WorldWideScience

Sample records for brachial cutaneous nerve

  1. MEDIAL BRACHIAL CUTANEOUS NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY: A DIAGNOSTIC METHOD FOR MEDIAL CORD LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B TAVANA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Regarding to the absence of doccumented studies concerning medial brachial coetaneous nerve conduction, the present study was conducted to evaluate this parameter as a diagnostic method for injuries to medial cord and lower trunk of brachial plexus. Methods. The sensory nerve action potential of median, ulnar and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves were recorded to show these roots (Cs-TV are intact. Then, the medial brachial cutaneous nerve was stimulated on the line that connects axilla to medial epicondyle (parallel with mid axillary line at the junction site of coracobrachialis muscle to humerus recording was done 2 cm above the medial epicondyle (10 cm under stimulating site. Results. In all cases the wave was biphasic with primary negative phase. The latency was 2±0.3 ms-1 (range 1.4-2.6 ms-1 and the amplitude of SNAP was 30±10 mv (range 10-50 mV. The nerve conduction velocity was 61±4 ms-1 (range 53-69 ms-1. Discussion. With regard to the intensity and site of stimulation and recording area, this wave is not due to compound nerve action potential of median or ulnar nerve. This study may be useful in evaluation of T1 root and in differential diagnosis of medial cord and lower trunk lesions with ulnar and medial part of median nerve injuries.

  2. Sensory restoration by lateral antebrachial cutaneous to ulnar nerve transfer in children with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Price, Andrew E; Valencia, Herbert; Ramos, Lorna E; Grossman, John A I

    2010-12-01

    Selective peripheral nerve transfers represent an emerging reconstructive strategy in the management of both pediatric and adult brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries. Transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the forearm into the distal ulnar nerve is a useful means to restore sensibility to the ulnar side of the hand when indicated. This technique is particularly valuable in the management of global brachial plexus birth injuries in children for which its application has not been previously reported. Four children ages 4 to 9 years who sustained brachial plexus birth injury with persistent absent sensibility on the unlar aspect of the hand underwent transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve to the distal ulnar nerve. In three patients, a direct transfer with a distal end-to-side repair through a deep longitudinal neurotomy was performed. In a single patient, an interposition nerve graft was required. Restoration of sensibility was evaluated by the "wrinkle test."

  3. Radial Nerve Injury after Brachial Nerve Block - Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szederjesi Janos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adding epinephrine to local anesthetics is recommended to extend the duration of peripheral nerve blocks. We describe in this article two cases of radial nerve injury possible due to coadministration of epinephrine during brachial plexus block.

  4. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  5. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  6. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  7. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  8. Median nerve neuropraxia by a large false brachial artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijftogt, Niki; Cancrinus, Ernst; Hoogervorst, Erwin L J; van de Mortel, Rob H W; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral nerve compression is a rare complication of an iatrogenic false brachial artery aneurysm. We present a 72-year-old patient with median nerve compression due to a false brachial artery aneurysm after removal of an arterial catheter. Surgical exclusion of the false aneurysm was performed in order to release traction of the median nerve. At 3-month assessment, moderate hand recovery in function and sensibility was noted. In the case of neuropraxia of the upper extremity, following a history of hospital stay and arterial lining or catheterization, compression due to pseudoaneurysm should be considered a probable cause directly at presentation. Early recognition and treatment is essential to avoid permanent neurological deficit. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Formation of median nerve without the medial root of medial cord and associated variations of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu SP

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical variations in the formation, course and termination of brachial plexus are well documented and have clinical significance to surgeons, neurologists and anatomists. The present case report describes the unusual origin of median nerve, arising directly from the lateral cord without the union of lateral and medial roots of brachial plexus. A communicating branch existed between the ulnar nerve and anterior division of middle trunk. The lateral pectoral nerve was arising from anterior divisions of upper and middle trunks as two separate branches instead from lateral cord. The branches then joined together to form the lateral pectoral nerve. The medial cord instead of its five terminal branches, had only three branches, the ulnar nerve, medial pectoral nerve and a single trunk for the medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm which got separated at the middle of the arm. The variations of the lateral cord and its branches make it a complicated clinical and surgical approach which is discussed with the developmental background.

  11. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  12. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  13. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrona E

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleni Chrona,1,2 Georgia Kostopanagiotou,1 Dimitrios Damigos,3 Chrysanthi Batistaki1 1Second Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, “Attikon” Hospital, Athens, 2Department of Anesthesiology, General Hospital of “Ag. Panteleimon,” Piraeus, 3Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Abstract: Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES is a commonly underdiagnosed and undertreated chronic state of pain. This syndrome is characterized by the entrapment of the cutaneous branches of the lower thoracoabdominal intercostal nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle, which causes severe, often refractory, chronic pain. This narrative review aims to identify the possible therapeutic strategies for the management of the syndrome. Seventeen studies about ACNES therapy were reviewed; of them, 15 were case–control studies, case series, or case reports, and two were randomized controlled trials. The presently available management strategies for ACNES include trigger point injections (diagnostic and therapeutic, ultrasound-guided blocks, chemical neurolysis, and surgical ­neurectomy, in combination with systemic medication, as well as some emerging techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation and neuromodulation. An increased awareness of the syndrome and the use of specific diagnostic criteria for its recognition are required to facilitate an early and successful management. This review compiles the proposed ­management strategies for ACNES. Keywords: anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, intercostal, neuralgia, management

  14. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero-Manzanal, Francisco; Lax-Pérez, Raquel; López-Bernabé, Roberto; Betancourt-Bastidas, José Ramiro; Iñiguez de Onzoño-Pérez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder surgery is often performed with the patient in the so called "beach-chair position" with elevation of the upper part of the body. The anesthetic procedure can be general anesthesia and/or regional block, usually interscalenic brachial plexus block. We present a case of brachial plexus palsy with a possible mechanism of traction based on the electromyographic and clinical findings, although a possible contribution of nerve block cannot be excluded. We present a case of a 62 year-old female, that suffered from shoulder fracture-dislocation. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed in the so-called "beach-chair" position, under combined general-regional anesthesia. In the postoperative period complete motor brachial plexus palsy appeared, with neuropathic pain. Conservative treatment included analgesic drugs, neuromodulators, B-vitamin complex and physiotherapy. Spontaneous recovery appeared at 11 months. DISCUSION: in shoulder surgery, there may be complications related to both anesthetic technique and patient positioning/surgical maneuvers. Regional block often acts as a confusing factor when neurologic damage appears after surgery. Intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus, and may be favored by the fixed position of the head using the accessory of the operating table in the beach-chair position. When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Nerve reconstruction: A cohort study of 93 cases of global brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Acceptable function (restoration of biceps power ≥3 can be obtained in more than two thirds (73% of these global brachial plexus injuries by using the principles of early exploration and nerve transfer with rehabilitation.

  16. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  17. Long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve in patients with brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Alijani, Babak; Andalib, Sasan

    2016-09-01

    For the reconstruction of brachial plexus lesions, restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder function is fundamental and is achieved by dual nerve transfers. Shoulder stabilization and movement are crucial in freedom of motion of the upper extremity. In patients with C5-C6 brachial plexus injury, spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a fascicle of ulnar nerve to musculocutaneous nerve (dual nerve transfer) are carried out for restoration of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for restoration of shoulder abduction in patients with brachial plexus palsy undergoing a dual nerve transfer. In the present retrospective review, 22 consecutive subjects with upper brachial plexus palsy were assessed. All of the subjects underwent spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a dual nerve transfer from the ulnar nerve to the biceps branch and from the median nerve to the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve simultaneously. All of the subjects were followed up for 18 to 24 months (average, 21.7 months) for assessing the recovery of the shoulder abduction and motor function. Spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve showed a motor function recovery of M3 and M4 in 13.6 and 63.6% of the subjects, respectively. However, 22.7 % of the subjects remained with a motor function of M2. The mean of shoulder abduction reached 55.55 ± 9.95° (range, 40-72°). Altogether, good functional results regained in 17 out of 22 the subjects (77.2 %). Linear regression analysis showed that advanced age was a predictor of low motor functional grade. The evidence from the present study suggests that transferring spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve for restoring shoulder abduction is an effective and reliable treatment with high success rate in patients with brachial

  18. Results of intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng-Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Cheng-Huan; Hu, Shao-Nan; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2011-12-01

    Intercostal nerve (ICN) transfer has been one of the main extraplexal nerve transfers in treating brachial plexus root avulsion. This retrospective study evaluated results of ICN transfer for reconstruction of the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) in brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP). Eighteen boys and 6 girls with BPBP, who had avulsion of at least 2 spinal nerves of the plexus, underwent ICN transfer for reconstruction of MCN, from March 2003 to October 2005. The brachial plexus lesion was diagnosed by clinical assessment, surgical exploration, and intraoperative neurophysiological investigations. The age at surgery ranged from 3 to 11 months of life, with a mean of 5 months. Two intercostals were used for one, 3 intercostals for 9, and 4 intercostals for 14 patients. The intercostals were transferred to MCN in 12 and to the anterior division of the upper trunk in the other 12 cases. Twenty-four children were followed up for 24 to 79 months, with an average of 53 months. No complications were found in the respiratory system. Of 14 transfers with 4 intercostals, biceps gained M4 strength in 8, M3 in 4, and M2 in 2. Of 9 transfers with 3 intercostals, biceps obtained M4 strength in 8 and M3 in 1. One transfer with 2 intercostals got M4 strength of biceps. Twelve patients whose intercostals were transferred to MCN, gained M4 strength of biceps in 11 and M3 in 1, whereas the other 12 patients with intercostals transferred to anterior division of the upper trunk, obtained M4 strength of biceps in 6, M3 in 4, and M2 in 2. The rate of M3 strength or more was 92% and that of M4 was 71%. ICN transfer is a safe and reliable procedure for reconstruction of the MCN in BPBP. There seems to be no difference of effects between transfers with 3 and those with 4 intercostals. The transferred nerves should be coapted to MCN, rather than a more proximal portion of the plexus. Level III: retrospective comparative study.

  19. Dorsal ulnar cutaneous nerve conduction: reference values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garibaldi Solange G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the reference values of the dorsal ulnar cutaneous nerve (DUC sensory nerve conduction (SNC in 66 healthy individuals. Measurements were processed using stimulating electrodes positioned between the ulnar bone and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, 11-13 cm proximal to the active electrode recording. Superficial recording electrodes were placed on the fourth intermetacarpal space. The mean sensory conduction velocity (SCV in males was 63.7 -- 0.16 x age ± 3.36 m/s and in females was 57.7 ± 3.37 m/s. The mean sensory nerve action potential (SNAP amplitude in males was 19.5 ± 10.7 µV and in females was 24.6 ± 5.8 µV. The mean SNAP duration was 0.96 ± 0.13 ms. No significant differences regarding the DUC-SCV, distal latency, and SNAP duration or amplitude were found between both sides of the same subject. The amplitude of the SNAP was higher in females than males. The effects of age on DUC-SCV were distinct for each gender.

  20. Acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberbuhler, Paz; León Cejas, Luciana V; Binaghi, Daniela; Reisin, Ricardo C

    2013-11-15

    Acute brachial plexus neuropathy is characterized by acute onset of shoulder girdle and arm pain, followed by weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. It affects primarily nerves of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus and the long thoracic nerve. Cranial nerve involvement is an infrequent association and implies a diagnostic challenge. We report a unique case of acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of the cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII. Fifty six year-old woman who developed acute dysphonia, dysphagia and left shoulder pain, followed, six days later, by left arm weakness. Needle examination showed only fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in the left deltoid muscle. MRI of the brachial plexus shows enlargement of the trunks, cords and terminal branches, with mild gadolinium enhancement. This case illustrates the unique presentation of neuralgic amyotrophy with involvement of nerves outside the brachial plexus, and the importance of MRI for diagnosis, in the absence of electrophysiologic involvement. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Nollet, Frans; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A.; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2006-01-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active

  2. Median nerve and brachial artery entrapment in the tendinous arch of coracobrachialis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues V

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variation in the pattern of muscle insertion and possible neurovascular entrapment is important for orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons and physiotherapists. We found a variation in the insertion pattern of coracobrachialis and entrapped median nerve and brachial artery by the tendinous arch of the muscle, in relation to the neurovascular bundle. The coracobrachialis had an additional insertion in the form of a tendinous arch which extended from the lower part of the muscle to the medial intermuscular septum. The median nerve, brachial artery, its venae commitantes and a muscular branch from brachial artery passed deep to this arch. The abnormality reported here might result in neurovascular compression symptoms in upper limb.

  3. Evaluation of suprascapular nerve neurotization after nerve graft or transfer in the treatment of brachial plexus traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, Martijn J A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; de Boer, Kees S; Thomeer, Ralph T W M

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the restoration of shoulder function by means of suprascapular nerve neurotization in adult patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 lesions due to a severe brachial plexus traction injury. The primary goal of brachial plexus reconstructive surgery was to restore biceps muscle function and, secondarily, to reanimate shoulder function. Suprascapular nerve neurotization was performed by grafting the C-5 nerve in 24 patients and by accessory or hypoglossal nerve transfer in 29 patients. Additional neurotization involving the axillary nerve was performed in 18 patients. Postoperative needle electromyography studies of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and deltoid muscles showed signs of reinnervation in most patients; however, active glenohumeral shoulder function recovery was poor. In nine (17%) of 53 patients supraspinatus muscle strength was Medical Research Council (MRC) Grade 3 or 4 and in four patients (8%) infraspinatus muscle power was MRC Grade 3 or 4. In 18 patients in whom deltoid muscle reinnervation was attempted, MRC Grade 3 or 4 function was demonstrated in two (11%). In the overall group, eight patients (15%) exhibited glenohumeral abduction with a mean of 44 +/- 17 degrees (standard deviation [SD]; median 45 degrees) and four patients (8%) exhibited glenohumeral exorotation with a mean of 48 +/- 24 degrees (SD; median 53 degrees). In only three patients (6%) were both functions regained. The reanimation of shoulder function in patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 brachial plexus traction injuries following suprascapular nerve neurotization is disappointingly low.

  4. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Radiologic manifestation of the malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumor involving the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Aran, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old African American female with history of bilateral breast cancer status after lumpectomy and radiation therapy presented with right hand, wrist, and arm pain. She was found to have a right axillary mass and a large lesion in the right brachial plexus. A biopsy of the brachial plexus mass came back as a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. This case report illustrates the critical value of multiple imaging modalities in definitive diagnosis of this rare pathologic entity.

  6. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These nerves ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation ... associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may include: ...

  7. Median palmar cutaneous nerve injury in a volleyball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitkind, Andrew I; Zhao, Peng; Oh-Park, Moo Yeon; Fast, Avital

    2009-04-01

    A 14-yr-old female patient, a competitive high school volleyball player, was seen for an evaluation of right-hand numbness and tingling. Her symptoms began insidiously, midway through her second season of competitive play. Numbness and tingling improved with rest but returned immediately after resuming competition. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging were within normal limits. Meticulous sensory examination revealed a decrease in sensation to light touch over an area consistent with the distribution of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. It is postulated that the patient's complaints were due to right median palmar cutaneous nerve damage secondary to repetitive trauma to the right forearm and wrist as a result of her competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of median palmar cutaneous nerve damage as a result of participation in competitive volleyball.

  8. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B 12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months

  9. Extending the Indications for Primary Nerve Surgery in Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart A. Bade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study identifies a small subset of patients with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who, while they do not meet common surgical indications, may still benefit from primary nerve surgery. Methods. Between April 2004 and April 2009, 17 patients were offered primary nerve surgery despite not meeting the standard surgical indications of the authors. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of these 17 patients using prospectively collected data. Results. This group of 17 patients were identified as having poor shoulder function at about 9 months of age despite passing the Cookie Test. Fourteen patients underwent surgical intervention and three families declined surgery. All patients in the operative group regained some active external rotation after surgery. Five patients in this group have required further interventions. Two of the three patients for whom surgery was declined have had no subsequent spontaneous improvement in active external rotation. Discussion. The commonly used indications for primary nerve surgery in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may not adequately identify all patients who may benefit from surgical intervention. Patients who pass the Cookie Test but have poor spontaneous recovery of active shoulder movements, particularly external rotation, may still benefit from primary nerve surgery.

  10. Outcome following spinal accessory to suprascapular (spinoscapular) nerve transfer in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Ramos, Lorna E; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, Agatha; Grossman, John A I

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5-30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable option for shoulder reinnervation in

  11. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Strijers, Rob L M; Frans, Nollet; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A; Vandertop, W Peter

    2006-10-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active shoulder exorotation, to evaluate for functional recovery, and to understand why other superior trunk functions spontaneously recover in contrast with exorotation. In 54 children, an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer was performed as a separate procedure at a mean age of 21.7 months. Follow-up examinations were conducted before and at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 36 months after operation and included scoring of shoulder exorotation and abduction. Intraoperative reactivity of spinatus muscles and additional needle electromyographic responses were registered after electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves. Histological examination of suprascapular nerves was performed. Trophy of spinatus muscles was followed by magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The influence of perinatal variables and results of ancillary investigations on outcome were evaluated. Exorotation improved from 70 degrees to functional levels exceeding 0 degrees, except in two patients. Abduction improved in 27 patients, with results of 90 degrees or more in 49 patients. Electromyography at 4 months did not show signs of denervation in 39 out of 40 patients. Intraoperative electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves elicited spinatus muscle reaction in 44 out of 48 patients. Histology of suprascapular nerves was normal. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans showed only minor wasting of spinatus muscles in contrast with major wasting after successful operations. An accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer is effective to restore active exorotation when performed as the primary or a separate secondary procedure in children older than 10 months of age. Contradictory spontaneous recovery of other superior

  12. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  13. Membrane properties in small cutaneous nerve fibers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Kristian; Frahm, Ken Steffen; Petrini, Laura; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mørch, Carsten D

    2017-02-01

    Assessment of membrane properties is important for understanding the mechanisms of painful peripheral neuropathy, developing new diagnostic techniques, and screening/profiling of analgesics that target ion channels. Small cutaneous nerves were activated electrically by small diameter (0.2 mm) cathodes, and large nerves were activated by ordinary patch electrodes. This new perception threshold tracking method combines perception threshold assessment and stimulation paradigms from conventional threshold tracking. The strength-duration time-constant of large fibers (580 µs ± 160 µs) was lower than the time constant of small fibers (1060 µs ± 690 µs; P fibers showed less threshold reduction than large fibers (repeated-measures analysis of variance, Bonferroni, P = 0.006). This is a reliable method to investigate the membrane properties of small cutaneous nerve fibers in humans and may be used in clinical settings as a diagnostic or profiling tool. Muscle Nerve 55: 195-201, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Short-term efficacy of multiple nerves branch transfer for treating superior trunk brachial plexus in jury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiuzhou; Xu, Jianguang; Xu, Wendong; Xu, Lei; Gu, Shihui; Shen, Yundong; Zhao, Xin; Gu, Yudong

    2008-09-01

    To recover the loss of the shoulder and elbow function after superior trunks injury of brachial plexus through multiple nerves branch transfer simultaneously near the nerve entering points of recipient nerves. Four male patients (aged 21-39 years) with superior trunks injury of brachial plexus were treated from February to September 2007. All cases were injured in the traffic accident, left side in 1 case and right side in 3 cases, resulting in the loss of shoulder abduction, shoulder extorsion, shoulder lift and elbow flexion, and the increase of muscle strength of shoulder shrug, elbow extension and finger flexion to above or equal to 4th grade. Patients were hospitalized 3-11 months after injury. Electromyography showed that the functions of accessory nerve, ulnar nerve and the branch to long head of triceps brachii were good, but the function of median nerve was injured partially. The following multiple donor nerves transfer were performed under general anaesthesia, namely from posterior approach accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve, from triceps to axillary nerve, from the partial branch of ulnar nerve to the biceps and/or brachial is muscular branch of musculocutaneous nerve. All incisions healed by first intention. One case suffered postoperative numbness on the ulnar side of hand and was symptomatically relieved after expectant treatment, while 3 cases had no manifestation of the motor and sensory functional injury related to donor nerve. All patients were followed up for 7-12 months. All patients regained the shoulder abduction and the elbow flexion 3-4 months after operation and electromyography showed that there was the regenerative potential in 3 recipient muscles. The shoulder abduction, elbow flexion and the muscle strength of the patients was 30-65 degrees, 90-120 degrees and 3-4 grade, respectively, 6-7 months after operation. Twelve months after operation, the first patient's shoulder abduction, external rotation, superinduction and elbow flexion

  15. [Effects of different doses of dexmedetomidine combined with ropivacaine for brachial plexus nerve block in children undergoing polydactyly surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-Hui; Sun, Wei-Guo; Li, Yong-le; Chen, Xiang-Nan; Qi, Dong-Mei; Sun, Yi-Juan

    2017-06-20

    To observe the anesthetic effect and safety of different doses of dexmedetomidine combined with ropivacaine for brachial plexus nerve block in children undergoing polydactyly surgery. Eighty children undergoing polydactyly surgery were randomized into 4 groups to receive brachial plexus nerve block with dexmedetomidine at 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 µg/kg combined with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) (D1, D2, and D3 groups, respectively) or with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) only (control group). The onset time, duration of brachial plexus nerve block, awakening time, success rate, and incidence of complications were compared among the groups. Results In D2 and D3 groups, the onset time and awakening time were shorter and anesthesia lasted longer than those in the control group. The onset time and awakening time were shorter and anesthesia maintenance time was longer in D3 group than in D1 group. The success rates of brachial plexus nerve block were significantly higher in D1-3 groups than in the control group (Pblock occurred in 1 child and respiratory depression in another; 2 or 3 patients had Horner syndrome, and 1 patient in D3 group experienced an episode of lowered heart beat to below 70 min(-1). All the complications were managed properly and the patients all recovered uneventfully. Brachial plexus nerve block with 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) is safe for effective anesthesia in children undergoing surgery for polydactyly.

  16. A Need for Logical and Consistent Anatomical Nomenclature for Cutaneous Nerves of the Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Thomas R.; Burkel, William E.; Cortright, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    The system of anatomical nomenclature needs to be logical and consistent. However, variations in translation to English of the Latin and Greek terminology used in Nomina Anatomica and Terminologia Anatomica have led to some inconsistency in the nomenclature of cutaneous nerves in the limbs. An historical review of cutaneous nerve nomenclature…

  17. Operative treatment with nerve repair can restore function in patients with traction injuries in the brachial plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiasny, Jerzy; Birkeland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Brachial plexus injuries are usually a result of road traffic accidents and a cause of severe disability that typically affects young adult males. In 2010, a national centre was established for referral of these cases from Danish trauma centres. In this paper, we report on our...... surgical activity and reflect on the role for this new national centre. METHODS: Records from all our operated patients were reviewed retrospectively. For outcome analysis, we focused on patients who had sustained traction injuries with a surgical follow-up exceeding one year. We used either nerve grafting...... or transfers for nerve repairs based on the pattern of nerve injury seen intraoperatively. RESULTS: Overall, 24 patients were operated, and 12 patients were included in the outcome analysis. The six patients with upper brachial plexus palsies all regained shoulder function and useful elbow flexion. Of the six...

  18. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can happen because of shoulder trauma, tumors, or ... the nerves stretch or tear. Some brachial plexus injuries may heal without treatment. Many children who are ...

  19. Brachial plexus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise to ... in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  20. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radi Shahien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radi Shahien, Abdalla BowirratDepartment of Neurology, Ziv Medical Center, Zfat, IsraelAbstract: We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24-year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy.Keywords: facial nerve paralysis, partial brachial plexopathy, epidural blood patch

  1. ANÁLISE DA ORIGEM E DISTRIBUIÇÃO DOS NERVOS PERIFÉRICOS DO PLEXO BRAQUIAL DA PACA (Agouti paca, LINNAEUS, 1766 ORIGIN AND DITRIBUTION ANALYSIS OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS PERIPHERAL NERVES OF PACA (Agouti paca, LINNAEUS, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena Brendolan Gerbasi

    2008-12-01

    , biceps brachial and brachial muscles. The radial nerve went through the triceps brachial, tensor fasciae latae and anconeus muscles. The long thoracic and the thoracodorsal nerves branched on the latissimus dorsi muscle, and the lateral thoracic gave off on the trunk cutaneous muscle. The cranial pectoral nerves branched on the deep pectoral muscle and the caudal pectoral nerves gave off on the superficial pectoral muscle. The brachial plexus of pacas is formed by 12 pairs of nerves presenting different origins, which arose from ventral roots from the fifth pair of cervical to the second pair of thoracic nerves, not occurring trunks or cords in those formation.
    KEY  WORDS: Agouti paca, brachial plexus, distribution, nervous system.

  2. Variations in brachial plexus and the relationship of median nerve with the axillary artery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Vani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial Plexus innervates the upper limb. As it is the point of formation of many nerves, variations are common. Knowledge of these is important to anatomists, radiologists, anesthesiologists and surgeons. The presence of anatomical variations of the peripheral nervous system is often used to explain unexpected clinical signs and symptoms. Case Presentation On routine dissection of an embalmed 57 year old male cadaver, variations were found in the formation of divisions and cords of the Brachial Plexus of the right side. Some previously unreported findings observed were; direct branches to the muscles Pectoralis Minor and Latissimus dorsi from C6, innervation of deltoid by C6 and C7 roots and the origin of lateral pectoral nerve from the posterior division of upper trunk. The median nerve was present lateral to axillary artery. The left side brachial plexus was also inspected and found to have normal anatomy. Conclusion The probable cause for such variations and their embryological basis is discussed in the paper. It is also concluded that although these variations may not have affected the functioning of upper limb in this individual, knowledge of such variations is essential in evaluation of unexplained sensory and motor loss after trauma and surgical interventions to the upper limb.

  3. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen's disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasoon, Dev; Mandal, Swapan Kumar; Agrawal, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides were screened for Schwann cells, granuloma, and necrosis. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained smears were searched for lepra bacilli and globi. Morphological index was calculated in multibacillary lesions. Twenty-nine sensory cutaneous nerves were aspirated in 23 patients. While 15 cases showed skin and nerve involvement, 8 cases showed only nerve involvement. Terminal cutaneous branch of the radial nerve was most often aspirated. No motor loss was observed after aspiration. Five cytologic pictures were seen - Epithelioid cell granuloma only in 6 cases, epithelioid cell granuloma with necrosis in 1 case, epithelioid cell granuloma with lepra bacilli in 3 cases, necrosis with lepra bacilli in 1 case, and only lepra bacilli in 12 cases. Morphological index ranged from 20% to 80%. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a feasible, viable, effective, and safe procedure. It adds to diagnostic FNA yield in patients with concomitant skin involvement and offers a way to evaluate patients with only nerve involvement. Calculation of morphological index allows prognostication and may have a role in assessing response to therapy and/or relapse.

  4. Impact of eight weeks of repeated ischaemic preconditioning on brachial artery and cutaneous microcirculatory function in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen; Nyakayiru, Jean; Bailey, Tom G; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy; Sprung, Victoria S; Hopkins, Nicola D; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2015-08-01

    Ischaemic preconditioning has well-established cardiac and vascular protective effects. Short interventions (one week) of daily ischaemic preconditioning episodes improve conduit and microcirculatory function. This study examined whether a longer (eight weeks) and less frequent (three per week) protocol of repeated ischaemic preconditioning improves vascular function. Eighteen males were randomly allocated to either ischaemic preconditioning (22.4 ± 2.3 years, 23.7 ± 3.1 kg/m(2)) or a control intervention (26.0 ± 4.8 years, 26.4 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)). Brachial artery endothelial-dependent (FMD), forearm cutaneous microvascular function and cardiorespiratory fitness were assessed at zero, two and eight weeks. A greater improvement in FMD was evident following ischaemic preconditioning training compared with control at weeks 2 (2.24% (0.40, 4.08); p=0.02) and 8 (1.11% (0.13, 2.10); p=0.03). Repeated ischaemic preconditioning did not change cutaneous microcirculatory function or fitness. These data indicate that a feasible and practical protocol of regular ischaemic preconditioning episodes improves endothelial function in healthy individuals within two weeks, and these effects persist following repeated ischaemic preconditioning for eight weeks. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  5. Increased density of cutaneous nerve fibres in the affected dermatomes after herpes zoster therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zografakis, Charalampos; Tiniakos, Dina G; Palaiologou, Marina; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Kittas, Christos; Staurianeas, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster neural injury was assessed by determining cutaneous nerve density in skin biopsies from the affected dermatomes of 35 adult patients with herpes zoster in the acute phase and 3 months...

  6. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus block decreases the incidence of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular punctures and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with peripheral nerve stimulator in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia-Min; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Fu, Shu-Kun; Yuan, Chao-Qun; Chen, Kai; Li, Jia-Yi; Li, Quan

    2012-05-01

    The use of traditional techniques (such as landmark techniques, paresthesia and peripheral nerve stimulator) for upper-limb anesthesia has often been restricted to the expert or enthusiast, which was blind. Recently, ultrasound (US) has been applied to differ blood vessel, pleura and nerve, thus may reduce the risk of complications while have a high rate of success. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of ultrasound guidance (vs. peripheral nerve stimulator, (PNS)) decreases risk of vascular puncture, risk of hemi-diaphragmatic paresis and risk of Horner syndrome and improves the success rate of nerve block. A search strategy was developed to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) reporting on complications of US and PNS guidance for upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (brachial plexus) in adults available through PubMed databases, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase databases, SinoMed databases and Wanfang data (date up to 2011-12-20). Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data. Risk ratios (OR) were calculated for each outcome and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI) with the software of Review Manager 5.1.0 System (Cochrane Library). Sixteen trials involving 1321 adults met our criteria were included for analysis. Blocks performed using US guidance were more likely to be successful (risk ratio (RR) for block success 0.36, 95%CI 0.23 - 0.56, P block performance (RR 0.13, 95%CI 0.06 - 0.27, P complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (RR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03 - 0.52, P = 0.0001). US decreases risks of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular puncture and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with techniques that utilize PNS for nerve localization. Larger studies are needed to determine whether or not the use of US can decrease risk of neurologic complications.

  7. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  8. Incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis after peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasound guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sachin Ghodki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: We compared interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB using peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS and ultrasound (US techniques. The primary outcomes were the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (HDP and the duration of the block. Secondary outcomes were the block success rate, time to conduct the block, onset of sensory block, and dermatomal spread, postoperative pain by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, duration of postoperative analgesia and incidence of complications. Material and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, and observer-blinded study in 60 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under block plus general anesthesia. ISBPB was performed with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine using either PNS (Group PNS, n = 30 or US (Group US, n = 30. Hemidiaphragmatic function, the primary outcome, was assessed by ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragmatic movement and pulmonary function tests using a bedside spirometer (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. General anesthesia was administered to all the patients for surgery. P < 0.05 test was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Twelve patients in Group PNS had HDP and none in Group US (P < 0.0001. PFTs were also significantly reduced in Group PNS (P < 0.0001. The time to conduct the block and sensory onset time both were less in Group US (P < 0.05. The groups did not differ in block success rate, duration of analgesia, and NRS. Other complications like incidence of Horner′s syndrome and vascular puncture were comparable in both the groups. Conclusions: PNS guided ISBPB with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine is associated with a higher incidence of HDP as compared to US guided ISBPB. There is no significant difference in quality or duration of analgesia in the two groups.

  9. Treatment response and central pain processing in Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome: An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijckevorsel, D.C.M. van; Boelens, O.B.A.; Roumen, R.M.; Wilder, O.H.; Goor, H. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 10-30% of chronic abdominal pain originates in the abdominal wall. A common cause for chronic abdominal wall pain is the Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (ACNES), in which an intercostal nerve branch is entrapped in the abdominal rectus sheath. Treatment consists of local

  10. Vascular branches from cutaneous nerve of the forearm and hand: application to better understanding raynaud's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, K; Ohmichi, M; Ohmichi, Y; Yakura, T; Hammer, N; Mizuno, D; Naito, M; Nakano, T

    2017-09-29

    Cutaneous nerves have branches called vascular branches (VBs) that reach arteries. VBs are thought to be involved in arterial constriction, and this is the rationale for periarterial sympathectomy as a treatment option for Raynaud's disease. However, the branching patterns and distribution areas of the VBs remain largely unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anatomical structures of the VBs of the cutaneous nerves. Forty hands and forearms were examined to assess the branching patterns and distribution areas of the VBs of the superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN), the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LACN), the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN), and the palmar cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (PCUN). VBs reaching the radial and ulnar arteries were observed in all specimens. The branching patterns were classified into six types. The mean distance between the radial styloid process and the point where the VBs reached the radial artery was 34.3 ± 4.8 mm in the SBRN and 38.5 ± 15.8 mm in the LACN. The mean distance between the ulnar styloid process and the point where the VBs reached the ulnar artery was 60.3 ± 25.9 mm in the MACN and 43.8 ± 26.0 mm in the PCUN. This study showed that the VBs of the cutaneous nerves have diverse branching patterns. The VBs of the SBRN had a more limited distribution areas than those of the other nerves. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Direct electrical injury to brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksud Mubarak Devale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical current can cause neurological damage directly or by conversion to thermal energy. However, electrical injury causing isolated brachial plexus injury without cutaneous burns is extremely rare. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy who sustained accidental electrical injury to left upper extremity with no associated entry or exit wounds. Complete motor and sensory loss in upper limb were noted immediately after injury. Subsequently, the patient showed partial recovery in muscles around the shoulder and in ulnar nerve distribution at 6 months. However, there was no improvement in muscles supplied by musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves. On exploration at 6 months after trauma, injury to the infraclavicular plexus was identified. Reconstruction of musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves by means of sural nerve cable grafts was performed. The patient has shown excellent recovery in musculocutaneous nerve function with acceptable recovery of radial nerve function at 1-year post-injury.

  12. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, D M

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks.

  13. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoighe, D M; Baker, J F; Mulhall, K J

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve transposition: Renaissance of an old concept in the light of new anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Amgad S

    2017-04-01

    Meralgia paresthetica causes pain in the anterolateral thigh. Most surgical procedures involve nerve transection or decompression. We conducted a cadaveric study to determine the feasibility of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) transposition. In three cadavers, the LFCN was exposed in the thigh and retroperitoneum. The two layers of the LFCN canal superficial and deep to the nerve were opened. The nerve was then mobilized medially away from the ASIS, by cutting the septum medial to sartorius. It was possible to mobilize the nerve for 2 cm medial to the ASIS. The nerve acquired a much straighter course with less tension. A new technique of LFCN transposition is presented here as an anatomical feasibility study. The surgical technique is based on the new understanding of the LFCN canal. Clin. Anat. 30:409-412, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Increased density of cutaneous nerve fibres in the affected dermatomes after herpes zoster therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografakis, Charalampos; Tiniakos, Dina G; Palaiologou, Marina; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Kittas, Christos; Staurianeas, Nikos

    2014-03-01

    Herpes zoster neural injury was assessed by determining cutaneous nerve density in skin biopsies from the affected dermatomes of 35 adult patients with herpes zoster in the acute phase and 3 months post-treatment, using protein gene product 9.5 immunohistochemistry. In contrast to the significant increase in subepidermal nerve fibre density (11.77 ± 4.88/mm vs. 13.29 ± 5.74/mm, p = 0.045) after 3 months, no differences were found in epidermal free nerve endings (2.43 ± 2.35/mm and 2.8 ± 2.86/mm, p = 0.168). Patients with post-herpetic neuralgia had significantly lower subepidermal nerve fibre densities (9.7 ± 2.05/mm vs. 14.72 ± 6.13/mm, p = 0.011) compared with non-post-herpetic neuralgia patients. No differences in cutaneous nerve density were found in relation to antiviral therapy. In conclusion, 3 months after acute infection, no sign of epidermal innervation recovery is observed, while the increased subepidermal nerve fibre density in the affected dermatomes probably reflects nerve regeneration that is not affected by antiviral agent type. Subepidermal nerve fibre density is decreased in patients with post-herpetic neuralgia 3-months post-acute herpes zoster infection.

  16. Management of anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome in a cohort of 139 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, O.B.A.; Scheltinga, M.R.M.; Houterman, S.; Roumen, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES) is generally neglected as a source of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a diagnostic workup protocol and treatment regimen in patients with suspected ACNES. METHODS: A cohort of all

  17. Development and neuronal dependence of cutaneous sensory nerve formations: Lessons from neurotrophins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Juan A; Pérez-Piñera, Pablo; García-Suárez, Olivia; Cobo, Juan; Vega, Jose A

    2010-05-01

    Null mutations of genes from the NGF family of NTs and their receptors (NTRs) lead to loss/reduction of specific neurons in sensory ganglia; conversely, cutaneous overexpression of NTs results in skin hyperinnervation and increase or no changes in the number of sensory neurons innervating the skin. These neuronal changes are paralleled with loss of specific types of sensory nerve formations in the skin. Therefore, mice carrying mutations in NT or NTR genes represent an ideal model to identify the neuronal dependence of each type of cutaneous sensory nerve ending from a concrete subtype of sensory neuron, since the development, maintenance, and structural integrity of sensory nerve formations depend upon sensory neurons. Results obtained from these mouse strains suggest that TrkA positive neurons are connected to intraepithelial nerve fibers and other sensory nerve formations depending from C and Adelta nerve fibers; the neurons expressing TrkB and responding to BDNF and NT-4 innervate Meissner corpuscles, a subpopulation of Merkell cells, some mechanoreceptors of the piloneural complex, and the Ruffini's corpuscles; finally, a subpopulation of neurons, which are responsive to NT-3, support postnatal survival of some intraepithelial nerve fibers and Merkel cells in addition to the muscle mechanoreceptors. On the other hand, changes in NTs and NTRs affect the structure of non-nervous structures of the skin and are at the basis of several cutaneous pathologies. This review is an update about the role of NTs and NTRs in the maintenance of normal cutaneous innervation and maintenance of skin integrity. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Electrical nerve stimulation as an aid to the placement of a brachial plexus block : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Most local anaesthetic blocks are placed blindly, based on a sound knowledge of anatomy. Very often the relationship between the site of deposition of local anaesthetic and the nerve to be blocked is unknown. Large motor neurons may be stimulated with the aid of an electrical current. By observing for muscle twitches, through electrical stimulation of the nerve, a needle can be positioned extremely close to the nerve. The accuracy of local anaesthetic blocks can be improved by this technique. By using the lowest possible current a needle could be positioned within 2-5mm of a nerve. The correct duration of stimulation ensures that stimulation of sensory nerves does not occur. The use of electrical nerve stimulation in veterinary medicine is a novel technique that requires further evaluation.

  19. Management of painful scar-tethered cutaneous nerves of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, T A; Sierakowski, A; Elliot, D

    2017-06-01

    We report the results of treatment by division and proximal relocation of 44 painful, scar-tethered cutaneous nerves of the upper limb in 22 patients. In all patients, neuropathic pain had developed either following surgery or trauma, but without apparent direct nerve injury. The mean duration of pain symptoms prior to relocation was 17 (range 7-44) months. Adequate treatment involved relocation of 35 nerves at a first operation for each of the 22 patients, with six patients requiring further surgery to relocate 9 nerves. At a minimum follow-up of 6 months, nerve relocation resulted in complete resolution of all forms of pain at the primary site in 21/22 (95%) patients and no pain or hypersensitivity at the final relocation site in 19 of the 22 patients (86%). Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Is there a dose response of dexamethasone as adjuvant for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block? A prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabin; Richman, Kenneth A; Grodofsky, Samuel R; Bhatt, Siya; Huffman, George Russell; Kelly, John D; Glaser, David L; Elkassabany, Nabil

    2015-05-01

    The study objective is to examine the analgesic effect of 3 doses of dexamethasone in combination with low concentration local anesthetics to determine the lowest effective dose of dexamethasone for use as an adjuvant in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. The design is a prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study. The setting is an academic medical center. The patients are 89 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. All patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 4 treatment groups: (i) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL; (ii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 1-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; (iii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 2-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; and (iv) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 4-mg preservative-free dexamethasone. All patients received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks and general anesthesia. The measurements are the duration of analgesia and motor block. The median analgesia duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block with 0.25% bupivacaine was 12.1 hours; and 1-, 2-, or 4-mg dexamethasone significantly prolonged the analgesia duration to 22.3, 23.3, and 21.2 hours, respectively (P = .0105). Dexamethasone also significantly extended the duration of motor nerve block in a similar trend (P = .0247). Low-dose dexamethasone (1-2 mg) prolongs analgesia duration and motor blockade to the similar extent as 4-mg dexamethasone when added to 0.25% bupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Primary Cutaneous Carcinosarcoma: The first reported case with peripheral nerve sheath differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Yıldız

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous carcinosarcomas (CS are extremely rare biphasic tumors mainly located on sun-exposed areas. Two hypotheses–multiclonal (convergence and monoclonal (divergence- have been suggested for the evolution of the tumor. According to multiclonal hypothesis two or more stem cells of epithelial and mesenchymal origin give rise to these tumors, while a single totipotential cell differentiatiate into epithelial and mesenchymal components, either synchronously or metachronously according to monoclonal hypothesis. Cutaneous CSs are subdivided into two distinct groups as epidermal and adnexal CSs, due to their epithelial content. We present an interesting cutaneous adnexal CS, showing peripheral nerve sheath differentiation and having the spiradenocarcinoma component derived from spiradenoma. As far as we know, it is the first case of the literature with this features.

  2. Cutaneous saphenous nerve graft for the treatment of sciatic neurotmesis in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Granger, Nicolas; Moissonnier, Pierre; Fanchon, Laurent; Hidalgo, Antoine; Gnirs, Kirsten; Blot, Stephane

    2006-01-01

    Case Description—A 2-year-old Griffon Vendéen was examined because of a 1-month history of right hind limb lameness after a traumatic injury. Clinical Findings—Neurologic examination revealed monoplegia and anesthesia of the right hind limb distal to the stifle (femorotibial) joint except for the area supplied by the cutaneous saphenous nerve. Results of electromyographic testing were consistent with a severe lesion of the tibial and peroneal nerves at the level of the stifle joint. Treatment...

  3. Nerve transfer versus muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion after pan-brachial plexus injury: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Arvin R; Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Brown, Justin M; Mandeville, Ross

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Pan-brachial plexus injury (PBPI), involving C5-T1, disproportionately affects young males, causing lifelong disability and decreased quality of life. The restoration of elbow flexion remains a surgical priority for these patients. Within the first 6 months of injury, transfer of spinal accessory nerve (SAN) fascicles via a sural nerve graft or intercostal nerve (ICN) fascicles to the musculocutaneous nerve can restore elbow flexion. Beyond 1 year, free-functioning muscle transplantation (FFMT) of the gracilis muscle can be used to restore elbow flexion. The authors present the first cost-effectiveness model to directly compare the different treatment strategies available to a patient with PBPI. This model assesses the quality of life impact, surgical costs, and possible income recovered through restoration of elbow flexion. METHODS A Markov model was constructed to simulate a 25-year-old man with PBPI without signs of recovery 4.5 months after injury. The management options available to the patient were SAN transfer, ICN transfer, delayed FFMT, or no treatment. Probabilities of surgical success rates, quality of life measurements, and disability were derived from the published literature. Cost-effectiveness was defined using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) defined by the ratio between costs of a treatment strategy and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. A strategy was considered cost-effective if it yielded an ICER less than a willingness-to-pay of $50,000/QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was performed to address parameter uncertainty. RESULTS The base case model demonstrated a lifetime QALYs of 22.45 in the SAN group, 22.0 in the ICN group, 22.3 in the FFMT group, and 21.3 in the no-treatment group. The lifetime costs of income lost through disability and interventional/rehabilitation costs were $683,400 in the SAN group, $727,400 in the ICN group, $704,900 in the FFMT group, and $783,700 in the no

  4. A tool for teaching three-dimensional dermatomes combined with distribution of cutaneous nerves on the limbs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooloos, J.G.M.; Vorstenbosch, M.A.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This

  5. A Tool for Teaching Three-Dimensional Dermatomes Combined with Distribution of Cutaneous Nerves on the Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This confusion leads to the misconception that these two…

  6. Neuropraxia of the palmar cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve during carpal tunnel decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Arenas Prat, J; Sinha, S

    2005-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most commonly encountered conditions in the hand clinic and carpal tunnel decompression is the most frequently performed procedure in hand surgery. It is an effective procedure for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, there is a high risk of complications that can be avoided with an understanding of wrist anatomy, appropriate planning and execution. We highlight one such complication, a case of neuropraxia of the palmar cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve that followed carpal tunnel decompression.

