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Sample records for brachial biceps muscle

  1. Morphometric analyses of normal pediatric brachial biceps and quadriceps muscle tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sallum, Adriana M E; Varsani, Hemlata; Holton, Janice L; Marie, Suely K N; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric normal brachial biceps (14 specimens) and quadriceps muscles (14 specimens) were studied by immunohistochemistry to quantify fiber-type, diameter and distribution, capillary density, presence of inflammatory cells...

  2. Biceps Brachii Long Head Overactivity Associated with Elbow Flexion Contracture in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C.; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Methods: Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. Results: The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Conclusions: Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion

  3. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  4. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  5. Resultado da neurotização do nervo ulnar para o músculo bíceps braquial na lesão do plexo braquial Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to brachial biceps muscle in brachial plexus injury

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    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar de forma crítica os fatores que influenciam os resultados da neurotização do nervo ulnar no ramo motor do músculo bíceps braquial, visando a restauração da flexão do cotovelo em pacientes com lesão do plexo braquial. MÉTODOS: 19 pacientes, 18 homens e uma mulher, com idade média de 28,7 anos foram avaliados entre fevereiro de 2003 e maio de 2007. Oito pacientes apresentavam lesão das raízes C5-C6 e 11, das raízes C5-C6-C7. O intervalo de tempo médio entre a injúria e o tratamento cirúrgico foi 7,5 meses. Quatro pacientes apresentavam fraturas cervicais associadas à lesão do plexo braquial. O seguimento pós-operatório foi de 15,7 meses. RESULTADO: Oito pacientes recuperaram força de flexão do cotovelo MRC grau 4; dois, MRC grau 3 e nove, MRC OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachial biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachial biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term

  6. Clinico-embryological perspective of a rare accessory brachial muscle with possible musculocutaneous nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, V; Yadav, Y; Arora, Jyoti; Kumar, H; Suri, R K; Rath, G

    2009-03-01

    Both brachialis and biceps brachii are primary flexors of the arm and elbow from the biomechanical perspective. Numerous reports exist in anatomical literature regarding accessory heads of biceps brachii, although such accessory bellies in relation to brachialis muscle are less frequently elucidated. We report a unilateral case of a rare accessory muscle interposed between the biceps brachii and brachialis, having the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) entrapped between the two. Furthermore, the muscle divided into two slips, upper slip was attached to biceps brachii and the other gained insertion to the brachial fascia. Innervation to this accessory muscle was derived from MCN. The embryological basis for such supernumerary muscle is discussed. Additionally, the case is considered under surgical and clinical perspective, highlighting the importance of familiarity with such variations. Anatomical variations of the brachial musculature may cause diagnostic perplexities while interpreting MRI or CT scans.

  7. Contribution of denervated muscle to contractures after neonatal brachial plexus injury: not just muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Liangjun, Hu; Tuttle, Lori J; Weekley, Holly; Christopher, Wylie; Lieber, Richard L; Cornwall, Roger

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the contribution of muscle fibrosis to elbow flexion contractures in a murine model of neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI). Four weeks after NBPI, biceps and brachialis fibrosis were assessed histologically and compared with the timing of contracture development and the relative contribution of each muscle to contractures. Modulus of elasticity and hydroxyproline (collagen) content were measured and correlated with contracture severity. The effect of halofuginone antifibrotic therapy on fibrosis and contractures was investigated. Elbow contractures preceded muscle fibrosis development. The brachialis was less fibrotic than the biceps, yet contributed more to contractures. Modulus and hydroxyproline content increased in both elbow flexors, but neither correlated with contracture severity. Halofuginone reduced biceps fibrosis but did not reduce contracture severity. Contractures after NBPI cannot be explained solely by muscle fibrosis, arguing for investigation of alternate pathophysiologic targets for contracture prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Histochemistry profile of the biceps brachii muscle fibres of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella, Linnaeus, 1758

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    CHF Bortoluci

    Full Text Available A general analysis of the behaviour of “Cebus” shows that when this primate moves position to feed or perform another activity, it presents different ways of locomotion. This information shows that the brachial biceps muscle of this animal is frequently used in their locomotion activities, but it should also be remembered that this muscle is also used for other development activities like hiding, searching for objects, searching out in the woods, and digging in the soil. Considering the above, it was decided to research the histoenzimologic characteristics of the brachial biceps muscle to observe whether it is better adpted to postural or phasic function. To that end, samples were taken from the superficial and deep regions, the inserts proximal (medial and lateral and distal brachial biceps six capuchin monkeys male and adult, which were subjected to the reactions of m-ATPase, NADH-Tr. Based on the results of these reactions fibres were classified as in Fast Twitch Glycolitic (FG, Fast Twitch Oxidative Glycolitic (FOG and Slow Twitc (SO. In general, the results, considering the muscle as a whole, show a trend of frequency FOG> FG> SO. The data on the frequency were studied on three superficial regions FOG=FG>SO; the deep regions of the inserts proximal FOG=FG=SO and inserting the distal FOG>FG=SO. In conclusion, the biceps brachii of the capuchin monkey is well adapted for both postural and phasic activities.

  9. On the effect of thermal agents in the response of the brachial biceps at different contraction levels.

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    Garcia, Larissa Martins; Soares, Alcimar Barbosa; Simieli, Camila; Boratino, Alessandra Vairo Peres; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess electromyographic features of the brachial biceps muscle after the application of cryotherapy and short-wave diathermy. Sixty healthy volunteers participated in the study and were equally divided into three groups: cryotherapy - application of ice packs for 30 min; short-wave diathermy for 20 min; and control. The thermal agents were applied to the anterior and posterior regions of the non-dominant arm. The electromyographic (EMG) signal from the brachial biceps was recorded before and after the application of thermal agents during flexion of the elbow joint at 25%, 50%, 75% of a maximum voluntary isometric contraction defined at least two days before the actual experiments (MVICbl). The volunteers also were asked to execute a free MVIC before and after the application of the thermal agents (MVIC free). A linear regression model with mixed effects (random and fixed) was used. Intra-group analysis showed a reduction in root mean square (RMS) at MVIC free, with no change in the median frequency of the EMG signal at any contraction level for the short-wave diathermy group. An increase on RMS values and a decrease on median frequencies were found after the application of cryotherapy for all contraction levels. The results imply that cryotherapy plays an important role on changing neuromuscular responses at various levels of muscle contraction. Therapists should be aware of that and carefully consider its use prior to activities in which neuromuscular precision is required.

  10. Closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii in wakeboarders.

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    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Swanson, Britta L; Bannar, Stephen M

    2012-06-01

    Closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii is a rare injury. In this report, two cases of closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii after wakeboard traumas are described. Both patients presented with a swollen arm, weakness during flexion, and a mass in the affected forearm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed displacement of the biceps brachii into the forearm. The rupture was successfully treated with muscle removal in one case and muscle repair in the other. In patients with a wakeboard trauma and similar presentations, closed proximal muscle rupture of the biceps brachii should be suspected.

  11. A rare variation of the biceps brachi muscle

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    Paval J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biceps brachii muscle is very variable. Biceps may be composed of one to five heads. Although the variations in the origin are plenty, there are a very few cases reported on the variations in the insertion of the biceps brachii muscle. In this report we present a variant biceps brachii muscle which gives an abnormal muscle fasciculus from its medial side which continues as a narrow tendinous slip and is inserted in to the medial supracondylar ridge of humerus. We discuss in this report, the possible median nerve entrapment due to the presence of such a variation.

  12. An unusual metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma: Biceps brachii muscle

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    Muzaffer Sariaydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle metastasis of nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC is a rare occurrence, and the most effective treatment modality is currently unknown. In this case presentation, we report a patient with NSCLC who underwent palliative radiotherapy for biceps muscle metastasis of NSLCS. Our case was a 49-year-old woman who had lung adenocarcinoma with biceps muscle metastasis. She had been followed up for 2 years due to Stage IV lung adenocarcinoma from whom a biopsy was taken from a painful mass in right arm that was found to be compatible with metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma. She had palliative radiotherapy for her painful mass and systemic chemotherapy was planned. After palliative radiotherapy, the pain originating from the metastatic mass in right biceps muscle alleviated. Palliative radiotherapy can be a valuable treatment option for cases with skeletal muscle metastasis.

  13. Magnetic stimulation of biceps after intercostal cross-innervation for brachial plexus palsy. A study of motor evoked potentials in 25 patients.

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    Kawai, H; Murase, T; Shibuya, R; Kawabata, H; Yonenobu, K; Masatomi, T; Ono, K

    1994-07-01

    We studied the motor evoked potentials (MEP) in the biceps of 25 patients with traumatic brachial plexus palsy from root avulsion after cross-innervation by intercostal nerves. We used transcranial, transcervical and transthoracic magnetic stimulation at 8 to 235 months (mean 51) after transfer of intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. Biceps strength recovered to MRC grade 2 in eight patients, grade 3 in three and grade 4 in 14. The mean latency of the MEP in the normal biceps on transcranial stimulation was 12.5 +/- 1.3 ms and on transcervical stimulation 6.3 +/- 1.1 ms. After intercostal reinnervation the mean latency on transcranial stimulation was 21.7 +/- 4.5 ms and on transthoracic stimulation 11.6 +/- 3.8 ms. The latency of the biceps MEP after reinnervation by intercostal nerves on transcranial and transthoracic magnetic stimulation correlated well with the duration of follow-up and the latency of the MEP on transthoracic magnetic stimulation correlated significantly with muscle power.

  14. Kinesio taping effect on biceps brachii muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Králová Dagmar; Novotný Jan; Řezaninová Jana

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed at presenting the idea of inventor Dr. Kenzo Kase that kinesio tape application with proximal base leads to muscle contraction facilitation and application with distal base leads to muscle contraction inhibition. Twenty male volleyball players with the dominant shoulder girdle muscle imbalance between the ages of 25 and 30 participated in this study. There were compared two techniques which were placed on biceps brachii muscle in shoulder and elbow joint extension. Isokinetic ...

  15. Computational sensitivity analysis to identify muscles that can mechanically contribute to shoulder deformity following brachial plexus birth palsy.

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    Crouch, Dustin L; Plate, Johannes F; Li, Zhongyu; Saul, Katherine R

    2014-02-01

    Two mechanisms, strength imbalance or impaired longitudinal muscle growth, potentially cause osseous and postural shoulder deformity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Our objective was to determine which muscles, via either deformity mechanism, were mechanically capable of producing forces that could promote shoulder deformity. In an upper limb computational musculoskeletal model, we simulated strength imbalance by allowing each muscle crossing the shoulder to produce 30% of its maximum force. To simulate impaired longitudinal muscle growth, the functional length of each muscle crossing the shoulder was reduced by 30%. We performed a sensitivity analysis to identify muscles that, through either simulated deformity mechanism, increased the posteriorly directed, compressive glenohumeral joint force consistent with osseous deformity or reduced the shoulder external rotation or abduction range of motion consistent with postural deformity. Most of the increase in the posterior glenohumeral joint force by the strength imbalance mechanism was caused by the subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, and infraspinatus. Posterior glenohumeral joint force increased the most owing to impaired growth of the infraspinatus, subscapularis, and long head of biceps. Through the strength imbalance mechanism, the subscapularis, anterior deltoid, and pectoralis major muscles reduced external shoulder rotation by 28°, 17°, and 10°, respectively. Shoulder motion was reduced by 40° to 56° owing to impaired growth of the anterior deltoid, subscapularis, and long head of triceps. The infraspinatus, subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, long head of biceps, anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, and long head of triceps were identified in this computational study as being the most capable of producing shoulder forces that may contribute to shoulder deformity following brachial plexus birth palsy. The muscles mechanically capable of producing deforming shoulder forces should be the focus of

  16. The effects of denervation, reinnervation, and muscle imbalance on functional muscle length and elbow flexion contracture following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

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    Weekley, Holly; Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Eismann, Emily; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2012-08-01

    The pathophysiology of paradoxical elbow flexion contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) is incompletely understood. The current study tests the hypothesis that this contracture occurs by denervation-induced impairment of elbow flexor muscle growth. Unilateral forelimb paralysis was created in mice in four neonatal (5-day-old) BPI groups (C5-6 excision, C5-6 neurotomy, C5-6 neurotomy/repair, and C5-T1 global excision), one non-neonatal BPI group (28-day-old C5-6 excision), and two neonatal muscle imbalance groups (triceps tenotomy ± C5-6 excision). Four weeks post-operatively, motor function, elbow range of motion, and biceps/brachialis functional lengths were assessed. Musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) denervation and reinnervation were assessed immunohistochemically. Elbow flexion motor recovery and elbow flexion contractures varied inversely among the neonatal BPI groups. Contracture severity correlated with biceps/brachialis shortening and MCN denervation (relative axon loss), with no contractures occurring in mice with MCN reinnervation (presence of growth cones). No contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening occurred following non-neonatal BPI, regardless of denervation or reinnervation. Neonatal triceps tenotomy did not cause contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening, nor did it worsen those following neonatal C5-6 excision. Denervation-induced functional shortening of elbow flexor muscles leads to variable elbow flexion contractures depending on the degree, permanence, and timing of denervation, independent of muscle imbalance. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii

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    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available biological regeneration in athletes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of lymphatic kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

  18. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

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    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  19. Four-headed biceps and triceps brachii muscles, with neurovascular variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Soubhagya R; Soubhagya, R Nayak; Krishnamurthy, Ashwin; Ashwin, Krishnamurthy; Kumar, Madhan; Madhan, Kumar S J; Prabhu, Latha V; Latha, V Prabhu; Saralaya, Vasudha; Vasudha, Saralaya; Thomas, Merin M; Merin, M Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Anatomical variations of the biceps brachii and triceps brachii have been described by various authors, but the occurrence of four-headed biceps brachii and triceps brachii in an ipsilateral arm is rare and has not been reported before in the literature. During routine cadaveric dissection in the department of anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India, various unusual variants were noted in the left arm of a cadaver of a 67-year-old man. The variants include a four-headed biceps, a four-headed triceps, communication between the musculocutaneous and median nerves, and a high origin of deep brachial artery from the axillary artery. The occurrence of these anomalies and the clinical and morphological significance are discussed.

  20. Four-headed biceps brachii muscle with variant course of musculocutaneous nerve: anatomical and clinical insight

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    Aggarwal A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of four-headed biceps brachii muscle with variation in the course of musculocutaneous nerve was observed in left arm of a 48-year-old embalmed male cadaver. One of the extra head (third was fleshy throughout, originated from anteromedial surface of shaft of humerus and merged with the deep surface of short head. Fourth thin tendinous head originated just below lesser tuberosity of humerus and joined with the third head. Both accessory heads were lying under cover of short head of biceps. Musculocutaneous nerve was coursing between two supernumerary heads and subsequently between third head and short head of biceps brachii muscle. Origin of third head from shaft of humerus led to passage of nerve between this head and short head, before acquiring normal position between biceps brachii and brachialis muscles, and emerging out as lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm. Intramuscular course of nerve may be a potential site for nerve compression by hypertrophied biceps associated with strenuous regular physical activity of biceps or weight lifting.

  1. Analysis of activity of motor units in the biceps brachii muscle after intercostal-musculocutaneous nerve transfer.

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    Sakuta, Naoki; Sasaki, Sei-Ichi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2005-04-01

    We examined respiratory activity of motor units (MUs) in the internal intercostal nerves (IICNs)-transferred biceps brachii muscle (IC-biceps) in cats. MUs of IC-biceps showed respiratory discharges in inspiratory and expiratory phases, and these were enhanced by CO2 inhalation. Narrowing the airway also enhanced inspiratory and expiratory MUs activity. A mechanical load to the thorax immediately enhanced inspiratory MUs activity and weakened expiratory MUs activity. We analyzed the cross-correlation of MUs activity in interchondral muscle and IC-biceps to characterize the respiratory spinal descending inputs to motoneurons. We confirmed the short-term synchronization from interchondral muscles indicating divergence of a single respiratory presynaptic axon to thoracic motoneurons, but could not find synchronization from IC-biceps. The motor axonal conduction velocity (axonal CV) of IC-biceps MUs was lower than that of interchondral muscles. There was no correlation between the respiratory recruitment order of IC-biceps MUs and their axonal CV. These results indicate that IC-biceps shows the respiratory activities and afferent inputs from intercostal muscle spindles in the neighboring segments remain influential on activity of IC-biceps. In addition, the short-term synchronization from IC-biceps could not be found, suggesting that the intercostal nerve transfer alters the respiratory spinal descending inputs to thoracic motoneurons.

  2. Accessory brachialis muscle associated with high division of brachial artery

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    Krishnamurthy A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During routine dissection for the undergraduate students in the Department of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, of a male cadaver aged 73 years, we encountered an additional slip of brachialis muscle taking origin in the flexor compartment of left arm and inserting into the forearm. The origin of the additional muscle belly was from the anteromedial surface of shaft and medial supracondylar ridge of lower end of humerus. The additional muscle slip merged with the tendon of pronator teres before inserting on the lateral surface of the shaft of radius. The median nerve pierced the muscle at a distance of 6 cm from the medial epicondyle of humerus, supplied it and had a routine course later. Associated with the muscular abnormality was the high division of brachial artery into radial and ulnar arteries 17.5 cm from the medial epicondyle. The ulnar artery passed beneath the accessory brachialis muscle along with the median nerve. The role of additional muscles in compression syndrome is a well known phenomenon. The altered anatomy of the blood vessels may make them more vulnerable to trauma and to hemorrhage but at the same time more accessible for cannulation. Medical fraternity including orthopedicians and neurologists need to be aware of such variations when dealing with upper limb injuries or operations around the elbow joint.

  3. Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation.

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    Osterlund, Catharina; Liu, Jing-Xia; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Eriksson, Per-Olof

    2011-04-01

    Significant changes in extrafusal fiber type composition take place in the human masseter muscle from young age, 3-7 years, to adulthood, in parallel with jaw-face skeleton growth, changes of dentitions and improvement of jaw functions. As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. To test this hypothesis, we examined muscle spindles in the young masseter muscle and compared the result with previous data on adult masseter spindles. Also muscle spindles in the young biceps brachii muscle were examined. The result showed that muscle spindle composition and distribution were alike in young and adult masseter. As for the adult masseter, young masseter contained exceptionally large muscle spindles, and with the highest spindle density and most complex spindles found in the deep masseter portion. Hence, contrary to our hypothesis, masseter spindles do not undergo major morphological changes between young age and adulthood. Also in the biceps, young spindles were alike adult spindles. Taken together, the results showed that human masseter and biceps muscle spindles are morphologically mature already at young age. We conclude that muscle spindles in the human young masseter and biceps precede the extrafusal fiber population in growth and maturation. This in turn suggests early reflex control and proprioceptive demands in learning and maturation of jaw motor skills. Similarly, well-developed muscle spindles in young biceps reflect early need of reflex control in learning and performing arm motor behavior. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. BRAIN-STEM INFLUENCES ON BICEPS REFLEX ACTIVITY AND MUSCLE TONE IN THE ANESTHETIZED RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JUCH, PJW; SCHAAFSMA, A; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of electrical stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC) and adjacent brainstem structures on the tonic reflex (TVR), the tonic stretch reflex (TSR) and on muscle tone (MT) in anaesthetized rat. Increases in TVR. TSR and MT of the m. biceps were evoked from regions

  5. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend S.

    2015-01-01

    , indicating their existence in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether short-latency crossed-spinal reflexes are present in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle following ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations during a sitting task, where participants maintained a slight pre...

  6. Unusual nerve supply of biceps from ulnar nerve and median nerve and a third head of biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in branching pattern of the brachial plexus are common and have been reported by several investigators. Of the four main nerves traversing the arm, namely median, ulnar, radial and musculocutaneous, the ulnar and median nerve do not give any branches to muscles of the arm. Ulnar nerve after taking origin from medial cord of brachial plexus runs distally through axilla on medial side of axillary artery till middle of arm, where it pierces the medial intermuscular septum and enters the posterior compartment of arm. Ulnar nerve enters forearm between two heads of flexor carpi ulnaris from where it continues further. It supplies flexor carpi ulnaris , flexor digitorum profundus and several intrinsic muscles of hand . We recently observed dual supply of biceps muscle from ulnar and median nerves in arm. Musculocutaneous nerve was absent. Although communications between nerves in arm is rare, the communication between median nerve and musculocutaneous nerve were described from the 19th century which could explain innervation of biceps from median nerve. But no accurate description of ulnar nerve supplying biceps could be found in literature. Knowledge of anatomical variation of these nerves at level of upper arm is essential in light of the frequency with which surgery is performed to transfer nerve fascicles from ulnar nerve to biceps in case of brachial plexus injuries. We also observed third head of biceps, our aim is to describe the exact topography of this variation and to discuss its morphological.

  7. Analysis of the Biceps Brachii Muscle by Varying the Arm Movement Level and Load Resistance Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuradebah Burhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biceps brachii muscle illness is one of the common physical disabilities that requires rehabilitation exercises in order to build up the strength of the muscle after surgery. It is also important to monitor the condition of the muscle during the rehabilitation exercise through electromyography (EMG signals. The purpose of this study was to analyse and investigate the selection of the best mother wavelet (MWT function and depth of the decomposition level in the wavelet denoising EMG signals through the discrete wavelet transform (DWT method at each decomposition level. In this experimental work, six healthy subjects comprised of males and females (26 ± 3.0 years and BMI of 22 ± 2.0 were selected as a reference for persons with the illness. The experiment was conducted for three sets of resistance band loads, namely, 5 kg, 9 kg, and 16 kg, as a force during the biceps brachii muscle contraction. Each subject was required to perform three levels of the arm angle positions (30°, 90°, and 150° for each set of resistance band load. The experimental results showed that the Daubechies5 (db5 was the most appropriate DWT method together with a 6-level decomposition with a soft heursure threshold for the biceps brachii EMG signal analysis.

  8. Core Muscle Activation During Unstable Bicep Curl Using a Water-Filled Instability Training Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Stephen C; Blanchette, Taylor W; Karwan, Lauren A; Pearson, Spencer S; OʼNeil, Allison P; Karlik, Dustin A

    2016-11-01

    Glass, SC, Blanchette, TW, Karwan, LA, Pearson, SS, O'Neil, AP, and Karlik, DA. Core muscle activation during unstable bicep curl using a water-filled instability training tube. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3212-3219, 2016-The purpose of this study was to assess compensatory muscle activation created during a bicep curl using a water-filled, unstable lifting tube. Ten men (age = 21 ± 1.6 years, height = 180.0 ± 3.3 cm, mass = 87.4 ± 15.0 kg) and 10 women (age = 19.6 ± 1.3 years, height = 161.4 ± 12.0 cm, mass = 61.2 ± 7.4 kg) completed bicep curls using an 11.4-kg tube partially filled with water during a 50% open-valve, 100% open, and control setting. Subjects completed 8 repetitions within each condition with integrated electromyographic signal (converted to percent maximal voluntary contraction) of the bicep, deltoid, rectus abdominus, and paraspinal muscles measured. Compensatory activation was determined using the natural log of coefficient of variation across concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions. There were no differences between gender for any condition. Significant variability was seen across treatments for paraspinal muscles for CON and ECC at 50% (CON LnCV = 3.13 ± 0.56%, ECC LnCV = 3.34 ± 0.58%) and 100% (CON = 3.24 ± 0.34%, ECC = 3.46 ± 0.35%) compared with control (CON = 2.59 ± 0.47%, ECC = 2.80 ± 0.61%). Deltoid variability was greater at the 100% open setting (CON = 3.51 ± 0.53%, ECC = 3.56 ± 0.36%) compared with control (CON = 2.98 ± 0.35%, ECC = 2.97 ± 0.45%). The abdominal CON 100% showed variability (3.02 ± 0.47%) compared with control (2.65 ± 0.43%). Bicep activation remained unvaried. Compensatory activation of postural muscles contribute to postural stability. This device may be a useful tool for neuromuscular training leading to improved stability and control.

  9. Double muscle transfer for upper extremity reconstruction following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Kuwata, N; Muramatsu, K; Hottori, Y; Kawai, S

    1999-11-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. The authors use free muscle transfers for reconstruction of the upper limb to resolve the difficult problems in complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. This article describes the authors' updated technique--the double free muscle procedure. Reconstruction of prehension to achieve independent voluntary finger and elbow flexion and extension by the use of double free muscle and multiple nerve transfers following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus (nerve roots C5 to T1) is presented. The procedure involves transferring the first free muscle, neurotized by the spinal accessory nerve for elbow flexion and finger extension, a second free muscle transfer reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves for finger flexion, and neurotization of the triceps brachii via its motor nerve by the third and fourth intercostal motor nerves to extend and stabilize the elbow. Restoration of hand sensibility is obtained via the suturing of sensory rami from the intercostal nerves to the median nerve. Secondary reconstruction, including arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb and glenohumeral joint, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and distal tendons, improve the functional outcome. Based on the long-term result, selection of the patient, donor muscle, and donor motor nerve were indicated. Most patients were able to achieve prehensile functions such as holding a can and lifting a heavy box. This double free muscle transfer has provided prehension for patients with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus and has given them new hope to be able to use their otherwise useless limbs.

  10. Unusual presentation of an infected primary hydatid cyst of biceps femoris muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarhan, N.C.; Agildere, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak cad. 10. sok No:45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey); Tuncay, I.C.; Demirors, H. [Department of Orthopedics, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Barutcu, O. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana Teaching and Research Center, Adana (Turkey)

    2002-10-01

    Hydatid cysts of the musculoskeletal system are rare. Unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of an infected primary hydatid cyst of the biceps femoris muscle are presented in a 40-year-old man on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure. No daughter cysts were present within the mother cyst cavity, but there was a fatty nodule which has not previously been described in a muscular hydatid cyst. Although the cyst was infected secondarily, no surrounding soft tissue inflammatory reaction was noted. Hydatid cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis of unusual soft-tissue masses in regions where the disease is endemic. (orig.)

  11. Reliability of ultrasound texture measures of Biceps Brachialis and Gastrocnemius Lateralis muscles' images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Pereira Júnior, Newton; da Matta, Thiago Torres; Alvarenga, André Victor; de Albuquerque Pereira, Wagner Coelho; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is an important tool for diagnosing of many musculoskeletal tissue conditions. Image texture analysis can be used to characterize this tissue. The complexity curve (CC) is a technique commonly used to characterize the number of grey-level transitions in an image. Variability and reliability of US texture measures in the muscle tissue are unavailable in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the variability and reliability of five CC texture parameters from US images of healthy Biceps Brachialis and Gastrocnemius Lateralis (GL) muscles, with longitudinal and transversal orientations of the probe. Eight images per subject were obtained for 30 men in 2 days. Mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient for the five parameters were calculated for regions of interest. Results showed that the variability was similar for both muscles and most of the parameters showed satisfactory reliability (r > 0·7) for the Biceps Brachialis with the transverse scan and for the GL with the longitudinal scan. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Mechanical muscle fibre conduction velocity of the biceps as measured by a new seismic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journée, H L; de Jonge, A B; van Calker, R; Gräler, G

    1995-01-01

    A recently-developed technique, called seismic myography (SMG) has the characteristic of recording fast micro-mechanical response times. These times can be determined with sub-millisecond accuracy. The response times can be compared to response times of EMG recordings. The "muscular electro-seismic response" (MESR) latencies, due to direct electrical stimulation of the biceps muscle, are used for explorative measurements of the mechanical conduction velocity of the muscle fibres. The measurements are performed by means of a general-purpose physiological multimeter which is equiped with the micro-seismic function. Measurements are performed on two healthy subjects, aged 22 years. The MESR-latencies are measured along a medial and a lateral trajectory on their biceps muscles. The MESR-latencies at stimulus-cathodal to seismic transducer distances of 2,0-3,5 cm, are in the range of 2.0-3.8 ms, while at distances in the range of 7.5-8.9 cm the MESR-latencies varied between 3.4 and 4.7 ms. The calculated mechanical muscle fibre conduction velocities (MMFCV) are in the range between 36 and 89 m/s. There is a reproducability error of maximum 20%. The MMFCV's of the lateral and medial trajectory do not differ within the accuracy of the present method. However, the MMFCV's are considerably higher than the electrical muscle fibre conduction velocities of MUAPS ((E)MFCV). Some aspects of the MMFCV and possible consequences to surface EMG recordings are discussed. It is concluded that this seismic method for measuring MMFCV is a new accessible and simple to handle tool for the description of muscle function, and offers an interesting new contribution in experimental muscular research.

  13. Rupture of the Distal Biceps Tendon Combined with a Supinator Muscle Tear in a 51-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Nayyar; Martin Quirno; Saqib Hasan; Leon Rybak; Meislin, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Distal biceps tendon rupture is a relatively uncommon occurrence in the general female population, and to our knowledge, has not been reported in association with a supinator muscle tear. We report a case of 51-year-old woman who experienced sharp pain in her forearm and elbow after lifting a heavy object. History and physical examination raised suspicion for a distal biceps tendon rupture. MRI imaging determined a combined distal biceps tendon tear with a supinator muscle tear with subsequen...

  14. Quantitative Mechanical Properties of the Relaxed Biceps and Triceps Brachii Muscles in Patients with Subacute Stroke: A Reliability Study of the Myoton-3 Myometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ling Chuang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Test-retest reliability of the myotonometer was investigated in patients with subacute stroke. Methods. Twelve patients with substroke (3 to 9 months poststroke were examined in standardized testing position twice, 60 minutes apart, with the Myoton-3 myometer to measure tone, elasticity, and stiffness of relaxed bilateral biceps and triceps brachii muscles. Intrarater reliability of muscle properties was determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the standard error of measurement (SEM, and the minimal detectable change (MDC. Results. Intrarater reliability of muscle properties of bilateral biceps and triceps brachii muscles were good (ICCs=0.79–0.96 except for unaffected biceps tone (ICC=0.72. The SEM and MDC of bilateral biceps and triceps brachii muscles indicated small measurement error (SEM% <10%, MDC% <25%. Conclusion. The Myoton-3 myometer is a reliable tool for quantifying muscle tone, elasticity, and stiffness of the biceps and triceps brachii in patients with subacute stroke.

  15. Proximal Biceps Tendonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tendons that attach the top of the biceps muscle to the shoulder are the proximal tendons . There are two proximal ... ll want to do exercises that strengthen the muscles of your shoulder and upper arm. Strong muscles will keep the ...

  16. Rupture of the Distal Biceps Tendon Combined with a Supinator Muscle Tear in a 51-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Nayyar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal biceps tendon rupture is a relatively uncommon occurrence in the general female population, and to our knowledge, has not been reported in association with a supinator muscle tear. We report a case of 51-year-old woman who experienced sharp pain in her forearm and elbow after lifting a heavy object. History and physical examination raised suspicion for a distal biceps tendon rupture. MRI imaging determined a combined distal biceps tendon tear with a supinator muscle tear with subsequent confirmation at surgery. Surgical repair was performed for the distal biceps tendon only through a single incision approach using the Endobutton technique.

  17. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  18. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre;

    Ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations in seated humans elicit short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle (Stevenson et al., 2012). The short-latency cBF reflexes were inhibitory following iKnee extension perturbations, and facilitatory following...... of MUs. 11 seated participants (mean age 25 ± 5 years) performed a voluntary isometric knee extension with the ipsilateral leg and contralateral knee flexion to 10% of MVC. Surface EMG was recorded bilaterally from the BF and rectus femoris, and iEMG from the cBF. A mechanical actuator (MTS......-Systems Corporation) imposed iKnee flexion or extension perturbations (8° and 150°/s) in blocks of 60 trials. iEMG data for flexion and extension perturbations were decomposed (EMGLAB, McGill et al., 2005) into constituent MU action potentials (APs). The total number of APs was quantified using a 10 ms window...

  19. Chemical composition of Infraspinatus, #Triceps brachii, Longissimus thoraces, Biceps femoris, Semitendinosus#, and #Semimembranosus# of Bactrian (#Camelus bactrianus#) camel muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Raiymbek, Gulzhan; Faye, Bernard; Serikbayeva, Assiya; Konuspayeva, Gaukhar; Kadim, Isam T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine chemical composition of Infraspinatus, Triceps brachii, Longissimus thoraces, Biceps femoris, Semitendinosus, and Semimembranosus muscles from nine Bactrian carcasses (2-3 years of age). The left side muscles were collected and kept in a chiller (3-4ºC) for 48 hrs then stored at -20ºC. Chemical analyses were carried out to determine moisture, crude protein, fat (ether extract), ash, essential and non-essential element contents. The Infraspinatus, T...

  20. “徒手针刺影响健康人和中风后遗症患者肱二头肌功能的即时效果的平行随机对照试验”的研究方案%Evaluation of the immediate effects of manual acupuncture on brachial bicep muscle function in healthy individuals and poststroke patients: a study protocol of a parallelgroup randomized clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Paula de Sousa Fragoso; Arthur de Sá Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Stroke is a morbid entity in Chinese medicine recognized for over 2 000 years with sensory-motor impairments reported by several classical authors.However,the majority of controlled clinical trials of acupuncture in the treatment of poststroke recovery failed to obtain significant long-term results on functional recovery.Moreover,contradictory results have been obtained regarding the immediate effects of acupuncture stimulation on the electrical activity of human skeletal muscles as observed using surface electromyography.These results raise the question of whether acupuncture has any effect on the neuromuscular level.This study aims to evaluate the immediate effects of manual acupoint stimulation on the electrical activity and strength of the biceps brachii of healthy individuals and patients with chronic hypertonic hemiparesis.METHODS AND DESIGN:The study proposes a single-blinded randomized clinical trial with four parallel groups.Healthy subjects and poststroke patients with chronic spastic hemiparesis will be submitted to a single acupuncture intervention puncturing either Quchi (Ll11) or Tianquan (PC2).The immediate effects on muscle function will be assessed by surface electromyography and isometric force of the biceps brachii muscle as the primary outcome.Secondary outcomes comprise the frequency of patterns in each group,as well as the frequency distribution of manifestations.DISCUSSION:The proposed study design includes some improvements on common methodological issues on clinical trials with an integrative design.This study design is expected to provide new insights on the neuromuscular effects of acupuncture stimulation in healthy subjects and poststroke patients.TRIAL REGISTRATION:Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br) in English and Portuguese in October 2011.Registration number:RBR-5g7xqh.%背景:中风作为一种疾病,中医早在2 000多年前即有诸多经典著作对其进行描述.然而,大部分有关针

  1. Nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness after posterior decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Hideaki; Toyoda, Kouichiro; Kawai, Shinya

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded intraoperatively following nerve root stimulation in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A total of 19 upper limbs in 12 patients aged 55-72 years (mean, 65.5 years) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined. CMAPs were recorded from deltoid and biceps brachii muscle following C5 and C6 root stimulation. Although both C5 and C6 roots were innervated for deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in all subjects, the amplitude ratio of CMAPs (C5/C6) differed individually depending on the symptomatic intervertebral levels of the spinal cord. The C5 root predominantly innervated both deltoid and biceps brachii in patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C4-C5 intervertebral level compared to patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C5-C6 intervertebral level. Although no patients sustained postoperative radiculopathy in our study, severe weakness and unfavorable recovery are expected when the C5 root in patients with C4-C5 myelopathy is damaged. From the electrophysiological aspect, C4-C5 cord lesions are likely to be a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness in patients with compressive cervical myelopathy.

