery was 7.6 months and exceeded 365 days in 29% (64 of 222 patients) of cases. Treatment at a smaller hospital for the initial injury was significantly associated with surgery beyond 365 days after injury. Patient insurance type, travel distance for surgery, distance between the 2 treating hospitals, and changing hospitals between injury and surgery did not significantly influence time to surgery. Nearly one third of patients in Florida, New York, and North Carolina underwent BPI surgery more than 1 year after the injury. Patients initially treated at smaller hospitals are at risk for undergoing delayed BPI surgery. These findings can inform administrative and policy efforts to expedite timely referral of patients with BPI to experienced centers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB). Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block: a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4hours after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20%-0.34%]. No successful block patient reported pain after 4hours. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided ABPB can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical detection of the brachial plexus for peripheral nerve blocks: an in vivo swine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynolf, Marcus; Sommer, Micha; Desjardins, Adrien E; van der Voort, Marjolein; Roggeveen, Stefan; Bierhoff, Walter; Hendriks, Benno H W; Rathmell, James P; Kessels, Alfons G H; Söderman, Michael; Holmström, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Accurate identification of nerves is critical to ensure safe and effective delivery of regional anesthesia during peripheral nerve blocks. Nerve stimulation is commonly used, but it is not perfect. Even when nerve stimulation is performed in conjunction with ultrasound guidance, determining when the needle tip is at the nerve target region can be challenging. In this in vivo pilot study, we investigated whether close proximity to the brachial plexus and penetration of the axillary artery can be identified with optical reflectance spectroscopy, using a custom needle stylet with integrated optical fibers. Ultrasound-guided insertions to place the needle tip near the brachial plexus at the axillary level were performed at multiple locations in 2 swine, with the stylet positioned in the cannula of a 20-gauge stimulation needle. During each insertion, optical reflectance spectra were acquired with the needle tip in skeletal muscle, at the surface of muscle fascia, and at the nerve target region; confirmation of the final needle position was provided by nerve stimulation. In addition, an insertion to the lumen of the axillary artery was performed in a third swine. Differences in the spectra were quantified with lipid and hemoglobin parameters that provide contrast for optical absorption by the respective chromophores. The transition of the needle tip from skeletal muscle to the nerve target region was associated with higher lipid parameter values (P ultrasound imaging, and it could potentially allow for reliable identification of the injection site during peripheral nerve blocks.

  17. Comprehensive approach to newborns and infants with brachial plexus impairment – proposal of Slovenian guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Groleger Sršen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of brachial plexus (IBP in the neonate and infant remains an important problem. Risk factors for IBP are well known, but the mechanisms of impairment are not yet fully understood. It is important to identify early signs of IBP and to evaluate the hand function. In the guidelines we propose to use the Toronto scale for evaluation of hand function. The newborn with IBP should be referred to physiotherapy, and then regularly followed-up once a month. If the arm and hand function, especially flexion of the elbow, is not improving at the age of two months, the infant should be referred to the tertiary level rehabilitation centre and to department for plastic surgery at the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana. When necessary, the reconstructive procedure should be done by the age of three to six months. After reconstruction of brachial plexus, the child needs a comprehensive therapy program, which involves passive stretching, sensory stimulation, exercises to promote the development of active voluntary movements, bimanual activities, and symmetrical posture and movement patterns.

  18. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  19. [Radius reed osteotomy for supination deformity in children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkar, F; Dana, C; Salon, A; Glorion, C

    2013-12-01

    We report our experience and results in the use of reed pronating osteotomy in supination deformities secondary to obstetrical brachial plexus injury. This retrospective study involved 11 patients with paralytic supination of the forearm due to a brachial plexus injury. Other causes of paralytic supination were excluded. The surgical technique consisted of a proximal osteotomy of the ulna fixed by an intramedullary nail and a stable elastic reed osteotomy of the radius. The minimum postoperative follow-up was 2 years. Four boys and seven girls mean aged 8 years (5-12) were operated on between 2000 and 2010. The mean preoperative supination was measured at 63°. The final position average pronation was 37°. Loss of pronation was measured at 15°. No complication was observed. With a mean follow-up of 4 years (2-12), the reed osteotomy of radius associated with a proximal transverse osteotomy of ulna has proven itself effective for correction of paralytic supination of the forearm without complication or reoperation.

  20. Outcomes associated with a structured prenatal counseling program for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Mary Veronica; Bender, Christina; Townsend, Kathryn E; Hamilton, Emily F

    2012-08-01

    We examined outcomes that were associated with a novel program to identify patients who are at high risk for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. The program included a checklist of key risk factors and a multifactorial algorithm to estimate risk of shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. We examined rates of cesarean delivery and shoulder dystocia in 8767 deliveries by clinicians who were enrolled in the program and in 11,958 patients of clinicians with no access to the program. Key risk factors were identified in 1071 of 8767 mothers (12.2%), of whom 40 of 8767 women (0.46%) had results in the high-risk category. The rate of primary cesarean delivery rate was stable (21.2-20.8%; P = .57). Shoulder dystocia rates fell by 56.8% (1.74-0.75%; P = .002). The rates of shoulder dystocia and cesarean birth showed no changes in the group with no access to the program. With the introduction of this program, overall shoulder dystocia rates fell by more than one-half with no increase in the primary cesarean delivery rate. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Variations in branching of the posterior cord of brachial plexus in a Kenyan population

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    Matakwa Ludia C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the branching of posterior cord are important during surgical approaches to the axilla and upper arm, administration of anesthetic blocks, interpreting effects of nervous compressions and in repair of plexus injuries. The patterns of branching show population differences. Data from the African population is scarce. Objective To describe the branching pattern of the posterior cord in a Kenyan population. Materials and methods Seventy-five brachial plexuses from 68 formalin fixed cadavers were explored by gross dissection. Origin and order of branching of the posterior cord was recorded. Representative photographs were then taken using a digital camera (Sony Cybershot R, W200, 7.2 Megapixels. Results Only 8 out of 75 (10.7% posterior cords showed the classical branching pattern. Forty three (57.3% lower subscapular, 8(10.3% thoracodorsal and 8(10.3% upper subscapular nerves came from the axillary nerve instead of directly from posterior cord. A new finding was that in 4(5.3% and in 3(4% the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm respectively originated from the posterior cord in contrast to their usual origin from the medial cord. Conclusions Majority of posterior cords in studied population display a wide range of variations. Anesthesiologists administering local anesthetic blocks, clinicians interpreting effects of nerve injuries of the upper limb and surgeons operating in the axilla should be aware of these patterns to avoid inadvertent injury. A wider study of the branching pattern of infraclavicular brachial plexus is recommended.

  2. Case Report- Une cause rare de plexopathie brachiale : une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 50 ans ayant une histoire de cancer du sein et qui accuse une symptomatologie d'atteinte du plexus brachial. L'IRM montre une masse qui envahie le plexus brachial compatible avec une métastase. L'IRM est très utile pour le diagnostic et l'orientation thérapeutique des ...

  3. Effectiveness of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing brachial plexus tumours in dogs – short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiak Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences that contribute to a quick and reliable diagnosis of brachial plexus tumours in dogs. The tumours were successfully diagnosed in 6 dogs by the MRI with the use of SE, FSE, STIR, Turbo 3 D, 3D HYCE, and GE sequences and the gadolinium contrast agent

  4. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Nollet, Frans; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A.; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2006-01-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active

  5. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J.T.H.; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal

  6. Ultrasound-guided training in the performance of brachial plexus block by the posterior approach: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Rettig, H.C.; Koornwinder, T.; Renes, S.H.; Gielen, M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The application of ultrasonography in guiding and controlling the path of the stimulating needle to the brachial plexus via the posterior approach (Pippa technique) was studied. In 21 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, scheduled for surgery of the shoulder or upper arm, needle insertion was

  7. Aspects of activities and participation of 7-8 year-old children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, E.; Ahmed, J.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; de Groot, V.; Beckerman, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) can experience problems in the performance of meaningful activities such as writing, bimanual activities, and participation in sports and leisure activities. Aims: To quantify the everyday functioning and participation of 7-8

  8. Early effects of muscle atrophy on shoulder joint development in infants with unilateral birth brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelein Vitringa, V. M.; Jaspers, R.T.; Mullender, M.G.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Shoulder deformities in children with a birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI) are caused by muscle imbalances; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the early interactions between shoulder muscles and shoulder joint development.Method In a

  9. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shoulder area. These nerves provide the shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand with movement and sensation. ... Pectoral girdle and upper limb: overview and surface anatomy. In: Standring S, ed. Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis ...

  10. Nalbuphine as an adjuvant to 0.5% bupivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus block is a reliable, regional anesthetic technique for upper arm surgeries. Opioid agonist-antagonists are also used as adjuvant to enhance the analgesia of bupivacaine. The present study was aimed to assess the analgesic efficacy and safety of nalbuphine as an adjuvant to 0.5% bupivacaine for brachial plexus block. Patients and Methods: Sixty adult patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II of both genders were randomized into two groups of thirty patients each to receive either 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine with 1 mL of normal saline (Group 1 or 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine with 1 mL of nalbuphine 10 mg (Group 2 for brachial plexus block under ultrasound guidance. Patients were observed for onset and duration of sensory and motor block with duration of pain relief as primary end points while occurrence of any adverse effect due to technique or nalbuphine was noted as secondary outcome. Results: The ultrasound guided the visualization of the nerves, needle, and spread of local anesthetic at brachial plexus block site. Nalbuphine did not affect the onset time of block but enhanced the duration of sensory and motor block. The duration of postoperative analgesia was 481.53 ± 42.45 min in Group 2 and 341.31 ± 21.42 min in Group 1, with statistically highly significant difference (P < 0.001. There were no hemodynamic variations and no complication of technique or adverse effects due to nalbuphine occurred. Conclusion: Nalbuphine 10 mg has significantly extended the duration of analgesia of brachial plexus block with no adverse effects.

  11. High prevalence of cranial asymmetry exists in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Megan; Gorbutt, Kimberly A; Peethambaran, Ammanath; Yang, Lynda; Nelson, Virginia S; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu

    2016-11-30

    This study aimed to: 1) evaluate the prevalence of cranial asymmetry (positional plagiocephaly) in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP); 2) examine the association of patient demographics, arm function, and NBPP-related factors to positional plagiocephaly; and 3) determine percentage of spontaneous recovery from positional plagiocephaly and its association with arm function. Infants plagio group), including infants with resolved positional plagiocephaly (plagio-resolved subgroup); and 2) those who never had positional plagiocephaly (non-plagio group). Standard statistics were applied. Eighteen of 28 infants (64%) had positional plagiocephaly. Delivery type might be predictive for plagiocephaly. Infants in the non-plagio group exhibited more active range of motion than infants in the plagio group. All other factors had no significant correlations. A high prevalence of positional plagiocephaly exists among the NBPP population examined. Parents and physicians should encourage infants to use their upper extremities to change position and reduce chance of cranial asymmetry.

  12. Serial casting for elbow flexion contractures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, B J; Steenbeek, D; Nelissen, R G H H

    2016-09-02

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of serial casting of elbow flexion contractures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. A prospective consecutive cohort study was performed with a median follow-up of 5 years. Forty-one patients with elbow flexion contractures ≥ 30° were treated with serial casting until the contracture was ≤ 10°, for a maximum of 8 weeks. Range of motion, number of recurrences and patient satisfaction were recorded and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank and Cox regression tests. Passive extension increased from a median of -40° (IQR -50 to -30) to -15° (IQR -10 to -20, p contractures, although recurrences were frequent. The severity of elbow flexion contracture is a predictor of recurrence. We recommend more research on muscle degeneration and determinants involved in elbow flexion contractures to improve treatment strategies and prevent side-effects.

  13. Contribution of denervated muscle to contractures after neonatal brachial plexus injury: not just muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Liangjun, Hu; Tuttle, Lori J; Weekley, Holly; Christopher, Wylie; Lieber, Richard L; Cornwall, Roger

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the contribution of muscle fibrosis to elbow flexion contractures in a murine model of neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI). Four weeks after NBPI, biceps and brachialis fibrosis were assessed histologically and compared with the timing of contracture development and the relative contribution of each muscle to contractures. Modulus of elasticity and hydroxyproline (collagen) content were measured and correlated with contracture severity. The effect of halofuginone antifibrotic therapy on fibrosis and contractures was investigated. Elbow contractures preceded muscle fibrosis development. The brachialis was less fibrotic than the biceps, yet contributed more to contractures. Modulus and hydroxyproline content increased in both elbow flexors, but neither correlated with contracture severity. Halofuginone reduced biceps fibrosis but did not reduce contracture severity. Contractures after NBPI cannot be explained solely by muscle fibrosis, arguing for investigation of alternate pathophysiologic targets for contracture prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Palsy of the upper limb: Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, arthrogryposis, cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Philandrianos, C; Tekpa, B

    2016-10-01

    "Palsy of the upper limb" in children includes various diseases which leads to hypomobility of the member: cerebral palsy, arthrogryposis and obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. These pathologies which differ on brain damage or not, have the same consequences due to the early achievement: negligence, stiffness and deformities. Regular entire clinical examination of the member, an assessment of needs in daily life, knowledge of the social and family environment, are key points for management. In these pathologies, the rehabilitation is an emergency, which began at birth and intensively. Splints and physiotherapy are part of the treatment. Surgery may have a functional goal, hygienic or aesthetic in different situations. The main goals of surgery are to treat: joints stiffness, bones deformities, muscles contractures and spasticity, paresis, ligamentous laxity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of shoulder dystocia training on the incidence of brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Steven R; Feier, Nikolaus; Chetiyaar, Jyothi B; Naylor, Margaret H; Sumersille, Melanie; Cervellione, Kelly L; Predanic, Mladen

    2011-04-01

    We sought to determine whether implementation of shoulder dystocia training reduces the incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI). After implementing training for maternity staff, the incidence of OBPI was compared between pretraining and posttraining periods using both univariate and multivariate analyses in deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. The overall incidence of OBPI in vaginal deliveries decreased from 0.40% pretraining to 0.14% posttraining (P shoulder dystocia dropped from 30% to 10.67% posttraining (P shoulder dystocia training remained associated with reduced OBPI (P = .02) after logistic regression analysis. OBPI remained less in the posttraining period (P = .01), even after excluding all neonates with birthweights >2 SD above the mean. Shoulder dystocia training was associated with a lower incidence of OBPI and the incidence of OBPI in births complicated by shoulder dystocia. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk factors for brachial plexus injury in a large cohort with shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Katherine A; Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Caughey, Aaron B

    2016-11-01

    To examine birthweight and other predictors of brachial plexus injury (BPI) among births complicated by shoulder dystocia. A retrospective cohort study of term births complicated by shoulder dystocia in California between 1997 and 2006. Birthweight at time of delivery was stratified into 500-g intervals. Women were further stratified by diabetes status, parity, and race/ethnicity. The perinatal outcome of BPI was assessed. This study included 62,762 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia, of which 3168 (5 %) resulted in BPI. The association between birthweight and BPI remained significant regardless of confounders. Each increasing birthweight interval was associated with an increasing risk of BPI compared with 3000-3499-g birthweight. Race/ethnicity, diabetes, and parity were also independently associated with BPI. Increasing birthweight increases the risk of BPI among births with shoulder dystocia, independent of advanced maternal age, race, parity, gestational diabetes, or operative vaginal delivery.

  17. Distal infrared thermography and skin temperature after ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Bjerregaard, Lars S; Lundstrøm, Lars H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increases in skin temperature may be used as an early predictor of the success of interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB), but we lack detailed information on the thermographic response. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and characterise the thermographic response after IBPBs. DESIGN......: Prospective observational study. SETTING: University hospital and private hospital. PATIENTS: Twenty-nine male and 17 female patients scheduled for ambulatory shoulder surgery. Exclusion criteria were age less than 18 years, body weight more than 120 kg and any coagulation abnormality. INTERVENTIONS: Infrared...... thermographic imaging of the hand before and at 1 min intervals for 30 min after an ultrasound-guided IBPB with 20 ml ropivacaine 7.5 mg ml. Cooling of both hands was performed to standardise measurements. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Thermographic changes in skin temperature on the dorsum of the hand. RESULTS: Forty...

  18. Karakteristik dan Faktor Risiko Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy pada Bayi Baru Lahir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Vincent Handoyo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP is an injury of entire or part of brachial plexus correlated with delivery process. Incidence in developing countries is around 0.15%. Risk factors include intrapartum and intrauterine. Three types of OBPP are Duchenne Erb, Klumpke, and whole arm palsy. This was a retrospective study of characteristic and risk factors of OBPP in Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, period January 2002-April 2007. Data were collected from perinatology ward medical records, and analyzed using binary logistic regression. OBPP incidence was 0.141%. All were Erb palsy and single pregnancy, 68.75% were head-occiput posterior presentation, 50% were spontaneous birth, 18.75% had meconeal staining, 62.5% had birth weight ≥3,500 g, 56.25% were male, 68.75% asphyxia, 12.5% shoulder dystocia, and 6.25% clavicle fracture. Risk factors significantly correlated were foot presentation (OR 9.357; 95%CI, transverse fetal position (OR 5.136; 95%CI, vacuum, forceps, breech/foot extraction (OR 5.240;95%CI, 4.320; 95%CI, 14.411; 95%CI, respectively, birth weight 3,500-3,999 g (OR 4.571;95%CI, birth weight ≥4,500 g (OR 57.759; 95%CI, asphyxia (ORs 5.992; 95%CI, and severe asphyxia (OR 6.094; 95%CI. Sectio cesarea tend to have protective effect {OR 0.244; 95%CI; p=0.062 (>0.05}. The important risk factors of OBPP are foot presentation, breech/foot extraction, and birth weight >4,500 g.

  19. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of two bupivacaine concentrations on axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo H C; Takeda, Alexandre; Barreto, Cleber N; Faria, Bernadete; Assunção, Nilson A

    The risk of systemic bupivacaine toxicity is a persistent problem, which makes its pharmacokinetic study fundamental for regional anesthesia safety. There is little evidence of its influence on plasma peak at different concentrations. The present study compares two bupivacaine concentrations to establish how the concentration affects this drug plasma peak in axillary brachial plexus block. Postoperative latency and analgesia were also compared. 30 patients were randomized. In the 0.25% Group, 0.25% bupivacaine (10mL) was injected per nerve. In the 0.5% Group, 0.5% bupivacaine (5mL) was injected per nerve. Peripheral blood samples were collected during the first 2hours after the blockade. For sample analyses, high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used. Plasma peak occurred 45minutes after the blockade, with no difference between groups at the assessed time-points. Plasma peak was 933.97 ± 328.03 ng.mL -1 (mean ± SD) in 0.25% Group and 1022.79 ± 253.81 ng.mL -1 in 0.5% Group (p = 0.414). Latency was lower in 0.5% Group than in 0.25% Group (10.67 ± 3.71 × 17.33min ± 5.30, respectively, p = 0.004). No patient had pain within the first 4hours after the blockade. For axillary brachial plexus block, there was no difference in bupivacaine plasma peak despite the use of different concentrations with the same local anesthetic mass. The concentration inversely influenced latency. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. Effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective, randomised, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant A Biradar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used to prolong brachial plexus block. We performed a prospective, randomised, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus block as this is the most common type of brachial block performed in our institute. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologist′s physical status I and II patients undergoing elective hand, forearm and elbow surgery under brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of normal saline (group C, n=30 or 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg (group D, n=30. The block was performed using a nerve stimulator. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade were assessed. The sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated and recorded at 5, 10, 20, 120 min, and at every 30 min thereafter. Results: Two patients were excluded from the study because of block failure. The onset of sensory and motor blockade (13.4±2.8 vs. 16.0±2.3 min and 16.0±2.7 vs. 18.7±2.8 min, respectively were significantly more rapid in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. The duration of sensory and motor blockade (326±58.6 vs. 159±20.1 and 290.6±52.7 vs. 135.5±20.3 min, respectively were significantly longer in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline in supraclavicular brachial plexus block speeds the onset and prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  1. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelein Vitringa, V. M.; van Kooten, E.O.; Jaspers, R.T.; Mullender, M.G.; Loogman, M.H.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P < 0·05) in the VEGF group. The results of

  3. Spinal anesthesia as a complication of brachial plexus block using the posterior approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramideh, Majid; van den Oever, Huub L. A.; Walstra, Gerard J.; Dzoljic, Misa

    2002-01-01

    IMPLICATIONS: In this case report we describe a technique used to provide local analgesia for surgical procedures. Although this technique has a reduced risk of complications, we present a patient who experienced a life-threatening paralysis without loss of consciousness during an attempted brachial

  4. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies

  5. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: amchen@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  6. [Effects of patient-controlled infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain and surgical efficacy in patients with terrible tyriad of the elbow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu-Zhen, Wang; Ge, Ye-Ying; Ye, Guang-Yao; Zhang, Jing-Wei; Ma, Wei-Hu

    2017-11-25

    To study the effects of ultrasound guided inter-scalene brachial plexus block and patient-controlled infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain and surgical efficacy in patients with terrible tyriad of the elbow. From March 2015 to August 2016, 60 patients with terrible tyriad of the elbows were treated in Ningbo No.6 Hospital with ASA I to II internal fixation. There were 32 males and 28 females, ranging in age from 16 to 70 years old, with a mean age of (55.6±18.2) years old. All the patients were divided into two groups(30 cases in each group): controlled intermuscular groove brachial plexus block (group C), infraclavicular brachial plexus block(group I). All catheters were placed using ultra-sound visualization and injected 0.33% ropivacaine 30 ml preoperatively. After regaining consciousness, all patients connected the electronic pump. The solution contained 0.2% ropiva-caine and the pump was setup to deliver a 5 ml bolus dose, with a 15 min lock out interval and background infusion at 5 ml/h. Both analgesia lasted until 5 d after operation. The patients underwent rehabilitation exercise everyday for 5 consecutive days starting from 24 h after operation.VAS score was recorded at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 4 d, 5 d after operation during rest and rehabilitation exercise time. The elbow articular range of motion and Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS) were recorded at 6 d after operation. Catheter-related adversereactions (such as oozing from the insertion site, obstruction, prolapse) were recorded. The success rate of blockade was 100% during insertion in both groups. Compared with group C, the VAS score at 3 d during rest time and 3, 4, 5 d after operation during rehabili-tation exercise were decreased(2.5±0.5 vs. 3.8±1.1, 3.0±0.4 vs. 5.0±0.9, 2.5±0.4 vs. 4.5±1.2, 2.1±0.3 vs. 4.1±1.0, P plexus block can be effectively used for postoperative pain after fixation for terrible tyriad of the elbows, and it can increase surgical outcome.

  7. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mürtz, P.; Kaschner, M.; Lakghomi, A.; Gieseke, J.; Willinek, W.A.; Schild, H.H.; Thomas, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mürtz, P., E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, M., E-mail: Marius.Kaschner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lakghomi, A., E-mail: Asadeh.Lakghomi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J., E-mail: juergen.gieseke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Philips Healthcare, Lübeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, W.A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus.

  9. Muscular and glenohumeral changes in the shoulder after brachial plexus birth palsy: an MRI study in a rat model

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    Soldado Francisco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder abnormalities are the major cause of morbidity in upper brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP. We developed a rat model of upper trunk BPBP and compared our findings to previously reported animal models and to clinical findings in humans. Methods Forty-three 5-day-old newborn rats underwent selective upper trunk neurectomy of the right brachial plexus and were studied 3 to 20 weeks after surgery. The passive shoulder external rotation was measured and the shoulder joint was assessed bilaterally by a 7.2T MRI bilaterally. Results We found a marked decrease in passive shoulder external rotation, associated with a severe subscapularis muscle atrophy and contracture. None however developed the typical pattern of glenohumeral dysplasia. Conclusions In contradiction with previous reports, our study shows that the rat model is not adequate for preclinical studies of shoulder dysplasia. However, it might serve as a useful model for studies analyzing shoulder contracture occurring after upper BPBP.

  10. Operative treatment with nerve repair can restore function in patients with traction injuries in the brachial plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiasny, Jerzy; Birkeland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    surgical activity and reflect on the role for this new national centre. METHODS: Records from all our operated patients were reviewed retrospectively. For outcome analysis, we focused on patients who had sustained traction injuries with a surgical follow-up exceeding one year. We used either nerve grafting...... or transfers for nerve repairs based on the pattern of nerve injury seen intraoperatively. RESULTS: Overall, 24 patients were operated, and 12 patients were included in the outcome analysis. The six patients with upper brachial plexus palsies all regained shoulder function and useful elbow flexion. Of the six...... in patients with complete brachial plexus palsies. Our data suggest that nerve transfers may result in a better functional outcome than nerve grafting. We believe that there is a role for a Danish centre for the treatment of these injuries. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  11. Advanced radiological work-up as an adjunct to decision in early reconstructive surgery in brachial plexus injuries

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    Björkman Anders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As neurophysiologic tests may not reveal the extent of brachial plexus injury at the early stage, the role of early radiological work-up has become increasingly important. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concordance between the radiological and clinical findings with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injuries. Methods Seven consecutive male patients (median age 33; range 15-61 with brachial plexus injuries, caused by motor cycle accidents in 5/7 patients, who underwent extensive radiological work-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography myelography (CT-M or both were included in this retrospective study. A total of 34 spinal nerve roots were evaluated by neuroradiologists at two different occasions. The degree of agreement between the radiological findings of every individual nerve root and the intraoperative findings was estimated by calculation of kappa coefficient (К-value. Using the operative findings as a gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of the clinical findings and the radiological findings were estimated. Results The diagnostic accuracy of radiological findings was 88% compared with 65% for the clinical findings. The concordance between the radiological findings and the intraoperative findings was substantial (К = 0.76 compared with only fair (К = 0.34 for the clinical findings. There were two false positive and two false negative radiological findings (sensitivity and PPV of 0.90; specificity and NPV of 0.87. Conclusions The advanced optimized radiological work-up used showed high reliability and substantial agreement with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

  12. Good sensory recovery of the hand in brachial plexus surgery using the intercostobrachial nerve as the donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Foroni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Restoration of the sensitivity to sensory stimuli in complete brachial plexus injury is very important. The objective of our study was to evaluate sensory recovery in brachial plexus surgery using the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN as the donor. Methods: Eleven patients underwent sensory reconstruction using the ICBN as a donor to the lateral cord contribution to the median nerve, with a mean follow-up period of 41 months. A protocol evaluation was performed. Results: Four patients perceived the 1-green filament. The 2-blue, 3-purple and 4-red filaments were perceptible in one, two and three patients, respectively. According to Highet's scale, sensation recovered to S3 in two patients, to S2+ in two patients, to S2 in six patients, and S0 in one patient. Conclusion: The procedure using the ICBN as a sensory donor restores good intensity of sensation and shows good results in location of perception in patients with complete brachial plexus avulsion.

  13. Evaluation of suprascapular nerve neurotization after nerve graft or transfer in the treatment of brachial plexus traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, Martijn J A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; de Boer, Kees S; Thomeer, Ralph T W M

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the restoration of shoulder function by means of suprascapular nerve neurotization in adult patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 lesions due to a severe brachial plexus traction injury. The primary goal of brachial plexus reconstructive surgery was to restore biceps muscle function and, secondarily, to reanimate shoulder function. Suprascapular nerve neurotization was performed by grafting the C-5 nerve in 24 patients and by accessory or hypoglossal nerve transfer in 29 patients. Additional neurotization involving the axillary nerve was performed in 18 patients. Postoperative needle electromyography studies of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and deltoid muscles showed signs of reinnervation in most patients; however, active glenohumeral shoulder function recovery was poor. In nine (17%) of 53 patients supraspinatus muscle strength was Medical Research Council (MRC) Grade 3 or 4 and in four patients (8%) infraspinatus muscle power was MRC Grade 3 or 4. In 18 patients in whom deltoid muscle reinnervation was attempted, MRC Grade 3 or 4 function was demonstrated in two (11%). In the overall group, eight patients (15%) exhibited glenohumeral abduction with a mean of 44 +/- 17 degrees (standard deviation [SD]; median 45 degrees) and four patients (8%) exhibited glenohumeral exorotation with a mean of 48 +/- 24 degrees (SD; median 53 degrees). In only three patients (6%) were both functions regained. The reanimation of shoulder function in patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 brachial plexus traction injuries following suprascapular nerve neurotization is disappointingly low.

  14. The Use of Botulinum Toxin Injection for Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Patrick J; Grossman, John A I; Price, Andrew E; Reddy, Chandan; Chopan, Mustafa; Chim, Harvey

    2018-03-01

    Most brachial plexus birth injuries (BPBI) are caused by traction on the brachial plexus during a difficult delivery. Fortunately, the possibility of complete recovery from such an incident is relatively high, with only 10% to 30% of patients having prolonged and persistent disability. These patients have muscle imbalances and co-contractions typically localized around the shoulder and elbow. These imbalances and co-contractures cause abnormal motor performances and bone/joint deformities. Typically, physical/occupational therapies are the conventional therapeutic modalities but are often times inadequate. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections into targeted muscles have been used to combat the muscular imbalances and co-contractions. With compliance to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review was performed to identify studies published between 2000 and 2017 that used BTX-A to treat neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Ten studies were included, involving 325 patients. Three groups of indications for the use of BTX-A were identified: (1) internal rotation/adduction contracture of the shoulder; (2) elbow flexion lag/elbow extension lag; and (3) forearm pronation contracture. The included studies show an overall beneficial effect of BTX-A in treating co-contractures seen in patients with BPBI. Specifically, BTX-A is shown to reduce internal rotation/adduction contractures of the shoulder, elbow flexion/extension contractures, and forearm pronation contractures. These beneficial effects are blunted when used in older patients. Nevertheless, BTX-A is a useful treatment for BPBI with a relatively low-risk profile.

  15. Psychosocial outcomes and coping after complete avulsion traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Lauren; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    To understand psychosocial outcomes, coping and adjustment after complete avulsion traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). We conducted a grounded theory analysis of 12 semi-structured patient interviews exploring psychosocial outcomes, augmented by quantitative evaluation of self-reported mental health and social functioning, body image and coping strategies obtained via three questionnaires (SF-36, Brief COPE and modified SWAP). Subjects' main sources of psychological stress were chronic pain, unemployment, decreased self-efficacy and social-emotional consequences of poor body image. One third of participants reported depression, half experienced anger and frustration and two-thirds were dissatisfied with the appearance of their affected limbs. Acceptance, active coping, planning and emotional support were the most frequently used coping strategies. Patients encounter high levels of physical and psychological stress after complete avulsion BPI and must find ways to cope to adjust to their injuries. They face similar challenges to patients with spinal cord injuries, for whom many models describing coping and adjustment exist. Similar models could facilitate more complete adjustment and rehabilitation of BPI patients and help to reduce the prevalence of negative stress responses, including anger and depression. Future patients would benefit from a multidisciplinary treatment program, involving medical and mental health services.

  16. Muscle changes in brachial plexus birth injury with elbow flexion contracture: an MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Lamminen, Antti E.; Peltonen, Jari I.; Nietosvaara, A.Y.; Kirjavainen, Mikko O.

    2007-01-01

    Muscle pathology of the arm and forearm in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) with elbow flexion contracture has not been evaluated with MRI. To determine whether limited range of motion of the elbow in BPBI is correlated with specific patterns of muscular pathology. For 15 BPBI patients, total active motion (TAM) of the elbow (extension-flexion) and the forearm (pronation-supination) were measured. MRI of the elbow joints and musculature allowed assessment of elbow congruency. Fatty infiltration and size reduction of the muscles were graded semiquantitatively. Mean TAM of the elbow was 113 (50 -140 ) and that of the forearm 91 (10 -165 ). The greater the size reduction of the brachioradialis muscle, the more diminished was elbow TAM. The more extensive the BPBI and muscle pathology of the pronator teres muscle, the more limited was the TAM of the forearm. Pathology of the supinator and brachialis muscles was evident in every patient. Extensive BPBI may result in marked limitation of TAM. Elbow flexion contracture seems to be caused mainly by brachialis muscle pathology. Prosupination of the forearm is better preserved when the pronator teres is not severely affected. MRI can reliably show the extent of muscle pathology in BPBI. (orig.)

  17. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J P F; van Royen, Barend J; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

     Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture.  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I-III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function.  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r  = 0.600, p  = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation ( p  > 0.200). Internal rotation strength ( r  =  - 0.425, p muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL.

  18. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in breast cancer patients with radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy

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    Mondrup, K.; Olsen, N.K. (Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Odense Unviersity Hospital (Denmark)); Pfeiffer, P.; Rose, C. (Department of Oncology R, Odense University Hospital (Denmark))

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients without signs of recurrent disease at least 60 months after radiotherapy (RT). Clinically, 35% (95% confidence limits: 25-47%) had RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-36%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%), assessment of a definite level was not possible. In most, symptoms began during or immediately after RT, thus being without significant latency. Numbness or paresthesias (71%, 52-86%) and pain (43%, 25-62%) were the most prominent symptoms, while the most prominent objective signs were decreased or absent muscle stretch reflexes (93%, 77-99%) closely followed by sensory loss (82%, 64-93%) and weakness (71%, 52-86%). Neurophysiological investigations were carried out in 46 patients (58%). The most frequent abnormalities in patients with RBP were signs of chronic partial denervation with increased mean duration of individual motor unit potentials, and decreased amplitude of compound muscle and sensory action potentials. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. (author).

  19. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in breast cancer patients with radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrup, K.; Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Rose, C.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients without signs of recurrent disease at least 60 months after radiotherapy (RT). Clinically, 35% (95% confidence limits: 25-47%) had RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-36%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%), assessment of a definite level was not possible. In most, symptoms began during or immediately after RT, thus being without significant latency. Numbness or paresthesias (71%, 52-86%) and pain (43%, 25-62%) were the most prominent symptoms, while the most prominent objective signs were decreased or absent muscle stretch reflexes (93%, 77-99%) closely followed by sensory loss (82%, 64-93%) and weakness (71%, 52-86%). Neurophysiological investigations were carried out in 46 patients (58%). The most frequent abnormalities in patients with RBP were signs of chronic partial denervation with increased mean duration of individual motor unit potentials, and decreased amplitude of compound muscle and sensory action potentials. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. (author)

  20. Decreased rates of shoulder dystocia and brachial plexus injury via an evidence-based practice bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienas, Laura E; Hedriana, Herman L; Wiesner, Suzanne; Pelletreau, Barbara; Wilson, Machelle D; Shields, Laurence E

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate whether a standardized approach to identify pregnant women at risk for shoulder dystocia (SD) is associated with reduced incidence of SD and brachial plexus injury (BPI). Between 2011 and 2015, prospective data were collected from 29 community-based hospitals in the USA during implementation of an evidence-based practice bundle, including an admission risk assessment, required "timeout" before operative vaginal delivery (OVD), and low-fidelity SD drills. All women with singleton vertex pregnancies admitted for vaginal delivery were included. Rates of SD, BPI, OVD, and cesarean delivery were compared between a baseline period (January 2011-September 2013) and an intervention period (October 2013-June 2015), during which there was a system-wide average bundle compliance of 90%. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of SD (17.6%; P=0.028), BPI (28.6%; P=0.018), and OVD (18.0%; P<0.001) after implementation of the evidence-based practice bundle. There was a nonsignificant reduction in primary (P=0.823) and total (P=0.396) cesarean rates, but no association between SD drills and incidence of BPI. Implementation of a standard evidence-based practice bundle was found to be associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of SD and BPI. Utilization of low-fidelity drills was not associated with a reduction in BPI. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  1. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury

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    D. Fraiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1. Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies.

  2. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

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    Chiba, Emiko, E-mail: chibaemi23@comet.ocn.ne.jp; Hamamoto, Kohei, E-mail: hkouhei917@gmail.com [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan); Nagashima, Michio, E-mail: nagamic00@gmail.com [Asahikawa Medical University, Department of Emergency Medicine (Japan); Matsuura, Katsuhiko, E-mail: kmatsur@gmail.com; Okochi, Tomohisa, E-mail: t-shachi@dj8.so-net.ne.jp; Tanno, Keisuke, E-mail: tankichi1974@gmail.com; Tanaka, Osamu, E-mail: otanaka@omiya.jichi.ac.jp [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. The patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).