  7. Functional connectivity of motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury after contralateral cervical nerve transfer: a resting-state fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Aihong; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wei; Bai, Rongjie [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Xicheng Qu, Beijing (China); Wang, Shufeng; Xue, Yunhao; Li, Wenjun [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the functional connectivity of the motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). Twelve patients with total brachial plexus root avulsion underwent RS-fMRI after contralateral C7 nerve transfer. Seventeen healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study as controls. The hand motor seed regions were defined as region of interests in the bilateral hemispheres. The seed-based functional connectivity was calculated in all the subjects. Differences in functional connectivity of the motor cortical network between patients and healthy controls were compared. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the M1 areas was increased in patients with BPAI compared with the controls. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the supplementary motor areas was reduced bilaterally. The resting-state inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the bilateral M1 areas is altered in patients after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, suggesting a functional reorganization of cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  8. Relation of Lateral Antebrachial Cutaneous Nerve to the Volar Approach to Distal Radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Valerie H; Tong, Pei Yein; Liao, Janice; Lee, Han Jing; Foo, Tun-Lin

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LABCN) in relation to volar approaches to the distal radius is not well visited. With the increasing popularity of distal radius fracture fixation with volar locking plates, it is prudent to study the innervation pattern of the LABCN to minimize the risk of nerve injury. Ten cadaveric distal radial forearms were dissected to study the relationship between the LABCN, flexor carpi radialis (FCR), superficial branch of radial nerve (SBRN), and scaphoid tubercle (ST). The LABCN coursed closer to the FCR than the SBRN, with branches traversing the tendon in two specimens. The LABCN was also noted to be intimately related to the radial artery, with an average distance of the LABCN from the lateral border of FCR was 6.4mm distally and 9.6mm proximally. There is a sparsely innervated corridor between the radial border of the FCR and terminal branches of the LABCN that provides safe access for volar approach to the distal radius.

  9. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Samini, Fariborz; Alijani, Babak; Behzadnia, Hamid; Firozabadi, Fariborz Ayati; Reihanian, Zoheir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers. Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females) consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons. PMID:27517072

  10. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Emamhadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers.   Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons.

  11. MRI-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated sitting pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Dharmdev H.; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Fritz, Jan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Del Grande, Filippo [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Radiologia, Lugano, Ticino (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Neuropathy of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may manifest as pain and paresthesia in the skin over the inferior buttocks, posterior thigh, and popliteal region. Current treatment options include physical and oral pain therapy, perineural injections, and surgical neurectomy. Perineural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief; however, to our knowledge, there is currently no minimally invasive denervation procedure for sustained pain relief that could serve as an alternative to surgical neurectomy. Percutaneous cryoablation of nerves is a minimally invasive technique that induces a sustained nerve conduction block through temporary freezing of the neural layers. It can result in long-lasting pain relief, but has not been described for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated PFCN pain. We report a technique of MR-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve resulting in successful treatment of PFCN-mediated sitting pain. Cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve seems a promising, minimally invasive treatment option that deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of objective muscle strength in C5-C6 and C5-C7 brachial plexus injury patients after double nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin; Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quantitative muscle strength to distinguish the outcomes of different injury levels in upper arm type brachial plexus injury (BPI) patients with double nerve transfer. Nine patients with C5-C6 lesions (age = 32.2 ± 13.9 year old) and nine patients with C5-C7 lesions (age = 32.4 ± 7.9 year old) received neurotization of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve combined with the Oberlin procedure (fascicles of ulnar nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve) were recruited. The average time interval between operation and evaluation were 27.3 ± 21.0 and 26.9 ± 20.6 months for C5-C6 and C5-C7, respectively. British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scores and the objective strength measured by a handheld dynamometer were evaluated in multiple muscles to compare outcomes between C5-C6 and C5-C7 injuries. There were no significant differences in BMRC scores between the groups. C5-C6 BPI patients had greater quantitative strength in shoulder flexor (P = 0.02), shoulder extensor (P C5-C7 BPI patients. Upper arm type BPI patients have a good motor recovery after double nerve transfer. The different outcomes between C5-C6 and C5-C7 BPI patients appeared in muscles responding to hand grip, wrist extension, and sagittal movements in shoulder and elbow joints. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional outcome and quality of life after traumatic total brachial plexus injury treated by nerve transfer or single/double free muscle transfers: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satbhai, N G; Doi, K; Hattori, Y; Sakamoto, S

    2016-02-01

    Between 2002 and 2011, 81 patients with a traumatic total brachial plexus injury underwent reconstruction by double free muscle transfer (DFMT, 47 cases), single muscle transfer (SMT, 16 cases) or nerve transfers (NT, 18 cases). They were evaluated for functional outcome and quality of life (QoL) using the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, both pre- and post-operatively. The three groups were compared and followed-up for at least 24 months. The mean shoulder abduction and flexion were comparable in all groups, but external rotation was significantly better in the DFMT group as were range and quantitative power of elbow flexion. Patients who had undergone DFMT had reasonable total active finger movement and hook grip strength. All groups showed improvement in function at a level greater than a minimum clinically important difference. The DFMT group showed the greatest improvement. Patients in the DFMT group had a better functional outcome and QoL recovery than those in the NT and SMT groups. Double free muscle transfer procedure is capable of restoring maximum function in patients of total brachial plexus palsy. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. A quantitative assessment of the functional recovery of flexion of the elbow after nerve transfer in patients with a brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, T J; Singh, A K; Fox, M; Sinisi, M; MacQuillan, A

    2016-11-01

    Improvements in the evaluation of outcome after nerve transfers are required. The assessment of force using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grades (0 to 5) is not suitable for this purpose. A ceiling effect is encountered within MRC grade 4/5 rendering this tool insensitive. Our aim was to show how the strength of flexion of the elbow could be assessed in patients who have undergone a re-innervation procedure using a continuous measurement scale. A total of 26 patients, 23 men and three women, with a mean age of 37.3 years (16 to 66), at the time of presentation, attended for review from a cohort of 52 patients who had undergone surgery to restore flexion of the elbow after a brachial plexus injury and were included in this retrospective study. The mean follow-up after nerve transfer was 56 months (28 to 101, standard deviation (sd) 20.79). The strength of flexion of the elbow was measured in a standard outpatient environment with a static dynamometer. In total, 21 patients (81%) gained MRC grade 4 strength of flexion of the elbow. The mean force of flexion was 7.2 kgf (3 to 15.5, sd 3.3). This study establishes that the dynamometer may be used for assessing the strength of flexion of the elbow in the outpatient department after nerve reconstructive surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1517-20. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães - 2: biópsia fascicular e histologia dos nervos radial, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs - 2: fascicular biopsy and histology of the radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi demonstrar os aspectos clínicos e neurológicos relevantes para o diagnóstico da avulsão do plexo braquial em cães, relacionando estes achados com os resultados da histologia dos nervos radiais, medianos, ulnar e músculo cutânea. A biópsia fascicular destes nervos foi realizada após abordagem cirúrgica às faces lateral e medial do braço afetado. Todos os fascículos submetidos ao exame histológico apresentaram alterações como tumefação axonal, degeneração walleriana e infiltrado inflamatório em graus variados, havendo principalmente nos nervos radial, mediano e ulnar a proliferação de colagem endoneural. A associação destes resultados com as alterações neurológicas e da eletroneuroestimulação (relatados na parte 1 e 3 deste trabalho respectivamente sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial em todos os casos.The main purposes of this work were the neurological evaluation of dogs with brachial plexus avulsion and correlation of these findings with the results of histology of the radial, median, and ulnar and muscle cutaneous nerves. Fascicular nerve biopsy was performed after surgical approach of medial and lateral aspect of the arm. Ali the submitted fascicles presented histologic alterations compatible with wallerian degeneration, axonal swelling, and inflammatory infiltrate ranging from mild to pronounced, with endoneural collagen proliferation mainly in radial, median and ulnar nerves. The association of these results with neurological and electroneurostimulation exams (respectively described in part 1 and 3 of this work suggested in all cases an almost total involvement of brachial plexus roots.

  17. Folic acid supplementation increases cutaneous vasodilator sensitivity to sympathetic nerve activity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Greaney, Jody L; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-05-01

    During heat stress, blunted increases in skin sympathetic nervous system activity (SSNA) and reductions in end-organ vascular responsiveness contribute to the age-related reduction in reflex cutaneous vasodilation. In older adults, folic acid supplementation improves the cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to passive heating; however, the influence of folic acid supplementation on SSNA:CVC transduction is unknown. Fourteen older adults (66 ± 1 yr, 8 male/6 female) ingested folic acid (5 mg/day) or placebo for 6 wk in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. In protocol 1, esophageal temperature (Tes) was increased by 1.0°C (water-perfused suit) while SSNA (peroneal microneurography) and red cell flux in the innervated dermatome (laser Doppler flowmetry; dorsum of the foot) were continuously measured. In protocol 2, two intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of the lateral calf for graded infusions of acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-10) to 10(-1) M) with and without nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blockade (20 mM nitro-l-arginine methyl ester). Folic acid improved reflex vasodilation (46 ± 4% vs. 31 ± 3% CVCmax for placebo; P Folic acid increased the slope of the SSNA-to-CVC relation (0.08 ± 0.02 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01 for placebo; P Folic acid augmented ACh-induced vasodilation (83 ± 3% vs. 66 ± 4% CVCmax for placebo; P = 0.002); however, there was no difference between treatments at the NOS-inhibited site (53 ± 4% vs. 52 ± 4% CVCmax for placebo; NS). These data demonstrate that folic acid supplementation enhances reflex vasodilation by increasing the sensitivity of skin arterioles to central sympathetic nerve outflow during hyperthermia in aged human subjects. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. A literature review of intercostal-to-musculocutaneous-nerve transfers in brachial plexus injury patients: Does body mass index influence results in Eastern versus Western countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Paez, Miguel Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Background: A wide range of results have appeared in the literature for intercostal nerve transfers in brachial plexus patients. Oriental countries generally have a lower body mass index (BMI) than their occidental counterparts. We analyzed published series of intercostal nerve transfers for elbow reinnervation to determine if a difference in outcomes exists between Eastern and Western series that could be inversely related to BMI. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted. Inclusion criteria were: (1) time from trauma to surgery <12 months, (2) minimum follow-up one year, (3) intercostal to musculocutaneous nerve transfer the only surgical procedure performed to reestablish elbow flexion, and (4) males comprising more than 75% of cases. Two groups were created: Series from western countries, including America, Europe, and Africa; and series from Asia. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to assess for the degree of correlation between percent responders and mean national BMI. Results: A total of 26 series were included, 14 from western countries and 12 from Eastern countries, encompassing a total of 274 and 432 surgical cases, respectively. The two groups were almost identical in mean age, but quite different in mean national BMI (26.3 vs. 22.5) and in the percentage of patients who achieved at least a Medical Research Council (MRC) level 3 (59.5% vs. 79.3%). Time from trauma to surgery was slightly shorter in Eastern (3.4 months) versus Western countries (5.0 months). Conclusions: The percentage of responders to intercostal to musculocutaneous nerve transfer was inversely correlated with the mean national BMI among male residents of the country where the series was performed. PMID:24381795

  19. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  20. Targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus: rationale and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonerie, Pierre; Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Dyck, P James B; Spinner, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Nerve biopsy is useful in the management of neuromuscular disorders and is commonly performed in distal, noncritical cutaneous nerves. In general, these procedures are diagnostic in only 20%-50%. In selected cases in which preoperative evaluation points toward a more localized process, targeted biopsy would likely improve diagnostic yield. The authors report their experience with targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus and provide a description of the operative technique. METHODS All cases of targeted biopsy of the brachial plexus biopsy performed between 2003 and 2015 were reviewed. Targeted nerve biopsy was performed using a supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or proximal medial arm approach. Demographic data and clinical presentation as well as the details of the procedure, adverse events (temporary or permanent), and final pathological findings were recorded. RESULTS Brachial plexus biopsy was performed in 74 patients (47 women and 27 men). The patients' mean age was 57.7 years. All patients had abnormal findings on physical examination, electrodiagnostic studies, and MRI. The overall diagnostic yield of biopsy was 74.3% (n = 55). The most common diagnoses included inflammatory demyelination (19), breast carcinoma (17), neurolymphomatosis (8), and perineurioma (7). There was a 19% complication rate; most of the complications were minor or transient, but 4 patients (5.4%) had increased numbness and 3 (4.0%) had additional weakness following biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus is an effective diagnostic procedure, and in highly selected cases should be considered as the initial procedure over nontargeted, distal cutaneous nerve biopsy. Using MRI to guide the location of a fascicular biopsy, the authors found this technique to produce a higher diagnostic yield than historical norms as well as providing justification for definitive treatment.

  1. Brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish V Khadilkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN, often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise.

  2. Variation in the termination of musculocutaneous nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas HR

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case of variation of the musculocutaneous nerve observed in a middle aged Indian male cadaver during routine educational dissection. We examined a variation in the termination of musculocutaneous nerve in right upper limb. After piercing coracobrachialis muscle musculocutaneous nerve divided into lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm and another branch that joined with median nerve below the insertion of the coracobrachialis. This abnormal branch coming from the musculocutaneous nerve had a very close oblique course over the brachial artery. Precise knowledge of variations of this report may help to plan a surgery in the region of axilla and arm, traumatology of the shoulder joint and plastic and reconstructive repair operations.

  3. Treatment response and central pain processing in Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome: An explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijckevorsel, Dagmar C; Boelens, Oliver B; Roumen, Rudi M; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H; van Goor, Harry

    2017-01-01

    10-30% of chronic abdominal pain originates in the abdominal wall. A common cause for chronic abdominal wall pain is the Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (ACNES), in which an intercostal nerve branch is entrapped in the abdominal rectus sheath. Treatment consists of local anaesthetics and neurectomy, and is ineffective in 25% of cases for yet unknown reasons. In some conditions, chronic pain is the result of altered pain processing. This so-called sensitization can manifest as segmental or even generalized hyperalgesia, and is generally difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to assess pain processing in ACNES patients responsive and refractory to treatment by using Quantitative Sensory Testing, in order to explore whether signs of altered central pain processing are present in ACNES and are a possible explanation for poor treatment outcomes. 50 patients treated for ACNES with locally orientated treatment were included. They were allocated to a responsive or refractory group based on their response to treatment. Patients showing an improvement of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain score combined with a current absolute VAS of dermatomes and at four control areas on the non-dominant side of the body, i.e. the musculus trapezius pars medialis, musculus rectus femoris, musculus abductor hallucis and the thenar. The ACNES dermatomes were chosen to signal segmental hyperalgesia and the sum of the control areas together as a reflection of generalized hyperalgesia. Lower thresholds were interpreted as signs of sensitized pain processing. To test for alterations in endogenous pain inhibition, a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) response to a cold pressor task was determined. Also, patients filled in three pain-related questionnaires, to evaluate possible influence of psychological characteristics on the experienced pain. Patients refractory to treatment showed significantly lower pressure pain thresholds in the ACNES dermatomes and for the sum of as

  4. Incidence of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropraxia after anterior approach hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Krista; Beaulé, Paul E; Kim, Paul R; Fazekas, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Although injury to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) is a known complication of anterior approaches to the hip and pelvis, no study has quantified its' incidence in anterior arthroplasty procedures. We therefore defined the incidence, functional impact, and natural history of LFCN neuropraxia after an anterior approach for both hip resurfacing (HR) and primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). We followed 132 patients who underwent an anterior hip approach (55 THA; 77 HR). We administered self-reported questionnaires for sensory deficits of LFCN, neuropathic pain score (DN4), visual analog scale, as well as SF-12, UCLA, and WOMAC scores at one year postoperatively. A subset of 60 patients (30 THA; 30 HR) was evaluated at two time intervals. One hundred seven patients (81%) reported LFCN neuropraxia with a mean severity score of 2.32/10 and a mean DN4 score of 2.42/10. Hip resurfacing had a higher incidence of neuropraxia as compared with THA: 91% versus 67%, respectively. No functional limitations were reported on SF-12, WOMAC, or UCLA scores. Of the subset of 60 patients followed over an average of 12 months, 53 (88%) reported neuropraxia at the first followup interval with only three (6%) having complete resolution at second followup. Improvement in DN4 scores was observed over time: 3.6 versus 2.5, respectively. Although LFCN neuropraxia was a frequent complication after anterior approach THA, it did not lead to functional limitations in our patients. A decrease in symptoms occurred over time but only a small number of patients reported complete resolution. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  6. Obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI, also known as birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI, is unfortunately a rather common injury in newborn children. Incidence varies between 0.15 and 3 per 1000 live births in various series and countries. Although spontaneous recovery is known, there is a large subset which does not recover and needs primary or secondary surgical intervention. An extensive review of peer-reviewed publications has been done in this study, including clinical papers, review articles and systematic review of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Causes of OBPI, indications of primary nerve surgery and secondary reconstruction of shoulder, etc. are discussed in detail. Although all affected children do not require surgery in infancy, a substantial proportion of them, however, require it and are better off for it. Secondary surgery is needed for shoulder elbow and hand problems. Results of nerve surgery are very encouraging. Children with OBPI should be seen early by a hand surgeon dealing with brachial plexus injuries. Good results are possible with early and appropriate intervention even in severe cases.

  7. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN) done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer). Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs). The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months). The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months) and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months). 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90). Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95). The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently results in early and

  8. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruquee Sajedur

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer. Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs. The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months. The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months. 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90. Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95. The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently

  9. Brachial plexopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2015-01-01

    or days/week, most physical exposures, in particular upper limb posture and repetition, were significant risk indicators with clear dose–response relationships. These findings were supported by psychophysical responses that also identified perceived work pace and the use of force as risk indicators...... occupational physical exposures and brachial plexopathy. Methods 80 patients with brachial plexopathy according to defined criteria and 65 controls of similar age and sex without upper limb complaints were recruited by general practitioners. Patients and controls completed a questionnaire on physical....... The identified psychosocial relations were limited to measures reflecting physical exposures. Conclusions While the identified risk indicators have previously been associated to upper limb symptoms as well as to diagnosed disorders other than brachial plexopathy, this study indicates an association between...

  10. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Brachial plexopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition may include: Blood tests Chest x-ray Electromyography ( EMG ) to check the muscles and nerves that control the muscles MRI of the head, neck, and shoulder Nerve conduction to check how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Nerve biopsy to examine ...

  12. Resultado da neurotização do nervo ulnar para o músculo bíceps braquial na lesão do plexo braquial Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to brachial biceps muscle in brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar de forma crítica os fatores que influenciam os resultados da neurotização do nervo ulnar no ramo motor do músculo bíceps braquial, visando a restauração da flexão do cotovelo em pacientes com lesão do plexo braquial. MÉTODOS: 19 pacientes, 18 homens e uma mulher, com idade média de 28,7 anos foram avaliados entre fevereiro de 2003 e maio de 2007. Oito pacientes apresentavam lesão das raízes C5-C6 e 11, das raízes C5-C6-C7. O intervalo de tempo médio entre a injúria e o tratamento cirúrgico foi 7,5 meses. Quatro pacientes apresentavam fraturas cervicais associadas à lesão do plexo braquial. O seguimento pós-operatório foi de 15,7 meses. RESULTADO: Oito pacientes recuperaram força de flexão do cotovelo MRC grau 4; dois, MRC grau 3 e nove, MRC OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachial biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachial biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term

  13. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7  6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p  4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02424630.

  14. Technical feasibility of robot-assisted minimally-invasive neurolysis of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh: About a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyere, A; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Vernet, P; Salazar Botero, S; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P-A

    2016-12-01

    To limit the risk of iatrogenic neuroma and recurrence after surgical treatment of meralgia paresthetica, some authors have recently developed a technique of endoscopic neurolysis of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh (LCNT) below the level of the inguinal ligament. We report the case of a robot-assisted endoscopic technique underneath the inguinal ligament. A 62-year-old patient suffering of idiopathic meralgia paresthetica for the past 18 months received a Da Vinci robot-assisted minimally-invasive 10cm long neurolysis, of which 1/3 was situated above the level of the inguinal ligament and 2/3 below it. The patient was discharged the following day without complications. At 6-months follow-up the pain was rated 0/10 compared to 5/10 pre-operatively. Robot-assisted endoscopic neurolysis of the LCNT retains the advantages of conventional endoscopy and enables to approach the nerve in the most frequently compressed zone underneath the inguinal ligament. The three-dimensional view offered by robotic surgery facilitates the dissection. The superiority of this technique remains to be demonstrated by comparing it to conventional techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuropraxia of the cutaneous nerve of the cervical plexus after shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Soo; Kim, Yee-Suk

    2005-05-01

    This article presents uncommon cases of neuropraxia of the lesser occipital nerve and the greater auricular nerve after arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder in the beach-chair position under general anesthesia. The lesser occipital nerve and the greater auricular nerve are superficial ascending branches of the cervical plexus. These 2 superficial nerves may be easily vulnerable because of their superficial anatomic locations. We assumed that the severity of the neuropraxia of superficial branches of the cervical plexus was related to the degree of rotation and deviation of the head and neck, the duration of the procedure, and compression by head strap and elastic bandage used for fixing the head to the rectangular-shaped headrest of the beach-chair device. We recommend that during surgery in the beach-chair position, the auricle be protected and covered with cotton and gauze to avoid direct compression and the position of the head and neck be checked and corrected frequently. We hope for a new design of the headrest of the beach-chair device to prevent neuropraxia and to attach the head firmly and safely.

  16. Examining communication between ultraviolet (UV)-damaged cutaneous nerve cells and epidermal keratinocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J V; Holtz, R

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of the skin to Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a stressful event and the skin has multiple innate defense mechanisms to counter this threat. For instance, oxidatively damaged nerve cells will express neuroglobin, a hexa-coordinate heme protein, to scavenge free radicals such as nitric oxide (NO). Likewise, keratinocytes will express various anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), which will defend the cells against oxidative threats. Nonetheless, cells will still express free radicals during excessive irradiation. A fundamental question that needs to be asked is: what do these cells communicate to one another during such stressful events? This paper will present results of an in vitro study in which dorsal root ganglion were irradiated with UV radiation to elicit oxidative events such as release of NO and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent neuropeptide. Cell survival was also examined using the standard MTT assay. A plant-based neuroglobin mimic called phytoglobin was used as an NO scavenger to see if control of NO would influence CGRP expression and cell survival. Results of this study demonstrate that control of NO expression in irradiated nerve cells can influence CGRP expression and can also increase cell survival rates. Following this preliminary study, controlled amounts of the nerve cell growth media were added to cultures of normal human keratinocytes and the keratinocytes were allowed to interact with the nerve cell media for 24 h. Following this treatment period, human microarrays were run on the keratinocytes to see what genes were influenced in the keratinocytes as a result of contact with the irradiated nerve cell growth media. It was found that several critical genes expressed by the keratinocytes including NO synthase (NOS1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), transglutaminase 1 and 3 (TGM1 and TGM3), metallopeptidase inhibitor 1 (TIMP1), and filaggrin (FLG) were clearly influenced by the damaged nerve cells.

  17. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy : impact throughout the lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van der M.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is a nerve injury to the brachial plexus which controls arm-movements. This thesis describes the impact of this injury on the lives of patients in terms of quality of life, participation, healthcare use and treatment outcomes. Findings in this thesis

  18. hoarseness and Horner's after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to compressive effects on the axillary fascial sheath. However, further studies are required to prove this. Keywords: combined incidence, Horner's syndrome, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Introduction. Supraclavicular block is performed at the level of divisions of the brachial plexus.

  19. [Ultrasound-guided cutaneous intercostal branches nerves block: A good analgesic alternative for gallbladder open surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Martín, M T; López Álvarez, S; Mozo Herrera, G; Platero Burgos, J J

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases. However, there are still some patients for whom conversion to open surgery is required. This surgery can produce significant post-operative pain. Opioids drugs have traditionally been used to treat this pain, but side effects have led to seeking alternatives (plexus, nerve or fascia blocks or wound). The cases are presented of 4 patients subjected to ultrasound-guided intercostal branches blocks in the mid-axillary line from T6 to T12 with levobupivacaine as an analgesic alternative in open surgery of gallbladder, with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accelerates cutaneous wound healing and inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgen, Seren Gülşen; Sayın, Oya; Cetin, Ferihan; Tuç Yücel, Ayşe

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and other common treatment methods used in the process of wound healing in terms of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the study, 24 female and 24 male adult Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups: (1) the non-wounded group having no incision wounds, (2) the control group having incision wounds, (3) the TENS (2 Hz, 15 min) group, (4) the physiological saline (PS) group and (5) the povidone iodine (PI) group. In the skin sections, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical methods. In the non-wounded group, the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α signaling molecules was weaker in the whole tissue; however, in the control group, significant inflammatory response occurred, and strong cytokine expression was observed in the dermis, granulation tissue, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands (P TENS group, the decrease in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 immunoreaction in the skin was significant compared to the other forms of treatment (P TENS group suggest that TENS shortened the healing process by inhibating the inflammation phase.

  1. Acute Appendicitis, Somatosensory Disturbances ("Head Zones"), and the Differential Diagnosis of Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (ACNES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumen, Rudi M H; Vening, Wouter; Wouda, Rosanne; Scheltinga, Marc M

    2017-06-01

    Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES) is a neuropathic abdominal wall pain syndrome typically characterized by locally altered skin sensations. On the other hand, visceral disease may also be associated with similar painful and altered skin sensations ("Head zones"). Aim of the study was to determine if patients with acute appendicitis demonstrated somatosensory disturbances in the corresponding right lower quadrant Head zone. The presence of somatosensory disturbances such as hyperalgesia, hypoesthesia, altered cool perception, or positive pinch test was determined in 100 patients before and after an appendectomy. Potential associations between altered skin sensations and various items including age, sex, history, body temperature, C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocyte count, and type of appendicopathy (normal, inflamed, necrotic, or perforated) were assessed. A total of 39 patients demonstrated at least one right lower abdominal quadrant skin somatosensory disturbance before the laparoscopic appendectomy. However, locoregional skin sensation normalized in all but 2 patients 2 weeks postoperatively. No differences were found concerning patient characteristics or type of appendicopathy between populations with or without altered lower abdominal skin sensations. A substantial portion of patients with acute appendicitis demonstrate right lower abdominal somatosensory disturbances that are similar as observed in acute ACNES. Both may be different sides of the same coin and are possibly expressions of segmental phenomena as described by Head. McBurney's point, a landmark area of maximum pain in acute appendicitis, is possibly a trigger point within a Head zone. Differentiating acute appendicitis from acute ACNES is extremely difficult, but imaging and observation may aid in the diagnostic process.

  2. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  3. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayram Kelle; Filiz Koc

    2012-01-01

    Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000): 247-250

  4. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  5. Microanatomy of the brachial plexus roots and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Ping; Hong, Li; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Xian-Qin; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To provide the anatomical basis of brachial plexus roots for the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion injury. The morphological features of brachial plexus roots were observed and measured on 15 cervicothoracic spine of adult cadavers. The relationship of brachial plexus nerve roots and the surrounding tissues also were observed, as well as the blood supply of anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus. Origination of the nerve roots in the dorsal-ventral direction from the midline was fine-tuned at each level along the spinal cord. The minimum distance of the origin of the nerve root to midline was 2.2 mm at C 5, while the maximum was 3.1 mm at T 1. Inversely, the distance between the origin of the posterior root and the midline of the spinal cord gradually decreased, the maximum being 4.2 mm at C 5 and minimum 2.7 mm at T 1. Meanwhile, there was complicated fibrous connection among posterior roots of the brachial plexus. The C 5-6 nerve roots interlaced with tendons of the scalenus anterior and scalenus medius and fused with the transverse-radicular ligaments in the intervertebral foramina. However, these ligaments were not seen in C 7-8, and T 1. The blood supply of the anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus was from the segmental branches of the vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery, with a mean outer diameter of 0.61 mm. The systematic and comprehensive anatomic data of the brachial plexus roots provides the anatomical basis to diagnose and treat the brachial plexus root avulsion injury.

  6. Variations in branching of the posterior cord of brachial plexus in a Kenyan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matakwa Ludia C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the branching of posterior cord are important during surgical approaches to the axilla and upper arm, administration of anesthetic blocks, interpreting effects of nervous compressions and in repair of plexus injuries. The patterns of branching show population differences. Data from the African population is scarce. Objective To describe the branching pattern of the posterior cord in a Kenyan population. Materials and methods Seventy-five brachial plexuses from 68 formalin fixed cadavers were explored by gross dissection. Origin and order of branching of the posterior cord was recorded. Representative photographs were then taken using a digital camera (Sony Cybershot R, W200, 7.2 Megapixels. Results Only 8 out of 75 (10.7% posterior cords showed the classical branching pattern. Forty three (57.3% lower subscapular, 8(10.3% thoracodorsal and 8(10.3% upper subscapular nerves came from the axillary nerve instead of directly from posterior cord. A new finding was that in 4(5.3% and in 3(4% the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm respectively originated from the posterior cord in contrast to their usual origin from the medial cord. Conclusions Majority of posterior cords in studied population display a wide range of variations. Anesthesiologists administering local anesthetic blocks, clinicians interpreting effects of nerve injuries of the upper limb and surgeons operating in the axilla should be aware of these patterns to avoid inadvertent injury. A wider study of the branching pattern of infraclavicular brachial plexus is recommended.

  7. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the...

  8. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Brachial plexus 3D reconstruction from MRI with dissection validation: a baseline study for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Bogaert, Stephanie; Vandemaele, Pieter; Huysse, Wouter; Achten, Eric; Leijnse, Joris; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to establish a baseline for detailed 3D brachial plexus reconstruction from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Concretely, the goal was to determine the individual brachial plexus anatomy with maximum detail and accuracy achievable, as yet irrespective of whether the methods used could be economically and practically applied in the clinical setting. Six embalmed cadavers were randomly taken for MRI imaging of the brachial plexus. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) segmentation for all brachial plexus parts was done. The 2D brachial plexus segmentations were 3D reconstructed using Mimics(®) software. Then, these 3D reconstructions were anatomically validated by dissection of the cadavers. After finalising the cadaver experiments, brachial plexus MRIs were obtained in three healthy male volunteers and the same reconstruction procedure as in vitro was followed. A procedure was developed for brachial plexus 3D reconstruction based on MRI without the use of any contrast agent. Anatomical validation of six cadaver brachial plexus reconstructions showed high correspondence with the dissected brachial plexuses. Anatomical variations of the main branches were equally present in the 3D reconstructions generated. However, there were also some differences that related to the difference between the surface anatomy of the nerve and the internal nerve structure. In vivo, it was possible to reconstruct the complete brachial plexus in such a manner that normal-appearing BPs were derived in a reproducible way. This study showed that the described procedure results in accurate and reproducible brachial plexus 3D reconstructions.

  10. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a result of shoulder trauma, tumors, or inflammation. There is a rare syndrome called Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, or brachial plexitis , which ... as a result of shoulder trauma, tumors, or inflammation. There is a rare syndrome called Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, or brachial plexitis , which ...

  11. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Yalcin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture.

  12. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  13. Ultrasonography for neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob Rahul; DiPietro, Michael A; Somashekar, Deepak; Parmar, Hemant A; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonography has previously been reported for use in the evaluation of compressive or traumatic peripheral nerve pathology and for its utility in preoperative mapping. However, these studies were not performed in infants, and they were not focused on the brachial plexus. The authors report a case in which ultrasonography was used to improve operative management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). An infant boy was born at term, complicated by right-sided shoulder dystocia. Initial clinical evaluation revealed proximal arm weakness consistent with an upper trunk injury. Unlike MRI or CT myelography that focus on proximal nerve roots, ultrasonography of the brachial plexus in the supraclavicular fossa was able to demonstrate a small neuroma involving the upper trunk (C-5 and C-6) and no asymmetry in movement of the diaphragm or in the appearance of the rhomboid muscle when compared with the unaffected side. However, the supra- and infraspinatus muscles were significantly asymmetrical and atrophied on the affected side. Importantly, ultrasound examination of the shoulder revealed posterior glenohumeral laxity. Instead of pursuing the primary nerve reconstruction first, timely treatment of the shoulder subluxation prevented formation of joint dysplasia and formation of a false glenoid, which is a common sequela of this condition. Because the muscles innervated by proximal branches of the cervical nerve roots/trunks were radiographically normal, subsequent nerve transfers were performed and good functional results were achieved. The authors believe this to be the first report describing the utility of ultrasonography in the surgical treatment planning in a case of NBPP. Noninvasive imaging, in addition to thorough history and physical examination, reduces the intraoperative time required to determine the extent and severity of nerve injury by allowing improved preoperative planning of the surgical strategy. Inclusion of ultrasonography as a preoperative

  14. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasin...

  15. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, New Delhi (India). NMR Research Center); Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1989-11-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.).

  16. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia.

  17. Postoperative Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Damage,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-28

    the median nerve, 32 cases involved the radial nerves, seven cases involved fibular nerves and one case involved femoral nerves. Follow up visits ranged...Satisfactory. 7. Poor. 8. Percentage outstanding or excellent. 9. Brachial plexus. 10. Ulnar nerve. 11. Median nerve. 12. Radial nerve. 13. Fibular nerve...sufficient oxygen, thus attaining the treatment objective of improving or correcting oxygen deficiency state. The axons of the peripheral nerves do not hav-ý

  18. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  19. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  20. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, Sho; Hara, Yuki; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Hara, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tanefumi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enla...

  1. Surgical significance of brachial arterial variants in a Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was a cadaveric dissection study of 162 upper limbs at the Department of Human Anatomy University of Nairobi, Kenya. The brachial artery was exposed entirely from the lower border of teres major to its point of termination. The course in relation to the median nerve and the level of termination were recorded ...

  2. Transarterial Brachial Plexus Anaesthesia for Upper Limb Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We present our experience with the transarterial brachial plexus anaesthesia as a technique of choice for upper limb procedure in developing countries where nerve stimulator may not be readily available. Methods: For all consenting patients, the axillary block was instituted using a 23G hypodermic needle and ...

  3. Lipomas of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Alexander; Yang, Kai; King, David; Dzwierzynski, William; Sanger, James; Hettinger, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Lipomas are common benign tumors. When they develop in proximity to peripheral nerves, they can cause neurologic symptoms secondary to mass effect. Previous reports have shown symptom resolution after removal of lipomas compressing various upper extremity peripheral nerves. However, brachial plexus lipomas are relatively rare. Our multidisciplinary experience with brachial plexus lipoma resection is reviewed in the largest case series to date. A retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection of brachial plexus lipomatous tumors between 2006 and 2016 was performed. Patient demographic data, diagnostic imaging, clinical presentation, operative details, surgical pathology, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Twelve brachial plexus lipomatous tumors were resected in 11 patients: 10 lipomas, 1 hibernoma, and 1 atypical lipomatous tumor. The most common tumor location was supraclavicular (50%), followed by axillary (42%), and proximal medial arm (8%). The most common brachial plexus segment involved was the upper trunk (50%), followed by posterior cord (25%), lateral pectoral nerve (8%), lower trunk (8%), and proximal median nerve (8%). Most patients presented with an enlarging painless mass (58%). Of the patients who presented with neurologic symptoms, symptoms resolved in the majority (80%). Brachial plexus lipomas are rare causes of compression neuropathy in the upper extremity. Careful resection and knowledge of brachial plexus anatomy, which may be distorted by the tumor, are critical to achieving a successful surgical outcome with predictable symptom resolution. Finally, surveillance magnetic resonance imaging may be warranted for atypical lesions.

  4. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  5. Perineural spread of melanoma to the brachial plexus: identifying the anatomic pathway(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Tomas; Laughlin, Ruple S; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-08

    Perineural spread of melanoma is a well-known mechanism of metastasis in cases involving cranial nerves. Brachial plexus involvement is rare and the pathway is unknown. A retrospective review of the Mayo Clinic database was performed to identify patients with a history of melanoma and brachial plexus compromise between 1994 and 2017. Inclusion criteria were a history of melanoma, a clinical diagnosis of brachial plexopathy, radiological features consistent with perineural spread and biopsy of melanoma within nerve. We identified 42 cases, 24 men and 18 women with a median age of 61 years (37 - 84 years) with a history of melanoma and a brachial plexopathy. After review of their clinical information, 2 cases fulfilled inclusion criteria. Both patients presented with progressive brachial plexopathy and imaging studies revealed features consistent with perineural spread. In 40 excluded cases, brachial plexopathy was caused by: metastasis to axillary lymph nodes (n = 11); trauma (n = 8); post-surgical sequelae (n = 7); tumors other than melanoma (n = 5); inflammation (n = 5); radiation (n = 2); a combination of radiation and post-surgical changes (n = 1); and radiculopathy (n = 1). The 2 identified cases both showed similar clinical and radiological features. We believe that there is a pattern of perineural spread to the brachial plexus through the cervical plexus. Literature review shows several recently published cases demonstrating an analogous mechanism of melanoma spread involving upper cervical nerves which supports our proposed pathway. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  7. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali, E-mail: vshali77@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Upadhyaya, Divya N. [Department of Plastic Surgery, King George Medical University, Shah Meena Road, Chowk, Lucknow 226 003 (India); Kumar, Adarsh [Department of Plastic Surgery, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Gujral, Ratni B. [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • MR neurography is the imaging modality of choice in patients who have sustained brachial plexus injury. It is helpful in determining the level and extent of injury. • The authors have used a Visual Per-operative Scoring system to assess the usefulness of MR neurography in delineating the level and type of the lesion. • The imaging findings were classified based on the level of injury—root, trunk or cord. These findings were correlated with those seen on surgical exploration. A good correlation was found in the majority (65%) of patients and average correlation (30%) in others. - Abstract: Objectives: Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Methods: Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus—roots, trunks and cords. Results: Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative

  8. Multiple polymerase chain reaction markers for the differentiation of canine cutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumours versus canine fibrosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Klopfleisch, R

    2014-01-01

    Currently canine fibrosarcomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) are differentiated by their histopathological phenotype. Preliminary global transcriptomic analysis has identified genes with significant differential expression in both tumour types that may act as potential tumour markers. The aim of the present study was to establish reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays for the differentiation of formalin-fixed and paraffin wax-embedded tumours of both types. Fifty histologically well-defined examples of canine fibrosarcomas and PNSTs were characterized immunohistochemically for the expression of S100, laminin and PGP 9.5. RT-PCR assays for the potential fibrosarcoma markers FHL2-Ex4 and FHL2-Ex9 and the PNST markers GLI1 and CLEC3B were established and tested for their specificity and sensitivity to differentiate fibrosarcomas and PNSTs by their mRNA expression. Immunohistochemical analysis challenged the value of S100, laminin and PGP 9.5 for the diagnosis of PNSTs, since both PNSTs and fibrosarcomas showed similar expression of these proteins. In contrast, a combination of the markers GLI1 and CLEC3B differentiated PNSTs from fibrosarcomas with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 87%. The proposed fibrosarcoma markers FHL2-Ex4 and FHL2-Ex9 failed to separate PNSTs and fibrosarcomas (sensitivity 50%, specificity 88%). The failure of these markers to unequivocally separate fibrosarcomas and PNSTs raises questions as to whether histologically uniform PNSTs are less uniform at the molecular level than expected or if both tumour types, despite their different morphology, are more closely related in terms of their histogenesis than previously thought. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Utility of ultrasound in noninvasive preoperative workup of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Di Pietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound has been utilized in the evaluation of compressive and traumatic peripheral nerve pathology. To determine whether US can provide comprehensive evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in the setting of neonatal brachial plexus palsy and whether this information can be used to guide preoperative nerve reconstruction strategies. In this retrospective cohort study, preoperative brachial plexus ultrasonography was performed in 52 children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who were being considered for surgery. The 33 children who had surgery compose the patient cohort. The presence and location of post-ganglionic neuromas were evaluated by US and compared to the surgical findings. US evaluation of shoulder muscle atrophy was conducted as an indirect way to assess the integrity of nerves. Finally, we correlated glenohumeral joint laxity to surgical and clinical management. Ultrasound correctly identified 21 of 25 cases of upper trunk and middle trunk neuroma involvement (84% sensitivity for each). It was 68% sensitive and 40% specific in detection of lower trunk involvement. US identified shoulder muscle atrophy in 11 of 21 children evaluated; 8 of these 11 went on to nerve transfer procedures based upon the imaging findings. US identified 3 cases of shoulder joint laxity of the 13 children evaluated. All 3 cases were referred for orthopedic evaluation, with 1 child undergoing shoulder surgery and another requiring casting. Ultrasound can provide useful preoperative evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  10. The current role of diagnostic imaging in the preoperative workup for refractory neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Wilson, Thomas J; DiPietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent improvements in perinatal care, the incidence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains relatively common. CT myelography is currently considered to be the optimal imaging modality for evaluating nerve root integrity. Recent improvements in MRI techniques have made it an attractive alternative to evaluate nerve root avulsions (preganglionic injuries). We demonstrate the utility of MRI for the evaluation of normal and avulsed spinal nerve roots. We also show the utility of ultrasound in providing useful preoperative evaluation of the postganglionic brachial plexus in patients with NBPP.

  11. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  12. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  13. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  14. Brachial Plexus Lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick

    patient showed paralysis of all muscles of the shoulder and muscles of the anterior compartment of the arm. This clinical ... patient had paralysis of muscles of the hand being innerved by median nerve or ulna nerve. He showed also ... This a temporary condition where the muscle regains complete function. Injury of the ...

  15. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Coroneos, Christopher J.; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R.; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and childr...

  16. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  17. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  18. Restoration of motor control and proprioceptive and cutaneous sensation in humans with prior upper-limb amputation via multiple Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) implanted in residual peripheral arm nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelken, Suzanne; Page, David M; Davis, Tyler; Wark, Heather A C; Kluger, David T; Duncan, Christopher; Warren, David J; Hutchinson, Douglas T; Clark, Gregory A

    2017-11-25

    Despite advances in sophisticated robotic hands, intuitive control of and sensory feedback from these prostheses has been limited to only 3-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) with 2 sensory percepts in closed-loop control. A Utah Slanted Electrode Array (USEA) has been used in the past to provide up to 81 sensory percepts for human amputees. Here, we report on the advanced capabilities of multiple USEAs implanted in the residual peripheral arm nerves of human amputees for restoring control of 5 DOF and sensation of up to 131 proprioceptive and cutaneous hand sensory percepts. We also demonstrate that USEA-restored sensory percepts provide a useful source of feedback during closed-loop virtual prosthetic hand control. Two 100-channel USEAs were implanted for 4-5 weeks, one each in the median and ulnar arm nerves of two human subjects with prior long-duration upper-arm amputations. Intended finger and wrist positions were decoded from neuronal firing patterns via a modified Kalman filter, allowing subjects to control many movements of a virtual prosthetic hand. Additionally, USEA microstimulation was used to evoke numerous sensory percepts spanning the phantom hand. Closed-loop control was achieved by stimulating via an electrode of the ulnar-nerve USEA while recording and decoding movement via the median-nerve USEA. Subjects controlled up to 12 degrees-of-freedom during informal, 'freeform' online movement decode sessions, and experienced up to 131 USEA-evoked proprioceptive and cutaneous sensations spanning the phantom hand. Independent control was achieved for a 5-DOF real-time decode that included flexion/extension of the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers, and the wrist. Proportional control was achieved for a 4-DOF real-time decode. One subject used a USEA-evoked hand sensation as feedback to complete a 1-DOF closed-loop virtual-hand movement task. There were no observed long-term functional deficits due to the USEA implants. Implantation of high-channel-count USEAs

  19. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  20. Origem e distribuição do plexo braquial de Saimiri sciureus Origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of Saimiri sciureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenara B. Araújo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descreveram a origem e composição do plexo braquial de quatro Saimiri sciureus, pertencentes ao Centro Nacional de Primatas (Cenp, Ananindeua/PA, os quais foram fixados com formaldeído e dissecados. Os achados revelaram que o plexo braquial desta espécie é constituído por fibras neurais provenientes da união das raízes dorsais e ventrais das vértebras cervicais C4 a C8 e torácica T1, e organizado em quatro troncos. Cada tronco formou um nervo ou um grupo de nervos, cuja origem variou entre os animais; na maioria, foi encontrado o tronco cranial originando o nervo subclávio, o tronco médio-cranial dando origem aos nervos supraescapular, subescapular, parte do radial, e em alguns casos ao nervo axilar, nervo musculocutâneo e ao nervo mediano; o tronco médio-caudal formou parte do nervo radial, e em alguns casos os nervos axilar, nervo musculocutâneo, nervo mediano, nervo toracodorsal, nervo ulnar e nervo cutâneo medial do antebraço, sendo os dois últimos também originados no tronco caudal.The authors described the origin and composition of the brachial plexus of four Saimiri sciureus, from the National Primate Center (Cenp, Ananindeua/PA, which were fixed with formaldehyde and dissected. Findings revealed that the brachial plexus of this species is composed by nervous fibers from the roots of cervical vertebrae C4 to C8 and thoracic vertebrae T1, and organized into four branchs. Each branch has formed a nerve or a group of nerves, the origin was varied between animals, mostly were found the cranial trunk originate the subclavian nerve; the medium-cranial originate the suprascapular, subscapular, part of radial and in some cases the axillary, musculocutaneous and median nerves; the medium-caudal trunk originate part of radial nerve and in some cases the axillary, musculocutaneous, median, thoracodorsal, ulnar and medial cutaneous of forearm nerves, the last two nerves also originate from the caudal trunk.