  2. Motor unit synchronization in FDI and biceps brachii muscles of strength-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fling, Brett W; Christie, Anita; Kamen, Gary

    2009-10-01

    Motor unit (MU) synchronization is the simultaneous or near-simultaneous firing of two MUs which occurs more often than would be expected by chance. The present study sought to investigate the effects of exercise training, muscle group, and force level, by comparing the magnitude of synchronization in the biceps brachii (BB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of untrained and strength-trained college-aged males at two force levels, 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 80% MVC. MU action potentials were recorded directly via an intramuscular needle electrode. The magnitude of synchronization was assessed using previously-reported synchronization indices: k', E, and CIS. Synchronization was significantly higher in the FDI than in the BB. Greater synchronization was observed in the strength-trained group with CIS, but not with E or k'. Also, synchronization was significantly greater at 80% MVC than at 30% MVC with E, but only moderately greater with CIS and there was no force difference with k'. Synchronization prevalence was found to be greater in the BB (80.1%) than in the FDI (71.5%). Thus, although the evidence is a bit equivocal, it appears that MU synchronization is greater at higher forces, and greater in strength-trained individuals than in untrained subjects.

  3. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF THE BICEPS BRACHII AFTER EXERCISE-INDUCED MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirous Ahmadi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that strenuous eccentric exercise may result in muscle damage. We proposed that vigorous eccentric exercise (EE would impair myoelectric activity of the biceps brachii. This study utilised a 7-day prospective time-series design. Ten healthy males performed a session of 70 maximal EE elbow flexion contractions. Analysis of surface electromyography activity (sEMG was performed on the signals recorded during isometric contractions at 50% (IC50 and 80% (IC80 of maximum voluntary isometric torque (MVT, deriving RMS and MDF as sEMG parameters. Linear regression of the RMS and MDF time-series (20-s sustained IC50 and IC80 was used to extract intercepts and slopes of these signals on each day. Plasma creatine kinase activity (CK, MVT, arm circumference, subjective perception of soreness and elbow joint range of motion were also measured to assess effectiveness of EE to evoke muscle damage. CK increased over resting values until day 5 after EE, and remained significantly (p < 0.05 elevated even on day 7. MVT had decreased to 45% of its initial value by day 2 after EE, and remained significantly depressed for the following 6 days. In addition, muscle soreness and arm circumference increased, and range of motion decreased after EE. A significant shift of MDF intercept towards lower frequencies at both IC50 and IC80 was observed after EE in the exercised arm, and these values gradually recovered within the next 3 days during IC50. Although there were some changes in RMS values, these alterations were persistent in both control and exercised arms, and did not follow a consistent pattern. In conclusion, a prolonged reduction in MDF intercept was observed after EE, but this was not closely time-associated with the biochemical, anthropometric or functional markers of muscle damage. Compared to RMS, MDF was a more consistent measure to reflect changes in sEMG

  4. Changes in muscle architecture of biceps femoris induced by eccentric strength training with nordic hamstring exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Fernandez, D; Docampo-Blanco, P; Martinez-Fernandez, J

    2017-03-17

    Eccentric strength training alters muscle architecture, but it is also an important factor for the prevention of hamstring injuries. The purpose was to determine the architectural adaptations of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) after eccentric strength training with nordic hamstring exercise (NHE), followed by a subsequent detraining period. The participants in this intervention (n=23) completed a period of 13 weeks consisting of a first week of control and prior training, followed by 8 weeks of eccentric strength training with NHE, and concluding with a 4-week period of detraining. The architectural characteristics of the BFlh were measured at rest using two-dimensional ultrasound before (M1-week 1) and after (M2-week 9) the eccentric strength training, and at the end of the detraining period (M3-week 13). The muscle fascicle length significantly increased (t=-7.73, d=2.28, P<.001) in M2 compared to M1, as well as the muscle thickness (t=-5.23, d=1.54, P<.001), while the pennation angle presented a significant decrease (t=7.81, d=2.3, P<.001). The muscle fascicle length decreased significantly (t=6.07, d=1.79, P<.001) in M3 compared to M2, while the pennation angle showed a significant increase (t=-4.63, d=1.36, P<.001). The results provide evidence that NHE may cause alterations in the architectural conditions of the BFlh and may have practical implications for injury prevention and rehabilitation programs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Postoperative monitoring in free muscle transfers for reconstruction in brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodakundi, Chaitanya; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Soutetsu; Yonemura, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Yuki

    2012-03-01

    Free gracilis transfers are done for reanimation of the upper limb in traumatic total brachial plexus palsy. Because of buried nature of the free muscle and monitoring skin flap in the axillary or infraclavicular region, it is always a tricky situation for continuous and repeated monitoring to assess vascular status. Critical ischemia times vary between the muscle and monitoring skin flap because of which signs of ischemic changes in the monitoring skin flap are always delayed with respect to the muscle. We describe a novel method that uses the principle of evoked potentials from the muscle to assess the vascular status of the free muscle and detects vascular compromise early before the skin changes are apparent.

  6. Neurovascularized free short head of the biceps femoris muscle transfer for one-stage reanimation of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akiteru; Maruyama, Yu

    2005-02-01

    The single-stage technique for cross-face reanimation of the paralyzed face without nerve graft is an improvement over the two-stage procedure because it results in early reinnervation of the transferred muscle and shortens the period of rehabilitation. On the basis of an anatomic investigation, the short head of the biceps femoris muscle with attached lateral intermuscular septum of the thigh was identified as a new candidate for microneurovascular free muscle transfer. The authors performed one-stage transfer of the short head of the biceps femoris muscle with a long motor nerve for reanimation of established facial paralysis in seven patients. The dominant nutrient vessels of the short head were the profunda perforators (second or third) in six patients and the direct branches from the popliteal vessels in one patient. The recipient vessels were the facial vessels in all cases. The length of the motor nerve of the short head ranged from 10 to 16 cm, and it was sutured directly to several zygomatic and buccal branches of the contralateral facial nerve in six patients. One patient required an interpositional nerve graft of 3 cm to reach the suitable facial nerve branches on the intact side. The period required for initial voluntary movement of the transferred muscles ranged from 4 to 10 months after the procedures. The period of postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 42 months. Transfer of the vascularized innervated short head of the biceps femoris muscle is thought to be an alternative for one-stage reconstruction of the paralyzed face because of the reliable vascular anatomy of the muscle and because it allows two teams to operate together without the need to reposition the patient. The nerve to the short head of the biceps femoris enters the side opposite the vascular pedicle of the muscle belly, and this unique relationship between the vascular pedicle and the motor nerve is anatomically suitable for one-stage reconstruction of the paralyzed face. As much

  7. Muscle changes in brachial plexus birth injury with elbow flexion contracture: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Lamminen, Antti E. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Peltonen, Jari I.; Nietosvaara, A.Y. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki (Finland); Kirjavainen, Mikko O. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    Muscle pathology of the arm and forearm in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) with elbow flexion contracture has not been evaluated with MRI. To determine whether limited range of motion of the elbow in BPBI is correlated with specific patterns of muscular pathology. For 15 BPBI patients, total active motion (TAM) of the elbow (extension-flexion) and the forearm (pronation-supination) were measured. MRI of the elbow joints and musculature allowed assessment of elbow congruency. Fatty infiltration and size reduction of the muscles were graded semiquantitatively. Mean TAM of the elbow was 113 (50 -140 ) and that of the forearm 91 (10 -165 ). The greater the size reduction of the brachioradialis muscle, the more diminished was elbow TAM. The more extensive the BPBI and muscle pathology of the pronator teres muscle, the more limited was the TAM of the forearm. Pathology of the supinator and brachialis muscles was evident in every patient. Extensive BPBI may result in marked limitation of TAM. Elbow flexion contracture seems to be caused mainly by brachialis muscle pathology. Prosupination of the forearm is better preserved when the pronator teres is not severely affected. MRI can reliably show the extent of muscle pathology in BPBI. (orig.)

  8. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan;

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  9. Brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish V Khadilkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN, often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise.

  10. SUPERNORMAL MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY DURING INTERMITTENT ISOMETRIC-EXERCISE IN HUMAN MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; LANGE, F

    1994-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and surface electromyographic parameters were studied in the brachial biceps muscle of healthy males during voluntary intermittent isometric contractions at 50% of maximum force. Recovery in the following 15 min was then observed. The measurements were perform

  11. Electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii at three submaximal intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagesh eBhambhani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the electromyographic, cerebral and muscle hemodynamic responses during intermittent isometric contractions of biceps brachii at 20%, 40% and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. Eleven volunteers completed two minutes of intermittent isometric contractions (12/min at an elbow angle of 90° interspersed with three minutes rest between intensities in systematic order. Surface electromyography (EMG was recorded from the right biceps brachii and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS was used to simultaneously measure left prefrontal and right biceps brachii oxyhemoglobin (HbO2, deoxyhemoglobin (HHb and total hemoglobin (Hbtot. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv bilaterally. Finger photoplethysmography was used to record beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate. EMG increased with force output from 20% to 60% MVC (P0.05. MCAv increased from rest to exercise but was not different among intensities (P>0.05. Force output correlated with the root mean square EMG and changes in muscle HbO2 (P0.05 at all three intensities. Force output declined by 8% from the 1st to the 24th contraction only at 60% MVC and was accompanied by systematic increases in RMS, cerebral HbO2 and Hbtot with a levelling off in muscle HbO2 and Hbtot. These changes were independent of alterations in mean arterial pressure. Since cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were elevated at 60% MVC, we attribute the development of fatigue to reduced muscle oxygen availability rather than impaired central n

  12. Variations of Origin of Long Head of Biceps Brachii Muscle from Glenoid Labrum of Scapula

    OpenAIRE

    Ketan Chauhan; Meenakshi Bansal; Pratik Mistry; Dhananjay Patil; Sanjay Modi; Chandrakant Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The origin of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon in the majority of literature is not same. The relationships of the tendon with the glenoid labrum of the scapula also vary. Methodology: Dissection of 50 shoulder joints of adult human cadavers of both sexes done. The joint cavity was exposed by making an incision in the posterior part of the capsule of the joint to see the extent of its attachment on gleniod labrum. Results: In all specimens, the biceps tendon was found ...

  13. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-04-22

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue.

  14. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC, however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue.

  15. [Contribution of the biceps brachii and pronator teres muscles to the efforts of pronation or supination. I. Statistical work (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoecke, J; Pérot, C; Goubel, F

    1978-03-20

    The electrical activity of the biceps brachii and pronator teres muscles is studied through the prono-supination of the forearm in some isometrical conditions (static work) with different loads and joint positions. If the pronator teres is always being active in pronation, this activity is a function of the load and of the wrist and elbow positions. The same phenomena can be observed for the biceps brachii but when in supination. From the curvilinear relationships between the integrated electrical activity and the load--observed on both muscles--some torque-angle relationships can be established for the biceps brachii which show that a bifunctional muscle seems to be characterized by a very and unique force-length relationship.

  16. Proteome profiles of longissimus and biceps femoris porcine muscles related to exercise and resting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F.W.Te Pas, Marinus; Keuning, Els; Van der Wiel, Dick J.M.

    2011-01-01

    by rest for 0, 1, or 3 h; control pigs without exercise. Proteome profiles and biochemical traits measuring energy metabolism and meat quality traits expected to be related to exercise were determined in the Longissimus and the Biceps femoris of the pigs. The results indicated associations between protein...

  17. Electromyographic Responses during Elbow Movement at Two Angles with Voluntary Contraction: Influences of Muscle Activity on Upper Arm Biceps Brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizam Uddin Ahamed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Electromyography (EMG signals generated by individuals is part of human musculoskeletal system research and signals are always influenced by the electrode placement in the muscle. This characteristic is also obvious at Biceps Brachii (BB muscles during the movement of elbow at different angles. The purpose of this study was to monitor and determine the BB muscle function in 3 conditions: (i electrodes were placed at 3 locations on the BB, (ii elbow was fixed at the two angles (90° and 150° and (iii isometric contractions were performed to record EMG data. EMG data were obtained from six healthy subjects (n = 6, mean±SD age = 24.4±3.1 years, body mass = 68±6.3 kg, height = 164±4.1 cm, BMI = 21.2±2.3, right arm dominated. A Bluetooth-enabled laptop, wireless EMG sensors, digital dynamometer and angle meter were used for data recording. EMG data were calculated and analyzed by average value, standard deviation, Root Mean Square (RMS and highest peak of the signal during maximum voluntary contraction. All the dependent variables were calculated using repeated measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. The results from the research showed that (i according to the calculation of average RMS and the maximum peaks of EMG signals, there was a significant difference between 2 angles (p = 0.047, i.e., p<0.05, but no interaction at the same angles when overall average EMG and standard deviation value are considered and (ii majority of the outcomes showed that EMG activity is higher in the order of middle, upper and lower BB muscle. It is therefore important that electrical signals generated upon different electrode placements and angles on the BB muscle are used for biceps rehabilitation and other physiological measurements on upper arm.

  18. MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF FAMILIAL HYPOKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS - INVASIVE VERSUS SURFACE DETERMINATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; LINKS, TP; ZWARTS, MJ; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1994-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) in the brachial biceps muscle was determined in a large family of patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP) by both a surface and an invasive method. Other surface EMG parameters and the muscle force were also determined. Both the surface and the inv

  19. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J P F; van Royen, Barend J; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

     Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture.  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I-III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function.  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r = 0.600, p = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation (p > 0.200). Internal rotation strength (r =  - 0.425, p muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL.

  20. Variations of Origin of Long Head of Biceps Brachii Muscle from Glenoid Labrum of Scapula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Chauhan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The origin of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon in the majority of literature is not same. The relationships of the tendon with the glenoid labrum of the scapula also vary. Methodology: Dissection of 50 shoulder joints of adult human cadavers of both sexes done. The joint cavity was exposed by making an incision in the posterior part of the capsule of the joint to see the extent of its attachment on gleniod labrum. Results: In all specimens, the biceps tendon was found to be attached to the supraglenoid tubercle as well as to the gleniod labrum. In 74% of specimens, the major part of the tendon was attached to the posterior aspect of the labrum while in 26% it was seen in the anterior aspect as well. The posterior labral attachment extended up to the lower part whereas the anterior attachment was limited to the upper part only. On the basis of the biceps attachment to the anterior or posterior labrum, we categorized them into three types of origin. Conclusion: The awareness of these normal anatomical variations are significant for arthroscopic diagnosis and may help to explain the various patterns of injury seen in partial or complete detachment of the tendon, the labrum or both. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(2.000: 137-139

  1. [Secondary replacement operations for reconstruction of elbow joint function after lesion of the brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A; Hierner, R; Becker, M H

    1997-07-01

    Elbow flexion plays a key role in the overall function of the upper extremity. In the case of unilateral complete brachial plexus lesion, restoration of elbow flexion will dramatically increase the patient's chances of regaining bimanual prehension. Furthermore, depending on the type of reconstruction, stability of the glenohumeral joint as well as some supination function of the forearm can be restored to a varying degree at the same time. Depending on the level of brachial plexus lesion and/or reinnervation, different reconstructive procedures are available. In order to select the best treatment option for the patient it is necessary to known the extent of the lesion of the brachial plexus and/or ventral upper arm muscles, to time the operation appropriately, to be aware of all treatment possibilities and to recall the special problems of tendon transfer for brachial plexus patients. Our concept is based on our experience with more than 1100 patients presenting a brachial plexus lesion between 1981 and 1996 and treated in our institution. There were 528 operative revisions of the brachial plexus. Some 225 patients underwent secondary muscle/tendon transfers. In 35 patients elbow flexion was reconstructed by bipolar latissimus dorsi transfer (n = 10), triceps-to-biceps transfer (n = 15), modified flexor/pronator muscle mass proximalization (n = 6) and the multiple-stage free functional muscle transfer after intercostal nerve transfer (n = 4).

  2. Loop Biceps Tenotomy: An Arthroscopic Technique for Long Head of Biceps Tenotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Bihel, Thomas; Dubois, Elodie; Teboul, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon is frequently involved in shoulder pathologies, often in relation to inflammatory or degenerative damage to the rotator cuff. Biceps tenodesis in the bicipital groove and tenotomy are the main treatment options. Tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon is a simpler and quicker procedure than tenodesis, and it does not require the use of implants. However, retraction of the biceps tendon, leading to Popeye deformity, and biceps muscle cramps are common ...

  3. Acute effects of direct inhibitory pressure over the biceps brachii myotendinous junction on skeletal muscle activation and force output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cè, Emiliano; Longo, Stefano; McCoy, Emily; Bisconti, Angela Valentina; Tironi, Davide; Limonta, Eloisa; Rampichini, Susanna; Rabuffetti, Marco; Esposito, Fabio

    2017-08-12

    Force (F) reduction is reported with myotendinous junction (MTJ) manipulation. Autogenic inhibition reflex (AIR) activation is supposed to be the main mechanism. Still, its role remains unclear. The study aimed at assessing the effects of MTJ direct inhibitory pressure (DIP) on neuromuscular activation and F in the elbow flexor (agonist) and extensor (antagonist) muscles. After maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) assessment, thirty-five participants randomly performed submaximal contractions at 20, 40, 60, and 80% MVC. Electromyographic (EMG), mechanomyographic (MMG), and F signals were recorded. Protocol was repeated under (i) DIP (10-s pressure on the biceps brachii MTJ) with the elbow at 120° (DIP120), (ii) DIP with the elbow at 180° (DIP180), and (iii) without DIP (Ctrl). Electromechanical delay (EMD) components, EMG and MMG root mean square (RMS), and rate of force development (RFD) were calculated. Independently from the angle, DIP induced decrements in MVC, RFD, and RMS of EMG and MMG signals and lengthened the EMD components in agonist muscles (P<0.05). The DIP-induced decrease in F output of the agonist muscles seems to be possibly due to a concomitant impairment of the neuromuscular activation and a transient decrease in stiffness. After DIP, the antagonist muscle displayed no changes; therefore, the intervention of AIR remains questionable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Contribution of the biceps brachii and pronator teres muscles to the efforts of pronation or supination. II. dynamic work (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoecke, J; Pérot, C; Goubel, F

    1978-03-20

    The electrical activity of the biceps brachii and pronator teres muscles is studied through the prono-supination of the forearm in some anisometrical conditions (dynamic work) when the inertia of the mobile system and the elbow position are being varied. The subjects are required to perform pronation, supination and flexion movements, either isolated or combined. From the findings obtained when the integrated electrical activity (Q) is related to the mechanical work (W), one can conclude that a. the Q-W linear relationship seems to characterize the chief function of a muscle, b. the slope of the Q-W relationship depends on the elbow position, c. the pronator muscles do not inhibit in a selective manner the biceps supinating function. So a bifunctional muscle seems to act as a whole.

  5. Changes in cortical beta activity related to a biceps brachii movement task while experiencing exercise induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Kristina; Lambert, Michael I; Tam, Nicholas; Lamberts, Robert P; Baumeister, Jochen

    2014-01-17

    Exercise-induced-muscle-damage (EIMD) is a well-described phenomenon which leads to decreased force output and altered neuromuscular function. How these symptoms of EIMD affect brain function, in particular cortical activity has not been described. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the symptoms of EIMD and cortical beta (β) activity during a submaximal biceps brachii movement. Half of the subjects participated in an EIMD protocol. Control and EIMD groups were monitored for 132h thereafter. Muscle pain scores in the EIMD group peaked after 36h with the lowest muscle torque reported at 12h. Beta-1 and -2 activity was increased in the frontal and parietal area in the experimental group at 12h. This suggests an impact of EIMD induced neuromuscular changes on the cortical proprioceptive and motor perceptive networks. Beta-2 activity decreased in the control group over time suggesting a loss in focused attention and greater familiarization with the protocol as the study progressed. These data suggest that a change in β-1 and -2 activity is associated with integrating movement perception and proprioception post-EIMD.

  6. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated" contractio

  7. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2006-01-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated"

  8. Role of еlectromyography in assessing prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury in practice of a specialized center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Novikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of current publication – to present our own experience in use of electromyographic examination in prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury to practical neurologists and neurophysiologists. Review of literature shows that common approaches to electrotrophysiological diagnosis of obstetric brachial plexus injury do not exist. The aim of this study– to evaluate retrospectively electrophysiological and sonographic parameters of obstetric brachial plexus injury in children, determining the most informative variables. Since 2007 to 2014 we examined 218 children, 74 of them were operated. Electrophysiological investigation in young children have difficulties in performance.We present our algorithm of diagnostic of obstetric brachial plexus injury: 1 testing main muscles, which perform basic movementsin upper limb (needle EMG of supra- and infraspinatus muscles and cutaneous EMG of biceps muscles; 2 localization of injury (paralysis or Duchenne – Erb palsy and electrophysiological criteria of spinal cord root avulsion. We found out that the most crucial role in assessing prognosis plays an examination of motor unit potentials (MUPs duration. Absence of MUPs within needle EMG from supraspinatus muscle and absence of interference curve from biceps muscle during first 6 months have poor prognosis. After 6 months careful, dynamic study of MUPs duration in infraspinatus muscle and co-contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles is needed. To decide whether reconstructive surgery in a patient with obstetric brachial plexus injury is necessary, surgeon must analyze clinical and instrumental data. The possibility of usage of the ultrasonogrophy in brachial plexus injury requires further investigation.

  9. Clinical outcome of shoulder muscle transfer for shoulder deformities in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: A study of 150 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Residual muscle weakness, cross-innervation (caused by misdirected regenerating axons, and muscular imbalance are the main causes of internal rotation contractures leading to limitation of shoulder joint movement, glenoid dysplasia, and deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Muscle transfers and release of antagonistic muscles improve range of motion as well as halt or reverse the deterioration in the bony architecture of the shoulder joint. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of shoulder muscle transfer for shoulder abnormalities in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients of obstetric brachial plexus palsy with shoulder deformity underwent shoulder muscle transfer along with anterior shoulder release at our institutions from 1999 to 2007. Shoulder function was assessed both preoperatively and postoperatively using aggregate modified Mallet score and active and passive range of motion. The mean duration of follow-up was 4 years (2.5-8 years. Results: The mean preoperative abduction was 45° ± 7.12, mean passive external rotation was 10° ± 6.79, the mean active external rotation was 0°, and the mean aggregate modified Mallet score was 11.2 ± 1.41. At a mean follow-up of 4 years (2.5-8 years, the mean active abduction was 120° ± 18.01, the mean passive external rotation was 80° ± 10.26, while the mean active external rotation was 45° ± 3.84. The mean aggregate modified Mallet score was 19.2 ± 1.66. Conclusions: This procedure can thus be seen as a very effective tool to treat internal rotation and adduction contractures, achieve functional active abduction and external rotation, as well as possibly prevent glenohumeral dysplasia, though the long-term effects of this procedure may still have to be studied in detail clinico-radiologically to confirm this hypothesis. Level of evidence: Therapeutic level IV

  10. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  11. Analysis of concentric and eccentric contractions in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography signals and multifractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Kiran; Swaminathan, Ramakrishnan

    2016-06-23

    Muscle contractions can be categorized into isometric, isotonic (concentric and eccentric) and isokinetic contractions. The eccentric contractions are very effective for promoting muscle hypertrophy and produce larger forces when compared to the concentric or isometric contractions. Surface electromyography signals are widely used for analyzing muscle activities. These signals are nonstationary, nonlinear and exhibit self-similar multifractal behavior. The research on surface electromyography signals using multifractal analysis is not well established for concentric and eccentric contractions. In this study, an attempt has been made to analyze the concentric and eccentric contractions associated with biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography signals and multifractal detrended moving average algorithm. Surface electromyography signals were recorded from 20 healthy individuals while performing a single curl exercise. The preprocessed signals were divided into concentric and eccentric cycles and in turn divided into phases based on range of motion: lower (0°-90°) and upper (>90°). The segments of surface electromyography signal were subjected to multifractal detrended moving average algorithm, and multifractal features such as strength of multifractality, peak exponent value, maximum exponent and exponent index were extracted in addition to conventional linear features such as root mean square and median frequency. The results show that surface electromyography signals exhibit multifractal behavior in both concentric and eccentric cycles. The mean strength of multifractality increased by 15% in eccentric contraction compared to concentric contraction. The lowest and highest exponent index values are observed in the upper concentric and lower eccentric contractions, respectively. The multifractal features are observed to be helpful in differentiating surface electromyography signals along the range of motion as compared to root mean square and median

  12. Group Ia afferents contribute to short-latency interlimb reflexes in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2017-01-01

    and velocity of the iKnee rotations. Methods 11 seated participants (mean age: 25 ± 5 years) performed a voluntary isometric knee extension with the ipsilateral leg and contralateral knee flexion to 10% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A mechanical actuator (MTS-Systems Corporation) imposed i...... amplitudes (4 vs. 8°) at the same 150°/s velocity (p’s > 0.08). Conclusion Because fast conducting group Ia muscle spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in muscle stretch velocity, while group II spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in amplitude (Grey et al., JPhysiol., 2001; Matthews, Trends...... Neurosci., 1991), group Ia velocity sensitive muscle spindle afferents likely contribute to the short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the cBF muscle following iKnee joint rotations. This supports the findings for the short-latency crossed responses in the human soleus muscle (Stubbs & Mrachacz...

  13. BICEP's bispectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    The simplest interpretation of the Bicep2 result is that the scalar primordial power spectrum is slightly suppressed at large scales. These models result in a large tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. In this work we show that the type of inflationary trajectory favoured by Bicep2 also leads to a larger non-Gaussian signal at large scales, roughly an order of magnitude larger than a standard slow-roll trajectory.

  14. Significance of elbow extension in reconstruction of prehension with reinnervated free-muscle transfer following complete brachial plexus avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Shigetomi, M; Kaneko, K; Soo-Heong, T; Hiura, Y; Hattori, Y; Kawakami, F

    1997-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus underwent reconstruction of elbow extension by intercostal nerve transfer following reconstruction of prehension with either a single or double free-muscle transfer. Long-term results of elbow extension were evaluated in 24 patients. Reinnervation of the triceps muscle took longer than that of the transferred muscle on serial electromyographic examinations, and the eventual strength of the triceps muscle was weak. None attained M5 grade, 2 achieved M4 grade, 4 achieved M3 grade, 8 achieved M2 grade, 5 achieved M1 grade, and another 5 achieved M0 grade. However, despite the weak recovery, 14 patients were able to obtain useful functional recovery of the triceps muscle, enabling it to stabilize the elbow joint against the transferred muscle, which acted as simultaneous elbow flexor and wrist or finger extensor. Elbow stability is imperative in order to obtain voluntary finger function following free-muscle transfer. Should the triceps muscle fail to recover following intercostal nerves neurotization, transferring the reinnervated infraspinatus to the triceps is an optional procedure to provide stabilization of the elbow.

  15. MRI of rotator cuff muscle atrophy in relation to glenohumeral joint incongruence in brachial plexus birth injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeyhiae, Tiina H. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, PO Box 281, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki (Finland); Nietosvaara, Yrjaenae A.; Peltonen, Jari I. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki (Finland); Remes, Ville M. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kirjavainen, Mikko O. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland); Lamminen, Antti E. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, PO Box 281, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate rotator cuff muscles and the glenohumeral (GH) joint in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) using MRI and to determine whether any correlation exists between muscular abnormality and the development of glenoid dysplasia and GH joint incongruity. Thirty-nine consecutive BPBI patients with internal rotation contracture or absent active external rotation of the shoulder joint were examined clinically and imaged with MRI. In the physical examination, passive external rotation was measured to evaluate internal rotation contracture. Both shoulders were imaged and the glenoscapular angle, percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the greatest thickness of the subscapular, infraspinous and supraspinous muscles were measured. The muscle ratio between the affected side and the normal side was calculated to exclude age variation in the assessment of muscle atrophy. All muscles of the rotator cuff were atrophic, with the subscapular and infraspinous muscles being most severely affected. A correlation was found between the percentage of humeral head anterior to the middle of the glenoid fossa (PHHA) and the extent of subscapular muscle atrophy (r{sub s}=0.45, P=0.01), as well as between its ratio (r{sub s}=0.5, P P=0.01). Severity of rotator cuff muscle atrophy correlated with increased glenoid retroversion and the degree of internal rotation contracture. Glenoid retroversion and subluxation of the humeral head are common in patients with BPBI. All rotator cuff muscles are atrophic, especially the subscapular muscle. Muscle atrophy due to neurogenic damage apparently results in an imbalance of the shoulder muscles and progressive retroversion and subluxation of the GH joint, which in turn lead to internal rotation contracture and deformation of the joint. (orig.)

  16. The effect of whole-body vibration and resistance training on muscle strength in a 13-year-old boy with m. biceps femoris lesion and posttraumatic calcification

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    Pantović Milan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common adaptation after major muscle lesion of m. biceps femoris that results in numerous health-sport related complications. Resistance strength training and whole-body vibration (WBV have been recognized as an effective tool, which attenuates atrophy and evokes hypertrophy. Case report. We presented a 13-year-old boy with a lesion of m. biceps femoris and posttraumatic calcification sustained in soccer training session 6 month prior participation in this study. The patient underwent training 3 times a week for 7 weeks, including unilateral progressive WBV + resistance training (RT of the right hamstrings muscle group using WBV and weights. Hamstrings muscle strength was measured using a Cybex isokinetic dynamometer. At the end of week 4, the patient peak torque value of the involved leg increased from 39% body weight (BW to 72% BW and bilateral deficit decreased from -64% to -35%; at the end of week 7 the participant’s peak torque value of the involved leg increased from 72% BW to 98% BW and bilateral deficit decreased from -35% to -3%, respectively. Conclusion. Unilateral WBV + RT protocol evokes strength increase in the hamstrings muscle group. This case study suggests that adding WBV, as well as the RT program have to be considered in the total management of strength disbalance. Further studies are needed to verify the efficiency of WBV + RT protocol over the classic physical therapy exercise program.

  17. Supernumerary head of biceps brachii

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian A

    2010-01-01

    The biceps brachii muscle and the musculocutaneous nerve of arm are frequent in their variations. A third head of biceps brachii was noted unilaterally during routine anatomy dissection. Variation in musculocutaneous nerve was also seen on the same arm. The evolutionary and functional basis of such variations are discussed. Such variations become relevant during surgical intervention of the arm, especially after humeral fracture with subsequent unusual bone displacements.

  18. Supernumerary head of biceps brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The biceps brachii muscle and the musculocutaneous nerve of arm are frequent in their variations. A third head of biceps brachii was noted unilaterally during routine anatomy dissection. Variation in musculocutaneous nerve was also seen on the same arm. The evolutionary and functional basis of such variations are discussed. Such variations become relevant during surgical intervention of the arm, especially after humeral fracture with subsequent unusual bone displacements.

  19. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury:electrophysiological characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Liu; Xun-cheng Xu; Yi Zou; Su-rong Li; Bin Zhang; Yue Wang

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we per-formed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduc-tion function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regener-ated potentials ifrst appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘ex-cellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The func-tional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  20. [Effect of hypodynamia on the hemomicrocirculatory bed of the triceps muscle and brachial fascia in the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, M V; Shafikova, L F

    1984-10-01

    By means of amputation of the forearm (the place of the brachial musculus attachment is kept intact) in 30 male rats certain conditions are produced for decreasing force activity in the m. triceps brachii. Anatomical changes in structure and in distribution of links of the hemomicrocirculatory bed (HMCB) are followed in the medial head of the muscle and in the fascia covering it. Time of observations - 1-60 days. The sections of the muscles and some parts of the fascia are impregnated with silver nitrate solution. The greatest changes are observed to occur in the capillary-venular links of the HMCB during the interval of 1.14-4.5 days and are manifested as initial congestion of venous blood in these links. Later (4.5-15.3 and further 60 days) together with stable dilatation of all venous components of the blood bed certain qualitative changes take place in the arteriolar links of the HMCB.

  1. Contributions of muscle imbalance and impaired growth to postural and osseous shoulder deformity following brachial plexus birth palsy: a computational simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Cornwall, Roger; Crouch, Dustin L; Li, Zhongyu; Saul, Katherine R

    2015-06-01

    Two potential mechanisms leading to postural and osseous shoulder deformity after brachial plexus birth palsy are muscle imbalance between functioning internal rotators and paralyzed external rotators and impaired longitudinal growth of paralyzed muscles. Our goal was to evaluate the combined and isolated effects of these 2 mechanisms on transverse plane shoulder forces using a computational model of C5-6 brachial plexus injury. We modeled a C5-6 injury using a computational musculoskeletal upper limb model. Muscles expected to be denervated by C5-6 injury were classified as affected, with the remaining shoulder muscles classified as unaffected. To model muscle imbalance, affected muscles were given no resting tone whereas unaffected muscles were given resting tone at 30% of maximal activation. To model impaired growth, affected muscles were reduced in length by 30% compared with normal whereas unaffected muscles remained normal in length. Four scenarios were simulated: normal, muscle imbalance only, impaired growth only, and both muscle imbalance and impaired growth. Passive shoulder rotation range of motion and glenohumeral joint reaction forces were evaluated to assess postural and osseous deformity. All impaired scenarios exhibited restricted range of motion and increased and posteriorly directed compressive glenohumeral joint forces. Individually, impaired muscle growth caused worse restriction in range of motion and higher and more posteriorly directed glenohumeral forces than did muscle imbalance. Combined muscle imbalance and impaired growth caused the most restricted joint range of motion and the highest joint reaction force of all scenarios. Both muscle imbalance and impaired longitudinal growth contributed to range of motion and force changes consistent with clinically observed deformity, although the most substantial effects resulted from impaired muscle growth. Simulations suggest that treatment strategies emphasizing treatment of impaired longitudinal

  2. The impact of rectification on the electrically evoked long-latency reflex of the biceps brachii muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaid, Ssuhir; Kornhuber, Malte E

    2013-11-27

    Long latency reflexes (LLR) were elicited electrically and obtained by full wave rectified and non-rectified data recordings in 10 healthy subjects. After single or train stimuli (sensory radial nerve; interstimulus interval 3ms) amplitude and peak latency values were measured over the bent biceps brachii (BB) muscle, either without or with 1.5kg weight load. After rectification, mean LLR amplitude values made up 30% of the non-rectified data, independent from the stimulus type and weight load. In the non-rectified data, a significant gain in amplitude resulted from train stimuli compared with single stimuli, and from weight load compared to no weight load. No such significant difference was detected when rectified data were analysed. Furthermore, average amplitude values of rectified and non-rectified curves were studied using 11 sine waves and damped sine waves with equal phase intervals that were varied from 0° up to 34.4°. Phase shifts ranging from 10° to 25° resulted in excess amplitude decline of rectified data compared with non-rectified data. The long and polysynaptic course that LLR information takes leads to considerable overlap of responses to subsequent stimuli. This overlap of motor unit potentials forming the LLR obviously results in excess amplitude cancellation after rectification as shown for sine and damped sine waves. Rectification leads to an increase in the frequency content of the data that renders it prone to phase cancellation. In the present study, this cancellation was harmful as it prevented detection of important factors of influence such as stimulus strength and motor unit recruitment level.

  3. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is not affected by varying visual feedback in an isometric task in biceps brachii muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eRantalainen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI of the primary motor cortex (M1 appears to play a significant role in skill acquisition. Consequently, it is of interest to find out which factors cause modulation of SICI. Purpose: To establish if visual feedback and force requirements influence SICI. Methods: SICI was assessed from 10 healthy adults (5 males and 5 females aged between 21 and 35 years in three submaximal isometric elbow flexion torque levels (5%, 20% and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction [MVC] and with two tasks differing in terms of visual feedback. Single-pulse and paired-pulse motor evoked potentials (MEPs, supramaximal M-wave and background surface electromyogram (sEMG were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle. Results: Repeated measures MANOVA was used for statistical analyses. Background sEMG did not differ between tasks (F = 0.4, P = 0.68 nor was task × torque level interaction observed (F = 1.2, P = 0.32, whereas background sEMG increased with increasing torque levels (P = 0.001. SICI did not differ between tasks (F = 0.9, P = 0.43 and no task × torque level interaction was observed (F = 2.3, P = 0.08. However, less SICI was observed at 40% MVC compared to the 5% and 20% MVC torque levels (P = 0.01 to 0.001. Conclusion: SICI was not altered by performing the same task with differing visual feedback. However, SICI decreased with increasing submaximal torque providing further evidence that SICI is one mechanism of modulating cortical excitability and plays a role in force gradation.