  3. Analysis of Patient-Dependent and Trauma-Dependent Risk Factors for Persistent Brachial Plexus Injury after Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gutkowska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries (BPIs caused by shoulder dislocation usually have a transient character and tend to resolve spontaneously. However, in some patients the symptoms can persist and require operative intervention. This work aims to determine the risk factors for persistent BPIs resulting from shoulder dislocation. The study comprised 73 patients (58 men, 15 women; mean age: 50 years treated operatively between the years 2000 and 2016 for persistent BPIs resulting from shoulder dislocation. Patient age, gender, type of initial trauma, number of affected nerves, presence of accompanying injuries, and time interval from dislocation to its reduction were analysed. Elderly patients more often sustained multiple-nerve injuries, while single nerve injuries were more often observed in younger patients. Injury to a single nerve was diagnosed in 30% of the patients. Axillary nerve was most commonly affected. Fracture of the greater tuberosity of humerus coincided with total BPI in 50% of the cases. Longer unreduced period caused injury to multiple nerves. Analysis of our patient group against relevant literature revealed that persistent BPI after shoulder dislocation is more common in older patients. Injuries to ulnar and median nerves more often require operative intervention due to low potential for spontaneous recovery of these nerves.

  4. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Emiko; Hamamoto, Kohei; Nagashima, Michio; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Okochi, Tomohisa; Tanno, Keisuke; Tanaka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. The patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).

  5. Prevention of brachial plexus injury-12 years of shoulder dystocia training: an interrupted time-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, J F; Lenguerrand, E; Bentham, G L; Tawfik, S; Claireaux, H A; Odd, D; Fox, R; Draycott, T J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate management and outcomes of incidences of shoulder dystocia in the 12 years following the introduction of an obstetric emergencies training programme. Interrupted time-series study comparing management and neonatal outcome of births complicated by shoulder dystocia over three 4-year periods: (i) Pre-training (1996-99), (ii) Early training (2001-04), and (iii) Late training (2009-12). Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK, with approximately 6000 births per annum. Infants and their mothers who experienced shoulder dystocia. A bi-monthly multi-professional 1-day intrapartum emergencies training course, that included a 30-minute practical session on shoulder dystocia management, commenced in 2000. Neonatal morbidity (brachial plexus injury, humeral fracture, clavicular fracture, 5-minute Apgar score shoulder dystocia (resolution manoeuvres performed, traction applied, head-to-body delivery interval). Compliance with national guidance improved with continued training. At least one recognised resolution manoeuvre was used in 99.8% (561/562) of cases of shoulder dystocia in the late training period, demonstrating a continued improvement from 46.3% (150/324, P shoulder dystocia. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Diagnostic value of combined magnetic resonance imaging examination of brachial plexus and electrophysiological studies in multifocal motor neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basta Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by slowly progressive asymetrical weakness of limbs without sensory loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of brachial plexus using combined cervical magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of plexus brachialis in patients with MMN. We payed special attention to the nerve roots forming nerves inervating weak muscles, but without detectable conduction block (CB using conventional nerve conduction studies. Methods. Nine patients with proven MMN were included in the study. In all of them MRI of the cervical spine and brachial plexus was performed using a Siemens Avanto 1.5 T unit, applying T1 and turbo spinecho T1 sequence, axial turbo spin-echo T2 sequence and a coronal fat-saturated turbo spin-echo T2 sequence. Results. In all the patients severe asymmetric distal weakness of muscles inervated by radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves was observed and the most striking presentation was bilateral wrist and finger drop. Three of them had additional proximal weakness of muscles inervated by axillar and femoral nerves. The majority of the patients had slightly increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein content. Six of the patients had positive serum polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 antibodies. Electromyoneurography (EMG showed neurogenic changes, the most severe in distal muscles inervated by radial nerves. All the patients had persistent partial CBs outside the usual sites of nerve compression in radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves. In three of the patients cervical magnetic stimulation suggested proximal CBs between cervical root emergence and Erb’s point (prolonged motor root conduction time. In all the patients T2-weighted MRI revealed increased signal intensity in at least one cervical root, truncus or fasciculus of brachial plexus. Conclusion. We found clinical correlation between muscle weakness

  7. Continuous interscalene brachial plexus block versus parenteral analgesia for postoperative pain relief after major shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Hameed; Samad, Khalid; Khan, Fauzia A

    2014-02-04

    Postoperative pain may lead to adverse effects on the body, which might result in an increase in morbidity. Its management therefore poses a unique challenge for the clinician. Major shoulder surgery is associated with severe postoperative pain, and different modalities are available to manage such pain, including opioid and non-opioid analgesics, local anaesthetics infiltrated into and around the shoulder joint and regional anaesthesia. All of these techniques, alone or in combination, have been used to treat the postoperative pain of major shoulder surgery but with varying success. The objective of this review was to compare the analgesic efficacy of continuous interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with parenteral opioid analgesia for pain relief after major shoulder surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1950 to December 2012), EMBASE (1980 to December 2012), Web of Science (1954 to December 2012), CINAHL (1982 to December 2012) and bibliographies of published studies. We included randomized controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of continuous ISBPB compared with different forms of parenteral opioid analgesia in relieving pain in adult participants undergoing elective major shoulder surgery. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted outcome data. We included two randomized controlled trials (147 participants). A total of 17 participants were excluded from one trial because of complications related to continuous ISBPB (16) or parenteral opioid analgesia (one). Thus we have information on 130 participants (66 in the continuous ISBPB group and 64 in the parenteral opioid group). The studies were clinically heterogeneous. No meta-analysis was undertaken. However, results of the two included studies showed better pain relief with continuous ISBPB following major shoulder surgery and a lower incidence of complications when interscalene block is performed under

  8. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

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    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Emmanuel [Department of Physical Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Kerckaert, Ingrid; D' Herde, Katharina [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  9. Severe obstetric brachial plexus palsies can be identified at one month of age.

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    Martijn J A Malessy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish whether severe obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP can be identified reliably at or before three months of age. METHODS: Severe OBPP was defined as neurotmesis or avulsion of spinal nerves C5 and C6 irrespective of additional C7-T1 lesions, assessed during surgery and confirmed by histopathological examination. We first prospectively studied a derivation group of 48 infants with OBPP with a minimal follow-up of two years. Ten dichotomous items concerning active clinical joint movement and needle electromyography of the deltoid, biceps and triceps muscles were gathered at one week, one month and three months of age. Predictors for a severe lesion were identified using a two-step forward logistic regression analysis. The results were validated in two independent cohorts of OBPP infants of 60 and 13 infants. RESULTS: Prediction of severe OBPP at one month of age was better than at one week and at three months. The presence of elbow extension, elbow flexion and of motor unit potentials in the biceps muscle correctly predicted whether lesions were mild or severe in 93.6% of infants in the derivation group (sensitivity 1.0, specificity 0.88, in 88.3% in the first validation group (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.76 and in 84.6% in the second group (sensitivity of 1.0, specificity 0.66. INTERPRETATION: Infants with OBPP with severe lesions can be identified at one month of age by testing elbow extension, elbow flexion and recording motor unit potentials (MUPs in the biceps muscle. The decision rule implies that children without active elbow extension at one month should be referred to a specialized center, while children with active elbow extension as well as active flexion should not. When there is active elbow extension, but no active elbow flexion an EMG is needed; absence of MUPs in the biceps muscle is an indication for referral.

  10. Restoration of shoulder motion using single- versus dual-nerve repair in obstetrical brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Alain Joe; AlNaeem, Hassan; Aubin-Lemay, Camille; Kvann, Julie Chakriya; Alam, Peter; Retrouvey, Helene; Aldekhayel, Salah; Zadeh, Teanoosh

    2018-02-23

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder abduction and external rotation (ER) after single-nerve repair of the upper trunk alone versus dual-nerve repair of both the upper trunk and the suprascapular nerve. METHODS A retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's experience repairing obstetrical brachial plexus injuries between June 1995 and June 2015 was performed. Eight patients underwent repair of the upper trunk alone, and 10 patients underwent repair of the upper trunk and the suprascapular nerve. Shoulder abduction and ER ranges of motion (ROMs) (in degrees) were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. Postoperative ROM and the difference in ROM gained after surgery were compared by independent t-test analysis. RESULTS The mean follow-up time was 161.4 weeks (range 62-514 weeks, SD 124.0 weeks). The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 31.3 weeks (range 19.9-47.0 weeks, SD 6.9 weeks). The mean postoperative shoulder abduction ROMs were 145.0° (range 85°-180°, SD 39.4°) after single-nerve repair and 134.0° (range 90°-180°, SD 30.3°) after dual-nerve repair (p = 0.51). The mean postoperative shoulder ER ROMs were 67.5° (range 10°-95°, SD 28.8°) after single-nerve repair and 72.0° (range 10°-95°, SD 31.3°) after dual-nerve repair (p = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS The authors found no difference in shoulder abduction and ER between patients who underwent single-nerve repair of the upper trunk alone and those who underwent dual-nerve repair of both the upper trunk and the suprascapular nerve.

  11. Interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroplasty: Postoperative analgesia, patient satisfaction and complications

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    Shah Anand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroplasty procedures are seldom performed on an ambulatory basis. Our objective was to examine postoperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, patient satisfaction and complications of ambulatory shoulder arthroplasty performed using interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB. Materials and Methods: We prospectively examined 82 consecutive patients undergoing total and hemi-shoulder arthroplasty under ISB. Eighty-nine per cent (n=73 of patients received a continuous ISB; 11% (n=9 received a single-injection ISB. The blocks were performed using a nerve stimulator technique. Thirty to 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine was injected perineurally after appropriate muscle twitches were elicited at a current of less than 0.5% mA. Data were collected in the preoperative holding area, intraoperatively and postoperatively including the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, at 24h and at seven days. Results: Mean postoperative pain scores at rest were 0.8 ± 2.3 in PACU (with movement, 0.9 ± 2.5, 2.5 ± 3.1 at 24h and 2.8 ± 2.1 at seven days. Mean postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV scores were 0.2 ± 1.2 in the PACU and 0.4 ± 1.4 at 24h. Satisfaction scores were 4.8 ± 0.6 and 4.8 ± 0.7, respectively, at 24h and seven days. Minimal complications were noted postoperatively at 30 days. Conclusions: Regional anesthesia offers sufficient analgesia during the hospital stay for shoulder arthroplasty procedures while adhering to high patient comfort and satisfaction, with low complications.

  12. Neurinoma del plexo braquial simulando metastasis de adenocarcinoma de mama Schwannoma of the brachial plexus resembling a breast adenocarcinoma metastasis

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    Gregorio Rodríguez Boto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Los neurinomas del plexo braquial son tumores infrecuentes que pueden confundirse con otras lesiones de índole tumoral. Se presenta el caso de una mujer de 40 años, tratada previamente de un adenocarcinoma de mama derecha en el pasado, que en el estudio de extensión realizado 5 años después se detectó una lesión localizada en el plexo braquial derecho. La paciente se encontraba asintomática. El diagnóstico radiológico de presunción fue metástasis de adenocarcinoma mamario. Se realizó un abordaje axilar derecho descubriendo una lesión bien delimitada en el plexo braquial. Con ayuda de la monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria, se observó que la lesión dependía de la rama cubital y se pudo realizar una resección completa preservando la función de dicho nervio. El estudio anatomopatológico confirmó que se trataba de un neurinoma, descartando así la existencia de metástasis. La evolución postoperatoria fue satisfactoria. Seis años después de la intervención no existe recidiva tumoral. En nuestro conocimiento este es el primer caso publicado en la literatura de un neurinoma del plexo braquial dependiente de la rama cubital. La monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria resulta fundamental para abordar este tipo de lesiones con baja morbilidad.Schwa nomas originating from the brachial plexus, although rare, may be mistaken for another type of tumour. A 40 year-old woman, who had been treated years earlier for a breast adenocarcinoma, showed in the 5-year follow-up magnetic resonance examination a localized lesion in the right brachial plexus. The presumptive radiological diagnosis was a metastasis from the primary adenocarcinoma. Following surgical access via the right axilla, a well-circumscribed mass in the brachial plexus was detected. Under intraoperative electrophysiological guidance, the lesion was observed to depend on the ulnar nerve and its complete resection was possible without compromising nerve

  13. Research progress of dorsal root entry zone lesioning for the treatment of pain after brachial plexus avulsion

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    Qing-jun LIU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pain after brachial plexus avulsion (BPA is a clinically common drug-refractory neuropathic pain. Overactive spontaneous potential due to deafferentation in the neurons of spinal dorsal horn is the main pathogenesis of pain after BPA. Dorsal root entry zone (DREZ lesioning is one way that damages overactive spontaneous potential neurons in spinal dorsal horn through radio-frequency electrode or bipolar coagulation so as to achieve pain relief. Dorsal root entry zone lesioning is a safe and effective treatment approach for pain after BPA. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.014

  14. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized, Parallel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-10-01

    Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n = 47; SCBPB group: n = 46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5-C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 μg increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P = 0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P blocks. However, SCBPB produces a better motor blockade and a lower incidence of Horner's syndrome than ISBPB.

  15. Reliability and accuracy assessment of radiation therapy oncology group-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus contouring

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    Velde, Joris van de [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; Gersem, Werner de; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Vuye, Philippe; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan; Herde, Katharina d' ; Kerckaert, Ingrid; Hoof, Tom van [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    The goal of this work was to validate the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus (BP) contouring by determining the intra- and interobserver agreement. Accuracy of the delineation process was determined using anatomically validated imaging datasets as a gold standard. Five observers delineated the right BP on three cadaver computed tomography (CT) datasets. To assess intraobserver variation, every observer repeated each delineation three times with a time interval of 2 weeks. The BP contours were divided into four regions for detailed analysis. Inter- and intraobserver variation was verified using the Computerized Environment for Radiation Research (CERR) software. Accuracy was measured using anatomically validated fused CT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets by measuring the BP inclusion of the delineations. The overall kappa (κ) values were rather low (mean interobserver overall κ: 0.29, mean intraobserver overall κ: 0.45), indicating poor inter- and intraobserver reliability. In general, the κ coefficient decreased gradually from the medial to lateral BP regions. The total agreement volume (TAV) was much smaller than the union volume (UV) for all delineations, resulting in a low Jaccard index (JI; interobserver agreement 0-0.124; intraobserver agreement 0.004-0.636). The overall accuracy was poor, with an average total BP inclusion of 38 %. Inclusions were insufficient for the most lateral regions (region 3: 21.5 %; region 4: 12.6 %). The inter- and intraobserver reliability of the RTOG-endorsed BP contouring guidelines was poor. BP inclusion worsened from the medial to lateral regions. Accuracy assessment of the contours showed an average BP inclusion of 38 %. For the first time, this was assessed using the original anatomically validated BP volume. The RTOG-endorsed BP guidelines have insufficient accuracy and reliability, especially for the lateral head-and-neck regions. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war

  16. Analysis of normal and dysplastic glenohumeral morphology at magnetic resonance imaging in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy

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    Bunt, Fabian van de [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pearl, Michael L.; Lee, Eric K.; Peng, Lauren; Didomenico, Paul [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Glenoid version and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line are commonly used 2-D measures to assess deformity of the glenohumeral joint of children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. To assess whether glenoid version and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line would be altered by standardizing the measurements to the orientation of the scapula. Twenty-one bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated by four reviewers. Measurements were performed on the axial image slices and again after applying 3-D reformatting. Three-dimensional reformatting led to intrapatient corrections up to 25 for version and -30% for percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line. The mean difference on the involved side between clinical and anatomical version across all subjects from all reviewers was 2.2 ± 3.9 (range: -4.5 to 11.5 ). The mean difference in the percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line after reformatting was -1.8% (range: -15.9% to 5.2%). Measurements can differ greatly for the same child depending on technical factors of image acquisition and presentation in the clinical setting. With this study, we present a clinically accessible protocol to correct for scapular orientation from MRI data of children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. (orig.)

  17. Permanent brachial plexus birth palsy does not impair the development and function of the spine and lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirjavainen, Mikko O; Remes, Ville M; Peltonen, Jari; Helenius, Ilkka J; Rautakorpi, Sanna M; Vähäsarja, Vesa J; Pöyhiä, Tiina H; Nietosvaara, Yrjänä

    2009-11-01

    Permanent brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) impairs the function of the affected upper limb. Avulsion type root injuries may damage the cervical spinal cord. Whether abnormal function of an upper limb affected by BPBP has any observable effects on the development of the locomotion system and overall motor function has not been clarified in depth. A total of 111 patients who had undergone brachial plexus surgery for BPBP in infancy were examined after a mean follow-up time of 13 (5-32) years. Patients' physical activities were recorded by a questionnaire. No significant inequalities in leg length were found and the incidence of structural scoliosis (1.7%) did not differ from that of the reference population. Nearly half of the patients (43%) had asynchronous motion of the upper limbs during gait, which was associated with impaired upper limb function. Data obtained from the completed questionnaires indicated that only few patients were unable to participate in normal activities such as: bicycling, cross-country skiing or swimming. Not surprisingly, 71% of the patients reported problems related to the affected upper limb, such as muscle weakness and/or joint stiffness during the aforementioned activities.

  18. [Comparison of blockage effect of axillary brachial plexus block between ultrasound guidance alone and ultrasound guidance plus neurostimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Yang; Lin, Hui-hua; Wang, Tian-long

    2013-06-04

    To compare the blockage effect of multiple injection axillary brachial plexus blockage between ultrasound guidance alone and ultrasound guidance plus neurostimulation. Upon the approval of institutional ethical committee, a total of 166 patients underwent hand, forearm and distal arm operations under axillary brachial plexus blockage from January to May in 2011 at Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital. They were randomly allocated to receive either ultrasound guidance plus nerve stimulation (group US-NS, n = 83) or ultrasound guidance alone (group US, n = 83) for nerve localization. Ten milliliter ropivacaine 0.5% was administered separately on each nerve. Blockage time, needle frequency, success rate, onset of sensory and motor blocks, procedure-related complications (vascular puncture, acute nerve injury and tourniquet pain, etc.) and patient satisfaction were recorded. The procedure time was shorter in US group than in US-NS group [(3.3 ± 1.5) vs (5.3 ± 2.0) min, P axillary blockage with ultrasound guidance yield similar success rates whether or not combined with nerve stimulation guidance. There appears to be a lower incidence rates of complications for ultrasound guidance alone versus ultrasound guidance plus neurostimulation.

  19. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  20. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established. This study aimed to determine between session reliability and measurement errors of 3D-ULMA using the acromion method (AM) in children with OBPP. Ten participants (mean 10 years, range 7-15 years, Narakas classification I-III) completed 3D-ULMA on two occasions, mean interval of 8.6 d (±2.8 d). Kinematic data were captured by a 4-CODA cx1 optoelectronic tracking system. Participants performed three trials of the modified Mallet scale tasks. Local coordinate systems, segment and joint rotations were defined as recommended by the International Society of Biomechanics. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 2,K) and standard error of measurement (SEM) were calculated for task duration, range and joint angle at point of task achievement (PTA). Results indicated poor reliability for spatiotemporal parameters and range. Moderate to excellent reliability at PTA was observed in 19/60 variables (ICC: 0.77-0.98; SEM: 3.5°-10.4°). The Abduction Task had the highest (ICC: 0.79-0.98; SEM: 3.5°-10.3°) with External Rotation the lowest reliability. Glenohumeral and thoracohumeral elevation had the most consistent reliability. Scapular protraction/retraction had consistently poor reliability (ICC: 0-0.72; SEM: 3.5°-10.2°) with axial rotation also poor (ICC: 0.00-0.91; SEM: 6.3°-32.8°). This study determined inconsistent test-retest reliability of 3D-ULMA, using AM, to track dynamic performance of functional tasks in children with OBPP. It is the first study to outline measurement error in this population. This information permits more reliable interpretation of future studies of kinematic patterns in children with OBPP.

  1. Coracoid Abnormalities and Their Relationship with Glenohumeral Deformities in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

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    Wentz Melissa J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with incomplete recovery from obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI usually develop secondary muscle imbalances and bone deformities at the shoulder joint. Considerable efforts have been made to characterize and correct the glenohumeral deformities, and relatively less emphasis has been placed on the more subtle ones, such as those of the coracoid process. The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the relationship between coracoid abnormalities and glenohumeral deformities in OBPI patients. We hypothesize that coracoscapular angles and distances, as well as coracohumeral distances, diminish with increasing glenohumeral deformity, whereas coracoid overlap will increase. Methods 39 patients (age range: 2-13 years, average: 4.7 years, with deformities secondary to OBPI were included in this study. Parameters for quantifying coracoid abnormalities (coracoscapular angle, coracoid overlap, coracohumeral distance, and coracoscapular distance and shoulder deformities (posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion were measured on CT images from these patients before any surgical intervention. Paired Student t-tests and Pearson correlations were used to analyze different parameters. Results Significant differences between affected and contralateral shoulders were found for all coracoid and shoulder deformity parameters. Percent of humeral head anterior to scapular line (PHHA, glenoid version, coracoscapular angles, and coracoscapular and coracohumeral distances were significantly lower for affected shoulders compared to contralateral ones. Coracoid overlap was significantly higher for affected sides compared to contralateral sides. Significant and positive correlations were found between coracoscapular distances and glenohumeral parameters (PHHA and version, as well as between coracoscapular angles and glenohumeral parameters, for affected shoulders. Moderate and positive correlations existed between coracoid

  2. Topographic pattern of the brachial plexus at the axillary fossa through real-time ultrasonography in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin Hye; Kim, Youn Jin; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Dong Yeon; Lee, Guie Yong; Kim, Chi Hyo

    2014-11-01

    The ability to explore the anatomy has improved our appreciation of the brachial anatomy and the quality of regional anesthesia. Using real-time ultrasonography, we investigated the cross-sectional anatomy of the brachial plexus and of vessels at the axillary fossa in Koreans. One hundred and thirty-one patients scheduled to undergo surgery in the region below the elbow were enrolled after giving their informed written consent. Using the 5-12 MHz linear probe of an ultrasound system, we examined cross-sectional images of the brachial plexus in the supine position with the arm abducted by 90°, the shoulder externally rotated, and the forearm flexed by 90° at the axillary fossa. The results of the nerve positions were expressed on a 12-section pie chart and the numbers of arteries and veins were reported. Applying gentle pressure to prevent vein collapse, the positions of the nerves changed easily and showed a clockwise order around the axillary artery (AA). The most frequent positions were observed in the 10-11 section (79.2%) for the median, 1-2 section (79.3%) for the ulnar, 3-5 section (78.4%) for the radial, and 8-9 section (86.9%) for the musculocutaneous nerve. We also noted anatomical variations consisting of double arteries (9.2%) and multiple axillary veins (87%). Using real-time ultrasonography, we found that the anatomical pattern of the major nerves in Koreans was about 80% of the frequent position of individual nerves, 90.8% of the single AA, and 87% of multiple veins around the AA.

  3. Addition of Liposome Bupivacaine to Bupivacaine HCl Versus Bupivacaine HCl Alone for Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block in Patients Having Major Shoulder Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandepitte, C.; Kuroda, M.; Witvrouw, R.; Anne, L.; Bellemans, J.; Corten, K.; Vanelderen, P.J.; Mesotten, D.; Leunen, I.; Heylen, M.; Boxstael, S. Van; Golebiewski, M.; Velde, M. van de; Knezevic, N.N.; Hadzic, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We examined whether liposome bupivacaine (Exparel) given in the interscalene brachial plexus block lowers pain in the setting of multimodal postoperative pain management for major shoulder surgery. METHODS: Fifty-two adult patients were randomized to receive either 5 mL of

  4. Musculoskeletal growth in the upper arm in infants after obstetric brachial plexus lesions partial denervation and its relation with residual muscle function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruoff, J.M.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; Jaspers, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Denervation after obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) is associated with reduced musculoskeletal growth in the upper arm. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced growth of upper arm flexor and extensor muscles is related to active elbow function and humeral length. Method In

  5. Elbow Flexion Contractures in Childhood in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions: A Longitudinal Study of 20 Neurosurgically Reconstructed Infants with 8-Year Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, M.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; van Royen, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Little knowledge exists on the development of elbow flexion contractures in children with obstetrical brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). This study aims to evaluate the prognostic significance of several neuromuscular parameters in infants with OBPL regarding the later development of elbow

  6. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus block decreases the incidence of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular punctures and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with peripheral nerve stimulator in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia-Min; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Fu, Shu-Kun; Yuan, Chao-Qun; Chen, Kai; Li, Jia-Yi; Li, Quan

    2012-05-01

    The use of traditional techniques (such as landmark techniques, paresthesia and peripheral nerve stimulator) for upper-limb anesthesia has often been restricted to the expert or enthusiast, which was blind. Recently, ultrasound (US) has been applied to differ blood vessel, pleura and nerve, thus may reduce the risk of complications while have a high rate of success. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of ultrasound guidance (vs. peripheral nerve stimulator, (PNS)) decreases risk of vascular puncture, risk of hemi-diaphragmatic paresis and risk of Horner syndrome and improves the success rate of nerve block. A search strategy was developed to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) reporting on complications of US and PNS guidance for upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (brachial plexus) in adults available through PubMed databases, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase databases, SinoMed databases and Wanfang data (date up to 2011-12-20). Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data. Risk ratios (OR) were calculated for each outcome and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI) with the software of Review Manager 5.1.0 System (Cochrane Library). Sixteen trials involving 1321 adults met our criteria were included for analysis. Blocks performed using US guidance were more likely to be successful (risk ratio (RR) for block success 0.36, 95%CI 0.23 - 0.56, P block performance (RR 0.13, 95%CI 0.06 - 0.27, P complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (RR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03 - 0.52, P = 0.0001). US decreases risks of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular puncture and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with techniques that utilize PNS for nerve localization. Larger studies are needed to determine whether or not the use of US can decrease risk of neurologic complications.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Administered with or without Adrenaline for the Paravertebral Brachial Plexus Block in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Amélie; Troncy, Eric; Guillot, Martin; Varin, France; Del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2017-01-01

    Adrenaline is known to prolong the duration of local anesthesia but its effects on the pharmacokinetic processes of local anesthetic drugs are not fully understood. Our objective was to develop a compartmental model for quantification of adrenaline's impact on the pharmacokinetics of perineurally-injected lidocaine in the dog. Dogs were subjected to paravertebral brachial plexus block using lidocaine alone or adrenalinated lidocaine. Data was collected through a prospective, randomised, blinded crossover protocol performed over three periods. Blood samples were collected during 180 minutes following block execution. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed and their goodness-of-fit were compared. The lowering effects of adrenaline on the absorption of lidocaine were statistically determined with one-sided tests. A one-compartment disposition model with two successive zero-order absorption processes best fitted our experimental data. Adrenaline decreased the peak plasma lidocaine concentration by approximately 60% (P Adrenaline decreased the absorption rate of lidocaine and prolonged the duration of its absorption.

  8. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life Components in Children With Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kate W-C; Austin, Amy; Yeaman, Jan; Phillips, Lauren; Kratz, Anna; Yang, Lynda J-S; Carlozzi, Noelle E

    2017-04-01

    Currently, no published, validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) exist for use with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). NBPP is a debilitating condition that occurs during the perinatal period, resulting in paralysis/paresis and loss of sensation in the affected arm. Commonly used NBPP measures are not comprehensive and do not fully account for clinically meaningful changes in function or progression of the disorder. To evaluate important components of HRQOL for children with NBPP and identify where new PRO measures are needed. Eleven focus groups comprising children with NBPP (4), family members (6), and professional providers (1) to assess HRQOL. Brachial plexus clinic. Children with NBPP, their parents, and professional providers. Children 7-17 years old with NBPP; parents/caregivers at least 18 years of age; professionals with ≥2 years' experience providing NBPP clinical care; ability to read and speak English fluently. Focus group sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and deidentified. Qualitative frequency analysis identified different aspects of HRQOL relevant to NBPP. This analysis expands on the grounded-theory approach to qualitative analysis, including development of a domain framework, open and axial coding, selective coding, and descriptive analysis. The resulting HRQOL domain framework (and frequency analysis) was then compared to the domain framework for existing PRO measures (PROMIS and Neuro-QoL) to identify components of HRQOL where new PRO measures are needed for NBPP. Not applicable. Although many physical, social, and emotional health domains were captured by existing PRO measures, some significant NBPP-specific topics emerged from qualitative analysis-functionality, sensory, physical appearance, arm/hand compensation and preference, explaining functionality/appearance to others, and self-esteem and body image concerns. Development of sensitive and specific measures capturing arm

  10. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J [The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  11. Correlation of pediatric outcomes data collection instrument with measures of active movement in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M; Zurakowski, David

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the range of Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) scores in children with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and determine its correlation with 3 published measures of active motion and function. One hundred fifty children with BPBP between the ages of 2 and 10 years were evaluated. Active upper-extremity motion was assessed using the modified Mallet Classification (MC), the Toronto Test score (TTS), and the Hospital for Sick Children Active Movement Scale. At the time of evaluation, patients and/or families were administered the age-appropriate PODCI questionnaire, and PODCI scores were compared with published normative data. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the correlation between MC, TTS, and Active Movement Scale as predictors of PODCI scores. Mean PODCI global function score in the BPBP patients was 82.4 (range, 35.1-100), significantly lower than the published value of 93.3 in healthy, age-matched norms (P MC correlated most highly with PODCI global function scores in patients aged 2 to 5 years, whereas the TTSs best correlated with global function in patients aged 6 to 10 years. Brachial plexus birth palsy patients have lower global and upper-extremity function compared with their healthy, age-matched peers, as measured by the PODCI. Physician-derived measures of active movement correlate with the patient/parent-derived PODCI scores and may be used to predict global function, upper-extremity function, and sports/physical activity in children 2 to 10 years of age with BPBP.

  12. Nerve transfer versus muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion after pan-brachial plexus injury: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Arvin R; Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Brown, Justin M; Mandeville, Ross

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Pan-brachial plexus injury (PBPI), involving C5-T1, disproportionately affects young males, causing lifelong disability and decreased quality of life. The restoration of elbow flexion remains a surgical priority for these patients. Within the first 6 months of injury, transfer of spinal accessory nerve (SAN) fascicles via a sural nerve graft or intercostal nerve (ICN) fascicles to the musculocutaneous nerve can restore elbow flexion. Beyond 1 year, free-functioning muscle transplantation (FFMT) of the gracilis muscle can be used to restore elbow flexion. The authors present the first cost-effectiveness model to directly compare the different treatment strategies available to a patient with PBPI. This model assesses the quality of life impact, surgical costs, and possible income recovered through restoration of elbow flexion. METHODS A Markov model was constructed to simulate a 25-year-old man with PBPI without signs of recovery 4.5 months after injury. The management options available to the patient were SAN transfer, ICN transfer, delayed FFMT, or no treatment. Probabilities of surgical success rates, quality of life measurements, and disability were derived from the published literature. Cost-effectiveness was defined using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) defined by the ratio between costs of a treatment strategy and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. A strategy was considered cost-effective if it yielded an ICER less than a willingness-to-pay of $50,000/QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was performed to address parameter uncertainty. RESULTS The base case model demonstrated a lifetime QALYs of 22.45 in the SAN group, 22.0 in the ICN group, 22.3 in the FFMT group, and 21.3 in the no-treatment group. The lifetime costs of income lost through disability and interventional/rehabilitation costs were $683,400 in the SAN group, $727,400 in the ICN group, $704,900 in the FFMT group, and $783,700 in the no

  13. The brain plasticity in patients with brachial plexus root avulsion after contralateral C7 nerve-root transfer: a FDG-PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, C.T.; Guan, Y.H.; Xu, W.D.; Zhao, J.; Sun, G.X.; Lin, X.T.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To study FDG-PET for imaging the brain plasticity in patients with brachial plexus root avulsion after contralateral C7 nerve-root transfer. Methods: One male patient with left brachial plexus root avulsion underwent a two-stage procedure (first phase: C7 root → ulnar nerve; second phase: ulnar nerve → recipient nerve) 4 years ago; Another with right brachial plexus root avulsion also underwent a two-stage procedure 3 years ago. First two patients underwent basic FDG-PET imaging, the next day FDG-PET scans were performed after initiative or passive limb movement. Using ROI and MPI tools to evaluate the images. The ratios of sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami to white matter were used as the semiquantitive index. Results: Whether brain plasticity had occurred was determined by whether the affected limb can perform initiative movement. The increases in glucose metabolism of left sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami in patient with left brachial plexus root avulsion were 40.1%, 37.9%, 48.3%, 31.9% after initiative movement, the right corresponding brain regions were 39.4%, 34.3%, 48.5%,35.4% respectively. However, the increases in glucose metabolism of left sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami in patient with right brachial plexus root avulsion were increased by 12.6%, 9.6%, 10.7%, 5.3% after passive movement, the right corresponding brain regions were respectively 17.9%, 12.9%, 15.4%, 10.1%. It was founded that the metabolism of bilateral sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami increased after initiative movement, while the metabolism of right sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami increased more obviously than that of the left brain regions when using MPI tool to substract the images before and after the affected limb movement. Conclusions: Sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami were necessary to the initiative movement. After being activated by movement, the metabolisms of plasticised brain regions increased obviously. However, the

  14. The Vienna psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexus injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hruby, Laura Antonia; Pittermann, Anna; Sturma, Agnes; Aszmann, Oskar Christian

    2018-01-01

    Background Global brachial plexopathies cause major sensory and motor deficits in the affected arm and hand. Many patients report of psychosocial consequences including chronic pain, decreased self-sufficiency, and poor body image. Bionic reconstruction, which includes the amputation and prosthetic replacement of the functionless limb, has been shown to restore hand function in patients where classic reconstructions have failed. Patient selection and psychological evaluation before such a lif...

  15. Buprenorphine as an adjuvant to 0.5% ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A randomized, double-blind, prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block is ideal for upper limb surgical procedures. Buprenorphine used as an adjuvant to ropivacaine may prolong analgesia. Aims: The aim is to assess the analgesic efficacy and safety of buprenorphine added to 0.5% ropivacaine solution. Settings and Design: This prospective, double-blind, randomized study was conducted on 60 adult patients of the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I and II undergoing various upper limb surgeries under ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Subjects and Methods: Patients were allocated into two groups of 30 each to receive either 30 ml 0.5% ropivacaine with 1 ml buprenorphine (0.3 mg (Group B or 30 ml 0.5% ropivacaine with 1 ml normal saline (Group C for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Onset, duration, and quality of sensory block and motor block; duration of analgesia and side effects were observed. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was significantly longer in Group B (868.2 ± 77.78 min than in Group C (439.3 ± 51.19 min. The mean duration of motor and sensory block were significantly longer in Group B (451.8 ± 57.18 min and (525.8 ± 50 min, respectively, than in Group C (320.5 ± 43.62 min and (373 ± 53.78 min, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Addition of buprenorphine to ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block prolonged the duration of sensory and motor blockade and postoperative analgesia without an increase in side effects.

  16. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Kooten, Ed O; Jaspers, Richard T; Mullender, Margriet G; van Doorn-Loogman, Mirjam H; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2009-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods: This is a prospective study on 24 children w...

  17. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Kooten, Ed O; Mullender, Margriet G; van Doorn-Loogman, Mirjam H; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 chi...

  18. Effect of dexmedetomidine as adjuvant in ropivacaine-induced supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective, double-blinded and randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Different additives have been used to prolong brachial plexus block. We evaluated the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade. The primary endpoints were the onset and duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 84 patients (20-50 years posted for elective forearm and hand surgery under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were divided into two equal groups (Group R and RD in a randomized, double-blind fashion. In group RD (n = 42 30 ml 0.5% ropivacaine +1 ml (100 μg of dexmedetomidine and group R (n = 42 30 ml 0.5% ropivacaine +1 ml normal saline were administered in supraclavicular block. Sensory and motor block onset times and block durations, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS, hemodynamics and side-effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Though with similar demographic profile in both groups, sensory and motor block in group RD (P < 0.05 was earlier than group R. Sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use were significantly longer and the total need for rescue analgesics was lower in group RD (P < 0.05 than group R. Post-operative VAS value at 12 h were significantly lower in group RD (P < 0.05. Intra-operative hemodynamics were significantly lower in group RD (P < 0.05 without any appreciable side-effects. Conclusion: It can be concluded that adding dexmedetomidine to supraclavicular brachial plexus block increases the sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use, and decreases total analgesic use with no side-effects.

  19. Is there a dose response of dexamethasone as adjuvant for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block? A prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabin; Richman, Kenneth A; Grodofsky, Samuel R; Bhatt, Siya; Huffman, George Russell; Kelly, John D; Glaser, David L; Elkassabany, Nabil

    2015-05-01

    The study objective is to examine the analgesic effect of 3 doses of dexamethasone in combination with low concentration local anesthetics to determine the lowest effective dose of dexamethasone for use as an adjuvant in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. The design is a prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study. The setting is an academic medical center. The patients are 89 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. All patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 4 treatment groups: (i) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL; (ii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 1-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; (iii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 2-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; and (iv) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 4-mg preservative-free dexamethasone. All patients received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks and general anesthesia. The measurements are the duration of analgesia and motor block. The median analgesia duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block with 0.25% bupivacaine was 12.1 hours; and 1-, 2-, or 4-mg dexamethasone significantly prolonged the analgesia duration to 22.3, 23.3, and 21.2 hours, respectively (P = .0105). Dexamethasone also significantly extended the duration of motor nerve block in a similar trend (P = .0247). Low-dose dexamethasone (1-2 mg) prolongs analgesia duration and motor blockade to the similar extent as 4-mg dexamethasone when added to 0.25% bupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. K. Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR] strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%, while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block.