  1. VARIATION IN THE FORMATION AND INNERVATION OF THE MEDIAN NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Rao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the anatomy of brachial plexus are common. So is the median nerve anatomy. K nowledge of the variations contributes to the surgeons planning and curative intent during surgical repair of the Median nerve deficiencies. During routine brachial p lexus dissections of cadavers for undergraduate students a variation of formation and innervations by the median nerve was identified at our department of anatomy , Rangaraya medical college, kakinada. A total of forty two brachial plexuses were explored an d a variation in a male body on the left side was noted.

  2. Anatomical characteristics of the brachial plexus of the maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus Illiger, 1811

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessica Ariane de Melo Cruz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Eight male and female maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus cadavers, previously fixed in formalin, were used to identify the origin of the brachial plexus, nerves and innervation territory in order to determine an anatomical pattern for this species. The plexus of B. torquatus was derived from the C7 to C10 and T1 to T2 spinal nerves, but the participation of T2 was variable. The spinal nerves gave origin to the cranial and caudal trunks, which joined to form a common trunk, from which two fascicles were formed. All the nerves from the brachial plexus were originated from these two fascicles, except the thoracic, long pectoral and suprascapular nerves, which arose before the formation of the common trunk. The organization of the brachial plexus into trunks and fascicles, and subsequent origin of peripheral nerves, demonstrates that most of the spinal nerves contribute to the composition of the peripheral nerves and the possibility that lesions or traumatic injuries would damage most of the thoracic member.

  3. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  4. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  5. Anatomy of axillary nerve and its clinical importance: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurushantappa, Prakash Kuppasad; Kuppasad, Saniya

    2015-03-01

    Axillary nerve is one of the terminal branches of posterior cord of brachial plexus, which is most commonly injured during numerous orthopaedic surgeries, during shoulder dislocation & rotator cuff tear. All these possible iatrogenic injuries are because of lack of awareness of anatomical variations of the nerve. Therefore, it is very much necessary to explore its possible variations and guide the surgeons to enhance the better clinical outcome by reducing the risk and complications. Twenty five cadavers (20 Males & 05 Females) making 50 specimens including both right and left sides were dissected as per standard dissection methods to find the origin, course, branches, distribution & exact location of the nerve beneath the deltoid muscle from important landmarks like: posterolateral aspect of acromion process, anteromedial aspect of tip of coracoid process, midpoint of deltoid muscle insertion (deltoid tuberosity of humerus) and from the midpoint of vertical length of deltoid muscle. The measurements were recorded and tabulated. The measurements were entered in Microsoft excel and mean, proportion, standard deviation were calculated by using SPSS 16th version. The axillary nerve was found to take origin from the posterior cord of brachial plexus (100%) dividing into anterior & posterior branches in Quadrangular space (88%) and supply deltoid muscle mainly. It also gave branches to teres minor muscle, shoulder joint capsule & superolateral brachial cutaneous nerve (100%). This study concluded that the mean distance of axillary nerve from the - anteromedial aspect of tip of coracoid process, posterolateral aspect of acromion process, midpoint of deltoid insertion & from the midpoint of vertical length of deltoid muscle measured to be (in cm) as 3.56±0.51, 7.4±0.99, 6.7±0.47 & 2.45±0.48 respectively. The mean vertical distance of entering point of axillary nerve from the anterior upper, mid middle upper & posterior upper deltoid border found to be (in cm): 4.94±0

  6. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  7. Acute brachial diplegia due to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorson, Kenneth C; Kolb, David A; Marks, Donald S; Hayes, Michael T; Baquis, George D

    2011-01-01

    to describe acute brachial diplegia as the initial manifestation of Lyme disease. bilateral, predominantly motor, cervical radiculoplexus neuropathy, the "dangling arm syndrome," has not been reported as a complication of acute Lyme infection. retrospective series of 5 patients from 2 tertiary neuromuscular centers. there were 4 men and 1 woman with an average age of 69 years. One recalled a tick bite, and preceding constitutional symptoms included headache (2) and fever, arthralgias, and fatigue in 1 patient each. Proximal arm weakness and acute pain developed within 3 weeks from onset; pain was bilateral in 3 patients and unilateral in 2 patients, and was described as severe throbbing. Arm weakness was bilateral at onset in 3 patients, and right sided in 2 patients followed by spread to the left arm within days. All the patients had weakness in the deltoid and biceps that was 3/5 or less (Medical Research Council scale), with variable weakness of the triceps and wrist extensors; 1 patient had a flail right arm and moderate (4/5) weakness of the proximal left arm muscles. Light touch was normal in the regions of weakness, and 1 patient had mildly reduced pin sensation over the forearm. Serum IgM Lyme titers were elevated in all the patients and were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid in 4 tested patients. The cerebrospinal fluid protein ranged between 135 and 176 mg/dL with lymphocytic pleocytosis (range, 42 to 270 cells). Electrodiagnostic studies showed normal median and ulnar motor potentials with asymmetrically reduced sensory amplitudes in the median (4), ulnar (3), and radial, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous potentials in 1 patient each. Two patients had acute denervation in the cervical or proximal arm muscles. There was full recovery after antibiotic therapy in 4 patients and considerable improvement in 1 patient after 2 months. acute brachial diplegia is a rare manifestation of acute Lyme infection and responds promptly to antibiotic therapy.

  8. Platysma motor branch transfer in brachial plexus repair: report of the first case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertelli Jayme

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nerve transfers are commonly employed in the treatment of brachial plexus injuries. We report the use of a new donor for transfer, the platysma motor branch. Methods A patient with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus and phrenic nerve paralysis had the suprascapular nerve neurotized by the accessory nerve, half of the hypoglossal nerve transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve, and the platysma motor branch connected to the medial pectoral nerve. Results The diameter of both the platysma motor branch and the medial pectoral nerve was around 2 mm. Eight years after surgery, the patient recovered 45° of abduction. Elbow flexion and shoulder adduction were rated as M4, according to the BMC. There was no deficit after the use of the above-mentioned nerves for transfer. Volitional control was acquired for independent function of elbow flexion and shoulder adduction. Conclusion The use of the platysma motor branch seems promising. This nerve is expendable; its section led to no deficits, and the relearning of motor control was not complicated. Further anatomical and clinical studies would help to clarify and confirm the usefulness of the platysma motor branch as a donor for nerve transfer.

  9. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  10. Anatomic Variations in the Palmar Cutaneous Branch of the Median ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysesthesias due to palmar cutaneous branch of median nerve injuries infrequently follow carpal tunnel release surgeries. Objective: To determine the course of palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve in wrist of adult Nigerians, identify the common variations, determine its relations to the palmaris longus (PL) in the ...

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mürtz, P., E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, M., E-mail: Marius.Kaschner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lakghomi, A., E-mail: Asadeh.Lakghomi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J., E-mail: juergen.gieseke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Philips Healthcare, Lübeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, W.A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus.

  12. Ulnar nerve contribution in the innervation of the triceps brachii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ulnar nerve is considered the thickest terminal branch of the medial cord in the brachial plexus and most authors does not mention the possibility of this nerve emitting branches to the arm. However, some studies reported that the ulnar nerve could supply the medial head of triceps brachii muscle. The main objective in ...

  13. Nerve identification and prevention of intraneural injection in regional anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayeri, N.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with techniques to more reliably identify nervous structures and subsequently prevent intraneural injection in the practice of regional anesthesia. To identify nerves of the brachial plexus and sciatic nerve, both conventional techniques such as nerve stimulation, as well as

  14. Oral administration of milk-derived phospholipids inhibits penetration of cutaneous nerve fibres into epidermis in a mouse model of acute dry skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, A; Kamata, Y; Takahashi, N; Matsuda, H; Kosaka, R; Umehara, Y; Ogawa, H; Tominaga, M; Takamori, K

    2017-09-20

    The density of intraepidermal nerve fibres has been shown to be higher in itchy dry skin than in healthy skin, suggesting that epidermal hyperinnervation is at least partly involved in peripheral itch sensitization. We investigated whether oral administration of milk-derived phospholipids (MPLs) would inhibit epidermal hyperinnervation in a mouse model of dry skin. We found that the number of intraepidermal nerve fibres was significantly lower in the MPL group than in the control group. Expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the epidermis was significantly decreased by oral administration of MPLs, whereas expression of semaphorin (Sema)3A, a nerve repulsion factor, was increased in the MPL group. These results suggest that dietary MPLs attenuate the penetration of nerve fibres into the epidermis by reducing epidermal NGF levels and increasing Sema3A level. Thus, dietary MPLs may have beneficial effects in the prevention and/or alleviation of dry skin-induced itch by reducing intraepidermal nerve fibre density. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  16. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  17. Cutaneous leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh V; Kumar Joginder

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACTLeishmaniasis is considered to be zoonotic disease, caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania, and transmitted by a bite of infected female sandfly. Primary cutaneous leishmaniasis is not common disease in Nepal, however, there were cases reported from Terai region of Nepal. The patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis present with a papule or nodule at the site of inoculation, followed by formation of crusts. Differential diagnoses of cutaneous leishmaniasis include variety...

  18. [Surgical anatomy of the sural nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamim, A C; Tuma Júnior, P; Grillo, M A; Ferreira, M C

    1995-01-01

    The sural nerve is generally used as a graft in nervous reconstructions due to its easy access and minimal sequelae after its withdrawal. Although this nerve presents a constancy in its topographical localization, anatomical variations are frequent. Thus, trying to determine the formation pattern of the sural nerve complex, 38 legs from 19 cadaveres were dissected. The data obtained differ from those of the literature as to the frequency of the occurrence of the two classically known patter (pattern I and II). Besides, it was possible to identify two other paterns (pattern III and IV) of the sural nerve formation not yet described The cutaneous nerve and the comunicating peroneal nerve were found in 21% of the cases. In the literature, the frequency is of 65.8% to 80%. Pattern II, where the sural nerve is originated from the medial sural cutaneous nerve, was identified in 52.6% of cases, while in the literature its frequency is of 20 to 34.2%. Pattern III, not yet described in the literature, had the sural nerve coming from the junction between the medial sural cutaneous nerve and the lateral sural cutaneous one, with a frequency of 21% of the cases. Pattern IV, also not yet described in the literature, had the sural nerve originated from the common fibular nerve in 5.2% of patients. It was also possible to identify in the sample the presence of the lateral sural cutaneous nerve (branch of the common fibular nerve) and of the peroneal communicating nerve (branch of the lateral sural cutaneous nerve) with anatomical characteristics indicating them as an alternative source of nerve grafts.

  19. STUDY OF COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN MUSCULOCUTANEOUS NERVE AND MEDIAN NERVE IN ADULT CADAVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangulappa Derangula

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Variations of the musculocutaneous nerve and the median nerve, like the communications between the two, may prove valuable in the traumatology of the shoulder joint and upper arm region. These variations are important in the procedure of blocking the brachial plexus and in clinical neurology. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted on 100 upper limbs belonging to 50 cadavers (Right 50 &left 50 obtained from the Department of Anatomy, Kakatiya medical college, Warangal, Telangana. Dissection of the infraclavicular part of the brachial plexus was done. The variations in the origin, course and communications with the median nerve were noted. RESULTS In 2% of the limbs the nerve was found to give one communicating branch to the median nerve after piercing the coracobrachialis. CONCLUSION Knowledge of possible variations between musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve is necessary to general surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurologists and orthopaedic surgeons.

  20. Low frequencies, but not high frequencies of bi-polar spinal cord stimulation reduce cutaneous and muscle hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Y; Wacnik, P W; Sluka, K A

    2008-08-15

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an established treatment for neuropathic pain. However, SCS is not effective for all the patients and the mechanisms underlying the reduction in pain by SCS are not clearly understood. To elucidate the mechanisms of pain relief by SCS, we utilized the spared nerve injury model. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, the tibial and common peroneal nerves were tightly ligated, and an epidural SCS lead implanted in the upper lumbar spinal cord. SCS was delivered daily at one of 4 different frequencies (4Hz, 60Hz, 100Hz, and 250Hz) at approximately 85% of motor threshold 2 weeks after nerve injury for 4 days. Mechanical withdrawal threshold of the paw and compression withdrawal threshold of the hamstring muscles were measured before and after SCS on each day. All rats showed a decrease in withdrawal threshold of the paw and the muscle 2 weeks after nerve injury. Treatment with either 4Hz or 60Hz SCS significantly reversed the decreased withdrawal threshold of the paw and muscle. The effect was cumulative with a greater reversal by the fourth treatment when compared to the first treatment. Treatment with 100Hz, 250Hz or sham SCS had no significant effect on the decreased withdrawal threshold of the paw or muscle that normally occurs after nerve injury. In conclusion, SCS at 4Hz and 60Hz was more effective in reducing hyperalgesia than higher frequencies of SCS (100Hz and 250Hz); and repeated treatments result in a cumulative reduction in hyperalgesia.

  1. Fastklemt nerve som årsag til svære postoperative smerter fra arvæv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael; Venzo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Entrapment of a cutaneous nerve in a surgical scar may cause chronic post-operative pain. The condition presents with similar symptoms as a traumatic neuroma or as an anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, which, however, is often idiopathic. We present a case, where entrapment of a cutane......Entrapment of a cutaneous nerve in a surgical scar may cause chronic post-operative pain. The condition presents with similar symptoms as a traumatic neuroma or as an anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, which, however, is often idiopathic. We present a case, where entrapment...... of a cutaneous nerve in a laparotomy scar caused chronic pain. The symptoms were immediately relieved after selective neurectomy....

  2. Hourglass-Like Constriction of the Brachial Plexus in the Posterior Cord: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasunobu; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Hourglass-like constrictions are fascicular conditions confirmed definitively by interfascicular neurolysis. Certain peripheral nerves have vulnerable areas such as around the elbow in the posterior interosseous nerve. We report the first hourglass-like constriction in the brachial plexus supplying the radial innervated forearm musculature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brachial plexus were consistent with neuralgic amyotrophy (NA). A 9-yr-old boy experienced worsening left arm pain and difficulty in elevating the shoulder. Sequentially, severe palsy emerged when extending the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Based on the clinical picture, we diagnosed him with NA. The oblique coronal T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery images showed mildly diffuse enlargement and hyperintensity of the brachial plexus. He showed few signs of improvement and interfascicular neurolysis was performed 11 mo after the onset. One of the fascicles in the posterior cord had developed an hourglass-like constriction. Electrical stimulation confirmed that the fascicle supplied forearm muscles. His wrist and finger extension had almost recovered at the 12-mo postoperative visit. Hourglass-like constrictions can occur in the brachial plexus. Although surgical approaches for the constrictions are still controversial, several reports demonstrated their effectiveness. Meanwhile, concerning NA treatment, evidence on the surgical intervention is lacking. Brachial plexus MRI might help in discerning the lesion and planning treatment options including surgical interventions. Hourglass-like constrictions are a possible etiology for certain NA patients with residual symptoms or paresis.

  3. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães - 3: eletroneuroestimulação dos nervos radial, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs - 3: electroneurostimulation of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi relacionar os aspectos clínicos, neurológicos e histopatológicos (descritos nas partes l e 2 deste trabalho com os resultados obtidos após estimulação elétrica dos nervos radiai, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo. Realizou-se a estimulação elétrica destes nervos durante o ato cirúrgico no qual foram coletados os fascículos para histopatolo gia. Os nervos radial, mediano e ulnar de todos os cães submetidos à eletroneuroestimulação apresentaram evidências de degenera- ção. enquanto que o nervo musculocutâneo apresentava função próxima do normal em 25% dos casos. A associação dos resultados do exame neurológico, da histologia e da eletroneuroestimulação sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial, enfatizando a necessidade de continuidade de pesquisas na área, visando principalmente a recuperação das raízes nervosas envolvidas.The purpose ofthis work was to relate lhe clinicai, neurological and histopathotogical aspects (as described in the sections I and 2 ofthis work with the obtained results after the electric stimulation of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerrves. The electric stimulation of these nerves was realized during the cirurgic act, when the fascicle were obtained for the histopathologic examination. The radial, median and ulnar nerves of ali dogs submitted to electroneurostimulation presented evidences of degeneration, while the musculocutaneous nerve present almost normal functions in 25% of the cases. The interpretation ofthe results obtained from neurologic, histologic and electroneurostimulation examination suggested the almost total involvement of brachial plexus in ali cases. This work emphasized the need for further research in this área with lhe main purpose of recuperating the involved roots.

  5. Postfixed brachial plexus radiculopathy due to thoracic disc herniation in a collegiate wrestler: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Scott A; Doberstein, Scott T; Rushlow, David R

    2013-01-01

    To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1-T2 disc herniation. A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1-T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1-T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for patients with suspected brachial plexus radiculopathies.

  6. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  7. Enhancement of median nerve regeneration by mesenchymal stem cells engraftment in an absorbable conduit: improvement of peripheral nerve morphology with enlargement of somatosensory cortical representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Julia T.; Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben Ernesto; de Almeida, Fernanda M.; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Martinez, Ana Maria B.; Franca, João G.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN), 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL) conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1), electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in three groups: MN Intact (n = 4), PCL-Only (n = 3), and PCL+MSC (n = 3). Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group) or without (PCL-Only group) injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to five animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383 ± 390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively) than the PCL-Only group (2,226 ± 575 fibers; 1.6 mm2). In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN. PMID:25360086

  8. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  9. Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  10. Bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior com uso de neuroestimulador e ropivacaína a 0,5% Bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso de neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% Posterior brachial plexus block with nerve stimulator and 0.5% ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Beato

    2005-08-01

    ícula y húmero proximal. El objetivo de este estudio fue mostrar los resultados observados en pacientes sometidos a bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5%. MÉTODO: Veintidós pacientes con edad entre 17 y 76 años, estado físico ASA I y II, sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas envolviendo el hombro, clavícula y húmero proximal fueron anestesiados con bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior utilizando neuroestimulador desde 1 mA. Lograda la contracción deseada, la corriente fue disminuida para 0,5 MA y, permaneciendo la respuesta contráctil, fueron inyectados 40 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5%. Fueron evaluados los siguientes parámetros: latencia, analgesia, duración de la cirugía, duración de la analgesia y del bloqueo motor, complicaciones y efectos colaterales. RESULTADOS: El bloqueo fue efectivo en 20 de los 22 pacientes; la latencia media fue de 15,52 min; la duración media de la cirugía fue de 1,61 hora. La media de duración de la analgesia fue de 15,85 horas y del bloqueo motor 11,16 horas. No fueron observados señales y síntomas clínicos de toxicidad del anestésico local y ningún paciente presentó efectos adversos del bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: En las condiciones de este estudio el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% demostró que es una técnica efectiva, confortable para el paciente y de fácil realización.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are several approaches to the brachial plexus depending on the experience of the anesthesiologist and the site of the surgery. Posterior brachial plexus block may be an alternative for shoulder, clavicle and proximal humerus surgery. This study aims at presenting the results of patients submitted to posterior brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine and the aid of nerve stimulator. METHODS: Participated in this study 22 patients aged 17 to 76 years, physical status ASA I and II

  11. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  12. Distal transfers as a primary treatment in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a series of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanghurde, B A; Mehta, R; Ladkat, K M; Raut, B B; Thatte, M R

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the results of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (with or without axillary nerve neurotization) and an Oberlin transfer as primary treatment in children with Narakas type I obstetric brachial plexus injuries, when parents refused to consent to conventional nerve trunk-/root-level reconstruction. A total of 20 children with poor shoulder abduction and no biceps antigravity function but with good hand function were treated with spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve and an Oberlin transfer at a mean age of 5.8 months (SD 3.27; range 3-12.) All the patients were evaluated at a mean of 2.8 years (SD 0.8; range 1.5 to 3.8) post-operatively. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Of the remainder, 11 had grade 4+ power of elbow flexion and six patients had grade 4 power at 1 year follow-up; all had 4+ power of elbow flexion at final follow-up. At final follow-up the Mallet score was a mean of 15; (SD 4.22, range 9 to 20). Primary distal nerve transfers can give good outcomes in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injuries and may be an alternative to surgery on the nerve trunks IV. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Nerve involvement in granuloma annulare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle; DiCaudo, David J; Dahl, Mark V

    2012-01-01

    Nerve involvement developed in a patient with granuloma annulare, as evidenced by a perineural infiltrate of histiocytes in the dermis. The histopathologic pattern was suggestive of leprosy. No mycobacteria were observed, and neurologic testing was normal. To determine whether inflammation of the nerves or perineural tissue is common in granuloma annulare, we studied the cutaneous nerves in skin biopsy specimens from 14 patients with granuloma annulare. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to highlight inflammatory cells and with S-100 to identify cutaneous nerves. No inflammation around nerves was found in 12 specimens, abutting granulomatous inflammation was found in 1 specimen, and enveloping granulomatous inflammation was found in 1 specimen. No nerves were infiltrated by inflammatory cells. Perineural granulomatous inflammation resembling the perineural infiltrate of leprosy appears to be an uncommon characteristic of granuloma annulare. Clinical correlation and acid-fast stains can assist in establishing the correct diagnosis.

  14. Cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chandra Adhikari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLeishmaniasis is considered to be zoonotic disease, caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania, and transmitted by a bite of infected female sandfly. Primary cutaneous leishmaniasis is not common disease in Nepal, however, there were cases reported from Terai region of Nepal. The patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis present with a papule or nodule at the site of inoculation, followed by formation of crusts. Differential diagnoses of cutaneous leishmaniasis include variety of skin diseases, inflammatory like impetigo, eczema, or granulomatous like sarcoidosis, lupus vulgaris, to skin tumor like basal cell carcinoma & squamous cell carcinoma. There are various procedures and laboratory techniques used to diagnose leishmaniasis. Punch skin biopsy is widely used & popular technique to diagnose cutaneous leishmaniasis. Different drugs like sodium stibogluconate, sodium antimony gluconate, Amphotericin B and Miltefosine: are used for its treatment. No vaccines are available for prevention. 

  15. Sodium Channel Nav1.8 Underlies TTX-Resistant Axonal Action Potential Conduction in Somatosensory C-Fibers of Distal Cutaneous Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amanda H; Vyshnevska, Alina; Hartke, Timothy V; De Col, Roberto; Mankowski, Joseph L; Turnquist, Brian; Bosmans, Frank; Reeh, Peter W; Schmelz, Martin; Carr, Richard W; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2017-05-17

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na V ) channels are responsible for the initiation and conduction of action potentials within primary afferents. The nine Na V channel isoforms recognized in mammals are often functionally divided into tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (TTX-s) channels (Na V 1.1-Na V 1.4, Na V 1.6-Na V 1.7) that are blocked by nanomolar concentrations and TTX-resistant (TTX-r) channels (Na V 1.8 and Na V 1.9) inhibited by millimolar concentrations, with Na V 1.5 having an intermediate toxin sensitivity. For small-diameter primary afferent neurons, it is unclear to what extent different Na V channel isoforms are distributed along the peripheral and central branches of their bifurcated axons. To determine the relative contribution of TTX-s and TTX-r channels to action potential conduction in different axonal compartments, we investigated the effects of TTX on C-fiber-mediated compound action potentials (C-CAPs) of proximal and distal peripheral nerve segments and dorsal roots from mice and pigtail monkeys ( Macaca nemestrina ). In the dorsal roots and proximal peripheral nerves of mice and nonhuman primates, TTX reduced the C-CAP amplitude to 16% of the baseline. In contrast, >30% of the C-CAP was resistant to TTX in distal peripheral branches of monkeys and WT and Na V 1.9 -/- mice. In nerves from Na V 1.8 -/- mice, TTX-r C-CAPs could not be detected. These data indicate that Na V 1.8 is the primary isoform underlying TTX-r conduction in distal axons of somatosensory C-fibers. Furthermore, there is a differential spatial distribution of Na V 1.8 within C-fiber axons, being functionally more prominent in the most distal axons and terminal regions. The enrichment of Na V 1.8 in distal axons may provide a useful target in the treatment of pain of peripheral origin. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is unclear whether individual sodium channel isoforms exert differential roles in action potential conduction along the axonal membrane of nociceptive, unmyelinated peripheral nerve

  16. Peripheral Nerve Lymphomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Tun-Lin; Yak, Ryan; Puhaindran, Mark E

    2017-03-01

    Lymphoma involvement of peripheral nerves is rare and it may mimic benign neurogenic tumors or neuropraxic injury. This study presents three patterns of presentations in four patients with neurolymphomatous involvement of their peripheral nerves. We reviewed the clinical records of four patients who underwent exploratory brachial plexus surgery (n = 1), pronator tunnel decompression (n = 1) and peripheral nerve exploration (n = 2) and subsequently found to have neurolymphomatosis (NL). Histological diagnoses were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) and NK/T-cell lymphoma (n = 1). NL lacks pathognomonic clinical and imaging features that aid clinicians in diagnosis. Apart from a history of lymphoma, and high clinical index of suspicion, PET-CT scans appear to be a helpful adjunct in detecting high metabolic lesions occuring in situ or systemically. Intra-operative frozen section is helpful to detect round blue cells, before final cytological diagnosis.

  17. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-27

    The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further guideline development and multicentre research. A structured

  18. Description of the brachial plexus of the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis Sclater, 1882: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luane Lopes Pinheiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis is one of the rarest species of South American canids. Aiming to describe the morphology of this animal and enhance the study of comparative neuroanatomy, we studied the anatomical makeup of the brachial plexus of a female specimen from Paragominas (PA. The specimen was donated, after natural death, to the Institute of Animal Health and Production (ISPA at the Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia (UFRA. The animal was fixed in 10% formalin and later dissected bilaterally to reveal the origin of the brachial plexus. In A. microtis, the brachial plexus is derived from the ventral rami of the last three cervical spinal nerves and the first thoracic spinal nerve (C6-T1. The brachial plexus derivatives with their respective origins were: suprascapular n. (C6 and C7, subscapular n. (C6, musculocutaneous n. (C6 and C7, axillary n. (C6 and C7, radial n. (C7 and C8, median n. (C7, C8 and T1, ulnar n. (C8 and T1, thoracodorsal n. (C8 and T1, cranial pectoral nn. (C7, C8 and T1 and caudal pectoral nn. (C8 and T1. The brachial plexus of A. microtis resembled what has been described for the domestic dog, in relation to the origin of the initial and final segment, but showed differences in the composition of some nerves.

  19. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Harman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is used to describe a spectrum of diseases caused by the parasitic protozoa leishmania spp. and transmitted by infected female sandflies. There are three main forms of the disease; cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral. According to the World Health Organization, almost 12 million people from 98 countries worldwide are currently infected with leishmaniasis, while 350 million people are at risk. It was reported that 2 million new cases are diagnosed every year, with three-fourth are cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL cases. The scientific and medical communities have learnt a lot about CL during the 20th and early 21st centuries. However, the management and control of the disease remains a difficult task. This article was focused on the most common form of the disease, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and especially its epidemiological aspects and treatment.

  20. Cutaneous Porphyrias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard Christiansen, Anne; Aagaard, Lise; Krag, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare diseases caused by altered haem synthesis leading to the accumulation of different haem intermediates. Neurovisceral attacks may occur in acute porphyrias, while photosensitivity is the presenting symptom in cutaneous porphyrias. We present here an overview of symptoms...... and a flowchart for the diagnosis of cutaneous porphyrias, with recommendations for monitoring and an update of treatment options. From the Danish Porphyria Register, we present the incidences and approximate prevalences of cutaneous porphyrias within the last 25 years. A total of 650 patients with porphyria...... cutanea tarda were identified, 73 with erythropoietic protoporphyria, 9 with variegate porphyria, 4 with hereditary coproporphyria and one with congenital erythropoietic porphyria. The total incidence of all porphyrias was ~0.52/100,000 per year....

  1. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    1997-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial

  2. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  3. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cevdet Düger; Ahmet Cemil İsbir; İclal Özdemir Kol,; Kenan Kaygusuz; Sinan Gürsoy,; Caner Mimaroğlu

    2013-01-01

    Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular, central ...

  4. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Düger, Cevdet; İsbir, Ahmet; Özdemir Kol, İclal; Kaygusuz,Kenan; Gürsoy, Sinan; Mimaroğlu, Caner

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular,...

  5. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Düger, Cevdet; İsbir, Ahmet Cemil; Özdemir Kol, İclal; Kaygusuz,Kenan; Gürsoy, Sinan; Mimaroğlu, Caner

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular,...

  6. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  7. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duz Bulent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients.

  8. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  9. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force......-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased...

  10. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  11. Proximal conduction block in the pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Guillaume; Grapperon, Aude-Marie; Duclos, Yann; Franques, Jérôme; Labauge, Pierre; Renard, Dimitri; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Attarian, Shahram

    2015-12-01

    Conduction block (CB) has been included in the Rajabally criteria for axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Because the nerve roots may be affected early in GBS, detection of proximal CB by the triple stimulation technique (TST) can be useful. We describe TST findings in 2 patients who presented with the pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of axonal GBS. In the first patient, although conventional nerve conduction studies (NCS) did not fit electrodiagnostic criteria for axonal GBS, the TST detected proximal CB in the median and ulnar nerves. In the second patient, NCS fulfilled criteria for axonal GBS, and the TST detected proximal CB in the median nerve. After plasmapheresis, NCS and TST findings were normalized, suggesting reversible conduction failure rather than demyelinating CB. The TST may be useful for diagnosis of PCB when NCS remain inconclusive. The technique provides additional clues for classifying PCB into the acute nodo-paranodopathies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a permanent challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Otto Heise

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP has an incidence of 1.5 cases per 1000 live births and it has not declined despite recent advances in obstetrics. Most patients will recover spontaneously, but some will remain severely handicapped. Rehabilitation is important in most cases and brachial plexus surgery can improve the functional outcome of selected patients. This review highlights the current management of infants with NBPP, including conservative and operative approaches.

  13. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  14. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Ultrasound guidance is the safe and effective method for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  15. Ultrasound-guided approach to nerves (direct vs. tangential) and the incidence of intraneural injection: a cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sermeus, L.A.; Sala-Blanch, X.; McDonnell, J.G.; Lobo, C.A.; Nicholls, B.J.; Geffen, G.J. van; Choquet, O.; Iohom, G.; Galve, B. de Jose Maria; Hermans, C.; Lammens, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of nerve puncture and intraneural injection based on the needle approach to the nerve (direct vs. tangential). Two expert operators in regional anaesthesia performed in-plane ultrasound-guided nerve blocks (n = 158) at different levels of the brachial plexus in

  16. Long-Term Outcome of Brachial Plexus Reimplantation After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachramanoglou, Carolina; Carlstedt, Thomas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Choi, David

    2017-07-01

    Complete brachial plexus avulsion injury is a severe disabling injury due to traction to the brachial plexus. Brachial plexus reimplantation is an emerging surgical technique for the management of complete brachial plexus avulsion injury. We assessed the functional recovery in 15 patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation surgery after complete brachial plexus avulsion injury with clinical examination and electrophysiological testing. We included all patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Patients were assessed with detailed motor and sensory clinical examination and motor and sensory electrophysiological tests. We found that patients who had reimplantation surgery demonstrated an improvement in Medical Research Council power in the deltoid, pectoralis, and infraspinatous muscles and global Medical Research Council score. Eight patients achieved at least grade 3 MRC power in at least one muscle group of the arm. Improved reinnervation by electromyelography criteria was found in infraspinatous, biceps, and triceps muscles. There was evidence of ongoing innervation in 3 patients. Sensory testing in affected dermatomes also showed better recovery at C5, C6, and T1 dermatomes. The best recovery was seen in the C5 dermatome. Our results demonstrate a definite but limited improvement in motor and sensory recovery after reimplantation surgery in patients with complete brachial plexus injury. We hypothesize that further improvement may be achieved by using regenerative cell technologies at the time of repair. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Etiological risk factors for brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudić, Igor; Fatusić, Zlatan; Sinanović, Osman; Skokić, Fahrija

    2006-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for brachial plexus palsy in newborns. We analyzed 45 544 live-born children, born over a nine-year period from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2004. The analysis was retrospective and based on the medical documentation of the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinic for Neurology, and Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of the University Clinical Center Tuzla. We compared study and control groups of newborns. Rates among groups were compared using Chi-square, with significance at p labor pattern itself, it was found that the highest factors of risk for brachial plexus injury were birth weight of over 4000 g, a precipitous second stage of labor (labor. Brachial plexus palsy was more frequent when the mothers were overweight, with a body mass index >or=29 kg/m2. None of the parturient women, whose newborns were diagnosed with brachial plexus palsy, had external conjugate diameter <18 cm. Newborns delivered vaginally were not diagnosed with a higher frequency of brachial plexus palsy when compared to newborns who were delivered by cesarean section, but newborns who were vaginal breech-delivered were diagnosed to have a higher incidence of brachial plexus palsy. Newborns whose mothers were older than 35 years were diagnosed to have brachial plexus palsy more frequently, but a statistically significant difference between primiparas and multiparas was not found. A total of 39 newborns (45.2%) were diagnosed with a fracture of the clavicle, which was the most frequently combined damage with brachial plexus injury. Forty-two newborns (48.8%) had an Apgar score of brachial plexus damage was 3858.1+/-587.7 g, which for an average gestational age of 38.8+/-1.8 weeks, corresponds to eutrophic newborns. Both male and female newborns were

  18. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN BLUE-FRONTED PARROT (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayssa Marley Nóbrega da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetic procedures are commonly used in domestic and wild birds, because of its low cost and fast induction, as long as applied with great precision, which requires specific anatomical knowledge of the site of incision. This study aimed to establish the origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of the Blue-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva by anatomic dissection of the skin and musculature of 22 specimens (17 males and 5 females from the Wild Animals Screening Center of the Federal District after death by natural causes. The dissection work promoted the isolation of the forming roots of the brachial plexus, as well as its ramifications. The brachial plexus was formed by four trunks, including the ventral spinal cord rami segments from C9 to C10, C10 to C11, C11 to T1 and T1 to T2, which joined into a short common trunk, branched into dorsal and ventral cords. The thin nerves subcoracoideus and subscapularis and the branch to the scapulohumeralis muscle originated from the common trunk. The dorsal cord originated the anconeal, axillaris and radialis nerves, while the ventral cord gave origin for the pectoralis cranialis, pectoralis caudalis, coracobrachialis and medianoulnaris. These branches innervated the muscles of the extensor and flexor compartments of the forelimb, pectoral muscles and overlying skin.

  20. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Shigeki; Mizuno, Kosaku [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  2. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  3. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus

  4. Role of еlectromyography in assessing prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury in practice of a specialized center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Novikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of current publication – to present our own experience in use of electromyographic examination in prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury to practical neurologists and neurophysiologists. Review of literature shows that common approaches to electrotrophysiological diagnosis of obstetric brachial plexus injury do not exist. The aim of this study– to evaluate retrospectively electrophysiological and sonographic parameters of obstetric brachial plexus injury in children, determining the most informative variables. Since 2007 to 2014 we examined 218 children, 74 of them were operated. Electrophysiological investigation in young children have difficulties in performance.We present our algorithm of diagnostic of obstetric brachial plexus injury: 1 testing main muscles, which perform basic movementsin upper limb (needle EMG of supra- and infraspinatus muscles and cutaneous EMG of biceps muscles; 2 localization of injury (paralysis or Duchenne – Erb palsy and electrophysiological criteria of spinal cord root avulsion. We found out that the most crucial role in assessing prognosis plays an examination of motor unit potentials (MUPs duration. Absence of MUPs within needle EMG from supraspinatus muscle and absence of interference curve from biceps muscle during first 6 months have poor prognosis. After 6 months careful, dynamic study of MUPs duration in infraspinatus muscle and co-contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles is needed. To decide whether reconstructive surgery in a patient with obstetric brachial plexus injury is necessary, surgeon must analyze clinical and instrumental data. The possibility of usage of the ultrasonogrophy in brachial plexus injury requires further investigation.

  5. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J-T H; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-10-01

    To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Fifty-one incident, treatment-naive patients with CIDP (n = 23) or MMN (n = 28) underwent imaging of the brachial plexus using (i) a standardized MRI protocol to assess enlargement or T2 hyperintensity and (ii) bilateral HRUS to determine the extent of nerve (root) enlargement. We found enlargement of the brachial plexus in 19/51 (37%) and T2 hyperintensity in 29/51 (57%) patients with MRI and enlargement in 37/51 (73%) patients with HRUS. Abnormal results were only found in 6/51 (12%) patients with MRI and 12/51 (24%) patients with HRUS. A combination of the two imaging techniques identified 42/51 (83%) patients. We found no association between age, disease duration or Medical Research Council sum-score and sonographic nerve size, MRI enlargement or presence of T2 hyperintensity. Brachial plexus sonography could complement MRI in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected CIDP and MMN. Our results indicate that combined imaging studies may add value to the current diagnostic consensus criteria for chronic inflammatory neuropathies. © 2017 EAN.

  6. Brachial plexus injury in Thailand: a report of 520 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songcharoen, P

    1995-01-01

    Between October 1984 and October 1993, 520 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injuries were treated at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok. There were 486 male and 34 female patients. Eighty-two percent of the injuries were caused by motorcycle accidents, 9% by other traffic accidents, and 9% by gunshot, stabbing, and other means. The initial physical examination revealed 332 (63.8%) complete paralyses and 88 (36.2%) incomplete paralyses. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated conservatively, 43 patients were observed before definitive treatment was given, and 350 patients were treated by operative means. Four hundred and twenty-one surgical procedures were performed, consisting of 314 neurotisations (250 spinal accessory, 14 plexo-plexal, 21 intercostal, 21 phrenic, 4 cervical plexus, 1 long thoracic, and 3 neuromuscular), 38 neurolyses, 23 nerve grafting, 16 free muscle transfers combined with neurotisations, and 30 musculotendinous transfers. Motor functional recovery of patients followed up for more than 2 years was evaluated. Nerve grafting gave 82% good (more than MRC grade 3) and 18% fair and poor recovery. Neurolysis gave 69% good and 31% fair and poor recovery. In patients with neurotisation, the spinal accessory (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculotaneous) intercostal (to musculotaneous), phrenic (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculocutaneous), and plexo- plexal methods gave a significant number of good results.

  7. Hoarseness of voice after supraclavicular ultrasound-guided subclavian perivascular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block is ideal for surgical procedures at or distal to the elbow. Ultrasound (USG continues to grow in popularity as a method of nerve localization, and for the supraclavicular block, it has the advantage of allowing real-time visualization of the plexus, pleura, and vessels along with the needle and local anesthetic spread, but it may conversely create a false sense of security. The incidence of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN block occurring with supraclavicular approach is 1.3% of patients.[10] Incidence of RLN block with USG-guided supraclavicular block is not known. In this case report, we discuss a rare complication of RLN block which occurred while performing a supraclavicular perivascular block performed under USG guidance.

  8. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  9. Detection of positional brachial plexus injury by radial arterial line during spinal exposure before neuromonitoring confirmation: a retrospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengyong; Chen, Leo; Kwon, Paul; Montez, Michele; Voegeli, Thomas; Bueff, Hans

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate the potential usefulness of radial arterial line monitoring in detection of brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery. Multiple neuromonitoring modalities including SEPs, MEPs and EMG were performed for a posterior thoracicolumbar surgery. Radial arterial line (A-line) was placed on the right wrist for arterial blood pressure monitoring. Reliable ulnar nerve SEPs, hand muscle MEPs and arterial blood pressure readings were obtained after patient was placed in a prone position. A-line malfunction was noted about 15 min after incision. Loss of ulnar nerve SEPs and hand muscle MEPs with a cold hand on the right was noticed when neuromonitoring resumed after spine exposure. SEPs, MEPs, A-line readings and hand temperature returned after modification of the right arm position. Radial arterial line monitoring may help detect positional brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery when continuous neuromonitoring is interrupted during spine exposure in prone position.

  10. Bloqueio do nervo frênico após realização de bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via interescalênica: relato de caso A bloqueo del nervio frénico después de la realización de bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica: relato de caso Phrenic nerve block after interscalene brachial plexus block: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Cangiani

    2008-04-01

    embargo, en su mayoría, sin repercusiones clínicas importantes. El objetivo de este relato fue presentar un caso en que ocurrió bloqueo del nervio frénico, con comprometimiento ventilatorio en paciente con insuficiencia renal crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa, bajo bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía perivascular interescalénica. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 50 años, tabaquista, portador de insuficiencia renal crónica en régimen de hemodiálisis, hipertensión arterial, hepatitis C, diabetes melito, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa en el miembro superior derecho bajo bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica. El plexo braquial fue localizado con la utilización del estimulador de nervio periférico. Se inyectaron 35 mL de una solución de anestésico local constituida de una mezcla de lidocaína a 2% con epinefrina a 1:200.000 y ropivacaína a 0,75% en partes iguales. Al final de la inyección el paciente estaba lúcido, pero sin embargo con disnea y predominio de incursión respiratoria intercostal ipsilateral al bloqueo. No había murmullo vesicular en la base del hemitórax derecho. La SpO2 se mantuvo en un 95%, con catéter nasal de oxígeno. No fue necesaria la instalación de métodos de auxilio ventilatorio invasivo. La radiografía del tórax reveló que el hemidiafragma derecho ocupaba el 5° espacio intercostal. El cuadro clínico se revirtió en tres horas. CONCLUSIONES: El caso mostró que hubo parálisis total del nervio frénico con síntomas respiratorios. A pesar de no haber sido necesaria la terapéutica invasiva para el tratamiento, queda el aviso aquí para la restricción de la indicación de la técnica en esos casos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Phrenic nerve block is a common adverse event of brachial plexus block. However, in most cases it does not have any important clinical repercussion. The objective

  11. Nerve biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nerve ... A nerve biopsy is most often done on a nerve in the ankle, forearm, or along a rib. The health care ... feel a prick and a mild sting. The biopsy site may be sore for a few days ...

  12. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Luis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis, and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory. Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1% of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens.

  13. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia improves arteriovenous fistula flow characteristics in end-stage renal disease patients. ... In all patients, a radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula was created by an experienced surgeon using a standard surgical technique. In both groups 20 ml of 0.375% ...

  14. Brachial artery approach for outpatient arteriography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jai Kyung; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jae Hwan [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brachial approach arteriography for outpatients, with particular regard to safety and image quality. The angiographic findings and follow-up medical records of 131 brachial approach arteriographies in 121 outpatients were retrospectively analysed. 5 F pigtail catheters were used in 125 cases and 5-F OCU-A catheters were used in three cases of renal arteriography, and three of upper extremity arteriography without catheter. Except for three cases of brachial artery puncture failure, all procedures were performed successfully. One hundred and fifteen of 119 lower extremity arteriographies were visualized down to the level of the tibioperoneal artery. The non-visualized cases were three in which there was multiple obstruction at the distal common iliac artery and one with insufficient contrast amount due to renal failure In four cases there were complications : two involved arterial thrombosis, one was an intramuscular hematoma, and one an A-V fistula. For outpatients, brachial approach arteriography can replace the femoral approach. Its image quality is excellent, there are time-cost benefits, and the rate of complications is relatively low.

  15. Obstetric brachial plexus lesions: CT myelography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Pondaag, W.; Malessy, M.J.; Verbist, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the value of computed tomographic (CT) myelography in the detection of root damage and differentiation of root avulsions from neurotmesis in a large cohort of patients with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was

  16. Rectus Abdominis Motor Nerves as Donor Option for Free Functional Muscle Transfer: A Cadaver Study and Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Aaron B; Nicoson, Michael C; Moore, Amy M; Hunter, Dan A; Tung, Thomas H

    2017-04-01

    Current management of brachial plexus injuries includes nerve grafts and nerve transfers. However, in cases of late presentation or pan plexus injuries, free functional muscle transfers are an option to restore function. The purpose of our study was to describe and evaluate the rectus abdominis motor nerves histomorphologically and functionally as a donor nerve option for free functional muscle transfer for the reconstruction of brachial plexus injuries. High intercostal, rectus abdominis, thoracodorsal, and medial pectoral nerves were harvested for histomorphometric analysis from 4 cadavers from levels T3-8. A retrospective chart review was performed of all free functional muscle transfers from 2001 to 2014 by a single surgeon. Rectus abdominis nerve branches provide a significant quantity of motor axons compared with high intercostal nerves and are comparable to the anterior branch of the thoracodorsal nerve and medial pectoral nerve branches. Clinically, the average recovery of elbow flexion was comparable to conventional donors for 2-stage muscle transfer. Rectus abdominis motor nerves have similar nerve counts to thoracodorsal, medial pectoral nerves, and significantly more than high intercostal nerves alone. The use of rectus abdominis motor nerve branches allows restoration of elbow flexion comparable to other standard donors. In cases where multiple high intercostal nerves are not available as donors (rib fractures, phrenic nerve injury), rectus abdominis nerves provide a potential option for motor reconstruction without adversely affecting respiration.