  4. Karakteristik Kimia dan Mikrostruktur Otot Longissimus Dorsi dan Biceps Femoris dari Sapi Glonggong (Chemical Characteristics and Microstructure of Longissimus Dorsi and Biceps Femoris Muscle of Glonggong Beef Cattle

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    Amrih Prasetyo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate chemical and microstructure characteristics of glonggong (excessive drink meat compared with the normal meat. The meat samples were taken from Boyolali Regency, came from five glonggong male Ongole grade cattle, and from five normal cattle with the average life weight of 250–300 kg. The chemical data were analyzed by using analysis of variance of 2x2 factorial patterns. The microstructure characteristics were also analyzed descriptively. The water content of glonggong meat was higher compared with that of normal meat on BF and LD muscle, average water content was 80.64% and 80.14% vs 78.60% and 74.57%, respectively. The protein contents of BF (15.98% and LD (16.17% was lower than the protein contents normal meat of BF (21.08% and LD (21.07%, respectively. The Result of statistical analyzed shows significant pengglonggongan of cattle before slaughtered (P<0.05 to meat fat value at every muscle. The meat lactic acid value of glonggong meat of LD muscle was lower than that of normal meat of LD muscle (2815.891 vs 6827.77 ppm. There was a damage of glonggong meat microstructure of LD, BF muscle and also of liver organ. In conclusion, glonggong meat had a lower chemical characteristics compared with the normal meat. (Key words: Chemical, Microstructure, Meat, Glonggong

  5. Complete rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon and the distal biceps tendon

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    Pieter J. Oberholzer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most common injury to the biceps muscle is rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon. A tear can occur proximally, distally or at the musculotendinous junction. Two cases are discussed, in both of which the patients felt a sudden sharp pain in the upper arm, at the shoulder and elbow respectively, and presented with a biceps muscle bump (Popeye deformity.

  6. Rupture of the distal biceps brachii tendon: isokinetic power analysis and complications after anatomic reinsertion compared with fixation to the brachialis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonz, Andreas; Loitz, Dietmar; Wöhler, Peter; Reilmann, Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    Anatomic reattachment of the distal biceps tendon is well established but bears the risk of complications including loss of motion and nerve damage. We questioned whether nonanatomic repair by tenodesis to the brachialis muscle is able to accomplish similar results with less risk. We compared the results of anatomic repair with suture anchors (n = 6) with the results of nonanatomic repair (n = 8). Anatomic reattachment of the biceps tendon can restore full power of flexion in most cases as determined by isokinetic muscle tests (mean, 96.8% compared with the contralateral side). Nonanatomic repair also restores flexion strength to a mean of 96%. Supination power averaged 91% after anatomic repair. Supination strength after nonanatomic repair did not improve in 4 of 8 patients (42%-56% of the uninjured arm). The other 4 patients were able to produce 80% to 150% of the strength of the contralateral side. Major complications such as radioulnar synostosis or motor nerve damage were not encountered in either group. Heterotopic ossification was seen in 4 cases after reinsertion to the tuberosity. One of these patients was not satisfied with the procedure because of anterior elbow pain, even at rest. After tenodesis to the brachialis, one patient was unsatisfied because of considerable weakness. We concluded that major complications after anatomic repair are rare but must not be ignored. Tenodesis of the distal biceps tendon is a safe alternative procedure. We inform our patients about the benefits and risks of anatomic and nonanatomic repair as well as those of nonoperative treatment. The decision concerning the type of therapy best suited for an individual patient should be made on an informed consent basis.

  7. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

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    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  8. Restoration of prehension with the double free muscle technique following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. Indications and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Muramatsu, K; Hattori, Y; Otsuka, K; Tan, S H; Nanda, V; Watanabe, M

    2000-05-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. Double free muscle transfer was performed in patients who had complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. After initial exploration of the brachial plexus and (if possible) repair of the fifth cervical nerve root, the first free muscle, used to restore elbow flexion and finger extension, is transferred and reinnervated by the spinal accessory nerve. The second free muscle, transferred to restore finger flexion, is reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves. The motor branch of the triceps brachii is reinnervated by the third and fourth intercostal nerves to restore elbow extension. Hand sensibility is restored by suturing of the sensory rami of the intercostal nerves to the median nerve or the ulnar nerve component of the medial cord. Secondary reconstructive procedures, such as arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb, shoulder arthrodesis, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and the distal tendons, may be required to improve the functional outcome. The early results were evaluated in thirty-two patients who had had reconstruction with use of the double free muscle procedure. Twenty-six of these patients were followed for at least twenty-four months (mean duration, thirty-nine months) after the second free muscle transfer, and they were assessed with regard to the long-term outcome as well. Satisfactory (excellent or good) elbow flexion was restored in twenty-five (96 percent) of the twenty-six patients and satisfactory prehension (more than 30 degrees of total active motion of the fingers), in seventeen (65 percent). Fourteen patients (54 percent) could position the hand in space, negating simultaneous flexion of the elbow, while moving the fingers at least 30 degrees and could use the reconstructed hand for activities requiring the use of two hands, such

  9. Quality traits in muscle biceps femoris and back-fat from purebred Iberian and reciprocal Iberian×Duroc crossbred pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventanas, Sonia; Ventanas, Jesús; Jurado, Angela; Estévez, Mario

    2006-08-01

    The present study evaluated the physico-chemical characteristics of muscle biceps femoris and back-fat from purebred Iberian (PBI) pigs and reciprocal crossbred Iberian×Duroc pigs (IB×D pigs: Iberian dams×Duroc sires; D×IB pigs: Duroc dams×Iberian sires). Muscles from PBI pigs contained significantly higher amounts of IMF, heme pigments and iron than those from crossbred pigs. In addition, muscles from PBI pigs were darker (lower L(∗)-values) and redder (higher a(∗)-values) and exhibited a more intense colour (higher chroma value) which was closer to the true red axis (lower hue value) than muscles from crossbred pigs. Back-fat from PBI pigs had significantly higher percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and significantly smaller percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than those from crossbred pigs. Regarding the fatty acid profiles of the muscle lipid fractions, the genetic background particularly affected the composition of the polar lipid (PL) fraction. PL in muscles from PBI pigs contained significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and total MUFA and significantly lower amounts of arachidonic acid, certain long-chain PUFA (ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids) and total amount of PUFA than PL in muscles from crossbred pigs. The results obtained indicate that tissues from PBI pigs would be more suitable for the production of dry-cured meats than those from cross-bred pigs. The position of the dam or the sire in reciprocal Iberian×Duroc crosses had no clear effects on meat quality.

  10. The role of subscapularis muscle denervation in the pathogenesis of shoulder internal rotation contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Casaccia, Marcelo; Fernandez-Martin, Alejandra; Marotta, Mario; Fontecha, Cesar G; Haddad, Sleiman; Knörr, Jorge; Soldado, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the role of subscapularis muscle denervation in the development of shoulder internal rotation contracture in neonatal brachial plexus injury. Seventeen newborn rats underwent selective denervation of the subscapular muscle. The rats were evaluated at weekly intervals to measure passive shoulder external rotation. After 4 weeks, the animals were euthanized. The subscapularis thickness was measured using 7.2T MRI axial images. The subscapularis muscle was then studied grossly, and its mass was registered. The fiber area and the area of fibrosis were measured using collagen-I inmunostained muscle sections. Significant progressive decrease in passive shoulder external rotation was noted with a mean loss of 58° at four weeks. A significant decrease in thickness and mass of the subscapularis muscles in the involved shoulders was also found with a mean loss of 69%. Subscapularis muscle fiber size decreased significantly, while the area of fibrosis remained unchanged. Our study shows that subscapularis denervation, per se, could explain shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury, though its relevance compared to other pathogenic factors needs further investigation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  12. The role of muscle imbalance in the pathogenesis of shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldado, Francisco; Fontecha, Cesar G; Marotta, Mario; Benito, David; Casaccia, Marcelo; Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Zlotolow, Dan; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-07-01

    An internal rotation contracture of the shoulder is common after neonatal brachial plexus injuries due to subscapularis shortening and atrophy. It has been explained by 2 theories: muscle denervation and muscle imbalance between the internal and external rotators of the shoulder. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that muscle imbalance alone could cause subscapularis changes and shoulder contracture. We performed selective neurectomy of the suprascapular nerve in 15 newborn rats to denervate only the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus muscles, leaving the subscapularis muscle intact. After 4 weeks, passive shoulder external rotation was measured and a 7.2-T magnetic resonance imaging scan of the shoulders was used to determine changes in the infraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. The subscapularis muscle was weighed to determine the degree of mass loss. An additional group of 10 newborn rats was evaluated to determine the sectional muscle fiber size and muscle area of fibrosis by use of images from type I collagen immunostaining. There was a significant decrease in passive shoulder external rotation, with a mean loss of 66°; in the thickness of the denervated infraspinatus, with a mean loss of 40%; and in the thickness and weight of the non-denervated subscapularis, with mean losses of 28% and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in subscapularis muscle fiber size and area of fibrosis between shoulders after suprascapular nerve injury. Our study supports the theory that shoulder muscle imbalance is a cause of shoulder contracture in patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of biceps tendinitis and tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgay, Catherine A

    2009-09-01

    Biceps tendinitis is inflammation of the tendon around the long head of the biceps muscle. Biceps tendinosis is caused by degeneration of the tendon from athletics requiring overhead motion or from the normal aging process. Inflammation of the biceps tendon in the bicipital groove, which is known as primary biceps tendinitis, occurs in 5 percent of patients with biceps tendinitis. Biceps tendinitis and tendinosis are commonly accompanied by rotator cuff tears or SLAP (superior labrum anterior to posterior) lesions. Patients with biceps tendinitis or tendinosis usually complain of a deep, throbbing ache in the anterior shoulder. Repetitive overhead motion of the arm initiates or exacerbates the symptoms. The most common isolated clinical finding in biceps tendinitis is bicipital groove point tenderness with the arm in 10 degrees of internal rotation. Local anesthetic injections into the biceps tendon sheath may be therapeutic and diagnostic. Ultrasonography is preferred for visualizing the overall tendon, whereas magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography arthrography is preferred for visualizing the intra-articular tendon and related pathology. Conservative management of biceps tendinitis consists of rest, ice, oral analgesics, physical therapy, or corticosteroid injections into the biceps tendon sheath. Surgery should be considered if conservative measures fail after three months, or if there is severe damage to the biceps tendon.

  14. Loop biceps tenotomy: an arthroscopic technique for long head of biceps tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Bihel, Thomas; Dubois, Elodie; Teboul, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon is frequently involved in shoulder pathologies, often in relation to inflammatory or degenerative damage to the rotator cuff. Biceps tenodesis in the bicipital groove and tenotomy are the main treatment options. Tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon is a simpler and quicker procedure than tenodesis, and it does not require the use of implants. However, retraction of the biceps tendon, leading to Popeye deformity, and biceps muscle cramps are common complications after tenotomy. Therefore we propose an arthroscopic technique for tenotomy that limits the risk of Popeye deformity. This procedure consists of creating a loop at the severed end of the biceps tendon, which prevents the tendon from retracting into the bicipital groove.

  15. Articulate torque and electromyographic activity of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles during isokinetic knee flexion movements in soccer athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bodnariuc Fontes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the articulate torque (TO and the electromyographic activity (EMG of soccer athlete’s long head Biceps Femoris (BF and Semitendinosus (ST muscles during isokinetic knee fl exion movements (concentric-CON and eccentric-ECC actions at differing velocities, carried out in the ventral decubitus position. Fourteen soccer players aged 19 and 20 years old (71.2 ± 6.5 kg, 176.6 ± 6.4 cm were enrolled from the Associação Atlética Ponte Preta under- 20 team. They followed a protocol specifying 5 repetitions of fl exion (CON and ECC action of the knee at three velocities (60, 180 and 300º/s at random. The recovery interval between series adopted was 3 minutes. EMG Activity was recorded using surface electrodes and data were expressed in terms of root mean squares (RMS. Statistical analysis employed analysis of variance (Friedman test for repeated measures followed by the Wilcoxon test when necessary, with the level of signifi cance set at P ABSTRACT O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar o torque articular (TO e a atividade eletromiográfi ca (EMG dos músculos Bíceps Femoral (BF cabeça longa e semitendíneo (ST durante movimentos isocinéticos de fl exão do joelho (ação concêntrica-CON e excêntrica-EXC, em diferentes velocidades de execução, na posição de decúbito ventral em atletas de futebol. Fizeram parte do estudo 14 atletas de futebol da equipe sub-20, da Associação Atlética Ponte Preta, com idade entre 19 e 20 anos (71,24 ± 6,53 kg, 176,59 ± 6,44 cm. Os atletas realizaram uma série de cinco repetições de fl exão (ação CON e EXC do joelho, em 3 velocidades (60, 180 e 300°/s, defi nidas anteriormente aleatoriamente. O intervalo de recuperação adotado entre as séries foi de 3 minutos. A atividade EMG foi coletada, utilizando-se eletrodos de superfície e os dados foram expressos em root mean square (RMS. Para análise estatística, foi empregada a análise de vari

  16. Reverse split hand syndrome: Dissociated intrinsic hand muscle atrophy pattern in Hirayama disease/brachial monomelic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravinder-Jeet; Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Polavarapu, Kiran; Vengalil, Seena; Prasad, Chandrajit; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2017-02-01

    Preferential involvement of C7, C8, T1 level anterior horn cells is a typical feature in Hirayama disease/brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA). There are no clinico-electrophysiological studies to substantiate the peculiar pattern of muscle involvement. Thirty subjects, 10 in each group of BMMA, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and age-matched normal healthy subjects underwent detailed clinical and electrophysiological testing. Results showed that the mean age at evaluation for BMMA and ALS patients was 25.8 ± 3.8 and 51.8 ± 9.5 years, respectively; illness duration was 8.1 ± 5.7 years and 11.14 ± 2.85 months, respectively. Clinically, all BMMA patients had reverse of split hand (RSH) syndrome [abductor digiti minimi (ADM) affected more than abductor pollicis brevis (APB)], while 7/10 ALS patients had classical split hand syndrome (APB affected more than ADM). In BMMA, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of APB was preserved but reduced/absent in ADM compared to the ALS group which demonstrated reverse findings. APB/ADM ratio was >0.8 in the BMMA group (>1.4 in 80%), around 1.0 in normal controls (none had >1.4) and <0.8 in ALS (70% having values <0.6). In conclusion, RSH syndrome may provide valuable diagnostic clues to differentiate this relatively self-restricted disease from progressive degenerative disease like ALS.

  17. The effect of housing conditions on Biceps femoris muscle fibre properties, fatty acid composition, performance and carcass traits of slow-growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenek Volek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of stocking density on the biceps femoris (BF muscle fibre properties, meat quality, the growth performance and carcass traits of Czech White rabbits.  A total of 20 rabbits (40 days old, 10 rabbits per treatment, sex ratio 1/1 were reared in cages at different stocking densities (10 rabbits/m2 or 4 rabbits/m2 for 49 days. Stocking density had no significant effect on the growth performance. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to hot carcass weight (HCW or dressing-out percentage. The proportions of both perirenal (9.5 vs. 15.9 g/kg HCW; P=0.010 and total dissectible fat (14.9 vs. 25.1 g/kg HCW; P=0.001 were lower in rabbits reared at the lower stocking density. No significant differences in ultimate pH values, meat colour or proximate composition were observed. The hind leg meat of rabbits reared at the lower stocking density contained significantly less lauric (4.6 vs. 6.7 mg/100 g of muscle; P=0.008 and myristic acid (52.2 vs. 64.4 mg/100 g of muscle; P=0.033. Significantly higher percentages of βR fibres (16.3 vs. 6.5 %, P=0.001 and αR fibres (24.5 vs. 14.2 %; P=0.001 and a significantly lower percentage of αW fibres (59.2 vs. 79.3 %; P=0.001 were also observed in these rabbits. The mean cross-sectional area (1882 vs. 2744 μm2; P=0.001 and diameter (47.9 vs. 58.5 μm; P=0.001 of βR fibres were smaller in rabbits reared at the lower stocking density. Thus, the lower stocking density favourably affected the medium-chain fatty acid profile of meat and fibre characteristics of the rabbits' biceps femoris muscle.

  18. Immediate electromyographic changes of the biceps brachii and upper rectus abdominis muscles due to the Pilates centring technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Wesley Carvalho; Martins, Fábio Luiz Mendonça; Vitorino, Débora Fernandes de Melo; Barbosa, Michelle Cristina Sales Almeida

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the electrical behaviour of the biceps brachii (BB) and upper rectus abdominis (URA) by surface electromyography (sEMG) during a forearm flexion with and without the Pilates centring technique. Ten female subjects (with a minimum of one week of experience with the Pilates method) were recruited. The long head of the BB and URA were evaluated while an isotonic contraction of the BB was performed using the Pilates breathing technique and powerhouse contraction, followed by another contraction without these techniques. The data were normalised by a maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Normality was accepted, and the paired t-test was used to determine data differences (p concentric compared to the eccentric phase. In addition, this last phase, the centring activation was greater than without the Pilates technique. The Pilates method seems to influence the increase in BB activity during dynamic contraction, especially during the eccentric phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analyzing the influence of curl speed in fatiguing biceps brachii muscles using sEMG signals and multifractal detrended moving average algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Kiran; Swaminathan, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, an attempt has been made to analyze surface electromyography (sEMG) signals of fatiguing biceps brachii muscles at different curl speeds using multifractal detrended moving average (MFDMA) algorithm. For this purpose, signals are recorded from fifty eight healthy subjects while performing curl exercise at their comfortable speed until fatigue. The signals of first and last curls are considered as nonfatigue and fatigue conditions, respectively. Further, the number of curls performed by each subject and the endurance time is used for computing the normalized curl speed. The signals are grouped into fast, medium and slow using curl speeds. The curl segments are subjected to MFDMA to derive degree of multifractality (DOM), maximum singularity exponent (MXE) and exponent length multifractality index (EMX). The results show that multifractal features are able to differentiate sEMG signals in fatiguing conditions. The multifractality increased with faster curls as compared with slower curl speed by 12%. High statistical significance is observed using EMX and DOM values between curl speed and fatigue conditions. It appears that this method of analyzing sEMG signals with curl speed can be useful in understanding muscle dynamics in varied neuromuscular conditions and sports medicine.

  20. [Variation of muscle mass and weight in critical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Matarín, J; del Cotillo-Fuente, M; Grané-Mascarell, N; Quintana, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantify the muscle mass and body weight variation in critically ill patients and to identify associated factors. A descriptive follow-up study. Data for demographic variables, body weight, fluid balance, daily kilocalories, the amount of sedation and muscle relaxants received and motor physiotherapy applied were collected. Three consecutive measurements were performed in the brachial biceps and quadriceps rectus by using ultrasound, upon admission and every 5 days until discharge. 68 patients were included. Average age was of 73.5 [57-78,5] years. The median length of stay was 9.5 [5.5 -15] days. The median 16 (SD=5.7) daily kilocalories per kg/weight, 91.2% received sedation, 44.1% received muscle relaxants and 20% received physiotherapy. The patients presented a muscle wasting of 4.9 (SD=3.9)mm, p <.001 in the brachial biceps and 5.6 (SD=4.8)mm, p <.001 in the quadriceps rectus. Regression analysis selected the length of stay and the muscle relaxants are the most influential variables in the brachial biceps muscle wasting (R2=0.4), and length of stay as the most influential in the quadriceps rectus muscle wasting (R2=0.3). Patient's mean body weight on admission was of 81.1 (SD=15)kg and 81.2 (SD=14.2)kg on discharge, p=.95. The critically ill patient presents a significant muscle waste related with the length of stay and the treatment received with muscle relaxants. Patients are being discharged with a similar body weight to which they were admitted but with a significant reduction of muscle mass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  1. [Evaluation of surgical repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behounek, J; Hrubina, M; Skoták, M; Krumpl, O; Zahálka, M; Dvorák, J; Fucík, M

    2009-02-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY To present the results of surgical repair of ruptures of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii muscle and thus show the adequacy of this treatment. MATERIAL Between 1987 and 2006, 19 patients had surgery for distal biceps tendon rupture. Only one side was affected in each patient. All patients were men between 28 and 69 years (average age, 47.5 years) at the time of injury (surgery). When the patients were evaluated at the end of 2007, 18 patients were included, because one died a year after surgery. METHODS The surgical repair always included a single-incision anatomical reattachment into the radial tuberosity. In 11 patients, a modified Mac Reynolds method with screw and washer fixation was used; in seven patients the insertion was fixed with Mitek anchors and, in one, it was sutured to the adjacent soft tissues. The average follow-up was 7 years (range, 1 to 20.5 years). The patients were evaluated for the cause of injury, their physical activity, age, dominance of the injured arm, surgical procedure and complications. RESULTS In 18 patients surgical repair was done early and, in one, at 16 days after injury. In all of them the tendon was detached from its site of insertion, but never torn. The intra-operative complications included, in one patient, bleeding owing to iatrogenic damage to a branch of the brachial artery, and difficult separation of the tendon due to its previous healed injury in another patient. Early post-operative complications included superficial skin necrosis in one patient and transient neurological deficit of the dorsal brand of the radial nerve and of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm in two and one patient, respectively. The late complications were heterotropic ossification in three patients and screw migration in the one treated by the Mac Reynolds method. Excellent results were recorded in 11 patients (61 %), and good outcomes with a slight restriction of motion or muscle strength not limiting the

  2. Functional outcome and quality of life after traumatic total brachial plexus injury treated by nerve transfer or single/double free muscle transfers: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satbhai, N G; Doi, K; Hattori, Y; Sakamoto, S

    2016-02-01

    Between 2002 and 2011, 81 patients with a traumatic total brachial plexus injury underwent reconstruction by double free muscle transfer (DFMT, 47 cases), single muscle transfer (SMT, 16 cases) or nerve transfers (NT, 18 cases). They were evaluated for functional outcome and quality of life (QoL) using the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, both pre- and post-operatively. The three groups were compared and followed-up for at least 24 months. The mean shoulder abduction and flexion were comparable in all groups, but external rotation was significantly better in the DFMT group as were range and quantitative power of elbow flexion. Patients who had undergone DFMT had reasonable total active finger movement and hook grip strength. All groups showed improvement in function at a level greater than a minimum clinically important difference. The DFMT group showed the greatest improvement. Patients in the DFMT group had a better functional outcome and QoL recovery than those in the NT and SMT groups. Double free muscle transfer procedure is capable of restoring maximum function in patients of total brachial plexus palsy. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. "Popeye muscle" morphology in OBPI elbow flexion contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Maizlin, Zeev V; DeMatteo, Carol; Gjertsen, Deborah; Bain, James R

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of elbow flexion contracture (EFC) in obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) is not established. In basic science models, neonatal denervation leads to impaired muscle growth. In clinical studies, diminished growth is correlated with extent of denervation, and improved with surgical repair. In EFC, the biceps are clinically short and round vs the contralateral size, termed the "Popeye muscle". The objective of this study was to determine if the biceps morphology (muscle belly and tendon length) in arms with EFC secondary to OBPI is different vs the contralateral. This is a retrospective matched-cohort study. Patients with unilateral EFC (>20°) secondary to OBPI were identified (median = 6.6 years, range = 4.7-16.8). A blinded radiologist used computed tomography to measure length of the biceps short head muscle belly, and tendon bilaterally using standardised anatomical landmarks. Twelve patients were analyzed. The biceps muscle belly in the injured arm was shorter in all patients vs contralateral, mean difference = 3.6 cm (80%), p muscle belly and overall length, but longer tendon vs normal. This is termed the "Popeye muscle" for its irregular morphology. Findings are consistent with impaired limb growth in denervation.

  4. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

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    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years. Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. Results The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Conclusion Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  5. The Effects of Positive and Negative Feedback on Maximal Voluntary Contraction Level of the Biceps Brachii Muscle: Moderating Roles of Gender and Conscientiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıkabak, Murat; Yaman, Çetin; Tok, Serdar; Binboga, Erdal

    2016-11-02

    We investigated the effect of positive and negative feedback on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the biceps brachii muscle and explored the mediating effects of gender and conscientiousness. During elbow flexion, MVCs were measured in positive, negative, and no-feedback conditions. Participants were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups based on the median split of their scores on Tatar's five-factor personality inventory. Considering all participants 46 college student athletes (21 female, 28 male), positive feedback led to a greater MVC percentage change (-5.76%) than did negative feedback (2.2%). MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition differed significantly by gender, but the negative feedback condition did not. Thus, positive feedback increased female athletes' MVC level by 3.49%, but decreased male athletes' MVC level by 15.6%. For conscientiousness, MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition did not differ according to high and low conscientiousness. However, conscientiousness interacted with gender in the positive feedback condition, increasing MVC in high-conscientiousness female athletes and decreasing MVC in low-conscientiousness female athletes. Positive feedback decreased MVC in both high- and low-conscientiousness male athletes.

  6. Improved C3-4 transfer for treatment of root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk Animal experiments and clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zou; Xuecheng Cao; Jing Li; Lifeng Liu; Pingshan Wang; Jinfang Cai

    2012-01-01

    Experimental rats with root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk were treated with the improved C3-4 transfer for neurotization of C5-6. Results showed that Terzis grooming test scores were significantly increased at 6 months after treatment, the latency of C5-6 motor evoked potential was gradually shortened, and the amplitude was gradually increased. The rate of C3 instead of C5 and the C4 + phrenic nerve instead of C6 myelinated nerve fibers crossing through the anastomotic stoma was approximately 80%. Myelinated nerve fibers were arranged loosely but the thickness of the myelin sheath was similar to that of the healthy side. In clinical applications,39 patients with root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk were followed for 6 months to 4.5 years after treatment using the improved C3 instead of C5 nerve root transfer and C4 nerve root and phrenic nerve instead of C6 nerve root transfer. Results showed that the strength of the brachial biceps and deltoid muscles recovered to level III-IV, scapular muscle to level III-IV, latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major muscles to above level III, and the brachial triceps muscle to level 0-III. Results showed that the improved C3-4 transfer for root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk in animal models is similar to clinical findings and that C3-4 and the phrenic nerve transfer for neurotization of C5-6 can innervate the avulsed brachial plexus upper trunk and promote the recovery of nerve function in the upper extremity.

  7. Free Functioning Gracilis Muscle Transfer versus Intercostal Nerve Transfer to Musculocutaneous Nerve for Restoration of Elbow Flexion after Traumatic Adult Brachial Pan-Plexus Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    After complete five-level root brachial plexus injury, free functional muscle transfer and intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve are two potential reconstructive options for elbow flexion. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of free functional muscle transfer versus intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfers with respect to strength. Sixty-two patients who underwent free functional muscle transfer reconstruction or intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion following a pan-plexus injury were included. The two groups were compared with respect to postoperative elbow flexion strength according to the British Medical Research Council grading system; preoperative and postoperative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores. In the free functional muscle transfer group, 67.7 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. In the intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer group, 41.9 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. The difference was statistically significant (p intercostal nerves used for the musculocutaneous nerve transfer did not correlate with better elbow flexion grade. Based on this study, gracilis free functional muscle transfer reconstruction achieves better elbow flexion strength than intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion after pan-plexus injury. The role of gracilis free functional muscle transfer should be carefully considered in acute reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  8. Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    distal tendon . Although these findings overlap with those seen in tendinopathy , the presence of bone marrow edema at the radial tuberosity and fluid in...the bicipitoradial bursa suggests a partial tear rather than tendinopathy .3 When the distal biceps tendon tear is complete, MR imaging shows...Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture Military Medicine Radiology Corner, 2006 Radiology Corner Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture Contributors: CPT Michael

  9. Brachial plexus variation involving the formation and branches of the cords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian-Taylor FM

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This case report is aimed at reporting a rare variation of brachial plexus involving the cords and its branches in the right upper limb. The musculocutaneous nerve was missing. The whole medial cord continued as a medial root of median nerve. The lateral cord gave off the lateral root of median nerve and an additional root joined with posterior cord to form a short common trunk. The short common trunk divided into two roots: one joined the median nerve; and the second one continued down as ulnar nerve. Median nerve supplied biceps brachii and brachialis muscles. The coracobrachialis muscle was supplied by radial nerve. The cutaneous innervation to the upper limb was derived from radial and ulnar nerves.

  10. ADDITIONAL TENDINOUS INSERTION OF BICEPS BRACHII: A CASE REPORT

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    Daimi S.R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the variable presentations of biceps brachii, a proper understanding of the anatomy of the muscle, and possible anatomical variants is a pre-requisite in managing distal biceps injury. We present the case of a 65 years old male cadaver showing variationin the insertion pattern of biceps brachii muscle unilaterally on the left arm. Although the origin of the muscle was normal, its insertion was by two separate tendons; a common and an accessory; both inserting on diverse regions of the radial tuberosity. The common tendon was formed by the tendons from short head and long head. The accessory tendon was the extension of the fleshy belly on the lateral side of the main muscle (Accessory Muscle Belly towards its lower third. Knowledge of the accessory tendon of the biceps iscrucial while performing tendon reconstruction and repair and it may also lead to unusual displacement of the bone fragment, subsequent to fracture.

  11. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii on the tendon of the subscapularis muscle

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    Marcelo Baggio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results from arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii (LHBB on the tendon of the subscapularis muscle, with regard to the presence of pain, subscapularis lesion, presence of Popeye's sign and patient satisfaction. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted on 32 patients with LHBB lesions, through preoperative interviews and physical examinations, which were repeated six months after the operation. The main variables studied were the belly press, bear hug and lift-off tests, Popeye's sign, anterior pain and satisfaction. The data were entered into Epi Info 3.5.4 and SPSS 18.0. In order to investigate the variables of interest, the chi-square, Student t and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used. The confidence interval was 95% and p values less than 0.05 were taken to be statistically significant. RESULTS: 32 patients of median age 57.5 years were evaluated. Anterior pain was reported by one interviewee after the operation. The tests for evaluating subscapularis lesions did not show any damage to this musculature after the surgery. Popeye's sign was negative in all the patients. The patient satisfaction rate reached 90.6% of the interviewees. CONCLUSION: This study showed that the new surgical technique described here presented excellent performance, without any subscapularis lesion and without identifying Popeye's sign. Only 3.1% of the patients had complaints of residual pain. The high level of satisfaction among the patients after the surgery confirms the results presented.

  12. Effects of Pre-Exhausting the Biceps Brachii Muscle on the Performance of the Front Lat Pull-Down Exercise Using Different Handgrip Positions

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    Vilaça-Alves José

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of pre-exhaustion (PE of the biceps brachii muscle (BB on the number of repetitions and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE in the front lat pull-down (FLPD using different handgrip positions. Additionally, the effect of sex and its interaction with performance and the RPE were also examined. The participants were 19 healthy subjects: 8 men (age: 27.13±2.85 years; body height: 180.63±6.65 cm; body mass: 82.05±8.92 kg; and body fat: 14.67±6.09%; and 11 women (age: 28.81±3.68 years; body height: 162.91±6.51 cm; body mass 59.63±6.47 kg; and body fat: 24.11±4.33%. The number of repetitions and the RPE in the FLPD exercise with different handgrip positions, with and without PE of the BB, was documented. The following main significant effects were seen: i PE of the BB decreased the number of repetitions (p<0.001 and increased the RPE (p<0.001; ii the narrow handgrip width elicited a higher RPE (p<0.001 and iii women performed fewer repetitions than men in all FLPD exercise variations (p=0.023. Significant interactions were also observed between: i PE or sex and the RPE (p=0.024; and ii PE or handgrip width and the number of repetitions (p<0.001. In conclusion, PE of the BB promotes a decreased performance in the FLPD exercise along with a greater RPE, especially when using a narrow handgrip position

  13. Functional reconstruction following brachial plexus root avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixin Sun; Cunyi Fan; Yudong Gu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To sum up the treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion and the progress in functional reconstruction and rehabilitation following brachial plexus root avulsion.DATA SOURCES: A search of Medline was performed to select functional reconstruction and rehabilitation following brachial plexus injury-related English articles published between January 1990 and July 2006, with key words of "brachial plexus injury, reconstruction and rehabilitation". Meanwhile, a computer-based search of CBM was carried out to select the similar Chinese articles published between January 1998 and July 2006,with key words of "brachial plexus injury, reconstruction and rehabilitation".STUDY SELECTION: The materials were checked primarily, and the literatures of functional reconstruction and rehabilitation of brachial plexus injury were selected and the full texts were retrieved.Inclusive criteria: ① Functional reconstruction following brachial plexus injury. ② Rehabilitation method of brachial plexus injury. Exclusive criteria: Reviews, repetitive study, and Meta analytical papers.DATA EXTRACTION: Forty-six literatures about functional reconstruction following brachial plexus injury were collected, and 36 of them met the inclusive criteria.DATA SYNTHESIS: Brachial plexus injury causes the complete or incomplete palsy of muscle of upper extremity. The treatment of brachial plexus is to displace not very important nerves to the distal end of very important nerve, called nerve transfer, which is an important method to treat brachial plexus injury.Postoperative rehabilitations consist of sensory training and motor functional training. It is very important to keep the initiativeness of exercise. Besides recovering peripheral nerve continuity by operation, combined treatment and accelerating neural regeneration, active motors of cerebral cortex is also the important factor to reconstruct peripheral nerve function.CONCLUSION: Consciously and actively strengthening functional

  14. Repair of brachial plexus lower trunk injury by transferring brachialis muscle branch of musculocutaneous nerve:anatomic feasibility and clinical trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xian-you; HOU Chun-lin; GU Yu-dong; SHI Qi-lin; GUAN Shi-bing

    2008-01-01

    Background There are few effective methods for treating injuries to the lower trunk of brachial plexus,and the curative effect is usually poor.The purpose of this study was to provide anatomic references for transferring the brachialis muscle branch of musculocutaneous nerve(BMBMCN)for selective neurotization of finger flexion in brachiaI plexus lower trunk injury,and to evaluate its clinical curative effects.Methods Microanatomy and measurement were done on 50 limbs from 25 adult human cadavers to obserye the origin,branch,type of the BMBMCN and median nerve,as well as their adjacent structures.Internal topographic features of the fascicular groups of the median nerve at the level of the BMBMCN were observed.In addition,the technique of BMBMCN transfer for selective neurotization of finger flexion of the median nerve was designed and tested in 6 fresh adult human cadavers.Acetylcholinesterase(AchE)staining of the BMBMCN and median nerve was done to observe the features of the nerve fibers.This technique was clinically tried to restore digital flexion in 6 cases of adult brachial plexus lower trunk injury.These cases were followed up for 3,6,9 and 12 months postoperatively.Recovery of function,grip strength,nerve electrophysiology and muscle power of the affected limbs were observed and measured.Results The brachialis muscle was totally innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve(MCN).Based on the Hunter's line,the Ievel of the origin of the BMBMCN was(13.18±2.77)cm.AchE histochemical staining indicated that the BMBMCN were totally made up of medullated nerve fibers.At the level of the BMBMCN,the median nerve consistently collected into three fascicular groups as shown by microanatomy in combination with AchE stain.The posterior fascicular group was mainly composed of anterior Interosseous nerves and branches to the palmaris longus.The technique was tested in six fresh cadavers successfully,except that stoma split occurred in one case.Five of the six cases recovered

  15. Biceps tendinitis and subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, W C; McCluskey, G M

    2001-07-01

    Since the 17th century, the long head of the biceps tendon as a source of shoulder pain and its functional significance has been a source of debate. Although the term tendinitis is commonly used, overuse tendon injuries infrequently demonstrate inflammatory cells; instead, degenerative changes resulting from the failure of self-repair usually are found. Bicipital tendinitis or bicipital tenosynovitis is most often secondary to impingement beneath the coracoacromical arch. Primary bicipital tendinitis and tendinitis secondary to instability are possible, however. Through a careful history, physical examination, and appropriate imaging studies, the clinician can establish the diagnosis of disorders of the biceps tendon Arthroscopic evaluation greatly improves the diagnosis and treatment of biceps tendon and related shoulder pathology. Although the exact functional role of the biceps tendon remains incompletely defined, a growing body of evidence supports its role as a stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint. This stabilizing function should be incorporated into the treatment of biceps tendon disorders. Routine tenodesis has been replaced by a more individualized approach, taking into consideration physiologic age, activity level, expectations, and exact shoulder pathology present. New repair techniques are under development, and preservation of the biceps-labral complex is now preferred when possible.