  1. Reconstruction of shoulder abduction and external rotation with latissimus dorsi and teres major transfer in obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Kahraman; Bülbül, Murat; Demir, Bilal Birkan; Büyükkurt, Cem Dinçay; Ayanoğlu, Semih; Esenyel, Cem Zeki

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the results of latissimus dorsi and teres major tendon transfer to the rotator cuff together with musculotendinous lengthening of the subscapularis and/or pectoralis major muscles in patients with internal rotation contracture and decreased external rotation and abduction secondary to obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. Thirty patients (18 boys, 12 girls; mean age 9 years; range 4 to 15 years) with internal rotation contracture and loss of external rotation and abduction of the shoulder secondary to obstetrical brachial plexus palsy underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi/teres major tendons to the rotator cuff. In addition, musculotendinous lengthening of the subscapularis and pectoralis major (n=15), pectoralis major (n=9), and subscapularis (n=6) were performed. Nine patients had upper plexus involvement (C5-6), 14 had C5-7 involvement, and seven had complete plexus involvement (C5-T1). According to the Waters and Peljovich classification, all the patients had a congruent glenohumeral joint, which was classified as type 1 in one patient, type 2 in 15 patients, and type 3 in 14 patients. Pre- and postoperative range of motion values of the patients were measured and their motor functions were evaluated with the Mallet scoring system. The mean follow-up period was 47.8 months (range 9 to 84 months). Preoperatively, the mean active abduction was 75.8°, and the mean active external rotation was 25.2°. Postoperatively, the mean abduction and external rotation increased to 138.3° (by 62.5°, 82.5%) and 76.4 degrees (by 51.2°, 203.2%), respectively. Improvements in the degrees of abduction and external rotation were significant (p=0.000). According to the Mallet scoring system, the mean preoperative global abduction and global external rotation scores were 2.97 and 2.43, respectively; the mean Mallet scores for the ability to move the hand to the mouth, neck, and back were 2.50, 2.17, and 2.67, respectively. Postoperatively, the mean global abduction

  2. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Internal Rotation Contractures in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy. A Minimum 5-Year Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van Wijlen-Hempel, Marie S; Hogendoorn, Simone; de Boer, Kees S; Malessy, Martijn J A; Keurentjes, J Christiaan; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    Brachial plexus birth palsy is frequently associated with internal rotation contractures of the shoulder as a result of muscle imbalance. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in the subscapular (SC) muscle on external rotation and the need for tendon transfer for external rotation of the shoulder. A prospective comparative study was performed including 15 consecutive patients treated with BTX-A and a historic control group of 67 patients with mean age 30 months (SD 10). The BTX-A injection (2 IU/kg body weight) was performed immediately following MRI under general anesthesia in the SC muscle. Passive external rotation, the need for tendon transfer surgery, glenohumeral deformity, and muscle degeneration were evaluated. The hazard ratio for no relapse of internal rotation contracture after BTX-A injection compared with no BTX-A injection was calculated. In the BTX-A group, the passive external rotation in adduction increased from -1 degree (95% CI, -10 to 8) to 32 degrees (95% CI, 17-46) at 3 months and 6 patients were indicated for surgery compared with a decline from -2 degrees (95% CI, -7 to 3) to -11 degrees (95% CI, -17 to -6) in the control group with 66 indications for surgery. At 5 years of follow-up, 10 patients in the BTX-A group were indicated for surgery with a hazard ratio of 4.0 (95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4). BTX-A injection in the SC muscle of brachial plexus birth palsy patients can reduce internal rotation contractures and subsequently the need for tendon transfer surgery. At 5 years of follow-up a relapse was seen in 67% of the patients treated with BTX-A. Because at MRI less SC degeneration was found in the good responders on BTX-A treatment, this group seems to be the best target group. Further research is needed on patient selection for BTX-A injection including glenohumeral deformity, SC degeneration, as well as doses of BTX-A to be used. Level II-prospective comparative study.

  3. Plexus brachialis strain and compression deformation in the costo-axillary-brachial region: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskis, Edgars; Skuja, Sandra; Evansa, Irina; Steina, Eva; Pīlipa, Anna Sondore; Vābels, Grigorijs; Teibe, Uldis; Jansons, Haralds; Groma, Valērija; Vanags, Indulis

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of different mechanisms in nerve injury during arm abduction positions. The tasks were to determine the strain deformation of the plexus brachialis during arm abduction, to measure the pressures in the neurovascular bundle in the cervico-costoclavicular-axillary area, and evaluate the histological changes of nerve after the stretch test. During the cadaveric study on 7 specimens 7-20 h after death, strain deformation of plexus brachialis as well as compression deformation caused by the surrounding structures of the neurovascular bundle were investigated in the arm abduction position of 0°, 90°, 12°, 150°, and 180°. One nerve sample was studied histologically after 15% stretch on the bench. The relative strain deformation of 3%-23% was documented during 0° to 180° abduction tests. The strain deformation from 0° to 90° was significant (P<0.001). The mean pressure change in the bundle was 13.6 mm Hg at 90°, 53.7 mm Hg at 120°, 73.4 mm Hg at 150°, and 89.0 mm Hg at 180° arm abduction. An increase in pressure was significant in the intervals: 0°-90° (P<0.001), 91°-120° (P<0.001), 121°-150° (P<0.001) and 151°-180° (P<0.05). Nerve traction and tissue compression arising during the arm abduction above 90° were found to be sufficient to induce lesions in neural bundles of the plexus brachialis.

  4. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães -1: aspectos clínicos e neurológicos Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs -1: clinical and neurological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    ; superficial skin sensorial loss distal to the elbow; dorsal carpal skin abrasions and ulceration. The association of these results with histologic and electroneurostimulation exams (described in part 2 and 3 of this work respectively suggested in all cases an almost total involvement of brachial plexus roots.

  5. The superficial brachial artery passing superficially to the pectoral ansa, the highest superficial brachial artery (Arteria brachialis superficialis suprema).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Satoru; Kawai, Katsushi; Koizumi, Masahiro; Kodama, Kodo

    2011-06-01

    The human superficial brachial artery passes superficially to the median nerve and can be classified into three subtypes according to its topographical relationship to the pectoral ansa. When the superficial brachial artery passes superficially to the pectoral ansa, it is defined as the highest superficial artery. We found the highest superficial brachial arteries in both arms of a single cadaver. The right one coexisted with a normal axillary artery, and its identification was not difficult. The left one ran medially to the brachial plexus proximally and became superficial to the brachial plexus after branching off the artery, which gave the subscapular artery, then passed between the radial nerve and its accessory root from deep to superficial and ended as an inferior collateral ulnar artery. We also found a muscular axillary arch in each of the arms, both of which were innervated by the medialmost branch from the pectoral ansa. The right highest superficial brachial artery passed deep to the nerve to the muscular axillary arch. We conjectured that the left axillary artery is where the highest superficial brachial artery, as found on the right, coexists with the axillary artery in the case of Adachi's C-type brachial plexus (AxC). Then, the highest superficial brachial artery develops as a main stem, and the latter remains as a rudimentary AxC. Because the left axillary artery is caught on neither the pectoral ansa nor its branches, the left axillary artery can shift medially to the brachial plexus, and its true form is not obvious.

  6. The Vienna psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Antonia Hruby

    Full Text Available Global brachial plexopathies cause major sensory and motor deficits in the affected arm and hand. Many patients report of psychosocial consequences including chronic pain, decreased self-sufficiency, and poor body image. Bionic reconstruction, which includes the amputation and prosthetic replacement of the functionless limb, has been shown to restore hand function in patients where classic reconstructions have failed. Patient selection and psychological evaluation before such a life-changing procedure are crucial for optimal functional outcomes. In this paper we describe a psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with complete brachial plexopathies and present psychosocial outcome variables associated with bionic reconstruction.Between 2013 and 2017 psychosocial assessments were performed in eight patients with global brachial plexopathies. We conducted semi-structured interviews exploring the psychosocial adjustment related to the accident, the overall psychosocial status, as well as motivational aspects related to an anticipated amputation and expectations of functional prosthetic outcome. During the interview patients were asked to respond freely. Their answers were transcribed verbatim by the interviewer and analyzed afterwards on the basis of a pre-defined item scoring system. The interview was augmented by quantitative evaluation of self-reported mental health and social functioning (SF-36 Health Survey, body image (FKB-20 and deafferentation pain (VAS. Additionally, psychosocial outcome variables were presented for seven patients before and after bionic reconstruction.Qualitative data revealed several psychological stressors with long-term negative effects on patients with complete brachial plexopathies. 88% of patients felt functionally limited to a great extent due to their disability, and all of them reported constant, debilitating pain in the deafferented hand. After bionic reconstruction the physical

  7. The Vienna psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Laura Antonia; Pittermann, Anna; Sturma, Agnes; Aszmann, Oskar Christian

    2018-01-01

    Global brachial plexopathies cause major sensory and motor deficits in the affected arm and hand. Many patients report of psychosocial consequences including chronic pain, decreased self-sufficiency, and poor body image. Bionic reconstruction, which includes the amputation and prosthetic replacement of the functionless limb, has been shown to restore hand function in patients where classic reconstructions have failed. Patient selection and psychological evaluation before such a life-changing procedure are crucial for optimal functional outcomes. In this paper we describe a psychosocial assessment procedure for bionic reconstruction in patients with complete brachial plexopathies and present psychosocial outcome variables associated with bionic reconstruction. Between 2013 and 2017 psychosocial assessments were performed in eight patients with global brachial plexopathies. We conducted semi-structured interviews exploring the psychosocial adjustment related to the accident, the overall psychosocial status, as well as motivational aspects related to an anticipated amputation and expectations of functional prosthetic outcome. During the interview patients were asked to respond freely. Their answers were transcribed verbatim by the interviewer and analyzed afterwards on the basis of a pre-defined item scoring system. The interview was augmented by quantitative evaluation of self-reported mental health and social functioning (SF-36 Health Survey), body image (FKB-20) and deafferentation pain (VAS). Additionally, psychosocial outcome variables were presented for seven patients before and after bionic reconstruction. Qualitative data revealed several psychological stressors with long-term negative effects on patients with complete brachial plexopathies. 88% of patients felt functionally limited to a great extent due to their disability, and all of them reported constant, debilitating pain in the deafferented hand. After bionic reconstruction the physical component summary

  8. Effects of Exercise Training With Proprioceptive Equipment on Proprioceptive and Functional Status of Children with Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Injury

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    Deran Oskay

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Decreased proprioception in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury (OBPI reduces the quality of functional movement. Hence, the aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training with additional proprioceptive equipments on the functional status and proprioceptive sense in children with OBPI. Methods: Forty children with OBPI were randomly divided into two groups. Passive, active and active-assisted range of motion and stretching exercises were included in home-based program (HP group while additional exercises with proprioceptive equipments were also added in the proprioceptive training (PT group. After 6 weeks, proprioceptive perception and functional level were compared to pre-treatment results. Results: Proprioceptive perception at the beginning and at the end of the movement increased in both groups (p<0,05. The Active Movement Scale (AMS scores increased significantly only in some movements in both groups (p<0,05. AMS scores of shoulder abduction and external rotation in PT group were better than HP group (p<0,05. Conclusion: Home exercise program and proprioceptive exercise training both improve proprioceptive sense and functional status in children with OBPI. The proprioceptive exercise training seems to be more beneficial in improving functional movements of shoulder.

  9. Transfer of latissmus dorsi and teres major tendons without subscapularis release for the treatment of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy sequela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozben, Hakan; Atalar, Ata Can; Bilsel, Kerem; Demirhan, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    Patients with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) sequela exhibit adduction and internal rotation contractures. The muscular imbalance may result in secondary bony changes. Tendon transfers and muscular releases may improve shoulder function in these patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional and radiological results of pectoralis major tendon Z-plasty with transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons to rotator cuff tendons without release of subscapularis muscle in patients with mild sequela of OBPP. Twenty-six consecutive patients, who were treated with tendon transfer and met the eligibility criteria, were included in the study. No additional humeral osteotomy or subscapularis tenotomy was performed. Functional evaluation is made according to range of motion and Mallet scoring system. Preoperative radiologic evaluation was made according to the grading system of Waters. A significant increase in shoulder function was found in all patients. Postoperative radiographs revealed glenohumeral congruity was maintained in all patients. Improvement in shoulder abduction and external rotation was higher in patients who were operated before the age of 7. Pectoralis major tendon lengthening with transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons to rotator cuff is an effective and reproducible technique and can improve shoulder functions in patients with OBPP. Subscapularis release is not always required to overcome internal rotation contracture. Secondary glenohumeral changes might also be prevented with this approach. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Early effects of muscle atrophy on shoulder joint development in infants with unilateral birth brachial plexus injury.

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    Van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; Jaspers, Richard; Mullender, Margriet; Ouwerkerk, Willem J; Van Der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2011-02-01

    Shoulder deformities in children with a birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI) are caused by muscle imbalances; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the early interactions between shoulder muscles and shoulder joint development. In a retrospective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of 36 infants (21 males, 15 females) younger than 12 months (mean 4.8 mo) with unilateral BBPI, volumes and thicknesses of standardized segments of the infraspinatus, subscapularis, and deltoid muscles were measured in both shoulders and expressed as ratios of pathological/unaffected side. The relation between muscle ratios and humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, glenoid version, and deformity was analysed. Compared with the unaffected side, the muscles of the affected side were of significantly smaller volume and thickness. The subscapularis was the most severely affected muscle, its volume being only 64% (SD 21%) and its thickness only 79% (SD 23%) of the corresponding values on the unaffected side (p atrophy and, possibly, by a reduction in the number of sarcomeres in series. These effects are strongly related to shoulder joint subluxation. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.

  11. Cocontraction measured with short-range stiffness was higher in obstetric brachial plexus lesions patients compared to healthy subjects.

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    Anguelova, Galia V; de Vlugt, Erwin; Vardy, Alistair N; van Zwet, Erik W; van Dijk, J Gert; Malessy, Martijn J A; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2017-10-03

    We suggest short range stiffness (SRS) at the elbow joint as an alternative diagnostic for EMG to assess cocontraction. Elbow SRS is compared between obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) patients and healthy subjects (cross-sectional study design). Seven controls (median 28years) and five patients (median 31years) isometrically flexed and extended the elbow at rest and three additional torques [2.1,4.3,6.4Nm] while a fast stretch stimulus was applied. SRS was estimated in silico using a neuromechanical elbow model simulating the torque response from the imposed elbow angle. SRS was higher in patients (250±36Nm/rad) than in controls (150±21Nm/rad, p=0.014), except for the rest condition. Higher elbow SRS suggested greater cocontraction in patients compared to controls. SRS is a promising mechanical alternative to assess cocontraction, which is a frequently encountered clinical problem in OBPL due to axonal misrouting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PATIENT SATISFACTION- A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN GENERAL ANAESTHESIA AND SUPRA CLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK IN FOREARM ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

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    Lingaraj Sahu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND There are different types, factors and procedures in anaesthesia influencing patient’s satisfaction. We have compared the satisfaction level between general anaesthesia (GA and supra clavicle brachial plexus block (SCBPB and studied few factors which influences the outcome of satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients of age more than 21 years who were admitted for implant removal of the forearm, included in the study. Those operated under GA during previous surgery, were given SCBPB during implant removal and vice versa. Questionnaires based feedbacks were taken twice separately for different anaesthesia they experienced. Statistical analysis was done using student’s t test. RESULTS There is increase in satisfaction level in patients who were operated under SCBPB during present surgery over patients who were operated under SCBPB during previous surgery is 8.78% (*p<0.05. The increase in satisfaction level in present SCBPB group over previous GA group is 32.3% (**p<0.001 which shows strong statistical significance. In comparison between present SCBPB over present GA there is increase in satisfaction level by 14.67% which has a statistical significance at ***p<0.01. CONCLUSION Satisfaction level is more in SCBPB group than GA group. The satisfaction score in shivering, post-operative pain control and early oral intake is high in SCBPB group which indicates that these three factors influence the patient’s satisfaction level.

  13. To determine block establishment time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using blunt versus short bevel needle: A prospective randomized trial

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    V Ahuja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unintentional intraneural injection under ultrasound guidance (USG with fine caliber needles and lower success rate with large caliber Tuohy needles in supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCB have been reported. Materials and Methods: We undertook study to standardize the use of 20-gauge short versus blunt bevel needle for SCB. After approval of Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent, patients were randomized using computer-generated random number table to either of the two groups; blunt bevel needle group (n = 30: SCB under USG using 20-gauge Tuohy needle or short bevel needle group (n = 30: SCB under USG using 20-gauge short bevel needle. The primary outcome of the study was time to establishment of sensory and motor block of individual nerves, and secondary outcome was tolerability and any adverse effects. Results: The time to establishment of sensory and motor block in individual nerve territory was similar in both the groups. The complete sensory and motor anesthesia was achieved in 78.3% patients and complete sensory and motor anesthesia after supplementary block was achieved in 86.6% patients. Paresthesias during SCB were recorded in 15 patients. Out of these eight patients were of blunt bevel group and seven patients were of short bevel group. None of the patients experienced any neurological adverse effects. Conclusion: The establishment of sensory and motor blockade of individual nerves was similar to 20-gauge short and blunt bevel needle under ultrasound guide with no neurological adverse events.

  14. Ontology-based image navigation: exploring 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus using AIM and RadLex.

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    Wang, Kenneth C; Salunkhe, Aditya R; Morrison, James J; Lee, Pearlene P; Mejino, José L V; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James F; Siegel, Eliot L; Rubin, Daniel L; Carrino, John A

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nervous system have traditionally been evaluated using clinical history, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic testing. In selected cases, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR) neurography may help further localize or characterize abnormalities associated with peripheral neuropathies, and the clinical importance of such techniques is increasing. However, MR image interpretation with respect to peripheral nerve anatomy and disease often presents a diagnostic challenge because the relevant knowledge base remains relatively specialized. Using the radiology knowledge resource RadLex®, a series of RadLex queries, the Annotation and Image Markup standard for image annotation, and a Web services-based software architecture, the authors developed an application that allows ontology-assisted image navigation. The application provides an image browsing interface, allowing users to visually inspect the imaging appearance of anatomic structures. By interacting directly with the images, users can access additional structure-related information that is derived from RadLex (eg, muscle innervation, muscle attachment sites). These data also serve as conceptual links to navigate from one portion of the imaging atlas to another. With 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus as the initial area of interest, the resulting application provides support to radiologists in the image interpretation process by allowing efficient exploration of the MR imaging appearance of relevant nerve segments, muscles, bone structures, vascular landmarks, anatomic spaces, and entrapment sites, and the investigation of neuromuscular relationships. RSNA, 2015

  15. Buprenorphine for postoperative analgesia: Axillary brachial plexus block versus intramuscular administration in a placebo-controlled trial

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    Deepali Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Peripheral administration of opioids has been suggested for prolongation of regional analgesia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study was undertaken to compare the effect of regional (axillary brachial plexus block [ABPB] versus intramuscular (IM buprenorphine (2 μg/kg in adults. Material and Methods: Seventy-five adults undergoing upper limb surgery received ABPB with local anaesthetic (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000, 9 ml normal saline [NS]. In addition, regional group RB (n = 25 received buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in ABPB and 1 ml NS IM. Systemic Group SB (n = 25 received 1 ml NS in ABPB and buprenorphine 2 μg/kg IM. Group C (n = 25 received 1 ml NS in ABPB and IM. Onset, duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic parameters, sedation score, pain scores using visual analog scale, duration of postoperative analgesia, rescue analgesic (RA requirement, adverse events, and patient satisfaction were noted. Results: Demographics, onset and duration of sensory, motor block were similar. RB group had longest duration of analgesia (20.61 ± 1.33 h compared to SB (10.91 ± 0.90 h and control group (5.86 ± 0.57 h (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C. RA requirement was highest in the control group and least in RB group (P = 0.000 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C. SB group had a maximum number of side effects (P = 0.041, SB vs. RB/C. Patient satisfaction was highest with group RB (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C, and P = 0.06 SB vs. C. Conclusion: Buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in axillary plexus block provides significantly prolonged analgesia with less RA requirement and greater patient satisfaction compared to IM administration. This is highly suggestive of action on peripheral opioid receptors.

  16. Brachial plexopathy

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    Satish V Khadilkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN, often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise.

  17. Evaluation of Self-Concept and Emotional-Behavioral Functioning of Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury.

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    Belfiore, Lori A; Rosen, Carol; Sarshalom, Rachel; Grossman, Leslie; Sala, Debra A; Grossman, John A I

    2016-01-01

    Background  The reported incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) is 0.87 to 2.2 per 1,000 live births. The psychological functioning, including self-concept and emotional-behavioral functioning, of children with BPBI has only been examined to a limited extent. Objective  The purpose of this study was to describe the self-concept and emotional-behavioral functioning in children with BPBI from both the child's and parent's perspective. Methods  Thirty-one children with BPBI, mean age 11 years 1 month, completed the Draw A Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance (DAP:SPED) and Piers Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (PHCSCS). The parents answered questions from the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parent Rating Scales (BASC-2 PRS). Results  The scores from the DAP:SPED drawings showed further evaluation was not strongly indicated in the majority of the children. The PHCSCS Total score demonstrated that the children had a strongly positive self-concept. The parental responses to the BASC-2 PRS indicated that few children were at risk or in the clinically significant range for the four composite scores and all of the component clinical or adaptive scales. Gender comparison revealed females exhibited greater anxiety than males. Conclusion  Both children and parents reported a positive psychological well-being for the majority of the children. Parents had greater concerns about their child's social-emotional functioning, particularly anxiety. An interdisciplinary approach (occupational therapy evaluation, clinical observation, and parental interview) is necessary to determine the need for mental health referral.

  18. MRI of rotator cuff muscle atrophy in relation to glenohumeral joint incongruence in brachial plexus birth injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H.; Nietosvaara, Yrjaenae A.; Peltonen, Jari I.; Remes, Ville M.; Kirjavainen, Mikko O.; Lamminen, Antti E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate rotator cuff muscles and the glenohumeral (GH) joint in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) using MRI and to determine whether any correlation exists between muscular abnormality and the development of glenoid dysplasia and GH joint incongruity. Thirty-nine consecutive BPBI patients with internal rotation contracture or absent active external rotation of the shoulder joint were examined clinically and imaged with MRI. In the physical examination, passive external rotation was measured to evaluate internal rotation contracture. Both shoulders were imaged and the glenoscapular angle, percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the greatest thickness of the subscapular, infraspinous and supraspinous muscles were measured. The muscle ratio between the affected side and the normal side was calculated to exclude age variation in the assessment of muscle atrophy. All muscles of the rotator cuff were atrophic, with the subscapular and infraspinous muscles being most severely affected. A correlation was found between the percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the extent of subscapular muscle atrophy (r s =0.45, P=0.01), as well as between its ratio (r s =0.5, P P=0.01). Severity of rotator cuff muscle atrophy correlated with increased glenoid retroversion and the degree of internal rotation contracture. Glenoid retroversion and subluxation of the humeral head are common in patients with BPBI. All rotator cuff muscles are atrophic, especially the subscapular muscle. Muscle atrophy due to neurogenic damage apparently results in an imbalance of the shoulder muscles and progressive retroversion and subluxation of the GH joint, which in turn lead to internal rotation contracture and deformation of the joint. (orig.)

  19. Volumetric tumor burden and its effect on brachial plexus dosimetry in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

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    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of gross tumor volume of the primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) disease on planned radiation dose to the brachial plexus (BP) in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Overall, 75 patients underwent definitive IMRT to a median total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. The right BP and left BP were prospectively contoured as separate organs at risk. The GTV was related to BP dose using the unpaired t-test. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine optimized volumetric thresholds of GTV-P and GTV-N corresponding to a maximum BP dose cutoff of > 66 Gy. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for factors associated with a higher maximal BP dose. A higher maximum BP dose (> 66 vs ≤ 66 Gy) correlated with a greater mean GTV-P (79.5 vs 30.8 cc; p = 0.001) and ipsilateral GTV-N (60.6 vs 19.8 cc; p = 0.014). When dichotomized by the optimized nodal volume, patients with an ipsilateral GTV-N ≥ 4.9 vs < 4.9 cc had a significant difference in maximum BP dose (64.2 vs 59.4 Gy; p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that an ipsilateral GTV-N ≥ 4.9 cc was an independent predictor for the BP to receive a maximal dose of > 66 Gy when adjusted individually for BP volume, GTV-P, the use of a low anterior neck field technique, total planned radiation dose, and tumor category. Although both the primary and the nodal tumor volumes affected the BP maximal dose, the ipsilateral nodal tumor volume (GTV-N ≥ 4.9 cc) was an independent predictor for high maximal BP dose constraints in head and neck IMRT.

  20. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Strijers, Rob L M; Frans, Nollet; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A; Vandertop, W Peter

    2006-10-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active shoulder exorotation, to evaluate for functional recovery, and to understand why other superior trunk functions spontaneously recover in contrast with exorotation. In 54 children, an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer was performed as a separate procedure at a mean age of 21.7 months. Follow-up examinations were conducted before and at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 36 months after operation and included scoring of shoulder exorotation and abduction. Intraoperative reactivity of spinatus muscles and additional needle electromyographic responses were registered after electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves. Histological examination of suprascapular nerves was performed. Trophy of spinatus muscles was followed by magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The influence of perinatal variables and results of ancillary investigations on outcome were evaluated. Exorotation improved from 70 degrees to functional levels exceeding 0 degrees, except in two patients. Abduction improved in 27 patients, with results of 90 degrees or more in 49 patients. Electromyography at 4 months did not show signs of denervation in 39 out of 40 patients. Intraoperative electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves elicited spinatus muscle reaction in 44 out of 48 patients. Histology of suprascapular nerves was normal. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans showed only minor wasting of spinatus muscles in contrast with major wasting after successful operations. An accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer is effective to restore active exorotation when performed as the primary or a separate secondary procedure in children older than 10 months of age. Contradictory spontaneous recovery of other superior

  1. MRI of rotator cuff muscle atrophy in relation to glenohumeral joint incongruence in brachial plexus birth injury

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    Poeyhiae, Tiina H. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, PO Box 281, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki (Finland); Nietosvaara, Yrjaenae A.; Peltonen, Jari I. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki (Finland); Remes, Ville M. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kirjavainen, Mikko O. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland); Lamminen, Antti E. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, PO Box 281, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate rotator cuff muscles and the glenohumeral (GH) joint in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) using MRI and to determine whether any correlation exists between muscular abnormality and the development of glenoid dysplasia and GH joint incongruity. Thirty-nine consecutive BPBI patients with internal rotation contracture or absent active external rotation of the shoulder joint were examined clinically and imaged with MRI. In the physical examination, passive external rotation was measured to evaluate internal rotation contracture. Both shoulders were imaged and the glenoscapular angle, percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the greatest thickness of the subscapular, infraspinous and supraspinous muscles were measured. The muscle ratio between the affected side and the normal side was calculated to exclude age variation in the assessment of muscle atrophy. All muscles of the rotator cuff were atrophic, with the subscapular and infraspinous muscles being most severely affected. A correlation was found between the percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the extent of subscapular muscle atrophy (r{sub s}=0.45, P=0.01), as well as between its ratio (r{sub s}=0.5, P P=0.01). Severity of rotator cuff muscle atrophy correlated with increased glenoid retroversion and the degree of internal rotation contracture. Glenoid retroversion and subluxation of the humeral head are common in patients with BPBI. All rotator cuff muscles are atrophic, especially the subscapular muscle. Muscle atrophy due to neurogenic damage apparently results in an imbalance of the shoulder muscles and progressive retroversion and subluxation of the GH joint, which in turn lead to internal rotation contracture and deformation of the joint. (orig.)

  2. 348 Pain Control by Coaptation Procedure C3 and C4 Anterior Rami to Brachial Plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shokei; Lonser, Russell R; Won, Daniel J; Tsao, Bryan E

    2016-08-01

    Previously, the authors presented the coaptation of C3 and C4 primary rami to one of brachial plexus trunks to regain function from cervical root avulsion-caused paralysis. The purpose of this presentation is 2-fold: (1) discuss specific surgical techniques and (2) discuss control or prevention of intractable pain associated with root avulsion. (1) The surgical procedure consists of exposure of C3 and C4 anterior rami coaptation to the upper trunk (Erb-Duchenne) or lower trunk (Klumpke), with sural nerve bridge graft, and additionally intercostal nerve coaptation to median and ulnar nerves for flail arm. (2) Of 30 total patients, 23 patients presented with Erb-Duchenne palsy due to C5 and C6 root avulsion, 3 presented with Klumpke palsy due to C8 and T1 avulsion, and 4 presented with C5 through T1 avulsion (a flail arm). These patients are divided into 2 groups according to pain control: Group 1 patients were operated on within 3 months after avulsion, group 2 was treated surgically later than 3 months postinjury. (1) The surgical procedure consists of exposure of C3 and C4 anterior rami coaptation to the upper trunk (Erb-Duchenne) or lower trunk (Klumpke), with sural nerve bridge graft, and additionally intercostal nerve coaptation to median and ulnar nerves for flail arm. (2) Of 30 patients, 23 patients presented with Erb-Duchenne palsy due to C5 and C6 root avulsion, 3 presented with Klumpke palsy due to C8 and T1 avulsion, and 4 presented with C5 through T1 avulsion (a flail arm). These patients are divided into 2 groups according to pain control: Group 1 patients were operated on within 3 months after avulsion; group 2 was treated surgically later than 3 months post injury. Coaptation procedures are effective to control arm and hand pain associated with nerve root avulsion.

  3. Evaluation of infraspinatus reinnervation and function following spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer in adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Heather L; Wagner, Eric R; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2017-07-01

    Our objective was to determine the prevalence and quality of restored external rotation (ER) in adult brachial plexus injury (BPI) patients who underwent spinal accessory nerve (SAN) to suprascapular nerve (SSN) transfer, and to identify patient and injury factors that may influence results. Fifty-one adult traumatic BPI patients who underwent SAN to SSN transfer between 2000 and 2013, all treated less than 1 year after injury with >1 year follow-up. The primary outcome measured was shoulder ER. The outcomes we utilized included "clinically useful ER" (motion ≥ -35° with ≥MRC 2 strength), modified British Medical Research Council (MRC) grading, and electromyographic (EMG) reinnervation. EMG evidence of re-innervation was found in 85% of patients. Surgery resulted in improved ER in 41% (21/51) of shoulders at an average of 28 months follow-up. Of these, only 31% (17/51) had clinically useful ER. The average ER active range of motion was 12° from full internal rotation (Range: -60° to 90°) and MRC grade 2.2 (2-4). The only predictor of ER improvement was an isolated upper trunk (C5-C6) injury. Improved ER was clinically evident in 76%, 37% and 26% of upper trunk (UT), C5-C6-C7 and panplexus injuries, respectively (P SSN transfer failed to provide useful recovery of ER through reinnervation of the infraspinatus muscle in injuries involving more levels than a C5-C6 root/upper trunk pattern. In patients with greater than C5-6 level injuries alternatives to SAN to SSN transfer should be considered to restore shoulder ER. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 37:365-370, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular local anesthetic administration on postoperative pain management in arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, the aim was to compare postoperative analgesia effects of the administration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular bupivacaine carried out with bupivacaine. METHODS: In the first group of patients 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine and ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISPB were applied, while 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was given via intra-articular (IA administration to the second group patients after surgery. Patients in the third group were considered the control group and no block was performed. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA with morphine was used in all three groups for postoperative analgesia. RESULTS: In the ISPB group, morphine consumption in the periods between 0-4, 6-12 and 12-24 postoperative hours and total consumption within 24 h was lower than in the other two groups. Morphine consumption in the IA group was lower than in the control group in the period from 0 to 6 h and the same was true for total morphine consumption in 24 h. Postoperative VASr scores in the ISPB group were lower than both of the other groups in the first 2 h and lower than the control group in the 4th and 6th hours (p < 0.05. In the IA group, VASr and VASm scores in the 2nd, 4th and 6th hours were lower than in the control group (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Interscalene brachial plexus block was found to be more effective than intra-articular local anesthetic injection for postoperative analgesia.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI in adults with suspect brachial plexus lesions: A multicentre retrospective study with surgical findings and clinical follow-up as reference standard

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    Tagliafico, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tagliafico@unige.it [Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Succio, Giulia; Serafini, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, Santa Corona Hospital, Pietra Ligure, Italy via XXV Aprile, 38- Pietra Ligure, 17027 Savona (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Radiology Department, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, 16138 Genova (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To evaluate brachial plexus MRI accuracy with surgical findings and clinical follow-up as reference standard in a large multicentre study. Materials and methods: The research was approved by the Institutional Review Boards, and all patients provided their written informed consent. A multicentre retrospective trial that included three centres was performed between March 2006 and April 2011. A total of 157 patients (men/women: 81/76; age range, 18–84 years) were evaluated: surgical findings and clinical follow-up of at least 12 months were used as the reference standard. MR imaging was performed with different equipment at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. The patient group was divided in five subgroups: mass lesion, traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, post-treatment evaluation, and other. Sensitivity, specificity with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), positive predictive value (PPV), pre-test-probability (the prevalence), negative predictive value (NPV), pre- and post-test odds (OR), likelihood ratio for positive results (LH+), likelihood ratio for negative results (LH−), accuracy and post-test probability (post-P) were reported on a per-patient basis. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity with 95% CIs were: 0.810/0.914; (0.697–0.904). Overall PPV, pre-test probability, NPV, LH+, LH−, and accuracy: 0.823, 0.331, 0.905, 9.432, 0.210, 0.878. Conclusions: The overall diagnostic accuracy of brachial plexus MRI calculated on a per-patient base is relatively high. The specificity of brachial plexus MRI in patients suspected of having a space-occupying mass is very high. The sensitivity is also high, but there are false-positive interpretations as well.

  6. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  7. Consideration of dose limits for organs at risk of thoracic radiotherapy: atlas for lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Feng-Ming Spring; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E; Komaki, Ritsuko U; Hurkmans, Coen W; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J

    2011-12-01

    To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy side promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex of a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongjun; Wang, Lumin

    2012-07-25

    A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was established by suture occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. In situ hybridization results showed that the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic rat cerebral cortex increased after cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Low frequency continuous wave electroacupuncture (frequency 2-6 Hz, current intensity 2 mA) stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side increased the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic cerebral cortex 14 days after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. At the same time, electroacupuncture stimulation of the healthy brachial plexus truck significantly decreased neurological function scores and alleviated neurological function deficits. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side can greatly increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression and improve neurological function.

  9. Brief reports: a clinical evaluation of block characteristics using one milliliter 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian

    2010-09-01

    We report onset and duration of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block using 1 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine per nerve (total local anesthetic volume 4 mL). Block performance time, block onset time, duration of surgery, and block duration were measured. Seventeen consecutive patients were recruited. The mean (SD) block performance and onset times were 271 (67.9) seconds and 9.7 (3.7) minutes, respectively. Block duration was 160.8 (30.7) minutes. All operations were performed using regional anesthesia alone. The duration of anesthesia obtained is sufficient for most ambulatory hand surgery.

  10. [Macrosomia, shoulder dystocia and elongation of the brachial plexus: what is the role of caesarean section?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehila, Mehdi; Derouich, Sadok; Touhami, Omar; Belghith, Sirine; Abouda, Hassine Saber; Cheour, Mariem; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of a macrosomic infant is associated with a higher risk for maternofoetal complications. Shoulder dystocia is the most feared fetal complication, leading sometimes to a disproportionate use of caesarean section. This study aims to evaluate the interest of preventive caesarean section. We conducted a retrospective study of 400 macrosomic births between February 2010 and December 2012. We also identified cases of infants with shoulder dystocia occurred in 2012 as well as their respective birthweight. Macrosomic infants weighed between 4000g and 4500g in 86.25% of cases and between 4500 and 5000 in 12.25% of cases. Vaginal delivery was performed in 68% of cases. Out of 400 macrosomic births, 9 cases with shoulder dystocia were recorded (2.25%). All of these cases occurred during vaginal delivery. The risk for shoulder dystocia invaginal delivery has increased significantly with the increase in birth weight (p Shoulder dystocia affectd macrosoic infants in 58% of cases. Shoulder dystocia is not a complication exclusively associated with macrosomia. Screening for risky deliveries and increasing training of obstetricians on maneuvers in shoulder dystocia seem to be the best way to avoid complications.