  17. Sonographic Guidance for Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Blocks: Single vs. Double Injection Cluster Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ju; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Jung, Wol Seon; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Mi Geum

    2017-09-01

    The cluster approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SC-BPB) can be easily performed but may result in asymmetric local anesthetic (LA) spread. The authors hypothesized that the use of a cluster approach in each of the 2 planes would achieve better 3-dimensional LA distribution than the traditional single cluster approach. The purpose of the present study was to compare a double injection (DI) in 2 planes (one injection in each plane) with the traditional single injection (SI) cluster approach for ultrasound-guided SC-BPB. A randomized, controlled trial. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center. In the SI group (n = 18), 30 mL of LA was injected into the main neural cluster after penetrating the brachial plexus sheath laterally. In the DI group (n = 18), the needle penetrated the sheath in a downward direction at the first skin puncture, and 15 mL of LA was injected, and at the second skin puncture (behind the initial puncture site), the needle penetrated the sheath in an upward direction, and 15 mL was again injected. Ultrasound-guided SC-BPB was evaluated from immediately after the block every 5 minutes to 30 minutes by sensory and motor testing. The main outcome variables were procedural time; onset time (time for complete sensory and motor block of the median, radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves); and rate of blockage of all 4 nerves. Procedure times (medians [interquartile range]) were similar in the DI and SI groups (5.5 [4.75 - 8] vs. 5 [4 - 7] minutes, respectively; P = 0.137). Block onset time in the DI group was not significantly different from that in the SI group (10 [5 - 17.5] vs. 20 [6.25 - 30] minutes, P = 0.142). However, the rate of blockage of all 4 nerves was significantly higher in the DI group (94% vs. 67%, P = 0.035). Although the results of this study indicate LA distribution in the DI group was more evenly spread within brachial plexus sheaths than in the SI group, this was not

  18. Application of magnetic motor stimulation for measuring conduction time across the lower part of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafezi Rahmatollah

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to calculate central motor conduction time (CMCT of median and ulnar nerves in normal volunteers. Conduction time across the lower part of the brachial plexus was measured by using magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex and brachial plexus and recording the evoked response in hand muscles. Design This descriptive study was done on 112 upper limbs of healthy volunteers. Forty-six limbs belonging to men and sixty-six belonging to women were studied by magnetic stimulation of both motor cortex and brachial plexus and recording the evoked response in thenar and hypothenar muscles. Stimulation of the motor cortex gives rise to absolute latency of each nerve whereas stimulation of the brachial plexus results in peripheral conduction time. The difference between these two values was considered the central motor conduction time (CMCT. Results In summary the result are as follows; Cortex-thenar latency = 21.4 ms (SD = 1.7, CMCT-thenar = 9.6 ms (SD = 1.9, Cortex-hypothenar latency = 21.3 ms (SD = 1.8, CMCT-hypothenar = 9.4 ms (SD = 1.8. Conclusion These findings showed that there is no meaningful difference between two genders. CMCT calculated by this method is a little longer than that obtained by electrical stimulation that is due to the more distally placed second stimulation. We recommend magnetic stimulation as the method of choice to calculate CMCT and its use for lower brachial plexus conduction time. This method could serve as a diagnostic tool for diagnosis of lower plexus entrapment and injuries especially in early stages.

  19. Effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective, randomised, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant A Biradar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used to prolong brachial plexus block. We performed a prospective, randomised, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus block as this is the most common type of brachial block performed in our institute. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologist′s physical status I and II patients undergoing elective hand, forearm and elbow surgery under brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of normal saline (group C, n=30 or 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg (group D, n=30. The block was performed using a nerve stimulator. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade were assessed. The sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated and recorded at 5, 10, 20, 120 min, and at every 30 min thereafter. Results: Two patients were excluded from the study because of block failure. The onset of sensory and motor blockade (13.4±2.8 vs. 16.0±2.3 min and 16.0±2.7 vs. 18.7±2.8 min, respectively were significantly more rapid in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. The duration of sensory and motor blockade (326±58.6 vs. 159±20.1 and 290.6±52.7 vs. 135.5±20.3 min, respectively were significantly longer in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline in supraclavicular brachial plexus block speeds the onset and prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  20. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: reviewing the literature comparing the results of primary versus secondary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Costales, Javier Robla; Paez, Miguel Domínguez; Nizzo, Gustavo; Valbuena, Sebastian; Varone, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPP) are a relatively common stretch injury of the brachial plexus that occurs during delivery. Roughly 30 % of patients will not recover completely and will need a surgical repair. Two main treatment strategies have been used: primary surgery, consisting in exploring and reconstructing the affected portions of the brachial plexus within the first few months of the patient's life, and secondary procedures that include tendon or muscle transfers, osteotomies, and other orthopedic techniques. Secondary procedures can be done as the only surgical treatment of OBPP or after primary surgery, in order to minimize any residual deficits. Two things are crucial to achieving a good outcome: (1) the appropriate selection of patients, to separate those who will spontaneously recover from those who will recover only partially or not at all; and (2) a good surgical technique. The objective of the present review is to assess the published literature concerning certain controversial issues in OBPP, especially in terms of the true current state of primary and secondary procedures, their results, and the respective roles each plays in modern-day treatment of this complex pathology. Considerable published evidence compiled over decades of surgical experience favors primary nerve surgery as the initial therapeutic step in patients who do not recover spontaneously, followed by secondary surgeries for further functional improvement. As described in this review, the results of such treatment can greatly ameliorate function in affected limbs. For best results, multi-disciplinary teams should treat these patients.

  1. The SPA arrangement of the branches of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus: a correction of a longstanding misconception and a new diagram of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Amgad

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Brachial plexus (BP) diagrams in most textbooks and papers represent the branches and divisions of the upper trunk (UT) in the following sequence from cranial to caudal: suprascapular nerve, anterior division, and then posterior division. This concept contradicts what is seen in the operating room and is noticed by most peripheral nerve surgeons. This cadaveric study was conducted to look specifically at the exact pattern of branching of the upper trunk of the BP. METHODS Ten cadavers (20 BPs) were dissected. Both supra- and infraclavicular exposures were performed. The clavicle was retracted or resected to identify the divisions of the BP. A posterior approach was used in 2 cases. RESULTS In all dissections the origin of the posterior division was in a more cranial and dorsal plane in relation to the anterior division. In most dissections the supra scapular nerve branched off distally from the UT, giving it the appearance of a trifurcation, taking off just cranial and dorsal to the posterior division. The branching pattern of the UT consistently had the following sequential arrangement from cranial and posterior to caudal and anterior: suprascapular nerve (S), posterior division (P), and anterior division (A), hence the acronym SPA. CONCLUSIONS Supraclavicular exposure of the BP exposes only the trunks and divisions. Recognizing the "SPA" arrangement of the branches helps in identifying the correct targets for neurotization, especially given that these 3 branches are the most common targets for BP repair. Understanding the anatomy means better surgical planning and better patient outcomes.

  2. A Case of Suspected Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brachial Plexus Detected by Magnetic Resonance Neurography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizuma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of breast cancer is often detected through a long-term course and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of brachial plexopathy suspected to be the initial lesion of breast cancer metastasis, which was only detected by magnetic resonance (MR neurography. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital within 2 years after operation for breast cancer because of progressive dysesthesia and motor weakness initially in the upper limb on the affected side and subsequently on the contralateral side. Enhanced computed tomography, axillary lymph node echo, gallium scintigraphy, and short tau inversion recovery MR images showed no abnormalities. MR neurography revealed a swollen region in the left brachial plexus. We suspected neuralgic amyotrophy and initiated treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and steroid therapy. However, there was no improvement, and the progression of motor weakness in the bilateral lower limbs appeared over 4 years. Concomitant elevation of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 level (58.9 U/ml led us to suspect breast cancer metastasis, which was associated with the worsening of neurological findings, although gallium scintigraphy and bone scintigraphy showed no inflammatory and metastatic lesions. Swelling of the cauda equina in enhanced lumbar MR imaging and abnormal accumulation at the brachial plexus and cervical spinal cord in positron-emission tomography were newly detected contrary to the normal findings on the gallium scintigraphy, which suggested cerebrospinal fluid seeding. We suspected breast cancer metastasis about the initial brachial plexopathy based on the clinical course. MR neurography may be a helpful tool to detect metastatic lesion, especially in nerve roots.

  3. Influence of exercise intensity on respiratory muscle fatigue and brachial artery blood flow during cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Ade, Carl J; Broxterman, Ryan M; Skutnik, Benjamin C; Barstow, Thomas J; Wong, Brett J; Harms, Craig A

    2014-08-01

    During high intensity exercise, both respiratory muscle fatigue and cardiovascular reflexes occur; however, it is not known how inactive limb blood flow is influenced. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of moderate and high exercise intensity on respiratory muscle fatigue and inactive limb muscle and cutaneous blood flow during exercise. Twelve men cycled at 70 and 85 % [Formula: see text] for 20 min. Subjects also performed a second 85 % [Formula: see text] test after ingesting 1,800 mg of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which has been shown to reduce respiratory muscle fatigue (RMF). Maximum inspiratory pressures (P Imax), brachial artery blood flow (BABF), cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), and mean arterial pressure were measured at rest and during exercise. Significant RMF occurred with 85 % [Formula: see text] (P Imax, -12.8 ± 9.8 %), but not with 70 % [Formula: see text] (P Imax, -5.0 ± 5.9 %). BABF and BA vascular conductance were significantly lower at end exercise of the 85 % [Formula: see text] test compared to the 70 % [Formula: see text] test. CVC during exercise was not different (p > 0.05) between trials. With NAC, RMF was reduced (p RMF, decreases in inactive arm blood flow, and vascular conductance, but not cutaneous blood flow.

  4. Unique Phrenic Nerve-Sparing Regional Anesthetic Technique for Pain Management after Shoulder Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason K. Panchamia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ipsilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common adverse event after an interscalene brachial plexus block, which can result in respiratory deterioration in patients with preexisting pulmonary conditions. Diaphragm-sparing nerve block techniques are continuing to evolve, with the intention of providing satisfactory postoperative analgesia while minimizing hemidiaphragmatic paralysis after shoulder surgery. Case Report. We report the successful application of a combined ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block and suprascapular nerve block in a patient with a complicated pulmonary history undergoing a total shoulder replacement. Conclusion. This case report briefly reviews the important innervations to the shoulder joint and examines the utility of the infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain management.

  5. Comparison between isotropic linear-elastic law and isotropic hyperelastic law in the finite element modeling of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruisseau-Carrier, A; Bahlouli, N; Bierry, G; Vernet, P; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    Augmented reality could help the identification of nerve structures in brachial plexus surgery. The goal of this study was to determine which law of mechanical behavior was more adapted by comparing the results of Hooke's isotropic linear elastic law to those of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic law, applied to a biomechanical model of the brachial plexus. A model of finite elements was created using the ABAQUS® from a 3D model of the brachial plexus acquired by segmentation and meshing of MRI images at 0°, 45° and 135° of shoulder abduction of a healthy subject. The offset between the reconstructed model and the deformed model was evaluated quantitatively by the Hausdorff distance and qualitatively by the identification of 3 anatomical landmarks. In every case the Hausdorff distance was shorter with Ogden's law compared to Hooke's law. On a qualitative aspect, the model deformed by Ogden's law followed the concavity of the reconstructed model whereas the model deformed by Hooke's law remained convex. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that the behavior of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic mechanical model was more adapted to the modeling of the deformations of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Treatment of residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with tendon transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, Mehmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Uysal, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the results of the correction of adduction and internal rotation deformities of the shoulder associated with residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) by the transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff. In order to correct adduction and internal rotation deformities associated with residual OBPP, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females; mean age 8.1 years; range 4 to 19 years) underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff and lengthening of the pectoralis major tendon with Z-plasty. The right and left extremities were affected in seven and three patients, respectively. Involvement of the C5-C6 nerve roots was detected in four, and C5-C6-C7 nerve roots in six patients. In two patients with a positive Putti sign, axillary roentgenograms showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and magnetic resonance and computed tomography scans revealed type III glenohumeral deformity. Functional evaluations were made using a 5-point scoring system proposed by Mallet. The mean follow-up was 23.6 months (range 5 to 42 months). Postoperatively, the mean abduction and external rotation were 134.5 degrees (range 95 degrees to 170 degrees ) and 70 degrees (range 45 degrees to 90 degrees ), respectively. The mean global abduction score was 4, external rotation score was 4.2, and the scores assigned to the ability to move hand to the neck and mouth were 3.5. Of two patients with type III glenohumeral deformity, whose ages were four and 19 years, abduction and external rotation were 150 degrees and 45 degrees in the former, 135 degrees and 70 degrees in the latter, respectively. The transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons is a necessary procedure to restore external rotation and abduction functions of paralysed shoulders. Compared to other techniques employed, it offers obvious advantages in terms of ease and cost, as well.

  7. Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakerley, Benjamin R; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome is defined by rapidly progressive oropharyngeal and cervicobrachial weakness associated with areflexia in the upper limbs. Serial nerve conduction studies suggest that PCB represents a localised subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome characterised by axonal rather than demyelinating neuropathy. Many neurologists are unfamiliar with PCB, which is often misdiagnosed as brainstem stroke, myasthenia gravis or botulism. The presence of additional ophthalmoplegia and ataxia indicates overlap with Fisher syndrome. Half of patients with PCB carry IgG anti-GT1a antibodies which often cross-react with GQ1b, whereas most patients with Fisher syndrome carry IgG anti-GQ1b antibodies which always cross-react with GT1a. Significant overlap between the clinical and serological profiles of these patients supports the view that PCB and Fisher syndrome form a continuous spectrum. In this review, we highlight the clinical features of PCB and outline new diagnostic criteria.

  8. Brachial amyotrophic diplegia in the setting of complete HIV viral load suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachia, David; Izzy, Saef; Ionete, Carolina; Salameh, Johnny

    2012-12-06

    Brachial amyotrophic diplegia (BAD) is a rare segmental form of motor neuron disease which presents with asymmetric lower motor neuron weakness largely confined to the upper extremities (UE). In the case being reported, a 62-year-old gentleman on antiretroviral treatment since 1993, presented with left-arm weakness in 2007 that quickly progressed to involve the right arm. Complete HIV-viral load suppression had been achieved since 2003. Examination revealed lower motor neuron weakness in both UEs, worse proximally than distally and normal strength in the lower extremities (LEs). Nerve conduction studies showed reduced amplitudes of bilateral median and ulnar nerves' motor responses. Needle electromyography of bilateral UE showed active and chronic denervation/reinnervation changes with normal findings in both LEs. MRI of the cervical spine showed cord atrophy. This is the first case report describing a patient who presented with BAD in the setting of complete HIV-viral load suppression for many years.

  9. Neuro-Myelomatosis of the Brachial Plexus - An Unusual Site of Disease Visualized by FDG-PET/CT: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Shimomura, Hideo; Totsune, Tomoko; Terao, Chiaki; Miyazawa, Hidemitsu; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2017-05-01

    BACKGROUND Peripheral or cranial nerve root dysfunction secondary to invasion of the CNS in multiple myeloma is a rare clinical event that is frequently mistaken for other diagnoses. We describe the clinical utility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT scanning for diagnosing neuro-myelomatosis. CASE REPORT A 63-year-old woman whose chief complaints were right shoulder and upper extremity pain underwent MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. MRI revealed a non-specific brachial plexus tumor. 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated intense FDG uptake in multiple intramedullary lesions and in the adjacent right brachial plexus, indicating extramedullary neural involvement associated with multiple myeloma, which was confirmed later by a bone marrow biopsy. CONCLUSIONS This is the first reported case of neuro-myelomatosis of the brachial plexus. It highlights the utility of the 18F-FDG PET/CT scan as a valuable diagnostic modality.

  10. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Takeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90 of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. METHODS: Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous. The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability or the same concentration (0.9 probability. Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4 h after the blockade. RESULTS: MEC90 was 0.241% [R 2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4 h. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations.

  11. Pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia following lightning: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Menka

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications following lightning are rare and occur in form of temporary neurological deficits of central origin. Involvement of peripheral nervous system is extremely rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Isolated unilateral pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia has never been reported in the literature. Steroids have long been used for treatment of neuropraxia. However, their use in lightning neural injury is unique and requires special mention. We report a rare case of lightning-induced unilateral complete flaccid paralysis along with sensory loss in a young patient. Lightning typically causes central nervous involvement in various types of motor and sensory deficit. Surprisingly, the nerve conduction study showed the involvement of peripheral nervous system involvement. Steroids were administered and there was significant improvement in neurological functions within a short span of days. Patients' functions in the affected limb were normal in one month. Our case was interesting since it is the first such case in the literature where lightning has caused such a rare instance of unilateral pan-brachial plexus lesion. Such cases when seen, raises the possibility of more common central nervous system pathology rather than peripheral involvement. However, such lesions can be purely benign forms of peripheral nerve neuropraxia, which can be managed by steroid treatment without leaving any long-term neurological deficits.

  12. Inhibition of motoneurons during the cutaneous silent period in the spinal cord of the turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær; Alaburda, Aidas

    2012-01-01

    motoneurons in the isolated carapace-spinal cord preparation from adult turtles during rhythmic scratch-like reflex. Electrical stimulation of cutaneous nerves induced CSP-like suppression of motor nerve firing during rhythmic network activity. The stimulus that generated the CSP-like suppression of motor......The transient suppression of motor activity in the spinal cord after a cutaneous stimulus is termed the cutaneous silent period (CSP). It is not known if CSP is due to suppression of the premotor network or direct inhibition of motoneurons. This issue was examined by intracellular recordings from...

  13. Chemotherapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0196 TITLE: CHEMOTHERAPY OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: DR. ARBA AGER CONTRACTING...DATE October 2012 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 01Sep2010–31 Dec 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHEMOTHERAPY OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS 5a...was used for tabulation of data and statistically analyzing the results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Leishmania major, Cutaneous Leishmaniasis , antileishmanial

  14. Anatomic Variations in the Palmar Cutaneous Branch of the Median ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The operative decompression of the carpal tunnel is one of the commonest elective surgical procedures carried out on the hand. One of most troublesome sequela is the painful neuroma which follows the damage to the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBMN).[1-3] Attention has been called to the injury to ...

  15. A study of the formation and branching pattern of brachial plexus and its variations in adult human cadavers of north Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal V Pattanshetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: The brachial plexus is highly variable, in its formation and branching pattern thus, knowledge of its anatomical patterns, may be insufficient for the surgeon operating on or around these nerves or for the regional anesthesiologist working in this area. Therefore, the present study was an attempt to study further about variations of brachial plexus encountered during routine dissection classes. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was carried out by dissection of 60 upper limbs of 30 cadavers, in the age group of 18 to 85 years, obtained during a study period of 2 years from the Department of Anatomy. The plexus was studied in its entire course commencing from the formation in cervical region, course through root of the neck and axilla, up to the main terminal branches of the upper extremity. During the dissection, variations of brachial plexus pertaining to its formation from the roots, trunks, divisions and cords and the branching pattern were observed and data was collected. Results: Out of the 60 cadaveric upper limbs studied for the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus, 2 limbs (3.33% were pre-fixed plexuses. Fusion of adjacent trunks was detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. Variations in branches of lateral cord were detected in 8 limbs (13.33%. Among Posterior cord variations 2-thoracodorsal nerves were detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. All the other branches from brachial plexus had been found to have no anatomical variations. Conclusion: In the present study, an attempt has been made to know the possible variations of the brachial plexus. Though the variations mentioned may not alter the normal functioning of the limb of the individual, but knowledge of the variations is of prime importance to be kept in mind, during anaesthetic and surgical procedures.

  16. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized, Parallel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-10-01

    Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n = 47; SCBPB group: n = 46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5-C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 μg increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P = 0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P blocks. However, SCBPB produces a better motor blockade and a lower incidence of Horner's syndrome than ISBPB.

  17. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legionnaires’ Disease & Pontiac Fever) Chapter 3 - Leishmaniasis, Visceral Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous Barbara L. Herwaldt, Alan J. Magill Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease found in parts of ...

  18. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy with neurotmesis of C5 and avulsion of C6: supraclavicular reconstruction strategies and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, M J A; Pondaag, W

    2014-10-15

    Nerve reconstruction strategies for restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder function in patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy with neurotmesis of C5 and avulsion of C6 are not well defined and the outcomes are unclear. From 1990 to 2008, nerve surgery was performed in 421 patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. This study focused on thirty-four infants who had a neurotmetic lesion of C5 and avulsion or intraforaminal neurotmesis of C6, irrespective of C7. The C8 and T1 functions were intact. Intraplexal transfer of C6 to C5 with direct coaptation was preferred for restoration of elbow flexion. The suprascapular nerve was reconnected either by extra-intraplexal transfer of the accessory nerve or by grafting from C5 to restore shoulder function. Additional grafts were attached from C5 to the C5 contribution of the posterior division of the superior trunk when technically possible. Transfer of either the C6 anterior root filaments or the entire C6 nerve to C5 was performed in seventeen patients (group A) with direct coaptation in fifteen of them. Grafting from C5 to the anterior division of the superior trunk was performed in the remaining seventeen infants (group B). An accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer was applied in twenty-nine infants. The suprascapular nerve was reconnected in five patients by grafting from C5. It was possible to attach one, two, or three additional grafts from C5 to the posterior division of the superior trunk in twenty-one patients. All infants had biceps muscle recovery to a Medical Research Council (MRC) grade of ≥4, twenty-two (65%) of the thirty-four patients obtained Mallet grade-IV abduction, and eleven (32%) of the thirty-four obtained Mallet grade-IV external rotation. In patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who have neurotmesis of C5 and avulsion of C6, elbow flexion can be successfully restored with supraclavicular intraplexal reconstruction with use of C5 as the proximal outlet. However, shoulder

  19. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  20. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pattern and prevalence of variations that occur in the supraclavicular part of the brachial plexus in a. Kenyan population. Study design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Materials and methods: Ninety-four brachial plexuses from forty-seven formalin fixed cadavers were displayed by gross

  1. Anomalous patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    block Background: Structural variations in the patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial plexus have drawn attentions both in anatomy and anaesthesia. Method: An observational study. Results: The brachial plexus was carefully inspected in both the right and left arms in 90 Nigerian cadavers, comprising of 74 ...

  2. Validation of brachial artery pressure reconstruction from finger arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Berend E.; van der Sar, Gertrude L.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Wesseling, Karel H.; Bos, Willem Jan W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Measurement of finger artery pressure with Finapres offers noninvasive continuous blood pressure, which, however, differs from brachial artery pressure. Generalized waveform filtering and level correction may convert the finger artery pressure waveform to a brachial waveform. An upper-arm

  3. Reconstruction of brachial artery pressure from noninvasive finger pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. J.; van Goudoever, J.; van Montfrans, G. A.; van den Meiracker, A. H.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse wave distortions, mainly caused by reflections, and pressure gradients, caused by flow in the resistive vascular tree, may cause differences between finger and brachial artery pressures. These differences may limit the use of finger pressure measurements. We investigated whether brachial

  4. Advanced radiological work-up as an adjunct to decision in early reconstructive surgery in brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkman Anders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As neurophysiologic tests may not reveal the extent of brachial plexus injury at the early stage, the role of early radiological work-up has become increasingly important. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concordance between the radiological and clinical findings with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injuries. Methods Seven consecutive male patients (median age 33; range 15-61 with brachial plexus injuries, caused by motor cycle accidents in 5/7 patients, who underwent extensive radiological work-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography myelography (CT-M or both were included in this retrospective study. A total of 34 spinal nerve roots were evaluated by neuroradiologists at two different occasions. The degree of agreement between the radiological findings of every individual nerve root and the intraoperative findings was estimated by calculation of kappa coefficient (К-value. Using the operative findings as a gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of the clinical findings and the radiological findings were estimated. Results The diagnostic accuracy of radiological findings was 88% compared with 65% for the clinical findings. The concordance between the radiological findings and the intraoperative findings was substantial (К = 0.76 compared with only fair (К = 0.34 for the clinical findings. There were two false positive and two false negative radiological findings (sensitivity and PPV of 0.90; specificity and NPV of 0.87. Conclusions The advanced optimized radiological work-up used showed high reliability and substantial agreement with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

  5. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasani, F.; Javanbakht, J.; Samani, R.; Shirani, D.

    2014-01-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammato...

  6. Axillary nerve injury: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, S P; Moran, E A

    2001-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is infrequently diagnosed but is not a rare occurrence. Injury to the nerve may result from a traction force or blunt trauma applied to the shoulder. The most common zone of injury is just proximal to the quadrilateral space. Atraumatic causes of neuropathy include brachial neuritis and quadrilateral space syndrome. The vast majority of patients recover with non-operative treatment. Baseline electromyographic and nerve conduction studies should be obtained within 4 weeks after injury, with a follow-up evaluation at 12 weeks. If no clinical or electromyographic improvement is noted, surgery may be appropriate. The results of operative repair are best if surgery is performed within 3 to 6 months from the injury. Surgical options include neurolysis, nerve grafting, and neurotization. The results of repair of axillary nerve injuries have been good compared with treatment of other peripheral nerve lesions, due to the monofascicular composition of the nerve and the relatively short distance between the zone of injury and the motor end-plate.

  7. Algorithm for bionic hand reconstruction in patients with global brachial plexopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Laura A; Sturma, Agnes; Mayer, Johannes A; Pittermann, Anna; Salminger, Stefan; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Global brachial plexus lesions with multiple root avulsions are among the most severe nerve injuries, leading to lifelong disability. Fortunately, in most cases primary and secondary reconstructions provide a stable shoulder and restore sufficient arm function. Restoration of biological hand function, however, remains a reconstructive goal that is difficult to reach. The recently introduced concept of bionic reconstruction overcomes biological limitations of classic reconstructive surgery to restore hand function by combining selective nerve and muscle transfers with elective amputation of the functionless hand and its replacement with a prosthetic device. The authors present their treatment algorithm for bionic hand reconstruction and report on the management and long-term functional outcomes of patients with global brachial plexopathies who have undergone this innovative treatment. METHODS Thirty-four patients with posttraumatic global brachial plexopathies leading to loss of hand function consulted the Center for Advanced Restoration of Extremity Function between 2011 and 2015. Of these patients, 16 (47%) qualified for bionic reconstruction due to lack of treatment alternatives. The treatment algorithm included progressive steps with the intent of improving the biotechnological interface to allow optimal prosthetic hand replacement. In 5 patients, final functional outcome measurements were obtained with the Action Arm Research Test (ARAT), the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. RESULTS In all 5 patients who completed functional assessments, partial hand function was restored with bionic reconstruction. ARAT scores improved from 3.4 ± 4.3 to 25.4 ± 12.7 (p = 0.043; mean ± SD) and SHAP scores improved from 10.0 ± 1.6 to 55 ± 19.7 (p = 0.042). DASH scores decreased from 57.9 ± 20.6 to 32 ± 28.6 (p = 0.042), indicating decreased disability. CONCLUSIONS The authors

  8. Peripheral nerve injuries: A retrospective survey of 1124 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, João A; Graça, Carla R; Ferreira, Vanessa F M

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) remain an important health problem often leading to severe motor disabilities predominantly in the younger population. To analyze our experience of clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation (EDX) of PNIs over a 26-year period. Between 1989 and 2014, 1124 consecutive patients with 1418 PNIs were referred for clinical as well as EDX evaluation. These PNIs involved upper and lower limbs as well as the facial nerves. Patients with iatrogenic lesions and spinal cord/spinal root lesions were excluded from this analysis. Brachial plexus (BP) injuries with associated or not with root avulsions were considered as one particular nerve and was include in the study as BP. The etiological categories of the sustained trauma included vehicular accidents, penetrating injuries, falls, gunshot wounds, car accidents involving pedestrians, sports injuries, and miscellaneous injuries. The mean age of our patients was 34.2 years and most were males (76.7%). Majority (80.9%) of the PNIs were isolated injuries. Combined lesions most commonly involved the ulnar and median nerves. Upper-limb PNIs accounted for 72.6% of our patients. The ulnar nerve was injured most often, either singly or in combination. Vehicular accidents were the most common causes of injury (46.4%), affecting the brachial BP or the radial, fibular, or sciatic nerves. Penetrating trauma (23.9%) commonly affected the ulnar and the median nerves. Falls and gunshot wounds frequently affected the ulnar, radial, and median nerves. Sports injuries, mostly soccer related, affected predominantly the fibular nerves. BP injuries were considerably more common in accidents involving motorcycles than those involving cars (46.1% vs. 17.1%), and root avulsions was more frequently associated in these cases. Most PNIs were caused by vehicular accidents and penetrating trauma, and affected young men. Overall, ulnar nerve, primary BP, and median nerve PNIs were the most prevalent lesions.

  9. Hand function after nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, G; Rosén, B

    2007-02-01

    Treatment of injuries to major nerve trunks in the hand and upper extremity remains a major and challenging reconstructive problem. Such injuries may cause long-lasting disabilities in terms of lost fine sensory and motor functions. Nowadays there is no surgical repair technique that can ensure recovery of tactile discrimination in the hand of an adult patient following nerve repair while very young individuals usually regain a complete recovery of functional sensibility. Post-traumatic nerve regeneration is a complex biological process where the outcome depends on multiple biological and environmental factors such as survival of nerve cells, axonal regeneration rate, extent of axonal misdirection, type of injury, type of nerve, level of the lesion, age of the patient and compliance to training. A major problem is the cortical functional reorganization of hand representation which occurs as a result of axonal misdirection. Although protective sensibility usually occurs following nerve repair, tactile discriminative functions seldom recover--a direct result of cortical remapping. Sensory re-education programmes are routinely applied to facilitate understanding of the new sensory patterns provided by the hand. New trends in hand rehabilitation focus on modulation of central nervous processes rather than peripheral factors. Principles are being evolved to maintain the cortical hand representation by using the brain capacity for visuo-tactile and audio-tactile interaction for the initial phase following nerve injury and repair (phase 1). After the start of the re-innervation of the hand (phase 2), selective de-afferentation, such as cutaneous anaesthesia of the forearm of the injured hand, allows expansion of the nerve-injured cortical hand representation, thereby enhancing the effects of sensory relearning. Recent data support the view that training protocols specifically addressing the relearning process substantially increase the possibilities for improved

  10. A comparison between brachial and echocardiographic systolic time intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Systolic time interval (STI is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP and brachial ejection time (bET were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP and ejection time (ET were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r = 0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r  = 0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r = 0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  11. Mechanisms, Treatment, and Patient Outcome of Iatrogenic Injury to the Brachial Plexus-A Retrospective Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Nora Franziska; Antoniadis, Gregor; Grolik, Brigitta; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; König, Ralph; Pedro, Maria Teresa

    2017-11-01

    Injury to the brachial plexus is a devastating condition, with severe impairment of upper extremity function resulting in distinct disability. There are no systematic reports on epidemiology, causative mechanisms, treatment strategies. or outcomes of iatrogenic brachial plexus injury (iBPI). We screened all cases of iatrogenic nerve injuries recorded between 2007 and 2017 at a single specialized institution. Mechanism of iBPI, type of previous causative intervention, location and type of the lesion as well as the type of revision surgery and functional patient outcome were analyzed. We identified 14 cases of iBPI, which all presented with significant impairment of upper extremity motor function (at least 1 muscle Medical Research Council grade 0). Neuropathic pain was present in most patients (11/14). Orthopedic shoulder procedures such as rotator cuff fixation, arthroplasty, and repositioning of a clavicle fracture accounted for iBPI in 7 of 14 patients. Other reasons for iBPI were resection or biopsy of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3 patients or lymph node situated at the cervicomediastinal area in 2 patients. Mechanisms also included transaxillary rib resection in one and sternotomy in another patient. The treatment of iBPI was conducted according to each individual's needs and included neurolysis in 4, nerve grafting in 9, and nerve transfers in 1 patient. We found improved symptoms after treatment in most patients (11/14). Most common causes for iBPI were shoulder surgery and resection or biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumor and lymph nodes. Early referral to specialized peripheral nerve centers may help to improve functional patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of two approaches of infraclavicular brachial plexus block for orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Trehan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus in infraclavicular region can be blocked by various approaches. Aim of this study was to compare two approaches (coracoid and clavicular regarding success rate, discomfort during performance of block, tourniquet tolerance and complications. The study was randomised, prospective and observer blinded. Sixty adult patients of both sexes of ASA status 1 and 2 requiring orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus were randomly assigned to receive nerve stimulator guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block either by lateral coracoid approach (group L, n = 30 or medial clavicular approach (group M, n = 30 with 25-30 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sensory block in the distribution of five main nerves distal to elbow, motor block (Grade 1-4, discomfort during performance of block and tourniquet pain were recorded by a blinded observer. Clinical success of block was defined as the block sufficient to perform the surgery without any supplementation. All the five nerves distal to elbow were blocked in 77 and 67% patients in groups L and M respectively. Successful block was observed in 87 and 73% patients in groups L and M, respectively (P > 0.05. More patients had moderate to severe discomfort during performance of block due to positioning of limb in group M (14 vs. 8 in groups M and L. Tourniquet was well tolerated in most patients with successful block in both groups. No serious complication was observed. Both the approaches were equivalent regarding success rate, tourniquet tolerance and safety. Coracoid approach seemed better as positioning of operative limb was less painful, coracoids process was easy to locate and the technique was easy to learn and master.

  13. Refinement of myotome values in the upper limb: Evidence from brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S W; Brown, M J C; Hems, T J

    2017-02-01

    We reviewed patients with partial supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries in order to refine the myotome values of the upper limb. Forty-two patients with defined partial injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus were reviewed from a prospective database. The injuries patterns covered C5, C5-6, C5-7, C5-8, C7-T1 and C8-T1 roots. Upper plexus injuries were classified on the basis of surgical exploration and intraoperative stimulation and lower plexus injuries from MRI. Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) was paralyzed in C5-7 injuries, in addition to paralysis of deltoid, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and biceps, when compared to C5-6 injuries. Complete paralysis of Flexor Digitorum Profundus (FDP) and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis (FDS) to all digits was identified in C7-T1 injuries. In C5-8 injuries weakness was noted in FDP of ulnar digits and intrinsics innervated by the ulnar nerve, while in C8-T1 injuries paralysis was noted in the FDP to the radial digits. All patients with C8-T1 injuries had paralysis of FDS and the thenar muscles. In upper plexus injuries paralysis of FCR indicated involvement of C7 root in addition to C5 and C6 roots. The results provide new detail of innervation of muscles acting on the hand. Flexor muscles and intrinsic muscles of the thumb and radial fingers (median nerve) have an important contribution from T1, while for those acting on the ulnar digits (ulnar nerve) the main contribution is from C8 with some input from C7. T1 also gives consistent innervation to extensor pollicis longus. A revised myotome chart for the upper limb is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP.

  15. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  16. Ecthyma mimicking cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moteb K. Alotaibi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic non-healing ulcerated skin lesion can be a diagnostic dilemma for the dermatologist in an area endemic with cutaneous leishmaniasis. The differential diagnosis may include a large list of cutaneous diseases ranging from infection to advanced skin cancers. Ecthyma is cutaneous infection caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus bacteria with dermal and subcutaneous invasion. Ecthyma is a differential diagnosis for cutaneous Leishmaniasis presenting as an ulcerated lesion in endemic areas. Being in endemic area for cutaneous leishmaniasis, general physicians and some dermatologist may miss other important and common differential diagnosis, resulting in delay of proper management and increase risk of complications. Our aim in this work is to draw the attentions toward better management while dealing with ulcerated cutaneous lesions. Method: Case reporting. Result: This is a case of a 60 year-old Sudanese male patient who presented with a chronic nonhealing ulcerated lesions at his right forearm for 4 months. The patient was misdiagnosed as a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis and he was treated with anti-leishmanial therapy with no improvement. He was finally diagnosed to have staphylococcal ecthyma that successfully responded to oral antibiotic. Conclusion: Dealing with chronic ulcerated skin lesion requires a carful and detailed history taking and a good knowledge of the common and endemic diseases in the patient’s area supported by proper laboratory studies

  17. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for pinched nerve is rest for the affected area. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or corticosteroids ... Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page ...

  18. Diffuse spinal and intercostal nerve involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, B.; Oguz, K.K.; Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Tan, E. [Dept. of Neurology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon demyelinating disorder with a relapsing and remitting or continuously progressive course. Hypertrophic nerve roots, sometimes associated with gadolinium enhancement, has been reported more commonly in lumbar spine and less commonly in the brachial plexus and cervical roots; however, diffuse involvement of intercostal nerves bilaterally has never been reported previously. We present MRI findings which include diffuse enlargement and mild enhancement of roots and extraforaminal segments of nerves in all segments except a short segment between T12-L2 as well as all the intercostal nerves in a case of CIPD with a 10-year history. (orig.)

  19. Epidemiology of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries Evaluated with Electrodiagnostic Studies in a Tertiary Care Hospital Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Gerardo E; Torres, Ruben Y

    2016-06-01

    To describe the etiologies and frequency of traumatic peripheral nerve injury (TPNI) seen in the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital in Puerto Rico. The charts of patients who underwent an electrodiagnostic study for a TPNI were revised. The main outcome measure was the frequency of each injury by anatomic location, specific nerve or nerves affected, injury mechanism, and injury severity. One hundred forty-six charts were included, and in them were listed a total of 163 nerve injuries; 109 (74.7%) cases were men and 37 (25.3%) were women. The mean age was 33.6 years. The facial nerve, the brachial plexus, and the ulnar nerve were more frequently injured than any other nerve or nerve bundle. The ulnar, sciatic, median, and radial nerves and the lumbosacral plexus were more commonly injured as a result of gunshot wounds than of any other mechanism of injury. The brachial plexus was most frequently injured in motor vehicle accidents and the facial nerve injuries most commonly had an iatrogenic cause. In terms of injury severity, 84.2% were incomplete and 15.8% were complete. TPNIs are common in young individuals and potentially can lead to significant disability. Further studies are needed to assess the socioeconomic impact of these injuries on our population.

  20. Shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration with nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Vekris, Marios; Lykissas, Marios; Gkiatas, Ioannis; Mitsionis, Gregory; Beris, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    In upper brachial plexus palsy patients, loss of shoulder function and elbow flexion is obvious as the result of paralysed muscles innervated by the suprascapular, axillary and musculocutaneus nerve. Shoulder stabilisation, restoration of abduction and external rotation are important as more distal functions will be affected by the shoulder situation. Between 2005 and 2011, eleven patients with upper type brachial plexus palsy were operated on with triceps nerve branch transfer to anterior axillary nerve branch and spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. All patients were men with ages ranged from 21 to 35 years (average, 27.4 years). The interval between injury and surgery ranged from 4 to 11 months (average, 7.2 months). Atrophy of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscle and subluxation at the glenohumeral joint was obvious in all patients preoperatively. During the pre-op examination all patients had at least muscle grading 4 on the triceps muscle. The mean post-operative value of shoulder abduction was 112.2° (range: 60-170°) while preoperatively none of the patients was able for abduction (pshoulder external rotation was 66° (range: 35-110°) while preoperatively none of them was able for external rotation (pshoulder abduction were significantly better that those of external rotation (p=0.0004). The postoperative average muscle grading for shoulder abduction according the MRC scale was 3.6±0.5 and for the shoulder external rotation was 3.2±0.4. Combined nerve transfer by using the spinal accessory nerve for suprascapular nerve neurotisation and one of the triceps nerve branches for axillary nerve and teres minor branch neurotisation is an excellent choice for shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bionic reconstruction to restore hand function after brachial plexus injury: a case series of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Roche, Aidan D; Salminger, Stefan; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hofer, Christian; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-30

    Brachial plexus injuries can permanently impair hand function, yet present surgical reconstruction provides only poor results. Here, we present for the first time bionic reconstruction; a combined technique of selective nerve and muscle transfers, elective amputation, and prosthetic rehabilitation to regain hand function. Between April 2011, and May 2014, three patients with global brachial plexus injury including lower root avulsions underwent bionic reconstruction. Treatment occurred in two stages; first, to identify and create useful electromyographic signals for prosthetic control, and second, to amputate the hand and replace it with a mechatronic prosthesis. Before amputation, the patients had a specifically tailored rehabilitation programme to enhance electromyographic signals and cognitive control of the prosthesis. Final prosthetic fitting was applied as early as 6 weeks after amputation. Bionic reconstruction successfully enabled prosthetic hand use in all three patients. After 3 months, mean Action Research Arm Test score increased from 5·3 (SD 4·73) to 30·7 (14·0). Mean Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure score improved from 9·3 (SD 1·5) to 65·3 (SD 19·4). Mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score improved from 46·5 (SD 18·7) to 11·7 (SD 8·42). For patients with global brachial plexus injury with lower root avulsions, who have no alternative treatment, bionic reconstruction offers a means to restore hand function. Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research & Economy, and European Research Council Advanced Grant DEMOVE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MR-myelography for the brachial plexus injury. Comparison of the MR-myelography, myelography and CT myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Yabe, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Ikuo; Takayama, Shinichiro; Yamanaka, Kazuyoshi; Ichikawa, Toru [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-03-01

    The usefulness of MR-myelography was evaluated in 6 patients with brachial plexus injury. Pseudo-meningocele was confirmed clearly on MR-myelography in 4 patients with whole plexus injury. In 2 patients with upper plexus injury, damages of C6 nerve root were confirmed but pseudo-meningocele was not found on MR-myelography. MR-myelography is noninvasive and the accuracy is not inferior to myelography. Because MR-myelography needs no contrast media and the images can be observed in three-dimensional direction, it is expected in future application. (H.O.)

  3. Ultrasound-guided block of the axillary nerve: a volunteer study of a new method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Asghar, S; Andersen, H L

    2011-01-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) is the gold standard for perioperative pain management in shoulder surgery. However, a more distal technique would be desirable to avoid the side effects and potential serious complications of IBPB. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a...... and describe a new method to perform an ultrasound-guided specific axillary nerve block....

  4. PRIMARY CUTANEOUS LEIOMYSARCOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Shubhangi Vinayak Agale; Sumit Grover; Rahul Zode; Shilpa Hande

    2011-01-01

    Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leio...

  5. Recurrent cutaneous leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes,Ciro Martins; Damasco,Fabiana dos Santos; Morais,Orlando Oliveira de; Paula,Carmen Dea Ribeiro de; Sampaio,Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an 18-year-old male patient who, after two years of inappropriate treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis, began to show nodules arising at the edges of the former healing scar. He was immune competent and denied any trauma. The diagnosis of recurrent cutaneous leishmaniasis was made following positive culture of aspirate samples. The patient was treated with N-methylglucamine associated with pentoxifylline for 30 days. Similar cases require special attention mainly because...

  6. Ankle-brachial index in HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martos Francisco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prognosis for patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has improved with the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Evidence over recent years suggests that the incidence of cardiovascular disease is increasing in HIV patients. The ankle-brachial index (ABI is a cheap and easy test that has been validated in the general population. Abnormal ABI values are associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. To date, six series of ABI values in persons with HIV have been published, but none was a prospective study. No agreement exists concerning the risk factors for an abnormal ABI, though its prevalence is clearly higher in these patients than in the general population. Whether this higher prevalence of an abnormal ABI is associated with a higher incidence of vascular events remains to be determined.

  7. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies, clinical, radiological and neurophysiological findings from a tertiary centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the clinical characteristics, aetiology, neuro-physiological characteristics, imaging findings and other investigations in a cohort of patients with non-traumatic brachial plexopathy (BP). METHODS: A 3-year retrospective study of patients with non-traumatic BP identified by electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS). Clinical information was retrieved from patients\\' medical charts. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were identified. Causes of BP included neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) (48%), neoplastic (16%), radiation (8%), post infectious (12%), obstetric (4%), rucksack injury (4%), thoracic outlet syndrome (4%) and iatrogenic (4%). Patients with NA presented acutely in 50%. The onset was subacute in all others. Outcome was better for patients with NA. All patients with neoplastic disease had a previous history of cancer. MRI was abnormal in 3\\/16 patients (18.8%). PET scanning diagnosed metastatic plexopathy in two cases. CONCLUSIONS: NA was the most common cause of BP in our cohort and was associated with a more favourable outcome. The authors note potentially discriminating clinical characteristics in our population that aid in the assessment of patients with brachial plexopathies. We advise NCS and EMG be performed in all patients with suspected plexopathy. Imaging studies are useful in selected patients.