  16. MUSCLE ACTIVITY RESPONSE TO EXTERNAL MOMENT DURING SINGLE-LEG DROP LANDING IN YOUNG BASKETBALL PLAYERS: THE IMPORTANCE OF BICEPS FEMORIS IN REDUCING INTERNAL ROTATION OF KNEE DURING LANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meguru Fujii

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Internal tibial rotation with the knee close to full extension combined with valgus collapse during drop landing generally results in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between internal rotation of the knee and muscle activity from internal and external rotator muscles, and between the internal rotation of knee and externally applied loads on the knee during landing in collegiate basketball players. Our hypothesis was that the activity of biceps femoris muscle would be an important factor reducing internal knee rotation during landing. The subjects were 10 collegiate basketball students: 5 females and 5 males. The subjects performed a single-leg drop landing from a 25-cm height. Femoral and tibial kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the knee angular motions were determined. Ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns (lateral hamstring and medial hamstring were simultaneously measured and computed. Results indicated that lower peak internal tibial rotation angle at the time of landing was associated with greater lateral hamstring activity (r = -0.623, p < 0.001. When gender was considered, the statistically significant correlation remained only in females. There was no association between the peak internal tibial rotation angle and the knee internal rotation moment. Control of muscle activity in the lateral to medial hamstring would be an important factor in generating sufficient force to inhibit excessive internal rotation during landing. Strengthening the biceps femoris might mitigate the higher incidence of non-contact ACL injury in female athletes

  17. Different cerebral plasticity of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles after peripheral neurotization in a patient with brachial plexus injury: A TMS and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie; Hua, Xu-Yun; Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Wang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2015-09-14

    Contralateral C7 (CC7) neurotization has been an important approach for brachial plexus injury (BPI). Patients can achieve relatively good grasping function driven by the proximal extrinsic hand muscle (flexor digitorum, FD) after CC7 neurotization, whereas the thumb opposition function driven by the distal intrinsic muscle (abductor pollicis brevis, APB) is poor. The present study aimed to investigate the brain reorganization patterns of the recovery processes of intrinsic and extrinsic hand functions after repairing the median nerve by CC7 neurotization. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used to evaluate the cerebral plasticity in one BPI patient after CC7 neurotization. After the CC7 neurotization, the patient showed improvements in the paralyzed hand. Combination of TMS and fMRI investigations demonstrated different cortical reshaping patterns of APB and FD. It was also found that the activated cortical areas of FD were located in bilateral motor cortices, but the area of APB was only located in ipsilateral motor cortex. The cerebral plasticity procedure appeared to be different in the gross and fine motor function recovery processes. It provided a new perspective into the cerebral plasticity induced by CC7 neurotization. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  19. Brachial plexopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or fingers Diminished arm reflexes Wasting of the muscles Weakness of hand flexing A detailed history may help determine the ... check the muscles and nerves that control the muscles MRI of the ... a piece of nerve under the microscope (rarely needed) Ultrasound

  20. Electrophysiological characteristics of motor units and muscle fibers in trained and untrained young male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duez, Lene; Qerama, Erisela; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that the amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and interference pattern analysis (IPA) would be larger in trained subjects compared with untrained subjects, possibly due to hypertrophy of muscle fibers and/or increased central drive. Moreover, we hypothesized...... and untrained subjects in IPA power spectrum and turns per second or amplitude of the CMAPs obtained by DMS. Muscle fiber hypertrophy and/or altered central drive may account for our results, but there was no indication of changes in muscle fiber excitability. Muscle Nerve, 2010....... that the untrained muscle is less excitable compared with the trained muscle. An electromyographic (EMG) needle electrode was used to record the IPA at maximal voluntary effort. The CMAP was obtained by stimulating the musculocutaneous nerve and recording the brachial biceps muscle using surface electrodes. CMAPs...

  1. Evaluation of elbow flexion following free muscle transfer from the medial gastrocnemius or transfer from the latissimus dorsi, in cases of traumatic injury of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Barra de Moraes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the gain in elbow flexion in patients with traumatic injury of the brachial plexus following muscle transfer from latissimus dorsi with the gain following free muscle transfer from the medial belly of the gastrocnemius. METHODS: This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 13 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Group 1 comprised seven patients who underwent transfers from the gastrocnemius and group 2 (controls comprised six patients who underwent transfers from the latissimus dorsi. The following functions were evaluated: (1 range of motion (ROM of elbow flexion, in degrees, using manual goniometry and (2 grade of elbow flexion strength, using a muscle strength scale. Satisfactory results were defined as: (1 elbow flexion ROM ≥ 80° and (2 elbow flexion strength ≥ M3. The Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 32 years (range: 17-56 and 72% had been involved in motorcycle accidents. Elbow flexion strength ≥ M3 was observed in seven patients (100% in group 1 and in five patients (83.3% in group 2 (p = 0.462. None of the patients presented M5, and one patient (16.7% in group 2 had a poor result (M2. Elbow flexion ROM with a gain ≥ 80° (daily functions was found in six patients (86% in group 1 and in three patients (50% in group 2 ( p = 0.1. CONCLUSION: The patients in group 1 had greater gains in strength and ROM than did those in group 2, but without statistical significance. Thus, transfers from the gastrocnemius become a new surgical option, if other techniques cannot be used.

  2. Distal biceps tendon injuries: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M L

    1999-01-01

    Rupture of the distal biceps tendon occurs most commonly in the dominant extremity of men between 40 and 60 years of age when an unexpected extension force is applied to the flexed arm. Although previously thought to be an uncommon injury, distal biceps tendon ruptures are being reported with increasing frequency. The rupture typically occurs at the tendon insertion into the radial tuberosity in an area of preexisting tendon degeneration. The diagnosis is made on the basis of a history of a painful, tearing sensation in the antecubital region. Physical examination demonstrates a palpable and visible deformity of the distal biceps muscle belly with weakness in flexion and supination. The ability to palpate the tendon in the antecubital fossa may indicate partial tearing of the biceps tendon. Plain radiographs may show hypertrophic bone formation at the radial tuberosity. Magnetic resonance imaging is generally not required to diagnose a complete rupture but may be useful in the case of a partial rupture. Early surgical reattachment to the radial tuberosity is recommended for optimal results. A modified two-incision technique is the most widely used method of repair, but anterior single-incision techniques may be equally effective provided the radial nerve is protected. The patient with a chronic rupture may benefit from surgical reattachment, but proximal retraction and scarring of the muscle belly can make tendon mobilization difficult, and inadequate length of the distal biceps tendon may necessitate tendon augmentation. Postoperative rehabilitation must emphasize protected return of motion for the first 8 weeks after repair. Formal strengthening may begin as early as 8 weeks, with a return to unrestricted activities, including lifting, by 5 months.

  3. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  4. [A case of subacute necrotizing lymphadenitis complicated with brachial plexus neuritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, A; Araki, E; Arakawa, K; Kikuchi, H; Iwaki, T; Yamada, T; Kira, J

    1998-01-01

    A 22-year-old female noted a low grade fever and swelling of the cervical lymph nodes in May 1997, and later developed a dry cough. She was diagnosed to have interstitial pneumonitis, and then administration of corticosteroids alleviated her symptoms. On February 6, 1998, however, a high fever recurred and her swollen cervical lymph node on the right side was biopsied on February 9, 1998. A histological examination revealed an increased number of histiocytes and karyorrhexis of the lymphocytes in the paracortical areas, and she was therefore diagnosed to have histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis. She could not fully elevate her arm on February 16, 1998. On admission, her cervical lymph node was swollen on the left side. A neurological examination revealed a marked weakness of the right deltoid muscle, moderate weakness of the right latissimus dorsi, triceps and brachioradialis muscles and also a mild weakness of the serratus anterior, supra- and infra-spinatus, and biceps brachii muscles. The muscle power of the other muscles were normal and no muscle atrophy was evident. Winging of the right scapula was observed. The deep tendon reflexes were normal in all four limbs, and her sensation was also normal. No cerebellar sign was found. The Jackson, Spurling, Allen, Morley and Adson tests were all negative. ESR was mildly elevated to 18 mm/hr, but CRP was negative. RF, ANA and anti-SS-A and SS-B antibodies were positive, whereas LE-test, direct and indirect Coombs tests and other autoantibodies were negative. Needle EMG disclosed fasciculation potentials in the right triceps muscle and polyphasic waves in the right deltoid muscle. MRI showed gadolinium-enhancement of the right brachial plexus. Although an abnormal accumulation of gallium was detected in the right parotid and bilateral submandibular glands, no sicca symptoms were found and the Schirmer test findings were normal. Oral prednisolone (50 mg/day with gradual tapering) alleviated both her symptoms and the

  5. Utility of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin type A for muscle imbalance in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy: Description of the procedure and action protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ron, A; Gallardo, R; Huete Hernani, B

    2017-03-24

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) usually has a favourable prognosis. However, nearly one third of all severe cases have permanent sequelae causing a high level of disability. In this study, we explore the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) and describe the procedure. We designed a prospective, descriptive study including patients with moderate to severe OBPP who were treated between January 2010 and December 2014. We gathered demographic data, type of OBPP, and progression. Treatment effectiveness was assessed with the Active Movement Scale (AMS), the Mallet classification, and video recordings. We gathered a total of 14 133 newborns, 15 of whom had OBPP (1.6 per 1000 live births). Forty percent of the cases had severe OBPP (0.4/1000), a dystocic delivery, and APGAR scores < 5; mean weight was 4038g. Mean age at treatment onset was 11.5 months. The muscles most frequently receiving BoNT-A injections were the pronator teres, subscapularis, teres major, latissimus dorsi, and pectoralis major. All the patients who completed the follow-up period (83%) experienced progressive improvements: up to 3 points on the AMS and a mean score of 19.5 points out of 25 on the Mallet classification at 2 years. Treatment improved muscle function and abnormal posture in all cases. Surgery was avoided in 3 patients and delayed in one. Adverse events were mild and self-limited. Due to its safety and effectiveness, BoNT-A may be used off-label as an adjuvant to physical therapy and/or surgery in moderate to severe OBPP. Ultrasound may increase effectiveness and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can happen because of shoulder trauma, tumors, or ... the nerves stretch or tear. Some brachial plexus injuries may heal without treatment. Many children who are ...

  7. Studies on conversion of motor function in intercostal nerves crossing for complete brachial plexus injuries of root avulsion type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M

    1983-11-01

    The progress of the functional conversion in cases where the 3rd and 4th intercostal nerves were crossed to the musculocutaneous nerve to regain elbow flexion after a total avulsion type of brachial plexus injury was followed up by means of the electromyogram, goniogram and spirogram in 25 patients. The joint position sense was further studied. It was found that in the early stage of reinnervation, spontaneous activity which synchronized with respiration was found in the biceps brachii muscles, but this involuntary element disappeared gradually and followed this the volitional control and endurance improved and became quite satisfactory within several years. It was observed that skin sensation played an important role in judging joint position.

  8. Biceps tendinitis caused by an osteochondroma in the bicipital groove: a rare cause of shoulder pain in a baseball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onga, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Akisue, Toshihiro; Marui, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is commonly seen in athletes who do repetitive overhead motions. Common causes of biceps tendinitis include impingement syndrome, subluxation of the biceps tendon, and attrition tendinitis, whereas biceps tendinitis secondary to a bone neoplasm is rare. A case of biceps tendinitis caused by an osteochondroma arising in the left humeral bicipital groove in a 25-year-old male baseball player is reported. The tumor was hook-shaped, originated from the inferomedial portion of the humeral lesser tubercle, and surrounded the biceps tendon. Symptoms of increasing pain and inability to throw resulted from direct irritation of the biceps tendon by the tumor. Total excision of the tumor relieved the symptoms within 3 weeks. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases in the English-language literature of biceps tendinitis caused by an osteochondroma.

  9. [Systematization of the musculo-tendinous architecture of the human biceps (musculus biceps brachii)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farisse, J; Guidon, P; Seriat-Gautier, B; Brunet, C; Gambarelli, J

    1984-09-01

    The structure of the brachial biceps is studied based upon the bilateral dissections of six subjects. The object of this work consists of determining the distribution of the group and muscular fibers in relation to the two proximal insertions and the two distal insertions. It is possible to describe the subgroups within each structure. The objective of each of these subgroups is considered within the framework of the coordination between the two muscular formation and the double insertions on the structure of the forearm. It is probable that this muscular formation corresponds to two different movements of the forearm during the locomotory progression. This work can be utilised in the sphere of the comparative biomechanical observation. Also electromyographic and the histochemical characteristics of the muscular group.

  10. Botulinum toxin for treatment of cocontractions related to obstetrical brachial plexopathy Toxina botulínica para tratamento das co-contrações relacionadas à plexopatia braquial obstétrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A was recently introduced for treatment of biceps - triceps muscle cocontraction, which compromises elbow function in children with obstetrical brachial plexopathy. This is our preliminary experience with this new approach. Eight children were treated with 2 - 3 U/kg of botulinum toxin injected in the triceps (4 patients and biceps (4 patients muscle, divided in 2 or 3 sites. All patients submitted to triceps injections showed a long-lasting improvement of active elbow flexion and none required new injections, after a follow-up of 3 to 18 months. Three of the patients submitted to biceps injections showed some improvement of elbow extension, but none developed anti-gravitational strength for elbow extension and the effect lasted only three to five months. One patient showed no response to triceps injections. Our data suggest that botulinum toxin can be useful in some children that have persistent disability secondary to obstetrical brachial plexopathy.A toxina botulínica do tipo A foi introduzida recentemente para o tratamento das co-contrações entre os músculos biceps e triceps, que comprometem a função do cotovelo nas crianças com plexopatia braquial obstétrica. Apresentamos nossa experiência preliminar com esta abordagem. Oito crianças foram tratadas com 2 - 3 U/kg de toxina botulínica injetada nos músculos triceps (4 pacientes e biceps (4 pacientes, divididas em 2 ou 3 sítios. Todos os pacientes submetidos a injeções no triceps apresentaram melhora persistente da flexão do cotovelo e nenhum precisou de novas aplicações após seguimento de 3 a 18 meses. Três pacientes submetidos a aplicações no biceps apresentaram melhora na extensão do cotovelo, mas nenhum adquiriu força antigravitacional e o efeito durou apenas 3 a 5 meses. Um paciente não respondeu às injeções. Nossos dados sugerem que a toxina botulínica pode ser útil no tratamento de algumas crianças com seqüelas de plexopatia braquial

  11. A third head of the biceps brachii and coexisting fused higher origin of brachioradialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fating AS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The biceps brachii is a large fusiform muscle in the flexor compartment of the arm. Brachioradialis is the most superficial muscle of the forearm. It has been reported that in 10% cases the third head of biceps brachii may arise from the supero-medial part of the brachialis and is attached to the bicipital apponeurosis. The presence of the third head is important for academic and clinical purpose. During routine dissection of a middle aged male cadaver at the Dr. PSIMS & RF, Gannavaram (INDIA; third head of biceps brachii and fused higher origin of brachioradialis were found in the left upper limb. The third head of biceps brachii arose from superomedial part of brachialis. Brachioradialis had higher additional origin beside its usual origin from proximal 2/3 of the lateral supracondylar crest of humerus. A variation in the heads of the biceps brachii muscle has already been reported to cause compression of surrounding neurovascular structures.

  12. Proximal Biceps Tenodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovack, Thomas J.; Idoine, John D.; Jacob, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To (1) better define the anatomy of the proximal shoulder in relation to the long head of the biceps tendon, (2) compare the length-tension relationship of the biceps tendon in the native shoulder with that after arthroscopic and open tenodesis techniques using interference screws, and (3) provide surgical recommendations for both procedures based on study findings. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twenty fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were dissected for analysis. Initial anatomic measurements involving the proximal long head of the biceps tendon (BT) were made, which included: the labral origin to the superior bicipital groove (LO-SBG), the total tendon length (TTL), the musculotendinous junction (MTJ) to the inferior pectoralis major tendon border, the MTJ to the superior pectoralis major tendon border, and the biceps tendon diameter (BTD) at 2 different tenodesis locations. These same measurements were made again after completing a simulated suprapectoral arthroscopic and open subpectoral tenodesis, both with interference screw fixation. Statistical comparisons were then made between the native anatomy and that after tenodesis, with the goal of assessing the accuracy of re-establishing the normal length-tension relationship of the long head of the BT after simulated arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral tenodesis with tenodesis screws. Results: For all cadavers, the mean TTL was 104.1 mm. For the arthroscopic suprapectoral technique, the mean LO-SBG was 33.6 mm, and the mean tendon resection length was 12.8 mm in males and 5.0 mm in females. The mean BTD was 6.35 mm at the arthroscopic suprapectoral tenodesis site and 5.75 mm at the open subpectoral tenodesis site. Males were found to have statistically longer TTL and LO-SBG measurements (111.6 vs 96.5 mm [P = .027] and 37.2 vs 30.0 mm [P = .009], respectively). In the native shoulder, the mean distances from the MTJ to the superior and inferior borders of the pectoralis

  13. The anatomy of the short head of biceps - not a tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crichton James

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The short head of biceps brachii has been the subject of little investigation when compared to the long head or distal biceps tendons. The aim of this study was to dissect and describe the origin and proximal portion of the short head of biceps brachii. Materials and Methods: Three left and two right (n = 5 fresh-frozen human cadaver shoulders were dissected and the proximal short head was measured and photographed. Results: The origin of the short head of biceps consisted of muscle fibres attaching directly to the tip of the coracoid process, with a thin, tendinous aponeurosis covering its anterior surface, rather than a true tendon as previously described. Conclusion: The short head of biceps does not attach to the coracoid process via a true tendon. These findings have implications for procedures that utilise the short head of biceps. Level of Evidence: Basic science study.

  14. Ultrasound demonstration of distal biceps tendon bifurcation: normal and abnormal findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Capaccio, Enrico; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Martinoli, Carlo [Universita di Genova, Cattedra di Radiologia ' ' R' ' - DICMI, Genoa (Italy); Michaud, Johan [University of Montreal, Department of Physiatry, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    We demonstrate the US appearance of the distal biceps tendon bifurcation in normal cadavers and volunteers and in those affected by various disease processes. Three cadaveric specimens, 30 normal volunteers, and 75 patients were evaluated by means of US. Correlative MR imaging was obtained in normal volunteers and patients. In all cases US demonstrated the distal biceps tendon shaped by two separate tendons belonging to the short and long head of the biceps brachii muscle. Four patients had a complete rupture of the distal insertion of the biceps with retraction of the muscle belly. Four patients had partial tear of the distal biceps tendon with different US appearance. In two patients the partial tear involved the short head of the biceps brachii tendon, while in the other two patients, the long head was involved. Correlative MR imaging is also presented both in normal volunteers and patients. US changed the therapeutic management in the patients with partial tears involving the LH of the biceps. This is the first report in which ultrasound considers the distal biceps tendon bifurcation in detail. Isolated tears of one of these components can be identified by US. Knowledge of the distal biceps tendon bifurcation ultrasonographic anatomy and pathology has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  15. 游离股薄肌移植在臂丛损伤治疗中的临床应用%The Clinical Application of Free Gracilis Muscle Transplantation in Treatment of the Brachial Plexus Avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林晓岗; 顾立强

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨游离股薄肌移植在臂丛损伤治疗中的疗效.方法:对47例臂丛根性损伤患者行71次吻合血管、神经的游离股薄肌移植重建上肢主要功能,术后随访观察功能恢复情况.结果:随访32例患者,26例恢复屈肘、伸指、伸拇功能,肌力M3-M4级;18例恢复屈指、屈拇功能,肌力M3-M4级;2例恢复伸肘功能,肌力M3级;4例屈指、屈拇肌力M1级.结论:吻合血管、神经的游离股薄肌移植是治疗臂丛神经根性损伤的有效手术方法.%Objective: To discuss the efficacy of the free gracilis muscle transplantation after brachial plexus injury. Method: 71 free gracilis muscles have been transplanted to reconstruct the main function of upper limb in 47 patients with root avulsion of brachial plexus, after surgery they were followed up to observe the functional recovery. Result: Follow-up were earned out in 32 patients, 26 patients the flexion of elbow and extension of fingers and thumb were restored, Their muscle power were M3 -M4 , 20 of them restored the function of finger and thumb flexion, with muscle power of M3 -M4 , 2 of them restored the function of the elbow extension, with muscle power of M3, the strength of finger and thumb flexion was Mj in the other 4 ca-ses. Conclusion: Free gracilis muscle transplantation with vaseularization and ncurotization is an effective method for treatment of complete root avulsion of brachial plexus.

  16. Complex anatomic variation in the brachial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupis, Th; Michalinos, A; Protogerou, V; Mazarakis, A; Skandalakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Authors describe a case of a complex anatomic variation discovered during dissection of the humeral region. On the right side, brachial artery followed a superficial course. Musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce coracobrachialis muscle but instead passed below the muscle before continuing in the forearm. On the left side, a communication between musculocutaneous and median nerve was dissected. Those variations are analytically presented with a brief review on their anatomic and clinical implications. Considerations on their embryological origin are attempted.

  17. Biceps Femoris Aponeurosis Size: A Potential Risk Factor for Strain Injury?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    EVANGELIDIS, PAVLOS E; MASSEY, GARRY J; PAIN, MATTHEW T G; FOLLAND, JONATHAN P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSEA disproportionately small biceps femoris long head (BFlh) proximal aponeurosis has been suggested as a risk factor for hamstring strain injury by concentrating mechanical strain on the surrounding muscle tissue...

  18. Long head of biceps: from anatomy to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, M

    2015-01-01

    The long head of the biceps (LHB), tendinous structure of the proximal brachial biceps, has its well-known anatomy, which contrasts with its current functional characterization. Various forms of proximal anchor and intra-articular route, important for the correct interpretation of its contribution to the pathology of the shoulder as well as the treatment methodology, are described. Knowledge of its biomechanics results mainly from cadaveric studies that contradict each other. Already the few studies in vivo indicate a depressant and stabilizing action, anterior, for the humeral head. Its pathology is rarely isolated because it is almost always correlated with rotator cuff or labrum pathology. It can be divided into 3 major groups (inflammatory, instability and traumatic) and subdivided according to its location. The anterior shoulder pain is the initial symptom of pathology of LHB Its perfect characterization is dependent on the associated injuries. Clinical tests are multiple and only their combination allows better sensitivity and specificity for LHB pathology. The arthro-MRI and dynamic ultrasound are able to increase proper diagnostic of the pathology of LHB. Treatment ranges from conservative and surgical. The latter includes the repair, tenotomy and tenodesis of LHB which can be performed by open or arthroscopic methodology. The author intends to review existing literature on all aspects related to the long head of the biceps from anatomy to treatment, presenting the latest results.

  19. Reduced short-interval intracortical inhibition after eccentric muscle damage in human elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Bradley M; Semmler, John G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the effect of eccentric exercise on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) after damage to elbow flexor muscles. Nine young (22.5 ± 0.6 yr; mean ± SD) male subjects performed maximal eccentric exercise of the elbow flexor muscles until maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force was reduced by ∼40%. TMS was performed before, 2 h after, and 2 days after exercise under Rest and Active (5% MVC) conditions with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded from the biceps brachii (BB) muscle. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the brachial plexus was used to assess maximal M-waves, and paired-pulse TMS with a 3-ms interstimulus interval was used to assess changes in SICI at each time point. The eccentric exercise resulted in a 34% decline in strength (P muscle strength (27%, P muscle soreness (P muscle damage. When the test MEP amplitudes were matched between sessions, we found that SICI was reduced by 27% in resting and 23% in active BB muscle 2 h after exercise. SICI recovered 2 days after exercise when muscle pain and soreness were present, suggesting that delayed onset muscle soreness from eccentric exercise does not influence SICI. The change in SICI observed 2 h after exercise suggests that eccentric muscle damage has widespread effects throughout the motor system that likely includes changes in motor cortex.

  20. Hanging the beef carcass by the forequarter to improve tenderness of the Longissimus dorsi and Biceps femoris muscles Suspensão da carcaça pelo dianteiro para melhorar a maciez dos músculos Longissimus dorsi e Biceps femoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Luchiari Filho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Hanging beef carcasses in different configurations in the cooler affect some carcass muscle tenderness. Forty Nellore steer carcasses (ten per day were chosen at random in a federally inspected slaughter plant and hanged alternate left and right sides either in the traditional way by the hindquarter (HQ or by the forequarter (FQ also called "tenderbife". Carcasses were selected from steers up to 30 months old and had an average hot carcass weight of 244.1 kg. These carcasses were chilled for 48 hours, when samples from the Longissimus dorsi (LD at the 12th rib and the Biceps femoris (BF at the P8 site were removed, kept under refrigeration (0-2ºC for five days and frozen for future analysis. The temperature of the LD after 24 hours taken at the 12th rib was not different for HQ (1.0ºC and FQ (0.9ºC. Fat thickness measured at the 12th rib was lower (P A suspensão da carcaça em diferentes formas na câmara fria influencia a maciez de alguns músculos da carcaça. As carcaças de 40 novilhos Nelore (dez por dia com no máximo 30 meses de idade foram selecionadas ao acaso em frigorífico (SIF 2543 e lados alternados de suas carcaças foram resfriados e pendurados pelo Tendão de Aquiles do traseiro especial (TA ou pelo músculo carpo radial dianteiro (DA, também chamado "tenderbife". Todas as carcaças eram de classificação B no Sistema Brasileiro de Tipificação de Carcaças, com média de peso de carcaça quente de 244,1 kg. O pH 24 horas não diferiu para os tratamentos, (TA = 5,69 e DA = 5,70. As carcaças foram resfriadas por 48 horas e a seguir, amostras do Longissimus dorsi (LD na altura da 12ª costela e Biceps femoris (BF na altura do sítio P8 foram removidas, mantidas sob refrigeração (0-2ºC por mais 5 dias e a seguir congeladas para posterior análises. A espessura de gordura medida na altura da 12ª costela foi menor (P < 0,05 para TA (3,8 mm do que DA (4,3 mm. A força de cisalhamento do músculo LD foi menor (P < 0,01 para

  1. Nerve transfer for treatment of brachial plexus injury: comparison study between the transfer of partial median and ulnar nerves and that of phrenic and spinal accessary nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯之启; 徐中和

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of using partial median and ulnar nerves for treatment of C5-6 or C5-7 avulsion of the brachial plexus with that of using phrenic and spinal accessary nerves.Methods: The patients were divided into 2 groups randomly according to different surgical procedures. Twelve cases were involved in the first group. The phrenic nerve was transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve or through a sural nerve graft, and the spinal accessary nerve was to the suprascapular nerve. Eleven cases were classified into the second group. A part of the fascicles of median nerve was transferred to be coapted with the motor fascicle of musculocutaneous nerve and a part of fascicles of ulnar nerve was transferred to the axillary nerve. The cases were followed up from 1 to 3 years and the clinical outcome was compared between the two groups. Results: There were 2 cases (16.6%) who got the recovery of M4 strength of biceps muscle in the first group but 7 cases (63.6%) in the second group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.025). However, it was not statistically different in the recovery of shoulder function between the two groups. Conclusions: Partial median and ulnar nerve transfer, phrenic and spinal accessary nerve transfer were all effective for the reconstruction of elbow or shoulder function in brachial plexus injury, but the neurotization using a part of median nerve could obtain more powerful biceps muscle strength than that of phrenic nerve transfer procedure.

  2. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) National Rehabilitation Information ... is a network of nerves that conducts signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to ...

  3. Myokymia in obstetrically related brachial plexopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclar, Gary; Maniker, Allen; Danto, Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Myokymic discharges are spontaneous bursts of semirhythmic potentials that are sometimes correlated with rippling movements of skin and muscle. They have been reported in limb muscles in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, spinal stenosis, nerve root and nerve compression, and envenomations. They commonly occur with radiation induced plexopathies (approximately 60% of patients), but have not been reported in obstetrically related brachial plexopathies. We report 2 instances of myokymia in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsies. Each child was studied twice, and it was only at the later study, when the child was 10 or 11 months of age, that these potentials were noted. This could represent ongoing recovery from lesions incurred at birth or developmental changes. The final common pathway of all causes of myokymia could be to generate axonal membrane hyperexcitability.

  4. A influência da mobilização articular nas tendinopatias dos músculos bíceps braquial e supra-espinal The influence of joint mobilization on tendinopathy of the biceps brachii and supraspinatus muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RI Barbosa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available As causas mais comuns de dor no ombro estão relacionadas às degenerações dos tendões da musculatura do manguito rotador. OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência da mobilização articular por meio dos movimentos acessórios do ombro na recuperação inicial de 14 pacientes com tendinopatia crônica dos mm. supra-espinal e/ou bíceps braquial. MÉTODOS: Foram comparados dois protocolos de tratamento, compostos da aplicação de ultra-som terapêutico na área do tendão afetado e de treinamento excêntrico na musculatura envolvida, acompanhados ou não de manobras de mobilização articular. Como métodos de avaliação foram utilizados os questionários de Constant e Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH, no início e ao final do tratamento. RESULTADOS: Os resultados encontrados demonstraram que ambos os protocolos de tratamento foram eficazes na reabilitação dos pacientes, pois se obtiveram melhores resultados funcionais na aplicação dos questionários quando comparados o final com o início do tratamento para os pacientes (pThe most common causes of shoulder pain are related to degeneration of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of joint mobilization by means of accessory movements of the shoulder during the early rehabilitation of 14 patients with chronic tendinopathy of the supraspinatus and/or biceps brachii muscles. METHODS: Two treatment protocols were compared: application of therapeutic ultrasound over the affected tendon area and eccentric training of the musculature involved, with or without joint mobilization maneuvers. The Constant and DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaires were used as the assessment method, before and after the treatment. RESULTS: The results showed that both treatment protocols were effective for patient rehabilitation, since better functional results were obtained at the end of the treatment, in comparison with the beginning (p<0

  5. The effects of aging on biceps brachii muscle fibers: a morphometrical study from biopsies and autopsies Efeitos do envelhecimento sobre as fibras do músculo biceps braquial: estudo morfométrico em biópsias e autópsias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Mattiello-Sverzut

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In order to study the morphology and size of muscle fibers, cross sections of biceps brachii samples from autopsies, up to 9 hours after death, and biopsies of 72 subjects were compared. The subjects aged 13 to 84 years in both sexes. METHODS: The samples obtained from autopsies (n=47 were from subjects with sudden death, or who died after acute disease without evidence of neuromuscular involvement. The biopsies (n=25 were from patients with symptoms suggestive of inflammatory or metabolic myopathy, not confirmed morphologically. The lesser diameter of muscle fibers was measured using the ATPase reaction. RESULTS: Morphological analysis showed that aging changes were present from the sixth decade in autopsies, and consisted of atrophy and/or type-grouping. The statistical models adjusted for females in both autopsies and biopsies were linear straight with no variation in fiber size with increasing age. The models adjusted for males in both groups were quadratic, indicating that age influenced the size of different type fibers. In males type 2 were larger than type 1 fibers, and than fibers in females. CONCLUSIONS: These values might be useful as controls, helping interpretation of changes in fiber size in samples obtained from biopsies and autopsies.OBJETIVOS: Para estudar a morfologia e o tamanho das fibras musculares, foram comparadas cortes transversos do bíceps braquial autopsiados, até 9 horas após o óbito, com biopsias musculares, em 72 indivíduos de ambos os sexos e idades entre 13 e 84 anos. MÉTODO: As amostras das autópsias (n=47 foram obtidas de indivíduos que morreram subitamente, ou após uma doença aguda sem evidência de comprometimento neuromuscular. As biópsias (n=25 foram obtidas de pacientes com sintomas sugestivos de miopatias inflamatória ou metabólica, não confirmadas morfologicamente. O diâmetro menor das fibras foi obtido usando a reação de ATPase. RESULTADOS: A análise morfológica mostrou que

  6. Augmentation of partially regenerated nerves by end-to-side side-to-side grafting neurotization: experience based on eight late obstetric brachial plexus cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moharram Ashraf N

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The effect of end-to-side neurotization of partially regenerated recipient nerves on improving motor power in late obstetric brachial plexus lesions, so-called nerve augmentation, was investigated. Methods Eight cases aged 3 – 7 years were operated upon and followed up for 4 years (C5,6 rupture C7,8T1 avulsion: 5; C5,6,7,8 rupture T1 avulsion:1; C5,6,8T1 rupture C7 avulsion:1; C5,6,7 ruptureC8 T1 compression: one 3 year presentation after former neurotization at 3 months. Grade 1–3 muscles were neurotized. Grade0 muscles were neurotized, if the electromyogram showed scattered motor unit action potentials on voluntary contraction without interference pattern. Donor nerves included: the phrenic, accessory, descending and ascending loops of the ansa cervicalis, 3rd and 4th intercostals and contralateral C7. Results Superior proximal to distal regeneration was observed firstly. Differential regeneration of muscles supplied by the same nerve was observed secondly (superior supraspinatus to infraspinatus regeneration. Differential regeneration of antagonistic muscles was observed thirdly (superior biceps to triceps and pronator teres to supinator recovery. Differential regeneration of fibres within the same muscle was observed fourthly (superior anterior and middle to posterior deltoid regeneration. Differential regeneration of muscles having different preoperative motor powers was noted fifthly; improvement to Grade 3 or more occurred more in Grade2 than in Grade0 or Grade1 muscles. Improvements of cocontractions and of shoulder, forearm and wrist deformities were noted sixthly. The shoulder, elbow and hand scores improved in 4 cases. Limitations The sample size is small. Controls are necessary to rule out any natural improvement of the lesion. There is intra- and interobserver variability in testing muscle power and cocontractions. Conclusion Nerve augmentation improves cocontractions and muscle power in the biceps, pectoral

  7. [Brachial plexus palsy in adults with radicular lesions, general concepts, diagnostic approach and results ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, C

    2003-12-01

    In post-traumatic brachial plexus lesions in adults, early repair will necessitate a variety of nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures. In complete palsies, a graft is performed from a radicular stump, using intercostal nerve transfers, partial cross C7 transfer, and the distal spinal accessory nerve. This will provide elbow flexion and extension in 75% of cases, and shoulder abduction or rotation in 50% of cases. In the upper type palsies, ulnar-biceps transfer is the standard procedure. Grafting from a ruptured cervical root, when available, is performed to reanimate the shoulder. In C5 C6 and C7 palsies, extension of the wrist and fingers is provided by tendon transfers. In chronic palsies, elbow flexion and extension loss is treated by means of free muscle transfers, (latissimus dorsi or gracilis) combined with nerve transfers (intercostals or spinal accessory). Secondary procedures are routinely necessary following recovery of elbow flexion. For the shoulder-humeral shaft osteotomy or fusion, for the hand-cosmetic fusion of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint in the prone position, or palliative treatment in case of partial recovery. For such weak "plexic hands", we have developed a specific hierarchical functional scale, useful for surgical decisions.