  11. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation of Brachial Plexus Nerve Roots and Supra-Scapular Nerve for Chronic Refractory Neuropathic Pain of the Upper Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouche, Bénédicte; Manfiotto, Marie; Rigoard, Philippe; Lemarie, Jean; Dix-Neuf, Véronique; Lanteri-Minet, Michel; Fontaine, Denys

    2017-10-01

    We report the outcome of a consecutive series of 26 patients suffering from chronic medically-refractory neuropathic pain of the upper limb (including 16 patients with complex regional pain syndrome), topographically limited, treated by brachial plexus (BP) nerve roots or supra-scapular nerve (SSN) peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS). The technique consisted in ultrasound-guided percutaneous implantation of a cylindrical lead (Pisces-Quad, Medtronic) close to the SSN or the cervical nerve roots within the BP, depending on the pain topography. All the patients underwent a positive trial stimulation before lead connection to a subcutaneous stimulator. Chronic bipolar stimulation mean parameters were: frequency 55.5 Hertz, voltage 1.17 Volts. The voltage was set below the threshold inducing muscle contractions or paresthesias. Two patients were lost immediately after surgery. At last follow-up (mean 27.5 months), the 20 patients still using the stimulation experienced a mean pain relief of 67.1%. Seventeen patients were improved ≥50%, including 12 improved ≥70%. In 11 patients with a follow-up >2 years, the mean pain relief was 68%. At last follow-up, respectively, six out of the nine (67%) patients treated by SSN stimulation and 10 out of 17 patients (59%) treated by BP stimulation were improved ≥50%. At last follow-up, 12 out of 20 patients still using the stimulation were very satisfied, six were satisfied, and two were poorly satisfied. Complications were: stimulation intolerance due to shock-like sensations (three cases), superficial infection (1), lead fractures (2), and migration (1). In this pilot study, SSN or BP roots PNS provided a relatively safe, durable and effective option to control upper limb neuropathic pain. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  12. The role of subscapularis muscle denervation in the pathogenesis of shoulder internal rotation contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Casaccia, Marcelo; Fernandez-Martin, Alejandra; Marotta, Mario; Fontecha, Cesar G; Haddad, Sleiman; Knörr, Jorge; Soldado, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the role of subscapularis muscle denervation in the development of shoulder internal rotation contracture in neonatal brachial plexus injury. Seventeen newborn rats underwent selective denervation of the subscapular muscle. The rats were evaluated at weekly intervals to measure passive shoulder external rotation. After 4 weeks, the animals were euthanized. The subscapularis thickness was measured using 7.2T MRI axial images. The subscapularis muscle was then studied grossly, and its mass was registered. The fiber area and the area of fibrosis were measured using collagen-I inmunostained muscle sections. Significant progressive decrease in passive shoulder external rotation was noted with a mean loss of 58° at four weeks. A significant decrease in thickness and mass of the subscapularis muscles in the involved shoulders was also found with a mean loss of 69%. Subscapularis muscle fiber size decreased significantly, while the area of fibrosis remained unchanged. Our study shows that subscapularis denervation, per se, could explain shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury, though its relevance compared to other pathogenic factors needs further investigation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml versus bupivacaine 5 mg/ml for interscalene brachial plexus block--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Kiefer, K; Herbrich, C; Seebauer, A; Schwender, D; Peter, K

    2002-06-01

    We investigated ropivacaine 75 mg/ml in comparison with bupivacaine 5 mg/ml in patients receiving interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) and general anaesthesia. In this randomized, double-blind, prospective clinical trial, each patient received an ISB block according to the technique originally described by Winnie and a catheter technique as per Meier. The rapidity of onset and the quality of sensory and motor block were determined. After general anaesthesia had been induced further parameters evaluated were consumption of local anaesthetic, opioid and neuromuscular blocking drug. After arrival in the recovery room, the patients were assessed for intensity of pain using a visual analog scale (VAS). One hundred and twenty patients were included in the study. The onset and development of sensory block was similar in both groups. Development and quality of motor block was also nearly identical for both local anaesthetics. Consumption of neuromuscular blocking drug and opioid did not differ between ropivacaine and bupivacaine. In the recovery room the mean pain score was less than 25 in both groups. There were no significant differences in terms of onset and quality of sensory or motor block during the intraoperative and early postoperative period. In addition we did not identify any side-effects related to the administration of the local anaesthetics. Ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml and bupivacaine 5mg/ml proved to be nearly indistinguishable when administered for interscalene brachial plexus block.

  14. Functional connectivity of motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury after contralateral cervical nerve transfer: a resting-state fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Aihong; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wei; Bai, Rongjie [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Xicheng Qu, Beijing (China); Wang, Shufeng; Xue, Yunhao; Li, Wenjun [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the functional connectivity of the motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). Twelve patients with total brachial plexus root avulsion underwent RS-fMRI after contralateral C7 nerve transfer. Seventeen healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study as controls. The hand motor seed regions were defined as region of interests in the bilateral hemispheres. The seed-based functional connectivity was calculated in all the subjects. Differences in functional connectivity of the motor cortical network between patients and healthy controls were compared. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the M1 areas was increased in patients with BPAI compared with the controls. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the supplementary motor areas was reduced bilaterally. The resting-state inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the bilateral M1 areas is altered in patients after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, suggesting a functional reorganization of cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  15. A prospective, randomized, double-blind comparison of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blocks using 2 versus 4 injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasogie, Ngozi; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Singh, Sudha; Armstrong, Kevin; Armstrong, Paidrig

    2010-04-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, we compared the effectiveness and time efficiency of perioperative axillary blocks performed via 2 different techniques, 1 involving 2 and the other 4 separate skin punctures. One hundred twenty patients undergoing upper limb surgery were randomized to receive either (1) an axillary brachial plexus block involving 2 injections, with 30 mL local anesthetic injected posterior to the axillary artery (with redirection, as needed, to achieve circumferential spread), plus 10 mL local anesthetic to the musculocutaneous nerve, guided by ultrasound (group 1, n = 56); or (2) 4 separate 10-mL injections to the median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves, using a combined ultrasound and neurostimulation technique (group 2, n = 58). All patients received 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine. The primary outcome was the success rate of the block, defined as anesthesia adequate for surgery. Secondary outcomes were the time to administer the block, time to the onset of motor-sensory block, time to surgical readiness, and incidence of adverse events. The 2-injection technique was slightly faster to administer (8 vs 11 minutes, P = 0.003). The mean nerve block score was slightly higher for the 4-injection group at the 10-, 15-, 20-, and 30-minute time points, but the cumulative percentages of blocks having taken effect were not significantly different over these time points, at 0.0%, 5.4%, 12.5%, and 37.5% among those who had received a 2-injection block versus 6.9%, 10.4%, 19.0%, and 48.3%, respectively, with the 4-injection block (P = 0.20). There was no difference in the percentage of patients with complete block by 30 minutes (32.1% vs 37.5%, P = 0.55) or in final block success rates (89.3% vs 87.9%, P = 0.99). An ultrasound-guided 2-injection axillary block may be as effective as, and more time efficient than, a 4-injection technique.

  16. Effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to local anesthetics for brachial plexus block: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Shin

    Full Text Available Tramadol, a 4-phenyl-piperidine analog of codeine, has a unique action in that it has a central opioidergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic analgesic, and peripheral local anesthetic (LA effect. Many studies have reported contradictory findings regarding the peripheral analgesic effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to LA in brachial plexus block (BPB. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effects of tramadol as an adjunct to LA in BPB during shoulder or upper extremity surgery.We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, KoreaMed databases, and Google Scholar for eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared BPB with LA alone and BPB with LA and tramadol. Primary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia. Secondary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on time to onset of sensory block and motor block and on adverse effects. We performed the meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3 software.We identified 16 RCTs with 751 patients. BPB with tramadol prolonged the duration of sensory block (mean difference [MD], -61.5 min; 95% CI, -95.5 to -27.6; P = 0.0004, motor block (MD, -65.6 min; 95% CI, -101.5 to -29.7; P = 0.0003, and analgesia (MD, -125.5 min; 95% CI, -175.8 to -75.3; P < 0.0001 compared with BPB without tramadol. Tramadol also shortened the time to onset of sensory block (MD, 2.1 min; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1; P < 0.0001 and motor block (MD, 1.2 min; 95% CI, 0.2 to 2.1; P = 0.010. In subgroup analysis, the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia was prolonged for BPB with tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.05 but not for BPB with tramadol 50 mg. The quality of evidence was high for duration of analgesia according to the GRADE system. Adverse effects were comparable between the studies.In upper extremity surgery performed under BPB, use of tramadol 100 mg as an adjuvant to LA appears to prolong the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia, and

  17. Anatomical characterization of the brachial plexus in dog cadavers and comparison of three blind techniques for blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelding, Alicia; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Thomason, Jeffrey; Moens, Noel

    2018-03-01

    To describe the ventral spinal nerve rami contribution to the formation of the brachial plexus (BP), and to compare ease of performing and nerve staining between three blind techniques for BP blockade in dogs. Prospective, randomized, blind study. A total of 18 dog cadavers weighing 28.2 ± 9.7 kg (mean ± standard deviation). Dogs were randomly assigned to two of three BP treatments: traditional approach (TA), perpendicular approach (PA), and axillary approach (AA). Dye (0.2 mL kg -1 ) was injected in the left BP using a spinal needle; another BP treatment was used in the right BP. Landmarks (L) included: L1, midpoint between point of the shoulder and sixth cervical (C 6 ) transverse process; L2, scapulohumeral joint; and L3, first rib. For TA, the needle was introduced craniocaudally through L1, medial to the limb and cranial to L3. For PA, the needle was directed perpendicular and caudal to L2, aligned with L1, until cranial to L3. For AA, the needle was directed ventrodorsally, parallel and cranial to L3 until at L1. All BPs were scored for dyeing quality [0 (poor) to 5 (excellent)]. The left BP was dissected for nerve origins. Durbin test was used to compare scores (p < 0.05). In all dogs, the musculocutaneous nerve originated from C 7 and C 8 ; the radial nerve from C 8 , the first thoracic vertebra (T 1 ) (16/18 dogs) and C 7 (2/18); and the median and ulnar nerves from C 8 , T 1 (17/18) and C 7 (1/18). Respective raw scores and adjusted scores for the incomplete block design were not significantly different (p = 0.72; ranks TA 16.5, PA 19.0, AA 18.5). The musculocutaneous, median, ulnar and radial nerves originate from C 7 , C 8 and T 1 . Regardless of the technique, knowledge of anatomy and precise landmarks are relevant for correct dye dispersion. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bloqueio do nervo frênico após realização de bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via interescalênica: relato de caso A bloqueo del nervio frénico después de la realización de bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica: relato de caso Phrenic nerve block after interscalene brachial plexus block: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Cangiani

    2008-04-01

    embargo, en su mayoría, sin repercusiones clínicas importantes. El objetivo de este relato fue presentar un caso en que ocurrió bloqueo del nervio frénico, con comprometimiento ventilatorio en paciente con insuficiencia renal crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa, bajo bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía perivascular interescalénica. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 50 años, tabaquista, portador de insuficiencia renal crónica en régimen de hemodiálisis, hipertensión arterial, hepatitis C, diabetes melito, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa en el miembro superior derecho bajo bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica. El plexo braquial fue localizado con la utilización del estimulador de nervio periférico. Se inyectaron 35 mL de una solución de anestésico local constituida de una mezcla de lidocaína a 2% con epinefrina a 1:200.000 y ropivacaína a 0,75% en partes iguales. Al final de la inyección el paciente estaba lúcido, pero sin embargo con disnea y predominio de incursión respiratoria intercostal ipsilateral al bloqueo. No había murmullo vesicular en la base del hemitórax derecho. La SpO2 se mantuvo en un 95%, con catéter nasal de oxígeno. No fue necesaria la instalación de métodos de auxilio ventilatorio invasivo. La radiografía del tórax reveló que el hemidiafragma derecho ocupaba el 5° espacio intercostal. El cuadro clínico se revirtió en tres horas. CONCLUSIONES: El caso mostró que hubo parálisis total del nervio frénico con síntomas respiratorios. A pesar de no haber sido necesaria la terapéutica invasiva para el tratamiento, queda el aviso aquí para la restricción de la indicación de la técnica en esos casos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Phrenic nerve block is a common adverse event of brachial plexus block. However, in most cases it does not have any important clinical repercussion. The objective

  19. Morphometric study of the upper intercostal nerves: practical application for neurotizations in traumatic brachial plexus palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfazadourian, H; Tramond, B; Dauge, M C; Oberlin, C

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was a morphometric evaluation of the intercostal nerves at different levels along their course in order to determine their adequacy in neurotizing the recipient nerves. The intercostal nerves were harvested from 5 cadavers. A biopsy of the nerve was obtained at 2 levels for each nerve in the parasternal region and at the level of the mid-axillary line. The musculocutaneous nerve was isolated at its origin from the lateral cord. Each harvested specimen was embedded in paraffin and sections were made using a microtome. These sections were then stained histochemically using HPS (Hematein, Phloxine, Safran). Real-time digitalisation of the video image under the microscope was performed. The sum of the different fascicular zones is the effective sensorimotor surface of the nerve at the level being studied. Direct suture of the upper three intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve is always possible upto the axillary fossa. The sixth intercostal nerve can be delivered upto this level in only 50% of cases without dissection of the musculocutaneous nerve upto its entry into the coracobrachialis. The musculocutaneous nerve presents a mean surface area of 2.64 mm2 while the nerve to the biceps has a mean surface area of 0.34 mm2 i.e. a ration of 1/8. The mean surface area of the intercostal nerves at the parasternal level is 0.23 mm2 while that at the axillary level is 0.34 mm2. Thus a loss of 33% in surface area occurs between the axillary and the parasternal levels. Our study confirms the insufficiency between the surface area of the intercostal nerves and the different nerve trunks to be neurotized. The relationship between the surface area of the musculocutaneous nerve and the three intercostal nerves is 26.72% with a minimum of 17.2%. If a fourth intercostal nerve is added, this ratio nerves appears to be a superior technique. We were able to deliver the sixth intercostal nerve for a direct suture to the musculocutaneous nerve in only half

  20. Hamartoma fibroso infantil: lesão volumosa com envolvimento de plexo braquil Children's fibrous hamartoma: extensive injury involving brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux Eyer de Jesus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar um caso de hamartoma fibroso da infância em lactente ressecado tardiamente e se apresentando como lesão extensa, com envolvimento de elementos vasculares e neurais do plexo braquial. MÉTODOS: Estudo de caso clínico e revisão de literatura pertinente. RESULTADOS: Criança do sexo masculino, com massa tumoral axilar direita, irregular surgida aos 2 meses de idade e relacionada à administração da vacina BCG, sendo tratada com agentes anti-tuberculosos, sem resposta. Mediante biópsia a lesão foi diagnosticada como hamartoma fibroso infantil, e, após sofrer período de crescimento rápido, foi submetida à exérese cirúrgica completa. CONCLUSÃO: O hamartoma fibroso juvenil é um tumor benigno raro, tipicamente se apresentando no primeiro ano de vida em meninos, com localização mais comum no oco axilar. O diagnóstico diferencial se faz com tumores de partes moles em geral e, em casos de apresentação na axila direita, com adenopatias axilares causadas por reação à BCG. O tratamento é exerese completa da lesão e o prognóstico é favorável.OBJECTIVE: To present a case of fibrous hamartoma in a late-dried infant presenting as an extensive injury, involving vascular and neural elements of brachial plexus. METHODS: Clinical case study and pertinent literature review. RESULTS: Male child, with right axillary irregular tumoral mass, of which onset occurred at 2 months of age and related to BCG vaccine application, being treated with anti-tuberculosis agents, not responding to therapy. Upon biopsy, the injury was diagnosed as children’s fibrous hamartoma, and, after a fast growing period, was submitted to total surgical exeresis. CONCLUSION: The juvenile fibrous hamartoma is a rare benign tumor, typically occurring within the first year of life in boys, most commonly located at axillary gap. The differential diagnosis is performed with soft parts tumors in general, and, in right axillary location cases, with

  1. Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block | Idehen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of seizure occurring immediately after completion of interscalene brachial plexus block, using 20mls mixture of 10mls of 0.5% bupivacaine and 10mls of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline for post operative analgesia. Seizure occurred despite negative test aspiration and non response to the use of 0.5mls of ...

  2. The effect of continuous interscalene brachial plexus block with 0.125% bupivacaine vs 0.2% ropivacaine on pain relief, diaphragmatic motility, and ventilatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choromanski, Dominik W; Patel, Pranav S; Frederick, Joel M; Lemos, Stephen E; Chidiac, Elie J

    2015-12-01

    Outpatient continuous interscalene brachial plexus blocks containing bupivacaine or ropivacaine are commonly used to control pain after shoulder surgery. Interscalene blocks cause hemidiaphragmatic paresis. Because ropivacaine preferentially blocks sensory fibers, it may cause less blockade of the phrenic nerve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 common continuous interscalene brachial plexus infusions: 0.125% bupivacaine vs 0.2% ropivacaine. The study hypothesis is that respiratory function will be less attenuated using ropivacaine than bupivacaine without affecting pain relief. Study design was a prospective randomized double-blind study, registered (NCT 02059070), with institutional review board approval and written informed consent. The setting was the preoperative and postoperative area in an orthopedic teaching hospital. Outpatients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopic surgery were included. All patients underwent baseline measurements and interscalene catheter placement, then randomized to receive pumps containing either 0.2% ropivacaine or 0.125% bupivacaine. Study measurements included preoperative and postoperative bedside spirometry and ultrasonographic evaluations of diaphragmatic excursion, postoperative pain scores, and postdischarge oral opioid (oxycodone) consumption. There were no statistically significant differences between bupivacaine vs ropivacaine in outcomes of forced expiratory volume at 1 second change (-22% ± 18.3% vs -29% ± 14.9%), diaphragmatic excursion (-81.4% ± 37.95% vs -75.5% ± 35.1%), VAS pain scores at rest (4.9 ± 2.9 vs 3.5 ± 2.8), or oral opioid consumption (33.7 ± 24.3 mg vs 35.1 ± 33.9 mg). There was no difference in respiratory dysfunction or opioid requirements between interscalene continuous peripheral nerve blocks with 0.125% bupivacaine or 0.2% ropivacaine. Further study is required to identify anesthetic infusates that will control pain while decreasing the attenuation of pulmonary function

  3. The role of muscle imbalance in the pathogenesis of shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldado, Francisco; Fontecha, Cesar G; Marotta, Mario; Benito, David; Casaccia, Marcelo; Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Zlotolow, Dan; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-07-01

    An internal rotation contracture of the shoulder is common after neonatal brachial plexus injuries due to subscapularis shortening and atrophy. It has been explained by 2 theories: muscle denervation and muscle imbalance between the internal and external rotators of the shoulder. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that muscle imbalance alone could cause subscapularis changes and shoulder contracture. We performed selective neurectomy of the suprascapular nerve in 15 newborn rats to denervate only the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus muscles, leaving the subscapularis muscle intact. After 4 weeks, passive shoulder external rotation was measured and a 7.2-T magnetic resonance imaging scan of the shoulders was used to determine changes in the infraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. The subscapularis muscle was weighed to determine the degree of mass loss. An additional group of 10 newborn rats was evaluated to determine the sectional muscle fiber size and muscle area of fibrosis by use of images from type I collagen immunostaining. There was a significant decrease in passive shoulder external rotation, with a mean loss of 66°; in the thickness of the denervated infraspinatus, with a mean loss of 40%; and in the thickness and weight of the non-denervated subscapularis, with mean losses of 28% and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in subscapularis muscle fiber size and area of fibrosis between shoulders after suprascapular nerve injury. Our study supports the theory that shoulder muscle imbalance is a cause of shoulder contracture in patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Addition of Liposome Bupivacaine to Bupivacaine HCl Versus Bupivacaine HCl Alone for Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block in Patients Having Major Shoulder Surgery.

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    Vandepitte, Catherine; Kuroda, Max; Witvrouw, Richard; Anne, Ludwig; Bellemans, Johan; Corten, Kristoff; Vanelderen, Pascal; Mesotten, Dieter; Leunen, Ine; Heylen, Micheline; Van Boxstael, Sam; Golebiewski, Monika; Van de Velde, Marc; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Hadzic, Admir

    We examined whether liposome bupivacaine (Exparel) given in the interscalene brachial plexus block lowers pain in the setting of multimodal postoperative pain management for major shoulder surgery. Fifty-two adult patients were randomized to receive either 5 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine HCl immediately followed by 10 mL of liposome bupivacaine 133 mg (n = 26) or 15 mL of 0.25% standard bupivacaine alone (n = 26) in interscalene brachial plexus block. The primary outcome (worst pain in the first postoperative week) was assessed by the Modified Brief Pain Inventory short form. Secondary outcomes were overall satisfaction with analgesia (OBAS), functionality of the surgical arm, sleep duration, time to first opioid (tramadol) request and opioid consumption (mEq), sensory-motor block characteristics, and the occurrence of adverse effects. Worst pain was lower in patients given liposome bupivacaine added to standard bupivacaine than in patients given standard bupivacaine alone (generalized estimating equation [GEE] estimated marginal mean values, 3.6 ± 0.3 vs 5.3 ± 0.4 points on the Numeric Rating Scale, respectively, although the effect was modest, 1.6 ± 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-2.5). Total OBAS scores indicated greater satisfaction (GEE estimated marginal mean values, 1.8 ± 0.3 vs 3.3 ± 0.4 on total OBAS, respectively, with modest effect, difference, 1.4 ± 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-2.4). There were no differences in any of the other secondary outcomes. Liposome bupivacaine added to standard bupivacaine may lower pain and enhance patient's satisfaction in the first postoperative week even in the setting of multimodal analgesia for major shoulder surgery.This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02554357) on July 11, 2015, by Principal Investigator Catherine Vandepitte, MD.

  5. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

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    Faruquee Sajedur

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer. Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs. The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months. The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months. 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90. Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95. The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently

  6. Comparison of dexamethasone and clonidine as an adjuvant to 1.5% lignocaine with adrenaline in infraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb surgeries

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    Dipal Mahendra Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The role of clonidine as an adjuvant to regional blocks to hasten the onset of the local anesthetics or prolong their duration of action is proven. The efficacy of dexamethasone compared to clonidine as an adjuvant is not known. We aimed to compare the efficacy of dexamethasone versus clonidine as an adjuvant to 1.5% lignocaine with adrenaline in infraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb surgeries. Material and Methods: Fifty three American Society of Anaesthesiologists-I and II patients aged 18-60 years scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to three groups to receive 1.5% lignocaine with 1:200,000 adrenaline and the study drugs. Group S (n = 13 received normal saline, group D (n = 20 received dexamethasone and group C (n = 20 received clonidine. The time to onset and peak effect, duration of the block (sensory and motor and postoperative analgesia requirement were recorded. Chi-square and ANOVA test were used for categorical and continuous variables respectively and Bonferroni or post-hoc test for multiple comparisons. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The three groups were comparable in terms of time to onset and peak action of motor and sensory block, postoperative analgesic requirements and pain scores. 90% of the blocks were successful in group C compared to only 60% in group D (P = 0.028. The duration of sensory and motor block in group S, D and C were 217.73 ± 61.41 min, 335.83 ± 97.18 min and 304.72 ± 139.79 min and 205.91 ± 70.1 min, 289.58 ± 78.37 min and 232.5 ± 74.2 min respectively. There was significant prolongation of sensory and motor block in group D as compared to group S (P < 0.5. Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly more in groups C and D as compared with group S (P < 0.5. Clinically significant complications were absent. Conclusions: We conclude that clonidine is more efficacious than dexamethasone as an adjuvant to 1.5% lignocaine in brachial

  7. Avaliação do ganho funcional do cotovelo com a cirurgia de Steindler na lesão do plexo braquial Evaluation of functional gain of the elbow following Steindler surgery for brachial plexus injury

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    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende

    2011-01-01

    underwent Steindler surgery with at least 6 months of follow-up. Pre- and post-operative assessments were carried out to determine gain in muscle strength, range of motion of the elbow, and DASH scale score. RESULTS: Of the eleven patients studied, nine (82% achieved a level of strength equal to or greater than M3 (MRC with good functional recovery. Two (18% reached strength level M2 (MRC. We observed that the patients had an average postoperative gain in range of motion of the elbow of 43.45 degrees. The average elbow flexion after surgery was 88 degrees. There was an improvement in elbow function, as demonstrated in the DASH Scale, in 81% of the patients studied. CONCLUSION: Modified Steindler surgery was effective in the treatment of patients with injuries of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus, with statistically significant gains in range of motion. In all the cases studied, there was some degree of gain in strength and range of elbow flexion, the gain being correlated with the initial muscle strength. Level of Evidence: Level II, prospective clinical trial.

  8. Radiation Dose to the Brachial Plexus in Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Its Relationship to Tumor and Nodal Stage

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    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Orlina, Lawrence; Willins, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine tumor factors contributing to brachial plexus (BP) dose in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) when the BP is routinely contoured as an organ at risk (OAR) for IMRT optimization. Methods and Materials: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 114 HNC patients underwent IMRT to a total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left BP prospectively contoured as separate OARs in 111 patients and the ipsilateral BP contoured in 3 patients (total, 225 BP). Staging category T4 and N2/3 disease were present in 34 (29.8%) and 74 (64.9%) patients, respectively. During IMRT optimization, the intent was to keep the maximum BP dose to {<=}60 Gy, but prioritizing tumor coverage over achieving the BP constraints. BP dose parameters were compared with tumor and nodal stage. Results: With a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 43 (37.7%) patients had {>=}24 months of follow-up with no brachial plexopathy reported. Mean BP volume was 8.2 {+-} 4.5 cm{sup 3}. Mean BP maximum dose was 58.1 {+-} 12.2 Gy, and BP mean dose was 42.2 {+-} 11.3 Gy. The BP maximum dose was {<=}60, {<=}66, and {<=}70 Gy in 122 (54.2%), 185 (82.2%), and 203 (90.2%) BP, respectively. For oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx sites, the mean BP maximum dose was 58.4 Gy and 63.4 Gy in T0-3 and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.002). Mean BP maximum dose with N0/1 and N2/3 disease was 52.8 Gy and 60.9 Gy, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In head-and-neck IMRT, dose constraints for the BP are difficult to achieve to {<=}60 to 66 Gy with T4 disease of the larynx, hypopharynx, and oropharynx or N2/3 disease. The risk of brachial plexopathy is likely very small in HNC patients undergoing IMRT, although longer follow-up is required.

  9. Ultrasound evaluation of diaphragm function and its application in critical patients, mechanical ventilation and brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Quintana Gordon, F de B; Nacarino Alcorta, B; Fajardo Pérez, M

    2017-11-01

    Before diaphragm ultrasonography, assessment of diaphragm function was very difficult due to the complex nature of its exploration. The use of this new technique has shed light on diagnostic problems and treatment with an improvement in final outcomes for critically ill patients, in whom the incidence of diaphragm weakness or dysfunction has been underestimated. Better knowledge of diaphragm function enables us earlier diagnosis by quantification of diaphragm contractile activity or evaluation of functional status after delivery of plexus block anaesthesia, facilitating therapeutic decisions. It is also being used as a guide in the process of weaning from mechanical ventilation or as the safest approach for braquial plexus block. In this review we present how to perform a systematic exploration of diaphragm function and its clinical implications. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of denervation, reinnervation, and muscle imbalance on functional muscle length and elbow flexion contracture following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekley, Holly; Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Eismann, Emily; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2012-08-01

    The pathophysiology of paradoxical elbow flexion contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) is incompletely understood. The current study tests the hypothesis that this contracture occurs by denervation-induced impairment of elbow flexor muscle growth. Unilateral forelimb paralysis was created in mice in four neonatal (5-day-old) BPI groups (C5-6 excision, C5-6 neurotomy, C5-6 neurotomy/repair, and C5-T1 global excision), one non-neonatal BPI group (28-day-old C5-6 excision), and two neonatal muscle imbalance groups (triceps tenotomy ± C5-6 excision). Four weeks post-operatively, motor function, elbow range of motion, and biceps/brachialis functional lengths were assessed. Musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) denervation and reinnervation were assessed immunohistochemically. Elbow flexion motor recovery and elbow flexion contractures varied inversely among the neonatal BPI groups. Contracture severity correlated with biceps/brachialis shortening and MCN denervation (relative axon loss), with no contractures occurring in mice with MCN reinnervation (presence of growth cones). No contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening occurred following non-neonatal BPI, regardless of denervation or reinnervation. Neonatal triceps tenotomy did not cause contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening, nor did it worsen those following neonatal C5-6 excision. Denervation-induced functional shortening of elbow flexor muscles leads to variable elbow flexion contractures depending on the degree, permanence, and timing of denervation, independent of muscle imbalance. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Outcome measures used in clinical studies on neonatal brachial plexus palsy: A systematic literature review using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarac, Cigdem; Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van der Weide, Amber; Schoones, Jan W; Malessy, Martijn J A; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vlieland, Thea P M Vliet

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of a neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) can vary widely among individuals and numerous clinical studies have been performed to identify the natural history and to improve treatment. The aim of this study was to identify and describe all outcome measures used in clinical studies on patients with an NBPP and categorize these outcome measures according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Electronic searches of different databases were carried out. All clinical studies describing one or more outcomes of NBPP were selected. Data on outcome measures was systematically extracted and the contents were analyzed and linked to the ICF. A total of 217 full texts were selected and 59 different outcome measures were identified. The 5 most frequently used outcome measures included range of motion of the shoulder (n= 166 studies, 76%), range of motion of the elbow (n= 87 studies, 40%), the Mallet scale (n= 66 studies, 30%), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (n= 37 studies, 17%) and the Medical Research Council motor grading scale (n= 31 studies, 14%). Assessments related to Body functions and Structures were most frequent, whereas assessments associated with Activities and Participation and Environmental Factors were relatively uncommon. There was a high variability among the outcome measures used, with measures within the ICF component Body Functions being most common. These results underscore the need for the development and usage of outcome measures representing all domains of health status in patients with NBPP.

  12. Metastatic Brachial Plexopathy in a Case of Recurrent Breast Carcinoma Demonstrated on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

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    Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan J.; Srivastava, Anurag; Bal, ChandraSekhar; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2014-03-15

    referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate the brachial plexus involvement. Coronal diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) revealed a mass in the right axilla, with a b value of 1,000, infiltrating the cord and branches of the right brachial plexus visualised as linear hyperintensities (Fig. 1c, arrow). Brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients can be metastatic (because major lymph drainage routes for the breast course through the axilla) or radiation induced, the former being the commoner of the two. Differentiation between the two pathologies is important for appropriate treatment planning. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Recognition of the pattern of brachial plexus involvement is thus essential for accurate interpretation of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT study. To date, two case reports and one small case series have demonstrated the feasibility of PET for confirming metastatic brachial plexopathy when MRI was suspicious of the same or when the patient was symptomatic for the same. This case highlights the possibility of metastatic brachial plexopathy even when the patient may not be overtly symptomatic for the same. The typical pattern as seen on MIP and coronal images is linear, extending from the superomedial aspect (supra/infraclavicular) to the lateral aspect of axilla closely related to the subclavian/axillary vessels). The commonest finding on computed tomography (CT) is that of an axillary mass, but may range from no remarkable abnormality to minimal thickening. Moreover, CT would not be able to differentiate metastatic from radiation plexopathy. MRI is the first-line imaging modality for evaluating brachial plexopathy and can delineate both normal and abnormal anatomy of the brachial plexus, with the ability to differentiate nerves from the surrounding vessels and soft tissue with greater detail than CT. In this case

  13. Análise comparativa da origem do plexo branquial de catetos (Tayassu tajacu Comparative analysis of the origin of the brachial plexus of the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu

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    Carlos Eduardo B. Moura

    2007-09-01

    .Collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu belongs to the Tayassuidae family, characterized by a "collar" of white hairs that cross behind the neck and extend bilaterally in front of the shoulders. It can be found from south-western United States to Argentina. In the literature a shortage of data is verified regarding the functional anatomy of the collared peccaries, especially of studies that involve the anatomy of the brachial plexus. To elucidate the behavior of this plexus of collared peccaries and with the purpose to contribute for the development of compared anatomy, this study was accomplished. Thirty animals of different ages were used (17 males and 13 females coming from the Wild Animal Multiplication Center of the "Universidade Federal Rural do Semiárido" Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. After slaughter bilateral dissection of the brachial plexuses took place, and the results were registered in schematic drawings and the dispositions grouped in tables for subsequent statistical analysis based on the percentile frequency. It was found that the Plexus brachialis of collared peccaries is the result of established communications, mainly among the Rami ventrales of the last three cervical nerves and of the first two thoracic nerves, having a contribution of the fourth and fifth cervical nerves in 16.67% and 50.00% of the cases, respectively. In 40.00% of the dissections the most frequent plexus was of the type C6, C7, C8, T1 and T2. The main nerves derived from brachial plexus of the collared peccaries and its respective origins had been: Nervus suprascapularis (C6, C7, Nn. subscapulares (C5, C6 e C7 or C6 e C7, N. axillaris (C6, C7, N. musculocutaneus (C7, C8, N. medianus (C7, C8, T1, T2, N. radialis (C8, T1, T2, N. ulnaris (C8, T1, T2, cranialis (C7, and caudalis (C7, C8 Nn. pectorales , N. thoracodorsalis (C6, C7, C8, N. thoracicus longus (C7, C8, and N. thoracicus lateralis (C8, T1, T2.

  14. Surgical anesthesia with a combination of T12 paravertebral block and lumbar plexus, sacral plexus block for hip replacement in ankylosing spondylitis: CARE-compliant 4 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xijian; Li, Ji; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xi; Mei, Wei

    2017-06-26

    Anesthesia management for patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis scheduled for total hip arthroplasty is challenging due to a potential difficult airway and difficult neuraxial block. We report 4 cases with ankylosing spondylitis successfully managed with a combination of lumbar plexus, sacral plexus and T12 paravertebral block. Four patients were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. All of them were diagnosed as severe ankylosing spondylitis with rigidity and immobilization of cervical and lumbar spine and hip joints. A combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block was successfully used for the surgery without any additional intravenous anesthetic or local anesthetics infiltration to the incision, and none of the patients complained of discomfort during the operations. The combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block, which may block all nerves innervating the articular capsule, surrounding muscles and the skin involved in total hip arthroplasty, might be a promising alternative for total hip arthroplasty in ankylosing spondylitis.

  15. Giant iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm of the brachial artery: A case report

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    Tulio Leite

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysms develop slowly and should be diagnosed as early as possible in order to avoid complications and a better outcome. Due to an increase in recent endovascular procedures and the fact that brachial artery puncture is being performed more routinely, incidence of brachial artery pseudoaneurysms among overall population may rise.