  8. Correlation between motor function recovery and daily living activity outcomes after brachial plexus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Ferreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To establish the correlation between clinical evaluation of motor function recovery and daily living activities in 30 patients with upper traumatic brachial plexus injury submitted to surgery. Methods The score of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire and the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LSUHSC scale were determined in 30 patients. Epidemiologic factors were also examined and correlations were determined. Results There was a significant correlation between the clinical evaluation and the daily living activities after a 12-month period (r = 0.479 and p = 0.007. A direct correlation was observed between the functional recovery of the upper limb and the time between injury and surgery (r = 0.554 and p = 0.001. The LSUHSC scores (p = 0.049 and scores from the DASH questionnaire (p = 0.013 were better among patients who returned to work. Conclusions Clinical evaluation and daily living activities in adult patients who underwent nerve transfer after brachial plexus injury showed significant and measurable improvements.

  9. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul David Weyker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal sciatic nerve block. Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. Diagnostic studies and potential mechanisms for nerve injury are discussed.

  10. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyker, Paul David; Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Pham, Thoha M

    2016-01-01

    Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal sciatic nerve block. Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. Diagnostic studies and potential mechanisms for nerve injury are discussed.

  11. Radiological Imaging Findings of a Case with Vertebral Osteoid Osteoma Leading to Brachial Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms.

  12. Pharyngeal-Cervical-Brachial Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap; John J Millichap

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from National University Hospital, Singapore, review the clinical features of 13 cases of pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and outline new diagnostic criteria.

  13. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  14. Case Report- Une cause rare de plexopathie brachiale : une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 50 ans ayant une histoire de cancer du sein et qui accuse une symptomatologie d'atteinte du plexus brachial. L'IRM montre une masse qui envahie le plexus brachial compatible avec une métastase. L'IRM est très utile pour le diagnostic et l'orientation thérapeutique des ...

  15. HIGH BIFURCATION OF THE BRACHIAL ARTERY - A COMMON VARIANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 28 cadavers were dissected for variations in the bifurcation of brachial artery bilaterally {n=56} at the department of anatomy, Rangaraya Medical College, Kakinada, A.P. from 2010 to 2015 . Found variations during routine dissections for first year MBBS students. The findings have thrown light on the common as well as rare variants in the anatomy of brachial artery bifurcation and the course of radial and ulnar arteries in current study

  16. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4h after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R(2): 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4h. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of two bupivacaine concentrations on axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo H C; Takeda, Alexandre; Barreto, Cleber N; Faria, Bernadete; Assunção, Nilson A

    2017-10-16

    The risk of systemic bupivacaine toxicity is a persistent problem, which makes its pharmacokinetic study fundamental for regional anesthesia safety. There is little evidence of its influence on plasma peak at different concentrations. The present study compares two bupivacaine concentrations to establish how the concentration affects this drug plasma peak in axillary brachial plexus block. Postoperative latency and analgesia were also compared. 30 patients were randomized. In the 0.25% Group, 0.25% bupivacaine (10mL) was injected per nerve. In the 0.5% Group, 0.5% bupivacaine (5mL) was injected per nerve. Peripheral blood samples were collected during the first 2hours after the blockade. For sample analyses, high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used. Plasma peak occurred 45minutes after the blockade, with no difference between groups at the assessed time-points. Plasma peak was 933.97 ± 328.03 ng.mL-1 (mean ± SD) in 0.25% Group and 1022.79 ± 253.81 ng.mL-1 in 0.5% Group (p = 0.414). Latency was lower in 0.5% Group than in 0.25% Group (10.67 ± 3.71 × 17.33min ± 5.30, respectively, p = 0.004). No patient had pain within the first 4hours after the blockade. For axillary brachial plexus block, there was no difference in bupivacaine plasma peak despite the use of different concentrations with the same local anesthetic mass. The concentration inversely influenced latency. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  18. Brachial and lumbar plexuses in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI assessment including apparent diffusion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Yuko; Sato, Noriko; Yamashita, Fumio; Kida, Jiro; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Tomoko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Masayuki; Komaki, Hirofumi [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Saitama Medial University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Iruma-gun, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Our purpose was to clarify the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the brachial and lumbar plexuses in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) using various kinds of sequences, including diffusion-weighted images (DWI). We evaluated the MR imaging findings for lumbar and/or brachial nerve plexuses in 13 CIDP patients and 11 normal volunteers. The nerve swelling was evaluated in comparison with normal controls by coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and signal abnormalities were evaluated by coronal STIR, T1-weighted images, and DWIs. The degrees of contrast enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the plexus were also assessed. In the patient group, diffuse enlargement and abnormally high signals were detected in 16 out of 24 plexuses (66.7%) on STIR, a slightly high signal was detected in 12 of 24 plexuses (50%) on T1-weighted images, and a high-intensity signal was detected in 10 of 18 plexuses (55.6%) on DWIs with high ADC values. Contrast enhancement of the plexuses was revealed in 6 of 19 plexuses (31.6%) and was mild in all cases. There were statistically significant differences between the ADC values of patients with either swelling or abnormal signals and those of both normal volunteers and patients without neither swelling nor abnormal signals. There were no relationships between MR imaging and any clinical findings. STIR is sufficient to assist clinicians in diagnosing CIDP. T1-weighted images and DWIs seemed useful for speculating about the pathological changes in swollen plexuses in CIDP patients. (orig.)

  19. C8 cross transfer for the treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Carozzo, Claude; Thibaut, Jean-Laurent; Escriou, Catherine; Hidalgo, Antoine; Blot, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical nerve 8 cross-transfer technique (C8CT) as a part of surgical treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) in the dog. Case series. Client-owned dogs suspected to have caudal BPA based on neurological examination and electrophysiological testing (n = 3). The distal stump of the surgically transected contralateral C8 ventral branch (donor) was bridged to the proximal stump of the avulsed C8 ventral branch (recipient) and secured with 9-0 polypropylene suture under an operating microscope. A carpal panarthrodesis was performed on the injured limb after C8CT. Surgical exploration confirmed avulsion of nerve roots C7, C8, and T1 in all cases. There was no evidence of an iatrogenic effect on the donor forelimb. Gradual improvement in function of the affected forelimb occurred in all dogs, with eventual recovery of voluntary elbow extension. Reinnervation was evident in EMG recordings 6 months postoperatively in all three dogs. Stimulation of the donor C8 ventral branch led to motor evoked potentials in the avulsed side triceps brachialis and radial carpus extensor muscles. Variable functional outcome was observed in the 3 dogs during clinical evaluation 3-4 years after surgery. Digital abrasion wounds, distal interphalangeal infectious arthritis, and self-mutilation necessitated distal phalanx amputation of digits 3 and 4 in 2 dogs. C8CT provided partial reconnection of the donor C8 ventral branch to the avulsed brachial plexus in the 3 dogs of this series. Reinnervation resulted in active elbow extension and promoted functional recovery in the affected limb. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. [Intraneural cyst of the supraescapular nerve: Atypical cause of peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome. Case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Beatriz; Isla, Alberto; Román de Aragón, María; Hernández, Borja; García Feijoo, Pablo; Palpán Flores, Alexis; Santiago, Susana

    2017-11-20

    Intraneural cysts are benign lesions located within the epineurium of some peripheral nerves and their aetiopathogenesis is controversial. Most are located at the level of the lower limbs. In the upper limbs, the most frequently affected nerve is the ulnar nerve. Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome due to the formation of an intraneural cyst is rare. In this article, we show a new case and perform a literature review of intraneural cysts located in the suprascapular nerve. We present a 49-year-old woman with pain in the lateral shoulder region of several months' evolution. A brachial plexus MR showed a tumour of approximately 2×1.5cm, with a cystic appearance, in relation to the upper trunk of the right brachial plexus. We used a supra-infraclavicular approach. The cystic tumour affected the suprascapular nerve. After locating a zone on the surface without nervous fascicles, we performed a partial resection of the capsule and emptying of the cyst, with a xanthochromic gelatinous content. The anatomopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of intraneural cyst. The suprascapular nerve is a mixed nerve, coming from the upper trunk. It provides the motor branches to the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle. Compression of the suprascapular nerve leads to atrophy of these muscles. This entity is one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with pain irradiating to the shoulder, and its correct treatment often results in complete remission of symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Results of Operative Treatment of Brachial Plexus Injury Resulting from Shoulder Dislocation: A Study with A Long-Term Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkowska, Olga; Martynkiewicz, Jacek; Mizia, Sylwia; Bąk, Michał; Gosk, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    Injury to the infraclavicular brachial plexus is an uncommon but serious complication of shoulder dislocation. This work aims to determine the effectiveness of operative treatment in patients with this type of injury. Thirty-three patients (26 men and 7 women; mean age, 45 years and 3 months) treated operatively for brachial plexus injury resulting from shoulder dislocation between the years 2000 and 2013 were included in this retrospective case series. Motor function of affected limbs was assessed pre- and postoperatively with the use of the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale. Sensory function in the areas innervated by ulnar and median nerves was evaluated with the BMRC scale modified by Omer and Dellon and in the remaining areas with the Highet classification. Follow-up lasted 2-10 years (mean, 5.1 years). Good postoperative recovery of nerve function was observed in 100% of musculocutaneous, 93.3% of radial, 66.7% of median, 64% of axillary, and 50% of ulnar nerve injuries. No recovery was observed in 5.6% of median, 6.7% of radial, 10% of ulnar, and 20% of axillary nerve injuries. Injury to a single nerve was associated with worse treatment outcome than multiple nerve injury. Obtaining improvement in peripheral nerve function after injury resulting from shoulder dislocation may require operative intervention. The type of surgical procedure depends on intraoperative findings: sural nerve grafting in cases of neural elements' disruption, internal neurolysis when intraneural fibrosis is observed, and external neurolysis in the remaining cases. The outcomes of surgical treatment are good, and the risk of intra- and postoperative complications is low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The brachio-brachial arteriovenous fistula: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobantu, Lucian Florin; Iliescu, Vlad Anton; Stiru, Ovidiu; Bubenek, Serban; Novelli, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the mid-term results of the brachio-brachial arteriovenous fistula in patients without adequate superficial venous circulation in the upper limb. Retrospective analysis included 49 patients, in whom a brachio-brachial fistula had been created in an end-to-side configuration. After the maturation period (1 month), the brachial vein was transposed into the subcutaneous tissue. Follow-up study was performed in patients with functional brachio-brachial fistula after the superficialization. Forty-nine patients underwent 49 brachio-brachial fistula constructions. All fistulas were functional. One month after surgery, 40 (81.6%) of these patients had a functional fistula, but in only 39 (79.6%) cases was the fistula suitable for hemodialysis (HD) following transposition to subcutaneous tissue. During the 1-month maturation period, the fistula became occluded in nine patients, and in one case the vein was permeable, so the fistula was functional, but too small to permit HD. Seventeen patients developed temporary edema of the forearm during the first month, in three cases the edema was extended to the entire arm, but no other complications were associated with the procedure. Follow-up lasted 18.0 +/- 11.1 (3-37) months, during which 7/39 patients presented with fistula occlusion. Three patients died and another three were out of the study for various reasons. The brachio-brachial fistula is a good alternative to prosthetic grafts in patients without superficial venous circulation in the upper limb.

  3. Subtraction of unidirectionally encoded images for suppression of heavily isotropic objects (SUSHI) for selective visualization of peripheral nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Niwa, Tetsu; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Luijten, Peter R. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Cauteren, Marc [Philips Healthcare, Asia Pacific, Tokyo (Japan); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce and assess a new magnetic resonance (MR) technique for selective peripheral nerve imaging, called ''subtraction of unidirectionally encoded images for suppression of heavily isotropic objects'' (SUSHI). Six volunteers underwent diffusion-weighted MR neurography (DW-MRN) of the brachial plexus, and seven volunteers underwent DW-MRN of the sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerves at the level of the knee, at 1.5 T. DW-MRN images with SUSHI (DW-MRN{sub SUSHI}) and conventional DW-MRN images (DW-MRN{sub AP}) were displayed using a coronal maximum intensity projection and evaluated by two independent observers regarding signal suppression of lymph nodes, bone marrow, veins, and articular fluids and regarding signal intensity of nerves and ganglia, using five-point grading scales. Scores of DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} were compared to those of DW-MRN{sub AP} using Wilcoxon tests. Suppression of lymph nodes around the brachial plexus and suppression of articular fluids at the level of the knee at DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} was significantly better than that at DW-MRN{sub AP} (P < 0.05). However, overall signal intensity of brachial plexus nerves and ganglia at DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} was significantly lower than that at DW-MRN{sub AP} (P < 0.05). On the other hand, signal intensity of the sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerves at the level of the knee at DW-MRN{sub SUSHI} was judged as significantly better than that at DW-MRN{sub AP} (P < 0.05). The SUSHI technique allows more selective visualization of the sciatic, common peroneal, and tibial nerves at the level of the knee but is less useful for brachial plexus imaging because signal intensity of the brachial plexus nerves and ganglia can considerably be decreased. (orig.)

  4. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach: A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Vazin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniques restricting the total volume to 20 mL. Methods. 120 patients were prospectively randomized to ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block with 20 mL ropivacaine 0.75% at either the supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or axillary level. Multiinjection technique was performed with all three approaches. Primary outcome measure was performance time. Results. Performance time and procedural pain were similar between groups. Needle passes and injection numbers were significantly reduced in the infraclavicular group (P<0.01. Nerve visibility was significantly reduced in the axillary group (P=0.01. Success-rate was significantly increased in the supraclavicular versus the axillary group (P<0.025. Total anesthesia-related time was significantly reduced in the supraclavicular compared to the infraclavicular group (P<0.01. Block duration was significantly increased in the infraclavicular group (P<0.05. No early adverse effects occurred. Conclusion. Supraclavicular and infraclavicular blocks exhibited favorable characteristics compared to the axillary block. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block with the multiinjection intracluster technique exhibited significantly reduced total anesthesia-related time and higher success rate without any early adverse events.

  5. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-09-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol+ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol+ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux·mmHg(-1)) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 vs 1.1±0.19CVC: pmenthol (main effect, pmenthol application during PORH (3.62±0.29 vs. 2.50±0.21flux·mmHg(-1); pmenthol-mediated vasodilation at thermoneutral baseline (1.29±0.19flux·mmHg(-1

  6. Skin temperature after interscalene brachial plexus blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, Henning; Braun, Sebastian; Werdehausen, Robert; Werner, Andreas; Lipfert, Peter; Stevens, Markus F.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In neuraxial anesthesia, increase of skin temperature is an early sign of successful block. Yet, during peripheral nerve block of the lower extremity, increase in skin temperature is a highly sensitive, but late sign of a successful block. We hypothesized that after

  7. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Ulrich; Markus, Christian K; Brederlau, Jörg; Roewer, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Without miniaturization resulting in affordable hand-held ultrasound systems, ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia would not be practicable. Nowadays facilitation of nerve blockade by means of ultrasound is achievable even in remote locations. Non-traumatic technique, visualisation of nerves, surrounding structures and the ability to assess the spread of the injected local anaesthetic combined with a high and predictable success rate are the major advantages when ultrasound is used in regional anaesthetic practise. After a short recapitulation of physical principles related to ultrasound this article focuses on the specific features related to ultrasound-guided identification and blockade of peripheral nerves. Technical pitfalls and their implications for a successful nerve block are put into perspective. Ultrasound can be used to facilitate blockade of the upper and lower extremity. The advantages and limitations of the technique when applied to the classical approaches for blockade of the brachial plexus and the femoral and ischiadic nerve are discussed. Ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia is a valuable tool to improve safety, success rate and patient comfort in daily anaesthetic practise.

  8. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasani, F; Javanbakht, J; Samani, R; Shirani, D

    2016-03-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammatory cells, which were present in the biopsies of the Leishmania-infected dog, were lymphocytes and plasma cells. The histopathology results emphasized the role of dog, particularly asymptomatic dog, as reservoirs for CCL because of the high cutaneous parasite loads. These results may help to explain the maintenance of high transmission rates and numbers of CCL cases in endemic urban regions.

  9. Rehabilitation of Supinator Nerve to Posterior Interosseous Nerve Transfer in Individuals With Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jodie; Cooper, Catherine; Flood, Stephen; Weymouth, Michael; van Zyl, Natasha

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a routine part of the early surgical management of brachial plexus injury, nerve transfers have only recently been used as a reconstructive option for those with tetraplegia. Subsequently, there is limited published literature on the rehabilitation theories and techniques for optimizing outcomes in this population. This article seeks to address this void by presenting our centers' working model for rehabilitation after nerve transfers for individuals with tetraplegia. The model is illustrated with the example of the rehabilitation process after a supinator nerve to posterior interosseous nerve transfer. This nerve transfer reconstructs wrist, finger, and thumb extension. The topics covered in the model include the following: patient selection and presurgical planning/intervention, managing the postoperative healing phase of an individual who is wheelchair dependent, maximizing motor reeducation, increasing muscle strength, and ensuring use in functional tasks. This article provides a platform for further development and collaboration to improve the outcomes of patients who undergo nerve transfers after tetraplegia. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary cutaneous leiomysarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agale, Shubhangi Vinayak; Grover, Sumit; Zode, Rahul; Hande, Shilpa

    2011-11-01

    Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma in a 77-year-old man and discuss the histological features and immunohistochemical profile of this uncommon neoplasm.

  11. Primary cutaneous leiomysarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhangi Vinayak Agale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the skin is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. It arises between the ages of 50 and 70 years, and shows a greater predilection for the lower extremities. Clinically, it presents with solitary, well-circumscribed nodule and, microscopically, consists of fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with "cigar-shaped" nuclei. Local recurrence is known in this tumor. We document a case of primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma in a 77-year-old man and discuss the histological features and immunohistochemical profile of this uncommon neoplasm.

  12. [Cutaneous hemangioma: clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, D; Norat, F; Bardot, J; Magalon, G

    2006-01-01

    Infantile cutaneous hemangioma is a benign vascular tumour present at 10% of the infants. It forms part of the group of the vascular tumours in the classification of International Society for Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA). Clinical diagnosis is easy in its triphasic typical form with a phase of sometimes brutal postnatal growth, a phase of stabilization and a phase of slow secondary regression. Classically, it is presented in the form of a mass or stains cutaneous red, of a subcutaneous mass or, generally, of a mixed form associating the two aspects.

  13. Cutaneous odontogenic sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M J; Scott, M J

    1980-06-01

    A case report and discussion of cutaneous odontogenic sinus tracts, frequently encountered but often misdiagnosed and mistreated, are presented. Awareness that periapical dental abscesses are the most common etiologic factor of cutaneous sinus tracts involving the face and neck will facilitate their early diagnosis and prevent needless treatment or anxiety for the patient. These lesions are often misinterpreted as chronic, resistant to therapy, pyogenic nodules, or granulomas. A high degree of suspicion is required for making the correct diagnosis, and dental roentgenographic studies should routinely be obtained in all such lesions. Permanent healing cannot be achieved unless the original site of infection is located and eradicated.

  14. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biazar, Cyrus; Sigges, Johanna; Patsinakidis, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, we assessed clinical and laboratory characteristics from patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) using the Core Set Questionnaire of the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). 1002 (768 females, 234 males...... included gender, age at onset of disease, LE-specific and LE-nonspecific skin lesions, photosensitivity, laboratory features, and the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus. The mean age at onset of disease was 43.0±15.7 years...

  15. The cutaneous porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg-Brand, Danja; Katugampola, Ruwani; Anstey, Alexander V; Badminton, Michael N

    2014-07-01

    The porphyrias are a group of mainly inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis where accumulation of porphyrins and/or porphyrin precursors gives rise to 2 types of clinical presentation: cutaneous photosensitivity and/or acute neurovisceral attacks. The cutaneous porphyrias present with either bullous skin fragility or nonbullous acute photosensitivity. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, complications, and current approach to porphyria management. Although focusing mainly on their dermatological aspects, the article also covers the management of acute porphyria, which by virtue of its association with variegate porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria, may become the responsibility of the clinical dermatologist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intermediate Type of Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2016-12-01

    Data of 829 infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were reviewed to identify any cases that could not be fitted into the any of the well-known types of palsy. These unusual cases were studied in detail with regard to clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings as well as management and spontaneous motor recovery. Erb's, extended Erb's, and total palsies were seen in 42.8%, 28.8%, and 28.0% of cases, respectively. Three cases (0.4%) did not fit into any of the classic types. One case had bilateral palsy, and the remaining 2 cases had unilateral palsy. All affected limbs presented with "abducted arms," "flexed forearms," and electrophysiological evidence of denervation of shoulder adductors and triceps. All cases had excellent spontaneous recovery within 6-12 months. It was concluded that these cases represent mild "intermediate" types of palsy in which the C7 root was the predominant site of injury. Good spontaneous recovery is expected. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Restoration of Elbow Flexion in Patients With Complete Traumatic and Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury After Functional Free Gracilis Muscle Transfer: Our Experience and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K; Boutros, Sean G; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Functional free gracilis muscle transfer is an operative procedure for elbow reconstruction in patients with complete brachial plexus nerve and avulsion injuries and in delayed or prolonged nerve denervation, as well as in patients with inadequate upper extremity function after primary nerve reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our patient records and identified 24 patients with complete brachial plexus nerve injury (13 obstetric, 11 males and 2 females; 11 traumatic, 9 males and 2 females) whose affected arm and shoulder were totally paralyzed and their voluntary elbow flexion or the biceps function was poor preoperatively (mean M0-1/5 in MRC grade). These patients had undergone the functional free gracilis muscle transfer procedure at our clinic since 2005. Results: Ninety-two percent of all patients showed recovery and improvement. Successful free gracilis muscle transfer is defined as antigravity biceps muscle strength of M3-4/5 and higher, which was observed in 16 (8 obstetric and 8 traumatic) of our 24 patients (67%) in this study at least 1 year after functional free gracilis muscle transfer. This is statistically significant ( P antigravity and elbow flexion at least 1 year after free gracilis muscle transfer at our clinic.

  18. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is frequently used for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. Part I of this article series described in detail the characteristic USG picture of peripheral nerves and the proper examination technique, following the example of the median nerve. This nerve is among the most often examined peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part presents describes the normal anatomy and ultrasound picture of the remaining large nerve branches in the upper extremity and neck – the spinal accessory nerve, the brachial plexus, the suprascapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial and ulnar nerves. Their normal anatomy and ultrasonographic appearance have been described, including the division into individual branches. For each of them, specific reference points have been presented, to facilitate the location of the set trunk and its further monitoring. Sites for the application of the ultrasonographic probe at each reference point have been indicated. In the case of the ulnar nerve, the dynamic component of the examination was emphasized. The text is illustrated with images of probe positioning, diagrams of the normal course of the nerves as well as a series of ultrasonographic pictures of normal nerves of the upper limb. This article aims to serve as a guide in the ultrasound examination of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. It should be remembered that a thorough knowledge of the area’s topographic anatomy is required for this type of examination.

  19. High Opening Injection Pressure Is Associated With Needle-Nerve and Needle-Fascia Contact During Femoral Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, D Matt; Robinson, Allegra

    2016-01-01

    High opening injection pressures (OIPs) have been shown to predict sustained needle tip contact with the roots of the brachial plexus. Such roots have a uniquely high ratio of fascicular versus connective tissue. It is unknown if this relationship is preserved during multifascicular nerve blockade. We hypothesized that OIP can predict needle-nerve contact during femoral nerve block, as well as detect needle contact with the fascia iliaca. Twenty adults scheduled for femoral block were recruited. Using ultrasound, a 22-gauge needle was sequentially placed in 4 locations: indenting the fascia iliaca, advanced through the fascia iliaca while lateral to the nerve, slightly indenting the femoral nerve, and withdrawn from the nerve 1 mm. At each location, the OIP required to initiate an injection of 1 mL D5W (5% dextrose in water) at 10 mL/min was recorded. Blinded investigators performed evaluations and aborted injections when an OIP of 15 psi was reached. Opening injection pressure was 15 psi or greater for 90% and 100% of cases when the needle indented the femoral nerve and fascia iliaca, respectively. Opening injection pressure was less than 15 psi for all 20 patients when the needle was withdrawn 1 mm from the nerve as well as at the subfascial position (McNemar χ2 P fascia iliaca (100%). Needle tip positions not indenting these structures were associated with OIP of less than 15 psi (100%).

  20. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve ...

  1. Subacute brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2012-06-01

    Brachial diplegia is a clinical term used to describe weakness restricted to the upper extremities. We report a case of brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus infection. A 48-year-old man developed severe painless bilateral upper extremity weakness within a few weeks of a flu-like illness. Clinical examination revealed marked periscapular, shoulder girdle, and humeral muscle atrophy and bilateral scapular winging, with near symmetrical bilateral hypotonic upper extremity weakness. This was associated with clinical signs of an encephalomyelopathy without cognitive or sensory deficits. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated a subacute disorder of motor neurons, their axons or both, involving the cervical and thoracic myotomes, with ongoing denervation. Serological studies confirmed recent West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Gradual improvement occurred following conservative supportive therapies. Progressive brachial diplegia is a rare neuromuscular presentation of WNV neuroinvasive disease. This case report adds to the clinical spectrum of WNV-induced neurologic sequelae. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prognostic value of thumb pain sensation in birth brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of absent thumb pain sensation in newborns and young infants with birth brachial plexopathy. METHODS: We evaluated 131 patients with birth brachial plexopathy with less than two months of age. Pain sensation was evoked by thumb nail bed compression to evaluate sensory fibers of the upper trunk (C6. The patients were followed-up monthly. Patients with less than antigravity elbow flexion at six months of age were considered to have a poor outcome. RESULTS: Thirty patients had absent thumb pain sensation, from which 26 showed a poor outcome. Sensitivity of the test was 65% and specificity was 96%. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of thumb pain sensation should be included in the clinical assessment of infants with birth brachial plexopathy.

  3. The amplitude of interlimb cutaneous reflexes in the leg is influenced by fingertip touch and vision during treadmill locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Juan; Misiaszek, John E

    2015-06-01

    Light touch at the fingertip has been shown to influence postural control during standing and walking. Interlimb cutaneous reflexes have been proposed to provide a neural link between the upper and lower limbs to assist in interlimb coordination during activities such as walking. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that cutaneous sensory pathways linking the arm and leg will be facilitated if subjects use light touch to assist with postural control during treadmill walking. To test this, interlimb cutaneous reflexes from the median nerve, serving the skin contact region, and radial nerve, serving an irrelevant sensory territory, were tested in the legs of subjects walking on treadmill in an unstable environment. Interlimb cutaneous reflexes were tested while subjects (a) touched or (b) did not touch a stable contact with their fingertip, and while the eyes were either (c) open or (d) closed. Reflexes arising from both nerves were facilitated when vision was removed that was then ameliorated when touch was provided. These changes in reflex amplitude during the eyes closed conditions were mirrored by changes in background muscle activity. We suggest that this facilitation of interlimb reflexes from both nerves arises from a generalized increase in excitability related to the postural anxiety of walking on a treadmill with the eyes closed, which is then restored by the provision of light touch. However, the influence of touch when the eyes were open differed depending upon the nerve stimulated. Radial nerve reflexes in the legs were suppressed when touch was provided, mirroring a suppression in the background muscle activity. In contrast, median nerve reflexes in the leg were larger when touch was provided with the eyes open, despite a suppression of background muscle activity. This nerve-specific effect of touch on the amplitude of the interlimb cutaneous reflexes suggests that touch sensory information from the median nerve was facilitated when that input was

  4. Reversible conduction failure in overlap of Miller Fisher syndrome and pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome in the spectrum of nodo-paranodopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Kolukısa, Mehmet; Babacan-Yıldız, Gülsen; Altıntaş, Özge; Yaman, Aslı; Asil, Talip

    2014-07-01

    Patients with an overlap of the pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome and Miller Fisher syndrome (PCB/MFS) have rarely been reported. The electrophysiological findings in PCB/MFS are of great interest and may provide insight into the pathophysiology of the disorder. We report the clinical features and nerve conduction study findings in a patient with PCB/MFS with high titers of antiganglioside antibodies against GQ1b, GD1a, and GD1b. In serial nerve conduction studies, compound muscle action potential amplitudes normalised without development of temporal dispersion within 3 weeks, and absent median, ulnar, and sural sensory nerve action potentials became recordable within 4 months. These findings are consistent with reversible conduction failure in both motor and sensory fibres, and PCB/MFS could be classified in the recently described nodo-paranodopathy spectrum of acute neuropathies associated with anti-ganglioside antibodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  6. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen M; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus-related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). The development of brachial plexus-related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurinoma del plexo braquial simulando metastasis de adenocarcinoma de mama Schwannoma of the brachial plexus resembling a breast adenocarcinoma metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Rodríguez Boto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Los neurinomas del plexo braquial son tumores infrecuentes que pueden confundirse con otras lesiones de índole tumoral. Se presenta el caso de una mujer de 40 años, tratada previamente de un adenocarcinoma de mama derecha en el pasado, que en el estudio de extensión realizado 5 años después se detectó una lesión localizada en el plexo braquial derecho. La paciente se encontraba asintomática. El diagnóstico radiológico de presunción fue metástasis de adenocarcinoma mamario. Se realizó un abordaje axilar derecho descubriendo una lesión bien delimitada en el plexo braquial. Con ayuda de la monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria, se observó que la lesión dependía de la rama cubital y se pudo realizar una resección completa preservando la función de dicho nervio. El estudio anatomopatológico confirmó que se trataba de un neurinoma, descartando así la existencia de metástasis. La evolución postoperatoria fue satisfactoria. Seis años después de la intervención no existe recidiva tumoral. En nuestro conocimiento este es el primer caso publicado en la literatura de un neurinoma del plexo braquial dependiente de la rama cubital. La monitorización neurofisiológica intraoperatoria resulta fundamental para abordar este tipo de lesiones con baja morbilidad.Schwa nomas originating from the brachial plexus, although rare, may be mistaken for another type of tumour. A 40 year-old woman, who had been treated years earlier for a breast adenocarcinoma, showed in the 5-year follow-up magnetic resonance examination a localized lesion in the right brachial plexus. The presumptive radiological diagnosis was a metastasis from the primary adenocarcinoma. Following surgical access via the right axilla, a well-circumscribed mass in the brachial plexus was detected. Under intraoperative electrophysiological guidance, the lesion was observed to depend on the ulnar nerve and its complete resection was possible without compromising nerve

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROPIVACAINE V/S ROPIVACAINE WITH MAGNESIUM SULPHATE FOR BRACHIAL PLUXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna Reddy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The prime duty of any anesthesiologist is to relive pain in the perioperative period. Today regional anesthesia is well established as equal to general anesthesia in effectiveness and patient acceptability. Regional anesthesia is blocking of peripheral ner ve conduction in a reversible way using local anesthetic agents. For surgeries on upper extremities, particularly in emergency surgeries, regional anesthesia has many advantages over general anesthesia. The brachial plexus is approached at the level of tru nks and the compact arrangement of trunks at the supraclavicular level gives a high success rate with minimum local anesthetic drug volume and a dense and fast onset of the block. To prolong the duration of analgesia various drugs have been studied as adju vants to the local anesthetics. AIM : To compare the efficacy of Ropivacaine and Ropivacaine with Magnesium Sulphate for Brachial Plexus Block by Supraclavicular technique, for upper limb orthopedic surgeries. DESIGN : A Prospective randomized comparative st udy . METHODS : Sixty adult patients of both sexes in the age group of 20 - 60 years belonging to ASA I/II category posted for various types of upper limb surgeries. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block wa s performed. Group – I (Ropivacaine alone – 30 patients received 29ml of 0.75% Ropiva caine with 1ml of normal saline .Group – II (Ropivacaine+Magnesium – 30 patients received 29ml of 0.75% Ropivacaine with Magnesium Sulphate 250mg (1ml of 500mg drug diluted wi th 1ml of distilled water. The following parameters were observed after performing Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus block in both the groups: 1. Time of onset of block (Sensory and Motor 2. Total Duration of Analgesia 3. Total Duration of Motor Blockade 4 . Dermatomes/Nerves blocked 5. Complications if any. RESULTS : There was no significant difference in onset of sensory blockade between Group I ( 4

  9. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”.

  10. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative evaluation of skin and nerve histopathology in single skin lesion leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Raghunatha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of leprosy being a disease of nerves, ROM therapy for single skin lesion leprosy was based on clinical trials without much evidence-based studies of nerve pathology. The present study was undertaken to compare the histology of skin and nerve in single skin lesion leprosy, and to assess the scientific rationale and justification of single dose ROM therapy. Methods: Twenty-seven untreated patients with single skin lesion without significantly thickened peripheral nerves were selected. Skin and nearby pure cutaneous nerve biopsies were studied under both H&E and Fite′s stain. Results: All the skin biopsies were negative for AFB and clinico-pathological correlation was positive in 51.85% of skin biopsy specimens. Histopathological diagnosis of leprosy was evident in 55.5% of clinically normal looking nerves, with AFB positivity in 29.6% of nerve biopsy specimens. Correlation between clinical diagnosis and nerve histopathology was poor (26%. Conclusions: Single skin lesion without thickened peripheral nerves as criteria for single dose ROM therapy is not logical, since the histological diagnosis of leprosy in normal looking nerves with presence of AFB is revealed in this study. Pure cutaneous nerve biopsy is a simple outpatient procedure, without complications. This study emphasizes the need to consider nerve pathology as an important tool for further therapeutic recommendations, than just clinical trials and skin pathology alone. Though single dose ROM therapy has been withdrawn recently, the principle holds good for any future therapeutic recommendations.

  12. Epidemiology of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries Evaluated by Electrodiagnostic Studies in a Tertiary Care Hospital Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ruben Y; Miranda, Gerardo E

    2015-01-01

    Describe the etiology and frequency of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries (TPNI) in the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital. The charts of patients who underwent an electrodiagnostic study for a TPNI were revised. The main outcome measure was the frequency of each injury by anatomic location, involved nerve, mechanism, and severity. 146 charts were included for a total of 163 injured nerves; 109 (74.7%) males and 37 (25.3%) females. The mean age was 33.6 years. The facial nerve and the brachial plexus followed by the ulnar nerve were more frequently involved. The ulnar, sciatic, median, radial nerve, and the lumbosacral plexus were more commonly injured by gunshot wounds, the brachial plexus by motor vehicle accidents, and the facial nerve by iatrogenic causes. The majority of the injuries were incomplete or partial (84.2% were incomplete and 15.8% complete injuries). TPNIs can lead to significant disability, but further investigation is needed to better understand their socio-economic impact.

  13. Pneumothorax post brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandim, Beatriz L S; Alves, Rodrigo R; Almeida, Rodrigo; Pontes, João Paulo J; Arantes, Lorena J; Morais, Fabíola P

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexus block is used for upper limbs anesthesia. The use of ultrasound-guided (USG) technique for blockade has become popular in recent years, facilitating its execution by providing real-time images of the plexus and surrounding structures while minimizing complications. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of pneumothorax following ultrasound-guided interscalene block. Male patient, 49 years old, weight 62kg and height 1.72m, slender, smoker, asymptomatic, ASA II E. The patient underwent surgical repair of right ulna open fracture through USG-guided interscalene brachial plexus block with axillary supplementation. After sedation and antisepsis, the linear probe of the USG apparatus was placed perpendicular to the interscalene groove (12 Hz), and stimucath A50 introduced in plane. After visualization of nerve trunks, 20mL of ropivacaine 0.5% was administered with axillary block supplementation (same volume and concentration of anesthetic). At the end of surgery, the patient complained of respiratory-dependent chest pain associated with dyspnea and decreased pulse oximetry (91% in room air), but hemodynamic stable (BP=130/70 and HR=84 bpm). Although pulmonary auscultation was normal, chest X-ray showed the presence of right pneumothorax. Water seal chest drainage was performed, after which the patient reported improvement of symptoms and was discharged from hospital in good general condition after 8 days. Despite the dynamic visualization of cervical structures with USG, interscalene block may result in pneumothorax. An unusual higher pleural dome due to the hyperinflated lung (smoking) probably facilitated the accidental pleural puncture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary cutaneous myoepithelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Markus Winther; Steiniche, Torben; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a case of primary myoepithelial carcinoma of the skin and reviews the available literature on this topic. Myoepitheliomas and carcinomas arise most frequently from myoepithelial cells within the salivary glands but are found in many anatomical locations. We documented a case...... of an 80-year-old man with a 2 × 2 × 1 cm tumour located on the scalp. This tumour emerged over a period of 2 months. The tumour was radically excised, and histological examination revealed a cutaneous myoepithelial carcinoma. At an 18-month follow-up, no recurrence of the tumour was found. A systematic...... literature search identified 23 papers that reported 58 cases of cutaneous myoepitheliomas and myoepithelial carcinomas. All cases are reviewed in the presented paper. This case report and literature review serves to increase awareness regarding myoepithelial carcinomas. These tumours exhibit high metastatic...

  15. Chronic zosteriform cutaneous leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Omidian M; Mapar M

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmanasis (CL) may present with unusual clinical variants such as acute paronychial, annular, palmoplantar, zosteriform, erysipeloid, and sporotrichoid. The zosteriform variant has rarely been reported. Unusual lesions may be morphologically attributed to an altered host response or owing to an atypical strain of parasites in these lesions. We report a patient with CL in a multidermatomal pattern on the back and buttock of a man in Khozestan province in the south of Iran. To our ...

  16. Naevus Lipomatosus Cutaneous Superficialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Siddappa

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of naevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficilis on the left sacro gluteo-coxal area in a 25 year old male is reported because of its rarity. The clinical features and hisoopathological changes of this condition are described. The possible factors regarding its predilection to the pelvic girdle region, the various theories regarding, its pathogensis and its differentiation from focal dermal. hypoplasia syndrome and grouped lesions of macular atrophy are discussed.

  17. Chitosan against cutaneous pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Champer, Jackson; Patel, Julie; Fernando, Nathalie; Salehi, Elaheh; Wong, Victoria; Kim, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus are cutaneous pathogens that have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics. We sought to determine if chitosan, a polymer of deacetylated chitin, could be used as a potential treatment against these bacteria. We found that higher molecular weight chitosan had superior antimicrobial properties compared to lower molecular weights, and that this activity occurred in a pH dependent manner. Electron and fluorescence microscopy revealed that chi...

  18. Diagnostic value of ankle-brachial index and toe-brachial index in arterial disease of lower extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lan; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG; Zhen-cheng YAN; Yin-xing NI; Sun, Fang; Sun, Jin; Xing-sen XU; Yu, Hao; Ying-sha LI; Dao-yan LIU; Zhi-ming ZHU

    2012-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the clinical application and its influencing factors of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and toe-brachial index (TBI) in the diagnosis of arterial disease of lower extremity. Methods  ABI and TBI were measured in 800 limbs of 402 patients with diabetes and/or hypertension hospitalized from July 2010 to February 2011. The patients were divided into narrow group (ABI < 0.9), normal group (0.9≤ABI < 1.3), and calcification group (ABI≥1.3) according to the value of ABI, and al...

  19. [Cutaneous manifestations of leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Díaz, Nancy; Medina, Gabriela; Palomino, Nymrod; Peralta, Fidelio

    2015-01-01

    To describe the type and frequency of cutaneous manifestations of leukemia. Observational, descriptive study. We included patients over 16 years of age, with confirmed diagnosis of leukemia from the Hematology and Dermatology Departments of the outpatient clinic and from in-patients. Patients with bone marrow transplantation were excluded. A complete history and physical examination of the skin and appendages was performed, with biopsy and cultures if required. The cutaneous manifestations were classified as infection or drug-related, leukemic infiltration, associated dermatosis to leukemia and non-specific lesions. Descriptive statistics was employed. We included 142 patients (62 females, 80 males) with the following diagnoses: acute myeloid leukemia (n=36), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=52), chronic myeloid leukemia (n=21), chronic lymphocitic leukemia (n=30) and hairy cells leukemia (n=3). 42% of patients (n=60) presented some dermatoses. There were 36 non-specific dermatoses, 21 drug-related, 20 infectious, 3 infiltrative and none associated. Cutaneous manifestations directly related to leukemia are frequent, being the non-specific ones, the most commonly observed. However, a thorough dermatologic examination is important in these patients as part of an overall evaluation.

  20. [Randomized prospective study of three different techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo Henirque Cunha; Takeda, Alexandre; Sousa, Paulo César Castello Branco de; Mehlmann, Fernanda Moreira Gomes; Junior, Jorge Kiyoshi Mitsunaga; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis

    2017-06-23

    Randomized prospective study comparing two perivascular techniques with the perineural technique for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block (US-ABPB). The primary objective was to verify if these perivascular techniques are noninferior to the perineural technique. 240 patients were randomized to receive the techniques: below the artery (BA), around the artery (AA) or perineural (PN). The anesthetic volume used was 40mL of 0.375% bupivacaine. All patients received a musculocutaneous nerve blockade with 10mL. In BA technique, 30mL were injected below the axillary artery. In AA technique, 7.5mL were injected at 4 points around the artery. In PN technique, the median, ulnar, and radial nerves were anesthetized with 10mL per nerve. Confidence interval analysis showed that the perivascular techniques studied were not inferior to the perineural technique. The time to perform the blockade was shorter for the BA technique (300.4±78.4sec, 396.5±117.1sec, 487.6±172.6sec, respectively). The PN technique showed a lower latency time (PN - 655.3±348.9sec; BA -1044±389.5sec; AA-932.9±314.5sec), and less total time for the procedure (PN-1132±395.8sec; BA -1346.2±413.4sec; AA 1329.5±344.4sec). TA technique had a higher incidence of vascular puncture (BA - 22.5%; AA - 16.3%; PN - 5%). The perivascular techniques are viable alternatives to perineural technique for US-ABPB. There is a higher incidence of vascular puncture associated with the BA technique. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  1. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Cutaneous nociception and neurogenic inflammation evoked by PACAP38 and VIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-38 (PACAP38) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) belong to the same secretin-glucagon superfamily and are present in nerve fibers in dura and skin. Using a model of acute cutaneous pain we explored differences in pain perception and vasomotor res...

  3. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be in......A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains...

  4. [Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Kaisa; Nuutinen, Pauliina; Raili, Kauppinen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms Cutaneous symptoms of porphyrias are initiated from a phototoxic reaction caused by sunlight and circulating porphyrins in the vascular walls of the skin. This leads in fragility, blistering and scarring of the skin on light-exposed areas. There are approximately 200 patients having hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms in Finland. Cutaneous symptoms of variegate porphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda are indistinguishable, but an effective treatment is available only for the latter. Differential diagnosis is important due to acute episodes occurring in variegate porphyria.

  5. Evaluation of Tookad-mediated photodynamic effect on peripheral nerve and pelvic nerve in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Dole, Kenneth C.; Blanc, Dominique; Whalen, Lawrence R.; Gould, Daniel H.; Huang, Zheng

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a novel vascular targeting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) has been investigated as an alternative modality for the treatment of prostate cancer and other diseases. This study investigated, for the first time, the vascular photodynamic effects of Tookad-PDT on nerve tissues. We established an in situ canine model using the cutaneous branches of the saphenous nerve to evaluate the effect of Tookad-PDT secondary to vascular damage on compound-action potentials. With Tookad dose of 2 mg/kg, treatment with 50 J/cm2 induced little change in nerve conduction. However, treatment with 100 J/cm2 resulted in decreases in nerve conduction velocities, and treatment with 200 J/cm2 caused a total loss of nerve conduction. Vasculature surrounding the saphenous nerve appeared irritated. The nerve itself looked swollen and individual fibers were not as distinct as they were before PDT treatment. Epineurium had mild hemorrhage, leukocyte infiltration, fibroplasias and vascular hypertrophy. However, the nerve fascicles and nerve fibers were free of lesions. We also studied the effect of Tookad-PDT secondary to vascular damage on the pelvic nerve in the immediate vicinity of the prostate gland. The pelvic nerve and saphenous nerve showed different sensitivity and histopathological responses to Tookad-PDT. Degeneration nerve fibers and necrotic neurons were seen in the pelvic nerve at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 50 J/cm2. Adjacent connective tissue showed areas of hemorrhage, fibrosis and inflammation. Our preliminary results suggest that possible side effects of interstitial PDT on prostate nerve tissues need to be further investigated.

  6. Brachial plexus block in phantom limb pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Sandra; Dietrich, Caroline; Meissner, Winfried; Huonker, Ralph; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this case report is twofold: first, to present evidence of long-lasting relief in a patient suffering from phantom limb pain after pharmacologically blocking his plexus brachialis and, second, to replicate results from a previous study focusing on cortical reorganization and phantom limb pain. Before regional anesthesia, the patient suffered from a phantom hand that cramped and was immovable. We performed a diagnostic axillary blockade of the brachial plexus to differentiate peripheral from more central contributions to phantom limb pain. During blockade of the brachial plexus, the patient reported a reduction of phantom limb pain for the first time following years of suffering and a complete loss of cramping together with muscle relaxation of the phantom hand. Additionally, we found cortical reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex (re-reorganization). Strikingly, the relaxed phantom limb together with the reduction of phantom limb pain remained preserved even 6 months after blockade of the brachial plexus. A single temporary blockade of the brachial plexus may relieve phantom limb pain and unpleasant phantom feelings (cramping) for an extended period. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassel, Christina L; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ∼50,000 SNPs across ∼2100 candidate genes to iden...