  8. Modified arthroscopic transfer of the long head of the biceps tendon to the conjoint tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yong; CUI Guo-qing; AO Ying-fang; XIAO Jian; YAN Hui; YANG Yu-ping; XIE Xing

    2009-01-01

    @@ The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) pathology has been implicated as a common source of shoulder pain. The patients may be more resistant to conservative treatment than those with isolated subacromial impingement.1 Even though, the surgical options of this disease remain controversial. It has been reported that tenotomy and tenodesis of the biceps tendon were usually utilized. However, persistent pain, deformity, and muscle cramping were frequently observed.1-5

  9. A Rare Anatomical Variation of the Brachial Plexus Characterized by the Absence of the Musculocutaneous Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ebrahimzadeh-Bideskan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowing of anatomical variations is very important during surgery, autopsy and cadaver dissection in the axillary region. In this study, a unilateral variation of the brachial nerve plexus, which is characterized by the absent of the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN, was found in the right arm of a male cadaver. The MCN normally originates from the lateral cord of the brachial nerve plexus and innervates the anterior brachial compartment muscles and lateral coetaneous of the forearm. In this case, the lateral cord of the brachial plexus was joined to the median nerve at the level of coracoid process with no evidence of any nerve braches from lateral cord to the anterior brachial compartment muscles. These muscles were innervated from some branches of median nerve directly.

  10. Quantitative measurement of the elastic modulus of the biceps brachii during muscle relaxation and tension by shear-wave elasto-sonography%实时定量超声弹性成像技术检测肱二头肌松弛和紧张状态下弹性模量值差异

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温朝阳; 范春芝; 安力春; 徐建红; 陈浩; 王月香; 唐杰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the difference of Young' s modulus in the biceps brachii during muscle relaxation and tension. Methods A total of 141 healthy male volunteers with age range from 16 to 34 years ( mean 22 years old ) were included in the study. A shear-wave elasto-sonography ( AixPlorer model, Supersonic Imagine,Aix en Provence, France ) coupled with a linear array transducer array ( 4-15 MHz )was used. The scanner was set at the SWE mode and then at Q-BOX mode and the ultrasound transducer was placed directly above the biceps brachii belly and carefully aligned with the muscle bundle. The elastic moduli of the biceps brachii were measured during muscle relaxation and tension in all 141 volunteers. Results The Young ' s modulus of biceps brachii was 123. 658 ± 31. 392 kPa during muscle tension and 45. 658 ± 13. 479 kPa during muscle relaxation, respectively with statistical significance ( P =0. 0000 ), Conclusion The Young' s modulus of the biceps brachii was higher during muscle tension than those during muscle relaxation.%目的 研究松弛和紧张状态下肱二头肌肌腹的杨氏模量值差异.方法 141例男性健康志愿者,年龄16~34岁, 中位年龄22岁.使用法国Supersonic 公司的AixPlore型实时定量剪切波弹性成像超声诊断仪,L4-15线阵探头沿肱二头肌肌腹肌束方向检查,启动超声仪器弹性成像模式(SWE)模式,然后使用其定量分析系统Q-BOX分别测量二头肌处于松弛与紧张状态下的杨氏模量值.结果 紧张状态下肱二头肌肌腹杨氏模量值为(123.658±31.392) kPa,松弛状态下杨氏模量值为(45.658±13.479) kPa,两者比较差异具有统计学意义(P=0.0000).结论 剪切波弹性成像技术可检测肱二头肌肌腹在松弛和紧张状态下杨氏模量值差异,紧张状态下较松弛状态下模量值大;定量超声弹性成像技术用于肌肉组织疾病检查,使提供常规超声之外的诊断信息成为可能.

  11. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães -1: aspectos clínicos e neurológicos Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs -1: clinical and neurological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available A avulsão do plexo braquial é afecção de ordem traumática relativamente comum, ocasionando paralisia grave do membro torácico. É freqüentemente confundida com paralisia do nervo radial, havendo controvérsias sobre o tratamento. O objetivo deste trabalho foi: avaliar clinica e neurologicamente cães com avulsão do plexo braquial, demonstrando os aspectos significativos para o diagnóstico desta afecção. Observou-se predominância de cães sem raça definida, fêmea, com menos de três anos de idade, sendo o atropelamento a etiologia principal. As alterações clinicam/neurológicas mais freqüentes foram: paralisia flácida, ausência do reflexo dopanículo, ausência dos reflexos tricipital, bicipital e extensor do carpo radial, atrofia dos músculos tríceps, bíceps, supra-espinhal, infra-espinhal e extensores do carpo, anestesia cutânea abaixo do nível do cotovelo e abrasão/ulceração em face dorsal da mão. A associação destes resultados com os aspectos da histologia e da eletroneuroestimulação (relatados na parte 2 e 3 deste trabalho, respectivamente sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial em todos os casos.Brachial plexus avulsion is a relatively common affection, causing serious paralysis of the thoracic limb. It is often misdiagnosed as radial paralysis and there are controversies about the treatment. The main purposes of this work were: to evaluate clinically and neurologically dogs with brachial plexus avulsion and to demonstrate the relevant aspects in the diagnosis of this affection. Predominantly mixed breed dogs, females under three years of age were observed, and the brachial plexus avulsion was mainly a result of road accidents. The more frequent clinical and neurological signs were: flacid paralysis, loss of the panniculus, triceps, biceps and extensor carpi radial muscle reflexes, atrophy of the muscles triceps, biceps, extensor carpi radial, supraspinatus and infraespinatus

  12. EFFECT OF THE SHOULDER POSITION ON THE BICEPS BRACHII EMG IN DIFFERENT DUMBBELL CURLS

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    Taian M.M. Vieira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Incline Dumbbell Curl (IDC and Dumbbell Preacher Curl (DPC are two variations of the standard Dumbbell Biceps Curl (DBC, generally applied to optimize biceps brachii contribution for elbow flexion by fixing shoulder at a specific angle. The aim of this study is to identify changes in the neuromuscular activity of biceps brachii long head for IDC, DPC and DBC exercises, by taking into account the changes in load moment arm and muscle length elicited by each dumbbell curl protocol. A single cycle (concentric-eccentric of DBC, IDC and DPC, was applied to 22 subjects using a submaximal load of 40% estimated from an isometric MVC test. The neuromuscular activity of biceps brachii long head was compared by further partitioning each contraction into three phases, according to individual elbow joint range of motion. Although all protocols elicited a considerable level of activation of the biceps brachii muscle (at least 50% of maximum RMS, the contribution of this muscle for elbow flexion/extension varied among exercises. The submaximal elbow flexion (concentric elicited neuro muscular activity up to 95% of the maximum RMS value during the final phase of IDC and DBC and 80% for DPC at the beginning of the movement. All exercises showed significant less muscle activity for the elbow extension (eccentric. The Incline Dumbbell Curl and the classical Dumbbell Biceps Curl resulted in similar patterns of biceps brachii activation for the whole range of motion, whereas Dumbbell Preacher Curl elicited high muscle activation only for a short range of elbow joint angle

  13. The “Anchor Shape” Technique for Long Head of the Biceps Tenotomy to Avoid the Popeye Deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Narvani, A. Ali; Atoun, Ehud; Van Tongel, Alexander; Sforza, Giuseppe; Levy, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Surgical options for symptomatic pathologies of the long head of the biceps (LHB) include tenotomy and tenodesis. Tenotomy is surgically simple and quick, does not require immobilization, and avoids implant complications. However, it is associated with residual “Popeye” muscle deformity and biceps muscle cramps. Tenodesis avoids Popeye deformity, but it is technically a more difficult operation with a longer rehabilitation period and possible implant complications. The purpose of this report ...

  14. Muscular coordination of biceps brachii and brachioradialis in elbow flexion with respect to hand position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKleiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of synergistic muscles towards specific movements over multi joint systems may change with varying position of distal or proximal joints. Purpose of this study is to reveal the relationship of muscular coordination of brachioradialis and biceps brachii during elbow flexion with respect to hand position and biomechanical advantages and disadvantages of biceps brachii. A group of 16 healthy subjects has been advised to perform 20 repetitions of single elbow flexion movements in different hand positions (pronated, neutral and supinated. With a speed of 20°/s, simultaneously sEMG of biceps brachii and brachioradialis and kinematics of the movement were recorded in a motion analysis laboratory. Normalized to MVC the sEMG amplitudes of both muscles contributing to elbow flexion movements were compared in pronated, supinated and neutral hand position over elbow joint angle. Significant differences in the contribution of brachioradialis were found in pronated hand position compared to supinated and neutral hand position while the muscular activity of biceps brachii shows no significant changes in any hand position.In conclusion, a statistical significant dependency of the inter-muscular coordination between biceps brachii and brachioradialis during elbow flexion with respect to hand position has been observed depending on a biomechanical disadvantage of biceps brachii.

  15. Bicep2. III. INSTRUMENTAL SYSTEMATICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Barkats, D. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bischoff, C. A.; Buder, I.; Karkare, K. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS 42, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bullock, E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Duband, L. [SBT, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France); Fliescher, S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D., E-mail: csheehy@uchicago.edu [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Collaboration: Bicep2 Collaboration; and others

    2015-12-01

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call “deprojection,” for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ∼10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. The contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10{sup −3}.

  16. ANATOMY OF BONE AND MUSCLE OF SCAPULA AND ARM OF Chrysocyon Brachyurus (CARNIVORA, CANIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Gonçalves Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus - Illiger, 1815, is the largest canid of South America     and its found in the central region of the continent, preferably in open field biomes. It may reach between 20 and 33 kg and up to 125 cm. It is under threat of extinction. Anatomical knowledge is  of great importance to the completion of information about wild species and clinical, surgical, and conservationist implications. This study aimed to describe the bones and the bone accidents of the cingulate forelimb of brachial region and their respective muscles in maned wolf, through dissection procedures of animals preserved in 10% formalin solution. The animals belong to the didactic collection of the Laboratory of Education and Research on Wild Animals of UFU, and are the result of roadkill. The bones are scapula and humerus. There was no clavicula. The muscles are: M. deltoideus; M. supraspinatus; M. infraspinatus; M. teres major; M. teres minor; M. triceps brachii caput: laterale, accessorium, longum and mediale; M. anconeus; M. biceps; M. subscapularis; M.  coracobrachialis; M. tensor fasciae antebrachii; M. brachial. The scapula and arm have specific accidents; however, they are similar to domestic dogs. The humerus is straight. The muscles have some peculiarities. Keywords: anatomy; canids; maned wolf; muscles; osteology.

  17. Differences in supraspinal and spinal excitability during various force outputs of the biceps brachii in chronic- and non-resistance trained individuals.

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    Gregory E P Pearcey

    Full Text Available Motor evoked potentials (MEP and cervicomedullary evoked potentials (CMEP may help determine the corticospinal adaptations underlying chronic resistance training-induced increases in voluntary force production. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of chronic resistance training on corticospinal excitability (CE of the biceps brachii during elbow flexion contractions at various intensities and the CNS site (i.e. supraspinal or spinal predominantly responsible for any training-induced differences in CE. Fifteen male subjects were divided into two groups: 1 chronic resistance-trained (RT, (n = 8 and 2 non-RT, (n = 7. Each group performed four sets of ∼5 s elbow flexion contractions of the dominant arm at 10 target forces (from 10%-100% MVC. During each contraction, subjects received 1 transcranial magnetic stimulation, 2 transmastoid electrical stimulation and 3 brachial plexus electrical stimulation, to determine MEP, CMEP and compound muscle action potential (Mmax amplitudes, respectively, of the biceps brachii. All MEP and CMEP amplitudes were normalized to Mmax. MEP amplitudes were similar in both groups up to 50% MVC, however, beyond 50% MVC, MEP amplitudes were lower in the chronic RT group (p<0.05. CMEP amplitudes recorded from 10-100% MVC were similar for both groups. The ratio of MEP amplitude/absolute force and CMEP amplitude/absolute force were reduced (p<0.012 at all contraction intensities from 10-100% MVC in the chronic-RT compared to the non-RT group. In conclusion, chronic resistance training alters supraspinal and spinal excitability. However, adaptations in the spinal cord (i.e. motoneurone seem to have a greater influence on the altered CE.

  18. Brachial plexus neuropathy - A long-term outcome study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Groothoff, JW; Nicolai, JP; Rietman, JS

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the long-term outcome of brachial plexus neuropathy in 16 patients. The mean follow up was 8 years. Nine patients complained of persistent pain and muscle weakness, four had continuing problems with various activities of daily living and 11 had trouble with some hou

  19. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  20. Biomechanical characterization of unicortical button fixation: a novel technique for proximal subpectoral biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Joseph P; Chen, Alvin; Wexler, Michael; Hertz, Benjamin; Grimaldi Bournissaint, Leandro; Nazarian, Ara; Ramappa, Arun J

    2015-05-01

    Proximal biceps tenodesis is one method for treating biceps-related pain. Tenodesis protects the length-tension relationship of the biceps muscle, maintains strength, and provides a better cosmetic appearance than tenotomy. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the mechanical properties of a unicortical metal button and an interference screw in proximal biceps tenodesis. Six pairs of fresh-frozen shoulders were dissected, leaving the proximal biceps tendon as a free graft. On each pair of shoulders, a biceps tenodesis was performed using an interference screw or a unicortical metal button. The specimens were mounted and a cyclic load (10-60 N) was applied at 1 Hz for 200 cycles, followed by an axial load to failure. The displacement, ultimate load to failure, and mode of failure were recorded. Displacement in response to cyclic loading was 3.7 ± 2.2 mm for the interference screw and 1.9 ± 1.0 mm for the cortical button (P = 0.03). Load at failure for the interference screw was 191 ± 64 N (stiffness: 24 ± 11 N/mm) and 183 ± 61 N (stiffness: 24 ± 7. N/mm) for the unicortical button (P = n.s. for both cases). As a novel technique for subpectoral biceps tenodesis, a unicortical button demonstrated significantly less displacement in response to cyclic loading than the interference screw. The ultimate load to failure and stiffness for the two methods were not different. In this way, a unicortical button may provide a reliable alternative method of fixation with a potentially lower risk of post-operative humeral fracture and a construct that permits early mobilization following biceps tenodesis.

  1. Surgical correction of the "Popeye biceps" deformity: dual-window approach for combined subpectoral and deltopectoral access and proximal biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Deepak N; DasGupta, Bibhas

    2012-09-01

    "Popeye biceps" deformity represents the appearance of a distally retracted biceps muscle resulting from either a traumatic long biceps tendon (LBT) rupture or an iatrogenic LBT tenotomy. Cosmetic and functional problems associated with the deformity may necessitate surgical correction, and surgical exposure using multiple incisions is recommended. The technique presented here describes a novel mini-open approach using a single 1-in incision that provides access to 3 peripectoral anatomical zones. Preoperative sonographic localization of the ruptured and retracted LBT is used to guide incision placement, and facilitates intraoperative tendon retrieval via a limited incision and minimal dissection. Inferolateral retraction of the mini-incision window permits infrapectoral and subpectoral LBT mobilization and dissection. Deltopectoral access via superomedial retraction of the same skin window is used to expose the suprapectoral zone and is employed for LBT retrieval and proximal tenodesis. Technical tips for safe dissection via a mini-incision, and methods for biological LBT augmentation are discussed.

  2. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER DISTAL BICEPS BRACHII REPAIR: A CASE SERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tim; Otto, Charissa; Zerella, Tanisha; Semmler, John G; Human, Taaibos; Phadnis, Joideep; Bain, Gregory I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate outcomes after surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture and the influence of arm dominance on isokinetic flexion and supination results. Background/Purpose While relatively uncommon, rupture of the distal biceps tendon can result in significant strength deficits, for which surgical repair is recommended. The purpose of this study was to assess patient reported functional outcomes and muscle performance following surgery. Methods A sample of 23 participants (22 males, 1 female), who had previously undergone surgical repair of the distal biceps tendon, were re-examined at a minimum of one year after surgery. Biodex isokinetic elbow flexion and supination testing was performed to assess strength (as measured by peak torque) and endurance (as measured by total work and work fatigue). The Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Mayo Elbow Performance Scale (MEPS) were used to assess participants' subjectively reported functional recovery. Results At a mean of 7.6 years after surgical repair, there were no differences between the repaired and uninvolved elbows in peak torque (p = 0.47) or total work (p = 0.60) for flexion or supination. There was also no difference in elbow flexion work fatigue (p = 0.22). However, there was significantly less work fatigue in supination, which was likely influenced by arm dominance, as most repairs were to the dominant arm, F(1,22)=5.67, p = 0.03. Conclusion The long-term strength of the repaired elbow was similar to the uninvolved elbow after surgery to the distal biceps tendon. Endurance of the repaired elbow was similar in flexion but greater in supination, probably influenced by arm dominance. Study design Retrospective case series Level of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27904798

  3. Solitary cysticercosis of the biceps brachii in a vegetarian: a rare and unusual pseudotumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry [Department of Radiology, New York Methodist Hospital Affiliated with Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 506 Sixth Street, Brooklyn, NY 11215 (United States); Klein, Michael J. [Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, 1 Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Hermann, George [Department of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, 1 Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Abdul-Quader, Mohammed [Department of Radiology, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, 177 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    We report a 40-year-old man with cysticercosis presenting as a solitary tumor in the biceps brachii muscle. Physical examination revealed an intramuscular mass and magnetic resonance imaging suggested a cyst. The histologic diagnosis was a cysticercus. Such solitary presentation of muscular cysticercosis is extremely rare with only a handful of sporadic reports in the literature. (orig.)

  4. Pain and the pathogenesis of biceps tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Elise B; Thankam, Finosh G; Dilisio, Matthew F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Biceps tendinopathy is a relatively common ailment that typically presents as pain, tenderness, and weakness in the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. Though it is often associated with degenerative processes of the rotator cuff and the joint, this is not always the case, thus, the etiology remains considerably unknown. There has been recent interest in elucidating the pathogenesis of tendinopathy, since it can be an agent of chronic pain, and is difficult to manage. The purpose of this article is to critically evaluate relevant published research that reflects the current understanding of pain and how it relates to biceps tendinopathy. A review of the literature was conducted to create an organized picture of how pain arises and manifests itself, and how the mechanism behind biceps tendinopathy possibly results in pain. Chronic pain is thought to arise from neurogenic inflammation, central pain sensitization, excitatory nerve augmentation, inhibitory nerve loss, and/or dysregulation of supraspinal structures; thus, the connections of these theories to the ones regarding the generation of biceps tendinopathy, particularly the neural theory, are discussed. Pain mediators such as tachykinins, CGRP, and alarmins, in addition to nervous system ion channels, are highlighted as possible avenues for research in tendinopathy pain. Recognition of the nociceptive mechanisms and molecular of biceps tendinopathy might aid in the development of novel treatment strategies for managing anterior shoulder pain due to a symptomatic biceps tendon. PMID:28670360

  5. Injection of marinade with actinidin increases tenderness of porcine M. biceps femoris and affects myofibrils and connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M.; Torngren, M. A.; Gunvig, A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Marination of beef muscles with brine solutions containing proteolytic enzymes from fruit extracts has been shown to tenderize meat. However, the effect of marination with actinidin on tenderness of pork muscles has not been investigated. Tenderness and eating quality of porcine M. bi...... indicate that actinidin tenderizes pork M. biceps femoris by affecting both the myofibrils and connective tissue....

  6. Glenoid labrum tears related to the long head of the biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J R; Carson, W G; McLeod, W D

    1985-01-01

    Tears of the glenoid labrum were observed in 73 baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes who underwent arthroscopic examination of the dominant shoulder. Most of the tears were located over the anterosuperior portion of the glenoid labrum near the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle into the glenoid. At arthroscopy, the tendon of the long head of the biceps appeared to originate through and be continuous with the superior portion of the glenoid labrum. In many cases it appeared to have pulled the anterosuperior portion of the labrum off the glenoid. This observation was verified at arthroscopy by viewing the origin of the biceps tendon into the glenoid labrum as the muscle was electrically stimulated. With stimulation of the muscle, the tendinous portion became quite taut, particularly near its attachment to the glenoid labrum, and actually lifted the labrum off the glenoid. Three-dimensional high-speed cinematography with computer analysis revealed that the moment acting about the elbow joint to extend the joint through an arc of about 50 degrees was in excess of 600 inch-pounds. The extremely high velocity of elbow extension which is generated must be decelerated through the final 30 degrees of elbow extension. Of the muscles of the arm that provide the large deceleration forces in the follow-through phase of throwing, only the biceps brachii traverses both the elbow joint and the shoulder joint. Additional forces are generated in the biceps tendon in its function as a "shunt" muscle to stabilize the glenohumeral joint during the throwing act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. US Findings of Biceps Tendinitis: Cross Sectional Area Measurements of Long Head of Biceps Brachii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong Soo; Seo, Kyung Mook; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup [ChungAng University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seung Min [Bundang Cha Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe typical sonographic findings in patients with biceps tendinitis. Seventy five patients who had been clinically diagnosed with biceps tendinitis were included. Of the 75, 37 were male, 38 were female, and their mean age was 56 {+-} 9.74. The patients complained of shoulder pain and ultrasonography was performed for bilateral shoulders in all patients. The cross sectional area of the biceps tendon was measured. The status of fluid collection around the biceps tendon and accompanying rotator cuff disease were also investigated. The cross sectional areas of the diseased biceps tendon were 0.18 {+-} 0.09 cm2 (range: 0.07-0.42), and the areas of the normal side was 0.11 {+-} 0.05 cm2 (0.03-0.24). The cross sectional area of the diseased biceps tendon was 0.075 {+-} 0.062 cm2 greater, on average, than the uninvolved site (p < 0.01). Thirty six patients(48%) had fluid collection around the inflamed biceps tendon, and 30 patients had accompanied rotator cuff disease. During US examination of the shoulder in patients complaining of shoulder pain, if the cross sectional area of the biceps tendon in the painful shoulder is asymmetrically and larger than the contralateral tendon, biceps tendonitis is suggested

  8. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  9. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  10. Motor unit firing intervals and other parameters of electrical activity in normal and pathological muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Smith, T; Høgenhaven, H

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of the firing intervals of motor units has been suggested as a diagnostic tool in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Part of the increase in number of turns seen in patients with myopathy could be secondary to the decrease in motor unit firing intervals at threshold force...... of the motor units, as noted in previous studies. In the brachial biceps muscle we have studied the firing intervals of 164 motor units in 14 controls, 140 motor units in 13 patients with myopathy and 86 motor units in 8 patients with neurogenic disorders, and related the findings to those of the turns...... analysis and the analysis of properties of individual motor unit potentials. To ensure comparable conditions we have examined motor unit firing intervals and turns at a force of 10% of maximum. The average of motor unit firing intervals and of interval variability was the same in controls and in patients...

  11. Direct cord implantation in brachial plexus avulsions: revised technique using a single stage combined anterior (first posterior (second approach and end-to-side side-to-side grafting neurorrhaphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Meguid Amr MS

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superiority of a single stage combined anterior (first posterior (second approach and end-to-side side-to-side grafting neurorrhaphy in direct cord implantation was investigated as to providing adequate exposure to both the cervical cord and the brachial plexus, as to causing less tissue damage and as to being more extensible than current surgical approaches. Methods The front and back of the neck, the front and back of the chest up to the midline and the whole affected upper limb were sterilized while the patient was in the lateral position; the patient was next turned into the supine position, the plexus explored anteriorly and the grafts were placed; the patient was then turned again into the lateral position, and a posterior cervical laminectomy was done. The grafts were retrieved posteriorly and side grafted to the anterior cord. Using this approach, 5 patients suffering from complete traumatic brachial plexus palsy, 4 adults and 1 obstetric case were operated upon and followed up for 2 years. 2 were C5,6 ruptures and C7,8T1 avulsions. 3 were C5,6,7,8T1 avulsions. C5,6 ruptures were grafted and all avulsions were cord implanted. Results Surgery in complete avulsions led to Grade 4 improvement in shoulder abduction/flexion and elbow flexion. Cocontractions occurred between the lateral deltoid and biceps on active shoulder abduction. No cocontractions occurred after surgery in C5,6 ruptures and C7,8T1 avulsions, muscle power improvement extended into the forearm and hand; pain disappeared. Limitations include spontaneous recovery despite MRI appearance of avulsions, fallacies in determining intraoperative avulsions (wrong diagnosis, wrong level; small sample size; no controls rule out superiority of this technique versus other direct cord reimplantation techniques or other neurotization procedures; intra- and interobserver variability in testing muscle power and cocontractions. Conclusion Through providing proper

  12. Ankle Brachial Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem, J.; Hansen, T.; Johansson, L.; Lind, L.; Ahlstroem, H. (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (SE))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. Purpose: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. Material and Methods: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. Results: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one >=50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a >= 50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. Conclusion: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population

  13. Trapezius transfer to treat flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After severe brachial palsy involving the shoulder, many different muscle transfers have been advocated to restore movement and stability of the shoulder. Paralysis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles can be treated by transfer of the trapezius. Methods We treated 10 patients, 8 males and 2 females, by transfer of the trapezius to the proximal humerus. In 6 patients the C5 and C6 roots had been injuried; in one C5, C6 and C7 roots; and 3 there were complete brachial plexus injuries. Eight of the 10 had had neurosurgical repairs before muscle transfer. Their average age was 28.3 years (range 17 to 41, the mean delay between injury and transfer was 3.1 years (range 14 months to 6.3 years and the average follow-up was 17.5 months (range 6 to 52, reporting the clinical and radiological results. Evaluation included physical and radiographic examinations. A modification of Mayer's transfer of the trapezius muscle was performed. The principal goal of this work was to evaluate the results of the trapezius transfer for flail shoulder after brachial plexus injury. Results All 10 patients had improved function with a decrease in instability of the shoulder. The average gain in shoulder abduction was 46.2°; the gain in shoulder flexion average 37.4°. All patients had stable shoulder (no subluxation of the humeral head on radiographs. Conclusion Trapezius transfer for a flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy can provide satisfactory function and stability.

  14. Ultrasonographic evaluation of brachial plexus tumors in five dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Scott; Long, Craig; Knipe, Marguerite; Hornof, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Five dogs with unilateral thoracic limb lameness, neurologic deficits, muscle atrophy, and pain, or a combination of these signs, were examined using ultrasonograghy. Large, hypoechoic tubular masses that displaced vessels and destroyed the normal architecture were found in each dog. The affected axilla of each patient was then imaged with computed tomography or magnetic resonance to fully assess the extent of the masses. We describe the use of ultrasound in screening patients for brachial plexus tumors.

  15. How Accurate Are We in Detecting Biceps Tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ryan M; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2016-01-01

    Biceps tendon pain is frequently called biceps "tendinitis," or inflammation of the biceps tendon. Histologic analysis of biceps tendon biopsies demonstrates changes in tenocyte size, ground substance, collagen organization, and vascularity observed with many different tendinopathies. There are distinct symptoms of biceps tendinopathy and a few provocative maneuvers can help make the diagnosis. Imaging studies (eg, MRI) can show changes in signal sequence or tears. However, MRI has a low sensitivity and frequently results in missed or misdiagnosed biceps pathology. Clinical decision making is best guided by a strong clinical suspicion based on patient history, physical examination, and MRI.

  16. Electrodiagnosis in traumatic brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Mansukhani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodiagnosis (EDX is a useful test to accurately localize the site, determine the extent, identify the predominant pathophysiology, and objectively quantify the severity of brachial plexopathies. It can also be used to examine muscles not easily assessed clinically and recognize minimal defects. Post-operatively and on follow up studies, it is important for early detection of re-innervation. It can be used intra-operatively to assess conduction across a neuroma, which would help the surgeon to decide further course of action. Localization of the site of the lesion can be very challenging as there may be multiple sites of involvement and hence the electroneuromyographic evaluation must be adequate. The unaffected limb also needs to be examined for comparison. The final impression must be co-related with the type and severity of injury.

  17. Electrodiagnosis in traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansukhani, K A

    2013-01-01

    Electrodiagnosis (EDX) is a useful test to accurately localize the site, determine the extent, identify the predominant pathophysiology, and objectively quantify the severity of brachial plexopathies. It can also be used to examine muscles not easily assessed clinically and recognize minimal defects. Post-operatively and on follow up studies, it is important for early detection of re-innervation. It can be used intra-operatively to assess conduction across a neuroma, which would help the surgeon to decide further course of action. Localization of the site of the lesion can be very challenging as there may be multiple sites of involvement and hence the electroneuromyographic evaluation must be adequate. The unaffected limb also needs to be examined for comparison. The final impression must be co-related with the type and severity of injury.

  18. True aneurysm of brachial artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovričević, Ivo; Franjić, Dario Bjorn; Brkić, Petar; Tomas, Davor

    2010-10-01

    True upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Following computer-tomography angiographic (CT-a) imaging examination, true saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the 77-year-old female without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by interposition of a part of great saphenous vein harvested from the left groin and creation of two end-to-end anastomoses between interposition graft and previously resected part of brachial artery. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay. Factors combined with minimal morbidity associated with repair suggest that surgical repair should be performed routinely for true upper extremity arterial aneurysms.

  19. 肩袖及肱二头肌能量技术对肱二头肌长头肌腱炎的远期疗效观察%Long term effect of muscle energy technique compared to corticosteroid injection in treating tendinitis of long head of bi-ceps brachii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱迪; 张大威; 章丽雅

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the long term effect of muscle energy technique (MET)used in the treatment of tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii.Methods:Forty-two patients with tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii were randomly assigned into 2 groups (n = 21 each).The control group was treated with corticosteroid injection, and the observation group was given MET.The two groups were assessed with muscle strength test and visual ana-logue scale (VAS)before treatment and at the end of the treatment period (3 weeks),and assessed with Constant at 3rd month,6th month and 1st year during the follow-up period after the treatment.Results:At the end of treatment (3 weeks),the strength of the biceps was significantly higher than before treatment (P <0.01),more significantly in the observation group than in the control group (P <0.01).The VAS scores in the two groups were significantly decreased after treatment as compared with those before treatment (P < 0.01),more significantly in the control group than in the observation group (P <0.01).At 3rd month,6th month,and 1st year during the follow-up peri-od after the treatment,the Constant scores in two groups were higher than pretreatment,and those in the observa-tion group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P <0.01).Conclusion:The short-term analge-sic efficacy of corticosteroid injection in the tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii is better than MET,but the long-term effect of MET in treating tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii is affirmative,and was obviously better than corticosteroid injection.%目的:应用肌肉能量技术(MET)对肩袖及肱二头肌进行干预,观察其对肱二头肌长头肌腱炎的远期疗效。方法:选取肱二头肌长头肌腱炎患者42例,随机分为观察组和对照组各21例,对观察组患者肩袖及肱二头肌应用MET 治疗,对照组进行鞘内注射封闭治疗,共治疗3周。分别于治疗前后进行疼痛视觉模拟

  20. BICEP3 focal plane design and detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, H; Ahmed, Z; Alexander, K D; Amiri, M; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Boenish, H; Bowens-Rubin, R; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Grayson, J A; Halpern, M; Harrison, S; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Kang, J; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Monticue, V; Namikawa, T; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Schwarz, R; Sorensen, C; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Wandui, A; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Willmert, J; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    BICEP3, the latest telescope in the BICEP/Keck program, started science observations in March 2016. It is a 550mm aperture refractive telescope observing the polarization of the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz. We show the focal plane design and detector performance, including spectral response, optical efficiency and preliminary sensitivity of the upgraded BICEP3. We demonstrate 9.72$\\mu$K$\\sqrt{\\textrm{s}}$ noise performance of the BICEP3 receiver.

  1. Testing procedures for SLAP lesions of the shoulder involving contraction and torsion of biceps long head and glenohumeral glides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sumeer; Watson, Lyn; Taylor, Nicholas F; Green, Rodney A; Hairodin, Zaki

    2011-11-01

    Testing procedures for SLAP lesions of the shoulder can combine resisted elbow flexion, forearm pronation and supination, and glenohumeral glides. These procedures reproduce symptoms by increasing biceps long head active tension or passive torsion, and by placing the shoulder in an unstable position. We compared activation of biceps long head and pain intensity, between supinated and pronated forearm positions, between different glides, and between individuals with and without shoulder impairment. A case control study. Twelve participants with suspected SLAP lesions and twelve with no history of shoulder injury volunteered. Electromyography measured muscle activity in biceps long head, normalised against maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Subjective pain intensity scores were recorded. Biceps long head activity was greater in forearm supination (mean 39% MVIC) than pronation (mean 24% MVIC), but pain was higher in pronation (mean 4.5/10) than supination (3.2/10). Biceps long head activity was greater when testing without a glide, but there was no difference in pain comparing the glide conditions. The impaired group experienced more pain (mean 3.9/10) than controls (mean 0.3/10) but there was no difference in shoulder muscle activity. No one combination of testing procedures appeared to be diagnostic of SLAP lesions in our sample. This study supports the theory that biceps long head acts as a stabiliser of the shoulder, and suggests that clinical testing procedures for SLAP lesions may need to inhibit biceps long head activity. The addition of glides to SLAP testing procedures did not affect the reproduction of pain.

  2. Brachial plexus injuries and dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, H S

    1988-05-01

    The brachial plexus and its associated structures demonstrate a propensity for certain disease processes not common to other areas of the nervous system. Brachial plexus disease produces a gait disturbance that may mimic musculoskeletal disease. When evaluating a case with possible traumatic brachial plexus disease, one relies heavily on historical, physical, and neurologic information when differentiating musculoskeletal disorders, although both may sometimes be present simultaneously in the same limb. With inflammatory disease, electromyography is extremely helpful, although an empiric dietary change may help confirm a suspicion. Brachial plexus surgery requires careful planning and meticulous technique. Attempts to remove malignant schwannomas have not been as successful as one would hope (Table 2). To a large extent, these dogs are treated late in the course of their disease because they are often treated for extended periods of time for musculoskeletal disease first. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention would help many of these dogs. New histopathologic techniques, electrodiagnostic equipment, and radiographic techniques are helping to define peripheral nerve disease in the companion animal. These techniques will help us categorize and treat these diseases with greater success in the future.

  3. Phase- and Workload-Dependent Changes in Corticospinal Excitability to the Biceps and Triceps Brachii during Arm Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa-Joy Spence

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study to examine corticospinal excitability (CSE to antagonistic muscle groups during arm cycling. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of the motor cortex and transmastoid electrical stimulation (TMES of the corticospinal tract were used to assess changes in supraspinal and spinal excitability, respectively. TMS induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs and TMES induced cervicomedullary evoked potentials (CMEPs were recorded from the biceps and triceps brachii at two positions, mid-elbow flexion and extension, while cycling at 5% and 15% of peak power output. While phase-dependent modulation of MEP and CMEP amplitudes occurred in the biceps brachii, there was no difference between flexion and extension for MEP amplitudes in the triceps brachii and CMEP amplitudes were higher during flexion than extension. Furthermore, MEP amplitudes in both biceps and triceps brachii increased with increased workload. CMEP amplitudes increased with higher workloads in the triceps brachii, but not biceps brachii, though the pattern of change in CMEPs was similar to MEPs. Differences between changes in CSE between the biceps and triceps brachii suggest that these antagonistic muscles may be under different neural control during arm cycling. Putative mechanisms are discussed.