  16. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

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    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years. Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. Results The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Conclusion Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  17. Sensory neuronopathy involves the spinal cord and brachial plexus: a quantitative study employing multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM)

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    Bao, Yi-Fang; Tang, Wei-Jun; Li, Yu-Xin; Geng, Dao-Ying [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Dong-Qing; Chen, Xiang-Jun [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zee, Chi-Shing [University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Sensory neuronopathy (SNN) is a distinctive subtype of peripheral neuropathies, specifically targeting dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We utilized MRI to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of DRG, spinal cord (SC), and brachial plexus at C7 level in SNN. We attempted multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) methods in nine patients with sensory neuronopathy and compared with those in 16 disease controls and 20 healthy volunteers. All participants underwent MRI for the measurement of DRG, posterior column (PC), lateral column, and spinal cord area (SCA) at C7 level. DRG diameters were obtained through its largest cross section, standardized by dividing sagittal diameter of mid-C7 vertebral canal. We also made comparisons of standardized anteroposterior diameter (APD) and left-right diameters of SC and PC in these groups. Signal intensity and diameter of C7 spinal nerve were assessed on TIRM. Compared to control groups, signal intensities of DRG and PC were higher in SNN patients when using MEDIC, but the standardized diameters were shorter in either DRG or PC. Abnormal PC signal intensities were identified in eight out of nine SNN patients (89 %) with MEDIC and five out of nine (56 %) with T2-weighted images. SCA, assessed with MEDIC, was smaller in SNN patients than in the other groups, with significant reduction of its standardized APD. C7 nerve root diameters, assessed with TIRM, were decreased in SNN patients. MEDIC and TIRM sequences demonstrate increased signal intensities and decreased area of DRG and PC, and decreased diameter of nerve roots in patients with SNN, which can play a significant role in early diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Kooten, Ed O; Mullender, Margriet G; van Doorn-Loogman, Mirjam H; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2009-05-18

    A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years). Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  19. Dosimetric benefits of placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hailan; Lu, Heming; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Huixian; Wei, Yinglin; Zhang, Yanxian; Liu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus (BP) could provide dosimetric benefits in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Planning CT images for 30 patients with NPC treated with definitive IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Target volumes, the BP and other critical structures were delineated; two separate IMRT plans were designed for each patient: one set no restrictions for the BP; the other considered the BP as a critical structure for which a maximum dose limit of ≤66 Gy was set. No significant differences between the two plans were observed in the conformity index, homogeneity index, maximum dose to the planning target volumes (PTVs), minimum dose to the PTVs, percentages of the volume of the PTVnx and PTVnd receiving more than 110% of the prescribed dose, or percentages of the volume of the PTVs receiving 95% and > 93% of the prescribed dose. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose, mean dose, V45, V50, V54, V60, V66 and V70 to the BP. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose to the BP, V45, V60 and V66 in both N0-1 and N2-3 disease; however, the magnitude of the dosimetric gain for each parameter between N0-1 and N2-3 disease was not significantly different, except for the V60 and V66. In conclusion, placing dose constraints on the BP can significantly decrease the irradiated volume and dose, without compromising adequate dose delivery to the target volume. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: a case report and literature review

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    YAN Meng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report a rare case of atypical choroid plexus papilloma and explore its clinical presentations and histopathological features, at the same time to take a review of relevant literature. Methods and Results A 1-year-old male patient presented with vomiting for 3 days after a sudden tumbling. Computed Tomography (CT showed a space-occupying lesion located in the left lateral ventricle. The lesion was with slight hyper-intensity signal compared to the adjacent brain parenchyma. Left lateral ventricle was enlarged and hydrocephalus was visible. Besides, edema occured in adjacent cerebral tissues. The surgical operation was performed under general anesthesia. During the operation, the tumor tissue was in heterogeneous consistency and rich blood supply, showing grey-white color, and attached to the choroid plexus. Microscopically, most tumor cells grew around the fibrovascular axis forming papillary pattern and showed no obvious atypia. However, in some areas, solid and sheet-like patterns were identified. Within these areas, increased cell density, mild to moderate cellular atypia and focal necrosis were appreciated. Some cells with acidophilic cytoplasm, few giant tumor cells and accidental mitosis were also seen, and the counting of mitosis was 2/10 HPF. Immunohistochemistry showed positive expression of pancytokeratin (PCK, synaptophysin (Syn, cytokeratin (CK8/18, vimentin (Vim and podoplanin (D2-40 in tumor cells. Integrase interactor-1 (INI-1 were also positively and focally expressed. The Ki-67 labeling index of tumor cells was 8% . S-100 protein, CK19, neuronal nuclei (Neu-N, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, chromogranin A (CgA, CK7 and CK20 were negatively stained. The patient was followed up for 6 months after operation and no recurrence was found. Conclusion Atypical choroid plexus papilloma, the biological behavior of which is between benignancy and malignancy, is one of the rare tumors

  1. Changes in Expressions of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I, Paired-Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor B, and Cluster of Differentiation 3ζ in Motor Cortical Representations of the Brachial Plexus After Avulsion in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI), paired-immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB), and cluster of differentiation 3ζ (CD3ζ) negatively regulate neuronal plasticity in developing and adult brains. The aim of this study was to evaluate expressive changes of these factors in motor cortical representations of the brachial plexus (MCRBP) after total brachial plexus root avulsion (tBPRA). A total of 45 rats were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups for evaluating mRNA and protein expression levels of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ: 7 days, 3 months, and control. In the 7-day and 3-month groups, expressions were examined at 7 days and 3 months, respectively, after left tBPRA. In the control group, the brachial plexus was uninjured. Three rats from each group were used for examining expressions of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ proteins by immunofluorescence labeling, 6 rats for quantification of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ mRNAs by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the remaining 6 animals for quantification of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ proteins by Western blotting. In the original MCRBP, mRNA and protein expression levels of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ were down-regulated 7 days postinjury compared with control (P  0.05). Recovery of protein expressions were initiated from near the border region of the original MCRBP. MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ may participate in motor cortical reorganization after tBPRA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ANÁLISE DA ORIGEM E DISTRIBUIÇÃO DOS NERVOS PERIFÉRICOS DO PLEXO BRAQUIAL DA PACA (Agouti paca, LINNAEUS, 1766 ORIGIN AND DITRIBUTION ANALYSIS OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS PERIPHERAL NERVES OF PACA (Agouti paca, LINNAEUS, 1766

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    Sílvia Helena Brendolan Gerbasi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O plexo braquial é um conjunto de nervos que surge na região medular cervicotorácica e que se distribui pelos membros torácicos e porção interna do tórax. O plexo braquial de oito pacas foi dissecado para evidenciação da origem e distribuição de seus nervos. O nervo supraescapular distribuía-se para os músculos supra e infra-espinhal, e o subescapular para o músculo subescapular. O nervo axilar ramificava-se para os músculos redondo maior, subescapular, redondo menor e deltóide. Os nervos ulnar e mediano ramificavam-se para a musculatura do antebraço, e o musculocutâneo para os músculos coracobraquial, bíceps braquial e braquial. O nervo radial abrangia o músculo tríceps braquial, tensor da fáscia do antebraço e ancôneo. O nervo torácico longo e o toracodorsal emitiam ramos para o músculo grande dorsal, e o torácico lateral para o músculo cutâneo do tronco. Os nervos peitorais craniais ramificavam-se no músculo peitoral profundo, e os nervos peitorais caudais distribuíam-se para o músculo peitoral superficial. O plexo braquial da paca é formado por doze pares de nervos com origens distintas, os quais surgem do quinto par de nervos cervicais até o segundo par de nervos torácicos, não havendo troncos ou cordões na formação destes.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Agouti paca, distribuição, plexo braquial, sistema nervoso. The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region and distributed in the thoracic limbs and inner thorax. The brachial plexus of eight pacas was dissected for study on the nerves origin and distribution. The suprascapular nerve went through the supra and infraspinal muscles and the subscapular gave off on the subscapular muscle. The axilar nerve was distributed on the teres major, subscapular, teres minor and deltoid muscles. The ulnar and the median nerves branched off on the forearm musculature, and the musculocutaneous branched on the coracobrachial

  3. The effect of low serum bicarbonate values on the onset of action of local anesthesia with vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block in patients with End-stage renal failure

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    Al-mustafa Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block is utilized in patients with chronic renal failure at the time of creation of an arterio-venous fistula (AVF. The aim of this study is to test the effect of impaired renal function, with the resulting deranged serum electrolytes and blood gases, on the success rate and the onset of action of the local anesthetics used. In this prospective clinical study, we investigated the effect of the serum levels of sodium, potassium, urea, crea-tinine, pH, and bicarbonate on the onset of action of a mixture of lidocaine and bupivacaine administered to create infraclavicular brachial plexus block. A total of 31 patients were studied. The success rate of the block was 93.5 % (29 patients. The mean onset time for impaired or re-duced sensation was found to be 8.9 ± 4.7 mins and for complete loss of sensation, was 21.2 ± 6.7 mins. There was no significant association with serum sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine or the blood pH level (P> 0.05. The bivariate correlation between serum bicarbonate level and the partial and complete sensory loss was -0.714 and -0.433 respectively, with significant correlation (P= 0.00, 0.019. Our study suggests that infraclavicular block in patients with chronic renal failure carries a high success rate; the onset of the block is delayed in patients with low serum bicarbonate levels.

  4. Brachial branches of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve: A case report with its clinical significance and a short review of the literature

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    Kapetanakis Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN is a branch of the brachial plexus with a great variation within its branches. Knowledge of these variations is critical to neurologists, hand surgeons, plastic surgeons, and vascular surgeons. The aim of this study was to search for variations of the MACN and to discuss their clinical significance. For this study, six arm cadavers from three fresh cadavers were dissected and examined to find and study possible anatomical variations of the MACN. The authors report a rare case of a variation of the MACN, in which there are four brachial cutaneous branches, before the separation to anterior (volar and posterior (ulnar branch, that provide sensory innervation to the medial, inferior half of the arm, in the area that is commonly innervated from the medial brachial cutaneous nerve. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of this nerve variation. This variation should be taken into serious consideration for the differential diagnosis of patients with complaints of hypoesthesia, pain, and paresthesia and for the surgical operations in the medial part of the arm.

  5. Evaluation of the box and blocks test, stereognosis and item banks of activity and upper extremity function in youths with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahey, Mary Jane; Kozin, Scott; Merenda, Lisa; Gaughan, John; Tian, Feng; Gogola, Gloria; James, Michelle A; Ni, Pengsheng

    2012-09-01

    One of the greatest limitations to measuring outcomes in pediatric orthopaedics is the lack of effective instruments. Computer adaptive testing, which uses large item banks, select only items that are relevant to a child's function based on a previous response and filters items that are too easy or too hard or simply not relevant to the child. In this way, computer adaptive testing provides for a meaningful, efficient, and precise method to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. Banks of items that assess activity and upper extremity (UE) function have been developed for children with cerebral palsy and have enabled computer adaptive tests that showed strong reliability, strong validity, and broader content range when compared with traditional instruments. Because of the void in instruments for children with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and the importance of having an UE and activity scale, we were interested in how well these items worked in this population. Cross-sectional, multicenter study involving 200 children with BPBP was conducted. The box and block test (BBT) and Stereognosis tests were administered and patient reports of UE function and activity were obtained with the cerebral palsy item banks. Differential item functioning (DIF) was examined. Predictive ability of the BBT and stereognosis was evaluated with proportional odds logistic regression model. Spearman correlations coefficients (rs) were calculated to examine correlation between stereognosis and the BBT and between individual stereognosis items and the total stereognosis score. Six of the 86 items showed DIF, indicating that the activity and UE item banks may be useful for computer adaptive tests for children with BPBP. The penny and the button were strongest predictors of impairment level (odds ratio=0.34 to 0.40]. There was a good positive relationship between total stereognosis and BBT scores (rs=0.60). The BBT had a good negative (rs=-0.55) and good positive (rs=0.55) relationship with

  6. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7  6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p  4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02424630.

  7. Unilateral high bifurcation of brachial artery: a case report | Auwal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Profunda Brachii, Superior Ulnar Collateral and Inferior Ulnar Collateral arteries arose from the relatively short brachial arterial trunk. Although the documented incidence of this anatomical variation is low in Nigeria, its concomitant widespread documentation in other parts of the world makes it a sufficiently important ...

  8. Absence of the musculocutaneous nerve with innervation of coracobrachialis, biceps brachii, brachialis and the lateral border of the forearm by branches from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKATANI, TOSHIO; TANAKA, SHIGENORI; MIZUKAMI, SHIGEKI

    1997-01-01

    Anomalies of the brachial plexus and its terminal branches are not uncommon. Variations in the course and branches of the musculocutaneous nerve have been noted (Clemente, 1985; Bergman et al. 1988) and its absence was reported by Le Minor (1990). Several anomalies were present in the left plexus of a 59-y-old Japanese man (Fig.). There were no anterior and posterior divisions of the middle trunk, although there were communications between the posterior, medial and lateral cords. The musculocutaneous nerve was absent (Le Minor, 1990) and the medial and lateral roots of the median nerve did not unite in the axillary fossa but in the upper arm about 5 cm distal to the lower border of latissimus dorsi (Adachi, 1928; Buch-Hansen, 1955). The hitherto unreported findings were branches arising directly from the lateral cord to supply coracobrachialis, both heads of biceps brachii and brachialis. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm was derived from the lateral cord with a small contribution from the medial root of the median nerve. Since there were communications between the posterior cord (a continuation of the middle trunk) and the medial and lateral cords, it is theoretically possibly, but not proven, that the root values of branches innervating the flexor muscles of the arm and forearm and the skin of lateral border of the forearm were normal. PMID:9419004

  9. Interscalene brachial plexus block for open-shoulder surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial between single-shot anesthesia and patient-controlled catheter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Sascha; Stehle, Jens; Schwemmer, Ulrich; Reppenhagen, Stephan; Rath, Beatrice; Gohlke, Frank

    2010-04-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) is widely used as an adjuvant regional pain therapy in patients undergoing major shoulder surgery and has proved its effectiveness on postoperative pain reduction and opioid-sparing effect. This single-center, prospective, double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study was to compare the effectiveness of a single-shot and a patient-controlled catheter insertion ISB system after major open-shoulder surgeries. Seventy patients were entered to receive an ISB and a patient-controlled interscalene catheter. The catheter was inserted under ultrasound guidance. Patients were then assigned to receive one of two different postoperative infusions, either 0.2% ropivacaine (catheter group) or normal saline solution (single-shot group) via a disposable patient-controlled infusion pump. The study variables were amount of rescue medication, pain at rest and during physiotherapy, patient satisfaction and incidence of unwanted side effects. The ropivacaine group revealed significantly less consumption of rescue medication within the first 24 h after surgery. Incidence of side effects did not differ between the two groups. Based on our results, we recommend the use of interscalene plexus block in combination with a patient-controlled catheter system under ultrasound guidance only for the first 24 h after major open-shoulder surgery.

  10. Anomalous patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    block Background: Structural variations in the patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial plexus have drawn attentions both in anatomy and anaesthesia. Method: An observational study. Results: The brachial plexus was carefully inspected in both the right and left arms in 90 Nigerian cadavers, comprising of 74 ...

  11. CHOROID PLEXUS PAPILLOMA OF THE 3 RD VENTRICLE- A CASE REPORT

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    Ezhil Arasi Nagamuthu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Choroid Plexus Papillomas (CPPs are rare intracranial neoplasms especially in the third ventricle. The most common site of presentation of these lesions is in the fourth ventricle in adults and lateral ventricles in children. Third ventricular lesion is uncommon, limited to a few case reports. These highly vascular tumours retain the physiological function of choroid plexus and thus lead to overproduction of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF besides obstructing the pathway resulting in hydrocephalus. CT and MRI are the investigations of choice and are diagnostic. Surgical management vary according to the site of tumour and aim is complete excision of tumour. We present an interesting report of a 5 months old infant who presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure whose CT revealed third ventricular CPP. After ventriculoperitoneal shunt, tumour was excised. Pathological examination revealed choroid plexus papilloma.

  12. Imagens ultra-sonográficas do plexo braquial na região axilar Imágenes ultra-sonográficas del plexo braquial en la región axilar Ultrasound images of the brachial plexus in the axillary region

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    Diogo Brüggemann da Conceição

    2007-12-01

    rotation of the shoulder and 90º flexion of the elbow. Using a 5 cm and 5-10 MHz digital transducer, median, ulnar and radial nerves were identified and their position in relation to the artery were recorded in an 8-sector sectional graphic chart, numbered in crescent order starting at the 12-hour position (medial, whose center represented the axillary artery. RESULTS: The median nerve was located mainly in sectors 8 (55% and 1 (28% (medial; the radial nerve was predominantly in sectors 4 (59% and 5 (34% (lateral; and the ulnar nerve in sectors 2 and 3 (inferior in 69% and 24% of the cases, respectively. There was a considerable variation in the location of the nerves in relation to the superior and inferior aspects of the artery. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time ultrasound inspection of the neurovascular structures of the brachial plexus in the axilla demonstrated that the median, ulnar and radial nerves have different relations with the axillary artery.

  13. Surgical Anatomy of the Radial Nerve at the Elbow and in the Forearm: Anatomical Basis for Intraplexus Nerve Transfer to Reconstruct Thumb and Finger Extension in C7 - T1 Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Chun-Lin; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Background  C7 - T1 palsy results in complete loss of finger motion and poses a surgical challenge. This study investigated the anatomy of the radial nerve in the elbow and forearm and the feasibility of intraplexus nerve transfer to restore thumb and finger extension. Methods  The radial nerves were dissected in 28 formalin-fixed upper extremities. Branching pattern, length, diameter, and number of myelinated fibers were recorded. Results  Commonly, the branching pattern (from proximal to distal) was to the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus, superficial sensory proximal to the lateral epicondyle, extensor carpi radialis brevis, supinator, extensor digitorum communis, extensor digiti minimi, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis, extensor pollicis longus, and extensor indicis distal to the lateral epicondyle. Conclusions  Branches to the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus, and supinator can be transferred to the posterior interosseous nerve to restore hand movement in patients with C7 - T1 brachial plexus palsies; the supinator branch is probably the best choice in this regard. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Karolinska Institutet 200 year anniversary - Symposium on Traumatic Injuries in the Nervous System: Injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system - Injuries and repair, pain problems, lesions to brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias K. Sköld

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Karolinska Institutet 200 year anniversary symposium on injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system gathered expertise in the spinal cord, spinal nerve and peripheral nerve injury field spanning from molecular prerequisites for nerve regeneration to clinical methods in nerve repair and rehabilitation. The topics presented at the meeting covered findings on adult neural stem cells that when transplanted to the hypoglossal nucleus in the rat could integrate with its host and promote neuron survival. Studies on vascularization after intraspinal replantation of ventral nerve roots and microarray studies in ventral root replantation as a tool for mapping of biological patterns typical for neuronal regeneration were discussed. Different immune molecules in neurons and glia and their very specific roles in synapse plasticity after injury were presented. Novel strategies in repair of injured peripheral nerves with ethyl-cyanoacrylate adhesive showed functional recovery comparable to that of conventional epineural sutures. Various aspects on surgical techniques which are available to improve function of the limb, once the nerve regeneration after brachial plexus lesions and repair has reached its limit were presented. Mo

  15. A case of tuberculous meningitis with prominent contrast enhancement of choroid plexus on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Shunya; Kobatake, Keitaro; Shinohara, Yukito; Tsugane, Rhuichi

    1986-01-01

    We report a case of tuberculous meningitis with specific CT findings which are different from those of previous reports. A 34-year-old man presented with 4-month history of left cervical lymph-node swelling, low grade fever and headache. He developed vomiting and consciousness disturbance. On admission, neurological examination revealed disorientation as to time, left homonymous hemianopsia, bilateral papilledema, left mydriasis, nuchal rigidity, and left hypereflexia. Tuberculin skin test was positive. CSF analysis revealed 307 WBC/mm 3 200 mg/dl protein, 68 mg/dl sugar and 124 mEq/l chlorine. Tryptophan reaction was positive and a fibrinous web was formed. CSF stains and cultures were negative. CT on admission showed ventricular dilatation, low density area in white matter of the right parietal region, and midline shift. A contrast enhanced CT scan showed prominent enhancement in the right choroid plexus and slight enhancement in the basal cisterns. Three months later, the enhancement in the choroid plexus was unchanged but that of the basal cistern was even more striking. Autopsy findings revealed lymphadenopathy with caseous necrosis in lung, liver, pancreas, spleen, and neck. In the central nervous system, the skull base was covered with gelatinous tissues and fibrin nets, and scattered tubercles in the meninges, multiple small infarctions in basal ganglia, and ventricular dilatation were observed. Tuberculoma, which was surrounded by a thick fibrotic wall, was observed in the right choroid plexus. (J.P.N.)

  16. Bilateral Brachial Artery Disease Presenting with Features of Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegobin, Karan; Lyons, Brittany; Maharaj, Satish; Baldeo, Cherisse; Reddy, Pramod; Cunningham, James

    2017-01-01

    To present a case of bilateral brachial artery disease presenting with features of Raynaud's phenomenon which was successfully treated with angioplasty and stenting, together with a review of the relevant literature. A 71-year-old female presented with a one-year history of intermittent pallor of both hands precipitated with cold objects. On examination, bilateral radial pulses were reduced. Prior photos showed pallor of the distal aspect of both palms. Angiogram showed high grade stenosis of the right brachial artery and focal occlusion with likely dissection of the left brachial artery. She underwent angioplasty and stenting for both lesions. She was asymptomatic without further episodes of Raynaud's phenomenon after five months on dual antiplatelet therapy. Upper-extremity vascular stenosis is uncommon. Structural changes in the vessel wall can cause vasospastic attacks, a mechanism described in secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. We hypothesize that these attacks may have been precipitated by the bilateral brachial artery disease. Furthermore, resolution of the symptoms after stent further supports our theory. Bilateral brachial artery disease is uncommon. Physicians should consider this in patients presenting with Raynaud's phenomenon. Brachial artery stenosis and occlusion is a treatable disease with good symptomatic outcomes after angioplasty and stenting.

  17. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault.

  18. Bilateral Brachial Artery Disease Presenting with Features of Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Seegobin, Karan; Lyons, Brittany; Maharaj, Satish; Baldeo, Cherisse; Reddy, Pramod; Cunningham, James

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To present a case of bilateral brachial artery disease presenting with features of Raynaud’s phenomenon which was successfully treated with angioplasty and stenting, together with a review of the relevant literature. Case. A 71-year-old female presented with a one-year history of intermittent pallor of both hands precipitated with cold objects. On examination, bilateral radial pulses were reduced. Prior photos showed pallor of the distal aspect of both palms. Angiogram showed high ...

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

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    M. S. Sinitsin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of cardiotropic therapy in neonates with severe posthypoxic myocardial ischemia and to improve severity rating criteria that would allow a differentiated approach to therapy for this condition. Subjects and methods. The efficiency of cardiotropic therapy was evaluated in 53 newborn infants with posthypoxic myocardial ischemia. Thirty (56.6% neonates received phosphocreatinine in a dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 3 days as cardiotropic support; 23 (43.4% babies had riboxine in a dose of 15—20 mg/kg. Results. The use of phosphocreatinine was found to be more effective than that of riboxine and to favor better blood biochemical composition parameters and lower ECG and intracardiac hemodynamic changes, which in turn reduced the time of mechanical ventilation from 11 to 8.25 days and that of administration of dopamine from 8 to 6 days, and its dose from 2 to 5 mg/kg/min. Conclusion. This investigation has led to the conclusion that there is a need for a comprehensive approach to diagnosing postischemic myocardial damages, including not only their clinical picture, but also a set of biochemical markers for ischemia and ECG and EchoCG changes on the 1st, 3rd, and then every 5—7 days and for the concomitant use of cardiotonic (dopamine and cardiotrophic (phosphocreatinine therapy; the administration of phosphocreatinine on intensive care unit admission (after prior hypoxia as early as possible improves neonatal heart performance values. There are positive changes in both ECG and EchoCG and biochemical parameters (LDH, ALT, AST, De Ritis ratio. Key words: posthypoxic myocar-dial ischemia, neonates, phosphocreatinine.

  20. Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy and Causation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, M J

    2016-07-01

    A vaginal childbirth is the result of the internal (endogenous) expulsive forces of uterine contractions, usually supplemented by active maternal pushing1. Depending on the clinical circumstances, additional external (exogenous) traction forces may be required from the birth attendant. This blend of internal and external forces varies from birth to birth. Women who have had a previous vaginal delivery, for example, may deliver successfully with uterine contractions alone and the role of the birth attendant may be simply to control and slow the delivery so that trauma to the maternal perineum from stretching by the fetal head is minimised. In contrast, additional traction may be required by an obstetrician at the time of an operative vaginal delivery for fetal distress or dystocia. The strength of the traction required may be increased by clinical factors, for example, fetal macrosomia or malposition. The traction should be axial in the direction of the birth canal, which is a vector combining horizontal and vertical traction at 25-45 degrees below the horizontal when the woman is in the lithotomy position.

  1. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    because of the poor quality of distal cephalic veins, multiple ... leading to inadequacy of blood flow, thrombosis and narrowing of vessels. Maturation of the fistula is affected by patient characteristics and the surgical technique. Larger vein diameter and high ... was visualised, the area lateral and superficial to it was explored.

  2. Brachial plexopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plexus is usually from direct injury to the nerve, stretching injuries (including birth trauma), pressure from tumors in the ... near the nerves to reduce pain Surgery to repair the nerves or remove something pressing on the nerves Occupational ...

  3. Opioid withdrawal presenting only nausea during tapering of oxycodone after celiac plexus block: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Takayama, Hiroto; Mamiya, Keiko; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is an effective treatment for patients suffering pain. CPB may allow for a reduction in opioid dosage, and may alleviate some of the unwanted side effects of these drugs. However, there is a substantial risk of withdrawal symptoms after reduction of opioid dose. We describe a case of pancreatic cancer developing opioid withdrawal after CPB, who presented only nausea. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to severe pancreatic cancer pain. He was administered oxycodone (oxycontin®) at 240 mg per day, and presented nausea and anorexia as side effects. CPB was performed due to insufficient pain relief. His pain disappeared on the same day as treatment. Oxycodone was reduced to 160 mg/day, and further reduced two days later to 80 mg/day. However, he complained of more severe nausea and loss of appetite even after tapering of oxycodone. Physical examination, blood chemistry examination, and brain computed tomography (CT) showed no abnormalities. Administration of fast-release oxycodone (Oxinome®) at a dose of 10 mg immediately improved his nausea. There have been no previous reports of nausea as the sole symptom of opioid withdrawal. The present case indicates that unless opioid side effects improve after dosage reduction, the possibility that they may be withdrawal symptoms should also be considered.

  4. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Bilateral spontaneous thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus; A rare etiology of acute scrotal pain: A case report and review of literature

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    Ktari Kamel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute testicular pain is frequent in urology. If torsion of the spermatic cord and orchiepididymites are usual, thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus is a very uncommon clinical entity. We present an unusual case and review the literature to explore potential etiologies and therapeutic strategies. Observation: A rare case of bilateral thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus occurred in a 39 year-old male.The diagnosis was confirmed with doppler sonographie and Computer Tomography. Urethral infection and protein C deficiency were found as associated factors. The treatment was conservative with good result. Conclusions: Anatomical factors are probably responsible for almost exclusive involvement of the left side. However, coagulation abnormalities and retroperitoneal tumors or absence of inferior vena cava must be sought especially in cases of right side or bilateral thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus. The management of pampiniform plexus thrombosis remains non surgical based on symptomatic treatment with good clinical and radiological evolution. Keywords: Thrombosis, Varicocele, Pain, Thrombophilia

  6. Choroid plexus carcinoma: clinical and radiological features of four cases and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogacheski, Enio; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Nascimento, Alessandra Bettega; Jacob, Graciela Vanessa Vicelli; Delle, Linei Augusta Brolini; Liu, Christian Bark; Belggi-Torres, Luis Fernando

    1998-01-01

    Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is rare central nervous system (CNS) tumor that accounts for nearly 0.06% of all intracranial neoplasms, most frequently occurring in patients less than 3 years of age. The authors present a clinical and radiological study of four patients with the diagnosis of CPC. The research was undertaken in the archives of radiology in the University Hospital of Curitiba, Parana State, Brazil, in the period from 1990 to 1997. The exams related to the CNS were catalogued and the CPC cases were looked into. Three of the patients were male and the mean age was 13.7 months. The clinical symptoms reported were due to intracranial hypertension, and the most common location was the lateral ventricles. Computed tomography scans show hydrocephalus and a mass hyperdense to the brain parenchyma, with marked enhancement post-contrast. Surgical resection was attempted in all patients. One of them died during the procedures. All of the other underwent relapse and died within an average of 7 months after the diagnosis. (author)

  7. Comprometimento do plexo braquial na cirurgia cardíaca para revascularização do miocárdio por esternotomia mediana: avaliação clínica The involvement of the brachial plexus in cardiac surgery with median sternotomy for the revascularization of the myocardium: clinical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURO ATRA

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar o plexo braquial na cirurgia cardíaca por esternotomia mediana para revascularização do miocárdio acompanhamos clinicamente 113 pacientes (87 homens e 26 mulheres no pré-operatório e entre o 5º e 8º dia pós-operatório. Do total dos pacientes, em 65 foi utilizada a artéria torácica interna. Não foi realizado exame de eletroneuromiografia. Encontramos lesão do plexo braquial em três pacientes, sendo que apenas em um foi utilizada a artéria torácica interna. Acreditamos que fatores como postura do paciente, hipotermia, afastadores torácicos, uso da artéria torácica interna têm importância nestas lesões. Devemos ficar atentos a estes fatores para evitar ou minimizar as lesões.To evaluate the involvement of brachial plexus in cardiac surgery with median sternotomy for the revascularization of the myocardium 113 patients (87 men and 26 women were clinically examined in the pre-operative and between the fifth and eighth post-operative days. The internal thoracic artery was used in 65 of the 113 patients. The electroneuromyography was not effected in any of the patients. A lesion of the brachial plexus was found in three patients though the internal thoracic artery was used in only one patient.We believe that factors such as posture of the patient, hypothermia, thoracic braces and use of the internal thoracic artery are relevant in the lesions. Hence one must be attentive to all the factors mentioned above so as to avoid or minimize the lesions.

  8. Treatment of a radiation-induced brachial plexopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ichirou; Harashina, Takao; Inoue, Takeo; Ueda, Kouichi; Hatoko, Mituo; Shidara, Yukinobu; Ito, Yoshiyasu.

    1990-01-01

    A radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a mastectomy causes severe pain and numbness, as well as motor and sensory disorders. Severe pain is often resistant to analgesic blocks, and in most instances, the effect of neurolysis is only temporary. We have treated two such patients with microsurgical neurolysis and then have covered the nerve by transferred muscles. In one case, the exposed brachial plexus was covered with a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap, and in the other, with a free rectus abdominis muscle flap. Pain and numbness were markedly improved in these two patients soon after the surgery, and the improvement in the sensory function also was relatively satisfactory. In one case, the motor function also improved. These patients have had no recurrence of pain or numbness for 4 years and 2 months and 4 years and 7 months after surgery, respectively. Further, their sensory and motor disorders did not advance. Surgical indications for a radiation-induced brachial plexopathy remain controversial, since the operation does not always ensure a marked improvement in the sensory and motor functions. Further, the operation is ineffective for patients with advanced nerve degeneration. Taking these factors into consideration, the preoperative predication of beneficial effects from this surgery is difficult. Despite our limited experience, however, our surgical method has been thought to be effective because it achieves a marked improvement in the numbness and pain experienced in the arms, which are usually the patients' chief complaints. (author)

  9. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita N Bhargava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  10. Medical Rehabilitation and Occupational Therapy in Patients with Lesion of Plexus Brachialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacheva D.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Causes for plexus brachialis damage are versatile, and in some cases remain unknown, but mostly result from degenerative and inflammatory processes. Treatment of brachial plexus dysfunction is often conservative and is subject to a team of specialists - neurologists, traumatologists, rehabilitation physicians, kinesitherapists and occupational therapists. The objective of the research is to report the recovery of patients with lesion of plexus brachialis after a complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation treatment program that includes electrostimulation, remedial massage, kinesitherapy, electrotherapy and occupational therapy. A total of 159 patients, treated at the Clinic of Physical Therapy, University Hospital of Pleven, were included in the study. Improvement of measured indexes: pain assessment, centimetry, assessment of upper limb muscle weakness, dynamometry and functional test of activities of daily living, was registered in all patients under observation. In order to achieve good results in the rehabilitation of patients with injured plexus brachialis, timely diagnosis, good medication therapy and early start of complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation are of crucial importance, so that performance of daily living activities improves. The good results come slowly and with difficulties, but the quality of life of patients and the quality of labor performed by them, improves significantly.

  11. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali, E-mail: vshali77@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Upadhyaya, Divya N. [Department of Plastic Surgery, King George Medical University, Shah Meena Road, Chowk, Lucknow 226 003 (India); Kumar, Adarsh [Department of Plastic Surgery, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Gujral, Ratni B. [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • MR neurography is the imaging modality of choice in patients who have sustained brachial plexus injury. It is helpful in determining the level and extent of injury. • The authors have used a Visual Per-operative Scoring system to assess the usefulness of MR neurography in delineating the level and type of the lesion. • The imaging findings were classified based on the level of injury—root, trunk or cord. These findings were correlated with those seen on surgical exploration. A good correlation was found in the majority (65%) of patients and average correlation (30%) in others. - Abstract: Objectives: Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Methods: Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus—roots, trunks and cords. Results: Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative

  12. Estudo comparativo entre ultrassom e neuroestimulação no bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via axilar Estudio comparativo entre ultrasonido y neuroestimulación en el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía axilar A comparative study between ultrasound and neurostimulation guided axillary brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Brüggemann da Conceição

    2009-10-01

    seleccionaron 40 pacientes para operaciones por elección en la mano, con bloqueo de plexo braquial vía axilar. Los pacientes se distribuyeron aleatoriamente y electrónicamente en dos grupos de 20 pacientes: Grupo Neuroestimulación (NE y Grupo Ultrasonido (US. Se compararon el tiempo de realización, la tasa de éxito y las complicaciones. RESULTADOS: Las tasas de bloqueo completo, falla parcial y falla total, no presentaron diferencias estadísticas significativa entre los grupos US y NE. El tiempo promedio para la realización del procedimiento en el grupo US (354 segundos no presentó diferencia estadística significativa cuando se le comparó al grupo NE (381 segundos. Los pacientes del grupo NE presentaron una tasa más elevada de punción vascular (40%, cuando se les comparó con el grupo US (10%, p Conceição DB, Helayel PE, Oliveira Filho GR - A Comparative Study between Ultrasound- and Neurostimulation-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of ultrasound in Regional Blocks is increasingly more frequent. However, very few studies comparing ultrasound and neurostimulation have been conducted. The objective of this study was to compare neurostimulation-guided axillary brachial plexus block with double injection and ultrasound-guided axillary plexus block for hand surgeries. The time to perform the technique, success rate, and complications were compared. METHODS: After approval by the Ethics on Research Committee of the Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, 40 patients scheduled for elective hand surgeries under axillary plexus block were selected. Patients were randomly divided into two groups with 20 patients each: Neurostimulation (NE and Ultrasound (US groups. The time to perform the technique, success rate, and complication rate were compared. RESULTS: Complete blockade, partial failure, and total failure rates did not show statistically significant differences between the US and NE groups. The mean time to perform the technique in

  13. The use of superficial cervical plexus block in oral and maxillofacial surgical practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kanthan, R. Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Aim: (1) To assess the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of superficial cervical plexus (SCP) block in oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases. (2) To assess any associated complication specifically related to the procedure. Subjects and Methods: The total number of patients was 10, out of which 6 were male and 4 were female patients. Six patients had incision and drainage of perimandibular space infections, two patients ...

  14. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Khoi D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. A retrospective case-series study of 12 903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy. A literature review of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) database was conducted to identify articles pertaining to brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery. In our total population of 12 903 patients, only 1 suffered from postoperative brachial plexopathy. The overall prevalence rate was thus 0.01%, but the prevalence rate at the site where this complication occurred was 0.07%. Previously reported risk factors for postoperative brachial plexopathy include age, anterior surgical procedures, and a diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The condition can also be due to patient positioning during surgery, which can generally be detected via the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring. Brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery is rare and merits further study.

  15. Curva de aprendizado da sonoanatomia do plexo braquial na região axilar Curva de aprendizaje de la sonoanatomía del plexo braquial en la región axilar Learning curve for the ultrasound anatomy of the brachial plexus in the axillary region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Escovedo Helayel

    2009-04-01

    : Proficiency in ultrasound-guided blocks demands four skills: recognition of the ultrasound anatomy, capacity to generate images, aligning the needle with the ultrasound beam, and recognizing the dispersion of the local anesthetic. The objective of this study was to construct and evaluate learning curves for image generation and ultrasound identification of the neurovascular structures in the axilla. METHODS: Seven Anesthesiology residents received theoretical and practical notions on the basic principles of ultrasound and the ultrasound anatomy of the axillary region with the objective to identify the terminal branches of the brachial plexus and axillary vessels. Each resident performed six exams. The accuracy and the time to identify the structures were evaluated. The success rate of each exam was calculated. Simple linear regression evaluated the time necessary to identify each structure in relation to the number of the exam. RESULTS: The axillary vessels were identified in 100% of the exams. The median nerve was identified in 83% of the cases from the first to the fifth exams. The radial nerve was identified in 100% of the exams. The ulnar nerve was identified in 67% of the cases in the first exam, and in 83% of the cases from the second to the fifth exams. The musculocutaneous nerve was identified in 50% of the cases in the first exam and in 83% of the cases in the fourth and fifth exams. All structures were identified correctly on the sixth exam. The mean time for the correct identification of the structures decreased considerably from the first to the sixth exam (r = - 0.37. CONCLUSIONS: Learning progression required the memorization of the ultrasound anatomy of the axillary region and acquisition of manual ability, and increasing success rates were associated with a significant reduction in the time to identify the structures.

  16. Ankle-Brachial Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measured at your arm. A low ankle-brachial index number can indicate narrowing or blockage of the arteries in ... tell your doctor so that he or she can continue to monitor your risk. Blockage (0.9 or less). An ankle-brachial index number less than 1.0 indicates narrowing of ...