  8. Shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in obstetrical brachial plexus injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Dijkstra, Piet; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Beelen, Anita; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of and the association between shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in a cohort of children with an obstetrical brachial plexus injury and to identify the risk factors for these complications. In a retrospective cohort study, all

  9. Obstetrical brachial plexus injuries: incidence, natural course and shoulder contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, A. F.; Wolf, H.; Oei, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) was investigated and the natural course of this disorder and the frequency of shoulder contracture described. Between 1988 and 1997 13,366 children with a gestational age of 30 weeks or more, were born at the Academic Medical Center,

  10. [Bilateral brachial plexus block. Case report and systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Terrazas, Gabriel Enrique; Garduño-Juárez, María de Ángeles; Limón-Muñoz, Marisol; Torres-Maldonado, Areli Seir; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The bilateral brachial plexus block is considered a contraindication, due to the possible development of complications, such as: toxicity from local anaesthetics or bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. However, with the real time visualisation provided by the ultrasound scan, these complications have decreased and it is a safer procedure. Four cases are presented where the bilateral block was performed using guided ultrasound, as the patients were unable to receive general anaesthesia due to a history of adverse effects or the use of opioids in the post-operative or by the prediction of a difficult airway associated with obesity. A systematic review of the literature from January 1993 to June 2013, was also performed by using a search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, ARTEMISA, LILACS, Google data bases, in Spanish and English language with the following words: bilateral brachial plexus block, bilateral interscalene block, bilateral infraclavicular block, bilateral supraclavicular block, bilateral lateral supraclavicular block, bilateral axillary block, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block. Based on the evidence found, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block in selected patients and expert hands, is no longer a contraindication. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Reconstruction of brachial pressure from finger arterial pressure during orthostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogert, Lysander W J; Harms, Mark P M; Pott, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In patients with recurrent syncope, monitoring of intra-arterial pressure during orthostatic stress testing is recommended because of the potentially sudden and rapid development of hypotension. Replacing brachial arterial pressure (BAP) by the non-invasively obtained finger arterial pressure (Fin...

  12. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines...

  13. Comparison of Two Techniques of Brachial Plexus Block for Upper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared trans-arterial approach and mid-humeral technique of axillary brachial plexus block in terms of the clinical benefit of each method; adequacy of block, onset of sensory and motor block, duration of block and complications. .In a prospective randomized study, axillary plexus block was carried out in 50 ...

  14. Brachial Plexus Blocks for Upper Extremity Surgeries in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Different techniques of brachial plexus blocks are in use to provide surgical anaesthesia from the shoulder to the fingertips. However, they are perceived as time-consuming and unreliable as the sole anaesthetic for surgical procedures. Until recently (July 2008), only general anaesthesia was employed in our ...

  15. Ultrasound of the cervical roots and brachial plexus in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Semmekrot, B.; Meulstee, J.; Verrips, A.; Alfen, N. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this exploratory study we investigated whether ultrasound can visualize the neonatal cervical roots and brachial plexus. METHODS: In 12 healthy neonates <2 days old, the neck region was studied unilaterally with ultrasound using a small-footprint 15-7-MHz transducer. RESULTS: The

  16. Use Of Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Facilitates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report the successful use of continuous axillary brachial plexus block in the assessment of muscle functions during tendon repair. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife between November 2006 and December 2007. The study included ...

  17. General intravenous anesthesia for brachial plexus surgery in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, P; Rutowski, R; Kielbowicz, Z; Kuryszko, J; Kielbowicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is a good experimental model for brachial plexus surgery. The risks of death during anesthesia were significantly greater in rabbits than cats or dogs. This article presents the protocol of injectable anesthesia for a short surgical procedure, safe for the rabbit patient and convenient for the surgeon.

  18. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines re...... are still lacking. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-8...

  19. Anatomical variations of the brachial plexus terminal branches in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical variations are clinically significant, but many are inadequately described or quantified. Variations in anatomy of the brachial plexus are important to surgeons and anesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. It is also important for radiologists who interpret plain and ...

  20. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchin, Pedro; Trope, Beatriz Moritz; Fernandes, Larissa Araujo; Barreiros, Glória; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis), it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  1. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M; O'Daly, A; Vyas, A; Rohde, C; Brushart, T M

    2013-11-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of pathway and end organ in the genesis of PMR in adult rats. Fresh and 2-week predegenerated femoral nerve grafts were transferred in correct or reversed alignment to replace the femoral nerves of previously unoperated Lewis rats. After 8 weeks of regeneration the motoneurons projecting through the grafts to recipient femoral cutaneous and muscle branches and their adjacent end organs were identified by retrograde labeling. Motoneuron counts were subjected to Poisson regression analysis to determine the relative roles of pathway and end organ identity in generating PMR. Transfer of fresh grafts did not result in PMR, whereas substantial PMR was observed when predegenerated grafts were used. Similarly, the pathway through which motoneurons reached the muscle had a significant impact on PMR when grafts were predegenerated, but not when they were fresh. Comparison of the relative roles of pathway and end organ in generating PMR revealed that neither could be shown to be more important than the other. These experiments demonstrate unequivocally that adult muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve differ in qualities that can be detected by regenerating adult motoneurons and that can modify their subsequent behavior. They also reveal that two weeks of Wallerian degeneration modify the environment in the graft from one that provides no modality-specific cues for motor neurons to one that actively promotes PMR. © 2013.

  2. Spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S H; Lee, J S; Kim, Y H; Kim, T W; Kwon, K M

    2017-06-27

    We investigated the spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). A total of 25 cases of non-operated traumatic BPI were analysed by retrospective review of medical records; in all cases, consecutive electrodiagnostic studies (ES) were conducted from 1 to 4 months and 18 to 24 months post-trauma. Injury severity was assessed using a modified version of Dumitru and Wilbourn's scale (DWS) based on ES. Spontaneous recovery of brachial plexus components per subject was analysed using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. A two-tailed Fisher's exact or Pearson's Chi-square test was used to examine the associations between initial injury severity (DWS grade 2 vs. 3, complete vs. incomplete), accompanying injury type (open vs. closed), main lesion location (supraclavicular vs. infraclavicular lesion), and spontaneous recovery. The most common cause of BPI was traffic accident (TA) (15 cases, 60%), and the most common type of TA-induced BPI was a motorcycle TA (5 cases), accounting for 20% of all injuries. The second most common type of injury was an occupational injury (6 cases, 24%). Thirty-eight (69%) of 55 injured brachial components in 25 cases had DWS grade 3 and 17 brachial components (31%) had grade 2. The DWS grade of brachial plexus components per subject significantly differed between the first and follow-up ES (p = 0.000). However, initial injury severity, accompanying injury type, and main lesion location were not statistically associated with spontaneous recovery (p > 0.05). Spontaneous recovery may be possible even in severe traumatic BPI. Multiple factors should be considered when predicting the clinical course of traumatic BPI.

  3. Brief reports: a clinical evaluation of block characteristics using one milliliter 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian

    2010-09-01

    We report onset and duration of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block using 1 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine per nerve (total local anesthetic volume 4 mL). Block performance time, block onset time, duration of surgery, and block duration were measured. Seventeen consecutive patients were recruited. The mean (SD) block performance and onset times were 271 (67.9) seconds and 9.7 (3.7) minutes, respectively. Block duration was 160.8 (30.7) minutes. All operations were performed using regional anesthesia alone. The duration of anesthesia obtained is sufficient for most ambulatory hand surgery.

  4. Risk factors of normal ankle-brachial index and low toe-brachial index in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Satoshi; Nakajima, Fumitaka; Yurugi, Takatomi; Morita, Tatsuyori; Jo, Fusakazu; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Maki, Kei

    2009-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease is high in patients with terminal renal failure, and it is a major problem in those on dialysis. A low ankle-brachial index (ABI) suggests the presence of arterial stenotic lesions between the aorta and the ankle joint, while a low toe-brachial index (TBI) suggests stenotic lesions between the aorta and the toes. Therefore, a normal ABI (> or =0.9) and a low TBI ( or =0.6) (N group) were compared. Low ankle-brachial and toe-brachial indices were detected in 13% and 22% of the patients, respectively. Comparison of the background factors and laboratory data between the N and L groups showed that the ratio of diabetes mellitus, interdialytic body weight gain, and Hb(A1c) values were significantly higher in the L group than in the N group. It was clarified that diabetes and excess body weight gain are involved as risk factors in dialysis patients with normal ABI/low TBI.

  5. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF PERIPHERAL NERVE SURGERY ASSISTED BY Da Vinci ROBOTIC SYSTEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Song, Diyu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Changjiang; Zhang, Shuming

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the research progress of peripheral nerve surgery assisted by Da Vinci robotic system. The recent domestic and international articles about peripheral nerve surgery assisted by Da Vinci robotic system were reviewed and summarized. Compared with conventional microsurgery, peripheral nerve surgery assisted by Da Vinci robotic system has distinctive advantages, such as elimination of physiological tremors and three-dimensional high-resolution vision. It is possible to perform robot assisted limb nerve surgery using either the traditional brachial plexus approach or the mini-invasive approach. The development of Da Vinci robotic system has revealed new perspectives in peripheral nerve surgery. But it has still been at the initial stage, more basic and clinical researches are still needed.

  6. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Secchin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis, it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  7. Dexamethasone as a ropivacaine adjuvant for ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block: A randomized, double-blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Marchioro, Patricia; Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana; Trevisol, Daisson José

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravenous or perineural dexamethasone added to ropivacaine on the duration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks (BPB). Randomized clinical trial. Sixty ASA physical status I-II patients with elective shoulder arthroscopic surgeries under interscalene brachial plexus blocks were randomly allocated to receive 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline (C group, n=20), 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml (4mg) of perineural dexamethasone (Dpn group, n=20), or 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline and intravenous 4mg dexamethasone (IV) (Div group, n=20). A nerve stimulation technique with ultrasound was used in all patients. The onset time and duration of sensory blocks were assessed. Secondary outcomes were pain scores (VAS) and postoperative vomiting and nausea (PONV). The duration of the motor and sensory block was extended in group Dpn compared with group Div and group C (Pdexamethasone was more effective than intravenous in extending the duration of ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided interscalene BPB. Moreover, Dpn has significant effects on onset time, PONV, and VAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Function and Structure of Peripheral Nerves Following Cutaneous Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-13

    fascial incisions and/or perineurial incisions in the management of the conduction blocks at so-e later phase of this study. For the past several months...that occur at intervals following injury in the burn model and the effect of various manipulations 4. . .. * ..... .... . .. .. . -* 4

  9. Short-latency tachycardia evoked by stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsema, A J; Bouman, L N; Karemaker, J M

    1985-04-01

    The short-latency effect on heart rate of peripheral nerve stimulation was studied in decerebrate cats. Selective activation (17-40 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) of low-threshold fibers in the nerves to the triceps surae muscle yielded isometric contractions of maximal force that were accompanied by a cardiac cycle length shortening within 0.4 s from the start of stimulation. This effect was abolished by pharmacologically induced neuromuscular blockade. The cardiac cycle length shortening during paralysis reappeared after a 6- to 10-fold increase of the stimulation strength. Cutaneous (sural) nerve stimulation (15-25 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) elicited reflex contractions in the stimulated limb, which were also accompanied by a cardiac acceleration with similar latency. Paralysis prevented the reflex contractions and reduced the cardiac response in some cats and abolished it in others. The response reappeared in either case after a 5- to 10-fold increase of the stimulus strength. It is concluded that muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve activity both cause a similar cardiac acceleration with a latency of less than 0.4 s. The response to muscle nerve stimulation is elicited by activity in group III afferents. It is excluded that the cardiac response to nerve stimulation is secondary to a change in the respiratory pattern.

  10. Chronic zosteriform cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidian M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmanasis (CL may present with unusual clinical variants such as acute paronychial, annular, palmoplantar, zosteriform, erysipeloid, and sporotrichoid. The zosteriform variant has rarely been reported. Unusual lesions may be morphologically attributed to an altered host response or owing to an atypical strain of parasites in these lesions. We report a patient with CL in a multidermatomal pattern on the back and buttock of a man in Khozestan province in the south of Iran. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multidermatomal zosteriform CL. It was resistant to conventional treatment but responded well to a combination of meglumine antimoniate, allopurinol, and cryotherapy.

  11. Cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiro; Lauletta Lindoso, José Angelo

    2012-06-01

    Tegumentary leishmaniases are caused by approximately 15 species of protozoa of the genus Leishmania. They prevail in tropical and subtropical areas of the Old and New World but human mobility also makes them a medical problem in nonendemic areas. Clinical manifestations may comprise cutaneous and mucocutaneous forms that may be localized, disseminated, or diffuse in distribution and may differ in Old and New World leishmaniases. Diagnosis and treatment vary according to the clinical manifestations, geographic area, and Leishmania species involved. This article highlights the diversity and complexity of tegumentary leishmaniases, which are worsened by human immunodeficiency virus/Leishmania coinfection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cutaneous malignancies of the perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David; Pootrakul, Llana; Harmon, Jenna; Trotter, Shannon

    2015-03-01

    This review discusses multiple cutaneous malignancies that can present on the perineum. Although all of these neoplasms are uncommon, a focus will be on the more common neoplasms including extramammary Paget disease, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Other more rare entities discussed are superficial leiomyosarcoma, giant solitary trichoepithelioma, and cutaneous endometriosis.

  13. Unusual Variation of the Biceps Brachii with Possible Median Nerve Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danylo Yershov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biceps brachii is one of three muscles of the anterior compartment of arm. Variations of the biceps brachii are not rare. The most frequent is the existence of a third head called the humeral head by Le Double (1897 (Rodríguez-Vázquez et al., 1999. Our article is based on the unexpected result of a routine dissection class held for medical students. Dissection was performed according to the guidelines accepted by the anatomy department (Seichert, 1999. We describe a third (accessory head of the biceps brachii. In addition of two regular heads, the third head originated together with the short head from the coracoid process and had three insertions on the humerus after enfolding the median nerve and the brachial artery. This particular variation is important from a clinical perspective as the third head may cause entrapment syndrome of the median nerve and hypoperfusion of the upper limb due to compression of the brachial artery.

  14. Nerve guidance channels in periphearl nerve repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gholamhosein farjah

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the nerve auto graft still remains the clinical Gold standard in repairing nerve injury gaps, many advances have been achieved to guide regenerating axons across the lesion. Functional recovery after peripheral nerve lesion is depended upon accurate regeneration of axons to their original target tissues. To increase the prospects of axonal regeneration and functional recovery, researches have focused on designing “ Nerve guidance channels” or NGCs.NGCs are either natural or synthetic tubular conduits that are used to bridge the gap between injured nerve stumps. This review paper describes peripheal nerve regeneration on NGCs.

  15. US imaging of the musculocutaneous nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto Stefano [National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Michaud, Johan [University of Montreal, Department of Physiatry, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Marchetti, Alessandra; Garello, Isabella; Martinoli, Carlo [Universita di Genova, Radiology Department, Genova (Italy); Padua, Luca [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore-Rome, Institute of Neurology, Rome (Italy); Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    To describe the potential value of high-resolution sonography for evaluation of the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN). The normal anatomy of the MCN was evaluated on three cadaveric limbs and correlated with the US images obtained in 15 healthy subjects. Seven consecutive patients with MCN neuropathy were then evaluated with sonography using 17.5 and 12.5-MHz broadband linear array transducers. All patients had abnormal nerve conduction studies and underwent correlative MR imaging on a 1.5-T system. One-to-one comparison between cadaveric specimens and sonographic images showed that the MCN can be reliably identified from the axilla through the elbow, including the lateral antebrachial cutaneous (LAbC) nerve. In the patients group with MCN neuropathy, sonography allowed detection of a wide spectrum of abnormalities. In 5/7 cases, a spindle neuroma was depicted in continuity with the nerve. In one case, US identified focal swelling of the nerve and in another case US was negative. The neuroma was hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences in 75% of cases. In one patient, the nerve showed Gd-enhancement on fat-suppressed T1-weighted sequences. The nerve was never detected on unenhanced T1-scans. Owing to its small-size and out-of-plane course, the MCN may be more reliably depicted with sonography rather than with MR imaging. US is promising for evaluating traumatic injuries of the MCN. By providing unique information on the entire course of the nerve, US can be used as a valuable complement of clinical and electrophysiologic findings. (orig.)

  16. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus anaesthesia: differences in success between patients of normal and excessive weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, U; Papenfuss, T; Greim, C; Brederlau, J; Roewer, N

    2006-06-01

    Interscalene plexus blocks are an important part of the peri-operative treatment in shoulder surgery. The nerve stimulation technique uses external landmarks for the definition of the injection site. Patient obesity is, therefore, one causative factor for a reduced success rate of the blockade. This study investigated whether there are differences in visibility of the target nerves and in the success rate of the block between patients of normal weight (nw) and obese patients (ow), when portable sonography is used for guidance of the interscalene nerve blockade (ISB). We investigated 70 patients routinely scheduled for shoulder surgery (ASA status I-III). The patients were allocated to group nw (body mass index BMI 25). The interscalene part of the brachial plexus was examined using high-frequency portable ultrasound. The blockade was performed under continuous sonographic monitoring. The quality of the ISB was tested post-operatively, and the time required for the procedure was documented. Identification of nerve structures in the obese patients did require slightly more time than in patients of normal weight, statistically (ow: 5 +/- 1 min versus nw: 4 +/- 2 min, p = 0.02). While in 33 patients (94 %) of group nw the plexus blockade was complete, in group ow 27 (77 %) of the blocks were sufficient. The difference in success, however, was not significant (p = 0.08). Visualisation of nerves was difficult in 3 patients in ow-group. Portable ultrasound provides efficient depiction of the interscalene plexus structures in obese patients and, when used for guidance of regional blockade, renders similar results as in patients of normal weight.

  17. Corynebacterium ulcerans cutaneous diphtheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Luke S P; Leslie, Asuka; Meltzer, Margie; Sandison, Ann; Efstratiou, Androulla; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    We describe the case of a patient with cutaneous diphtheria caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans who developed a right hand flexor sheath infection and symptoms of sepsis such as fever, tachycardia, and elevated C-reactive protein, after contact with domestic cats and dogs, and a fox. We summarise the epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, diagnosis, therapy, and public health aspects of this disease, with emphasis on improving recognition. In many European countries, C ulcerans has become the organism commonly associated with cutaneous diphtheria, usually seen as an imported tropical disease or resulting from contact with domestic and agricultural animals. Diagnosis relies on bacterial culture and confirmation of toxin production, with management requiring appropriate antimicrobial therapy and prompt administration of antitoxin, if necessary. Early diagnosis is essential for implementation of control measures and clear guidelines are needed to assist clinicians in managing clinical diphtheria. This case was a catalyst to the redrafting of the 2014 national UK interim guidelines for the public health management of diphtheria, released as final guidelines in March, 2015. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cutaneous tuberculosis in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalek, R; Mebazaa, A; Berriche, A; Kilani, B; Ben Osman, A; Mokni, M; Tiouiri Benaissa, H

    2013-09-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in Tunisia. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common presentation in our country. Cutaneous presentations are rare (1-2% of cases). The diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis (CT) is difficult. Histological and clinical presentations are polymorphous, many differential diagnoses are available, and it is difficult to isolate Mycobacterium. We had for aim to study the epidemiological and clinical features of CT in Tunisia, and to compare presentations before and after 1990. We conducted a retrospective study between January 1991 and December 2011, in which we included all cases of CT observed at the Infectious Diseases and Dermatology Units of the Tunis la Rabta Hospital. Hundred and thirty-seven patients were included, with a mean age of 43.8years; 72.3% were female patients. Hundred and fifty locations were observed, most of which on the head and neck. Scrofuloderma was the most frequent presentation, observed in 65% of cases. The diagnosis was confirmed by histology and/or microbiology in 75.8% of cases. The treatment was prescribed for a mean 11.3months, leading to full recovery in most cases. CT is still reported in Tunisia. The diagnosis relies mainly on histology. Controlling this mutilating tuberculosis requires a global control of this disease, and especially lymph node location, given the high rate of scrofuloderma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak Surajit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  20. Peripheral nerve entrapment caused by motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coert, J H; Dellon, A L

    1994-08-01

    During the era before seatbelts and air bags, extensive injury was common after motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). Yet upper extremity peripheral nerve problems, other than the brachial plexus injury, have not been ascribed previously to MVCs. Seven hundred twenty-five patients with the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), cubital tunnel syndrome (CT), and radial sensory nerve (RSN) entrapment in the forearm were reviewed. The number of MVC-caused nerve entrapments was 157 (68 for CTS, 64 for CT, and 25 for RSN). In 25% of the patients, the nerve entrapment was bilateral. This paper discusses the causal relationship between MVCs and subsequent nerve compressions in the upper extremity and discusses a suggested pathomechanism of injury. The most common pattern was for the injured person to be the driver, to have the injured hand or hands on the steering wheel, to be hit from the front or rear, and to develop a sudden onset of nerve compression symptoms within 1 week. Awareness of this causal relationship may allow early recognition and treatment.

  1. Etiology and mechanisms of ulnar and median forearm nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzović Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgraund/Aim. Most often injuries of brachial plexus and its branches disable the injured from using their arms and/or hands. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of median and ulnar forearm nerves injuries. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 99 patients surgically treated in the Clinic of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2010. All data are obtained from the patients' histories. Results. The majority of the injured patients were male, 81 (81.8%, while only 18 (18.2% were females, both mainly with nerve injuries of the distal forearm - 75 (75.6%. Two injury mechanisms were present, transection in 85 patients and traction and contusion in 14 of the patients. The most frequent etiological factor of nerve injuries was cutting, in 61 of the patients. Nerve injuries are often associated with other injuries. In the studied patients there were 22 vascular injuries, 33 muscle and tendon injuries and 20 bone fractures. Conclusion. The majority of those patients with peripheral nerve injuries are represented in the working age population, which is a major socioeconomic problem. In our study 66 out of 99 patients were between 17 and 40 years old, in the most productive age. The fact that the majority of patients had nerve injuries of the distal forearm and that they are operated within the first 6 months after injury, promises them good functional prognosis.

  2. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Establishment of Peripheral Nerve Injury Data Repository to Monitor and Support Population Health Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    1-8. 11. Kim, D. H., Murovic, Judith A., Tiel, Robert L., Kline, David G. (2004). "Penetrating injuries due to gunshot wounds involving the brachial...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-0-DM167033 TITLE: Establishment of Peripheral Nerve Injury Data Repository to Monitor and Support Population Health... Injury Data Repository to Monitor and Support Population Health Decisions 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-0-DM167033 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Reflections on the contributions of Harvey Cushing to the surgery of peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Patel, Neal; Nahed, Brian Vala; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    By the time Harvey Cushing entered medical school, nerve reconstruction techniques had been developed, but peripheral nerve surgery was still in its infancy. As an assistant surgical resident influenced by Dr. William Halsted, Cushing wrote a series of reports on the use of cocaine for nerve blocks. Following his residency training and a hiatus to further his clinical interests and intellectual curiosity, he traveled to Europe and met with a variety of surgeons, physiologists, and scientists, who likely laid the groundwork for Cushing's increased interest in peripheral nerve surgery. Returning to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1901, he began documenting these surgeries. Patient records preserved at Yale's Cushing Brain Tumor Registry describe Cushing's repair of ulnar and radial nerves, as well as his exploration of the brachial plexus for nerve repair or reconstruction. The authors reviewed Harvey Cushing's cases and provide 3 case illustrations not previously reported by Cushing involving neurolysis, nerve repair, and neurotization. Additionally, Cushing's experience with facial nerve neurotization is reviewed. The history, physical examination, and operative notes shed light on Cushing's diagnosis, strategy, technique, and hence, his surgery on peripheral nerve injury. These contributions complement others he made to surgery of the peripheral nervous system dealing with nerve pain, entrapment, and tumor.

  5. Medial and lateral antebrachial nerve conductions: Orthodromic or antidromic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunam Sanjeeva Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antidromic stimulation is usually used in the evaluation of lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LABCN and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MABCN. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between orthodromic and antidromic stimulations of these nerves. Materials and Methods: Medial and lateral antebrachial conduction studies by antidromic and orthodromic stimulation. Results: Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP amplitudes were larger with antidromic stimulation in the majority of subjects. The lateral antebrachial SNAP amplitude was 20.5 ± 9.29 μV with antidromic stimulation and 14.6 ± 6.13 μV with orthodromic stimulation (P < 0.001. Medial antebrachial SNAP amplitudes were 12.8 ± 4.93 μV using antidromic stimulation and 6.5 ± 3.84 μV with orthodromic stimulation (P < 0.001. Sensory conduction velocities were faster with orthodromic lateral antebrachial stimulation (P = 0.002 whereas velocities were similar in medial antebrachial nerve. Supramaximal stimulation of MABCN was not possible in half of the nerves sampled to avoid the muscle artifact. Conclusion: Orthodromic stimulation of LABCN and MABCN are easy to perform and can be supplanted for antidromic stimulation in which Supramaximal stimulation may not be possible in some individuals.

  6. CLINICAL COMPARISON BETWEEN 0.25% BUPIVACAINE AND BUPIVACAINE 0.25% AND TRAMADOL (2MG/KG IN BRACHIAL PHLEXUS BLOCK BY SUPRACLAVICULAR APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES : Adjunc ts to local anaesthetics for brachial plexus block may enhance the quality and duration of analgesia. Tramadol a synthetic 4 - phenylpiperidine analog of codeine is known to produce antinociception and enhance the effect of local anaesthetics when given epid urally , intrathecally or in various peripheral nerve blocks. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of Tramadol added to brachial plexus block by supraclavicular approach. METHODS : A prospective , randomized , single blinded study was conducted o n 60 ASA I or II adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in Group I (n=30 were given 38mL of 0.25% Bupivacaine plus 2ml NS and Group II (n = 30 w ere given 38 mL of 0.25% Bupivacaine plus 2 ml Tramadol (2mg/kg. The onset time and duration of sensory and motor blockade were recorded. Haemodynamic variables (i.e. heart rate , noninvasive blood pressure , oxygen saturation , and rescue analgesic require ments were recorded for 24 hrs postoperatively. RESULTS: the onset of sensory and motor block was significantly faster in Group II compared to Group I (P <0.05. Rescue analgesic requirements were significantly less in Group II compared to Group I (P , 0.05 . Haemodynamic variables did not differ between groups in the post - operative period. CONCLUSION: Tramadol (2mg/kg in combination with 38mL of Bupivacaine (0.25% hastened onset of sensory and motor block , and improved postoperative analgesia when used in brachial plexus block , without producing any adverse events.

  7. S-100 immunostaining in the distinction of borderline tuberculoid leprosy from other cutaneous granulomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi Tirumalae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histopathologic diagnosis of borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BTL is fraught with hurdles. It overlaps with other granulomas and documenting nerve involvement is the key to correct diagnosis. This is difficult on H and E sections alone. S-100 immunostaining may help in this regard. Objectives: To study the patterns of nerve involvement in BTL and other cutaneous granulomas using S-100 immunostain and compare its sensitivity with that of H and E staining, in both adequate and inadequate biopsies. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 cases of BTL were reviewed. And, 19 biopsies from other cutaneous granulomas were taken as controls. S-100 immunostaining was done on paraffin sections. The pattern of nerve involvement was graded as intact, infiltrated and/or fragmented, intact with perineural inflammation. Results: Of the 20 cases of BTL, S-100 demonstrated infiltrated and/or fragmented nerves in 15 and absent nerves in 5 cases. H and E stain identified neuritis in eight cases. The sensitivity of S-100 and H and E is 0.78 and 0.41. In the 19 controls, S-100 identified normal nerves in 16 with 7 showing perineural inflammation only and their absence in 2 cases. H and E identified normal nerves in nine cases. The sensitivity of S-100 and H and E is 0.83 and 0.41. In biopsies where subcutis was absent, the sensitivity of S-100 in identifying nerve involvement is 0.66 compared with H and E 0.33. Conclusion: S-100 staining is an efficient ancillary aid in distinguishing BTL from other granulomas and is superior to H and E in identifying nerve involvement, even where subcutis is absent. Infiltration and/or fragmentation of nerves by S-100 is the only reliable marker of BTL.

  8. Upper Trunk Brachial Plexus Palsy Following Chiropractic Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cunningham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Upper trunk brachial plexus palsy can result from high energy trauma and has never been reported following spinal manipulation.Background:The case is presented of a patient who developed an acute brachial plexus upper trunk palsy following spinal manipulative therapy. Discussion:Discussion is made on the incidence of complications following manipulation and recommendations to prospectively capture all serious complications.Concluding Remarks:Risks exist with spinal manipulative therapy. Neurological injury can occur. Risk assessment and re-examination should occur at every visit. Large rigorous prospective studies are required to identify the true incidence of serious complications resulting from manipulative therapy and the benefit:risk ratio.

  9. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  10. Lower trunk of brachial plexus injury in the neonate rat: effects of timing repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, Liverana; Pallini, Roberto; Romani, Rossana; Di Rocco, Federico; Ciampini, Alessandro; Gangitano, Carlo; Del Fa, Aurora; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    After lesion of a peripheral nerve in neonatal mammals, motoneurons undergo a cell death. We wanted to ascertain if early surgery could influence such post-axotomy motoneuronal death and improve the functional outcome. In this study, we investigated the functional and anatomical results after immediate and delayed repair of the lower trunk of brachial plexus (BP) sectioned at birth in rats. In neonate rats, the lower trunk of the left BP was cut. This nerve trunk was repaired either immediately [immediately-reconstructed group of rats (IR), or 30 days after, tardy reconstructed group of rats (TR)]; in the third group of animals, the nerve was not repaired (noreconstructed group of rats, NoR). In each group of animals, functional studies were performed at 90 days of age using the grooming test and the walking tracks analysis. Histologic studies of the C7-T1 spinal cord and lower trunk of BP were performed at 30 and 90 days of age; the numbers of motoneuron and axon were counted. Functional recovery was related to the difference in motoneuron number between the injured and the uninjured sides of the spinal cord of the operated animals. On the one side, only in the rats in which the inferior trunk was immediately repaired, the difference in motoneuron number between the two sides of the spinal cord was not statistically significant; these animals showed a good axonal regeneration and function recovery. On the other side, in the rats in which the inferior trunk was left unrepaired or tardy repaired, the decrease in motoneuron number in the injured side compared with the uninjured side of the spinal cord was statistically significant; these animals showed no axonal regeneration and no function recovery. The results cited above suggest that an important role in restoration of good neurological function after section of the lower trunk of BP in neonate rats is played by early nerve repair. Good neurological function was related more to a quite numerical balance of

  11. Delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy by newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries represent a low percentage of delivery complications. Most newborns fully recover from the injury, very few retain a permanent neurological deficit whereas some remain unnoticed. An objective of this study was to establish delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics and relation between the deficits with length of delivery, the length of delivery periods, induction of delivery and surgical interventions at delivery. The analysed group involved 90 newborn babies with an injury of brachial plexus made at the delivery in the period between 01.01.1996 and 31.12.2005. The controlled group included 90 newborns randomly selected. The comparison was made using an χ2 test. The incidence of injuries of plexus brachialis was 1.72 per 1,000 newborns. Analysing the length of delivery there was no difference found between the analysed and controlled group (p > 0.05. In the group of newborns with the injury of brachial plexus it was found that the second delivery period was significantly shorter (p < 0.01. In the analysed group 89 (98.8% newborn babies were delivered vaginally and one (1.2% was delivered by the cesarean section. 13 newborns (14.4% from the analysed group were delivered with application of vacuum extractor and in the controlled group it was the case with one (1.2% newborn baby (p < 0.01. The delivery of 98.8% newborns from the analysed group started spontaneously and two deliveries (1.2% were induced. Risk factors for injuries of plexus brachialis in newborns at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the University Clinical Centre Tuzla include shortened second delivery period and completion of deliveries applying the vacuum extractor.

  12. Delayed presentation of a traumatic brachial artery pseudoaneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, James C

    2009-09-01

    Delayed presentation of a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm following penetrating trauma is infrequently reported. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented three months following a penetrating trauma to his antecubital fossa with a sudden exacerbation of swelling and tenderness of his elbow. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography arteriography confirmed the presence of a large pseudoaneurysm. Surgical reconstruction was performed using the long saphenous vein as an interposition vein graft, restoring normal arterial circulation.

  13. Trapezius transfer to treat flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After severe brachial palsy involving the shoulder, many different muscle transfers have been advocated to restore movement and stability of the shoulder. Paralysis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles can be treated by transfer of the trapezius. Methods We treated 10 patients, 8 males and 2 females, by transfer of the trapezius to the proximal humerus. In 6 patients the C5 and C6 roots had been injuried; in one C5, C6 and C7 roots; and 3 there were complete brachial plexus injuries. Eight of the 10 had had neurosurgical repairs before muscle transfer. Their average age was 28.3 years (range 17 to 41, the mean delay between injury and transfer was 3.1 years (range 14 months to 6.3 years and the average follow-up was 17.5 months (range 6 to 52, reporting the clinical and radiological results. Evaluation included physical and radiographic examinations. A modification of Mayer's transfer of the trapezius muscle was performed. The principal goal of this work was to evaluate the results of the trapezius transfer for flail shoulder after brachial plexus injury. Results All 10 patients had improved function with a decrease in instability of the shoulder. The average gain in shoulder abduction was 46.2°; the gain in shoulder flexion average 37.4°. All patients had stable shoulder (no subluxation of the humeral head on radiographs. Conclusion Trapezius transfer for a flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy can provide satisfactory function and stability.

  14. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and surgical characteristics of peripheral nerve injuries caused by gunshot wounds in adults: a 40-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secer, Halil Ibrahim; Daneyemez, Mehmet; Tehli, Ozkan; Gonul, Engin; Izci, Yusuf

    2008-02-01

    There are few large-volume studies on the repair of peripheral nerve lesions caused by gunshot wounds. In this study, the results of peripheral nerve repair are analyzed, and the factors influencing the outcome are investigated. During a 40-year period, 2210 peripheral nerve lesions in 2106 patients who sustained gunshot injury were treated surgically in the Department of Neurosurgery. One thousand thirty-four patients had shrapnel injury, and 1072 patients had missile injury. Twelve peripheral nerves were included in this study, and all of them were repaired by direct suture, using nerve graft, or neurolysis. All patients underwent neurologic and electrophysiologic evaluations in the preoperative period and postoperatively at the end of the follow-up period. The mean time of follow-up was 2.6 years. Final outcome was based on the motor, sensory, and electrophysiologic recoveries, and a patient judgment scale. Using the muscle grading scale, sensory grading scale, EMNG, and patient judgments, the maximal recovery was achieved in the subscapular nerve, but there were only 4 subscapular nerve lesions, which is not sufficient for a statistically significant outcome. Furthermore, the tibial, median, and femoral nerve lesions showed the best recovery rate, whereas the peroneal nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial plexus lesions had the worst. Type of the peripheral nerve, injury (repair) level, associated injuries, electrophysiologic findings, operation time, intraoperative findings, surgical techniques, and postoperative physical rehabilitation are the prognostic factors for peripheral nerve lesions due to gunshot wounds.

  15. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Susan C.; Geannette, Christian; Sneag, Darryl B. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Wolfe, Scott W. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Hand and Upper Extremity, Department of Orthopedics, New York, NY (United States); Feinberg, Joseph H. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed - and consequently scar tethered - the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy. (orig.)

  16. [Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB). Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block: a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4hours after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20%-0.34%]. No successful block patient reported pain after 4hours. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided ABPB can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Secondary to Brachial Plexus Piercing Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Leonhard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural variations of the thoracic outlet create a unique risk for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS that is difficult to diagnose clinically. Common anatomical variations in brachial plexus (BP branching were recently discovered in which portions of the proximal plexus pierce the anterior scalene. This results in possible impingement of BP nerves within the muscle belly and, therefore, predisposition for nTOS. We hypothesized that some cases of disputed nTOS result from these BP branching variants. We tested the association between BP piercing and nTOS symptoms, and evaluated the capability of ultrasonographic identification of patients with clinically relevant variations. Eighty-two cadaveric necks were first dissected to assess BP variation frequency. In 62.1%, C5, superior trunk, or superior + middle trunks pierced the anterior scalene. Subsequently, 22 student subjects underwent screening with detailed questionnaires, provocative tests, and BP ultrasonography. Twenty-one percent demonstrated atypical BP branching anatomy on ultrasound; of these, 50% reported symptoms consistent with nTOS, significantly higher than subjects with classic BP anatomy (14%. This group, categorized as a typical TOS, would be missed by provocative testing alone. The addition of ultrasonography to nTOS diagnosis, especially for patients with BP branching variation, would allow clinicians to visualize and identify atypical patient anatomy.

  18. Intrapartum risk factors for permanent brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Sarah H; Stallings, Shawn P; Ghidini, Alessandro; Spong, Catherine Y; Deering, Shad H; Allen, Robert H

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare maternal, neonatal, and second stage of labor characteristics in shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in permanent brachial plexus injury with shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in no injury. Our cases were culled from a database of deliveries that resulted in permanent brachial plexus injuries and matched to control cases that were taken from a database of consecutive shoulder dystocia deliveries from one hospital. Deliveries that resulted in injury were excluded from the control cases; those cases with no recorded shoulder dystocia were excluded from the cases. Matching was for birth weight (+/-250 g), parity, and diabetic status. Rates of precipitous and prolonged second stage, operative delivery, neonatal depression, and average number of shoulder dystocia maneuvers used were compared between the two groups with chi(2) test, Fisher exact test, and the Student t test; a probability value of precipitous second stage rate, and sex were not significant between groups. The rates of precipitous second stage for both groups (28.0% injured and 35.0% uninjured) were more than triple the rates of prolonged second stage (9.5% injured and 11.3% uninjured). No characteristic of second-stage of labor predicts permanent brachial plexus injury. Precipitous second stage is the most prevalent labor abnormality that is associated with shoulder dystocia.

  19. Cutaneous larva migrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wieczorek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM is a tropical zoonosis, caused by parasites, usually Ancylostoma braziliense. Humans are an accidental host. Polish patients with CLM are usually tourists visiting tropical and subtropical countries. The first symptoms do not always appear as creeping eruptions, which complicates the diagnosis. Objective. To present the case of a man with CLM after returning from Thailand to Poland and associated diagnostic difficulties. Case report. We present a case of a 28-year-old man who returned to Poland from Thailand. The first symptoms appeared as disseminated pruritic papules. No improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines was observed. The diagnosis was established after the appearance of serpentine erythemas and improvement after albendazole therapy. Conclusions. In the case of returnees from exotic countries suffering from raised, pruritic rashes, and no improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines, parasitic etiology should be considered.

  20. Brachial artery reactivity in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Wexler, Orren; M Morgan, Mary Anne; Gough, Michael S.; Steinmetz, Sherry D; Mack, Cynthia M.; Darling, Denise C.; Doolin, Kathleen P.; Apostolakos, Michael J.; Graves, Brian T; Frampton, Mark W.; Chen, Xucai; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of brachial artery reactivity in response to stagnant ischemia provide estimates of microvascular function and conduit artery endothelial function. We hypothesized that brachial artery reactivity would independently predict severe sepsis and severe sepsis mortality. Methods This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study. We measured brachial artery reactivity in 95 severe sepsis patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care un...

  1. Tropical dermatology: cutaneous larva migrans, gnathostomiasis, cutaneous amebiasis and trombiculiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelmann, Kristian; Tomecki, Kenneth J; Martínez, José Darío

    2014-09-01

    In today's world, many people can travel easily and quickly around the globe. Most travel travel-related illnesses include fever, diarrhea, and skin disease, which are relatively uncommon in returning travelers. We review four of the most common emerging infestations and skin infections in the Americas, which are important to the clinical dermatologist, focusing on the clinical presentation and treatment of cutaneous larva migrans, gnathostomiasis, cutaneous amebiasis, and trombiculiasis.

  2. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  3. Recovery of nerve injury-induced alexia for Braille using forearm anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Anders; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-04-16

    Nerve injuries in the upper extremity may severely affect hand function. Cutaneous forearm anaesthesia has been shown to improve hand sensation in nerve-injured patients. A blind man who lost his Braille reading capability after an axillary plexus injury was treated with temporary cutaneous forearm anaesthesia. After treatment sensory functions of the hand improved and the patient regained his Braille reading capability. The mechanism behind the improvement is likely unmasking of inhibited or silent neurons, but after repeated treatment sessions at increasing intervals the improvement has remained at 1-year follow-up, implying a structural change in the somatosensory cortex.

  4. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  5. [Cervicofacial cellulitis revealing cutaneous lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbouzid, M A; Bencheikh, R; Benhammou, A; El Edghiri, H; Boulaich, M; Essakali, L; Kzadri, M

    2007-06-01

    The cervicofacial localization of cutaneous lymphomas is rare. These lymphomas usually present as a long-lasting and treatment-refractory papule or nodule. Lymphomas can also be revealed by cervicofacial cellulitis. We report 2 cases of cervicofacial cellulitis revealing a cutaneous lymphoma. The diagnosis was proved by multiple biopsies, performed because there was no clinical improvement in spite of an aggressive and adequate antibiotherapy. Our 2 patients were treated by radio and chemotherapy. Cutaneous lymphomas are lymphocytic proliferations stemming from cutaneous lymphoid tissue, without nodal, medullary, or visceral localization. Their clinical presentation is quite polymorphic, and cellulitis is one of the modes of revelation, especially forehead and neck localization. They have no portal of entry and are resistant to treatment. The diagnosis relies on histology, and biopsies must be performed if there is a suspicion of lymphoma. The treatment is radio and chemotherapy, and the evolution depends on the tumoral stage.

  6. Multiple Cutaneous (pre)-Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.T. van der Leest (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The three most common cutaneous malignancies are derived from melanocytes and keratinocytes (ordered in decreasing aggressiveness): melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). This thesis focuses only on these three types of cancer and

  7. Electron microscopy of human peripheral nerves of clinical relevance to the practice of nerve blocks. A structural and ultrastructural review based on original experimental and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, M A; Arriazu, R; Collier, C B; Sala-Blanch, X; Izquierdo, L; de Andrés, J

    2013-12-01

    The goal is to describe the ultrastructure of normal human peripheral nerves, and to highlight key aspects that are relevant to the practice of peripheral nerve block anaesthesia. Using samples of sciatic nerve obtained from patients, and dural sac, nerve root cuff and brachial plexus dissected from fresh human cadavers, an analysis of the structure of peripheral nerve axons and distribution of fascicles and topographic composition of the layers that cover the nerve is presented. Myelinated and unmyelinated axons, fascicles, epineurium, perineurium and endoneurium obtained from patients and fresh cadavers were studied by light microscopy using immunohistochemical techniques, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Structure of perineurium and intrafascicular capillaries, and its implications in blood-nerve barrier were revised. Each of the anatomical elements is analyzed individually with regard to its relevance to clinical practice to regional anaesthesia. Routine practice of regional anaesthetic techniques and ultrasound identification of nerve structures has led to conceptions, which repercussions may be relevant in future applications of these techniques. In this regard, the ultrastructural and histological perspective accomplished through findings of this study aims at enlightening arising questions within the field of regional anaesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Cutaneous lesions in new born

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdeva Meenakshi; Kaur Surjeet; Nagpal Madhu; Dewan S

    2002-01-01

    Five hundred unselected newborn babies delivered in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit II of SGBT Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar during April 2000 to October 2000 were examined for cutaneous lesions daily for the first five days after birth. Different cutaneous lesions were seen in 474(94. 8%) newborns. The physiological skin changes observed in order of frequency were Epstein pearls in 305(61%), Mongolian spot in 301(60. 2%), su...

  9. Cutaneous actinomycosis: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metgud S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous actinomycosis is a rare presentation. Here we present a case of cutaneous actinomycosis with no history of trauma or systemic dissemination. The isolate was identified as Actinomyces viscosus by standard methods. The isolate was found to be penicillin resistant by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Therefore, the patient was treated with cotrimoxazole and improved. Thus, this case highlights the importance of isolation and susceptibility testing in actinomycotic infection. The sinuses have healed, and the patient has recovered.