  4. Tenderness of Pork Muscles as Influenced by Chilling Rate and Altered Carcass Suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Elin; Møller, Anders Juel

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of tenderness improvements in porcine muscles (longissimus dorsi, semimembranosus, biceps femoris) in 72 carcasses by using combinations of three different chilling rates and two different suspennnsion methods....

  5. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and strength training to gain muscle strength in elderly women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesário, Denise Ferreira; Mendes, Geovânia Barbosa da Silva; Uchôa, Érica Patrícia Borba Lira; Veiga, Paulo Henrique Altran

    2014-01-01

    ...: To perform comparative analyze of results of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and strength training to gain muscle strength of biceps and quadriceps and grip in the elderly...

  6. Recent advances in the management of brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Singh Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of brachial plexus injury is a demanding field of hand and upper extremity surgery. With currently available microsurgical techniques, functional gains are rewarding in upper plexus injuries. However, treatment options in the management of flail and anaesthetic limb are still evolving. Last three decades have witnessed significant developments in the management of these injuries, which include a better understanding of the anatomy, advances in the diagnostic modalities, incorporation of intra-operative nerve stimulation techniques, more liberal use of nerve grafts in bridging nerve gaps, and the addition of new nerve transfers, which selectively neurotise the target muscles close to the motor end plates. Newer research works on the use of nerve allografts and immune modulators (FK 506 are under evaluation in further improving the results in nerve reconstruction. Direct reimplantation of avulsed spinal nerve roots into the spinal cord is another area of research in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  7. TWITCH PARAMETERS IN TRANSVERSAL AND LONGITUDINAL BICEPS BRACHII RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Šimunič

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the contractile properties of skeletal muscles is continuing to be an important issue and a difficult task methodologically. Longitudinal direction of skeletal muscle contraction blurs intrinsic muscle belly contractile properties with many factors. This study evaluates and explains contractile properties such as: delay time (Td, contraction time (Tc, half relaxation time (Tr and maximal amplitude (Dm extracted from twitch transversal response and compare them with torque response. In fifteen healthy males (age 23.7 ± 3.4 years isometric twitch transversal and torque responses were simultaneously recorded during graded electrically elicited contractions in the biceps brachii muscle. The amplitude of electrical stimulation was increased in 5 mA steps from a threshold up to a maximal response. The muscles’ belly transversal response was measured by a high precision mechanical displacement sensor while elbow joint torque was calculated from force readings. Results indicate a parabolic relation between the transversal displacement and the torque Dm. A significantly shorter Tc was found in transversal response without being correlated to torque Tc (r = -0.12; > 0.05. A significant correlation was found between torque Tc and the time occurrence of the second peak in the transversal response (r = 0.83; < 0.001. Electrical stimulation amplitude dependant variation of the Tc was notably different in transversal than in torque response. Td was similar at submaximal and maximal responses but larger in transversal at just above threshold contractions. Tr has a similar linear trend in both responses, however, the magnitude and the slope are much larger in the transversal response. We could conclude that different mechanisms affect longitudinal and transversal twitch skeletal muscle deformations. Contractile properties extracted from the transversal response enable alternative insights into skeletal muscle contraction mechanics.

  8. Repair of pressure sores over ischial tuberosity with long head of biceps femoris muscle flap combined with semi-V posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap%股二头肌长头肌瓣联合半V形股后筋膜皮瓣修复坐骨结节压疮

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海恒林; 申传安; 柴家科; 李华涛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical effect of transplantation of the long head of biceps femoris muscle flap in combination with semi-V posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap for repair of pressure sores over ischial tuberosity. Methods Eight patients with 10 deep pressure sores over ischial tuberosity were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital to the PLA General Hospital and the 98th Hospital of PLA from April 2004 to June 2010.The wounds measured from 2 cm × 2 cm to 6 cm ×4 cm were covered with the long head of biceps femoris muscle flap and semi-V posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap(ranged from 10 cm ×6 cm to 13 cm × 8 cm).The condition of flaps was observed and followed up for a long time. Results All flaps survived.Nine wounds healed by first intention.Subcutaneous accumulation of fluids occurred in one wound with formation of a sinus at drainage site,and it healed after dressing change for 25 days.Patients were followed up for 7 to 34 months.Sore recurred in one patient 9 months after surgery,and it was successfully repaired with the same flap for the second time.Flaps in the other 7 patients appeared satisfactory with soft texture and without ulceration. Conclusions This combined flap is easy in formation and transfer,and it causes little side injury with good resistance against pressure.It is a new method for repair of pressure sore over sacral region.%目的 观察应用股二头肌长头肌瓣联合半V形股后筋膜皮瓣修复坐骨结节压疮的临床疗效. 方法 选择2004年4月-2010年6月2家笔者单位收治的坐骨结节深度压疮患者8例共10处创面,压疮范围2cm×2 cm~6 cm ×4cm.设计股二头肌长头肌瓣和半V形股后筋膜皮瓣进行修复,其中股后筋膜皮瓣大小为10 cm ×6 cm ~13 cm×8 cm.统计术后皮瓣成活情况,并进行远期随访. 结果 术后皮瓣全部成活,其中9处压疮切口术后顺利愈合;1处因皮瓣下积液引流部位形成窦道,经换药治疗于术后25 d愈合.随访7

  9. Foam Rolling of Quadriceps Decreases Biceps Femoris Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Mark Tyler; Aboodarda, Saied Jalal; Hodgson, Daniel; Behm, David George

    2016-09-06

    Foam rolling has been shown to increase range of motion without subsequent performance impairments of the rolled muscle, however, there are no studies examining rolling effects on antagonist muscles. The objective of this study was to determine whether foam rolling the hamstrings and/or quadriceps would affect hamstrings and quadriceps activation in men and women. Recreationally active men (n=10, 25 ± 4.6 years, 180.1 ± 4.4 cm, 86.5 ± 15.7 kg) and women (n=8, 21.75 ± 3.2 years, 166.4 ± 8.8 cm, 58.9 ± 7.9 kg) had surface electromyographic activity analyzed in the dominant vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles upon a single leg landing from a hurdle jump under four conditions. Conditions included rolling of the hamstrings, quadriceps, both muscle groups and a control session. BF activation significantly decreased following quadriceps foam rolling (F(1,16) = 7.45, p = 0.015, -8.9%). There were no significant changes in quadriceps activation following hamstrings foam rolling. This might be attributed to the significantly greater levels of perceived pain with quadriceps rolling applications (F(1,18) = 39.067, p foam rolling for VL (F(6,30) = 1.31, p = 0.283) VM (F(6,30) = 1.203, p = 0.332) or BF (F(6,36) = 1.703, p = 0.199). Antagonist muscle activation may be altered following agonist foam rolling, however, it can be suggested that any changes in activation are likely a result of reciprocal inhibition due to increased agonist pain perception.

  10. Brachial plexus injury after transfer of free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周友清; 陈亮; 胡韶楠; 顾玉东

    2002-01-01

    @@ Free latissimus dorsi muscle transfer is widely used for functional reconstruction of flexion of elbow and fingers after brachial plexus injury at later stage, as well as for soft tissue coverage because of its large size and long and reliable pedicle with adequate vessel diameter.

  11. Ruptures of the distal biceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, James P; Shreve, Mark C; Youm, Thomas; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur most commonly in middle-aged males and result from eccentric contraction of the biceps tendon. The injury typically presents with pain and a tearing sensation in the antecubital fossa with resultant weakness in flexion and supination strength. Physical exam maneuvers and diagnostic imaging aid in determining the diagnosis. Nonoperative management is reserved for elderly, low demand patients, while operative intervention is generally pursued for younger patients and can consist of nonanatomic repair to the brachialis or anatomic repair to the radial tuberosity. Anatomic repair through a one-incision or two-incision approach is commonplace, while the nonanatomic repairs are rarely performed. No clear advantage exists in operative management with a one-incision versus two-incision techniques. Chronic ruptures present a more difficult situation, and allograft augmentation is often necessary. Common complications after repair include transient nerve palsy, which often resolves, and heterotopic ossification. Despite these possible complications, most studies suggest that better patient outcomes are obtained with operative, anatomic reattachment of the distal biceps tendon.

  12. Tensors, BICEP2, prior dependence, and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Cortês, Marina; Parkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the prior dependence on the inferred spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations, in light of recent results from BICEP2 and taking into account a possible dust contribution to polarized anisotropies. We highlight an optimized parameterization of the tensor power spectrum, and adoption of a logarithmic prior on its amplitude $A_T$, leading to results that transform more evenly under change of pivot scale. In the absence of foregrounds the tension between the results of BICEP2 and Planck drives the tensor spectral index $n_T$ to be blue-tilted in a joint analysis, which would be in contradiction to the standard inflation prediction ($n_T<0$). When foregrounds are accounted for, the BICEP2 results no longer require non-standard inflationary parameter regions. We present limits on primordial $A_T$ and $n_T$, adopting foreground scenarios put forward by Mortonson & Seljak and motivated by Planck 353 GHz observations, and assess what dust contribution leaves a detectable cosmological signal. ...

  13. Biceps Lesion Associated With Rotator Cuff Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ho Yeon; Kim, Jung Youn; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various tenodesis methods are being used for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, there is no consensus on the most appropriate surgical method. Hypothesis: There are significant differences in incidence of cosmetic deformity and persistent bicipital pain between open subpectoral and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis groups. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This study included 72 patients who underwent biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff repair between January 2009 and May 2014 and who were followed for at least 1 year. Open subpectoral tenodesis was performed in 39 patients (group A), and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis was performed in 33 patients (group B). Results: In group A, the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain during motion and mean University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Constant scores significantly improved from 4.6, 18.6, and 64.5 preoperatively to 1.9, 30.5, and 86.5 at last follow-up, respectively (P Popeye deformity was noted in 2 (5.2%) patients from group A and 5 (15.6%) patients from group B (P = .231). Additionally, persistent bicipital tenderness was noted in 1 (2.6%) patient from group A and 8 (24.2%) patients from group B (P = .012). Conclusion: Both open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic intracuff tenodesis show good clinical outcomes for long head of the biceps tendon lesions. However, open subpectoral tenodesis may be more appropriate, considering the low incidence of Popeye deformity and tenderness. PMID:27231699

  14. Biceps Tenodesis for Type II SLAP Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayrose, Gregory A; Karas, Spero G; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Tears of the superior glenoid labrum are a common cause of shoulder pain and disability, especially in overhead athletes such as pitchers, swimmers, and volleyball players. Type II SLAP lesions have been the most clinically important superior labral pathology, and the management of this lesion has been a very controversial topic. Currently, there are no high level studies in the literature to guide treatment. While the few level 3 and level 4 evidence studies that are available following arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions all report reasonable overall patient satisfaction, persistent postoperative pain is common and associated with a low return to pre-injury level of sports participation. There has been a recent school of thought that biceps tenodesis, which maintains the length-tension relationship of the long head of biceps, should be the procedure of choice for patients with isolated type II SLAP lesions. The current paper reviews the role biceps tenodesis plays in the management of type II SLAP tears.

  15. The role of biceps brachii and brachioradialis for the control of elbow flexion and extension movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Werder, Sylvie Charlotte Frieda Anneliese; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    How do synergistic muscles interact, when their contraction aims at stabilizing and fine-tuning a movement, which is induced by the antagonistic muscle? The aim of the study was to analyze the interaction of biceps and brachioradialis during fine-tuning control tasks in comparison to load bearing ones. The surface electromyogram of biceps, brachioradialis and triceps were examined in 15 healthy subjects in dynamic flexion and extension movements with different combinations of contraction levels, joint angles and angular velocities. The measurements were conducted in two configurations, where the torque due to an external load opposes the rotational direction of the elbow flexion (load bearing tasks) or the elbow extension (fine-tuning tasks). Whereas during load bearing control tasks, similar muscular activation of biceps and brachioradialis was observed for all joint angles, angular velocities and external loads, during fine-tuning control tasks a significant difference of the muscular activation of both flexors was observed for 1kg, F(3.639,47.305)=2.864, p=0.037, and 5kg of external load, F(1.570,21.976)=6.834, p=0.008. The results confirm the synergistic muscular activation of both flexors during load bearing tasks, but suggest different control strategies for both flexors when they comprise a fine-tuning control task.

  16. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  17. Disorders of the long head of the biceps: tenotomy versus tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Ursolino, André Petry Sandoval; Ramos, Vinicius Ferreira Lima; Takesian, Fernando Hovaguim; Tenor Júnior, Antonio Carlos; Costa, Miguel Pereira da

    2017-01-01

    Disorders of the long head of biceps tendon are common in clinical practice. Their causes could be degenerative, inflammatory, instability (subluxation or luxation) or traumatic. They are generally associated to other diseases of the shoulder, mainly rotator cuff injuries. Currently, there is controversy in the literature regarding the indications for surgical treatment and the choice of the best technique for each case, due to the possibility of esthetic deformity, loss of muscle strength, and residual pain. The objective of this study was to identify the indications for surgical treatment, the best surgical technique, and the advantages and disadvantages of each technique described in the orthopedic literature for the treatment of long head of biceps tendon injuries. A revision of the orthopedic medical literature on the following databases: Biblioteca Regional de Medicina (BIREME), Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar, comprising articles published in the period from 1991 to 2015.

  18. Disorders of the long head of the biceps: tenotomy versus tenodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Rebouças Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Disorders of the long head of biceps tendon are common in clinical practice. Their causes could be degenerative, inflammatory, instability (subluxation or luxation or traumatic. They are generally associated to other diseases of the shoulder, mainly rotator cuff injuries. Currently, there is controversy in the literature regarding the indications for surgical treatment and the choice of the best technique for each case, due to the possibility of esthetic deformity, loss of muscle strength, and residual pain. The objective of this study was to identify the indications for surgical treatment, the best surgical technique, and the advantages and disadvantages of each technique described in the orthopedic literature for the treatment of long head of biceps tendon injuries. A revision of the orthopedic medical literature on the following databases: Biblioteca Regional de Medicina (BIREME, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar, comprising articles published in the period from 1991 to 2015.

  19. Relevant anatomic landmarks and measurements for biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrance, Russell; Madsen, Wes; Yaseen, Zaneb; Giordano, Brian; Maloney, Michael; Voloshin, Ilya

    2013-06-01

    Biceps tenodesis around the pectoralis major insertion may alter resting tension on the biceps, leading to unfavorable clinical outcomes. The anatomic relationship between the musculotendinous junction (MTJ) of the biceps and the pectoralis major tendon will provide guidelines for anatomic location to perform biceps tenodesis with the goal of re-establishing biceps tension. Descriptive laboratory study. Cadaveric dissections were performed that reflected the pectoralis major tendon and exposed the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT). Calipers were used to measure the longitudinal width of the pectoralis major tendon at the humerus, 2 cm away from the humerus, and at its proximal expansion on the humerus. The distance from the proximal extent of the pectoralis major tendon footprint to the beginning of the MTJ of the biceps and the length of the MTJ of the biceps were recorded. The location of the distal end of the MTJ of the biceps relevant to the inferior border of the pectoralis major tendon was calculated. The average longitudinal width of the pectoralis major tendon at its humeral insertion was 76.8 mm, the width 2 cm away from the humerus averaged 37.3 mm, and the proximal expansion averaged 13.3 mm. The MTJ of the biceps began an average of 32.4 mm distal from the proximal aspect of the pectoralis major footprint and extended for an average of 78.1 mm. The MTJ of the LHBT was calculated to extend 3.3 cm distal to the inferior border of the pectoralis major footprint. The MTJ of the biceps begins further proximal than may be appreciated intraoperatively. Knowledge of the anatomic relationships between the LHBT, its MTJ, and the pectoralis major tendon provides helpful guidelines for the biceps tenodesis site. The final resting spot of the most distal aspect of the MTJ of the LHBT after tenodesis should be approximately 3 cm distal to the inferior edge of the pectoralis major tendon footprint on the humerus.

  20. MR imaging of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posniak, H V; Olson, M C; Dudiak, C M; Wisniewski, R; O'Malley, C

    1993-08-01

    The brachial plexus is difficult to evaluate with conventional radiologic techniques, including CT. However, it is well shown by MR imaging, which has direct multiplanar imaging capability and superior soft-tissue resolution [1-4]. We present our technique for evaluating the brachial plexus, discuss the anatomy, and illustrate normal and abnormal findings.

  1. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    2001-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial pl

  2. CMB Polarization with BICEP2 and Keck-Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryke, Clement; BICEP2 and Keck-Array Collaborations

    2013-01-01

    BICEP2 is an evolution from the highly successful BICEP CMB polarization experiment. In turn Keck-Array is an array of BICEP2 like receivers to achieve an additional increase in sensitivity. All these experiments are located at the South Pole in Antarctica and target the CMB B-mode polarization signal which is predicted to exist in many simpler models of Inflation at angular scales of several degrees. The design and performance of BICEP2 and Keck-Array is described and some preliminary polarization maps are presented.

  3. Long head of the biceps tendinopathy: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Shane J; Strauss, Eric J; Lenart, Brett A; Provencher, Matthew T; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2010-11-01

    Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps brachii encompasses a spectrum of pathology ranging from inflammatory tendinitis to degenerative tendinosis. Disorders of the long head of the biceps often occur in conjunction with other shoulder pathology. A thorough patient history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation are necessary for diagnosis. Nonsurgical management, including rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and injections, is attempted first in patients with mild disease. Surgical management is indicated for refractory or severe disease. In addition to simple biceps tenotomy, a variety of tenodesis techniques has been described. Open biceps tenodesis has been used historically. However, promising results have recently been reported with arthroscopic tenodesis.

  4. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  5. Tenderness of Pork Muscles as Influenced by Chilling Rate and Altered Carcass Suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Elin; Møller, Anders Juel

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of tenderness improvements in porcine muscles (longissimus dorsi, semimembranosus, biceps femoris) in 72 carcasses by using combinations of three different chilling rates and two different suspennnsion methods.......Evaluation of tenderness improvements in porcine muscles (longissimus dorsi, semimembranosus, biceps femoris) in 72 carcasses by using combinations of three different chilling rates and two different suspennnsion methods....

  6. Trifurcation of superficial brachial artery: a rare case with its clinico-embryological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Anshu, A; Dada, R

    2014-01-01

    Literatures on vasculature of upper limbs are crammed with reports of distinctly deviant version of normally prevalent vessels having modified origins, altered branching and odd courses. A unique anatomical variation in vascular pattern was observed during routine dissection of right upper limb in gross anatomy laboratory, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The brachial artery was placed superficial to median nerve in the arm and therefore it was called superficial brachial artery. In the cubital fossa, 2.8 cm distal to intercondylar line of elbow joint, this superficial brachial artery terminated by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and ulnar branches. Strikingly the ulnar branch, after its origin ran superficially over the median nerve and epitrochlear superficial flexor group of muscles of forearm in succession for the initial third of its course in the forearm, consequently it was addressed as superficial ulnar artery. The existence of superficial brachial artery in place of normal brachial artery, its termination by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and superficial ulnar arteries with remarkably different courses, leads to confusing disposition of structures in the arm, cubital fossa and in the forearm and collectively makes this myriad of anatomical variations even rarer. The clinico-embryological revelations for combination of these unconventional observations, apprises and guides the specialized medical personnel attempting blind and invasive procedures in brachium and ante-brachium. This case report depicts the anatomical perspective and clinical implications on confronting a rare variant vasculature architecture pattern of upper limb.

  7. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Clinical relevance of distal biceps insertional and footprint anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Kodde, Izaäk F.; Aster, Asir; Bleys, Ronald L A W; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this review was to present an overview, based on a literature search, of surgical anatomy for distal biceps tendon repairs, based on the current literature. Methods: A narrative review was performed using Pubmed/Medline using key words: Search terms were distal biceps,

  9. Multiple muscular variations including tenuissimus and tensor fasciae suralis muscles in the posterior thigh of a human case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kondo, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yuko; Terashima, Toshio; Miki, Akinori

    2017-09-01

    The posterior thigh muscles on the right side of an 81-year-old male cadaver had multiple variations, denoted muscles I-IV. Muscle I originated from the posteromedial surface of the greater trochanter and divided into two muscle bellies. These muscle bellies fused with the long head of the biceps femoris and were innervated by two branches from muscular branches of the semitendinosus and the long head of the biceps. Muscle II separated from the medial surface of the long head of the biceps in the proximal third and fused with the semitendinosus in the distal fourth. Muscle III was a biventer muscle. Its superior belly separated from the medial surface of the long head of the biceps in the distal third. The inferior belly of this muscle fused with the posterior surface of the crural fascia and was innervated by the tibial nerve. Muscle IV separated from the adductor magnus muscle, passed between the long and short heads of the biceps, fused with the inferior belly of muscle III, and was innervated by the muscular branch of the common fibular nerve to the short head of the biceps. Peeling off the epineurium of the muscular branches to the inferior belly of muscle III showed that this nerve fascicle divided from the common trunk with branches to the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. The inferior bellies of muscle III and muscle IV were thought to be equivalent to the tensor fasciae suralis and tenuissimus muscles, respectively.

  10. Gauged M-flation After BICEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Ashoorioon, A

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent BICEP2 results [arXiv:1403.3985] which may be attributed to the observation of B-modes polarization of the CMB with tensor-to-scalar ratio $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$, we revisit M-flation model. Gauged M-flation is a string theory motivated inflation model with Matrix valued scalar inflaton fields in the adjoint representation of a $U(N)$ Yang-Mills theory. In continuation of our previous works, we show that in the M-flation model induced from a supersymmetric 10d background probed by a stack of $N$ D3-branes, the "effective inflaton" $\\phi$ has a double-well Higgs-like potential, with minima at $\\phi=0,\\mu$. We focus on the $\\phi>\\mu$, symmetry-breaking region. We thoroughly examine predictions of the model for $r$ in the $2\\sigma$ region allowed for $n_S$ by the Planck experiment. As computed in [arXiv:0903.1481], for $N_e=60$ and $n_S=0.96$ we find $r\\simeq 0.2$, which sits in the sweet spot of BICEP2 region for $r$. We find that with increasing $\\mu$ arbitrarily, $n_S$ cannot go beyond ...

  11. Intramuscular variation in fresh ham muscle color

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experiment was conducted to characterize a defect involving pale muscle tissue in the superficial, ventral portion of ham muscles, resulting in two-toned appearance of cured ham products. Biceps femoris muscles (n = 200), representing 3 production systems, were obtained from the ham-boning lin...

  12. The "anchor shape" technique for long head of the biceps tenotomy to avoid the popeye deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvani, A Ali; Atoun, Ehud; Van Tongel, Alexander; Sforza, Giuseppe; Levy, Ofer

    2013-05-01

    Surgical options for symptomatic pathologies of the long head of the biceps (LHB) include tenotomy and tenodesis. Tenotomy is surgically simple and quick, does not require immobilization, and avoids implant complications. However, it is associated with residual "Popeye" muscle deformity and biceps muscle cramps. Tenodesis avoids Popeye deformity, but it is technically a more difficult operation with a longer rehabilitation period and possible implant complications. The purpose of this report is to describe a novel technique for LHB tenotomy that avoids the Popeye muscle deformity. Before releasing the LHB from its anchor over the superior labrum, this technique consists of making an oblique incision, involving 50% of the tendon, distal to its attachment at the superior labrum. A second standard complete tenotomy incision is made about 1.5 cm medial to the oblique incision. The remaining stump of the LHB at the tendon-labrum junction is resected. The first incision, an oblique incomplete incision, allows the remnant of the LHB to open up and form an "anchor shape" that anchors the LHB at the articular entrance of the bicipital groove, thus decreasing the risk of Popeye deformity.

  13. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment.

  14. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a permanent challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Otto Heise

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP has an incidence of 1.5 cases per 1000 live births and it has not declined despite recent advances in obstetrics. Most patients will recover spontaneously, but some will remain severely handicapped. Rehabilitation is important in most cases and brachial plexus surgery can improve the functional outcome of selected patients. This review highlights the current management of infants with NBPP, including conservative and operative approaches.

  15. BICEP3 performance overview and planned Keck Array upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, J. A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Alexander, K. D.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Boenish, H.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Kang, J.; Karkare, K. S.; Karpel, E.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Megerian, K. G.; Monticue, V.; Namikawa, T.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sorenson, C.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Steinbach, B.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tucker, C.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wandui, A.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Willmert, J.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Bicep3 is a 520mm aperture, compact two-lens refractor designed to observe the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 95 GHz. Its focal plane consists of modularized tiles of antenna-coupled transition edge sensors (TESs), similar to those used in Bicep2 and the Keck Array. The increased per-receiver optical throughput compared to Bicep2/Keck Array, due to both its faster f=1:7 optics and the larger aperture, more than doubles the combined mapping speed of the Bicep/Keck program. The Bicep3 receiver was recently upgraded to a full complement of 20 tiles of detectors (2560 TESs) and is now beginning its second year of observation (and first science season) at the South Pole. We report on its current performance and observing plans. Given its high per-receiver throughput while maintaining the advantages of a compact design, Bicep3- class receivers are ideally suited as building blocks for a 3rd-generation CMB experiment, consisting of multiple receivers spanning 35 GHz to 270 GHz with total detector count in the tens of thousands. We present plans for such an array, the new "BICEP Array" that will replace the Keck Array at the South Pole, including design optimization, frequency coverage, and deployment/observing strategies.

  16. Testing hybrid natural inflation with BICEP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-González, Mariana [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Germán, Gabriel, E-mail: gabriel@fis.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, CP 09340, México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 58040, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Hidalgo, Juan Carlos [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Sussman, Roberto A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-543, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-06-27

    We analyse Hybrid Natural Inflation in view of the recent results for the tensor index reported by BICEP2. We find that it predicts a large running of the scalar spectrum which is potentially detectable by large scale structure through measurements of clustering of galaxies in combination with CMB data and by 21 cm forest observations. The running of the running is also relatively large becoming close to 10{sup −2}. Along the way, we find general consistency relations at which observables are subject if the slow-roll approximation is imposed. Failure to satisfy these equations by the values obtained for the observables in surveys would be a failure of the slow-roll approximation itself.

  17. Can weak lensing surveys confirm BICEP2 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Schmidt, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The detection of B-modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization by the BICEP2 experiment, if interpreted as evidence for a primordial gravitational wave background, has enormous ramifications for cosmology and physics. It is crucial to test this hypothesis with independent measurements. A gravitational wave background leads to B-modes in galaxy shape correlations (shear) both through lensing and tidal alignment effects. Since the systematics and foregrounds of galaxy shapes and CMB polarization are entirely different, a detection of a cross-correlation between the two observables would provide conclusive proof for the existence of a primordial gravitational wave background. We find that upcoming weak lensing surveys will be able to detect the cross-correlation between B-modes of the CMB and galaxy shapes. However, this detection is not sufficient to confirm or falsify the hypothesis of a primordial origin for CMB B-mode polarization.

  18. Selective ultrasound guided pectoral nerve targeting in breast augmentation: How to spare the brachial plexus cords?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Jean; Grabs, Ursula; Grabs, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    Subpectoral breast augmentation surgery under regional anesthesia requires the selective neural blockade of the medial and lateral pectoral nerves to diminish postoperative pain syndromes. The purpose of this cadaver study is to demonstrate a reliable ultrasound guided approach to selectively target the pectoral nerves and their branches while sparing the brachial plexus cords. After evaluating the position and appearance of the pectoral nerves in 25 cadavers (50 sides), a portable ultrasound machine was used to guide the injection of 10 ml of 0.2% aqueous methylene blue solution in the pectoral region on both sides of three Thiel's embalmed cadavers using a single entry point-triple injection technique. This technique uses a medial to lateral approach with the entry point just medial to the pectoral minor muscle and three subsequent infiltrations: (1) deep lateral part of the pectoralis minor muscle, (2) between the pectoralis minor and major muscles, and (3) between the pectoralis major muscle and its posterior fascia under ultrasound visualization. Dissection demonstrates that the medial and lateral pectoral nerves were well stained while leaving the brachial plexus cords unstained. We show that 10 ml of an injected solution is sufficient to stain all the medial and lateral pectoral nerve branches without a proximal extension to the cords of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2012 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Zilpaterol hydrochloride affects cellular muscle metabolism and lipid components of ten different muscles in feedlot heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study determined if zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) altered muscle metabolism and lipid components of ten muscles. Crossbred heifers were either supplemented with ZH (n = 9) or not (Control; n = 10). Muscle tissue was collected (adductor femoris, biceps femoris, gluteus medius, infraspinatus, lat...

  20. Do Mixed States save Effective Field Theory from BICEP?

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Hael; Vardanyan, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    The BICEP2 collaboration has for the first time observed the B-mode polarization associated with inflationary gravitational waves. Their result has some discomfiting implications for the validity of an effective theory approach to single-field inflation since it would require an inflaton field excursion larger than the Planck scale. We argue that if the quantum state of the gravitons is a mixed state based on the Bunch-Davies vacuum, then the tensor to scalar ratio r measured by BICEP is different than the quantity that enters the Lyth bound. When this is taken into account, the tension between effective field theory and the BICEP result is alleviated.

  1. Remote therapeutic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetric al brachial plexus palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To report a method and remote therape utic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetrical brachial pl exus palsy.   Methods: From May 1995 to August 1996, 12 patients who had no r ecovery of biceps 3 months after birth were treated with nerve transposition. Ei ght had neuroma at the upper trunk and 4 had rupture or avulsion of the upper tr unk. Mallet test was used to evaluate the results.   Results: The follow-up of 40-52 months showed that excellent and good recovery in functions was found in 75% of the patients and the excellen t rate of phrenic nerve and accessory nerve transposition was 83.3% and 6 6.7% respectively. A complete recovery in shoulder and elbow joint function wa s in 3 patients and Mallet Ⅳ was in 6 patients.   Conclusions: Satisfactory outcome can be obtained by using earl y nerve transposition in treating obstetrical brachial plexus.Paralysis, obstetric; Peripheral nerves; Nerve trans position

  2. Comparison of brachial artery vasoreactivity in elite power athletes and age-matched controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Welsch

    Full Text Available Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes.To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls.Eight elite power athletes (age = 23 ± 2 years and ten controls (age = 22 ± 1 yrs were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD and a cold pressor test (CPT. Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test.Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39 ± 1.51 vs.3.73 ± 0.71 mm, p0.05 and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88 ± 21 vs.98 ± 26 bpm, p>0.05 following the step test.Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an 'athlete's artery' as previously shown for elite endurance athletes to elite power athletes, and presents a hypothetical explanation for the functional significance of the 'power athlete's artery'.

  3. Comparison of brachial artery vasoreactivity in elite power athletes and age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Michael A; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P; Parish, Tracie R

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Eight elite power athletes (age = 23 ± 2 years) and ten controls (age = 22 ± 1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39 ± 1.51 vs. 3.73 ± 0.71 mm, p0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88 ± 21 vs. 98 ± 26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an 'athlete's artery' as previously shown for elite endurance athletes to elite power athletes, and presents a hypothetical explanation for the functional significance of the 'power athlete's artery'.

  4. ARTHROSCOPIC CORRECTION OF THE INJURIES OF THE COMPLEX «TENDON OF THE BICEPS LONG HEAD - THE ARTICULAR LIP» IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH FULL-LAYER RUPTURES OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Dokolin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage of the long head of the biceps at the place of attachment to the articular tubercle supraglenoidal lip of shoulder, to the entrance and throughout intertubercle furrows are common causes of pain and dysfunction of the shoulder joint. At the same clinical manifestations of the morphology of such lesions may be different. The current literature discusses various options of surgical correction of the biceps injury. Variety of methods of surgical treatment and the lack of consensus in support of their application in different patients in different types of injuries were the basis for the present study. A prospective analysis of the functional results of surgical treatment of the 34 - year’s patients with associated rotator cuff (SSP+ISP+SSC+ and the tendon of the biceps muscle in age from 34 to 75 years. Options for surgical correction of the damaged part of the biceps were: biceps tenotomy, biceps tenotomy with intraarticular tenodez of the shoulder to the head before entering intertubercle furrow, biceps tenotomy and extraarticular subpectorialtenodez to the proximal humerus is intertubercle interferrent screw groove, as well as its attachment to the tendon suture large pectoral muscle. Choice of surgical approach depended on the patient's age, level of daily physical activity, morphology and localization of lesions. The best results were obtained when the extra-articular subpectorialtenodez of long head of the biceps to the proximal humerus interferrent screw and suture fixation to the pectoralis major muscle, the average follow-up was 16,6 ± 4,7 months.

  5. Use of intercostal nerves for different target neurotization in brachial plexus reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykissas, Marios G; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis P; Korompilias, Ananstasios V; Vekris, Marios D; Beris, Alexandros E

    2013-01-01

    Intercostal nerve transfer is a valuable procedure in devastating plexopathies. Intercostal nerves are a very good choice for elbow flexion or extension and shoulder abduction when the intraplexus donor nerves are not available. The best results are obtained in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients, when direct nerve transfer is performed within six months from the injury. Unlike the adult posttraumatic patients after median and ulnar nerve neurotization with intercostal nerves, almost all obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients achieve protective sensation in the hand and some of them achieve active wrist and finger flexion. Use in combination with proper muscles, intercostal nerve transfer can yield adequate power to the paretic upper limb. Reinnervation of native muscles (i.e., latissimus dorsi) should always be sought as they can successfully be transferred later on for further functional restoration. PMID:23878776

  6. S-dual inflation: BICEP2 data without unlikeliness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College at CUNY, Bronx NY 10468 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Barger, Vernon [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goldberg, Haim [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Huang, Xing [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 116, Taiwan (China); Marfatia, Danny [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    We show that S-dual inflationary potentials solve the unlikeliness problem manifested in Planck data and explain the excess B-mode power observed by the BICEP2 experiment as arising from primordial tensor fluctuations.

  7. Constraints on cosmological parameters from Planck and BICEP2 data

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    We show that the tension introduced by the detection of large amplitude gravitational wave power by the BICEP2 experiment with temperature anisotropy measurements by the Planck mission is alleviated in models where extra light species contribute to the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom. We also show that inflationary models based on S-dual potentials are in agreement with Planck and BICEP2 data.

  8. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    1996-01-01

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus p

  9. BICEP3 performance overview and planned Keck Array upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Grayson, J A; Ahmed, Z; Alexander, K D; Amiri, M; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Boenish, H; Bowens-Rubin, R; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Halpern, M; Harrison, S; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Kang, J; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Monticue, V; Namikawa, T; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Schwarz, R; Sorensen, C; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Wandui, A; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Willmert, J; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    BICEP3 is a 520 mm aperture, compact two-lens refractor designed to observe the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 95 GHz. Its focal plane consists of modularized tiles of antenna-coupled transition edge sensors (TESs), similar to those used in BICEP2 and the Keck Array. The increased per-receiver optical throughput compared to BICEP2/Keck Array, due to both its faster f/1.7 optics and the larger aperture, more than doubles the combined mapping speed of the BICEP/Keck program. The BICEP3 receiver was recently upgraded to a full complement of 20 tiles of detectors (2560 TESs) and is now beginning its second year of observation (and first science season) at the South Pole. We report on its current performance and observing plans. Given its high per-receiver throughput while maintaining the advantages of a compact design, BICEP3-class receivers are ideally suited as building blocks for a 3rd-generation CMB experiment, consisting of multiple receivers spanning 35 GHz to 270 GHz with total de...