  17. Giant congenital malformation of the perirectal plexus in computed tomography imaging – case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kędzierski, Bartłomiej; Nowak, Grzegorz; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Jaźwiec, Przemysław; Szuba, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the pelvic area is uncommon in males. The described case is of a giant lesion of this type that caused recurrent hemorrhaging in the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract. Preliminary diagnosis of vascular pathology was made on the basis of an endoscopic examination that revealed numerous pulsating protuberances of the rectal wall, in which blood flow was identified by means of transrectal ultrasonography. Complementing the diagnostics with a CT revealed a considerable extent of malformation, as well as its morphology and anatomical relations with the surrounding tissues. Following a two-year follow-up period, the malformation did not progress or demonstrate any intensification of clinical symptoms, therefore the patient continues to undergo conservative treatment

  18. Bupivacaine 0,25% versus ropivacaine 0,25% in brachial plexus block in dogs of beagle breedBupivacaína 0,25% versus ropivacaína 0,25% no bloqueio do plexo braquial em cães da raça beagle

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    Thiago Ignácio Wakoff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus block (BPB is a regional anesthesia technique which enables the attainment of surgical procedures distal scapulohumeral articulation. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ropivacaine and bupivacaine 0.25% without vasoconstrictor in BPB guided by electrical stimulation in dogs. Thirteen male and female beagle dogs underwent a BPB using bupivacaine and ropivacaine 0.25% (4mg/kg, both alone and in different times. The anesthesic block was performed in the right forelimb and as control group the block proceeded in the left forelimb using a solution of sodium chloride 0.9% in volume corresponding to the drug in the contralateral limb. The block was performed after the localization of the radial nerve with the aid of eletrical stimulation, which was infiltrated half the volume of anesthetic calculated and subsequently the remaining solution was administered on the median nerve. We evaluated sensitive and motor latencies and sensitive and motor block total time by clamping technique. In the present study, a technique for electrical stimulation was effective in 100% of animals. Bupivacaine had lower motor latency period, however, the sensitive latency between the two groups showed no statistically significant differences. In the block total time, bupivacaine obtained time significantly higher. Clinical signs characteristic of Horner’s syndrome were present in 15% of animals treated with bupivacaine. Furthermore, two animals presented signs of cardiotoxicity in bupivacaine group. The use of bupivacaine (4mg/kg without vasoconstrictor in dogs brachial plexus block provided longer analgesia and motor blockade, however, ropivacaine at the same dose and concentration was found to be free of deleterious effects associated of cardiovascular instability, hemodynamic and respiratory. O bloqueio do plexo braquial (BPB é uma técnica de anestesia regional que possibilita a realização de procedimentos cirúrgicos distais a articula

  19. Het plexus brachialis letsel. Een retrospectief onderzoek naar de functionele gevolgen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelot, Cornelis Hendrik

    1994-01-01

    The central issue of this study is accidental damage to the brachial plexus. In terms of medical rehabilitation, an understanding of the factors which determine the functional abilities is a prerequisite, since this understanding will eventually have an effect on therapeutic procedures. In a

  20. Transarterial Brachial Plexus Anaesthesia for Upper Limb Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: For all consenting patients, the axillary block was instituted using a 23G hypodermic needle and injection of 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline (40 – 50mL). Sociodemographic data, the quality of anaesthesia at commencement of surgery, time to request for first postoperative analgesia, surgeons and patients ...

  1. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans la main gauche, on peut voir très clairement le thenar et l'hypothenar. Les resultants d'examen du fonctionnement de la thyriode était normal. Le laryngoscope indirect, la méthode, indirecte du laryngoscoe a montré que la paralysie des cordes vocals de l'endroit gauche, le tamponnement du volume de la cellule était ...

  2. Secondary shoulder reconstruction in patients with brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Barmpitsioti, Antonia

    2011-07-01

    Restoration of shoulder stability in post-traumatic plexopathy patients is very important because more distal functions depend on a stable and functioning shoulder. The purpose of this study is to present our experience with secondary surgeries in patients with devastating paralysis. Functional outcomes were analyzed in relation to age, severity score and type of reconstruction. The medical records of 55 post-traumatic plexopathy patients who underwent secondary shoulder reconstruction, by a single surgeon, between 1978 and 2006, were reviewed. 55 patients had 73 procedures, 44 for shoulder abduction and 29 for external rotation. 38 patients underwent secondary surgery to augment shoulder abduction. Trapezius advancement was performed in 14 patients, double free muscle transfer in 18, free latissimus dorsi in 4 and triceps muscle transfer in 2 patients. 26 patients had secondary procedures for enhancement of shoulder external rotation. Dynamic rerouting of latissimus dorsi and teres major was carried out in 18 patients and rotational humerus osteotomy in 11 patients. All patients had improvement of shoulder stability and function. Shoulder abduction reached 40.80 ± 15.93 and external rotation at 24.28 ± 17.90°. Trapezius advancement yielded 41.81 ± 9.02° of abduction. Latissimus dorsi yielded stronger shoulder abduction than adductor longus. Rerouting of latissimus dorsi and teres major attained 22.33 ± 20.31° of dynamic external rotation while humerus osteotomy produced 26.87 ± 10.32 of external rotation. Secondary procedures such as pedicle and free muscles transfers, tendon transfers, and rotational humerus osteotomy augment shoulder stability and function in patients with irreparable paralysis. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous brachial plexus block as treatment for the Pancoast syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Six patients with severe neuropathic pain caused by a Pancoast tumor were treated with the continuous administration of local anesthetics. These patients had not responded to any other treatment, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, dexamethasone, tricyclic antidepressants,

  4. Choroid plexus papilloma and Aicardi syndrome: case report Papiloma do plexo coróideo e síndrome de Aicardi: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Pianetti Filho

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Aicardi syndrome associated with a choroid plexus papilloma of the third and both lateral ventricles in a 15 months old baby girl is repported. The tumor was completely removed via three craniotomies. Reports of the literature with the association of choroid plexus papilloma and Aicardi syndrome are rare. We suggest that children diagnosed with Aicardi syndrome should routinely undergo imaging studies of the brain, such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance.Relatamos o caso de uma criança com 15 meses de idade, portadora da síndrome de Aicardi associada a tumores nos ventrículos laterais e terceiro ventrículo (papilomas que foram retirados cirurgicamente através de três craniotomias. A ocorrência de papiloma do plexo coróideo associada à sindrome de Aicardi é raramente descrita na literatura. Sugerimos que as crianças portadoras da síndrome de Aicardi sejam rotineiramente submetidas a estudo radiológico do encéfalo através da tomografia computadorizada ou ressonância nuclear.

  5. Traumatic Peripheral Neuropraxias in Neonates: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Sushma; Bhandekar, Heena Sudhir; Korday, Charusheela Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve palsies in the newborn are uncommon but are a cause of severe anxiety in parents. Erb’s palsy, brachial plexus, radial nerve and facial nerve are the common nerves affected. Perinatal injuries are the most frequent cause of traumatic peripheral neuropraxias / nerve palsies. Usually these neuropraxias are self-limited with good recovery with conservative management in majority of cases.Ten neonates with peripheral neuropraxias were included in this retrospective stud...

  6. Redefining the coccygeal plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Jason T K; Stringer, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    The coccygeal plexus is variably described in anatomy texts and has rarely been studied despite the idiopathic nature of coccydynia in up to one-third of affected patients. The plexus was therefore investigated using a combination of microdissection and histology. The distal sacrum and coccyx in continuity with ischiococcygeus were removed en bloc from 16 embalmed cadavers (mean age 78 ± 10 years, 7 females) with no local disease. Ten specimens underwent microdissection of the coccygeal plexus and the remaining six were examined histologically after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and S100 immunohistochemistry to demonstrate nerve fibers. The coccygeal plexus is formed within ischiococcygeus from the ventral rami of S4, S5, and Co1 with a contribution (gray rami communicantes) from the sacral sympathetic trunk. It gives rise to anococcygeal nerves which pierce ischiococcygeus and the sacrospinous ligament to supply the subcutaneous tissue on the dorsal aspect of the coccyx. Some branches from the plexus pass medially anterior to the coccyx. The coccycgeal plexus is formed within ischiococcygeus rather than on its pelvic surface and appears to supply skin in the anococcygeal region. It probably also contributes to the innervation of ischiococcygeus, the sacrospinous ligament, coccygeal ligaments, and periosteum. It deserves to be considered as a potential pain generator that may be implicated in some patients with coccydynia. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Brachial artery approach for outpatient arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jai Kyung; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jae Hwan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brachial approach arteriography for outpatients, with particular regard to safety and image quality. The angiographic findings and follow-up medical records of 131 brachial approach arteriographies in 121 outpatients were retrospectively analysed. 5 F pigtail catheters were used in 125 cases and 5-F OCU-A catheters were used in three cases of renal arteriography, and three of upper extremity arteriography without catheter. Except for three cases of brachial artery puncture failure, all procedures were performed successfully. One hundred and fifteen of 119 lower extremity arteriographies were visualized down to the level of the tibioperoneal artery. The non-visualized cases were three in which there was multiple obstruction at the distal common iliac artery and one with insufficient contrast amount due to renal failure In four cases there were complications : two involved arterial thrombosis, one was an intramuscular hematoma, and one an A-V fistula. For outpatients, brachial approach arteriography can replace the femoral approach. Its image quality is excellent, there are time-cost benefits, and the rate of complications is relatively low

  8. A man with small vessel vasculitis presenting with brachial diplegia, multiple cranial mononeuropathies and severe orthostatic hypotension in diabetes mellitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Goodman, Jerry Clay; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2013-10-01

    We report a rare case of fulminant vasculitic mononeuropathy resulting in brachial diplegia, with suspected brainstem and autonomic nervous system involvement in a patient with diabetes mellitus. A 58-year-old Hispanic Caucasian man with diabetes mellitus presented with a 1-year history of progressive bilateral upper extremity weakness, orthostatic intolerance and progressive memory decline. Diagnostic evaluation including laboratory tests for progressive encephalopathies, systemic inflammatory and non-inflammatory neuropathies, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, electrodiagnostic studies, and nerve biopsy were performed. Clinical examination revealed moderate cognitive deficits on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale, bilateral facial weakness and weakness of bilateral shoulder girdle and intrinsic hand muscles. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses revealed elevated protein and an elevated immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, suggesting an immune-mediated process. Further laboratory work up was non-diagnostic. Electrodiagnostic studies demonstrated chronic asymmetric axonal mononeuropathies with ongoing denervation. A superficial radial nerve biopsy showed a chronic vasculitic neuropathy. Glucocorticosteroid treatment, symptomatic pharmacologic and supportive non-pharmacologic therapies resulted in improved clinical outcomes despite challenges with glycemic control. This case report emphasizes the importance of a thorough evaluation of atypical or uncommon neuromuscular presentations in diabetic patients without etiological presumptions. This is necessary in order to promptly establish a diagnosis, initiate appropriate therapies and prevent irreversible nerve injury.

  9. Algorithm for bionic hand reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Laura A; Sturma, Agnes; Mayer, Johannes A; Pittermann, Anna; Salminger, Stefan; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Global brachial plexus lesions with multiple root avulsions are among the most severe nerve injuries, leading to lifelong disability. Fortunately, in most cases primary and secondary reconstructions provide a stable shoulder and restore sufficient arm function. Restoration of biological hand function, however, remains a reconstructive goal that is difficult to reach. The recently introduced concept of bionic reconstruction overcomes biological limitations of classic reconstructive surgery to restore hand function by combining selective nerve and muscle transfers with elective amputation of the functionless hand and its replacement with a prosthetic device. The authors present their treatment algorithm for bionic hand reconstruction and report on the management and long-term functional outcomes of patients with global brachial plexopathies who have undergone this innovative treatment. METHODS Thirty-four patients with posttraumatic global brachial plexopathies leading to loss of hand function consulted the Center for Advanced Restoration of Extremity Function between 2011 and 2015. Of these patients, 16 (47%) qualified for bionic reconstruction due to lack of treatment alternatives. The treatment algorithm included progressive steps with the intent of improving the biotechnological interface to allow optimal prosthetic hand replacement. In 5 patients, final functional outcome measurements were obtained with the Action Arm Research Test (ARAT), the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. RESULTS In all 5 patients who completed functional assessments, partial hand function was restored with bionic reconstruction. ARAT scores improved from 3.4 ± 4.3 to 25.4 ± 12.7 (p = 0.043; mean ± SD) and SHAP scores improved from 10.0 ± 1.6 to 55 ± 19.7 (p = 0.042). DASH scores decreased from 57.9 ± 20.6 to 32 ± 28.6 (p = 0.042), indicating decreased disability. CONCLUSIONS The authors

  10. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Juan Camilo; Acosta, Mauricio Fernando; Uribe Jorge Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome in a young man, diagnosed with upper limb arteriography, leading to repeated arterio-arterial emboli originating from a post-stenotic subclavian artery aneurysm. It is of our interest due to its low incidence and the small number of cases reported that have been diagnosed by arteriography. The thoracic outlet is the path through which vascular and neural structures goes from the neck to the axilla, and it has three anatomical strictures, that when pronounced, can compress the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels, leading to different symptoms and signs.

  11. Complicated abdominal pregnancy with placenta feeding off sacral plexus and subsequent multiple ectopic pregnancies during a 4-year follow-up: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chaitali; Feldman, Joseph; Ogedegbe, Chinwe

    2016-02-11

    Abdominal pregnancy (pregnancy in the peritoneal cavity) is a very rare and serious type of extrauterine gestation that accounts for approximately 1.4% of all ectopic pregnancies. It also represents one of the few times an ectopic pregnancy can be carried to term. Early strategic diagnosis and management decisions can make a critical difference with regards to severity of morbidity and mortality risk. After an extensive search of the English language medical literature, we are unaware of any case of abdominal pregnancy in which the placenta was receiving its vascular supply from the sacral plexus. A 26-year-old African-American woman, primigravida, at 16 weeks 4 days' gestation, presented to our Emergency Department with abdominal pain. She did not complain of any vaginal bleeding. A physical examination revealed mild abdominal tenderness and no blood in the vaginal vault. Laboratory findings corresponded to an increased level of beta human chorionic gonadotropin; magnetic resonance imaging confirmed an abdominal pregnancy. She underwent feticide, administration of methotrexate and a laparotomy was done which was immediately deferred due to perceived increased bleeding risk. She was found to have an intra-abdominal ectopic pregnancy with the placenta attached to her omentum, cul-de-sac and rectosigmoid, with unusual and extensive vascularity from the sacral plexus. A repeat laparotomy was performed 11 weeks later, aimed at removal of the gestational sac and placenta that were left in situ on the first laparotomy. This time, we achieved successful removal of the peritoneal gestation, lysis of adhesions, ligation of vascular supply and cautery of the diminished vasculature. Subsequently, she had two ectopic pregnancies, which were managed with both medical and surgical interventions. Ectopic pregnancies should be identified early and evaluated for the etiology of the presentation. Rarely, an ectopic pregnancy implants at an extratubal location. Today, early

  12. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  13. Symptomatic bilateral xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

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    Selin Tural Emon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomas (XGRs of the choroid plexus are rare, asymptomatic, and benign lesions usually found incidentally. Here, we present a case of a 47-year-old male with bilateral XGR of the choroid plexus with periventricular edema and discuss our case in relation to a review of existing literature pertaining to the radiology of XGRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral trigonal XGR causing brain edema without ventricular dilatation. Despite the fact that they can cause hydrocephalus, XGRs are silent and benign lesions. Although the etiopathology of XGRs remains poorly understood, enhanced imaging analyses may provide additional information regarding edema and focal white matter signal changes.

  14. Conception of the cervico-brachial protector for motorcycle drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radek, A; Zapałowicz, K; Nawrocki, A; Demus, J; Maklewska, E; Matyjewski, M

    2000-01-01

    The increasing popularity of motorcycles increases the role of motorcycle accidents as a main cause of brachial plexus injuries. In view of the high social cost of treatment of the victims it seemed desirable to devise some kind of protective clothing for motorcyclists. The protective clothing devised by teams from Department of Neurosurgery, TRICOTEXTIL--and Aeronautics and Applied Mechanics Institute, consists of the following parts: cervical collar--acting against force causing lateral bending and extension of cervical spine, shock-absorptive shoulder pads--acting against the impact energy partially absorbing it and partially transmitting to the dorsal stiff bar, dorsal stiff bar and sacroiliac belt--partially immobilizes the thoracic and lumbar spine, acts against its compression, transmits the impact energy to the iliac crests and hips. The expected biomechanical effects of the cervico-brachial protector are as follows: In brachial region it should diminish the impact energy by its partial absorption and partial transmission along dorsal stiff bar to sacroiliac belt. It should act against excessive cervical spine motion--mainly against lateral bending and extension. It should act against excessive depression of the shoulder. The protective system built in the jacket should co-operate with the helmet of motorcycle driver. It should be comfortable for the driver and conform to security standards. Prototype of the protector underwent kinetic sledge tests in Industrial Motorization Institute (PIMOT), Warsaw, with the use of Hybrid Dummy II.

  15. The use of superficial cervical plexus block in oral and maxillofacial surgical practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthan, R Kamal

    2016-01-01

    (1) To assess the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of superficial cervical plexus (SCP) block in oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases. (2) To assess any associated complication specifically related to the procedure. The total number of patients was 10, out of which 6 were male and 4 were female patients. Six patients had incision and drainage of perimandibular space infections, two patients had Level Ib cervical lymph node biopsies, one patient had enucleation of cyst in the body of mandible, one patient had open reduction and internal fixation isolated angle fracture. Informed written consent was obtained from the patients after they had the procedure explained to them. Exclusion criteria included patient's refusal to undergo the procedure under regional anesthesia, allergy to local anesthetic, excessively anxious, and apprehensive patients, significant upper airway compromise warranting an endotracheal intubation to secure airway. All patients had the procedure done by the same operating surgeon. All patients had their surgical procedures under regional anesthesia (SCP block with supplemental nerve blocks) performed by the same surgeon with satisfactory anesthesia and analgesia without any complication. SCP block with concomitant mandibular nerve and long buccal nerve block has a high success rate, low complication rate, and high patient acceptability as shown in the study. The notable anesthetic effect and adequate working time, summed with the low risk of accidents and complications, make this technique a good alternative for sensitive blockage of part of the cranial and cervical regions and have positive outcomes in selective OMFS cases.

  16. Brachmann-Cornelia de Lange syndrome with a papilloma of the choroid plexus: analyses of molecular genetic characteristics of the patient and the tumor. A single-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Gordillo-Domínguez, Luis F; González-Carranza, Vicente; Torres-García, Samuel; García-Delgado, Constanza; Sánchez-Boiso, Adriana; Arenas-Huertero, Francisco; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; Baqueiro-Hernández, César; Buenrostro-Márquez, Guillermo; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sonia; Dhellemmes, Patrick; Castro-Sierra, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A 10-month-old girl with a Brachmann-Cornelia de Lange syndrome and a choroid plexus papilloma of the brain was studied at the Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez (HIMFG) in Mexico City. Presumptive papilloma of the third ventricle was evidenced on CT and MR images and removed. Pathological analysis confirmed its origin. A posterior radiosurgery was required due to a tumor relapse. Karyotypes (GTG bands) of the patient and her parents undertaken at HIMFG were normal. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analyses of blood DNA of the patient and her parents carried out at BlueGnome's Laboratory in Cambridge, UK, set in evidence amplification of genes SPNS2, GGT6, SMTNL2, PELP1, MYBBP1A, and ALOX15 in chromosome 17p of the patient. Since MYBBP1A is a proto-oncogene and ALOX15 participates in the development of cancer and metastases of tumors, further fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of these two genes were implemented at HIMFG. Amplification of the two genes was found in the tumor of the case under study but not in an unrelated papilloma of the choroid plexus. Further analyses of the association of choroid plexus papillomas with disorders of psycho-neural development and its relationship to molecular genetic modifications at chromosome 17p are now under way at HIMFG.

  17. Estudo comparativo da eficácia analgésica pós-operatória de 20 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5, 0,75 ou 1% no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior Estudio comparativo de la eficacia analgésica postoperatoria de 20 mL de ropivacaina a 0,5, 0,75 ó 1% en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior Comparative study for the postoperative analgesic efficacy of 20 mL at 0.5, 0.75, and 1% ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2008-10-01

    ía posterior se dividieron aleatoriamente en tres grupos de 30. Grupo 1: 20 mL de ropivacaina a 0,5%; Grupo 2: 20 mL de ropivacaina a 0,75%; Grupo 3: 20 mL de ropivacaina a 1%. El bloqueo se evaluó a través de la investigación de sensibilidad térmica utilizando algodón con alcohol y el dolor postoperatorio se evaluó según una escala numérico verbal (ENV en las primeras 48 horas. RESULTADOS: En los tres grupos la analgesia postoperatoria fue similar según los parámetros evaluados; ENV de dolor medio, tiempo hasta el primer quejido de dolor y consumo de opioides en el postoperatorio. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio mostró que el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior es una técnica que promueve una analgesia eficaz para intervenciones quirúrgicas en el hombro. Utilizando 20 mL de ropivacaina, las tres diferentes concentraciones estudiadas promueven analgesia similar.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Arthroscopic shoulder surgeries are associated with severe postoperative pain. Among the analgesic techniques available, brachial plexus block has the best results. The objective of this study was to determine which concentration of local analgesic used in the posterior brachial plexus block provides longer postoperative analgesia. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing posterior brachial plexus block were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each. Group I: 20 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine; Group 2: 20 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine; and Group 3: 20 mL of 1% ropivacaine. The blockade was evaluated by assessing the thermal sensitivity using a cotton pad with alcohol and postoperative pain was evaluated according to a Verbal Numeric Scale (VNS in the first 48 hours. RESULTS: Postoperative analgesia was similar in all three groups according to the parameters evaluated: mean VNS, time until the first complaint of pain, and postoperative opioid consumption. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that posterior brachial plexus block provides effective analgesia for shoulder surgeries

  18. Thyroxine transport in choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, P.W.; Aldred, A.R.; Menting, J.G.; Marley, P.D.; Sawyer, W.H.; Schreiber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of the choroid plexus in thyroid hormone transport between body and brain, suggested by strong synthesis and secretion of transthyretin in this tissue, was investigated in in vitro and in vivo systems. Rat choroid plexus pieces incubated in vitro were found to accumulate thyroid hormones from surrounding medium in a non-saturable process. At equilibrium, the ratio of thyroid hormone concentration in choroid plexus pieces to that in medium decreased upon increasing the concentration of transthyretin in the medium. Fluorescence quenching of fluorophores located at different depths in liposome membranes showed maximal hormone accumulation in the middle of the phospholipid bilayer. Partition coefficients of thyroxine and triiodothyronine between lipid and aqueous phase were about 20,000. After intravenous injection of 125 I-labeled thyroid hormones, choroid plexus and parts of the brain steadily accumulated 125 I-thyroxine, but not [ 125 I]triiodothyronine, for many hours. The accumulation of 125 I-thyroxine in choroid plexus preceded that in brain. The amount of 125 I-thyroxine in non-brain tissues and the [ 125 I]triiodothyronine content of all tissues decreased steadily beginning immediately after injection. A model is proposed for thyroxine transport from the bloodstream into cerebrospinal fluid based on partitioning of thyroxine between choroid plexus and surrounding fluids and binding of thyroxine to transthyretin newly synthesized and secreted by choroid plexus

  19. Unusual case of sciatic nerve and deep pelvic endometriosis with lumbosacral plexus spread presenting with muscular atrophy and foot drop

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    Narvir Singh Chauhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is an important disorder which affects women in the childbearing age group. In addition to the commonly observed intrapelvic sites, it can very rarely affect extrapelvic location such as the sciatic nerve. We describe an uncommon case of sciatic endometriosis leading to gross muscular atrophy and foot drop. The patient additionally had perineural extension of endometriosis along the ipsilateral lumbosacral trunk and coexisting intrapelvic endometrial implants in retrocervical area, uterosacral ligament, and urinary bladder wall.

  20. Estudo comparativo da eficácia analgésica pós-operatória de 20, 30 ou 40 mL de ropivacaína no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior Estudio comparativo de la eficacia analgésica postoperatoria de 20, 30 o 40 mL de ropivacaína en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior A comparative study on the postoperative analgesic efficacy of 20, 30, or 40 mL of ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2007-10-01

    fue determinar cuál volumen de anestésico local en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior propicia analgesia postoperatoria para esas operaciones de manera más eficiente. MÉTODO: Noventa pacientes sometidos al bloqueo del plexo braquial por vía posterior fueron divididos aleatoriamente en tres grupos de 30. Grupo 1 - volumen de 20 mL; Grupo 2 - volumen de 30 mL; Grupo 3 - volumen de 40 mL. En todos los grupos, el anestésico usado fue la ropivacaína a 0,375%. El bloqueo se evaluó a través de la investigación de sensibilidad térmica utilizando algodón con alcohol y el dolor postoperatorio se evaluó secundando una escala numérica verbal (ENV en las primeras 24 horas. RESULTADOS: En los tres grupos la analgesia postoperatoria fue similar según los parámetros evaluados; ENV de dolor promedio,tiempo hasta el primer quejido de dolor y consumo de opioides en el postoperatorio. En el grupo de 20 mL hubo un mayor consumo de analgésicos no opioides después de la 12ª hora de postoperatorio. En los grupos de 30 y 40 mL la extensión del bloqueo fue significativamente mayor. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio mostró que el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior es una técnica que promueve analgesia eficaz para intervenciones quirúrgicas en el hombro. Los tres diferentes volúmenes estudiados promovieron analgesia similar. La mayor extensión del bloqueo con volúmenes mayores no se tradujo en una mejor analgesia.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Arthroscopic surgeries of the shoulder are accompanied by severe postoperative pain. Among the analgesic techniques, brachial plexus block offers the best results. The objective of this study was to determine which volume of local anesthetic in the posterior brachial plexus block offers more adequate analgesia for those procedures. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing posterior brachial plexus block were randomly divided in three groups of 30 patients: Group 1 – volume of 20 mL; Groups 2 – volume of 30 m

  1. Brachial plexitis preceding encephalomyelitis in a patient with West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Sonja; Kaas, Bonnie; Simpkins, Alexis; Lyons, Jennifer; Venkatesan, Arun; Probasco, John

    2013-12-05

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old woman with West Nile virus infection presenting with painful brachial plexitis and radiculitis that preceded the more typically associated symptoms of meningoencephalitis. Physicians should be aware that West Nile virus infection can present with painful brachial plexitis.

  2. Gross morphological features of plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera

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    A. Cevik-Demirkan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the detailed features of the morphological structure and the innervation areas of the plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera. The animals (5 female and 5 male were euthanased with ketamine hydrocloride and xylazine hydrocloride combination, 60 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Skin, muscles and nerves were dissected under a stereo-microscope. The brachial plexus of the chinchilla is formed by rami ventrales of C5-C8, T1 and T2, and possesses a single truncus. The subscapular nerve is formed by the rami of the spinal nerves originating from C6 (one thin ramus and C7 (one thick and 2 thin rami. These nerves innervate the subscapular and teres minor muscles. The long thoracic nerve, before joining with the brachial plexus, obtains branches from C6 and C7 in 5 cadavers (3 male, 2 female, from C7 in 4 cadavers (2 male, 2 female and from C6-C8 in only 1 female cadaver. These nerves disperse in variable combinations to form the extrinsic and intrinstic named, nerves of the thoracic limb. An undefined nerve branch originates from the rami ventrales of C7, C8 and T1 spinal nerves enter the coracobrachial muscle.

  3. Subacute brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2012-06-01

    Brachial diplegia is a clinical term used to describe weakness restricted to the upper extremities. We report a case of brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus infection. A 48-year-old man developed severe painless bilateral upper extremity weakness within a few weeks of a flu-like illness. Clinical examination revealed marked periscapular, shoulder girdle, and humeral muscle atrophy and bilateral scapular winging, with near symmetrical bilateral hypotonic upper extremity weakness. This was associated with clinical signs of an encephalomyelopathy without cognitive or sensory deficits. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated a subacute disorder of motor neurons, their axons or both, involving the cervical and thoracic myotomes, with ongoing denervation. Serological studies confirmed recent West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Gradual improvement occurred following conservative supportive therapies. Progressive brachial diplegia is a rare neuromuscular presentation of WNV neuroinvasive disease. This case report adds to the clinical spectrum of WNV-induced neurologic sequelae. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy and hypofractionated regimens in adjuvant irradiation of patients with breast cancer-a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galecki, Jacek; Hicer-Grzenkowicz, Joanna; Grudzien-Kowalska, Malgorzata; Zalucki, Wojciech [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Michalska, Teresa [Academy of Medicine, Warsaw (Poland). Neurological Clinic, Second Dept.

    2006-04-15

    In order to increase the availability of adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer patients and make it more convenient and cheaper, in numerous cancer centres, the dose per fraction has been increased from 2 Gy to 2.25-2.75 Gy and the total dose has been decreased from 50 Gy to 40-45 Gy. The risk of developing any late complications after conventionally fractionated megavoltage radiotherapy is estimated to be below 1%. The aim of this review is to determine whether hypofractionated regimens increase the risk of damage to the brachial plexus. A review of the published literature shows that the use of doses per fraction in the range from 2.2 Gy to 4.58 Gy with the total doses between 43.5 Gy and 60 Gy causes a significant risk of brachial plexus injury which ranged from 1.7% up to 73%. The risk of radiation induced brachial plexopathy was smaller than 1% using regimens with doses per fraction between 2.2 and 2.5 Gy with the total doses between 34 and 40 Gy. Surgical manipulations in the axilla and chemotherapy have to be taken into account as additional factors which may increase the risk of brachial plexopathy.

  5. Asymmetric Bilateral Variations in the Musculocutaneous and Median Nerves with High Branching of Brachial Artery

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    Vandana Tomar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial Plexus is formed by the union of the anterior rami of cervical 5, 6, 7, 8 and thoracic 1 nerves. These nerves unite and divide to form the key nerves innervating the upper limb. Variations in the course of these nerves are clinically important to anesthetists, neurologists and orthopedicians. We report bilateral variations in the arterial and neural structures in the upper limb of a 65 year old cadaver. The muscles of the arm on one side were innervated by the median nerve with absence of musculocutaneous. While on the other side the musculocutaneous nerve contributed to the formation of the median nerve. There was a presence of high bifurcation of brachial artery on both sides. Knowledge of such variations in the innervations of muscles and the arterial supply of the limbs are important to remember before performing any reconstructive procedures or interventions on the limb.

  6. Rectus Abdominis Motor Nerves as Donor Option for Free Functional Muscle Transfer: A Cadaver Study and Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Aaron B; Nicoson, Michael C; Moore, Amy M; Hunter, Dan A; Tung, Thomas H

    2018-03-01

    Current management of brachial plexus injuries includes nerve grafts and nerve transfers. However, in cases of late presentation or pan plexus injuries, free functional muscle transfers are an option to restore function. The purpose of our study was to describe and evaluate the rectus abdominis motor nerves histomorphologically and functionally as a donor nerve option for free functional muscle transfer for the reconstruction of brachial plexus injuries. High intercostal, rectus abdominis, thoracodorsal, and medial pectoral nerves were harvested for histomorphometric analysis from 4 cadavers from levels T3-8. A retrospective chart review was performed of all free functional muscle transfers from 2001 to 2014 by a single surgeon. Rectus abdominis nerve branches provide a significant quantity of motor axons compared with high intercostal nerves and are comparable to the anterior branch of the thoracodorsal nerve and medial pectoral nerve branches. Clinically, the average recovery of elbow flexion was comparable to conventional donors for 2-stage muscle transfer. Rectus abdominis motor nerves have similar nerve counts to thoracodorsal, medial pectoral nerves, and significantly more than high intercostal nerves alone. The use of rectus abdominis motor nerve branches allows restoration of elbow flexion comparable to other standard donors. In cases where multiple high intercostal nerves are not available as donors (rib fractures, phrenic nerve injury), rectus abdominis nerves provide a potential option for motor reconstruction without adversely affecting respiration.

  7. superficial brachial artery terminiating as radial and superficial ulnar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    superficial brachial artery terminiating as radial and superficial ulnar arteries: a case report. P V Prasad Rao, S C Chaudhary. Abstract. No Abstract. Central African Journal of Medicine Vol. 47 (3) 2001: pp. 78-80. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  8. Comparison of Pelvic Plexus Blockade to other Conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the degree of pain, efficacy and safety of pelvic plexus block to other conventional techniques of analgesia in 12 core transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of prostate. Materials and Methods: The study included 160 consecutive cases of prostate biopsy, prospectively randomized into four groups of ...

  9. Continuous Infraclavicular Block for Forearm Amputation After Being Bitten by a Saltwater Crocodile (Crocodylus Porosus: A Case Report

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    Chin-Hsi Chiu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Two important issues after a complete right forearm amputation are replantation and ongoing pain management. There are no reports of successful forearm replantation as a consequence of a crocodile bite. Here, we discuss our pain management in a case of complete forearm amputation after a bite from a saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus, which necessitated six further operations to achieve successful replantation. Continuous infraclavicular brachial plexus block was effective for acute pain control in this case. We strongly recommend performing the block with an indwelling catheter under ultrasound guidance for higher accuracy and safety.

  10. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis; Ganglienblockade. Neurolyse des Plexus coeliacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H. [Klinikum Esslingen gGmbH, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Esslingen (Germany); Meier, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [German] Therapierefraktaere und schwere rezidivierende Schmerzen im Oberbauch stellen insbesondere beim nicht operablen Pankreaskarzinom, aber auch bei fortgeschrittenen entzuendlichen Erkrankungen eine Herausforderung dar. Die CT-gesteuerte Neurolyse/Blockade des Plexus coeliacus schaltet durch eine gezielte Zerstoerung der afferenten und efferenten Nervenfasern mit Alkohol die Schmerzweiterleitung aus. Mittels unterschiedlicher Zugaenge von ventral oder dorsal wird eine 22-G-Chiba-Nadel CT-durchleuchtungsgesteuert nach prae- und/oder paraaortal auf Hoehe des Truncus coeliacus vorgebracht. An der entsprechenden Lokalisation erfolgt die Injektion von 20

  11. Síndrome de Aicardi e papiloma do plexo coróide: uma associação rara. Relato de caso Aicardi syndrome and choroid plexus papilloma: a rare association. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima M. Aguiar

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso clínico de uma criança de 5 meses de idade, do sexo feminino, com achados característicos da síndrome de Aicardi: agenesia do corpo caloso, espasmos infantis, anormalidades oculares ("chorioretinal lacunae" e microftalmia, atraso do desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor e malformações vertebrais com cifoescoliose. Os exames complementares confirmaram o diagnóstico e as imagens neurorradiológicas evidenciaram, além da agenesia do corpo caloso, massa localizada em região atrioventricular esquerda (papiloma do plexo coróide. A síndrome de Aicardi associada a papiloma do plexo coróide é rara, sendo este o sétimo caso relatado na literatura. Os autores sugerem que o papiloma do plexo coróide seja considerado tumor característico da síndrome de Aicardi, pois a sua freqüência é mais do que coincidental.The authors report a case of a 5 months old female child with clinical features of Aicardi syndrome: agenesis of the corpus callosum, occular abnormalities ("chorioretinal lacunae" and microphthalmus, infantile spasms, mental retardation, vertebral malformations and thoracic deformity. The pacient was submitted to complementary examinations that confirmed the diagnosis. The neuroradiologic images (MRI showed besides corpus callosum agenesis a tumor located at the left ventricular atrium (choroid plexus papilloma. This association is a rare occurrence and the present case is the seventh described in literature. Furthermore, we suggest that the choroid plexus pappilloma could be a characteristic tumor of the Aicardi syndrome.

  12. Spontaneous isolated true aneurysms of the brachial artery in children

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    Sameer A. Hirji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are rare, and have been previously reported in children to be associated with congenital malformations and infectious or inflammatory processes. In this case series, we present two unique cases of spontaneous isolated true aneurysms of the brachial artery in two children. Both cases were incidentally found on examination, diagnosed by ultrasonography, and successfully managed by surgical excision and micro-vascular repair with vein grafting.