  10. Anatomical characterization of the brachial plexus in dog cadavers and comparison of three blind techniques for blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelding, Alicia; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Thomason, Jeffrey; Moens, Noel

    2017-12-12

    To describe the ventral spinal nerve rami contribution to the formation of the brachial plexus (BP), and to compare ease of performing and nerve staining between three blind techniques for BP blockade in dogs. Prospective, randomized, blind study. A total of 18 dog cadavers weighing 28.2 ± 9.7 kg (mean ± standard deviation). Dogs were randomly assigned to two of three BP treatments: traditional approach (TA), perpendicular approach (PA), and axillary approach (AA). Dye (0.2 mL kg -1 ) was injected in the left BP using a spinal needle; another BP treatment was used in the right BP. Landmarks (L) included: L1, midpoint between point of the shoulder and sixth cervical (C 6 ) transverse process; L2, scapulohumeral joint; and L3, first rib. For TA, the needle was introduced craniocaudally through L1, medial to the limb and cranial to L3. For PA, the needle was directed perpendicular and caudal to L2, aligned with L1, until cranial to L3. For AA, the needle was directed ventrodorsally, parallel and cranial to L3 until at L1. All BPs were scored for dyeing quality [0 (poor) to 5 (excellent)]. The left BP was dissected for nerve origins. Durbin test was used to compare scores (p < 0.05). In all dogs, the musculocutaneous nerve originated from C 7 and C 8 ; the radial nerve from C 8 , the first thoracic vertebra (T 1 ) (16/18 dogs) and C 7 (2/18); and the median and ulnar nerves from C 8 , T 1 (17/18) and C 7 (1/18). Respective raw scores and adjusted scores for the incomplete block design were not significantly different (p = 0.72; ranks TA 16.5, PA 19.0, AA 18.5). The musculocutaneous, median, ulnar and radial nerves originate from C 7 , C 8 and T 1 . Regardless of the technique, knowledge of anatomy and precise landmarks are relevant for correct dye dispersion. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of "normal" dermatomes and somatotopic maps by "abnormal" populations of cutaneous neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Scott, Sheryl A

    2002-11-15

    During development, motor and sensory axons grow to peripheral targets with remarkable precision. Whereas much has been learned about the development of motoneuron connectivity, less is known about the regulation of cutaneous innervation. In adults, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) innervate characteristic skin regions, termed dermatomes, and their axons project somatotopically in the dorsal horn. Here, we have investigated whether cutaneous neurons are selectively matched with specific skin regions, and whether peripheral target skin influences the central connections of cutaneous neurons. To address these questions, we shifted limb buds rostrally in chick embryos prior to axon outgrowth, causing DRGs to innervate novel skin regions, and mapped the resulting dermatomes and central projections. Following limb shifts, cutaneous innervation arose from more rostral and from fewer DRGs than normal, but the overall dermatome pattern was preserved. Thus, DRGs parcel out innervation of skin in a consistent manner, with no indication of matching between skin and DRGs. Similarly, cutaneous nerves established a "normal" somatotopic map in the dorsal horn, but in more rostral segments than usual. Thus, the peripheral target skin may influence the pattern of CNS projections, but does not direct cutaneous axons to specific populations of neurons in the dorsal horn.

  12. Arterial compliance across the spectrum of ankle-brachial index: the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Scott M; Jacobs, David R; Kronmal, Richard; Bluemke, David A; Criqui, Michael; Lima, Joao; Allison, Matthew; Duprez, Daniel; Segers, Patrick; Chirinos, Julio A

    2014-04-01

    A low ankle-brachial index is associated with cardiovascular disease and reduced arterial compliance. A high ankle-brachial index is also associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We tested the hypothesis that subjects with a high ankle-brachial index demonstrate a lower arterial compliance. In addition, we assessed whether pulse pressure amplification is increased among subjects with a high ankle-brachial index. We studied 6814 adults enrolled in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were, by definition, free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Differences in total arterial compliance (ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure), aortic and carotid distensibility (measured with magnetic resonance imaging and duplex ultrasound, respectively) were compared across ankle-brachial index subclasses (≤0.90, 0.91-1.29; ≥1.30) with analyses adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Peripheral arterial disease was detected in 230 (3.4%) and high ABI in 648 (9.6%) of subjects. Those with high ankle-brachial index demonstrated greater aortic/radial pulse pressure amplification than those with a normal ankle-brachial index. In adjusted models aortic and carotid distensibility as well as total arterial compliance, were lowest among those with ankle-brachial index≤0.9 (p<0.01 vs. all), but were not reduced in subjects with an ankle-brachial index≥1.3. Lower aortic, carotid and total arterial compliance is not present in subjects free of overt cardiovascular disease and with a high ankle-brachial index. However, increased pulse pressure amplification contributes to a greater ankle-brachial index in the general population and may allow better characterization of individuals with this phenotype. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Quantitation of the lower subscapular nerve for potential use in neurotization procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Khoury, Charles A; Salter, E George; Acakpo-Satchivi, Leslie; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2006-12-01

    New information regarding nerve branches of the brachial plexus can be useful to the surgeon performing neurotization procedures following patient injury. Nerves in the vicinity of the axillae have been commonly used for neural grafting procedures, with the exception of the lower subscapular nerve (LSN). The authors dissected and measured the LSN in 47 upper extremities (left and right sides) obtained in 27 adult cadavers, and determined distances between the LSN and surrounding nerves to help quantify it for possible use in neurotization procedures. The mean diameter of the LSN was 2.3 mm. The mean length of the LSN from its origin at the posterior cord until it branched to the subscapularis muscle was 3.5 cm, and the mean distance from this branch until its termination in the teres major muscle was 6 cm. Therefore, the mean length of the entire LSN from the posterior cord to the teres major was 9.5 cm. When the LSN was mobilized to explore its possible use in neurotization, it reached the entrance site of the musculocutaneous nerve into the coracobrachialis muscle in all but three sides and was within 1.5 cm from this point in these three. In the other specimens, the mean length of the LSN distal to this site of the musculocutaneous nerve was 2 cm. The mobilized LSN reached the axillary nerve trunk as it entered the quadrangular space in all specimens. The mean length of the LSN distal to this point on the axillary nerve was 2.5 cm. Furthermore, on all but one side the LSN was found within the confines of an anatomical triangle previously described by the authors. The authors hope that these data will prove useful to the surgeon for both identifying the LSN and planning for potential neurotization procedures of the brachial plexus.

  14. Cutaneous papillomatosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, F; Tachezy, R

    2005-01-01

    Three of four heifers housed together developed multiple cutaneous tumours in the linea alba and on the teats 3 months after the application of plastic muzzle plates with sharp tips to prevent mutual sucking and licking. Fibropapilloma with many koilocytes but few intranuclear inclusions was diagnosed histologically. The dermis showed neoplastic fibroblasts and a structureless intercellular matrix, and nonpurulent vasculitis was also recorded. Immunohistochemical examination with an antibody against L1 papillomavirus antigen demonstrated intranuclear positivity in single cells of the granular and cornified layers and in many mesenchymal cells in the fibrous parts of the tumours. CD3-positive lymphocytes were present in the wall of some blood vessels, and in the dermis and epidermis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen was detected predominantly in the basal layer of the epidermis and in the superficial dermis. Electron microscopy revealed small intranuclear aggregates of virus particles in an epidermocyte, damage to desmosomes and disorganization of cytokeratin filaments in many epidermocytes. Aggregates of virus particles were revealed also in a fibroblast in the dermis. In blood capillaries of the corium, acute swelling, inflammation and necrosis of the endothelium were observed. By means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide DNA sequencing of the PCR product, the virus was identified as bovine papilloma virus type 1 (BPV 1). The presence of this virus in the tissue was further confirmed by in-situ hybridization with a BPV 1 probe.

  15. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block

    OpenAIRE

    Weyker, Paul David; Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Pham, Thoha M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal s...

  16. Atypical chest pain: evidence of intercostobrachial nerve sensitization in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jennifer W; Grothusen, John R; Rosso, Andrea L; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Atypical chest pain is a common complaint among Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) patients with brachial plexus involvement. Anatomically, the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) is connected to the brachial plexus and innervates the axilla, medial arm and anterior chest wall. By connecting to the brachial plexus, the ICBN could become sensitized by CRPS spread and become a source of atypical chest pain. To evaluate the sensitivity of chest areas in CRPS patients and normal controls. Prospective investigation of pressure algometry in chest areas to determine chest wall sensitivity. CRPS patients and normal controls volunteered to participate in our study. Each individual was examined to meet inclusion criteria. Patients' report of chest pain history was collected from every participant. Pressure algometry was used to measure pressure sensitivity in the axilla, anterior axillary line second intercostal space, mid-clavicular third rib, mid-clavicular tenth rib, and midsternal. Each of these measurements were compared to an intra-participant abdominal measure to control for an individuals generalized sensitivity. The ratios of chest wall sensitivities were compared between CRPS patients and normal controls. A history of chest pain was reported by a majority (94%) of CRPS patients and a minority (19%) of normal controls. CRPS patients reported lifting their arm as a major initiating factor for chest pain. To pressure algometry, the ratios of CRPS patients were significantly greater than control subjects (pCRPS patients than normal controls. The ICBN could be the source of this sensitization by CRPS spread from the brachial plexus.

  17. DOES BRACHIAL ARTERY FMD PROVIDE A BIOASSAY FOR NITRIC OXIDE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Ives, Stephen J.; McDaniel, John; Trinity, Joel D.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Supiano, Mark A.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to better define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in young, healthy humans. Brachial artery blood velocity and diameter were determined (ultrasound Doppler) in eight volunteers (26 ± 1 yrs) before and after 5-min forearm circulatory occlusion with and without intra-arterial infusion of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (0.48 mg/dl/min). Control (CON) and L-NMMA trials were performed with the occlusion cuff placed in the traditional distal position, as well as proximal to the measurement site. FMD was significantly reduced, but not abolished, by L-NMMA in the distal cuff trial (8.9 ± 1.3 to 6.0 ± 0.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.02), with no effect of L-NMMA on FMD with proximal cuff placement (10.6 ± 1.2 to 12.4 ± 1.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.39). When the reduction in shear stimulus following L-NMMA was taken into account, no drug difference was observed for either distal (0.26 ± 0.02 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.40) or proximal (0.23 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.89) FMD trials. These findings challenge the assertion that NO is obligatory for brachial artery FMD, and call into question the sensitivity of this procedure for non-invasive determination of NO bioavailability in young, healthy humans. PMID:23774225

  18. Mechanisms and time course of menthol-induced cutaneous vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Daniel H; McCartney, Nathaniel B; Tumlinson, James H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-03-01

    Menthol is a vasoactive compound that is widely used in topical analgesic agents. Menthol induces cutaneous vasodilation, however the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Determining the rates of appearance and clearance of menthol in the skin is important for optimizing topical treatment formulation and dosing. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms contributing to menthol-mediated cutaneous vasodilation and to establish a time course for menthol appearance/clearance in the skin. Ten young (23±1years, 5 males 5 females) subjects participated in two protocols. In study 1, four intradermal microdialysis fibers were perfused with increasing doses of menthol (0.1-500mM) and inhibitors for nitric oxide (NO), endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs), and sensory nerves. Skin blood flow was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry and normalized to %CVC max . In study 2, two intradermal microdialysis fibers were perfused with lactated Ringer's solution. 0.017mL·cm -2 of a 4% menthol gel was placed over each fiber. 5μL samples of dialysate from the microdialysis fibers were collected every 30min and analyzed for the presence of menthol with high performance gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Skin blood flow (laser speckle contrast imaging) and subjective ratings of menthol sensation were simultaneously obtained with dialysate samples. In study 1, menthol induced cutaneous vasodilation at all doses ≥100mM (all pmenthol-mediated vasodilation (all p>0.05). In study 2, significant menthol was detected in dialysate 30min post menthol application (0.89ng, p=0.0002). Relative to baseline, cutaneous vasodilation was elevated from minutes 15-45 and ratings of menthol sensation were elevated from minute 5-60 post menthol application (all pMenthol induces cutaneous vasodilation in the skin through multiple vasodilator pathways, including NO, EDHF, and sensory nerves. Topical menthol is detectable in the skin within 30min and is cleared by 60min. Skin

  19. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Moayeri, N.; Bruhn, J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Chan, V.W.; Groen, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  20. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  1. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  2. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  3. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  4. Impact of age, sex and exercise on brachial and popliteal artery remodelling in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Swart, A.; Exterkate, A.; Naylor, L.H.; Black, M.A.; Cable, N.T.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of age, sex and exercise on wall thickness and remodelling in the popliteal and brachial arteries. METHODS: We compared wall thickness, lumen diameter and wall:lumen ratios in the brachial and popliteal arteries of 15 young (Y, 25.4+/-0.8 yr; 7M 8W) and 16 older

  5. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, J.A.; Beckerman, H.; de Groot, V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Method: Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the

  6. Trigeminal lesions and maternal behavior in Norway rats: I. Effects of cutaneous rostral snout denervation on maintenance of nurturance and maternal aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J M; Kolunie, J M

    1991-12-01

    Cutaneous desensitization of the upper, rostral snout by bilateral section of the infraorbital nerves in lactating Norway rat dams markedly, but transiently, disrupted retrieval and licking of pups, nursing behavior, and fighting with a strange male intruder. Removal of the mystacial vibrissae, which provide major inputs to the infraorbital nerves, or cutaneous desensitization of the chin by bilateral sectioning of the mental nerves did not disrupt these behaviors. However, cutaneous desensitization of both the upper and lower rostral snout exacerbated and prolonged the effects produced by infraorbital denervation alone. The control of maternal behavior and aggression by somatosensory reflexes and the possible bases for rapid behavioral recovery after partial trigeminal sensory denervations are discussed.

  7. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surg. 2006;. 72(2): 188-192. 14. Bigeleisen P.E. Anatomical variations of the phrenic nerve and its clinical implication for supraclavicular block. Brit. J. Anaesthesia. 2003; 91(6): 916-917. 15. Abdelazeem Ali El-Dawlatly. Phrenic nerve paralysis after subclavian revascularization surgery: A case report. Internet J. Anesthesiol.

  8. Nerve disorders in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John G; Baxter, Donald E

    2008-04-01

    Dancers are required to perform at the extreme of physiologic and functional limits. Under such conditions, peripheral nerves are prone to compression. Entrapment neuropathies in dance can be related to the sciatic nerve or from a radiculopathy related to posture or a hyperlordosis. The most reproducible and reliable method of diagnosis is a careful history and clinical examination. This article reviews several nerve disorders encountered in dancers, including interdigital neuromas, tarsal tunnel syndrome, medial hallucal nerve compression, anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome, superficial and deep peroneal nerve entrapment, and sural nerve entrapment.

  9. Nerve transfer for sensory reconstruction of C8-T1 dermatomes in tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme A; Ghizoni, Marcos F

    2016-11-01

    Absence of sensation in C8-T1 dermatome is a common finding in midcervical spinal cord injury. The goal was to restore sensation on the C8-T1 dermatomes by transferring sensory nerves with afferents on C5-C6 roots. A mean 10 months post spinal cord injury, we operated on 10 upper limbs from 5 tetraplegics averaging 23 years old. Cutaneous branches of the median nerve were transferred to the palm to the ulnar proper digital nerve of the little finger. In two patients, the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve was also transferred to the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. At a mean 20 months after surgery, on the ulnar side of the hand and little finger, all patients were able to perceive 19.3 g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament pressure. Nociception was restored on the medial side of the elbow, forearm, and hand. Faulty location was a common finding, but not as a major complaint. Sensory nerve transfers should be incorporated into the reconstruction of the upper limb in tetraplegics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:637-641, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  12. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Mehmet Salih; Yeşilova, Yavuz; Olgen, M Kirami; Ozbel, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania protozoon parasites is a disease which is characterized by long-term nodulo-ulcerative lesions healing spontaneously with scarring. The disease has been well-known in Anatolia for centuries and has different names such as; Urfa boil, Antep boil, year boil, Halep boil, oriental sore and beauty scar. The causative agents are Leishmania tropica and Leishmania tropica/Leishmania infantum in Southeastern Anatolia and East Mediterranean, respectively. CL is a notifiable disease in Turkey and, according to the Ministry of Health official records, 46.003 new cases were reported between 1990 and 2010. Among those cases, 96% of them were reported from the Şanlıurfa, Adana, Osmaniye, Hatay, Diyarbakır, İçel and Kahramanmaraş provinces. Although 45% of cases were notified from Şanlıurfa in the past 20 years, its ratio is currently decreasing while other regions' ratios have been showing an increasing trend. Easier transportation between cities, increased travel migration of the population from rural areas to the peripheral suburbs with inadequate infrastructure and unhealthy housing are thought to be the main factors for spreading the disease from Southeastern Anatolia to other regions of Turkey. Lack of treatment of patients as reservoir hosts because of different reasons and ineffective and inadequate use of insecticides against vector sand flies have also played an important role in spreading the disease. Neglect of this disease by patients and health institutions can also be considered as other factors for the spreading. We believe that, after the strategic plan for leishmaniasis prepared by the Turkish Ministry of Health with the contribution of scientists in 2011 is put into practice, the control of the disease will be more effective.

  13. Cutaneous human myiasis due to Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suite, M; Polson, K

    2007-10-01

    This is a case report of cutaneous myiasis due to Dermatobia hominis in a female physician who had travelled to Belize. Cutaneous myiasis is endemic in Central and South America but is seldom reported from the Caribbean islands.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amyloidosis, primary localized cutaneous, 2 Genetic Testing Registry: Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis 1 General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ...

  15. Onychomadesis Following Cutaneous Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damevska, Katerina; Gocev, Gorgi; Pollozahani, Nora; Nikolovska, Suzana; Neloska, Lence

    2017-04-01

    Beau lines are transverse, band-like depressions extending from one lateral edge of the nail to the other and affecting all nails at corresponding levels (1). Onychomadesis is considered an extreme form of Beau line with subsequent separation of the proximal nail plate from the nail bed. Both fall along a spectrum of nail plate abnormalities that occur secondary to temporary nail matrix arrest (NMA). Various systemic and dermatologic conditions have been reported in association with onychomadesis (2-7) (Table 1). Nail changes can affect all or some of the nails and both the fingernails and toenails; however, fingernails are more frequently affected. The severity of the nail changes varies depending on the underlying cause, its duration, and environmental factors (8). We present a case of onychomadesis following cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (CLCV). A 61-year-old woman presented to the Dermatology Clinic complaining of a purpuric rash that began on her lower extremities and rapidly progressed to her abdomen and upper extremities over the previous five days. Her medical history was remarkable for hypertension and diet-controlled diabetes mellitus. Her medications included enalapril, which she had been taking for the past four years. On three consecutive days before the skin eruption, the patient took oral diclofenac sodium for hip pain. A clinical examination revealed non-blanching petechial rash on the legs, abdomen, and upper limbs up to the elbow (Figure 1, A) with leukocytoclastic vasculitis on biopsy (Figure 1, B). Direct immunofluorescence was negative. Laboratory investigations revealed a white blood cell count of 14.5 × 109/L with a normal differential count, and a platelet count of 380 × 109/L. Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 65 mm/1st h, and C reactive protein was at 8.5 mg/dL. Antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, immune complexes, and cryoglobulinemia were negative, as were B and C hepatitis virus serological tests. Her renal

  16. Optimal timing for repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eugene; Inaba, Kenji; Byerly, Saskya; Escamilla, Diandra; Cho, Jayun; Carey, Joseph; Stevanovic, Milan; Ghiassi, Alidad; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    Data regarding outcomes after peripheral nerve injuries is limited, and the optimal management strategy for an acute injury is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine timing of repair and specific factors that impact motor-sensory outcomes after peripheral nerve injury. This was a single-center, retrospective study. Patients with traumatic peripheral nerve injury from January 2010 to June 2015 were included. Patients who died, required amputation, suffered brachial plexus injury, or had missing motor-sensory examinations were excluded. Motor-sensory examinations were graded 0 to 5 by the Modified British Medical Research Council system. Operative repair of peripheral nerves was analyzed for patient characteristics, anatomic nerve injured, level of injury, associated injuries, days until repair, and repair method. Three hundred eleven patients met inclusion criteria. Two hundred fifty-eight (83%) patients underwent operative management, and 53 (17%) underwent nonoperative management. Those who required operative intervention had significantly more penetrating injuries 85.7% versus 64.2% (p Injury Severity Score less than 15 (p = 0.013) and male sex (p = 0.006). Upper arm level of injury was a predictor of poor outcome (p = 0.041). Multivariate analysis confirmed male sex as a predictor of good motor outcome (p = 0.014; Adjusted Odds Ratio, 3.88 [1.28-11.80]). Univariate analysis identified distal forearm level of injury (p = 0.026) and autograft repair (p = 0.048) as predictors of poor sensory outcome. Damage control surgery for unstable patients undergoing laparotomy (p = 0.257) and days to nerve repair (p = 0.834) did not influence motor-sensory outcome. Outcomes did not differ significantly in patients who underwent repair 24 hours or longer versus those who were repaired later. Outcomes were primarily influenced by patient characteristics and injury level rather than operative characteristics. Peripheral nerve injuries can be repaired after damage control

  17. Potential axillary nerve stretching during RSA implantation: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Blandine; Leclère, Franck Marie; Casoli, Vincent; Paganini, Federico; Unglaub, Frank; Spies, Christian; Valenti, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical neurological injury after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) may jeopardize functional outcomes due to the risk of irreversible damage to the axillary nerve. We proposed a simple anatomical study in order to assess the macroscopic effects on the axillary nerve when lowering the humerus as performed during RSA implantation. We also measured the effect on the axillary nerve of a lateralization of the humerus. Between 2011 and 2012, cadaveric dissections of 16 shoulder specimens from nine fresh human cadavers were performed in order to assess the effects on the axillary nerve after the lowering and lateralization of the humerus. We assessed the extent of stretching of the axillary nerve in four positions in the sagittal plane [lowering of the humerus: great tuberosity in contact with the acromion (position 1), in contact with the upper (position 2), middle (position 3) and lower rim of the glenoid (position 4)] and three positions in the frontal plane [lateralization of the humerus: humerus in contact with the glenoid (position 1), humerus lateralized 1 cm (position 2) and 2 cm (position 3)]. When the humerus was lowered, clear macroscopical changes appeared below the middle of the glenoid (the highest level of tension). As regards the lateralization of the humerus, macroscopic study and measurements confirm the absence of stretching of the nerve in those positions. Lowering of the humerus below the equator of the glenoid changes the course and tension of the axillary nerve and may lead to stretching and irreversible damage, compromising the function of the deltoid. Improvements in the design of the implants and modification of the positioning of the glenosphere to avoid notching and to increase mobility must take into account the anatomical changes induced by the prosthesis and its impact on the brachial plexus. Level of Evidence and study type Level IV.

  18. Cutaneous silent period in myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ozden; Sencan, Savas; Ercalik, Tulay; Koytak, Pinar Kahraman; Alibas, Hande; Gunduz, Osman Hakan; Tanridag, Tulin; Uluc, Kayihan

    2018-01-01

    An increased response to painful stimuli without spontaneous pain suggests a role of central hyperexcitability of pain pathways in the pathogenesis of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). In this study we aimed to test the hypothesis that spinal pain pathways are affected in MPS. We used cutaneous silent period (CSP) parameters to demonstrate the hyperexcitability of spinal pain pathways in MPS. Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with MPS and 30 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The CSP recordings were performed in the right upper and left lower extremities. In both upper and lower extremities, patients had prolonged CSP latencies (P = 0.034 and P = 0.049 respectively) and shortened CSP durations (P = 0.009 and P = 0.008, respectively). Delayed and shortened CSP in MPS patients implies dysfunction in the inhibitory mechanism of the spinal/supraspinal pain pathways, suggesting central sensitization in the pathogenesis of MPS and supporting our research hypothesis. Muscle Nerve 57: E24-E28, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  20. The Effects of Simulated Microgravity and of Endurance Training on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Cutaneous Small Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, O. L.; Kalentchuk, V. U.; Andreev-Andrievskii, A. A.; Borzykh, A. A.; Mochalov, S. V.; Buravkov, S. V.; Borovik, A. S.; Sharova, A. P.; Tarasova, O. S.

    2008-06-01

    We investigated neuroeffector mechanisms in cutaneous small arteries of rats after 2-wk tail suspension (TS) or 8-wk endurance training (ET). Contractile responses of saphenous artery were studied in vitro and the periarterial nerve plexus was stained with glyoxylic acid. In TS rats pronounced decrease of neurogenic contraction was observed that correlated with smaller density of periarterial nerve plexus. However, TS increased smooth muscle sensitivity to noradrenaline and serotonin. In ET rats neurogenic response was also diminished, but the sensitivity to the agonists was not changed. ET had no effect on nerve density, but reduced intensity of their fluorescence. Therefore, both TS and ET depress sympathetic neurotransmission in cutaneous small arteries, but through different mechanisms.

  1. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  2. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers after catheter-based renal nerve ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates after renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition after renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (age 45-74 years) before, 6 (n = 11), and 12 months (n = 8) after renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA and raw MSNA signals were analyzed. We detected MSNA action-potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: -2 ± 3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2 ± 9 mm Hg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: -1 ± 3 mm Hg, ΔSBP: -1 ± 9 mm Hg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34 ± 3 bursts per minute and 8 ± 1 spikes per second. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (-1.4 ± 3.6 bursts/minute; -0.6 ± 1.4 spikes/second) or at 12 months (-2.5 ± 4.0 bursts/minute; -2.0 ± 1.6 spikes/second) after renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope = -0.06; P = .369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding after renal nerve ablation. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metastatic Brachial Plexopathy in a Case of Recurrent Breast Carcinoma Demonstrated on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan J.; Srivastava, Anurag; Bal, ChandraSekhar; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2014-03-15

    referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate the brachial plexus involvement. Coronal diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) revealed a mass in the right axilla, with a b value of 1,000, infiltrating the cord and branches of the right brachial plexus visualised as linear hyperintensities (Fig. 1c, arrow). Brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients can be metastatic (because major lymph drainage routes for the breast course through the axilla) or radiation induced, the former being the commoner of the two. Differentiation between the two pathologies is important for appropriate treatment planning. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Recognition of the pattern of brachial plexus involvement is thus essential for accurate interpretation of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT study. To date, two case reports and one small case series have demonstrated the feasibility of PET for confirming metastatic brachial plexopathy when MRI was suspicious of the same or when the patient was symptomatic for the same. This case highlights the possibility of metastatic brachial plexopathy even when the patient may not be overtly symptomatic for the same. The typical pattern as seen on MIP and coronal images is linear, extending from the superomedial aspect (supra/infraclavicular) to the lateral aspect of axilla closely related to the subclavian/axillary vessels). The commonest finding on computed tomography (CT) is that of an axillary mass, but may range from no remarkable abnormality to minimal thickening. Moreover, CT would not be able to differentiate metastatic from radiation plexopathy. MRI is the first-line imaging modality for evaluating brachial plexopathy and can delineate both normal and abnormal anatomy of the brachial plexus, with the ability to differentiate nerves from the surrounding vessels and soft tissue with greater detail than CT. In this case

  4. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  5. Medical treatment decision making after total avulsion brachial plexus injury: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Lauren E; Maynard, Mallory; Chung, Kevin C; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2015-06-01

    Complete avulsion traumatic brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) can be treated using nerve and musculoskeletal reconstruction procedures. However, these interventions are most viable within certain timeframes, and even then they cannot restore all lost function. Little is known about how patients make decisions regarding surgical treatment or what impediments they face during the decision-making process. Using qualitative methodology, the authors aimed to describe how and why patients elect to pursue or forego surgical reconstruction, identify the barriers precluding adequate information transfer, and determine whether these patients are satisfied with their treatment choices over time. Twelve patients with total avulsion BPIs were interviewed according to a semi-structured guide. The interview transcripts were qualitatively analyzed using the systematic inductive techniques of grounded theory to identify key themes related to the decision-making process and long-term satisfaction with decisions. Four decision factors emerged from our analysis: desire to restore function, perceived value of functional gains, weighing the risks and costs of surgery, and having concomitant injuries. Lack of insurance coverage (4 patients), delayed diagnosis (3 patients), and insufficient information regarding treatment (4 patients) prevented patients from making informed decisions and accessing care. Three individuals, all of whom had decided against reconstruction, had regrets about their treatment choices. Patients with panplexus avulsion injuries are missing opportunities for reconstruction and often not considering the long-term outcomes of surgery. As more Americans gain health insurance coverage, it is very likely that the number of patients able to pursue reconstruction will increase. The authors recommend implementing clinical pathways to help patients meet critical points in care within the ideal timeframe and using a patient- and family-centered care approach combined with

  6. Severe obstetric brachial plexus palsies can be identified at one month of age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn J A Malessy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish whether severe obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP can be identified reliably at or before three months of age. METHODS: Severe OBPP was defined as neurotmesis or avulsion of spinal nerves C5 and C6 irrespective of additional C7-T1 lesions, assessed during surgery and confirmed by histopathological examination. We first prospectively studied a derivation group of 48 infants with OBPP with a minimal follow-up of two years. Ten dichotomous items concerning active clinical joint movement and needle electromyography of the deltoid, biceps and triceps muscles were gathered at one week, one month and three months of age. Predictors for a severe lesion were identified using a two-step forward logistic regression analysis. The results were validated in two independent cohorts of OBPP infants of 60 and 13 infants. RESULTS: Prediction of severe OBPP at one month of age was better than at one week and at three months. The presence of elbow extension, elbow flexion and of motor unit potentials in the biceps muscle correctly predicted whether lesions were mild or severe in 93.6% of infants in the derivation group (sensitivity 1.0, specificity 0.88, in 88.3% in the first validation group (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.76 and in 84.6% in the second group (sensitivity of 1.0, specificity 0.66. INTERPRETATION: Infants with OBPP with severe lesions can be identified at one month of age by testing elbow extension, elbow flexion and recording motor unit potentials (MUPs in the biceps muscle. The decision rule implies that children without active elbow extension at one month should be referred to a specialized center, while children with active elbow extension as well as active flexion should not. When there is active elbow extension, but no active elbow flexion an EMG is needed; absence of MUPs in the biceps muscle is an indication for referral.

  7. Schwanoma de plexo braquial: relato de dois casos Schwannoma of brachial plexus: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoíno Leal Filho

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwanomas, neurinomas ou neurilemomas são tumores benignos de nervos periféricos. Podem ocorrer em associação com a neurofibromatose tipo 2. Relatamos dois casos de tumor cervical originado em plexo braquial sem associação com neurofibromatose. Uma mulher, de 31 anos apresentando uma tumefação em região supraclavicular direita, dor irradiada para o membro ipsilateral e sinal de Tinel à percussão da região. Outra mulher, 52 anos, com cervicobraquialgia persistente à direita há um ano. Ambas foram submetidas a microcirurgia, com ressecção total da lesão. O estudo histopatológico foi compatível com schwanoma. As duas pacientes tiveram boa evolução neurológica, com desaparecimento dos sinais e sintomas.Schwannomas, neurinomas or neurilemmomas are benign peripheral nerve tumors. The literature report some cases associated with neurofibromatosis 2. We report two cases of cervical schwannoma originating from the brachial plexus unassociated with neurofibromatosis. A 31-year-old woman presented with a mass in the right supraclavicular region, irradiating pain and distal tingling to percussion (Tinel's sign for 6 months. And a 52-year-old woman presented with pain in the cervical region and right arm for one year. Both the patients underwent to a microsurgery with total resection of the lesion. Histology of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. Postoperatively, the patients had a good recovery.

  8. [A long-term follow up of the shoulder in obstetrical brachial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, M; Ghroubi, S; Mezghanni, M; Triki, F E; Elleuch, M H

    2004-02-01

    To study shoulder impairment and disability caused by obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, their evolution under physical and surgical treatments, and the place of complementary explorations in persistent sequels. From 1991 to 2000, 129 patients (66 M, 63 F) were included in a retrospective study. Impairment was assessed by muscle recovery (deltoid, biceps, external rotators) and shoulder passive motion. Disability was assessed by Mallet functional test. Full spontaneous recovery was noted in 20% of patients before the age of 3 months. Repair of the nerve lesion was undertaken in four children between the 18th and 24th months. Full recovery of deltoid and biceps was noted in three-fourth of whole cases before the 12th month, and of the external rotation in only 45% at this same age. Seventy-seven percent of patients showed stage >or= III of Mallet test (VI: 20%, IV: 32%; III: 25%) at a middle age of 3.5 years. A long-term follow-up showed an external rotation limited less than 20 degrees in 15 children. Investigation by RMN or Arthroscanner was realized for five patients, this reveals a deformation with subluxation of the humeral head in two cases. Ten children were operated (liberation of sub-scapula in nine cases associated to a tendinous transfer six times; humeral osteotomie in one case). This surgery has allowed the improvement of the functional state in all cases. After-effects in shoulder are frequent especially the limitation of external rotation, which can lead to a deformation, and subluxation of the humeral head. The authors insist on the importance to push investigations in case of limitation of the passive external rotation to improve the therapeutic choice.

  9. Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Without Sedation Correlates With Injury Severity in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Andrea S; Shen, Peter Y; Nidecker, Anna E; Lee, Paul S; James, Michelle A

    2017-05-01

    Which infants with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) should undergo microsurgical plexus reconstruction remains controversial. The current gold standard for the decision for plexus reconstruction is serial clinical examinations, but this approach obviates the possibility of early surgical treatment. We hypothesize that a new technique using 3-dimensional volumetric proton density magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without sedation can evaluate the severity of BPBP injury earlier than serial clinical examinations. Infants were prospectively enrolled prior to 12 weeks of age and imaged using 3 Tesla MRI without sedation. Clinical scores were collected at all visits. The imaging findings were graded based on the number of injured levels and the severity of each injury, and a radiological score was calculated. All infants were followed at least until the decision for surgery was made based on clinical examination. Nine infants completed the MRI scan and clinical follow-up. The average Toronto score at presentation was 4.4 out of 10 (range, 0-8.2); the average Active Movement Scale score was 50 out of 105 (range, 0-86). Four infants required surgery: 2 because of a flail limb and Horner syndrome and 2 owing to failure to recover antigravity elbow flexion by age 6 months. Radiological scores ranged from 0 to 18 out of a maximum score of 25. The average radiological score for those infants who required surgery was 12 (range, 6.5-18), whereas the average score for infants who did not require surgery was 3.5 (range, 0-8). Three-dimensional proton density MRI can evaluate spinal nerve roots in infants without the need for radiation, contrast agents, or sedation. These data suggest that MRI can help determine the severity of injury earlier than clinical examination in infants with BPBP, although further study of a larger sample of infants with varying severity of disease is necessary. Diagnostic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by

  10. Interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroplasty: Postoperative analgesia, patient satisfaction and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Anand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroplasty procedures are seldom performed on an ambulatory basis. Our objective was to examine postoperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, patient satisfaction and complications of ambulatory shoulder arthroplasty performed using interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB. Materials and Methods: We prospectively examined 82 consecutive patients undergoing total and hemi-shoulder arthroplasty under ISB. Eighty-nine per cent (n=73 of patients received a continuous ISB; 11% (n=9 received a single-injection ISB. The blocks were performed using a nerve stimulator technique. Thirty to 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine was injected perineurally after appropriate muscle twitches were elicited at a current of less than 0.5% mA. Data were collected in the preoperative holding area, intraoperatively and postoperatively including the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, at 24h and at seven days. Results: Mean postoperative pain scores at rest were 0.8 ± 2.3 in PACU (with movement, 0.9 ± 2.5, 2.5 ± 3.1 at 24h and 2.8 ± 2.1 at seven days. Mean postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV scores were 0.2 ± 1.2 in the PACU and 0.4 ± 1.4 at 24h. Satisfaction scores were 4.8 ± 0.6 and 4.8 ± 0.7, respectively, at 24h and seven days. Minimal complications were noted postoperatively at 30 days. Conclusions: Regional anesthesia offers sufficient analgesia during the hospital stay for shoulder arthroplasty procedures while adhering to high patient comfort and satisfaction, with low complications.

  11. A Population-Based Analysis of Time to Surgery and Travel Distances for Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Baty, Jack; Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Osei, Daniel A

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of timely evaluation for patients with brachial plexus injuries (BPIs), in clinical practice we have noted delays in referral. Because the published BPI experience is largely from individual centers, we used a population-based approach to evaluate the delivery of care for patients with BPI. We used statewide administrative databases from Florida (2007-2013), New York (2008-2012), and North Carolina (2009-2010) to create a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for BPI (exploration, repair, neurolysis, grafting, or nerve transfer). Emergency department and inpatient records were used to determine the time interval between the injury and surgical treatment. Distances between treating hospitals and between the patient's home ZIP code and the surgical hospital were recorded. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictors for time from injury to surgery exceeding 365 days. Within the 222 patients in our cohort, median time from injury to surgery was 7.6 months and exceeded 365 days in 29% (64 of 222 patients) of cases. Treatment at a smaller hospital for the initial injury was significantly associated with surgery beyond 365 days after injury. Patient insurance type, travel distance for surgery, distance between the 2 treating hospitals, and changing hospitals between injury and surgery did not significantly influence time to surgery. Nearly one third of patients in Florida, New York, and North Carolina underwent BPI surgery more than 1 year after the injury. Patients initially treated at smaller hospitals are at risk for undergoing delayed BPI surgery. These findings can inform administrative and policy efforts to expedite timely referral of patients with BPI to experienced centers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial blood pressure index on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Tokuyuki; Ono, Kumeo; Tsuchida, Akiyasu; Kawai, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiko; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Koyanagi, Hikaru; Noguchi, Toshiharu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Sekihara, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Yukiyasu; Kanai, Hideo; Ishida, Hideki; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2005-10-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABPI) are markers for atherosclerosis, and each predicts mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, there have been no studies in the past that compared head-to-head the clinical validity of these 2 parameters. Compared with conventional aortic PWV, brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is considered simple and thereby easily applicable to clinical use. To clarify the relationship between baPWV and ABPI and assess their prognostic values, we analyzed 785 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 60.2 +/- 12.5 (SD) years for whom ABPI and baPWV at baseline had been measured simultaneously and who were followed up for 33.8 +/- 10.8 months. Of 785 patients, 131 deaths were recorded. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, all-cause mortality was progressively and significantly greater from the lowest quartile of baPWV onward (log-rank test, 41.8; P hemodialysis patients. However, baPWV was useful to pick a high-risk population in patients with ABPI greater than 0.9. Thus, screening hemodialysis patients by means of baPWV and ABPI provides complementary information in identifying a high-risk population.

  13. Consistency of Toe Systolic Pressures, Brachial Systolic Pressures, and Toe-Brachial Indices in People with and without Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevethan, Robert

    2018-01-22

    Toe systolic blood pressures (TSPs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) have been identified as useful adjuncts in the identification of pedal ischemia, peripheral artery occlusive diseases, and risk for either nonhealing of lower extremity wounds or for amputation. Valid measurement of TSPs and TBIs is therefore essential. However, it could be jeopardized by rater, instrument, and intratestee inconsistency. These three sources of inconsistency were examined in this research. Five publications addressing TSP and TBI consistency were identified and their results were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Moderate variability in TSPs was found across all studies; greater variability was evidenced in brachial systolic pressure, particularly for people who had diabetes; and TBI values also exhibited considerable variability, but little difference between people who did and did not have diabetes. These findings provide qualified evidence of consistency regarding measurement of TSPs but challenge the TBI as a valid and useful indicator in screening, prognostic, and monitoring contexts, particularly for people who have diabetes. However, there is a prospect that TBI assessment could be improved by adherence to standardized protocols and by obtaining multiple measurements from toes and arms on a single occasion as well as on different occasions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  16. [Histopathology of cutaneous drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortonne, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    There are many different types of cutaneous adverse reactions. The most classical reactions are driven by T lymphocytes that specifically react towards a drug, with an individual genetic susceptibility linked to certain type I major histocompatibility complex alleles. These reactions are characterized by a wide variety of clinical and histopathological presentations, and a wide range of severity. The most frequent entity is the maculopapular rash, while the most aggressive forms are the Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS-TEN). The histopathological alterations associated to each of these syndromes have been better described in the literature during the past 10 years, encompassing non-specific lesions, as in most drug induced maculopapular rashes, to more specific inflammatory patterns. The finding of confluent apoptotic keratinocytes with epidermal detachment is the prototypical aspect of SJS-TEN. There are however numerous pitfalls, and a similar aspect to those observed in each cutaneous drug reactions entities can be found in other diseases. DRESS syndrome can indeed present with dense and epidermotropic T-cell infiltrate, sometimes with nuclear atypias, and thus can be difficult to distinguish from a primary or secondary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnosis of cutaneous adverse reactions relies on a clinical-pathological confrontation and requires an accurate evaluation of drug imputability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  18. Sporotrichoid pattern of cutaneous nocardiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A young male patient, having linearly arranged nodular lesions on lower extremity was diagnosed to have lymphocutaneous variety of cutaneous nocardiosis. This is a rare entity and has to be differentiated form other causes of nodular lymphangitis. The patient responded dramatically to Cotrimoxazole therapy.

  19. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  20. Cutaneous thermoreceptors in primates and sub-primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iggo, A

    1969-02-01

    1. Cutaneous thermoreceptors were examined electrophysiologically in primates (monkey, baboon) and in sub-primates (dog and rat) by recording from single units dissected from peripheral nerves.2. Thermal stimuli were delivered from thermodes in contact with the skin.3. Primate ;cold' receptors had spot-like receptive fields and were found in both hairy and glabrous skin. The conduction velocities of the axons ranged from 0.6 to 15.3 m/sec.4. The discharge from the primate receptors characteristically appeared in bursts with intervals of silence within the range temperatures of 18-40 degrees C. Static and dynamic sensitivity curves were established, with maxima about 30 degrees C.5. Cold receptors in the lip of the dog had maximal sensitivity at 31-37 degrees C. The axons were myelinated with conduction velocities less than 20 m/sec.6. ;Warm' receptors, with maximal sensitivity at 40 degrees C and non-myelinated axons, were abundant in the scrotal nerve of the rat. The ;cold' receptors had maximal responses at 23-28 degrees C.7. The ;spurious' thermoreceptor behaviour of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors is described and the way in which they may distort integrated potential records from whole nerves is analysed.

  1. Timing of surgical reconstruction for closed traumatic injury to the supraclavicular brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R

    2015-07-01

    While it is widely accepted that cases of traumatic injury to the brachial plexus benefit from early surgical exploration and repair, with results deteriorating with long delays, policies vary regarding the exact timing of intervention. This is one of a pair of review articles considering the clinical issues, investigations, and surgical factors relating to management of injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus, as well evidence from experimental work and clinical outcomes.In this article Professor Birch argues for early exploration of the brachial plexus as the optimum both to delineate the pathology and undertake reconstructive surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Impact of eight weeks of repeated ischaemic preconditioning on brachial artery and cutaneous microcirculatory function in healthy males.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, H.; Nyakayiru, J.; Bailey, T.G.; Green, D.J.; Cable, N.T.; Sprung, V.S.; Hopkins, N.D.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischaemic preconditioning has well-established cardiac and vascular protective effects. Short interventions (one week) of daily ischaemic preconditioning episodes improve conduit and microcirculatory function. This study examined whether a longer (eight weeks) and less frequent (three

  3. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy - what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: Part 2. Upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungjun [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Hanyang University, Kuri Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kuri City, Kyunggi-do (Korea); Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Seung Min [Yonsei University, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University, Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-02-15

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging. (orig.)

  4. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy--what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: part 2. Upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjun; Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah; Kim, Seung Min; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2007-02-01

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging.

  5. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus. PMID:28932698

  6. Lack of physician-patient communication as a key factor associated with malpractice litigation in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Joseph; McGovern, Connie; Chang, Kate W C; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-02-01

    Perinatal disorders are prone to malpractice litigation. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) results from stretching the nerves in the perinatal period and may lead to paresis or paralysis and sensory loss in the affected arm. Little is known about the key factors associated with malpractice litigation by families of patients with NBPP and whether these factors reflect the practice environment or are inherent to the condition. In this study, the authors documented the percentage of families of NBPP patients at a specialty center that had filed a malpractice suit and described the key factors associated with that pursuit of legal action. The families/caregivers of 51 patients with NBPP who had presented to the University of Michigan Interdisciplinary Brachial Plexus Program participated in this study. A qualitative research design was applied using both a questionnaire to examine psychosocial factors and a dynamic tool to measure health outcomes from the patient perspective via parent proxy (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System [PROMIS] assessment instruments). Statistical analysis included the Fisher exact test, chi-square test, and Student t-test. The study protocol was approved by the University of Michigan institutional review board. Forty-seven percent of the families pursued malpractice litigation. In comparing patient families that had pursued legal action with those that had not, significant differences were revealed in the perception that the sustained birth injury was unnecessary (p = 0.002), the information received in the perinatal period was inadequate (p = 0.003), family concerns were ignored in the perinatal period (p = 0.005), and family concerns were not adequately addressed (p communication in the perinatal period, are associated with malpractice litigation in NBPP. The perceived level of global disability may affect the pursuit of malpractice litigation, whereas the isolated extent of nerve root involvement and/or upper

  7. Ultrasound guided distal peripheral nerve block of the upper limb: A technical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Sehmbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity surgery is commonly performed under regional anesthesia. The advent of ultrasonography has made performing upper extremity nerve blocks relatively easy with a high degree of reliability. The proximal approaches to brachial plexus block such as supraclavicular plexus block, infraclavicular plexus block, or the axillary block are favored for the most surgical procedures of distal upper extremity. Ultrasound guidance has however made distal nerve blocks of the upper limb a technically feasible, safe and efficacious option. In recent years, there has thus been a resurgence of distal peripheral nerve blocks to facilitate hand and wrist surgery. In this article, we review the technical aspects of performing the distal blocks of the upper extremity and highlight some of the clinical aspects of their usage.