  10. Gauged M-flation after BICEP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ashoorioon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In view of the recent BICEP2 results [arXiv:1403.3985] which may be attributed to the observation of B-modes polarization of the CMB with tensor-to-scalar ratio r=0.2−0.05+0.07, we revisit M-flation model. Gauged M-flation is a string theory motivated inflation model with Matrix valued scalar inflaton fields in the adjoint representation of a U(N Yang–Mills theory. In continuation of our previous works, we show that for a class of M-flation models the action for these inflaton fields can be such that the “effective inflaton field” ϕ has a double-well Higgs-like potential, with minima at ϕ=0,μ. We focus on the ϕ>μ, symmetry-breaking region. We thoroughly examine predictions of the model for r in the 2σ region allowed for nS by the Planck experiment. As computed in [arXiv:0903.1481], for Ne=60 and nS=0.96 we find r≃0.2, which sits in the sweet spot of BICEP2 region for r. We find that with increasing μ arbitrarily, nS cannot go beyond ≃0.9670, the scalar spectral index for the quadratic chaotic potential. As nS varies in the 2σ range which is allowed by Planck and could be reached by the model, r varies in the range [0.13,0.26]. Future cosmological experiments, like the CMBPOL, that confines nS with σ(nS=0.0029 can constrain the model further. Also, in this region of potential, for nS=0.9603, we find that the largest isocurvature mode, which is uncorrelated with curvature perturbations, has a power spectrum with the amplitude of order 10−11 at the end of inflation. We also discuss the range of predictions of r in the hilltop region, ϕ<μ.

  11. 26例臂丛神经损伤的神经肌电图分析%The Analysis of Electroneuromyography in 26 Cases with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄沚荷; 林深镇; 罗映辉; 丘春柳; 郭美云

    2000-01-01

    目的:探讨神经肌电图在臂丛受损诊断及定位中的作用.方法:对26例臂丛受损者采用表面电极法沿神经走行的不同部位顺向检测正中神经、尺神经、桡神经、肌皮神经、腋神经共91条神经的感觉及运动传导速度(或末端潜伏期)、F波;并用同心圆针电极观察拇短展肌、小指展肌、指总伸肌、肱二头肌、三角肌、冈上肌、冈下肌共114块肌肉的病理自发电位及募集形式.结果:91条运动神经在不同节段收集共有64条异常(70.3%);60条感觉神经有40条异常(66.7%);26例中F波异常者8例(30.8%).检测114块肌肉,其中59块肌肉静息状态出现≥两处纤颤和(或)正锐波; 49块肌肉重收缩时无运动单位电位,9块肌肉募集电位明显减小.结论:神经肌电图在臂丛神经损伤的诊断及定位中具有重要作用.%Objective:To investigate the significance of electroneuromyography in localization and clinical diagnosis of brachial plexus injuries. Methods: Othodromic surface stimulation and recording were used for nerve conduction studies . The motor and sensory conduction velocity were recoreded in different segments of 91 nerves including median,ulnar, radial, musculocutaneous and axillary nerves.F-wave latencies of the median nerves were obtained too. The standard concentric needle electromyography examination was performed on total 114 muscles containing abductor pollicis brevis, abductor digiti minimi, extensor digitorum,biceps brachii,deltoid, supraspinatus and infraspinatus. The pathological spontaneous electric activities and the pattern of motor unit recruitment were observed .Results: Abnormalities were noted in 64 out of 91 motor nerves(70.3% )and in 40 out of 60 sensory nerves (66.7%). Eight out of 26 F-wave latencies prolonged(30.8%). At least two localization fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves occured in 59 out of 114 resting muscles .The motor unit active potentials disappeared during maximal

  12. [The laterocranial fascia structures in the upper and forearm and the differences in the insertion of the M. biceps brachii in domestic mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzel, W; Forstenpointner, G; Skolek-Winnisch, R

    1993-03-01

    The laterocranial fascia of the upper arm and forearm, as well as aponeurotic relationships of the Musculus biceps brachii were investigated on each of ten forelimbs from horses, cattle and swine. Ten canine biceps were also investigated. Equine and bovine fascia contain elastic components. An as-yet undescribed ligament-like aponeuroses of the laterocranial forearm fascia to the Fossa radialis humeri was seen in all three species studied. The laterocranial fascia of the upper and forearm form a common passage for the Musculi brachialis et extensor carpi radialis. In the case of the horse, the ulnar aponeurotic tendon of the biceps muscle crosses below the Ligamentum collaterale cubiti medialis. In cattle, on the other hand, it runs between the two branches of the collateral ligament, to attach on the olecranon. This portion of the equine tendon protrudes into the joint. It has connective tissue character in young animals, but becomes fibrocartilaginous in older horses. The radial aponeuroses of the canine biceps exhibits two branches. A situation similar to that seen for the ulnar aponeuroses of the equine Musculus biceps brachii is observed on the inside surface of the porcine Ligamentum cubiti mediale, in which a wedge of connective tissue protrudes into the joint, taking on fibrocartilaginous character in older animals.

  13. Systematic evaluation of brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, S

    1993-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries offer a unique challenge to the athletic trainer because of their relatively high frequency rate in contact sports and because of the complexity of the neuroanatomy in the cervical area. During a game, athletic trainers must make a fast, accurate decision regarding a player's return to competition. It is imperative that the athletic trainer be able to quickly differentiate between minor injuries and more serious injuries warranting removal from the game and/or physician referral. A systematic approach to the evaluation of a brachial plexus injury is essential to ensure proper treatment. This paper will present a structured approach to an on-the-field assessment of brachial plexus injuries.

  14. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  15. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Chrysanthou, Chrysanthos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year) after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length) and 67.9% (width) after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention. Key pointsChanges in fascicle orientation after biceps femoris mild tear were reduced after a 28 day intervention and remained similar one year after injury.Tendon/aponeurosis strain per unit of moment of force decreased during the course of the therapeutic intervention.Future studies could utilize ultrasonography to monitor mechanical responses after various types of hamstring injury and interventions in order to improve criteria for a safe return to sport.

  16. Degeneration of the long biceps tendon: comparison of MRI with gross anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Florian M; Grehn, Holger; Hilbe, Monika; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Manzanell, Silvana; Hodler, Jürg

    2009-11-01

    The objective of our study was to relate alterations in biceps tendon diameter and signal on MR images to gross anatomy and histology. T1-weighted, T2-weighted fat-saturated, and proton density-weighted fat-saturated spin-echo sequences were acquired in 15 cadaveric shoulders. Biceps tendon diameter (normal, flattened, thickened, and partially or completely torn) and signal intensity (compared with bone, fat, muscle, and joint fluid) were graded by two readers independently and in a blinded fashion. The distance of tendon abnormalities from the attachment at the glenoid were noted in millimeters. MRI findings were related to gross anatomic and histologic findings. On the basis of gross anatomy, there were six normal, five flattened, two thickened, and two partially torn tendons. Reader 1 graded nine diameter changes correctly, missed two, and incorrectly graded four. The corresponding values for reader 2 were seven, one, and five, respectively, with kappa = 0.75. Histology showed mucoid degeneration (n = 13), lipoid degeneration (n = 7), and fatty infiltration (n = 6). At least one type of abnormality was found in each single tendon. Mucoid degeneration was hyperintense compared with fatty infiltration on T2-weighted fat-saturated images and hyperintense compared with magic-angle artifacts on proton density-weighted fat-saturated images. MRI-based localization of degeneration agreed well with histologic findings. Diameter changes are specific but not sensitive in diagnosing tendinopathy of the biceps tendon. Increased tendon signal is most typical for mucoid degeneration but should be used with care as a sign of tendon degeneration.

  17. [Current concepts in perinatal brachial plexus palsy. Part 2: late phase. Shoulder deformities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogliotti, Andrés Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial palsy is high and their sequelaes are frequent. Physiotherapy, microsurgical nerve reconstruction and secondary corrections are used together to improve the shoulder function. The most common posture is shoulder in internal rotation and adduction, because of the antagonist weakness. The muscle forces imbalance over the osteoarticular system, will result in a progressive glenohumeral joint deformity which can be recognized with a magnetic resonance image. Tendon transfers of the internal rotators towards the external abductor/rotator muscles, has good results, but has to be combined with antero-inferior soft-tissue releases, if passive range of motion is limited.

  18. Our experience with triceps nerve reconstruction in patients with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Barmpitsioti, Antonia

    2012-05-01

    Although elbow extension is facilitated by gravity, triceps muscle provides elbow joint stability; in patients with brachial plexus injuries stable elbow is necessary for obtaining useful hand function. This study presents the senior author's experience with triceps nerve reconstruction and the functional results in patients with brachial plexus injuries. Outcomes were analyzed in relation to denervation time, severity score, length of the interposition nerve graft and donor nerves used. One hundred and sixty two patients with brachial plexus injury had triceps nerve neurotization and elbow extension recovery between 1978 and 2006. The mean patient's age was 25.45 ± 9.90 years and the mean denervation time was 16.90 ± 26.95 months. Two hundred and thirty two motor donors were used in 156 patients; 6 patients underwent neurolysis; 86 intercostal nerves were transferred in 41 patients. Interposition nerve grafts were used in 130 patients. Results were good or excellent in 31.65% of patients. The age of patients and the severity of the brachial plexus lesion are among the factors that significantly influenced functional results. Intraplexus motor donors are always preferable achieving better functional outcomes than extraplexus donors. Intercostal nerves and the posterior division of contralateral C7 proved preferred donors for elbow extension restoration in multiple avulsions. Although it is difficult to restore strong elbow extension, triceps nerve reconstruction is suggested in brachial plexus management, since it provides elbow stability. Satisfactory elbow extension strength was restored in young patients with high severity score. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Percutaneous brachial access: a few simple considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, P Y; Ianessi, A; Ben Taarit, I

    2009-01-01

    This letter is with regards to the recently published article by Vidal et al. in the Journal Français de Radiologie Médicale. A clarification of US and venographic techniques of brachial venous catheterization and related complications are presented. The main indications for PICC line and subcutaneous port placement are described.

  20. Behaviour of the electrical impedance myography in isometric contraction of biceps brachii at different elbow joint angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, A. B. B.; Jotta, B.; Pino, A. V.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) can be understood as an experimental technique applied to evaluate bioelectrical impedance associated to the muscular activity. With the development of technique, some studies are trying to associate the EIM parameters with the morphological and physiological changes that occur in the muscle during contraction. In this context this work sought to associate EIM parameters observed during isometric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle at different elbow joint angles with the correspondent muscular force. Differently from previous works that did not observe significant correlation between those data, our findings point to high correlations between the some EIM resistive parameters and the muscle force. Despite the need of further investigation, our results indicated that EIM technique can be used to estimate muscle force in a noninvasive way.

  1. bicep2/KECK ARRAY. IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hui, H. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Barkats, D. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bischoff, C. A.; Bradford, K. J.; Buder, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS 42, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bullock, E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Duband, L. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA INAC-SBT, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Fliescher, S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hilton, G. C., E-mail: avieregg@kicp.uchicago.edu [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Collaboration: bicep2 and Keck Array Collaborations; and others

    2015-06-20

    bicep2 and the Keck Array are polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. bicep2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). bicep2 and the Keck Array share a common optical design and employ the field-proven bicep1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of bicep2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.

  2. Biceps tendinitis in chronic rotator cuff tears: a histologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaraju, Vamsi M; Kang, Richard W; Yanke, Adam B; McNickle, Allison G; Lewis, Paul B; Wang, Vincent M; Williams, James M; Chubinskaya, Susan; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic rotator cuff tears frequently have anterior shoulder pain attributed to the long head of the biceps brachii (LHBB) tendon. In this study, tenodesis or tenotomy samples and cadaveric controls were assessed by use of immunohistochemical and histologic methods to quantify inflammation, vascularity, and neuronal plasticity. Patients had moderate pain and positive results on at least 1 clinical test of shoulder function. The number of axons in the distal LHBB was significantly less in patients with biceps tendinitis. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunostaining was predominantly within nerve roots and blood vessels. A moderate correlation (R = 0.5) was identified between LHBB vascularity and pain scores. On the basis of these results, we conclude that, in the context of rotator cuff disease, the etiology of anterior shoulder pain with macroscopic changes in the biceps tendon is related to the complex interaction of the tendon and surrounding soft tissues, rather than a single entity.

  3. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios Kellis, Nikiforos Galanis, Chrysanthos Chrysanthou, Nikolaos Kofotolis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length and 67.9% (width after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention.

  4. Microscopic polyangiitis complicated with bilateral brachial plexopathy: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri Alavi, Seyed Ahmad; Meshkini, Mohammad; Pourlak, Tala; Khabbazi, Alireza

    2016-07-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis is a small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and presents itself with glomerulonephritis and hemorrhagic pulmonary capillaritis. Peripheral nervous system involvement is common in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis, but brachial plexopathy is unusual. We present the case of a 22-year-old man with known microscopic polyangiitis who was under maintenance therapy with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide and developed cough, dyspnea, and hemoptysis which increased in 6 days accompanying pain and paresthesia in the upper limbs. His physical examination revealed hypoesthesia, absence of deep tendon reflexes, and decreased muscle strength in the upper limbs. His chest computed tomography scan showed ground glass pattern in the lower and middle lobes. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed bilateral brachial plexopathy with involvement of all of the cervical roots that were more severe in the lower roots and left side.

  5. Age-related botulinum toxin effects on muscle fiber conduction velocity in non-injected muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Fiete; van Weerden, Tiemen W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We studied systemic effects of botulinum toxin (BTX) treatment on muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and possible effects of age. Methods: MFCV was determined by an invasive EMG method in the biceps brachii muscle. Seventeen BTX treated patients and 58 controls were investigated. BTX

  6. BICEP2. II. Experiment and three-year data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Amiri, M.; Davis, G.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Barkats, D. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bischoff, C. A.; Buder, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS 42, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bullock, E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Day, P. K.; Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Duband, L. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA INAC-SBT, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Fliescher, S., E-mail: ogburn@stanford.edu [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Collaboration: Bicep2 Collaboration; and others

    2014-09-01

    We report on the design and performance of the BICEP2 instrument and on its three-year data set. BICEP2 was designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales of 1°-5°(ℓ = 40-200), near the expected peak of the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves from cosmic inflation. Measuring B-modes requires dramatic improvements in sensitivity combined with exquisite control of systematics. The BICEP2 telescope observed from the South Pole with a 26 cm aperture and cold, on-axis, refractive optics. BICEP2 also adopted a new detector design in which beam-defining slot antenna arrays couple to transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, all fabricated on a common substrate. The antenna-coupled TES detectors supported scalable fabrication and multiplexed readout that allowed BICEP2 to achieve a high detector count of 500 bolometers at 150 GHz, giving unprecedented sensitivity to B-modes at degree angular scales. After optimization of detector and readout parameters, BICEP2 achieved an instrument noise-equivalent temperature of 15.8 μK√s. The full data set reached Stokes Q and U map depths of 87.2 nK in square-degree pixels (5.'2 μK) over an effective area of 384 deg{sup 2} within a 1000 deg{sup 2} field. These are the deepest CMB polarization maps at degree angular scales to date. The power spectrum analysis presented in a companion paper has resulted in a significant detection of B-mode polarization at degree scales.

  7. CMB polarimetry with BICEP: instrument characterization, calibration, and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Yuki D; Battle, John O; Bierman, Evan M; Bock, James J; Chiang, H Cynthia; Dowell, C Darren; Hivon, Eric F; Holzapfel, William L; Hristov, Viktor V; Jones, William C; Kaufman, J P; Keating, Brian G; Kovac, John M; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lange, Andrew E; Leitch, Erik M; Mason, Peter V; Matsumura, Tomotake; Nguyen, Hien T; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Rocha, Graca M; Yoon, Ki Won; Ade, P; Duband, L

    2008-01-01

    BICEP is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometric array designed to target the primordial gravity wave signature on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. Currently in its third year of operation at the South Pole, BICEP is measuring the CMB polarization with unprecedented sensitivity at 100 and 150 GHz in the cleanest available 2% of the sky, as well as deriving independent constraints on the diffuse polarized foregrounds with select observations on and off the Galactic plane. Instrument calibrations are discussed in the context of rigorous control of systematic errors, and the performance during the first two years of the experiment is reviewed.

  8. Tree Level Potential on Brane after Planck and BICEP2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Ferricha-Alami; A. Safsafi; L. Lahlou; H. Chakir; M. Bennai

    2015-06-01

    The recent detection of degree scale B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by the BICEP2 experiment implies that the inflationary ratio of tensor-to-scalar fluctuations is = 0.2$^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$, which has opened a new window in the cosmological investigation. In this regard, we propose a study of the tree level potential inflation in the framework of the Randall–Sundrum type-2 braneworld model. We focus on three branches of the potential, where we evaluate some values of brane tension . We discuss how the various inflationary perturbation parameters can be compatible with recent Planck and BICEP2 observations.

  9. Quantitative Diagnostic Method for Biceps Long Head Tendinitis by Using Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Wei Huang; Wei-Te Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the feasibility of grayscale quantitative diagnostic method for biceps tendinitis and determine the cut-off points of a quantitative biceps ultrasound (US) method to diagnose biceps tendinitis. Design. Prospective cross-sectional case controlled study. Setting. Outpatient rehabilitation service. Methods. A total of 336 shoulder pain patients with suspected biceps tendinitis were recruited in this prospective observational study. The grayscale pixel data of the range ...

  10. Restoration of elbow extension after primary reconstruction in obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2010-03-01

    Elbow extension is important for the elbow joint, and it is more difficult to restore with microsurgery than elbow flexion. The purpose of this article is to describe the experience of the authors with elbow extension reconstruction in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to the type of brachial plexus lesion, timing of surgery, and the type of nerve reconstruction. Fifty-five children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy who underwent nerve reconstruction for elbow extension restoration were studied. The mean follow-up period was 6.4 years (range, 2-22 y). Reinnervation of the triceps muscle was accomplished with indirect neurotization of the posterior cord from intraplexus donors or with direct neurotization from extraplexus donors, such as the contralateral C7 and the intercostal nerves. Thirty-seven (67%) of the 55 cases showed good or excellent results (>or=M3+). The average postoperative muscle grading for the triceps was 3.34+/-0.99 compared with 1.19+/-1.29 preoperatively (P<0.0001). Patients with C5 to C7 palsy achieved significantly stronger elbow extension than those with C5 to T1 palsy. In addition, the timing of surgery significantly influenced the final outcome. Elbow extension is one of big challenges to be restored, especially in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. In early cases (within 6 mo) intraplexus reconstruction of the posterior cord can give excellent results. In later cases, or in cases of multiple avulsions, extraplexus motor donors, which selectively targeted the triceps, can give variable results.

  11. Axillary artery injury combined with delayed brachial plexus palsy due to compressive hematoma in a young patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajima Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Axillary artery injury in the shoulder region following blunt trauma without association with either shoulder dislocation or fracture of the humeral neck has been previously reported. Axillary artery injury might also be accompanied with brachial plexus injury. However, delayed onset of brachial plexus palsy caused by a compressive hematoma associated with axillary injury after blunt trauma in the shoulder region has been rarely reported. In previous reports, this condition only occurred in old patients with sclerotic vessels. We present a case of a young patient who suffered axillary artery injury associated with brachial plexus palsy that occurred tardily due to compressive hematoma after blunt trauma in the shoulder region without association of either shoulder dislocation or humeral neck fracture. Case presentation A 16-year-old male injured his right shoulder in a motorbike accident. On initial physical evaluation, the pulses on the radial and ulnar arteries in the affected arm were palpable. Paralysis developed later from 2 days after the injury. Functions in the right arm became significantly impaired. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the axillary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass measuring 4 × 5 cm that was suspected to be a hematoma compressing the brachial plexus in a space between the subscapular muscle and the pectoralis minor muscle. Surgery was performed on the third day after injury. In intraoperative observations, the axillary artery was occluded with thrombus along 5 cm; a subscapular artery was ruptured; the brachial plexus was compressed by the hematoma. After evacuation of the hematoma, neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and revascularization of the axillary artery, the patient had an excellent functional recovery of the affected upper limb, postoperatively. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that axillary artery injuries may even occur in young people after severe blunt

  12. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali, E-mail: vshali77@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Upadhyaya, Divya N. [Department of Plastic Surgery, King George Medical University, Shah Meena Road, Chowk, Lucknow 226 003 (India); Kumar, Adarsh [Department of Plastic Surgery, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Gujral, Ratni B. [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • MR neurography is the imaging modality of choice in patients who have sustained brachial plexus injury. It is helpful in determining the level and extent of injury. • The authors have used a Visual Per-operative Scoring system to assess the usefulness of MR neurography in delineating the level and type of the lesion. • The imaging findings were classified based on the level of injury—root, trunk or cord. These findings were correlated with those seen on surgical exploration. A good correlation was found in the majority (65%) of patients and average correlation (30%) in others. - Abstract: Objectives: Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Methods: Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus—roots, trunks and cords. Results: Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative

  13. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results: Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion: Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. Keywords: biceps tendinitis, biceps tendinopathy, tenosynovium, anterior shoulder pain, long head biceps

  14. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  15. Brachial Approach to NOGA-Guided Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banovic, Marko; Ostojic, Miodrag C.; Bartunek, Jozef; Nedeljkovic, Milan; Beleslin, Branko; Terzic, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Several methods are available for delivering stem cells to the heart. Recent studies have highlighted the advantages of injecting the cells directly into the myocardium in order to increase myocardial retention of cells. A particular focus has been on percutaneous transendocardial injection, facilitated by electromechanical mapping. The NOGA® XP Cardiac Navigation System has a multicomponent catheter that is designed to guide and deliver transendocardial injections via a transfemoral approach, without a guidewire. However, this method may not be feasible in some patients who have peripheral vascular disease. Herein, we describe the case of a 68-year-old man whose tortuous, sharply angled iliac arteries precluded a femoral approach to transendocardial injection. To overcome the anatomic and mechanical challenges, we used a brachial approach. We believe that this is the 1st report of using the brachial route for transendocardial injection, and that it can be a viable alternative to the transfemoral approach in selected patients. PMID:21494532

  16. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: amchen@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  17. Effect of ageing time in vacuum package on veal longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris physical and sensory traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baldi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Study evaluated the effects of vacuum ageing (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 days on veal loin (longissimus dorsi; LD and silverside (biceps femoris; BF physical and sensory characteristics. Ageing did not affect cooking loss, increased LD pH and L*, a* and b* in both muscles. Shear force (SF decreased until day 6 in LD and day 10 in BF. Aroma, flavor and taste were not affected, while texturetraits were improved. SF was negative correlated with tenderness and juiciness and positive correlated with BF fibrousness and stringy sensation. Ageing improved texture properties withoutaltering other sensory traits.

  18. Intracapsular origin of the long head of the biceps tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, L.R. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Pedowitz, R. [Department of Orthopedics, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Kwak, S.; Muhle, C.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, P. [Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1999-03-01

    A developmental anomaly of the long head of the biceps tendon was found in a cadaveric shoulder. Findings on arthroscopy, routine MR imaging, and MR arthrography were compared and correlated with results of anatomic dissection. MR arthrography appears to be a very good diagnostic imaging method for depicting this anomaly prior to arthroscopy. (orig.) With 3 figs., 8 refs.

  19. Elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures: epicondylitis, biceps and triceps ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rineer, Craig A; Ruch, David S

    2009-03-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis are common causes of elbow pain in the general population, with the lateral variety being more common than the medial by a ratio reportedly ranging from 4:1 to 7:1. Initially thought to be an inflammatory condition, epicondylitis has ultimately been shown to result from tendinous microtearing followed by an incomplete reparative response. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatment options have been employed in the treatment of epicondylitis, without the emergence of a single, consistent, universally accepted treatment protocol. Tendon ruptures about the elbow are much less frequent, but result in more significant disability and loss of function. Distal biceps tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males as a result of an event that causes a sudden, eccentric contraction of the biceps. Triceps tendon ruptures are exceedingly rare but usually have a similar etiology with a forceful eccentric contraction of the triceps that causes avulsion of the tendon from the olecranon. The diagnosis of these injuries is not always readily made. Complete ruptures of the biceps or triceps tendons have traditionally been treated surgically with good results. With regard to biceps ruptures, there continues to be debate about the best surgical approach, as well as the best method of fixation of tendon to bone. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review of the broad topics of elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures, but rather is a review of recently published information on the topics that will assist the clinician in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  20. Endoscopic Repair of Acute and Chronic Retracted Distal Biceps Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2016-12-01

    Distal biceps tendon (DBT) ruptures are infrequent injuries that result in pain, weakness, and cosmetic deformity. Severe retraction of the ruptured DBT can occur at the time of injury, or in chronic neglected ruptures, and surgical exposure is performed using a single incision or a 2-incision technique. The technique presented here describes an endoscopic approach using 3 portals that provide access to the retracted DBT, biceps sheath, and radial tuberosity. Preoperative sonographic localization of the retracted DBT and neurovascular structures is used to guide portal placement. The parabiceps portal is used for visualization of the biceps sheath remnant, and the midbiceps portal is used to visualize and retrieve the retracted tendon in the arm. The retracted DBT is shuttled through the biceps sheath into the upper forearm, and 2 suture anchors are passed into the radial tuberosity under direct endoscopic vision. The DBT is whipstitched via the distal anterior portal, and nonsliding knots are tied to securely reattach the DBT to the prepared radial tuberosity. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of elbow position on biceps tendon reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles Isik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testing of tendon (T reflex is the basic method used in the diagnostic procedure of clinical neurology. Measurement of T reflexes precisely can be a valuable adjunct to clinical examination. Quantification of T reflexes may provide more accurate results. Aims: To analyze the effect of elbow position on biceps T reflex. Settings and Design: A self-controlled clinical trial of biceps T reflex testing at the Electrophysiology Unit of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Methods and Materials: Biceps T reflex was obtained utilizing a hand-held electronic reflex hammer in 50 extremities of 25 healthy volunteers and the effect of elbow position (at 90°, 120° and 150° on reflex response was evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Repeated-measures analysis of variance by the General Linear Model and Pearson correlation test procedures. Results: Onset latency was significantly shorter at 120° of elbow position. The maximum amplitude value of biceps T reflex was obtained at 90° of elbow position. Onset latency of the reflex correlated significantly with the height and arm length but not with age. Conclusions: The electrophysiological measurement of T reflexes is an easy and useful method in the quantification of reflexes, supplying more objective data. However, when performing T reflex studies, the position of the extremity should be taken into consideration to achieve more reliable results.

  2. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Yalcin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture.

  3. [Reconstruction of quadriceps femoris muscle function with muscle transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Meric, C

    2010-08-01

    Femoral nerve palsy, mostly of iatrogen cause, leads to paresis of quadriceps muscle with complete loss of knee extension. Therapeutical options include neurolysis, nerve reconstruction or functional muscle transplantations. Another concept is the transfer of hamstring muscles as described in post polio surgery. We describe our experience of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscle transfer for reconstruction of knee extension. From 2003 to 2007 seven patients (mean age 43) with complete loss of knee extension after femoral nerve lesion were treated. Nerve palsy was caused by direct lesion, traction, hematoma after collapse, lesion of lumbosacral plexus and an unclear muscle dystrophy. Indication for muscle transfer was due to long standing muscle paresis. All patients received a transfer of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscle/tendon into the quadriceps tendon. Patients were immobilised in a cast for 6 weeks in extended knee position. Weight bearing started after 8 weeks. Operations went uneventfully. All patients were able to extend the knee postoperatively against gravity and were able to climb stairs without help. 4 Patients had complete knee extension, 2 had a lack of 20 degrees , one of 30 degrees. Daily routine was possible in all cases. No instability of knee joints occurred postoperatively. In a nerve lesion close to the muscle a nerve reconstruction should be aimed. If not performed or with unsuccessful outcome, muscle transfer is a good option to restore function. All recent studies describe good to excellent results with stable knees, allowing the patient to manage daily routine without assistance and to climb stairs up and down. Long term complications such as dislocation of patella or genu recurvatum were not observed in our patients. The latter results as typical complication in polio from weakening knee flexion through biceps femoris transfer, if the gastrocnemius muscle is not forceful enough. However in an isolated femoral nerve lesion this

  4. Advanced Development of an Active Neuromusculature Response to Mechanical Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-31

    damping component, since the sarcolemna attached to the z disks does not allow appreciable movement. The tendinous parts of the muscle fiber are...can be found. These range from uo-.005 for the human rectus femorus muscle to uo-.009 for the human biceps muscle (Hatze, 1979) with an average value...three elbow flexor muscles: biceps brachii, brachial is and brachloradialis. Examination of the biceps brachii more closely shows the origin of the

  5. Repeated upper limb salvage in a case of severe traumatic soft-tissue and brachial artery defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaman, Hassan Hamdy; Shiha, Anis Elsayed

    2002-01-01

    We present the case of a 9-year-old male patient who suffered a gunshot injury to the right arm. The patient arrived in shock, his right arm severely traumatized, with soft-tissue loss involving the anterior surface and both sides of the right arm. The humerus was exposed. There was brachial artery defect and damage to the lateral fibers of the median nerve. The mangled extremity severity score (MESS) was 8 points. The patient was treated with general resuscitation, blood transfusion, and debridement. A venous graft, 12 cm in length, to bridge the brachial artery defect, and tendon transfer, triceps to the biceps, was performed in one step. Postoperatively, there was a normal radial pulse, normal skin color, normal temperature, and normal movement of the fingers without pain. Unfortunately, the patient then sustained a second trauma to the right arm 3 weeks later, rupturing the graft. This time he lost 1,500 cc of blood. After another blood transfusion, we performed a second reverse saphenous vein graft. The patient stayed at the hospital for 3 weeks. At follow-up 12 months later, the limb has good function and, except for the presence of a scar and skin graft, is equal in appearance to the left side.

  6. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-08-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P rotation [ER]: 57.5 ± 9.9 to 86.8 ± 9.3; internal rotation [IR]: 68.1 ± 10.8 to 88.1 ± 8.4; P rotator cuff tendon on postoperative MRI. The retear rate between the 2 groups showed no significant difference ( P = .552). Regarding clinical outcomes, both groups had no significant difference in the ASES score

  7. MRI of the brachial plexus: A pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Hendrik W. van [Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.es@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Bollen, Thomas L.; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus is the imaging modality of first choice for depicting anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. The anatomy of the roots, trunks, divisions and cords is very well depicted due to the inherent contrast differences between the nerves and the surrounding fat. In this pictorial review the technique and the anatomy will be discussed. The following pathology will be addressed: neurogenic tumors of the brachial plexus and sympathetic chain, superior sulcus tumors, other tumors in the vicinity of the brachial plexus, the differentiation between radiation and metastatic plexopathy, trauma, neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome and immune-mediated neuropathies.

  8. Functional Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Utilizing Homologous Extracellular Matrix as Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    should also serve as a scaffold and allow the incorporation of regenerat- ing muscle, connective, nerve , and blood vessel tissues. Several types of...To close the wound, the biceps femoris muscle was reattached to the tibia using simple, interrupted, polypropylene suture (Prolene 5-0; Ethicon, San...from the superficial skin and biceps femoris as well as the deep soleus and plan- taris. The nerve branch innervating the medial GAS was transected to

  9. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M Saltzman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160΀ of active forward elevation, 45΀ of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5.

  10. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  11. Improving the accuracy of the preoperative diagnosis of long head of the biceps pathology: the biceps resisted flexion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARRIGONI, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; DENARD, PATRICK; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE; CABITZA, PAOLO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to describe a new test for identifying lesions of the long head of the biceps (LHB) and to evaluate its diagnostic performance in comparison with selected traditional clinical tests. Methods one hundred and nine consecutive candidates for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were prospectively recruited. The BRF test, which measures biceps resisted flexion strength, was performed with the patient seated (armat the side and elbow flexed at 90°). The patient was asked to maintain maximal resistance for five seconds while strength was assessed with a digital dynamometer. Since the dynamometer expresses a continuous variable in kilograms, the measure was dichotomized using a threshold value (cut-off) value-able to simultaneously maximize the sensitivity and specificity. This cut-off value was derived from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Speed’s test and the O’Brien test were also performed. During arthroscopy the presence of LHB pathology was assessed. Results biceps resisted flexion strength was significantly higher in patients without associated LHB lesions [median (range): 3 kg (0–9.5 kg) versus 0 kg (0–8.5 kg); plesions. Conclusions the dBRF test showed higher accuracy than traditional clinical tests in diagnosing LHB lesions. This novel test for biceps pathology may be advantageous because it is objective and therefore likely reproducible. Level of Evidence Level II, Development of diagnostic test on basis of consecutive patients (with universally applied reference “gold” standard). PMID:25606543

  12. Slap Lesions in Middle-aged Patients: Biceps Repair or Tenodesis? What Should We Perform for Long Biceps Tendon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Sastre

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Biceps tenodesis is a feasible therapeutic alternative to anatomical repair for the treatment of SLAP lesions in middle-aged patients; the reinsertion failure rates for this type of lesion are rather discouraging due to the high percentage of revision surgeries that must be carried out after the primary intervention.

  13. Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Anil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether monitoring end- tidal Carbon Dioxide (capnography can be used to reliably identify the phrenic nerve during the supraclavicular exploration for brachial plexus injury. Methods Three consecutive patients with traction pan-brachial plexus injuries scheduled for neurotization were evaluated under an anesthetic protocol to allow intraoperative electrophysiology. Muscle relaxants were avoided, anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl and the airway was secured with an appropriate sized laryngeal mask airway. Routine monitoring included heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry and time capnography. The phrenic nerve was identified after blind bipolar electrical stimulation using a handheld bipolar nerve stimulator set at 2–4 mA. The capnographic wave form was observed by the neuroanesthetist and simultaneous diaphragmatic contraction was assessed by the surgical assistant. Both observers were blinded as to when the bipolar stimulating electrode was actually in use. Results In all patients, the capnographic wave form revealed a notch at a stimulating amplitude of about 2–4 mA. This became progressively jagged with increasing current till diaphragmatic contraction could be palpated by the blinded surgical assistant at about 6–7 mA. Conclusion Capnography is a sensitive intraoperative test for localizing the phrenic nerve during the supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus.