  13. Vascular patterns of upper limb: an anatomical study with accent on superficial brachial artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Baca, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the terminal segmentation of the axillary artery and to present four cases of anomalous branching of the axillary artery, the superficial brachial artery (arteria brachialis superficialis), which is defined as the brachial artery that runs superficially to the median nerve. Totally, 130 cadaveric upper arms embalmed by classical formaldehyde technique from collections of the Department of Anatomy, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, were macroscopically dissected with special focus on the branching arrangement of the axillary artery. The most distal part of the axillary artery (infrapectoral part) terminated in four cases as a bifurcation into two terminal branches: the superficial brachial artery and profunda brachii artery, denominated according to their relation to the median nerve. The profunda brachii artery primarily gave rise to the main branches of the infrapectoral part of the axillary artery. The superficial brachial artery descended to the cubital fossa where it assumed the usual course of the brachial artery in two cases and in the other two cases its branches (the radial and ulnar arteries) passed superficially to the flexors. The incidence of the superficial brachial artery in our study was 5% of cases. The reported incidence is a bit contradictory, from 0.12% to 25% of cases. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is of crucial importance for neurosurgeons and specialists using the radiodiagnostic techniques, particularly in cases involving traumatic injuries. The improved knowledge would allow more accurate diagnostic interpretations and surgical treatment. PMID:21342134

  14. Recurrent stingers in an adolescent American football player: dilemmas of return to play. A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremski, Jason L; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Herman, Daniel C

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a 16-year-old football linebacker with a history of recurrent stingers. Initial physical examination was normal as were cervical spine radiographs. MRI of the cervical spine revealed relative stenosis. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed chronic bilateral neurogenic changes of the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. A Kerr Collar was obtained to minimize head acceleration and force transmission through the neck. While there are return-to-play guidelines for recurrent stingers, there are inconsistencies with those recommendations. Our case highlights the challenges in contact sport athletes with recurrent stingers.

  15. Radiation Therapy to the Plexus Brachialis in Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis of Paresthesia in Relation to Dose and Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@gu.se [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderäng, Ulrica [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Regional Cancer Center, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To identify volume and dose predictors of paresthesia after irradiation of the brachial plexus among women treated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The women had breast surgery with axillary dissection, followed by radiation therapy with (n=192) or without irradiation (n=509) of the supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs). The breast area was treated to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions, and 192 of the women also had 46 to 50 Gy to the SCLNs. We delineated the brachial plexus on 3-dimensional dose-planning computerized tomography. Three to eight years after radiation therapy the women answered a questionnaire. Irradiated volumes and doses were calculated and related to the occurrence of paresthesia in the hand. Results: After treatment with axillary dissection with radiation therapy to the SCLNs 20% of the women reported paresthesia, compared with 13% after axillary dissection without radiation therapy, resulting in a relative risk (RR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.11). Paresthesia was reported by 25% after radiation therapy to the SCLNs with a V{sub 40} {sub Gy} ≥ 13.5 cm{sup 3}, compared with 13% without radiation therapy, RR 1.83 (95% CI 1.13-2.95). Women having a maximum dose to the brachial plexus of ≥55.0 Gy had a 25% occurrence of paresthesia, with RR 1.86 (95% CI 0.68-5.07, not significant). Conclusion: Our results indicate that there is a correlation between larger irradiated volumes of the brachial plexus and an increased risk of reported paresthesia among women treated for breast cancer.

  16. Occult radiological effects of lipomatosis of the lumbosacral plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, Mark A. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Howe, B.M.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN) is a condition of massive peripheral nerve enlargement frequently associated with hypertrophy within the distribution of the nerve, and most commonly affecting the distal limbs. We sought to understand if LN of the lumbosacral plexus would be associated with the trophic effects of LN on surrounding tissue within the pelvis, which may be clinically occult, but present on MRI. Fifty-one cases of LN, confirmed by pathology or pathognomonic appearance on MRI, were reviewed. Patients with LN of the sciatic nerve were investigated for radiological signs suggestive of overgrowth. Five patients had involvement of the sciatic nerve, 4 of whom had MR imaging of the pelvis. Three patients had LN involving the lumbosacral plexus, and one patient had isolated involvement of the sciatic nerve. All patients with involvement of the lumbosacral plexus demonstrated previously unrecognized evidence of nerve territory overgrowth in the pelvis, including: LN, profound adipose proliferation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, and bone hypertrophy and ankylosis. The patient with LN involving the intrapelvic sciatic nerve, but not the lumbosacral plexus did not demonstrate any radiological evidence of pelvic overgrowth. LN is broader in anatomical reach than previously understood. Proximal plexal innervation may be involved, with a consequent effect on axial skeleton and intrapelvic structures. (orig.)

  17. [Cervical neurinomas. (Considerations in five cases operated in Day-Surgery)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellucci, R; Toppi, L; Orsi, E; Capuano, L G; Pasciuto, A; Ortensi, A; Ascenzi, P; Lippolis, G; Berni, A; Corbellini, L

    1997-01-01

    We report the experiment of five cases of neurinoma observed in the division of Day Surgery of the Third Surgery Clinic, operating in the Hematology Institute of University of Studies "La Sapienza" in Rome. The problems of the diagnosis of this neoplasia has been faced, though it is commonly unknown or confused with other cervical especially lymphonodules tumefactions, from which it is almost impossible to distinguish before the operation. In the period of six years on 775 cases of cervical neoformations have been operated only 5 patients bearers of neuromi; two originated from vago cervicale (right and left), one from simpatico cervicale on the left, another from the left spinal accessory and the last from the secondary medial trunk of the left brachial plexus. All the patients have been operated in Day-Surgery anaesthesia, locoregional and with calming of spontaneous breath. One case, that originated from the secondary medial trunk of the left brachial plexus, has been operated with microsurgical technique. On all the cases has been done a subcapsular exeresis to preserve nervous continuity. No post operating complications have been recorded; all the patients discharged in the evening. The diagnosis about the nature is left to the final histological test on the operating piece. The surgical removal remains even today the elective treatment able to exclude probable relapses and potential malignant transformation of these tumours.

  18. Choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle: A rare infantile brain tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Mohindra, Sandeep; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Das, Ashim; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) represents an uncommon pediatric brain tumor with an overall incidence less than 1% of all intracranial tumors. Most of these tumors occur in the lateral ventricles in neonates. Third ventricular location is uncommon, limited to a few case reports. These highly vascular tumors retain the physiological function of choroid plexus and thus lead to overproduction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), besides obstructing the CSF pathway. Imaging is fairly sensitive and speci...

  19. DYSPHONIA AS AN UNCOMMON PRESENTATION OF PONTOCEREBELLAR CHOROID PLEXUS PAPILLOMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotim, Krešimir; Sajko, Tomislav; Zmajević, Marina; Šumonja, Ilijana; Grgić, Marko

    2015-06-01

    A case is presented of a patient with dysphonia, hearing loss and ataxia due to vestibulocochlear and vagal nerve compression by choroid plexus papilloma in the cerebellopontine angle. Choroid plexus papillomas are rare tumors usually arising in the lateral and fourth ventricle, and rarely found in the cerebellopontine angle, making the neuroimaging characteristics usually not sufficient for diagnosis. Patients usually present with headache and hydrocephalus but tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can cause vestibulocochlear dysfunction and cerebellar symptoms. Dysphonia along with hearing loss was a dominant symptom in the case presented. After complete surgical removal of the tumor, deterioration of dysphonia was noticed; it could be explained as peripheral vagal nerve neuropathy due to tumor compression and intraoperative manipulation. In this case report, we describe dysphonia as an uncommon presentation of a rare posterior fossa tumor. To our knowledge, a case of choroid plexus papilloma presenting with dysphonia has not been described before. Our case extends the differential diagnosis of dysphonia from the otorhinolaryngological to the neurosurgical field.

  20. Delayed presentation of a traumatic brachial artery pseudoaneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, James C

    2009-09-01

    Delayed presentation of a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm following penetrating trauma is infrequently reported. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented three months following a penetrating trauma to his antecubital fossa with a sudden exacerbation of swelling and tenderness of his elbow. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography arteriography confirmed the presence of a large pseudoaneurysm. Surgical reconstruction was performed using the long saphenous vein as an interposition vein graft, restoring normal arterial circulation.

  1. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James [Department of Medical Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Apisarnthanarax, Smith, E-mail: apisarns@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  2. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received ≥50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received ≤78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving ≥1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  3. Colesteatomas dos plexos coróides dos eqüídeos: observação de 14 casos Çholesteatomas of the choroid plexus of equidae: report on 14 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Thiago de Mello

    1949-12-01

    Full Text Available O autor faz considerações sobre os colesteatomas dos plexos coróides dos ventrículos laterais do cérebro e da base do cerebelo dos eqüídeos, examinando alguns aspectos da etiologia dessas colesteatose, baseado na literatura e em suas observações pessoais. Descreve, pela primeira vez no Brasil, casos de colesteatomas em eqüídeos, em número de 14, num total de 38 solípedes examinados (38,8%. Constatou a presença da lesão em muar, fato ainda não registrado na literatura.The author discusses cholesteatomas of the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles of the cerebrum and of the base of the cerebellum in Equidae, examining some aspects of aetiology of this cholesteatosis based on the literature and on his personal observations. He describes for the first time in Brazil, cases of cholesteatomas in Equidae, 14 in number of a total of 38 solipeds examined (36,8%. He found the presence of the lesion in the mule: a fact not yet men¬tioned in the literature.

  4. Choroid plexus carcinoma: clinical and radiological features of four cases and review of literature; Carcinoma do plexo coroide: achados clinicos e radiologicos de quatro casos e revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogacheski, Enio; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Nascimento, Alessandra Bettega [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Servico de Radiologia; Jacob, Graciela Vanessa Vicelli [Hopsital Universitario Cajuru, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Delle, Linei Augusta Brolini; Liu, Christian Bark [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas; Belggi-Torres, Luis Fernando [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Servico de Anatomia Patologica

    1998-10-01

    Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is rare central nervous system (CNS) tumor that accounts for nearly 0.06% of all intracranial neoplasms, most frequently occurring in patients less than 3 years of age. The authors present a clinical and radiological study of fourpatients with the diagnosis of CPC. The research was undertaken in the archives of radiology in the University Hospital of Curitiba, Parana State, Brazil, in the period from 1990 to 1997. The exams related to the CNS were catalogued and the CPC cases were looked into. Three of the patients were male and the mean age was 13.7 months. The clinical symptoms reported were due to intracranial hypertension, and the most common location was the lateral ventricles. Computed tomography scans show hydrocephalus and a mass hyperdense to the brain parenchyma, with marked enhancement post-contrast. Surgical resection was attempted in all patients. One of them died during the procedures. All of the other underwent relapse and died within an average of 7 months after the diagnosis. (author)

  5. Imaging of the lumbosacral plexus. Diagnostics and treatment planning with high-resolution procedures; Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis. Diagnostik und Therapieplanung mithilfe hochaufgeloester Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jengojan, S.; Schellen, C.; Bodner, G.; Kasprian, G. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    Technical advances in magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound-based neurography nowadays facilitate the radiological assessment of the lumbosacral plexus. Anatomy and imaging of the lumbosacral plexus and diagnostics of the most common pathologies. Description of the clinically feasible combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound diagnostics, case-based illustration of imaging techniques and individual advantages of MRI and ultrasound-based diagnostics for various pathologies of the lumbosacral plexus and its peripheral nerves. High-resolution ultrasound-based neurography (HRUS) is particularly valuable for the assessment of superficial structures of the lumbosacral plexus. Depending on the examiner's experience, anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve (e. g. relevant in piriformis syndrome) as well as more subtle variations, for example as seen in neuritis, can be sonographically depicted and assessed. The use of MRI enables the diagnostic evaluation of more deeply located nerve structures, such as the pudendal and the femoral nerves. Modern MRI techniques, such as peripheral nerve tractography allow three-dimensional depiction of the spatial relationship between nerves and local tumors or traumatic alterations. This can be beneficial for further therapy planning. The anatomy and pathology of the lumbosacral plexus can be reliably imaged by the meaningful combination of MRI and ultrasound-based high resolution neurography. (orig.) [German] Durch technische Fortschritte im Bereich der magnetresonanz- (MR-) und ultraschallbasierten Neurographie ist der Plexus lumbosacralis heute der radiologischen Abklaerung zugaenglich. Anatomie und Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis, Abklaerung der haeufigsten Pathologien. Erlaeuterung der klinisch sinnvollen Kombination von MR- und Ultraschalldiagnostik, Darstellung der Untersuchungstechniken und der jeweiligen Vorteile von MRT und Ultraschall anhand fallbasierter Praesentation unterschiedlicher

  6. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelein Vitringa, V. M.; van Noort, A.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.; van Royen, B.J.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of

  7. Anterior humeral circumflex artery avulsion with brachial plexus injury following an isolated traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rohi; Koris, Jacob; Wazir, Akhlaq; Srinivasan, Shyamsundar S

    2016-03-11

    A 70-year-old man presented to accident and emergency with an isolated anteriorly dislocated shoulder, in the absence of a concomitant fracture. There was no neurovascular deficit at presentation, and the shoulder was reduced under sedation, using the Kocher's technique. Following this, the patient developed signs of hypovolaemic shock. Clinical examination revealed an expanding fullness in the deltopectoral area, with compromise of the limb neurovascular status. CT imaging confirmed an expanding haematoma from the axillary vessels, restricting left lung expansion. Once resuscitated, the patient was transferred to theatre for exploration of the bleeding vessels. Intraoperative findings included an avulsed anterior circumflex humeral artery that was subsequently ligated. Postoperatively, the patient developed axillary, radial, median and ulnar nerve neuropraxia, which improved clinically prior to discharge. The patient was ultimately discharged home after a lengthy inpatient stay. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Reducing the risk of shoulder dystocia and associated brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch, Edith D; Allen, Robert H

    2011-06-01

    Despite persisting controversy over shoulder dystocia prediction, prevention, and injury causation, the authors find considerable evidence in recent research in the field to recommend additional guidelines beyond the current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines to improve clinical practice in managing patients at risk for experiencing shoulder dystocia. In this article, the authors offer health care providers information, practical direction, and advice on how to limit shoulder dystocia risk and, more importantly, to reduce adverse outcome risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Profile of children with new-born brachial plexus palsy managed in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    shoulder dystocia. Mothers who had prolonged labour before birth were also more likely to have a child with NBPP. In fact the observation made in a study by Al-Rekabi (2011) in Bint Al-Huda Teaching. Hospital, Thi-Qar revealed that prolonged labour is a risk factor for NBPP. Findings in this study show that prevalence of.

  10. Scapular deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy and the Hueter-Volkmann law; a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitringa, V.M.V.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Hueter-Volkmann law describes growth principles around joints and joint deformation. It states that decreased stress leads to increased growth and that excessive stress leads to growth retardation. Aim of this study was to test the possible results of this principle by measuring the

  11. Iatrogenic brachial and femoral artery complications following venipuncture in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Omer Faruk; Demircin, Metin; Ucar, Ibrahim; Duman, Umit; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Boke, Erkmen

    2006-01-01

    Catheter- or noncatheter-related peripheral arterial complications such as arterial pseudoaneurysm, embolus, or arteriovenous fistula may be seen in the pediatric age group. The most common etiologies defined for arterial complications are peripheral arterial puncture performed for a routine arterial blood gas analysis, arterial catheters placed for invasive monitorization of children, or catheterization performed for diagnostic purposes through the peripheral arterial system, most commonly the femoral artery. Nine children with peripheral arterial complications, whose ages varied between 2 months and 2.5 years, were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated surgically. Following physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, or digital subtraction angiography were used as diagnostic tools. We studied thrombophilic panels preoperatively. Six patients had brachial artery pseudoaneurysms that developed accidentally during venipuncture, I had a brachial arteriovenous fistula that developed after an accidental brachial artery puncture during routine peripheral blood analysis. In the remaining 2 patients, peripheral arterial embolic events were detected. One had a left brachial arterial embolus and the other had a sudden onset right femoral artery embolus that was detected via diagnostic interventions. No morbidity such as amputation, extremity loss, or mortality occurred due to the arterial events or surgery. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good clinical condition. In all patients, follow-up at 3 or 6 months revealed palpable peripheral artery pulsations of the ulnar and radial arteries at wrist level. Because the incidence of peripheral arterial complications is relatively low in children compared to adults, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are extrapolated from the adult guidelines. We proposed that early diagnosis and surgical approach prevented the complications from

  12. Lower brachial plexopathy in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agras, Pinar Isik; Guveloglu, Mine; Aydin, Yusuf; Yakut, Ali; Kabakus, Nimet

    2010-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by nonthrombocytopenic purpura with multisystem involvement. Nervous system involvement was reported, characterized by headaches, mental-status changes, seizures, paresis, coma, or encephalopathy. Peripheral neuropathy is rarely reported. We describe a 12-year-old boy with Henoch-Schönlein purpura who presented with abdominal pain and underwent a laparatomy before the onset of palpable purpuric rash. Neuropathic findings in the left lower brachial plexus developed while he was receiving steroid treatment for gastrointestinal involvement. He responded well to intravenous pulse steroid therapy. Both sensory and motor dysfunction returned to normal after 3 months of treatment. His steroid dose was gradually withdrawn and stopped. He was symptom-free at month 12 of follow-up. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Unusual Case of Neuralgic Amyotrophy Presenting with Bilateral Phrenic Nerve and Vocal Cord Paresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Holtbernd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuralgic amyotrophy (brachial plexus neuropathy, brachial plexus neuritis, or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is an uncommon inflammatory condition typically characterized by acute and severe shoulder pain followed by paresis with muscle weakness and atrophy of the upper limb or shoulder girdle. We report an unusual clinical manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy, namely bilateral phrenic nerve palsy with concomitant laryngeal paresis. Case Report: A 55-year-old male presented with orthopnea and aphonia after an episode of bilateral shoulder pain preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Spirometry, chest X-ray and videolaryngoscopy revealed bilateral and simultaneous paresis of the diaphragm and the vocal cords. Clinical examination at admission and at the 2-month follow-up did not show upper limb weakness or atrophy, except for a mild atrophy of the right supraspinatus muscle. An electromyography of the upper limb muscles and nerve conduction studies did not reveal signs of denervation. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and an MRI of the neuraxis were unremarkable. After treatment with prednisolone, vocal cord function markedly improved within 8 weeks, whereas paresis of the diaphragm persisted. Conclusion: Shoulder pain followed by diaphragmatic paralysis with dyspnea and hoarseness may be a manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy even if upper limb or shoulder girdle palsies are absent.

  14. The lumbosacral plexus of the red-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta leporina Linnaeus, 1758 (Rodentia: Caviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleidson Benevides de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The red-rumped agouti is a small-sized wild rodent, belonging to the Dasyproctidae family, with great zootechnical potential, and it adapts well to captivity. In order to contribute to the species biology, this study describes the origin of the nerves forming the lumbosacral plexus. Twelve animals (six males and six females were used, from previous experiments. The animals were fixed in a 10% formaldehyde aqueous solution and eviscerated after 72 hours. Then, the major and minor psoas muscles were retracted, exposing the nerves forming the plexus. Cotton soaked with 20-volume hydrogen peroxide was placed on these nerves, remaining for 12 hours straight for bleaching and subsequent dissection. The topographical relations of the lumbosacral plexus were grouped into tables and arranged in terms of simple percentage. In 7 cases (58.34%, the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti stemmed from the ventral roots of the last 4 lumbar nerves and the first 3 sacral nerves (Type I – L4-S3, in 4 animals (33.33% it stemmed from L5-S3 (Type II, and in 1 case (8.33% it stemmed from L5-S4 (Type III. The nerves participating of the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti were: lateral femoral cutaneous, genitofemoral, femoral, obturator, sciatic, cranial gluteal, caudal gluteal, and pudendal nerve. The origin of the lumbosacral plexus and the spinal nerves making up this plexus in red-rumped agoutis were similar to that described in other rodents, such as rock cavy, lowland paca and spix's yellow-toothed cavy.

  15. The choroid plexus in normal full-term neonate : a study of morphological variety on sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Ji Hye

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sonographic features of normal choroid plexus, thus helping avoid misinterpretations such as intraventricular hemorrhage or abnormality. Posterior coronal, parasagittal, and oblique sagittal scans of 400 choroid plexus in normal full-term neonates(100 girls, 100 boys) were reviewed with special attention to coronal configuration, glomus patterns, and the shape of anterior ends. Sonographic features were classified as follows ; tubular(type 1), posterior clubbing(type 2), mid-bulging(type 3), or double choroidal pattern(type 4), as seen on posterior coronal scans; crescent(type 1), superior notching(type 2), dorsal bulging(type 3), or inferior notching(type 4), as seen on parasagittal scans; and anterior tapering(type 1) and clubbing shape (type 2) on oblique parasagittal scans. Maximal diameters of the choroid plexus on posterior coronal scan and the glomus on parasagittal scan were measured. All sonographic measurements of normal choroid plexus were statistically analysed according to gender and side. Four hundred normal choroid plexus were classified as 293 cases(73%) of tubular pattern(type 1), 50 cases(13%) of posterior bulging(type 2), 44 cases (11%) of mid-bulging(type 3) and 13 cases(3%) of double choroidal pattern (type 4) as seen on posterior coronal scans ; 263 cases(66%) of crescent shape(type 1), 70 cases(17%) of superior notching (type 2), 38 cases(9%) of dorsal bulging(type 3), and 29 cases(7%) of inferior notching(type 4), as seen on parasagittal scans; and 233 cases(58%) of anterior tapering(type 1) and 167 cases(42%) of anterior clubbing (type 2), as seen on oblique parasagittal scans. Maximal diameters of the choroid plexus on posterior coronal scan were 7.17±0.12 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]) on the right side and 7.13±0.19 mm (95% CI) on the left side, and 8.13±0.24(95% CI) mm on the right and 8.57±0.29 mm on the left side glomus on parasagittal scan. There were no significant statistical

  16. Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, A.; Aranovich, D.; Greif, F.; Bachar, G.; Bartal, G.; Atar, E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications

  17. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the superior hypogastric plexus in an interstitial cystitis patient with chronic pain and symptoms refractory to oral and intravesical medications and bladder hydrodistension: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hae; Kim, Eugene; Kim, Bong Il

    2016-12-01

    A variety of therapeutic modalities are available for the treatment of interstitial cystitis. However, among them, the less invasive therapies are usually ineffective, whereas the invasive ones carry potential risks of serious side effects and complications. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the superior hypogastric plexus may be an alternative to conventional treatments, as it provides nondestructive neuromodulation to the superior hypogastric plexus, which transmits the majority of pain signals from the pelvic viscera. For 7 years, a 35-year-old female patient had been experiencing lower abdominal pain provoked by urinary bladder filling, perivulvar pain developing spontaneously during sleep or upon postural change, urinary urgency and frequency with 15- to 60-min intervals between urinations, and nocturia with 10 voids per night. Hydrodistension of the bladder, monthly intravesical administration of sterile sodium chondroitin sulfate, and oral medications including gabapentin and pentosan polysulfate had not been effective in managing the pain and symptoms. Given the satisfactory result of a diagnostic block of the superior hypogastric plexus, 2 sessions of PRF treatment of the superior hypogastric plexus, which applied radiofrequency pulses with a pulse frequency of 2 Hz and a pulse width of 20 ms for 120 s twice per session to maintain the tissue temperature near the electrode at 42°C, were performed at a 6-month interval. This treatment relieved the pain and symptoms for 2 years and 6 months. PRF treatment of the superior hypogastric plexus results in long-term improvements in the pain and symptoms associated with interstitial cystitis.

  18. Deoxycytidine transport and metabolism in choroid plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, R.; Huntoon, S.

    1983-05-01

    In vitro, the transport into and release of (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine from the isolated choroid plexus, the anatomical locus of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, were studied separately. By use of the ability of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) to inhibit deoxycytidine efflux from choroid plexus, the transport of 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine into choroid plexus at 37 degrees C was measured. Deoxycytidine was transported into choroid plexus against a concentration gradient by a saturable process that depended on intracellular energy production, but not intracellular binding or metabolism. The Michaelis-Menten constant (KT) for the active transport of deoxycytidine into choroid plexus was 15 microM. The active transport system for deoxycytidine was inhibited by naturally occurring nucleosides and deoxynucleosides, but not by 1 mM probenecid and 2-deoxyribose or 100 microM cytosine and cytosine arabinoside. With less than 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine in the medium, the choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine against a concentration gradient. However, approximately 50% of the (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine was phosphorylated to (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine nucleotides at a low extracellular (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine concentration (6 nM) in 15-min incubations. This accumulation process depended, in part, on saturable intracellular phosphorylation. These studies provide further evidence that the choroid plexus contains an active nucleoside transport system of low specificity for deoxynucleosides and ribonucleosides, and a separate, saturable efflux system for deoxynucleosides which is very sensitive to inhibition by NBTI.

  19. Décompression chirurgicale du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Ismael, Farid; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial est une pathologie souvent méconnue à cause de diagnostic difficile par manque des signes pathognomoniques conduisant souvent à des errances. Les manifestations cliniques dépendent selon qu'il s'agit d'une compression nerveuse, vasculaire ou vasculo-nerveuse. Le but de cette étude est de décrire certains aspects cliniques particuliers et évaluer le résultat fonctionnel après la décompression chirurgicale du paquet vasculo-nerveux. Notre étude rétrospective a porté sur l'analyse des données cliniques, radiologiques, IRM et EMG sur les patients opérés entre janvier 2010 et juillet 2013 du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial dans le service de traumatologie orthopédie de l'hôpital Ibn Sina de Rabat. 15 cas ont été colligés: 12 cas post traumatiques (fracture de la clavicule) et 3 cas d'origines congénitales, dont l’âge moyen était 35 ans (20 à 50 ans) avec 9 femmes et 6 hommes. A la fin du traitement, le score de Dash est passé de 109 (46% Normal=0) à 70 (20%), et le stress test de Roos était de 70/100 à 80/100. Le résultat était excellent dans 12 cas soit (80%) et moins bon dans dans 3 cas (20%). En définitive, la résection de malformations osseuses, l'excision des brides et la neurolyse du plexus brachial suivie de la rééducation a donné une bonne évolution fonctionnelle. PMID:25709735

  20. Factors affecting visual contrast of the choroid plexus in radionuclide choroid plexography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatani, Akio; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Fukuda, Kazuo

    1983-01-01

    During the clinical use of choroid plexus scintigraphy by sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate with prior administration of pyrophosphate(Sn), higher accumulation had been noted in the case of normal pressure hydrocephalus, subarachnoid hemorrhage and Moyamoya disease, and lower accumulation in pyogenic meningitis. Factors affecting accumulation ratio of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate in the choroid plexus was investigated. Sequential scintigrams were stored in the computer system (DEC, PDP-11/34) after sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate injection in man and dog. The time course of the accumulation ratio in the choroid plexus was analysed in the following various conditions. The accumulation ratio was not influenced by amidotrizoate meglumine used in contrast angiography. Prior administration of potassium perchlorate prevented the accumulation completely, and the administration after 30 min of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate injection halted the accumulation just as it was at the moment and decreased the plasma activity rapidly. Acetazolamide, which was supporsed to restrain the formation rate of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), increased the accumulation ratio in proportion to its dose. Based on these results and evidences provided by other researchers, the accumulation ratio in the choroid plexus may probably be varied by CSF formation rate and ability of anion pump but dilatation of the epithelial clefts may also have some effects. But, it was considered difficult to estimate immediately the function of the choroid plexus from the accumulation ratio for clinical use. (author)

  1. Rotator cuff tears in luxatio erecta: an arthroscopic perspective of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Tapashetti, Sandeep; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Luxatio erecta accounts for only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. More than 150 cases have been described in the literature, focusing mainly on the method of reduction and/or associated complications. Some of the well-described complications include injuries to the humeral head, glenoid, clavicle, rotator cuff, capsules and ligaments, brachial plexus and axillary artery/vein. Among these, rotator cuff injuries are reported to occur in about 80% of cases. However, in the majority of instances, cuff injuries have been managed conservatively and have been reported to apparently provide optimal functional outcomes. We report our experience with two cases of luxatio erecta associated with massive rotator cuff injuries, which were evaluated and further managed by arthroscopic repair. The emphasis in these cases is to define cuff injuries and proceed based on patients’ age, demands and characteristics of the cuff tears. Arthroscopic evaluation and cuff repairs should be contemplated in these patients, to improve shoulder functions. PMID:26561229

  2. Lumbar plexus and psoas major muscle: not always as expected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchmair, Lukas; Lirk, Philipp; Colvin, Joshua; Mitterschiffthaler, Gottfried; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting definitions concerning the exact location of the lumbar plexus have been proposed. The present study was carried out to detect anatomical variants regarding the topographical relation between the lumbar plexus and the psoas major muscle as well as lumbar plexus anatomy at the L4-L5

  3. Acute Brachial Artery Thrombosis in a Neonate Caused by a Peripheral Venous Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Berzel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case describes the diagnostic testing and management of an acute thrombosis of the brachial artery in a female neonate. On day seven of life, clinical signs of acutely decreased peripheral perfusion indicated an occlusion of the brachial artery, which was confirmed by high-resolution Doppler ultrasound. Imaging also showed early stages of collateralization so that surgical treatment options could be avoided. Unfractionated heparin was used initially and then replaced by low-molecular-weight heparin while coagulation parameters were monitored closely. Within several days, brachial artery perfusion was completely restored. Acetylsalicylic acid was given for additional six weeks to minimize the risk of recurring thrombosis. If inadequately fixated in a high-risk location, a peripheral venous catheter can damage adjacent structures and thus ultimately cause arterial complications.

  4. Brachial artery aneurysms following brachio-cephalic AV fistula ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Usman; Parkinson, Frances; Mohiuddin, Kamran; Davies, Paula; Woolgar, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery aneurysms proximal to a long-standing arteriovenous (AV) fistula can be a serious complication. It is important to be aware of this and manage it appropriately. Vascular access nurses input all data regarding patients undergoing dialysis access procedures into a securely held database prospectively. This was retrospectively reviewed to identify cases of brachial artery aneurysms over the last 3 years. In Morriston Hospital, around 200 forearm and arm AV fistulas are performed annually for vascular access in renal dialysis patients. Of these, approximately 15 (7.5%) are ligated. Three patients who had developed brachial artery aneurysms following AV fistula ligation were identified. All 3 patients had developed brachial artery aneurysms following ligation of a long-standing brachio-cephalic AV fistula. Two patients presented with pain and a pulsatile mass in the arm, and one presented with pins and needles and discoloration of fingertips. Two were managed with resection of the aneurysm and reconstruction with a reversed long saphenous vein interposition graft, the third simply required ligation of a feeding arterial branch. True aneurysm formation proximal to an AV fistula that has been ligated is a rare complication. There are several reasons for why these aneurysms develop in such patients, the most plausible one being the increase in blood flow and resistance following ligation of the AV fistula. Of note, all the patients in this study were on immunosuppressive therapy following successful renal transplantation. Vigilance by the vascular access team and nephrologists is paramount to identify those patients who may warrant further evaluation and investigation by the vascular surgeon.

  5. The catecholaminergic nerve plexus of Holothuroidea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Mejías, Wigberto; Jiménez, Luis B.

    2010-01-01

    Catecholamines have been extensively reported to be present in most animal groups, including members of Echinodermata. In this study, we investigated the presence and distribution of catecholaminergic nerves in two members of the Holothuroidea, Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) (Aspidochirotida, Holothuroidea) and Holothuria mexicana (Ludwig, 1875) (Aspidochirotida, Holothuroidea), by using induced fluorescence for catecholamines on tissue sections and immunohistochemistry with an antibody that recognizes tyrosine hydroxylase. The presence of a catecholaminergic nerve plexus similar in distribution and extension to those previously reported in other members of Echinodermata was observed. This plexus, composed of cells and fibers, is found in the ectoneural component of the echinoderm nervous system and is continuous with the circumoral nerve ring and the radial nerves, tentacular nerves, and esophageal plexus. In addition, fluorescent nerves in the tube feet are continuous with the catecholaminergic components of the radial nerve cords. This is the first comprehensive report on the presence and distribution of catecholamines in the nervous system of Holothuroidea. The continuity and distribution of the catecholaminergic plexus strengthen the notion that the catecholaminergic cells are interneurons, since these do not form part of the known sensory or motor circuits and the fluorescence is confined to organized nervous tissue. PMID:20827375

  6. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus cauterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and Choroid Plexus Cauterization (CPC) have been recommended as reliable surgical options in developing countries for childhood hydrocephalus owing to reported shunt failures in shunt dependency. Objective: To evaluate outcomes of the ETV and ETV-CPC ...

  7. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy | Kolawole | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Thyroidectomy is traditionally performed under general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. However, cervical plexus block has also been found useful for this operation in some parts of the world. This particular anaesthetic option has never been reported in our environment. The aims of this study were to ...

  8. Recidiv af cancer mammae kan vise sig som plexus brachialis-neuropati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Gro Helen; Gottrup, Hanne; Andersen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Neoplastic plexopathy is an unusual, but known cause of neuropathy. This is a case report of a patient, who developed brachial plexopathy years after completing treatment for breast cancer. The patient presented with pain in one arm and, subsequently, developed sensory deficits and muscle atrophy...

  9. Hand-arm vibration syndrome with distal brachial artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladyslava Bazylevska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract             Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS is a complex disorder of the peripheral extremities that is associated with occupational or recreational exposure to hand-transmitted vibration. Digital artery occlusion in HAVS is a common finding; however, proximal involvement is less likely.  We present a case of HAVS with the initial presentation of acute limb ischemia and with thrombus burden extending from the distal brachial artery and into the ulnar and radial arteries. To our knowledge, no case of HAVS syndrome of similar severity has been previously described. This case emphasizes the potential dangers of HAVS and the necessity for proper prophylactic interventions at the workplace.

  10. The blind pushing technique for peripherally inserted central catheter placement through brachial vein puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Myeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Kim, Han Myun; Song, Myung Gyu; Song, Soon-Young; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective clinical trial evaluating the technical feasibility and short-term clinical outcome of the blind pushing technique for placement of pretrimmed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) through brachial vein access. Patients requiring PICC placement at any of the three participating institutions were prospectively enrolled between January and December 2016. The review boards of all participating institutions approved this study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. PICC placement was performed using the blind pushing technique and primary brachial vein access. The following data were collected from unified case report forms: access vein, obstacles during PICC advancement, procedure time, and postprocedural complications. During the 12-month study period, 1380 PICCs were placed in 1043 patients. Of these, 1092 PICCs placed in 837 patients were enrolled, with 834 PICCs (76%) and 258 PICCs (34%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. In both arms, obstacles were most commonly noted in the subclavian veins (n = 220) and axillary veins (n = 94). Successful puncture of the access vein was achieved at first try in 1028 PICCs (94%). The technical success rate was 99%, with 1055 PICCs (97%) placed within 120 seconds of procedure time and 1088 PICCs (99%) having the tip located at the ideal position. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound detected catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) for 18 PICCs in 16 patients and late symptomatic UEDVT for 16 PICCs in 16 patients (3.1%). Catheter-associated UEDVT was noted for 28 PICCs (82%) and 6 PICCs (18%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. The incidence of obstacles and the procedure time (<120 seconds) differed significantly between brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access (P = .001). There was no statistically significant difference between brachial vein and

  11. Management of traumatic brachial artery injuries: A report on 49 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Hasan; Tuncer, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The brachial artery is the most frequently injured artery in the upper extremity due to its vulnerability. The purpose of our study was to review our experience with brachial artery injuries over a 9-year period, describing the type of injury, surgical procedures, complications, and associated injuries. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients with brachial artery injury underwent surgical repair procedures at our hospital, from the beginning of May 1999 to the end of June 2008. The brachial artery injuries were diagnosed by physical examination and Doppler ultrasonography. Depending on the mode of presentation, patients were either taken immediately to the operating room for bleeding control and vascular repair or were assessed by preoperative duplex ultrasonography. RESULTS: This study group consisted of 43 males and 6 females, ranging in age from 6 to 65 years with a mean (SD) age of 27.9 (6.7) years. The mechanism of trauma was penetrating in 45 patients and blunt in the remaining 4 patients. Stab injury was the most frequent form of penetrating trauma (24 of 45). Treatment included primary arterial repair in 5 cases, end-to-end anastomosis in 28 cases, interposition vein graft in 15 cases, and interposition-ringed polytetrafluoroethylene graft in 1 case. Associated injuries were common and included venous injury (14), bone fracture (5), and peripheral nerve injury (11). Fifteen patients developed postoperative complications. One patient underwent an above-elbow amputation. CONCLUSIONS: Prompt and appropriate management of the brachial artery injuries, attention to associated injuries, and a readiness to revise the vascular repair early in the event of failure will maximize patient survival and upper extremity salvage. PMID:19318753

  12. Saturday night palsy or Sunday morning hangover? A case report of alcohol-induced Crush Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Devitt, Brian M

    2011-01-01

    Saturday night palsy is a colloquial term given to brachial plexus injuries of the arm resulting from stretching or direct pressure against a firm object, often after alcohol or drug consumption. In most circumstances, this condition gives rise to a temporary plexopathy, which generally resolves. However, if the compression is severe and prolonged, a more grave form of this condition known as \\'Crush Syndrome\\' may occur. Skeletal muscle injury, brought about by protracted immobilization, leads to muscle decay, causing rhabdomyolysis, which may in turn precipitate acute renal failure. This condition is potentially fatal and has an extremely high morbidity. The case presented below demonstrates the drastic consequences that can result following an episode of \\'binge\\' drinking in a young man. What is most concerning is that this trend is increasing across society and cases like this may not be as rare in the future.