  8. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  9. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  10. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  11. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Babhulkar, Sonali; Hiremath, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial. PMID:23661959

  12. Psychometric evaluation of the Brachial Assessment Tool Part 1: Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Bridget Hill; Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; Ferris, Scott; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2017-11-06

    To evaluate reproducibility (reliability and agreement) of the Brachial Assessment Tool (BrAT) a new patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury (BPI) DESIGN: Prospective repeated measure design SETTING: Outpatient clinics PARTICIPANTS: Adults with confirmed traumatic BPI INTERVENTION: 43 people (age range 19-82) with BPI completed the 31-item 4-response BrAT twice, 2 weeks apart. Results for the 3 subscales and summed score were compared at time 1 and time 2 to determine reliability including systematic differences using paired t tests; test retest using Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC 1,1) and internal consistency using Cronbach alpha. Agreement parameters included standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change and limits of agreement. The BrAT RESULTS: Test retest reliability was excellent (ICC [1,1] = 0.90 - 0.97). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach alpha 0.90 - 0.98). Measurement error was relatively low (SEM range 3.1 - 8.8). A change of >4 for subscale 1, >6 for subscale 2, >4 for subscale 3 and >10 for the summed score is indicative of change over and above measurement error. Limits of agreement ranged from ± 4.4 (subscale 3) to 11.61 (summed score). These findings support the use of the BrAT as a reproducible patient reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic BPI with evidence of appropriate reliability and agreement for both individual and group comparisons. Further psychometric testing is required to establish the construct validity and responsiveness of the BrAT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  14. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  15. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  16. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  17. Nerve-Specific Input Modulation to Spinal Neurons during a Motor Task in the Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confais, Joachim; Kim, Geehee; Tomatsu, Saeka; Takei, Tomohiko; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-08

    If not properly regulated, the large amount of reafferent sensory signals generated by our own movement could destabilize the CNS. We investigated how input from peripheral nerves to spinal cord is modulated during behavior. We chronically stimulated the deep radial nerve (DR; proprioceptive, wrist extensors), the median nerve (M; mixed, wrist flexors and palmar skin) and the superficial radial nerve (SR; cutaneous, hand dorsum) while four monkeys performed a delayed wrist flexion-extension task. Spinal neurons putatively receiving direct sensory input were defined based on their evoked response latency following nerve stimulation. We compared the influence of behavior on the evoked response (responsiveness to a specific peripheral input) and firing rate of 128 neuron-nerve pairs based on their source nerve. Firing rate increased during movement regardless of source nerve, whereas evoked response modulation was strikingly nerve-dependent. In SR ( n = 47) and M ( n = 27) neurons (cutaneous or mixed input), the evoked response was suppressed during wrist flexion and extension. In contrast, in DR neurons ( n = 54, pure proprioceptive input), the evoked response was facilitated exclusively during movements corresponding to the contraction of DR spindle-bearing muscles (i.e., wrist extension). Furthermore, modulations of firing rate and evoked response were uncorrelated in SR and M neurons, whereas they tended to be positively comodulated in DR neurons. Our results suggest that proprioceptive and cutaneous inputs to the spinal cord are modulated differently during voluntary movements, suggesting a refined gating mechanism of sensory signals according to behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Voluntary movements produce copious sensory signals, which may overwhelm the CNS if not properly regulated. This regulation is called "gating" and occurs at several levels of the CNS. To evaluate the specificity of sensory gating, we investigated how different sources of somatosensory

  18. A man with small vessel vasculitis presenting with brachial diplegia, multiple cranial mononeuropathies and severe orthostatic hypotension in diabetes mellitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Goodman, Jerry Clay; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2013-10-01

    We report a rare case of fulminant vasculitic mononeuropathy resulting in brachial diplegia, with suspected brainstem and autonomic nervous system involvement in a patient with diabetes mellitus. A 58-year-old Hispanic Caucasian man with diabetes mellitus presented with a 1-year history of progressive bilateral upper extremity weakness, orthostatic intolerance and progressive memory decline. Diagnostic evaluation including laboratory tests for progressive encephalopathies, systemic inflammatory and non-inflammatory neuropathies, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, electrodiagnostic studies, and nerve biopsy were performed. Clinical examination revealed moderate cognitive deficits on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale, bilateral facial weakness and weakness of bilateral shoulder girdle and intrinsic hand muscles. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses revealed elevated protein and an elevated immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, suggesting an immune-mediated process. Further laboratory work up was non-diagnostic. Electrodiagnostic studies demonstrated chronic asymmetric axonal mononeuropathies with ongoing denervation. A superficial radial nerve biopsy showed a chronic vasculitic neuropathy. Glucocorticosteroid treatment, symptomatic pharmacologic and supportive non-pharmacologic therapies resulted in improved clinical outcomes despite challenges with glycemic control. This case report emphasizes the importance of a thorough evaluation of atypical or uncommon neuromuscular presentations in diabetic patients without etiological presumptions. This is necessary in order to promptly establish a diagnosis, initiate appropriate therapies and prevent irreversible nerve injury.

  19. The association between ankle-brachial index and quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ching; Kuo, Li-Ying; Tsao, Yu-Feng; Hong, Ling-Show; Wang, Chin-Suey; Lee, Chia-Chi; Lin, Lih-Jen; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsieng, Yu-Hsiung

    2010-08-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) is an important indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and PAD has a negative impact on quality of life (QOL). However, the correlation between ABI and QOL is unknown among chronic hemodialysis patients. Ankle-brachial index was measured, and WHOQOL-BRIEF (TW) questionnaire was completed. The association between ABI and QOL was analyzed using linear regression. A total of 54 chronic hemodialysis patients (mean age of 56.2 +/- 14.6 years) were included. Ankle-brachial index was positively associated with QOL (r = .448, P = .001). The QOL scores were 3.1 +/- 2.9 and 2.6 +/- 0.4 for 37 patients with an ABI more than 0.9 and 17 patients with an ABI less than 0.9 or more than 1.3 (p Ankle-brachial index is positively correlated to QOL among chronic hemodialysis patients.

  20. Ankle-Brachial Index as a Predictor of Mortality in Hemodialysis: A 5-Year Cohort Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jair Baptista Miguel; Jorge Paulo Strogoff de Matos; Jocemir Ronaldo Lugon

    Abstract Background: Abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) has been found to be a strong predictor of mortality in some hemodialysis populations in studies with relatively short periods of follow-up, lower than 2 years. Objective...

  1. Morphometric analyses of normal pediatric brachial biceps and quadriceps muscle tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sallum, Adriana M E; Varsani, Hemlata; Holton, Janice L; Marie, Suely K N; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric normal brachial biceps (14 specimens) and quadriceps muscles (14 specimens) were studied by immunohistochemistry to quantify fiber-type, diameter and distribution, capillary density, presence of inflammatory cells...

  2. La prise en charge de la paralysie obstétricale du plexus brachial du ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Averagely, evaluations of the results were uncertain due to a high drop out rate. And finally the authors suggest that prevention should be refrained in our African context. Keywords: Physiotherapy – Obstetrical paralysis- Brachial plexus – Infancy ...

  3. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  4. Estudo anatômico do trajeto do nervo musculocutâneo em relação ao processo coracoide Anatomical study of the musculocutaneous nerve in relation to the coracoid process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Rebouças

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os autores realizaram o estudo anatômico do trajeto do nervo musculocutâneo pela dissecção de 20 ombros em 10 cadáveres adultos frescos. MÉTODO: Mediu-se a distância da borda inferior do processo coracoide, ao ponto de penetração do ramo mais proximal do nervo musculocutâneo no músculo coracobraquial, denominada base. Partindo da borda inferomedial do processo coracoide, foi medida uma segunda distância até o ponto em que o fascículo lateral do plexo braquial cruza o músculo subclávio, sendo identificada como altura. A terceira mensuração foi da área triangular formada pelas duas primeiras medidas, denominada área. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que a média da base foi de 3,42cm, com variações de 2,38 a 4,30cm. A medida da altura foi em média 2,75cm, variando entre 1,03 a 3,80cm, e a média da área foi de 4,92cm², variando entre 1,22 a 7,99cm². CONCLUSÃO: Estas medidas são de grande importância, devido ao risco de lesão do nervo musculocutâneo nas abordagens cirúrgicas do ombro.OBJETIVE: The authors performed an anatomic study of the trajectory of the muscle cutaneous nerve, dissecting 20 shoulders in 10 fresh adult corpses. METHOD: The distance was measured from the inferior edge of the coracoid process to the point of penetration of the nearest branch of the cutaneous nerve muscle of the coracobrachialis muscle, called base. Starting at the inferior-medial edge of the coracoid process, a second measurement was made to the point at which the lateral fascicle of the brachial plexus crosses the subclavius muscle, denominated height. The third measurement was of the triangular area formed by the two first measurements, denominated area. RESULTS: The average base length was 3.42 cm, varying from 2.38 cm to 4.40 cm. The height measurement was 2.74 cm, on average, varying between 1.03 cm and 3.80 cm. And the average area was 4.92 cm², varying between 1.22 cm² and 7.99 cm². CONCLUSION: These measurements are very

  5. A comparison of brachial artery-brachial vein arteriovenous fistulas with arteriovenous grafts in patients with poor superficial venous anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Xuan-Binh D; Kim, Jerry J; Ihenachor, Ezinne J; Parrish, Aaron B; Bleck, Jenny D; Kaji, Amy H; Koopmann, Matthew C; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-02-01

    The autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) has been shown to be superior to the arteriovenous graft (AVG) with respect to cost, complications, and primary patency. Therefore, the National Kidney Foundation Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines recommend reserving AVGs for patients who do not have adequate superficial venous anatomy to support AVF placement. The brachial artery-brachial vein arteriovenous fistula (BVAVF) has emerged as an autologous last-effort alternative. However, there are limited data comparing BVAVFs and AVGs in patients who are otherwise not candidates for a traditional AVF. Patients who received a BVAVF from July 2009 to July 2014 were compared with those who received an AVG during the same period. At our institution, BVAVF and AVG are only performed in patients with poor superficial venous anatomy. Patient demographic data, operative details, and subsequent follow-up were collected. BVAVFs were performed with a two-stage approach, with initial arteriovenous anastomosis, followed by delayed superficialization or transposition. Our primary outcome measure was primary functional assisted patency at 1 year. Patients lost to follow-up were excluded. A subgroup analysis was also performed for patients in whom the BVAVF or the AVG was their first hemodialysis access surgery. During the study period, 29 patients underwent BVAVF and 32 underwent AVG. There were no differences in age, gender, or presence of diabetes between the two groups. The median days to cannulation from the initial operation were 141 (interquartile range, 94-214) in the BVAVF group and 29 (interquartile range, 14-33) in the AVG group (P functional assisted primary patency rates at 1 year (45% vs 25%; P = .1). Subgroup analysis demonstrated greater 1-year primary functional assisted primary patency (52% vs 19%; P functional maturation expected compared with AVG. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostic value of ankle-brachial index and toe-brachial index in arterial disease of lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan LI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the clinical application and its influencing factors of ankle-brachial index (ABI and toe-brachial index (TBI in the diagnosis of arterial disease of lower extremity. Methods  ABI and TBI were measured in 800 limbs of 402 patients with diabetes and/or hypertension hospitalized from July 2010 to February 2011. The patients were divided into narrow group (ABI < 0.9, normal group (0.9≤ABI < 1.3, and calcification group (ABI≥1.3 according to the value of ABI, and also into narrow group (TBI < 0.7 and normal group (TBI≥0.7 according to the value of TBI. The correlation of ABI with TBI was analyzed, and the differences in age, obesity parameters, biochemical indicators and other factors were compared between the groups. Influence of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP on ABI and TBI was further analyzed. Results  Only when ABI < 0.9, ABI and TBI have significant correlation (r=0.826, P < 0.01. W hen the group comparison based on ABI values, it was shown that the age and hs-CRP were significantly higher in the narrow group than in the normal group and calcification group (P < 0.01. The comparison between groups based on TBI values indicated that the age, systolic blood pressure and hs-CRP in the narrow group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05. ABI and TBI in the normal hs-CRP group were significantly higher than those in high hs-CRP group (P < 0.05. Conclusion  Hs-CRP may play an important role in the development and progression in peripheral arterial atherosclerosis. Therefore, ABI and TBI measurements in combination with hs-CRP level can improve early diagnosis of arterial disease of lower extremity.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Neurography in Cervical Radiculopathy: Plexus Patterns and Peripheral Nerve Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Kele, Henrich; Kronlage, Moritz; Godel, Tim; Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Bäumer, Philipp

    2017-10-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the imaging appearance and diagnostic value of plexus and peripheral nerve magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in cervical radiculopathy. This prospective study was approved by our institutional ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. A total of 24 patients were included with a diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy based on clinical examination, supporting electrophysiological examinations and spinal imaging consistent with the clinical syndrome. All patients then underwent a high-resolution MRN protocol including the brachial plexus from nerve roots to plexus cords using a 3-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip angle short tau inversion recovery and sagittal-oblique T2-weighted spectral adiabatic inversion recovery sequence, and ulnar, median, and radial nerves at the upper arm and elbow in T2-weighted fat saturated sequences. Two readers independently rated plexus elements regarding the presence of lesions at neuroforaminal levels, roots, trunks, and cord segments. Median, ulnar, and radial nerves were likewise rated. Findings were then compared to a referenced standard of cervical radiculopathy that was defined as the combined diagnosis of clinical syndrome including supporting electrophysiological exams and matching positive spinal imaging, and diagnostic performance parameters were calculated. Additional quantitative and qualitative analysis assessed peripheral nerve caliber and normalized T2-signal at arm level in cervical radiculopathy and compared them to 25 inflammatory neuropathy controls. Cervical radiculopathy resulted in distinct plexus lesion patterns for each level of neuroforaminal stenosis. Overall, brachial plexus MRN in cervical radiculopathy reached a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 87%, and overall diagnostic accuracy of 87%. Initial spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple positive findings for clinically

  8. The furcal nerve revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/ professionals involved in spine care.

  9. Cutaneous nociceptors lack sensitisation, but reveal μ-opioid receptor-mediated reduction in excitability to mechanical stimulation in neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Yvonne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries often trigger a hypersensitivity to tactile stimulation. Behavioural studies demonstrated efficient and side effect-free analgesia mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. However, mechanistic approaches addressing such opioid properties in painful neuropathies are lacking. Here we investigated whether opioids can directly inhibit primary afferent neuron transmission of mechanical stimuli in neuropathy. We analysed the mechanical thresholds, the firing rates and response latencies of sensory fibres to mechanical stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Results Two weeks following a chronic constriction injury of the saphenous nerve, mice developed a profound mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw innervated by the damaged nerve. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation we found no changes in the mechanical thresholds and latencies of sensory fibres from injured nerves. The firing rates to mechanical stimulation were unchanged or reduced following injury. Importantly, μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5]-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO significantly elevated the mechanical thresholds of nociceptive Aδ and C fibres. Furthermore, DAMGO substantially diminished the mechanically evoked discharges of C nociceptors in injured nerves. These effects were blocked by DAMGO washout and pre-treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys2-Tyr3-Orn5-Pen7-amide. DAMGO did not alter the responses of sensory fibres in uninjured nerves. Conclusions Our findings suggest that behaviourally manifested neuropathy-induced mechanosensitivity does not require a sensitised state of cutaneous nociceptors in damaged nerves. Yet, nerve injury renders nociceptors sensitive to opioids. Prevention of action potential generation or propagation in nociceptors might represent a cellular mechanism underlying peripheral opioid-mediated alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy.

  10. The involvement of cutaneous receptors in the biological effects of electromagnetic millimeter waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Emil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of peripheral nerve terminations in the mechanisms of action of electromagnetic millimeter waves (mmW was assessed. It is currently thought that mmW could be used in noninvasive complementary therapy because of their analgesic effect. However, the mechanisms of their antinociceptive effect and non-ionizing radiation are the subjects of controversy. The mechanisms of interaction of mmW and the cutaneous tissue have not been elucidated. We observed mast cell degranulation at the place of mmW action, a decrease of chronaxie and Turck reflex time, an increase in the number of afferent impulses after sciatic nerve at stimulation, as well as an increase electrocardiogram R-R interval of isolated frog heart after application of mmW. Based on these investigations, we propose that electromagnetic waves of millimeter length modify, through indirect mechanisms, the excitability and reactivity of peripheral nerve terminations.

  11. The reliability of toe systolic pressure and the toe brachial index in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Byron M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ankle Brachial Index is a useful clinical test for establishing blood supply to the foot. However, there are limitations to this method when conducted on people with diabetes. As an alternative to the Ankle Brachial Index, measuring Toe Systolic Pressures and the Toe Brachial Index have been recommended to assess the arterial blood supply to the foot. This study aimed to determine the intra and inter-rater reliability of the measurement of Toe Systolic Pressure and the Toe Brachial Index in patients with diabetes using a manual measurement system. Methods This was a repeated measures, reliability study. Three raters measured Toe Systolic Pressure and the Toe Brachial Index in thirty participants with diabetes. Measurement sessions occurred on two occasions, one week apart, using a manual photoplethysmography unit (Hadeco Smartdop 45 and a standardised measurement protocol. Results The mean intra-class correlation for intra-rater reliability for toe systolic pressures was 0.87 (95% LOA: -25.97 to 26.06 mmHg and the mean intra-class correlation for Toe Brachial Indices was 0.75 (95% LOA: -0.22 to 0.28. The intra-class correlation for inter-rater reliability was 0.88 for toe systolic pressures (95% LOA: -22.91 to 29.17.mmHg and 0.77 for Toe Brachial Indices (95% LOA: -0.21 to 0.22. Conclusion Despite the reasonable intra-class correlation results, the range of error (95% LOA was broad. This raises questions regarding the reliability of using a manual sphygmomanometer and PPG for the Toe Systolic Pressure and Toe Brachial Indice.

  12. [Cutaneous ultrasound and dermal fillers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas Fernández, C; Burón Álvarez, I; Fernández-Tresguerres Centeno, A; Alfageme Roldán, F; de Cabo Francés, F

    2015-11-01

    Requests for fillers or dermatological implants have dramatically increased in dermatology consultations in the last few years, either for the correction of superficial age-related wrinkles and cutaneous creases or to increase the volume of specific areas (cheeks, lips...). Dermatologists are often the first professionals to provide these treatments. Nevertheless, in other situations, the patients have already been treated, and many of them do not know the type of material that has been implanted or may even deny previous treatment, even when evident on clinical examination. In these occasions, cutaneous ultrasound is an effective and reliable tool for the real-time diagnosis of the kind of implant that has been used, its location, and the study of its possible complications. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The pattern of peripheral nerve injuries among Pakistani soldiers in the war against terror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaq, Sarah; Yasmeen, Rehana; Butt, Aamir Waheed; Akhtar, Noreen; Mansoor, Sahibzada Nasir

    2015-05-01

    To determine the pattern of peripheral nerve injuries in Pakistani soldiers in the War against terror. Case series. Department of Electrodiagnosis at Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from June 2008 to June 2011. All new cases of war wounded soldiers with peripheral nerve injuries were consecutively enrolled. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic study was carried out by experienced physiatrists. Data was entered in pretested especially designed questionnaire which was analysed using SPSS version 17.0. Seddon's classification system was used to assess the severity of injury. There were 418 cases of peripheral nerve injuries with 504 different nerve segments. Mean age was 29.41 ±8 years. Blast was the main cause of nerve injury in 244 (48.5%) cases followed by gunshot in 215 (42.7%) and 45 (8.9%) cases had nerve injuries secondary to fall, burial under debris and motor vehicle accidents. Eighty six (17%) cases had multiple nerve injuries. Most commonly injured nerve was ulnar (20.6%) followed by sciatic (16.7%), median (16.5%), radial (16.3%), peroneal (8.7%), brachial plexus (8.5%), axillary (4.8%), tibial (2%), femoral (1.8%), long thoracic (0.4%) and others (3.8%). Axonotmesis was seen in 459 (91.1%) cases, 44 (8.7%) cases revealed neurotmesis and 1 (0.2%) case had neuropraxia. Peripheral nerve injuries are a major component of war related injuries mainly involving the upper limbs. Electrodiagnostic studies help in assessing severity and determining prognosis. Precise documentation of severity of nerve injuries is important to estimate the burden on our resources and to extend rehabilitation services.

  14. The role of muscle imbalance in the pathogenesis of shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldado, Francisco; Fontecha, Cesar G; Marotta, Mario; Benito, David; Casaccia, Marcelo; Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Zlotolow, Dan; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-07-01

    An internal rotation contracture of the shoulder is common after neonatal brachial plexus injuries due to subscapularis shortening and atrophy. It has been explained by 2 theories: muscle denervation and muscle imbalance between the internal and external rotators of the shoulder. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that muscle imbalance alone could cause subscapularis changes and shoulder contracture. We performed selective neurectomy of the suprascapular nerve in 15 newborn rats to denervate only the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus muscles, leaving the subscapularis muscle intact. After 4 weeks, passive shoulder external rotation was measured and a 7.2-T magnetic resonance imaging scan of the shoulders was used to determine changes in the infraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. The subscapularis muscle was weighed to determine the degree of mass loss. An additional group of 10 newborn rats was evaluated to determine the sectional muscle fiber size and muscle area of fibrosis by use of images from type I collagen immunostaining. There was a significant decrease in passive shoulder external rotation, with a mean loss of 66°; in the thickness of the denervated infraspinatus, with a mean loss of 40%; and in the thickness and weight of the non-denervated subscapularis, with mean losses of 28% and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in subscapularis muscle fiber size and area of fibrosis between shoulders after suprascapular nerve injury. Our study supports the theory that shoulder muscle imbalance is a cause of shoulder contracture in patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biology of Human Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvnesh K. Sharma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the natural behavior of cutaneous melanoma, clinical and pathological factors, prognostic indicators, some basic research and the present and possible futuristic strategies in the management of this disease are presented. While surgery remains to be the most effective therapeutic approach in the management of early primary lesions, there is no standard adjuvant therapy after surgical resection, or for metastatic disease.

  16. [Cutaneous leishmaniases in French Guiana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotureau, B; Couppié, P; Nacher, M; Dedet, J P; Carme, B

    2007-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniases are endemic over the entire territory of French Guiana. At least 5 distinct Leishmania species coexist in the sylvatic ecotopes of this French territory. The present paper checks the advances in the ecological research field during the past 5 years. The current epidemiological situation and trends are detailed successively Links between the recrudescence of leishmaniases and gold-mining are highlighted. The potential adaptation of the pathogenic complexes to the newly anthropized habitats is also described.

  17. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  18. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum of a metastatic adenocarcinoma.

  19. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. Methods : A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60, or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60 for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. Results: The median (range number of skin punctures were 2 (2-4 in group US and 3 (2-5 in group NS (P =0.27. Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5% of group US and four patients (6.67% of group NS (P > =0.35. Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Conclusion: Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine.

  20. Biomedical and psychosocial factors associated with disability after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Christine B; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Beaton, Dorcas E; Mackinnon, Susan E; Katz, Joel

    2011-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomedical and psychosocial factors associated with disability at a minimum of six months following upper-extremity nerve injury. This cross-sectional study included patients who were assessed between six months and fifteen years following an upper-extremity nerve injury. Assessment measures included patient self-report questionnaires (the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire [DASH]; pain questionnaires; and general health and mental health questionnaires). DASH scores were compared by using unpaired t tests (sex, Workers' Compensation/litigation, affected limb, marital status, education, and geographic location), analysis of variance (nerve injured, work status, and income), or correlations (age and time since injury). Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the predictors of the DASH scores. The sample included 158 patients with a mean age (and standard deviation) of 41 ± 16 years. The median time from injury was fourteen months (range, six to 167 months). The DASH scores were significantly higher for patients receiving Workers' Compensation or involved in litigation (p = 0.02), had a brachial plexus injury (p = 0.001), or were unemployed (p disability, pain, and cold sensitivity. Disability as measured with the DASH was predicted by brachial plexus injury, older age, pain intensity, work status, time since injury, cold sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing.

  1. Comparison between Central and Brachial Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Elderly Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bordin Pelazza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the values of central and brachial systemic blood pressure (SBP between women and men over 60 years of age with systemic arterial hypertension. Methods. This study was a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with elderly patients admitted to and selected from spontaneous and scheduled demand at basic health units in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil, between March 2013 and March 2014. We included 69 study participants and compared central and brachial SBP using a Sphygmocor® XCEL device (AtCor Medical, Sydney, Australia. Results. Significant differences were found in the blood pressure values of the whole population in the central versus brachial systolic blood pressure (SP [140(21 versus 153(23 mmHg] and in the central versus brachial pulse pressure (PP [55(18 versus 70(18 mmHg]. Additionally, females exhibited higher blood pressure levels than males [central SP 144(23 versus 134(16 mmHg and brachial SP 161(26 versus 148(18 mmHg and central PP 62(17 versus 45(14 mmHg and brachial PP 80(21 versus 63(15 mmHg, resp.]. Conclusion. Elderly women exhibited higher blood pressure values than elderly hypertensive men.

  2. Retinal vascular caliber and brachial flow-mediated dilation: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh T; Islam, F M Amirul; Farouque, H M Omar; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Cotch, Mary Frances; Herrington, David M; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-07-01

    Retinal vascular caliber changes have been shown to predict stroke, but the underlying mechanism of this association is unknown. We examined the relationship between retinal vascular caliber with brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of systemic endothelial function. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a population-based study of persons 45 to 84 years of age residing in 6 US communities free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Brachial FMD data were collected at baseline (July 2000 to June 2002), and retinal vascular caliber was measured from digital retinal photographs at the second examination, immediately after the first (August 2002 to January 2004). Data were available for 2851 participants for analysis. The mean brachial FMD was 4.39+/-2.79%. After adjusting for age and gender, brachial FMD was reduced in persons with wider retinal venular caliber (changes in FMD -0.25, 95% CI, -0.36, - 0.13; PhemoglobinA(1C) (-0.18; 95% CI -0.30, - 0.06; P=0.004, per SD increase in venular caliber). Brachial FMD was not associated with retinal arteriolar caliber. Persons with wider retinal venules have reduced brachial FMD, independent of other vascular risk factors. This suggests that retinal venular caliber, previously shown to predict stroke, may be a marker of underlying systemic endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ting Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a rare gastrointestinal tumor. Additionally, cutaneous metastasis from such an internal malignancy is also uncommon. We reported the case of a 55-year-old man afflicted with ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. The patient did not undergo the standard Whipple procedure but received chemotherapy due to apparent left neck lymph node metastasis noted by initial PET/CT imaging. The skin metastasis presented as a left neck infiltrating purpuric lesion, which was confirmed by skin biopsy approximately one year after the patient's disease was first diagnosed. Thereafter, the patient received further chemotherapy pursuant to his course of medical management. Skin metastasis usually represents a poor patient prognosis. In these cases, treatment of cutaneous metastasis typically includes systemic chemotherapy and local management such as radiation therapy or tumor excision. And when choosing a chemotherapy regimen for the ampullary cancer, the histological subtypes (intestinal or pancreatobiliary should be comprehensively considered. In our review of the literature, the intestinal type seems to have less distant lymph node metastasis, advanced local invasion, as well as recurrence than pancreatobiliary type of ampullary cancer.

  4. Cutaneous Metastasis From Sacral Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Kristyna; Goodwin, Brandon; Sanchez, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy of notochord origin, representing 1-4% of malignant bone tumors., Typically, chordomas follow a slow progressive course with aggressive local extension, multiple recurrences, and metastases. Of particular interest to this case, cutaneous metastasis is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis of this entity can be a challenge due to the rarity of chordoma, as well as the infrequent presentation of distant cutaneous metastasis and non-specific clinical skin findings. We report a case of a 61-year-old male with a history of sacral chordoma treated by wide local excision 8 years prior to presentation developed a nodule on his scalp for 6 weeks. Physical examination revealed a 1 cm rubbery, pink, shiny dome-shaped nodule on his left occipital scalp. Hematoxylin and eosin sections revealed a lobular dermal proliferation of small ovoid cells and larger physaliferous cells with hyperchromatic, displaced nuclei and finely vacuolated "soap-bubble" cytoplasm in a myxoid stroma. Immunohistochemistry of tumor cells showed positivity for both S-100 protein and pancytokeratin (AE1/AE3), while smooth muscle actin (SMA), P63, and CK7 were negative. Additionally, tumor cells stained positive for brachyury. The medical history, clinical presentation, histopathological appearance and immunohistochemical profile are consistent with cutaneous metastasis from sacral chordoma, known as chordoma cutis. This case illustrates the integral role of dermatopathology in the diagnosis of a rare and critical condition.

  5. Cutaneous Chromatophoromas in Captive Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, J F; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2016-11-01

    Chromatophoromas are neoplasms arising from pigment-bearing cells (chromatophores) of the dermis. While isolated cases have been reported in the literature, the prevalence and biological behavior of chromatophoromas in snakes are unknown. Forty-two chromatophoromas were identified among 4663 submissions (0.9%) to a private diagnostic laboratory in a 16-year period. The most commonly affected snakes were colubrids (23 cases, 55%) and vipers (8 cases, 19%). The San Francisco garter snake was the most commonly affected species (6 cases; 14% of all affected snake species and 3.7% of all garter snake submissions). No sex predilection was found. The age of 28 snakes ranged from 5 to 27 years. Single cutaneous chromatophoromas were most commonly observed and presented as pigmented cutaneous masses or plaques along any body segment. Euthanasia or death due to progressive neoplastic disease or metastasis was reported in 8 (19%) and 4 (10%) cases, respectively. The survival time of 4 animals ranged from 4 to 36 months. Microscopically, xanthophoromas, iridophoromas, melanocytic neoplasms, and mixed chromatophoromas were identified, with melanocytic neoplasms being most common. Microscopic examination alone was generally sufficient for the diagnosis of chromatophoroma, but immunohistochemistry for S-100 and PNL-2 may be helpful for diagnosing poorly pigmented cases. Moderate to marked nuclear atypia appears to be consistently present in cutaneous chromatophoromas with a high risk of metastasis, while mitotic count, lymphatic invasion, the level of infiltration, and the degree of pigmentation or ulceration were not reliable predictors of metastasis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Spinal nerve root compositions of musculocutaneous nerve: an anatomical study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demircay, Emre; Musluman, Ahmet Murat; Cansever, Tufan; Yuce, Ismail; Civelek, Erdinc; Yilmaz, Adem; Kabatas, Serdar; Ozdes, Taskin; Sam, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the variations in the spinal nerve root compositions of musculocutaneous nerve and to confirm which spinal nerve root is the main ingredient in participating amount...

  7. Evaluation of cutaneous palpebral anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Recep; Ari, Seyhmus; Dal, Tuba; Kaya, Safak; Kortak, Mehmet Zeki; Dursun, Birgül; Dayan, Saim

    2013-10-01

    Anthrax is a rare disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Antrax is zoonotic disease and is often encountered in persons engaged in animal husbandry. Cutaneous anthrax is approximately 95% of anthrax in humans. Palbebral involvement is rare. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of cases with cutaneous palpebral anthrax. In this study, the patients diagnosed of cutaneous palpebral anthrax between January 2000 and December 2012, were investigated and evaluated, retrospectively. Cutaneous palpebral anthrax was diagnosed by the presence of typical anthrax lesion and/or observation of gram-positive encapsulated bacilli in gram prepations and/or culture positive of samples taken from lesions. In the cases who were culture-negative and without bacilli in gram-staining, the diagnosis was based on the presence of characteristic clinical presentation with a history of severe scarring formation, swelling, black eschar and positive response to the treatment. A total of 21 patients with cutaneous palpebral anthrax admitted to the two hospitals between January 2000 and December 2012. Eight patients were male (38.1%) and 13 patients were female (61.9%), and the mean age was 31 ± 21.2 (range 1-82 years). The most common symptoms on admission to the hospital were swelling and redness on the skin. Periorbital lesions were in the right eye in 14 cases and the most common eyelid involvement was seen in upper eyelid with 15 cases. The diagnosis was based on isolation of bacteria in five (23.8%) cases, detection of gram-positive bacilli in direct examination of characteristic lesion material in six (28.5%) cases. Ten (47.7%) cases were diagnosed by the characteristic appearance of the lesion. Malignant pustule was seen in all of our patients and seven cases (33.4%) had malignant edema. In the treatment, penicilin was used for 10 (47.7%) cases, ampicillin-sulbactam for five (23.8%) cases and, ciprofloxacin for three (14.3%) cases

  8. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Karin; Escribano, Luis; Grattan, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lesions in patients with mastocytosis are highly heterogeneous and encompass localized and disseminated forms. Although a classification and criteria for cutaneous mastocytosis (CM) have been proposed, there remains a need to better define subforms of cutaneous manifestations in patients...... times between 2010 and 2014 to discuss the classification and criteria for diagnosis of cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis. This article provides the major outcomes of these meetings and a proposal for a revised definition and criteria. In particular, we recommend that the typical...

  9. Low-dose ropivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block combined with general anesthesia for successful postoperative analgesia: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Iwata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ropivacaine, a long-acting local anesthetic agent, has been used for postoperative analgesia in brachial plexus block (BPB at high doses. However, use of lower doses would reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. Methods: We applied BPB with low-dose ropivacaine (10 mL of 0.375% ropivacaine after induction of general anesthesia for surgery of the upper extremities in 62 patients at our hospital. Ropivacaine was administered via a fluoroscopy-guided supraclavicular method. Analgesic effects during surgery, visual analog scale pain scores, skin sensation, muscle strength, and postoperative patient satisfaction indices were evaluated. Results: Fifty-six patients (90.3% did not require supplemental analgesics during surgery. The remaining six patients were administered fentanyl due to the insufficient analgesic effects of the nerve block. Some adverse effects, including numbness and delayed motor and sensory recovery of the upper extremities, were observed. The mean postoperative patient-evaluated visual satisfaction scale was 94.1. Conclusions: Our results suggest that low-dose ropivacaine is clinically acceptable for BPB under general anesthesia.

  10. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Emiko, E-mail: chibaemi23@comet.ocn.ne.jp; Hamamoto, Kohei, E-mail: hkouhei917@gmail.com [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan); Nagashima, Michio, E-mail: nagamic00@gmail.com [Asahikawa Medical University, Department of Emergency Medicine (Japan); Matsuura, Katsuhiko, E-mail: kmatsur@gmail.com; Okochi, Tomohisa, E-mail: t-shachi@dj8.so-net.ne.jp; Tanno, Keisuke, E-mail: tankichi1974@gmail.com; Tanaka, Osamu, E-mail: otanaka@omiya.jichi.ac.jp [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. The patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).

  11. Anatomia do plexo braquial de macaco-barrigudo (Lagothrix lagothricha Anatomy of the brachial plexus of the Woolly-Monkey (Lagothrix lagothricha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessica Ariane M Cruz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O macaco-barrigudo (Lagothrix lagothricha é um antropóide pertencente à Família Atelidae que possui os maiores primatas neotropicais. Um cadáver fêmea de macaco-barrigudo foi fixado com solução de formaldeído a 10%, posteriormente dissecado com o auxílio de lupa estereoscópica e fotodocumentado. O plexo braquial originou-se dos nervos espinhais C5 a C8 e T1, formando os troncos cranial, médio e caudal, dos quais derivaram os nervos periféricos que se assemelharam na origem e no território de inervação com os plexos de outros primatas, com exceção do nervo musculocutâneo que atravessou o músculo coracobraquial. Pesquisas sobre o plexo braquial de primatas fornecem dados que disponibilizam o acesso a informações valiosas sobre a morfologia destes animais e auxiliam no estabelecimento de parâmetros anatômicos entre as espécies, contribuindo também no tratamento de injúrias e procedimentos anestésicos.The woolly-monkey (Lagothrix lagothricha is an antropoid belonging to the Atelidae Family which includes the largest neotropical primates. A female cadaver woolly-monkey was fixed in a 10% formaldehyde solution and dissected using a stereoscopic magnifying glass and photodocumented. The brachial plexus originated from the spinal nerves C5 to C8 and T1, forming the cranial, medium, and caudal stems, from which derived the peripheral nerves; those nerves had similar origin and innervation area when compared to plexuses from other primates, with the exception of the musculocutaneous nerve that crossed the coracobraquial muscle. Data from studies with brachial plexus from primates allow the access to valuable information regarding the morphology of those animals, and could also assist in the establishment of anatomical parameters among species, which could then contribute to anesthetic procedures and injury treatments.

  12. brachial plexus blocks for upper extremity surgeries in a nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... and oxygen therapy. To localise the target nerve/ plexus, paraesthesia was elicited by mechanical stimulation before injecting the local anaesthetic solution in four out of ten patients in 2008. In 2009,. PNS technique was employed in 36 BPB with muscle twitch at 0.2-0.4mA as end-point, while the remaining.

  13. Brachial plexus lesions: Anatomical knowledge as an essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This clinical feature was in conformity with a lesion of inferior primary trunk. All diagnoses were made based on the clinical findings. These cases demonstrate the significance of a through anatomical knowledge in the clinical examination if one has to avoid confusing the signs of terminal nerves lesion with the trunk's lesion.

  14. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    schwannomas ofthe vagus and phrenic nervcs appeafing as medi— astinal masses”. Bmchial plexus schwannomatas have been reported to mani— fest as causing nerve compression symptoms8 which our patient cxperienced or an abnormal mediastinal shadow on plain chest— xray due to intrathoracïc extension'.

  15. The Safety of EXPAREL ® (Bupivacaine Liposome Injectable Suspension Administered by Peripheral Nerve Block in Rabbits and Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte M. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A sustained-release DepoFoam injection formulation of bupivacaine (EXPAREL, 15 mg/mL is currently being investigated for postsurgical analgesia via peripheral nerve block (PNB. Single-dose toxicology studies of EXPAREL (9, 18, and 30 mg/kg, bupivacaine solution (Bsol, 9 mg/kg, and saline injected around the brachial plexus nerve bundle were performed in rabbits and dogs. The endpoints included clinical pathology, pharmacokinetics, and histopathology evaluation on Day 3 and Day 15 (2/sex/group/period. EXPAREL resulted in a nearly 4-fold lower Cmax versus Bsol at the same dose. EXPAREL was well tolerated at doses up to 30 mg/kg. The only EXPAREL-related effect seen was minimal to mild granulomatous inflammation of adipose tissue around nerve roots (8 of 24 rabbits and 7 of 24 dogs in the brachial plexus sites. The results indicate that EXPAREL was well tolerated in these models and did not produce nerve damage after PNB in rabbits and dogs.

  16. Does obturator nerve block always occur in 3-1 block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Tekdemir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the femoral “3-in-1 block”, obturator nerve block is routinely unsuccessful. Anatomical studies are not available to explain why blockade of obturator nerve or lumbar plexus does not occur. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of femoral “3-in-1 block” obturator nerve block on a cadaver model.Materials and methods: Totally, 12 mature adult human cadavers were selected. Methylene blue dye (30 ml was injected under the fascia iliaca in eight cadavers and into the femoral nerve sheath in four cadavers. Careful bilateral dissections were performed following dye injections.Results: It was seen that the dye did not spread to the medial part of the psoas major muscle and the obturator nerve was not stained with the dye in eight cadavers in whom dye was injected laterally into the femoral sheat. In four cadavers in whom dye was injected into the femoral nerve sheat, metylene blue spread through fascial layers in the plane under the psoas muscle and stained the obturator nerve just before emerging medially from the fascia psoas. At this point, the obturator nerve pierced the psoas fascia and extended extrafascially in the medial and deep borders of the psoas muscle. In this area, the upper section of the obturator nerve was found also to be stained with the dye.Conclusion: We concluded that the cause of an unsuccessful obturator nerve block might be the fascial anatomy of this region. The lateral cutaneous femoral nerve and the femoral nerve easily can be blocked in the fascia iliaca compartment, but the obturator nerve block fails because of its being extrafascial in this region. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:149-51

  17. Nerve transfer to the deltoid muscle using the nerve to the long head of the triceps with the da Vinci robot: six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Atik, Teddy; Facca, Sybille; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Nerve transfer to the deltoid muscle using the nerve to the long head of the triceps is a reliable method for restoration of deltoid function. The aim of this retrospective study was to report the results of nerve transfer to the deltoid muscle using the nerve to the long head of the triceps procedure using a robot.  Our series included six patients (mean age 36.3 years) with total deltoid muscle paralysis. A da Vinci-S robot was placed in position. After dissection of the quadrilateral and triangular spaces, the anterior branch of the axillary nerve and the branch to the long head of the triceps were transected, and then robotically sutured with two 10-0 nylon stiches. In two cases, an endoscopic procedure was tried under carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation.  In all patients except one, deltoid function against resistance (M4) was obtained at the last follow-up evaluation. The average shoulder abduction was 112 degrees. No weakness of elbow extension was observed. In two cases with the endoscopic technique, vision was blurred and conversion to open technique was performed.  The advantages of robotic microsurgery are motion scaling and disappearance of physiological tremor. Reasons for failure of the endoscopic technique could be explained by insufficient pressure. We had no difficulty using the robot without the sensory feedback. The robot-assisted nerve transfer to deltoid muscle using the nerve to the long head of the triceps was a feasible application for restoration of shoulder abduction after brachial plexus or axillary nerve injury. Therapeutic Study. Level of Evidence IV. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. MRI of the Brachial Plexus: Modified Imaging Technique Leading to a Better Characterization of Its Anatomy and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos; Mailley, Kathleen; del Carpio O’Donovan, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist. The imaging assessment of the brachial plexus, in particular, has been traditionally challenging due to the complexity of its anatomy, its distribution in space and due to technical factors. Herein, we describe a modified technique used in our institution for the evaluation of the brachial plexus which led to a substantial decrease in scanning time and to better visualization of all the segments of the brachial plexus from the roots to the branches, in only one or two images, facilitating therefore the understanding of the anatomy and the interpretation of the study. To our knowledge, we are the first group to describe this technique of imaging the brachial plexus. We illustrate the benefit of this modified technique with an example of a patient with a lesion in the proximal branches of the left brachial plexus that was clinically suspected but missed on conventional brachial plexus imaging for six consecutive years. In addition, we review the common and infrequent benign and malignant pathology that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:24355190

  19. Ankle-brachial index by automated method and renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pereira Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The Ankle-brachial index (ABI is a non-invasive method used for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD. Aims To determine the clinical features of patients submitted to ABI measurement by automatic method. To investigate association between ABI and renal function. Methods The present is a cross-sectional study. The study was performed in a private clinic in the city of Fortaleza (Ce- Brazil. For ABI analysis, we utilized automatic methodology using a Microlife device. Data collection took place from March 2012 to January 2016. During this period, ABI was measured in 375 patients aged >50 years, who had a diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes or vascular disease. Results Of the 375 patients, 18 were categorized as having abnormal ABI (4.8 per cent and 357 were normal ABI (95.2 per cent. Patients with abnormal ABI showed older mean age when compared to patients with normal ABI. Among patients with normal renal function, only 0.95 per cent showed abnormal ABI; among patients with abnormal renal function, 6 per cent showed abnormal ABI. Conclusion 1 No differences were observed when comparing the groups regarding gender or the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia or CAD. 2 Group with abnormal ABI had renal function greater impairment.

  20. Arterial cutdown reduces complications after brachial access for peripheral vascular intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kret, Marcus R; Dalman, Ronald L; Kalish, Jeffrey; Mell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Factors influencing risk for brachial access site complications after peripheral vascular intervention are poorly understood. We queried the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative to identify unique demographic and technical risks for such complications. The Vascular Quality Initiative peripheral vascular intervention data files from years 2010 to 2014 were analyzed to compare puncture site complication rates and associations encountered with either brachial or femoral arterial access for peripheral vascular intervention. Procedures requiring multiple access sites were excluded. Complications were defined as wound hematoma or access vessel stenosis/occlusion. Univariate and hierarchical logistic regression was used to identify independent factors associated with site complications after brachial access. Of 44,634 eligible peripheral vascular intervention procedures, 732 (1.6%) were performed through brachial access. Brachial access was associated with an increased complication rate compared with femoral access (9.0% vs 3.3%; P access site stenosis/occlusion (2.1% vs 0.4%; P access complications included age, female gender, and sheath size. Complications occurred less frequently after arterial cutdown (4.1%) compared with either ultrasound-guided (11.8%) or fluoroscopically guided percutaneous access (7.3%; P = .07 across all variables). Neither surgeons' overall peripheral vascular intervention experience nor prior experience with brachial access predicted likelihood of adverse events. By multivariate analysis, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.84; P access complications. Larger sheath sizes (>5F) were associated with increased risk of complications (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.07-4.49; P = .03). Brachial access for peripheral vascular intervention carries significantly increased risks for access site occlusion or hematoma formation. Arterial cutdown and smaller sheath diameters are associated with lower