  13. Lesions in nerves and plexus after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, W.

    1978-01-01

    Apart from the typical, radiation-induced changes in the skin, common secondary findings were oedemas, radiation-induced ulceration, fibroses of the mediastinum and lungs, pleura adhesions, and osteoradionecroses. In one patient with radiogenic paresis of the plexus brachialis, irradiation of the spinal cord because of epidural metastases of a mammary carcinoma resulted in radiation myelopathy which was verified by laminectomy. Observations of radiogenic lesions of the plexus brachialis show that the usual site of the lesion in the vasomotoric nerve bundle is the axilla. The lesion is assumed to be caused mainly by an overlapping of the axillary, infraclavicular and supraclavicular fields of irradiation which results in a dose peak in the axilla. (orig./AJ) 891 AJ/orig.- 892 MKO [de

  14. CT-guided coeliac plexus block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Guenther, R.; Hoffmann, J.; Goedecke, R.

    1983-08-01

    A modified procedure for infiltrating the coeliac plexus for the treatment of chronic pain syndromes is described. The injection of the analgesic is made through a fine needle introduced via a transabdominal approach under CT guidance. The advantages of this technique, compared with the dorsal approach, are a more accurate placement of the solution and the ability to carry out this procedure in very sick patients. No complications have been observed.

  15. Acute triventricular hydrocephalus caused by choroid plexus cysts: a diagnostic and neurosurgical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennato, Pietro; Chiaramonte, Carmela; Cicala, Domenico; Donofrio, Vittoria; Barbarisi, Manlio; Nastro, Anna; Mirone, Giuseppe; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraventricular choroid plexus cysts are unusual causes of acute hydrocephalus in children. Radiological diagnosis of intraventricular choroid plexus cysts is difficult because they have very thin walls and fluid contents similar to CSF and can go undetected on routine CT studies. METHODS This study reports the authors' experience with 5 patients affected by intraventricular cysts originating from the choroid plexus. All patients experienced acute presentation with rapid neurological deterioration, sometimes associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, and required urgent surgery. In 2 cases the symptoms were intermittent, with spontaneous remission and sudden clinical deteriorations, reflecting an intermittent obstruction of the CSF pathway. RESULTS Radiological diagnosis was difficult in these cases because a nonenhanced CT scan revealed only triventricular hydrocephalus, with slight lateral ventricle asymmetry in all cases. MRI with driven-equilibrium sequences and CT ventriculography (in 1 case) allowed the authors to accurately diagnose the intraventricular cysts that typically occupied the posterior part of the third ventricle, occluding the aqueduct and at least 1 foramen of Monro. The patients were managed by urgent implantation of an external ventricular drain in 1 case (followed by endoscopic surgery, after completing a diagnostic workup) and by urgent endoscopic surgery in 4 cases. Endoscopic surgery allowed the shrinkage and near-complete removal of the cysts in all cases. Use of neuronavigation and a laser were indispensable. All procedures were uneventful, resulting in restoration of normal neurological conditions. Long-term follow-up (> 2 years) was available for 2 patients, and no complications or recurrences occurred. CONCLUSIONS This case series emphasizes the necessity of an accurate and precise identification of the possible causes of triventricular hydrocephalus. Endoscopic surgery can be considered the ideal treatment of choroid plexus

  16. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    inflammatory analgesic (NSAID), like piroxicam, given at the time of premedication may be worthwhile for subsequent cases. Adequate padding of all bony prominences may also help mini- mize the postural discomfort. Too much traction on the trachea during surgical manipula- tion and pressure effect of retractors are ...

  17. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraci, F.M.; Mayhan, W.G.; Williams, J.K.; Heistad, D.D. (Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City (USA))

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-{mu}m microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-{mu}m microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 {plus minus} 26 (means {plus minus} SE) ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in dogs and 385 {plus minus} 73 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by {approx} 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum.

  18. Coeliac plexus neurolysis for upper abdominal malignancies using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    coeliac plexus, thereby avoiding the needle piercing crucial structures and avoiding deposition of drug in the retrocrural space, thereby reducing the risk of neurological complications. Coeliac plexus neurolysis via an anterior approach using different imag- ing modalities does not completely abolish pain, rather it ...

  19. A comparison between brachial and echocardiographic systolic time intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Systolic time interval (STI is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP and brachial ejection time (bET were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP and ejection time (ET were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r = 0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r  = 0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r = 0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  20. A comparison of a single-stimulation lateral infraclavicular plexus block with a triple-stimulation axillary block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Arnaud; Gentili, Marc E; Marret, Emmanuel; Lamonerie, Laurent; Bonnet, Francis

    2003-01-01

    A single-stimulation infraclavicular brachial plexus block (ICB) is safe and easy to perform, although underused. This technique was compared with a triple-stimulation axillary block (AxB). One hundred patients scheduled for hand and forearm surgery were randomly allocated to 2 groups. ICB was performed with the needle inserted above the coracoid process in the upper lateral angle of the infraclavicular fossa and directed vertically until nerve stimulation elicited a distal motor response (median, radial, or ulnar). A single 40-mL bolus of ropivacaine 0.75% was injected. In the AxB group, 3 stimulations were performed to identify median or ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves, followed by an infiltration near the medial brachial and antebrachial cutaneous nerves. The same 40 mL of ropivacaine 0.75% was injected. Sensory and motor blocks were assessed at 5-minute intervals over 30 minutes. The time to block performance was shorter in the ICB than in the AxB group (2.5 +/- 1.9 minutes v 6.0 +/- 2.8 minutes, P <.001). The success rate (complete block in median, radial, ulnar, musculocutaneous, and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves) was comparable in the 2 groups (90% v 88% in groups ICB and AxB, respectively). Block extension was comparable, except for a higher rate of block completion in the axillary nerve distribution in group ICB and in the medial brachial cutaneous nerve in group AxB. The onset of each nerve block was comparable except for a faster onset for the musculocutaneous nerve in group AxB (8 +/- 3 v 10 +/- 5 minutes). A single shot ICB is equally effective as a triple-nerve stimulation AxB.

  1. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) with methylprednisolone pulse therapy for motor impairment of neuralgic amyotrophy: clinical observations in 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Ko-suke; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Seiko; Kuwahara, Motoi; Morita, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) is a distinct peripheral nervous system disorder characterized by attacks of acute neuropathic pain and rapid multifocal weakness and atrophy unilaterally in the upper limb. The current hypothesis is that the episodes are caused by an immune-mediated response to the brachial plexus, however, therapeutic strategies for NA have not been well established. We retrospectively reviewed 15 case series of NA; 10 of the 15 patients received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) with methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) and 9 of these 0 patients showed clinical improvement of motor impairment. Our clinical observations do not contradict the possibility that IVIg with MPPT may be one of the potential therapeutics for NA, however the efficacy remains to be established. Further confirmatory trials are needed in patients with various clinical severities and phases of NA. Further basic research and confirmatory trials should be performed to survey the efficacy of such immunomodulation therapy for NA.

  3. Procedural pain of an ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a comparison of axillary and infraclavicular approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Benedikte Skøtt; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Jacobsen, R B

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided infraclavicular (IC) and axillary (AX) blocks have similar effectiveness. Therefore, limiting procedural pain may help to choose a standard approach. The primary aims of this randomized study were to assess patient's pain during the block and to recognize its cause....

  4. Sonographic assessment of predictors of depth of the corner pocket for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Prescanning of supraclavicular region for estimating depth of corner pocket should be done before choosing an appropriate size needle. Furthermore, the needle should not be advanced more than the predicted corner pocket depth.

  5. Neurinoma del plexo braquial simulando metastasis de adenocarcinoma de mama Schwannoma of the brachial plexus resembling a breast adenocarcinoma metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorio Rodríguez Boto; Angela Moreno-Gutiérrez; Raquel Gutiérrez-González; Ángel Villar-Martín; Luis A. Arraez-Aybar; Javier Serrano Hernando

    2011-01-01

    Los neurinomas del plexo braquial son tumores infrecuentes que pueden confundirse con otras lesiones de índole tumoral. Se presenta el caso de una mujer de 40 años, tratada previamente de un adenocarcinoma de mama derecha en el pasado, que en el estudio de extensión realizado 5 años después se detectó una lesión localizada en el plexo braquial derecho. La paciente se encontraba asintomática. El diagnóstico radiológico de presunción fue metástasis de adenocarcinoma mamario. Se realizó un abord...

  6. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. I. Light microscopical studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1982-01-01

    interstitial cells (ICC-II) in the subserous layer. (2) Auerbach's plexus with an associated extensive plexus of interstitial cells (ICC-I) in close contact with tertiary fasciculi. (3) Nerve fasciculi of the outer division of the circular muscle layer. These formed a nerve plexus in a well-defined plane...... in the outermost cell layers (plexus muscularis superficialis), with few fasciculi located internal to this plexus. A few bipolar interstitial cells (ICC-IV) were associated with nerve fasciculi of this region. (4) A nerve plexus located in the region between the two subdivisions of the circular muscle, plexus...

  7. Acute brachial diplegia due to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorson, Kenneth C; Kolb, David A; Marks, Donald S; Hayes, Michael T; Baquis, George D

    2011-01-01

    to describe acute brachial diplegia as the initial manifestation of Lyme disease. bilateral, predominantly motor, cervical radiculoplexus neuropathy, the "dangling arm syndrome," has not been reported as a complication of acute Lyme infection. retrospective series of 5 patients from 2 tertiary neuromuscular centers. there were 4 men and 1 woman with an average age of 69 years. One recalled a tick bite, and preceding constitutional symptoms included headache (2) and fever, arthralgias, and fatigue in 1 patient each. Proximal arm weakness and acute pain developed within 3 weeks from onset; pain was bilateral in 3 patients and unilateral in 2 patients, and was described as severe throbbing. Arm weakness was bilateral at onset in 3 patients, and right sided in 2 patients followed by spread to the left arm within days. All the patients had weakness in the deltoid and biceps that was 3/5 or less (Medical Research Council scale), with variable weakness of the triceps and wrist extensors; 1 patient had a flail right arm and moderate (4/5) weakness of the proximal left arm muscles. Light touch was normal in the regions of weakness, and 1 patient had mildly reduced pin sensation over the forearm. Serum IgM Lyme titers were elevated in all the patients and were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid in 4 tested patients. The cerebrospinal fluid protein ranged between 135 and 176 mg/dL with lymphocytic pleocytosis (range, 42 to 270 cells). Electrodiagnostic studies showed normal median and ulnar motor potentials with asymmetrically reduced sensory amplitudes in the median (4), ulnar (3), and radial, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous potentials in 1 patient each. Two patients had acute denervation in the cervical or proximal arm muscles. There was full recovery after antibiotic therapy in 4 patients and considerable improvement in 1 patient after 2 months. acute brachial diplegia is a rare manifestation of acute Lyme infection and responds promptly to antibiotic therapy.

  8. FUNCTIONAL COMPLICATIONS FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER THERAPY AND THE ROLE OF REHABILITATION IN RECOVERY OF FUNCTIONAL STATUS-A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Popovic Petrovic

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The most common functional complications after the treatment of breast cancer are reduction of range of motion in the shoulder joint (incidence of 10 to 73%, lymphedema of the arm (10-30% and nerve damage of the arm or damage of brachial plexus (1.8-4.9%. Multiple complications rarely occur and they are usually of mild to moderate forms. Case report. VV (woman, born in 1965 was exposed to quadrantectomy of the left breast with axillary dissection in 2003 (pathohystology: ductal carcinoma; 4 removed lymph nodes, 1 of which with a secondary deposit. After the surgical intervention, the patient underwent chemotherapy (CMF protocol VI cycles and radiation therapy (50 Gy/12 cycles. Four months after the therapy completion, lymphedema of the left arm was developed, and few months later brachial plexus injury as well. First visit to physiatrist was five years later, with a significant reduction of range of motion in the left arm and severe lymphedema (maximum difference to 7.5 cm. EMNG trial indicated a moderate lesion of left median nerve and ulnar nerve and mild to moderate lesion of left radial nerve injury; DASH score was 107. After repeated physical treatments (since 2009, the last control in October 2016 showed that the functional status was significantly improved: reduction of range of motion was present in flexion and abduction only, lymphedema was reduced (maximum difference of 5.5 cm; DASH score was 48, while EMNG indicated a lesion of the median nerve and ulnar nerve in lower level, with signs of recovery. Conclusion. The implementation of an early rehabilitation program for the patients who were surgically treated for breast cancer is necessary in order to prevent functional complications and to enable continuous monitoring of the patients, while in the case with already developed complications, physical therapy should be initiated regardless of the period in which the functional limitations occured.

  9. Tumores do plexo coróideo Choroid plexus tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GERALDO PIANETTI

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available É feita análise estatística, semiológica, terapêutica e da evolução de 15 crianças portadoras de tumor do plexo coróideo, tratadas cirurgicamente no Serviço de Neuropediatria dos Hospitais das Clínicas (UFMG e São Francisco de Assis, num período de 15 anos (1981 a 1996. A idade variou de quatro meses a 16 anos, com média de três anos e seis meses, dez tinham menos de dois anos; nove eram do sexo feminino; 14 tinham sinais de hipertensão intracraniana; em todas elas a presença do tumor foi confirmada pelo estudo com tomografia computadorizada; em oito crianças o tumor estava localizado em um ventrículo lateral. Das 15 crianças, 11 necessitaram de derivação ventrículo-peritoneal; a exerese radical do tumor foi possível em 13 das 14 crianças operadas. O diagnóstico anátomo-patológico foi papiloma em 12 crianças e carcinoma nas outras duas. Duas crianças faleceram, uma no sétimo dia de pós-operatório e a outra 12 meses após, com metástases disseminadas pelo sistema nervoso central. É feita revisão da literatura pertinente e dados são comparados.This analysis comprises 15 children under 16 years of age, with choroid plexus tumors, seen in the Service of Paediatric Neurosurgery, Hospital das Clínicas and Hospital São Francisco de Assis in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, between 1981 and 1996. The patients were aged between 4 months and 16 years (average of 3 years and a half; 10 were less than 2 years, 9 were female; 14 children had clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension. All the children underwent CT scan and the choroid plexus tumors were clearly demonstrated in 14 of then. In 8 children the tumors were located in one lateral ventricle, 5 in the fourth ventricle and 2 had the tumors in more than one ventricle, 11 children required ventriculo-peritoneal shunt; 14 cases were operated on, 13 with total excision; 2 children died, respectively 7 days and one year after the surgery. Pathological examination revealed

  10. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  11. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15 and a...... that the choroid plexus in embryonic brain plays a major role in supplying the developing brain with essential nutrients.......The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15...... in the adult plexus were expressed at higher levels than in embryos. These results are compared with earlier published physiological studies of amino acid and monocarboxylate transport in developing rodents. This comparison shows correlation of high expression of some transporters in the developing brain...

  12. Plexus (Phillips Laboratory Expert System-Assisted User Software)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Myers, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Phillips Lab PLEXUS project to design, build, and distribute a user friendly, expert system assisted, GUI enhanced software suite of sophisticated atmospheric...

  13. Lesões expansivas do plexo coróide Choroid plexus mass lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lima Araújo Melo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available As lesões expansivas do plexo coróide constituem um grupo bastante amplo e heterogêneo de doenças e seus simuladores. Tumores, infecções, anomalias congênitas, hemorragias, cistos e fenômenos degenerativos são alguns dos exemplos de causas de lesões expansivas do plexo coróide. No presente trabalho fizemos revisão da literatura pertinente, descrevendo os achados de imagem e ilustrando-os com alguns casos do nosso serviço. Apesar de não existir na literatura descrição de sinais patognomônicos, a avaliação criteriosa e sistemática das características das lesões pode sugerir determinada etiologia.Choroid plexus mass lesions encompass a broad and heterogeneous group of diseases and their simulators. Tumors, infections, congenital anomalies, hemorrhage, cysts and degenerative diseases are some examples of mass lesions affecting the choroid plexus. In this article we review the current literature, describing the imaging findings and illustrating choroid plexus mass lesions with some cases diagnosed at our facility. Despite the inexistence of pathognomonic signs, a careful and systematic evaluation of the imaging characteristics may suggest many etiologies.

  14. Vascular entrapment of the sciatic plexus causing catamenial sciatica and urinary symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nucelio; Marques, Renato Moretti; Kamergorodsky, Gil; Ploger, Christine; Schor, Eduardo; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic congestion syndrome is a well-known cause of cyclic pelvic pain (Ganeshan et al., Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 30(6):1105-11, 2007). What is much less well known is that dilated or malformed branches of the internal or external iliac vessels can entrap the nerves of the sacral plexus against the pelvic sidewalls, producing symptoms that are not commonly seen in gynecological practice, such as sciatica, or refractory urinary and anorectal dysfunction (Possover et al., Fertil Steril 95(2):756-8. 2011). The objective of this video is to explain and describe the symptoms suggestive of vascular entrapment of the sacral plexus, as well as the technique for the laparoscopic decompression of these nerves. Two anecdotal cases of intrapelvic vascular entrapment are used to review the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus and demonstrate the laparoscopic surgical technique for decompression at two different sites, one on the sciatic nerve and one on the sacral nerve roots. After surgery, the patient with the sciatic entrapment showed full recovery of the sciatica and partial recovery of the myofascial pain. The patient with sacral nerve root entrapment showed full recovery with resolution of symptoms. The symptoms suggestive of intrapelvic nerve entrapment are: perineal pain or pain irradiating to the lower limbs in the absence of a spinal disorder, and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of prolapse of a bladder lesion. In the presence of such symptoms, the radiologist should provide specific MRI sequences of the intrapelvic portion of the sacral plexus and a team and equipment to expose and decompress the sacral nerves should be prepared.

  15. Automated analysis of brachial ultrasound time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weidong; Browning, Roger L.; Lauer, Ronald M.; Sonka, Milan

    1998-07-01

    Atherosclerosis begins in childhood with the accumulation of lipid in the intima of arteries to form fatty streaks, advances through adult life when occlusive vascular disease may result in coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Non-invasive B-mode ultrasound has been found useful in studying risk factors in the symptom-free population. Large amount of data is acquired from continuous imaging of the vessels in a large study population. A high quality brachial vessel diameter measurement method is necessary such that accurate diameters can be measured consistently in all frames in a sequence, across different observers. Though human expert has the advantage over automated computer methods in recognizing noise during diameter measurement, manual measurement suffers from inter- and intra-observer variability. It is also time-consuming. An automated measurement method is presented in this paper which utilizes quality assurance approaches to adapt to specific image features, to recognize and minimize the noise effect. Experimental results showed the method's potential for clinical usage in the epidemiological studies.

  16. Parche de lidocaína al 5% para el tratamiento del SDRC de extremidad superior por bloqueo transcutáneo del plexo braquial: Caso Clínico Licodocaíne patch for the treatment of CRPS in the arm by transcutaneous block of the brachial plexus: Clinical case

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Vidal; E. Calderón; L. M. Torres

    2007-01-01

    El síndrome de dolor regional complejo (SDRC) se manifiestan con una clínica variada que se caracteriza por dolor, impotencia funcional, trastornos vaso-sudomotores y alteraciones tróficas. Está causado por una lesión primaria o una disfunción del Sistema Nervioso Periférico, estableciéndose dos grupos: SDRC-I que sustituye al término DSR y el SDRCII en lugar del término causalgia. Caso clínico: Varón de 37 años de edad, que tras ser sometido a una artroscopia de hombro comenzó a presentar do...

  17. Parálisis obstétrica del plexo braquial: resultados preliminares de la transferencia del nervio espinal accesorio al nervio supraescapular en 10 casos. [Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: preliminary results in 10 cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Emiliano Valbuena

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo valuar los resultados preliminares sobre 10 casos de transferencias del nervio espinalaccesorio (NEA) al nervio supraescapular (NS) en parálisis obstétricas delplexo braquial (POPB). Material y métodos Entre los años 2010 y 2012 se realizaron 16 transferencias del NEA al NS en POPB. Fueron incluidos 10 casos que presentabanseguimiento mínimo de 18 meses. Se evaluó valores de fuerza muscular del hombrosegún la escala de Gilbert y se  usaronescalas funcionales de Mallet, y ...

  18. Patrones de lesión en parálisis obstétricas del plexo braquial. Hallazgos morfológicos en 27 exploraciones microquirúrgicas. [Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Patterns of injuries. Morphological findings in 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Valbuena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Evaluar los patrones morfológicos lesiónales en parálisis obstétricas del plexo braquial encontrados en 27 casos. Materiales y Métodos Se evaluó retrospectivamente los datos de las historias clínicas de 27 exploraciones microquirúrgicas realizadas durante el periodo de los años 2009-2012. Se usó la clasificación clínica de Narakas. Se comparó los hallazgos operatorios con el patrón clínico de lesión. Resultados Se observaron 17 patrones diferentes de lesión. Las parálisis totales mostraban el mayor tipo de diversidad lesional, presentando en general roturas de raíces altas con avulsiones de raíces bajas. El compromiso clínico de la raíz de C7 no siempre se correlaciono con los hallazgos quirúrgicos. Conclusión Las parálisis obstétricas del plexo braquial muestran una gran diversidad de lesiones. La cirugía es altamente demandante, requiriendo el manejo de todas las estrategias de reconstrucción para poder ser usadas dependiendo de acuerdo a los hallazgos quirúrgicos.

  19. Patrones de lesión en parálisis obstétricas del plexo braquial. Hallazgos morfológicos en 27 exploraciones microquirúrgicas. [Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Patterns of injuries. Morphological findings in 27 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Valbuena

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo Evaluar los patrones morfológicos lesiónales en parálisis obstétricas del plexo braquial encontrados en 27 casos. Materiales y Métodos Se evaluó retrospectivamente los datos de las historias clínicas de 27 exploraciones microquirúrgicas realizadas durante el periodo de los años 2009-2012. Se usó la clasificación clínica de Narakas. Se comparó los hallazgos operatorios con el patrón clínico de lesión. Resultados Se observaron 17 patrones diferentes de lesión. Las p...

  20. Chordata method combined with electrotherapy in functional recovery after brachial plexus injury: report of three clinical cases = Método Chordata combinado com eletroterapia na recuperação funcional após lesão do plexo braquial: relato de três casos clínicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Charlene Brito de

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Descrever três casos clínicos em que os indivíduos tiveram lesão de plexo braquial complexa, tratada com um programa inovador de fisioterapia, o Método Chordata, associado à eletroterapia. Descrição dos casos: Três pacientes sofreram lesões complexas do plexo braquial. Os três sujeitos foram submetidos à intervenção cirúrgica e a um longo período de reabilitação com o emprego do método Chordata (envolvendo exercícios de suspensão e pendulação corporal, combinada com a eletroterapia. Todos os pacientes apresentaram sinais significativos de recuperação na eletroneuromiografia pós-tratamento. Além disso, os três também apresentaram melhora na força muscular e nas amplitudes de movimento do membro superior acometido. Observou-se melhor postura e ganhos importantes nas atividades de vida diária (tais como dirigir um carro modificado, segurar objetos, realizar tarefas domésticas e atividades de lazer. Conclusões: Os resultados revelaram uma importante recuperação funcional após o programa de fisioterapia com o Método Chordata associado à eletroterapia, com impacto na vida diária dos pacientes, bem como nos achados eletroneuromiográficos. Ensaios clínicos randomizados são necessários para confirmar ou refutar esta nova estratégia terapêutica não farmacológica nas lesões de plexo braquial

  1. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.N.; Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 μg fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 μg fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients

  2. Comparison of ultrasound and ultrasound plus nerve stimulator guidance axillary plexus block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirelli, G.; Baskan, S.; Karabeyoglu, I.; Aytac, I.; Omek, D.H.; Erdogmus, A.; Baydar, M.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of axillary plexus blockade applied using ultrasound only and using ultrasound together with nerve stimulator in patients undergoing planned forearm, wrist or hand surgery. Methods: This randomised, prospective, double-blinded, single-centre study was conducted at Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, from November 2014 to August 2015, and comprised patients undergoing forearm, wrist or hand surgery. Participants were separated into 2 groups. In Group 1, the nerve roots required for the surgical site were located one by one and local anaesthetic was applied separately to each nerve for the block. In Group 2, the vascular nerve bundle was located under ultrasound guidance and a total block was achieved by administering all the local anaesthetic within the nerve sheath. In the operating room, standard monitorisation was applied. Following preparation of the skin, the axillary region nerve roots and branches and vascular structures were observed by examination with a high-frequency ultrasound probe. In both groups, a 22-gauge, 5cm block needle was entered to the axillary region with visualisation of the whole needle on ultrasound and 20ml local anaesthetic of 0.5% bupivacaine was injected. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: Of the 60 participants, there were 30(50%) in each group. The mean age was 39.1+-15 years in the group 1 which was the ultrasound nerve stimulation group, and 41.5+-14.3 years in group 2. The duration of the procedure was longer in group I than in group 2 (p<0.05). Patient satisfaction values during the procedure were higher in group 2(p<0.05). In the ulnar sensory examination, the values of the patients in group 1 were higher at 10, 15, 20 and 25 minutes (p<0.05). In the median, radial and ulnar motor examination, the values of the patients in group 1were higher at 15 and 20 minutes (p<0.05). Conclusion: Brachial plexus blockade via axillary approach guided by ultrasound offered

  3. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  4. Continuous lumbar plexus block for acute postoperative pain management after open reduction and internal fixation of acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelly, Jacques E; Casati, Andrea; Al-Samsam, Tameem; Coupe, Kevin; Criswell, Allen; Tucker, Jeffery

    2003-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of postoperative continuous lumbar plexus blocks for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture. Twenty-six patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture. DESIGN/PERSPECTIVE: According to a case-control study design, patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (n = 13) received postoperatively a continuous lumbar plexus block with 0.2% ropivacaine (10 mL/hr for 48 hours), and group 2 (n = 13) received postoperatively patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (1 mg; lock-out time, 10 minutes; total 6 mg/hr). Postoperative morphine consumption, time to unassisted ambulation, and clinical and radiographic outcomes. No significant differences in demographics, surgical procedure, or duration of surgery were reported between the two groups. The lumbar plexus catheter group showed a lower requirement for morphine in the postanesthesia care unit (6 mg [0-14 mg]) and during the first 2 days (20 mg [6-55 mg] on day 1 and 29 mg [4-56 mg] on day 2) than the control group (51 mg [20-100 mg] on day 1 and 50 mg [10-93 mg] on day 2) (P = 0.001 and P = 0.021). Effective unassisted ambulation was recovered earlier in patients with the lumbar plexus catheter (3 days; range 2-4 days) than in the control group (4 days; range 3-7 days) (P = 0.015). Continuous lumbar plexus block represents an interesting alternative for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture.

  5. Nerve Transfers in Patients with Brown-Séquard Pattern of Spinal Cord Injury: Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch-Wilkinson, Thorbjorn; McNeil, Stephen; White, Chris; Schrag, Christiaan; Midha, Rajiv

    2018-02-01

    Use of distal nerve transfer for improving upper limb function has been well described for patients with tetraplegic spinal cord injury and brachial plexus injuries but has not previously been described for Brown-Séquard type spinal cord injury. We describe our experience with 2 cases of combined Brown-Séquard injury and unilateral brachial amyotrophy. Patient 1, a 43-year-old woman, was involved in a motor vehicle accident and sustained left-side C5-7 level hemicord injury causing ipsilateral proximal arm weakness and sensory loss with contralateral hemisensory changes, neuropathic pain, and spasms. At 6 months after injury, she underwent a spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve, radial nerve triceps branch to axillary nerve, and ulnar fascicle to biceps transfer. At 2-year follow-up, she had improved function with Medical Research Council grade 4 power of shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, and internal and external rotation. Patient 2, a 38-year-old man, sustained a C4-5 fracture-dislocation in a motor vehicle accident and associated right-side hemicord injury involving the C5 and C6 myotomes with relatively preserved distal function. At 9 months after injury, he underwent radial nerve triceps branch to axillary nerve division and ulnar nerve fascicle to musculocutaneous nerve brachialis branch transfer. At 8 months after surgery, electromyography demonstrated evidence of further reinnervation of the deltoid muscle. Our early experience of nerve transfer with 2 patients with combined Brown-Séquard cord injury and brachial amyotrophy indicated acceptable surgical safety and demonstrated encouraging results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Raquianestesia total após bloqueio do plexo lombar por via posterior: relato de caso Raquianestesia total después del bloqueo del plexo lumbar por vía posterior: relato de caso Total spinal block after posterior lumbar plexus blockade: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Teixeira Domingues Duarte

    2006-10-01

    que continua hasta los espacios peridural y subaracnoideo, para donde la solución anestésica puede se dispersar. A pesar de ofrecer un extenso margen de seguridad, el bloqueo del plexo lumbar demanda del anestesiólogo un conocimiento minucioso de la anatomía, una capacitación en la técnica y una vigilancia constante.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lumbar plexus blockade can be very useful in surgical procedures of the hip, thigh, and knee, but it should be performed by an experienced anesthesiologist due to potential complications. The current report presents a case of total spinal block after posterior lumbar plexus blockade and discusses the possible pathophysiological mechanisms. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 34 years old, 97 kg, physical status ASA I, scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. After general anesthesia, a right posterior lumbar plexus blockade was performed with the adjunct of a peripheral nerve stimulator. The needle was introduced to a depth of 8 cm, perpendicular to the skin, 4 cm from the mid line, on a line perpendicular to the spinal process of L4. After identification of a motor response from the quadriceps, the intensity of the current was reduced to 0.35 mA and 0.5% ropivacaine (39 mL was administered. During the injection, there were intermittent contractions of the quadriceps. After the block, the patient presented apnea, hypotension, and both pupils were dilated. At the end of the surgery, the patient presented motor block of the lower extremities, which reversed only nine hours after the block. In the postoperative period, the patient complained of severe pain; he was discharged 12 days after the surgery without motor or sensitive deficits. CONCLUSIONS: To identify the psoas compartment, where the lumbar plexus blockade is located, the intensity of the current must be between 0.5 and 1 mA. Motor response with low current indicates that the needle may be inside the sheath that surrounds the nervous root and extends to the epidural and

  7. Choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle: angiography, preoperative embolization, and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, H.M. [Interventional Neuroradiology, S-047, Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center (United States); Dept. of Radiology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Marx, W.F. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Khanam, H. [Dept. of Pathology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jensen, M.E. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Dept. of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2001-06-01

    We report a unique case of choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle in an 8-month-old girl in which preoperative embolization played a salient role in management. Initial surgery was aborted due to excessive bleeding. Cerebral angiography demonstrated enlarged posterior choroidal arteries feeding the tumor, and intense, persistent tumor staining. These vessels were effectively embolized to stasis with polyvinyl alcohol particles. The patient underwent a second craniotomy and complete resection of the tumor with minimal blood loss. Postsurgical histology showed postembolization iatrogenic intratumoral necrosis. (orig.)

  8. Demystifying MR Neurography of the Lumbosacral Plexus: From Protocols to Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Muniz Neto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance neurography is a high-resolution imaging technique that allows evaluating different neurological pathologies in correlation to clinical and the electrophysiological data. The aim of this article is to present a review on the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus nerves, along with imaging protocols, interpretation pitfalls, and most common pathologies that should be recognized by the radiologist: traumatic, iatrogenic, entrapment, tumoral, infectious, and inflammatory conditions. An extensive series of clinical and imaging cases is presented to illustrate key-points throughout the article.

  9. Is lumbosacral plexus blockade effective and safe for surgical anesthesia in total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    had lumbosacral plexus blockade (lumbar plexus block, sacral plexus block and fascia transversalis plane block) with ropivacaine. Group 2 had continuous spinal anesthesia with repeated bupivacaine-doses. Group 3 had single-dose spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine. Hemodynamic data were recorded during...

  10. Increasing the efficacy of a celiac plexus block in patients with severe pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical possibilities of placing a catheter near the celiac plexus for performance of a celiac plexus block, and to study the efficacy of repeated neurolytic celiac plexus blocks with alcohol in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer pain resistant

  11. A Rare Form of Guillan Barre Syndrome: A Child Diagnosed with Anti-GD1a and Anti-GD1b Positive Pharyngeal-Cervical-Brachial Variant

    OpenAIRE

    Metin Uysalol; Burak Tatlı; Erhan Aygün; Semra Kayaoğlu; Nedret Uzel; Agop Çıtak

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant is a rare form of Guillan-Barre Syndrome (GBS). Antibodies against other membrane proteins like GM1b and GD1a have been found only in a small number of patients with Guillan Barre syndrome variant. Case Report: Here, we report a 5.5 year-old boy diagnosed early with positive GD1a and GD1b gangliosides of Guillan-Barre syndrome pharyngeal cervical-Brachial variant, who improved and recovered fully in a short period. This is in contrast...

  12. A Rare Form of Guillan Barre Syndrome: A Child Diagnosed with Anti-GD1a and Anti-GD1b Positive Pharyngeal-Cervical-Brachial Variant

    OpenAIRE

    Uysalol, Metin; Tatlı, Burak; Uzel, Nedret; Çıtak, Agop; Aygün, Erhan; Kayaoğlu, Semra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant is a rare form of Guillan-Barre Syndrome (GBS). Antibodies against other membrane proteins like GM1b and GD1a have been found only in a small number of patients with Guillan Barre syndrome variant. Case Report: Here, we report a 5.5 year-old boy diagnosed early with positive GD1a and GD1b gangliosides of Guillan-Barre syndrome pharyngeal cervical-Brachial variant, who improved and recovered fully in a short period. This is in cont...

  13. Traumatic peripheral neuropraxias in neonates: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sushma; Bhandekar, Heena Sudhir; Korday, Charusheela Sujit

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve palsies in the newborn are uncommon but are a cause of severe anxiety in parents. Erb's palsy, brachial plexus, radial nerve and facial nerve are the common nerves affected. Perinatal injuries are the most frequent cause of traumatic peripheral neuropraxias / nerve palsies. Usually these neuropraxias are self-limited with good recovery with conservative management in majority of cases.Ten neonates with peripheral neuropraxias were included in this retrospective study based on a review of these cases over a period of three and a half years. Their clinical profile, presenting symptoms, predisposing factors and management were analyzed. We encountered five neonates with erb's palsy, three with facial palsy and two had radial nerve affection. Risk factors in our series included large babies, prolonged or difficult labour, instrumental delivery and shoulder dystocia. All cases of peripheral nerve involvement were managed conservatively with physiotherapy. Nine neonates were discharged and showed gradual improvement and one patient unfortunately succumbed due to severe birth asphyxia. Parental counseling and rehabilitation play an important part in management of these cases.

  14. Surgical significance of brachial arterial variants in a Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knowledge of the variant anatomy of the brachial artery is important in radial arterial grafts for coronary bypass, percutaneous trans-radial approach to coronary angiography, angioplasty and flap surgery. These variations show ethnic differences but data from black populations are scarce. This study therefore ...

  15. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassel, Christina L; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ∼50,000 SNPs across ∼2100 candidate genes to iden...

  16. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines...

  17. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines...

  18. Effect of warming bupivacaine 0.5% on ultrasound-guided axillary plexus block. Randomized prospective double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, W; Ben Gabsia, A; Lebbi, A; Sammoud, W; Labbène, I; Kchelfi, S; Ferjani, M

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of warming bupivacaine 0.5% on ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block. Prospective, randomized, double-blind. Eighty patients undergoing elective or emergency surgery beyond the distal third of the upper limb were divided into two groups of 40 patients: the warm group received 15mL bupivacaine 0.5% heated to 37°C; the cold group received 15mL 0.5% bupivacaine stored for at least 24hours in the lower compartment of a refrigerator at 13-15°C. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks were evaluated every 5minutes for 40minutes. Postoperative pain was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24hours. Effective analgesia time was recorded as the interval between anesthetic injection and the first analgesia requirement (VAS>30mm). Time to onset of sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in the warm group, and mean duration of sensory and motor block and of postoperative analgesia significantly longer. Warming bupivacaine 0.5% to 37°C accelerated onset of sensory and motor block and extended action duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...... of inoperable disease. Techniques may still vary based on operator experience. Serious complications exist, but are rare....

  20. Ganglion Plexus Ablation in Advanced Atrial Fibrillation: The AFACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Antoine H. G.; Berger, Wouter R.; Krul, Sébastien P. J.; van den Berg, Nicoline W. E.; Neefs, Jolien; Piersma, Femke R.; Chan Pin Yin, Dean R. P. P.; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; van Boven, WimJan P.; de Groot, Joris R.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long duration of atrial fibrillation (AF), enlarged atria, or failed catheter ablation have advanced AF and may require more extensive treatment than pulmonary vein isolation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of additional ganglion plexus (GP) ablation