  14. Anatomy of the long head of biceps femoris: An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosovic, D; Muirhead, J C; Brown, J M M; Woodley, S J

    2016-09-01

    Hamstring strains, particularly involving the long head of biceps femoris (BFlh) at the proximal musculotendinous junction (MTJ), are commonly experienced by athletes. With the use of diagnostic ultrasound increasing, an in-depth knowledge of normal ultrasonographic anatomy is fundamental to better understanding hamstring strain. The aim of this study was to describe the architecture of BFlh, using ultrasonography, in young men and cadaver specimens. BFlh morphology was examined in 19 healthy male participants (mean age 21.6 years) using ultrasound. Muscle, tendon and MTJ lengths were recorded and architectural parameters assessed at four standardised points along the muscle. Measurement accuracy was validated by ultrasound and dissection of BFlh in six male cadaver lower limbs (mean age 76 years). Intra-rater reliability of architectural parameters was examined for repeat scans, image analysis and dissection measurements. Distally the BFlh muscle had significantly (P MTJ length. All other measures demonstrated good-excellent repeatability. BFlh is not uniform in architecture when imaged using ultrasound. It is likely that its distal-most segment is better suited for force production in comparison to the more proximal segments, which show excursive potential, traits which possibly contribute to the high rate of injury at the proximal MTJ. The data presented in this study provide specific knowledge of the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of BFlh, which should be of assistance in analysing BFlh injury via imaging. Clin. Anat. 29:738-745, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ruying; Rong, Xiaoming; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Huang, Xiaolong; Luo, Jinjun; Tang, Yamei

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) is one of the late complications in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate its clinical characteristics and risk factors. Thirty-onepatients with RIBP after radiotherapy for NPC were enrolled. Clinical manifestations of RIBP, electrophysiologic data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the correlation between irradiation strategy and incidence of RIBP were evaluated. The mean latency at the onset of RIBP was 4.26 years. Of the symptoms, paraesthesia usually presented first (51.6%), followed by pain (22.6%) and weakness (22.6%). The major symptoms included paraesthesia (90.3%), pain (54.8%), weakness (48.4%), fasciculation (19.3%) and muscle atrophy (9.7%). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electromyography (EMG) disclosed that pathological changes of brachial plexus involved predominantly in the upper and middle trunks in distribution. MRI of the brachial plexus showed hyper-intensity on T1, T2, post-contrast T1 and diffusion weighted whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) images in lower cervical nerves. Radiotherapy with Gross Tumor volume (GTVnd) and therapeutic dose (mean 66.8±2.8Gy) for patients with lower cervical lymph node metastasis was related to a significantly higher incidence of RIBP (P<0.001). Thus, RIBP is a severe and progressive complication of NPC after radiotherapy. The clinical symptoms are predominantly involved in upper and middle trunk of the brachial plexus in distribution. Lower cervical lymph node metastasis and corresponding radiotherapy might cause a significant increase of the RIBP incidence. PMID:26934119

  16. Vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block in children: a preliminary study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose Maria, B. de; Tielens, L.K.P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus blockade is a well-established technique in upper limb surgery. Among the infraclavicular approaches, the vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus (VIP) block is easy to perform and has a large spectrum of nerve blockade. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine

  17. [Analysis of risk factors for perinatal brachial plexus palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosk, Jerzy; Rutowski, Roman

    2005-04-01

    Risk factors of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy include: (1) large birth weight, (2) shoulder dystocia and prolonged second stage of labour, (3) instrumental vaginal delivery (forceps delivery, vacuum extraction), (4) diabetes mellitus and mother's obesity, (5) breech presentation, (6) delivery and infant with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy in antecedent delivery. The purpose was analysis of the classical risk factors for brachial plexus palsy based on our own clinical material. Clinical material consists of 83 children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy treated at the Department of Trauma and Hand Surgery (surgically--54, conservatively--29). Control group consists of 56 healthy newborns. Data recorded included: birth weight, body length, head and chest circumference, Apgar test at 1 min., type of brachial palsy and side affected, type of birth, presentation, duration of delivery (II stage), age of mother, mother's diseases, parity. The infants treated surgically have had a significantly higher birth weight, body height, head and chest circumference, in compression with control group and group treated conservatively. The differences were statistically important. Shoulder dystocia occurred in 32.9% of all vaginal delivery. Instrumental vaginal delivery was observed in 11.3% and breech presentation in 4.9% cases. There were no incidences of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy recurrence. Diabetes mellitus and mother's obesity was found in 3 cases. (1) Fetal macrosomia is the important risk factor of the obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. (2) Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may occur also in the absence of the classical risk factors.

  18. Giant iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm of the brachial artery: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Leite

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysms develop slowly and should be diagnosed as early as possible in order to avoid complications and a better outcome. Due to an increase in recent endovascular procedures and the fact that brachial artery puncture is being performed more routinely, incidence of brachial artery pseudoaneurysms among overall population may rise.

  19. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, Ewa G.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Henriquez, Nizare R.; Verheijen, Wilma G.; Zwarts, Machiel J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. Methods: sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and 1

  20. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, Ewa G.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Henriquez, Nizare R.; Verheijen, Wilma G.; Zwarts, Machiel J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. Methods: sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and 1

  1. Gravitational quantum effects in the light of BICEP2 results

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Recently BICEP2 found that the vanishing of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ is excluded at $7\\sigma$ level, and its most likely value is $r=0.2^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ at $1 \\sigma$ level. This immediately causes a tension with the Planck constraint $r < 0.11$. In addition, it also implies that the inflaton experienced a Planck excursion during inflation $\\Delta\\phi /M_{Pl} \\geq {\\cal{O}}(1)$, whereby the effective theory of inflation becomes questionable. In this brief report, we show that the inflationary paradigm is still robust, even after the quantum effects are taken into account. Moreover, these effects even help to relax the tension on the different values of $r$ given by BICEP2 and Planck.

  2. Local Reconstruction of the Inflationary Potential with BICEP2 data

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    We locally reconstruct the inflationary potential by using the current constraints on $r$ and $n_{\\rm s}$ from BICEP2 data. Assuming small and negligible $\\alpha_{\\rm s}$, the inflationary potential is approximately linear in $\\Delta\\phi\\sim M_{\\rm pl}$ range but becomes non-linear in $\\Delta\\phi\\sim 10 M_{\\rm pl}$ range. However if we allow for higher value of $\\alpha_{\\rm s}$, as suggested by the tension between BICEP2 and WMAP / Planck measurements, the local reconstruction is only valid in the range of $\\Delta\\phi\\sim 0.4 M_{\\rm pl}$, which challenges the inflationary background from the point of view of effective field theory.

  3. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  4. Free Biceps Tendon Autograft to Augment Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Obma, Padraic R.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while...

  5. A comparison between brachial and echocardiographic systolic time intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Systolic time interval (STI is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP and brachial ejection time (bET were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP and ejection time (ET were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r = 0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r  = 0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r = 0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  6. Inflation After False Vacuum Decay: New Evidence from BICEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, Raphael; Senatore, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Last year we argued that if slow-roll inflation followed the decay of a false vacuum in a large landscape, the steepening of the scalar potential between the inflationary plateau and the barrier generically leads to a potentially observable suppression of the scalar power spectrum at large distances. Here we revisit this analysis in light of the recent BICEP2 results. Assuming that both the BICEP2 B-mode signal and the Planck analysis of temperature fluctuations hold up, we find that the data now discriminate more sharply between our scenario and $\\Lambda$CDM. Nonzero tensor modes exclude standard $\\Lambda$CDM with notable but not yet conclusive confidence: at $\\sim 3.8\\,\\sigma$ if $r\\approx0.2$, or at $\\sim 3.5\\,\\sigma$ if $r=0.15$. Of the two steepening models of our previous work, one is now ruled out by existing bounds on spatial curvature. The other entirely reconciles the tension between BICEP2 and Planck. Upcoming $EE$ polarization measurements have the potential to rule out unmodified $\\Lambda$CDM dec...

  7. Evidence for bouncing evolution before inflation after BICEP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Cai, Yi-Fu; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin

    2014-06-27

    The BICEP2 Collaboration reports a detection of primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) B mode with a tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.20(-0.05)(+0.07) (68% C.L.). However, this result disagrees with the recent Planck limit r inflation models. In this Letter we consider an inflationary cosmology with a preceding nonsingular bounce, which gives rise to observable signatures on primordial perturbations. One interesting phenomenon is that both the primordial scalar and tensor modes can have a step feature on their power spectra, which nicely cancels the tensor excess power on the CMB temperature power spectrum. By performing a global analysis, we obtain the 68% C.L. constraints on the parameters of the model from the Planck+WP and BICEP2 data together: the jump scale log(10)(k(B)/Mpc(-1)) = -2.4 ± 0.2 and the spectrum amplitude ratio of bounce to inflation r(B) ≡ P(m)/A(s) = 0.71 ± 0.09. Our result reveals that the bounce inflation scenario can simultaneously explain the Planck and BICEP2 observations better than the standard cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and can be verified by future CMB polarization measurements.

  8. Age independent and position-dependent alterations in motor unit activity of the biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, B; Edwards, D L; Jakobi, J M

    2010-09-01

    In the biceps brachii, age-related differences in synaptic excitability and muscle architecture may affect motor unit (MU) activity differently depending on the position of the forearm. It was hypothesised that as a result of these age-related differences, greater changes in MU activity would accompany a change in forearm position in old when compared with young men. Six young (22 +/- 3 years) and six old (84 +/- 3 years) men maintained isometric elbow flexion at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during changes in forearm position. Forty-nine MUs in the short (SBB) and long (LBB) heads of the biceps brachii were followed. Motor unit recruitment and de-recruitment thresholds, motor unit discharge rates (MUDRs), and MU discharge variability were measured. Although an age-related decrease in MU recruitment thresholds, and increase in MU discharge variability was evident, changes in forearm position influenced MUDRs similarly in young and old men (P = 0.27). Motor unit recruitment thresholds of the SBB were highest in the pronated position (8.2 +/- 2.9 %MVC), whereas in the LBB they were highest in the supinated position (8.6 +/- 2.0 %MVC). Motor unit discharge rates of the LBB did not change with forearm position. In the SBB, MUDRs were highest when the forearm was supinated, and also greater when compared with the LBB in this position. No position-dependent changes were observed for MU discharge variability in the LBB, but the SBB exhibited greatest MU discharge variability in the pronated position. The results suggest that MU activity is modulated following a change in forearm position, but the response is similar in young and old adults.

  9. Influence of passive muscle tension on electromechanical delay in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Lacourpaille

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Electromechanical delay is the time lag between onsets of muscle activation and muscle force production and reflects both electro-chemical processes and mechanical processes. The aims of the present study were two-fold: to experimentally determine the slack length of each head of the biceps brachii using elastography and to determine the influence of the length of biceps brachii on electromechanical delay and its electro-chemical/mechanical processes using very high frame rate ultrasound. METHODS/RESULTS: First, 12 participants performed two passive stretches to evaluate the change in passive tension for each head of the biceps brachii. Then, they underwent two electrically evoked contractions from 120 to 20° of elbow flexion (0°: full extension, with the echographic probe maintained over the muscle belly and the myotendinous junction of biceps brachii. The slack length was found to occur at 95.5 ± 6.3° and 95.3 ± 8.2° of the elbow joint angle for the long and short heads of the biceps brachii, respectively. The electromechanical delay was significantly longer at 120° (16.9 ± 3.1 ms; p0.95. CONCLUSION: In contrast to previous observations on gastrocnemius medialis, the onset of muscle motion and the onset of myotendinous junction motion occurred simultaneously regardless of the length of the biceps brachii. That suggests that the between-muscles differences reported in the literature cannot be explained by different muscle passive tension but instead may be attributable to muscle architectural differences.

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P regeneration and survival of nerve cells

  11. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, the Putti sign-obligatory tilt of the scapula with brachiothoracic adduction-suggests the presence of glenohumeral abduction contracture. In the present study, we utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify this glenohumeral abduction contracture and evaluate its relationship to shoulder joint deformity, muscle atrophy, and function. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs of the thorax and shoulders obtained before and after shoulder rebalancing surgery (internal rotation contracture release and external rotation tendon transfer) for twenty-eight children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Two raters measured the coronal positions of the scapula, thoracic spine, and humeral shaft bilaterally on coronal images, correcting trigonometrically for scapular protraction on axial images. Supraspinatus, deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscle atrophy was assessed, blinded to other measures. Correlations between glenohumeral abduction contracture and glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, and Mallet shoulder function before and after surgery were performed. MRI measurements were highly reliable between raters. Glenohumeral abduction contractures were present in twenty-five of twenty-eight patients, averaging 33° (range, 10° to 65°). Among those patients, abductor atrophy was present in twenty-three of twenty-five, with adductor atrophy in twelve of twenty-five. Preoperatively, greater abduction contracture severity correlated with greater Mallet global abduction and hand-to-neck function. Abduction contracture severity did not correlate preoperatively with axial measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia, but greater glenoid retroversion was associated with worse abduction contractures postoperatively. Surgery improved passive external rotation, active abduction, and hand-to-neck function, but did not change the abduction contracture. A majority of patients with persistent shoulder weakness

  12. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    OpenAIRE

    Streit JJ; Shishani Y; Rodgers M; Gobezie R

    2015-01-01

    Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon an...

  13. BICEP2/SPUD: Searching for Inflation with Degree Scale Polarimetry from the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien Trong; Kovac, John; Adec, Peter; Aikin, Randol; Benton, Steve; Bock, Jamie; Brevik, Justus; Carlstrom, John; Dowell, Darren; Duband, Lionel; Golwala, Sunil; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kaufman, Jonathan; Keating, Brian; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lange, Andrew; Matsumura, Tomotake; Netterfield, Barth; Pryke, Clem; Ruhl, John; Sheehy, Chris; Sudiwala, Rashmi

    2008-01-01

    BICEP2/SPUD is the new powerful upgrade of the existing BICEP1 experiment, a bolometric receiver to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which has been in operation at the South Pole since January 2006. BICEP2 will provide an improvement up to 10 times mapping speed at 150 GHz compared to BICEP1, using the same BICEP telescope mount. SPUD, a series of compact, mechanically-cooled receivers deployed on the DASI mount at the Pole, will provide similar mapping speed in to BICEP2 in three bands, 100, 150, and 220 GHz. The new system will use large TES focal plane arrays to provide unprecedented sensitivity and excellent control of foreground contamination.

  14. BICEP2/SPUD: Searching for Inflation with Degree Scale Polarimetry from the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien Trong; Kovac, John; Adec, Peter; Aikin, Randol; Benton, Steve; Bock, Jamie; Brevik, Justus; Carlstrom, John; Dowell, Darren; Duband, Lionel; hide

    2008-01-01

    BICEP2/SPUD is the new powerful upgrade of the existing BICEP1 experiment, a bolometric receiver to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which has been in operation at the South Pole since January 2006. BICEP2 will provide an improvement up to 10 times mapping speed at 150 GHz compared to BICEP1, using the same BICEP telescope mount. SPUD, a series of compact, mechanically-cooled receivers deployed on the DASI mount at the Pole, will provide similar mapping speed in to BICEP2 in three bands, 100, 150, and 220 GHz. The new system will use large TES focal plane arrays to provide unprecedented sensitivity and excellent control of foreground contamination.

  15. Imaging tumours of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, Asif [Department of Radiology, The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Brockley Hill, HA7 4LP, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Tumours of the brachial plexus are rare lesions and may be classified as benign or malignant. Within each of these groups, they are further subdivided into those that are neurogenic in origin (schwannoma, neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour) and those that are non-neurogenic. Careful pre-operative diagnosis and staging is essential to the successful management of these lesions. Benign neurogenic tumours are well characterized with pre-operative MRI, appearing as well-defined, oval soft-tissue masses, which are typically isointense on T1-weighted images and show the ''target sign'' on T2-weighted images. Differentiation between schwannoma and neurofibroma can often be made by assessing the relationship of the lesion to the nerve of origin. Many benign non-neurogenic tumours, such as lipoma and fibromatosis, are also well characterized by MRI. This article reviews the imaging features of brachial plexus tumours, with particular emphasis on the value of MRI in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  17. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Rodgers, Mark; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years) underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body.

  18. Bilateral congenital absence of the long head of the biceps tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koplas, Monica C. [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute/HB6, Cleveland, OH (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute/A21, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ulmer, William H. [Orthopedic and Spine Specialists, York, PA (United States); Recht, Michael [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Absence of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare anomaly particularly when it occurs bilaterally. We present the magnetic resonance and arthroscopy findings in a patient with bilateral congenital absence of the long head of the biceps who presented with bilateral shoulder pain. Identification of a shallow or absent intertubercular groove may aid in differentiating congenital absence of the long head of the biceps from a traumatic tendon rupture. (orig.)

  19. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  20. Lateral antebrachial cutaneous neuropathy following the long head of the biceps rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, David M; Bishop, Allen T; Spinner, Robert J; Shin, Alexander Y

    2012-04-01

    Lateral antebrachial cutaneous neuropathies present as purely sensory lesions, manifesting as elbow pain or dysesthetic pain over the lateral forearm. Classically, entrapment of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve has been documented at the lateral edge of the biceps tendon as it exits the deep fascia in the antecubital fossa. We report a case of lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve traction neuritis, rather than entrapment, resulting from a rupture of the long head of the biceps. The biceps displaced the nerve laterally, resulting in sensory loss and severe allodynia. The patient's symptoms were relieved with proximal biceps tenodesis.

  1. Quantitative diagnostic method for biceps long head tendinitis by using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of grayscale quantitative diagnostic method for biceps tendinitis and determine the cut-off points of a quantitative biceps ultrasound (US) method to diagnose biceps tendinitis. Design. Prospective cross-sectional case controlled study. Outpatient rehabilitation service. A total of 336 shoulder pain patients with suspected biceps tendinitis were recruited in this prospective observational study. The grayscale pixel data of the range of interest (ROI) were obtained for both the transverse and longitudinal views of the biceps US. A total of 136 patients were classified with biceps tendinitis, and 200 patients were classified as not having biceps tendinitis based on the diagnostic criteria. Based on the Youden index, the cut-off points were determined as 26.85 for the transverse view and 21.25 for the longitudinal view of the standard deviation (StdDev) of the ROI values, respectively. When the ROI evaluation of the US surpassed the cut-off point, the sensitivity was 68% and the specificity was 90% in the StdDev of the transverse view, and the sensitivity was 81% and the specificity was 73% in the StdDev of the longitudinal view to diagnose biceps tendinitis. For equivocal cases or inexperienced sonographers, our study provides a more objective method for diagnosing biceps tendinitis in shoulder pain patients.

  2. Biceps tendon sheath effusion as a diagnostic clue to rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pankaj K; Shah, Bhavin; Shende, Amol; Rajesh, S

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of biceps tendon sheath effusion detected on ultrasound as a diagnostic clue to rotator cuff pathology. Despite being the most common cause of shoulder pain in adults early sonographic changes of rotator cuff tendinopathy are easy to miss. A total of 31 patients out of whom 27 had unilateral shoulder pain and 4 had bilateral complaints under- went ultrasonographic examination of shoulder joint using high frequency linear array transducer. Any fluid surrounding the long head of biceps tendon was noted followed by a careful search for any associated sonographic abnormality involving the rotator cuff. Eighteen out of the 35 had presence of fluid in their biceps tendon sheath. Twelve had presence of both biceps tendon sheath effusion and rotator cuff pathologies. Among 17 patients, who had no fluid in their biceps tendon sheath, only 2 had rotator cuff involvement whereas rest 15 had neither biceps tendon sheath fluid nor rotator cuff pathologies. A significant association was found between presence of fluid in long head of biceps tendon sheath and rotator cuff pathologies. Thus the most common finding observed in association with the presence of fluid around the long head of biceps tendon sheath in this study was tendinosis of rotator cuff. On ultrasonography simple presence of fluid around the long head of biceps tendon sheath demands careful examination of rotator cuff.

  3. Anatomy of the biceps tendon: implications for restoring physiological length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denard, Patrick J; Dai, Xuesong; Hanypsiak, Brian T; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the normal length and diameter of the long head of the biceps tendon (BT) to provide guidelines for interference screw tenodesis. Twenty-one cadaveric shoulders were dissected. The BT length was measured from its origin to the humeral head articular margin (AM), lower subscapularis, upper pectoralis major, musculotendinous junction of the biceps (MTJ), and lower pectoralis major (LPM). Tendon diameter was measured at levels corresponding to tenodesis: (1) at the AM, (2) suprapectorally, and (3) subpectorally. The mean tendon length was 24.9 mm from the origin to the AM, 56.1 mm to the lower subscapularis, 73.8 mm to the upper pectoralis major, 98.5 mm to the MTJ, and 118.4 mm to the LPM. The mean tendon diameter was 6.6 mm for tenodesis at the AM, 5.1 mm for suprapectoral tenodesis, and 5.3 mm for subpectoral tenodesis. During biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation, restoring the normal length-tension relation of the BT depends on the site of tenodesis and the depth of the bone socket. At the AM, a 25-mm bone socket on average will maintain the length-tension relation. For tenodesis more distally, the length of tendon resection varies with bone socket length. Because the MTJ is above the LPM, subpectoral tenodesis should be performed proximal to the LPM. This study provides guidelines for restoring the normal length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation. The simplest way to restore this relation is with tenodesis adjacent to the humeral head AM and a bone socket of 25 mm in depth. For tenodesis at more distal locations, both the length of the BT and the depth of the bone socket must be considered. Information about the normal BT may be useful in preserving the physiological length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Contralateral C7 transfer to lower trunk via the prespinal route in the repair of brachial plexus injury: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Jiang, Ye; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Contralateral C7 (cC7) root transfer to reconstruct brachial plexus injury (BPI) has been widely used. A revised technique that cC7 root was transferred to lower trunk via the prespinal route with direct neurorrhaphy has been reported clinically. The aim of this experimental study was to develop an animal model of the modified surgical approach in order to obtain quantification index of postoperative nerve regeneration and muscle morphology. Sixty adult Sprague-Dawley rats randomized into experimental and control groups of 30 each. In the experimental group, after total brachial plexus injury (BPI) the cC7 root was transferred to lower trunk via the prespinal route with direct neurorrhaphy, and in the control group the brachial plexus was only exposed without intervention. Electrophysiological study, muscle tension test, neuromorphology, muscle wet weight, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area measurements were obtained 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Median and ulnar nerve regeneration and the forearm flexor muscles functional recovery were obtained by cC7 root transfer to lower trunk via the prespinal route when measured at 12 weeks following the operation though the parameters had not recovered to normal value. We concealed the control and experimental groups from those who did the evaluations. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlação entre a proporção de fibras rápidas do músculo bíceps braquial e o torque relativo da flexão do cotovelo em sujeitos com hipótese clínica de miopatia Correlation between the proportion of fast fibers in the biceps brachii muscle and the relative torque during elbow flexion in subjects with clinical hypothesis of myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CGN Back

    2008-04-01

    findings may be related to the predominant fiber type expressed in the muscle analyzed. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the proportion of type 2 fibers in the biceps brachii muscles of subjects with a clinical hypothesis of myopathy with their peak isometric and isokinetic torque during elbow flexion. METHOD: Seven subjects with a clinical hypothesis of myopathy participated in this study: four females of mean age 37 years (sd = 9, weight 73kg (sd= 26 and height 155cm (sd= 6; and three males of mean age 39 years (sd= 1, weight 88kg (sd= 5 and height 172cm (sd= 4. The muscle fiber proportion was analyzed using the mATPase technique. One month after taking biopsies, the subjects performed concentric isometric and isokinetic strength tests for elbow flexion and extension using an isokinetic dynamometer. The isometric and isokinetic peak torques at 90°s-¹ and 180°s-¹ were evaluated and the relative 90° (RT90 and 180° (RT180 torques were calculated. Spearman’s correlation (r was used for statistical analyses. RESULTS: The proportion of type 2 fibers correlated positively with RT180 (r= 0.89, p= 0.01, and there was a moderate correlation with RT90 (r= 0.75, p= 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the contractile behavior of type 2 fibers was not modified in these subjects. The isokinetic dynamometer was shown to be an instrument capable of noninvasively evaluating muscle fiber type predominance.

  6. Brachial access technique for aortoiliac stenting revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a modified technique to perform iliac artery stenting through the brachial artery access. A 6F Brite tip sheath (Cordis, Jonhson & Jonhson Medical, Miami Lakes, FL, USA) is inserted into either brachial artery and a standard 4F Judkins Right diagnostic catheter was inserted over a 260 cm 0.038" Terumo Stiff wire (Terumo Corp, Tokyo, Japan) through the sheath. The catheter is navigated down to the aortic bifurcation, and after selecting the common iliac artery ostium, the wire is navigated through the lesion and advanced to the ipsilateral superficial femoral arteries. The catheter should be then moved forward over the wires beyond the lesion and the Terumo guidewire is replaced by two 0.038" 260 cm Supracor wires (Boston Scientific Corporation, San Jose, CA, USA). In order to facilitate advancement of the stent without risk of dislodgement as well as to check the position with low contrast dose injection, a 6 F (or 7F if large stent is selected) 90cm Shuttle Flexor introducer long sheath (Cook Group, Bloomington, IN, USA) should be advanced over the Supracor wire until it reaches the common iliac artery ostium. A road-map technique can be used to check the ostium position in order to properly deploy the selected stent. This technique promises to be safe and effective offering more support than guiding catheter technique; moreover it reduces the stress on the arterial vessel at the subclavian site and enables a stiff balloon or stent catheter to be advanced even through a very elongated and calcified aorta without the risk of stent dislodgement.

  7. Calcifying tendinopathy of the biceps brachii in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, P; Goldsmid, S E; Rothwell, T L; Bellenger, C R

    1992-12-01

    Calcifying tendinopathy of the biceps brachii was associated with lameness in a 1.5-year-old Rottweiler. Lameness was relieved by excision of the calcified mass and suture repair of the partially ruptured tendon. Calcifying tendinopathy is not well described in dogs, but it is a recognized clinical syndrome in human beings. The etiopathogenesis of the condition in human beings and dogs is poorly understood. Wider recognition of calcifying tendinopathy in dogs should lead to a better understanding of the disease and development of appropriate clinical treatments.

  8. Nonsingular bouncing cosmologies in light of BICEP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Quintin, Jerome [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 Canada (Canada); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [Physics Division, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou Campus, Athens (Greece); Wilson-Ewing, Edward, E-mail: yifucai@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: jquintin@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu, E-mail: wilson-ewing@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, 70803 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We confront various nonsingular bouncing cosmologies with the recently released BICEP2 data and investigate the observational constraints on their parameter space. In particular, within the context of the effective field approach, we analyze the constraints on the matter bounce curvaton scenario with a light scalar field, and the new matter bounce cosmology model in which the universe successively experiences a period of matter contraction and an ekpyrotic phase. Additionally, we consider three nonsingular bouncing cosmologies obtained in the framework of modified gravity theories, namely the Hořava-Lifshitz bounce model, the f(T) bounce model, and loop quantum cosmology.

  9. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  10. Brachial Arterial Pressure Monitoring during Cardiac Surgery Rarely Causes Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Asha; Bahadorani, Bobby; Wakefield, Brett J; Makarova, Natalya; Kumar, Priya A; Tong, Michael Zhen-Yu; Sessler, Daniel I; Duncan, Andra E

    2017-06-01

    Brachial arterial catheters better estimate aortic pressure than radial arterial catheters but are used infrequently because complications in a major artery without collateral flow are potentially serious. However, the extent to which brachial artery cannulation promotes complications remains unknown. The authors thus evaluated a large cohort of cardiac surgical patients to estimate the incidence of related serious complications. The institutional Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and Perioperative Health Documentation System Registry of the Cleveland Clinic were used to identify patients who had brachial artery cannulation between 2007 and 2015. Complications within 6 months after surgery were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic and procedural codes, Current Procedural Terminology procedure codes, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons variables. The authors reviewed electronic medical records to confirm that putative complications were related plausibly to brachial arterial catheterization. Complications were categorized as (1) vascular, (2) peripheral nerve injury, or (3) infection. The authors evaluated associations between brachial arterial complications and patient comorbidities and between complications and in-hospital mortality and duration of hospitalization. Among 21,597 qualifying patients, 777 had vascular or nerve injuries or local infections, but only 41 (incidence 0.19% [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.26%]) were potentially consequent to brachial arterial cannulation. Vascular complications occurred in 33 patients (0.15% [0.10 to 0.23%]). Definitely or possibly related infection occurred in 8 (0.04% [0.02 to 0.08%]) patients. There were no plausibly related neurologic complications. Peripheral arterial disease was associated with increased risk of complications. Brachial catheter complications were associated with prolonged hospitalization and in-hospital mortality. Brachial artery cannulation for

  11. Diagnostic value of combined magnetic resonance imaging examination of brachial plexus and electrophysiological studies in multifocal motor neuropathy

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    Basta Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by slowly progressive asymetrical weakness of limbs without sensory loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of brachial plexus using combined cervical magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of plexus brachialis in patients with MMN. We payed special attention to the nerve roots forming nerves inervating weak muscles, but without detectable conduction block (CB using conventional nerve conduction studies. Methods. Nine patients with proven MMN were included in the study. In all of them MRI of the cervical spine and brachial plexus was performed using a Siemens Avanto 1.5 T unit, applying T1 and turbo spinecho T1 sequence, axial turbo spin-echo T2 sequence and a coronal fat-saturated turbo spin-echo T2 sequence. Results. In all the patients severe asymmetric distal weakness of muscles inervated by radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves was observed and the most striking presentation was bilateral wrist and finger drop. Three of them had additional proximal weakness of muscles inervated by axillar and femoral nerves. The majority of the patients had slightly increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein content. Six of the patients had positive serum polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 antibodies. Electromyoneurography (EMG showed neurogenic changes, the most severe in distal muscles inervated by radial nerves. All the patients had persistent partial CBs outside the usual sites of nerve compression in radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves. In three of the patients cervical magnetic stimulation suggested proximal CBs between cervical root emergence and Erb’s point (prolonged motor root conduction time. In all the patients T2-weighted MRI revealed increased signal intensity in at least one cervical root, truncus or fasciculus of brachial plexus. Conclusion. We found clinical correlation between muscle weakness

  12. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Rodgers, Mark; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Background Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years) underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. PMID:25792859

  13. Origin, distribution, and insertion of the brachial plexus nerves in Blue-and-yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus, 1758

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    Kamal Achôa Filho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has about 80 species of parrots cataloged, and five of them are identified as Macaws. As the vast majority of birds, Macaws use flight as their primary means of locomotion. However, the strength and power generated during the cycle of beating wings require a mechanism of active neuromuscular control and specialized adaptations of muscles responsible for flight, which are innervated by the brachial plexus. This study aims to describe the origin and distribution of peripheral nerves that make up the brachial plexus in Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus, 1758, in order to aid the veterinarian to recognize and locate neuromuscular lesions in this species. We used five dead bodies, obtained from the Screening Center for Wild Animals in Paraíba, Brazil, in which the nerves were identified by direct dissection. Four nerve roots were viewed, originating three nerve trunks, which stem from the intervertebral spaces between the tenth cervical vertebra and the second thoracic vertebra. Nerves from the dorsal cord innervated extensor muscles, while ventral cord nerves innervated flexor muscles of the wing, in addition to the pectoral branches, responsible to innervate the superficial thoracic and shoulder muscles.

  14. Reimplantation combined with transplantation of transgenic neural stem cells for treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lei; LU Lai-jin; MENG Xiao-ting; CHEN Dong; ZHANG Zhi-xin; YANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore a new method to treat brachial plexus root avulsion experimentally by reimplantation combined with transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) modified by neurotrophin-3 gene (NT-3).Methods: The total RNA was extracted from neonatal rat striatum and the NT-3 cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and amplified by polymerase chain reaction.The NT-3 gene was transferred into NSCs via the pLEGFP-Cl,an expression plasmid vectors.The untransfected NSCs,the pLEGFP-Cl treated NSCs,and the pLEGFP-Cl-NT-3 treated NSCs were transplanted into corresponding spinal cord segment with brachial plexus root avulsion.The survival,differentiation,and migration of the transplanted cells were determined under confoeal laser scanning microscope or by immunohistochemistry method.The nerve regeneration was evaluated by gross observation,electrophysiologieal examination and reverse horseradish peroxidase tracing.Results: The NT-3 gene was successfully amplified and transferred into neural stem cells via the plasmid vectors.The transplanted cells survived,differentiated,and migrated and NT-3 was expressed within the spinal cord.The animals regained some muscle strength which was less than 3-degree muscular strength according to the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) evaluating system.The resuits of electrophysiological examination and reverse horseradish peroxidase tracing were superior in the pLEGFP-Cl-NT-3 group to the NSCs untransfected group orthe pLEGFP-Cl group.Conclusion: Transplantation of NSCs modified by NT-3gene combined with reimplantantion is a relatively effective way to treat brachial plexus root avuision experimentally.It still need further study to improve the results.

  15. Muscle activation sequencing of leg muscles during linear glide shot putting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Róisín M; Conway, Richard; Harrison, Andrew J

    2017-11-01

    In the shot put, the athlete's muscles are responsible for generating the impulses to move the athlete and project the shot into the air. Information on phasic muscle activity is lacking for the glide shot put event and therefore important technical information for coaches is not currently available. This study provides an electromyography (EMG) analysis of the muscle activity of the legs during shot put. Fifteen right-handed Irish national level shot putters performed six maximum effort throws using the glide shot put technique. EMG records of eight bilateral lower limb muscles (rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial- and lateral-gastrocnemius) were obtained during trials. Analysis using smooth EMG linear envelopes revealed patterns of muscle activity across the phases of the throw and compare men and women performers. The results showed that the preferred leg rectus femoris, the preferred leg biceps femoris and the non-preferred leg biceps femoris play important roles in the glide technique, with the total duration of high volumes of activity between 34 and 53% of the throw cycle. A comprehensive understanding of movement and muscle activation patterns for coaches could be helpful to facilitate optimal technique throughout each of the key phases of the event.

  16. Comparative study of phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Global brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) are devastating events frequently resulting in severe functional impairment. The widely used nerve transfer sources for elbow flexion in patients with global BPIs include intercostal and phrenic nerves. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global BPI. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion BPI was carried out. In the phrenic nerve transfer group, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the anterolateral bundle of the anterior division of the upper trunk (23 patients); in the intercostal nerve transfer group, three intercostal nerves were coapted to the anterolateral bundles of the musculocutaneous nerve. The British Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system, angle of elbow flexion, and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the recovery of elbow flexion at least 3 years postoperatively. The efficiency of motor function in the phrenic nerve transfer group was 83%, while it was 70% in the intercostal nerve transfer group. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of the MRC grade (p=0.646) and EMG results (p=0.646). The outstanding rates of angle of elbow flexion were 48% and 40% in the phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer groups, respectively. There was no significant difference of outstanding rates in the angle of elbow flexion between the two groups. Phrenic nerve transfer had a higher proportion of good prognosis for elbow flexion than intercostal nerve transfer, but the effective and outstanding rate had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation between the two groups according to MRC grading, angle of elbow flexion, and EMG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stretch reflex instability compared in three different human muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Manu, C A; Buonajuti, M

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of causing instability in the stretch reflex has been examined in three different human muscles: biceps, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) of the hand and digastric. Tremor recorded as fluctuation of isometric force was compared with that occurring during contraction against a spring load. The spring compliance was selected to make the natural frequency of the part in each case appropriate for oscillations in the short latency stretch reflex. A computer model of the whole system was used to predict the frequency at which oscillations should be expected and to estimate the reflex gain required in each case to cause sustained oscillations. Estimates were computed of the autospectra of the force records and of the rectified surface EMG signals and of the coherence functions. Normal subjects showed no evidence of a distinct spectral peak during isometric recording from any of the three muscles. However, in anisometric conditions regular oscillations in force occurred in biceps, but not in FDI or digastric. The oscillations in biceps at 8-9 Hz were accompanied by similar oscillations in the EMG which were highly coherent with the force signal. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong segmental stretch reflex effect in biceps and weak or absent reflex in FDI. Digastric is known to contain no muscle spindles and therefore to lack a stretch reflex. In two subjects who volunteered that they had more tremor than normal, but had no known neurological abnormality, there was a distinct peak in the force spectrum at 8-9 Hz in biceps and FDI in isometric conditions with coherent EMG activity. The peak increased in size in anisometric conditions in biceps but not in FDI. This component appears to be of central rather than of reflex origin. No equivalent component was found in digastric records. The results are discussed in relation to the possible role of the short latency stretch reflex in the genesis of physiological tremor in different muscles.

  18. Recovery of brachial plexus lesions resulting from heavy backpack use: A follow-up case series

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    Pihlajamäki Harri K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial plexus lesions as a consequence of carrying a heavy backpack have been reported, but the typical clinical course and long-term consequences are not clear. Here we evaluated the clinical course and pattern of recovery of backpack palsy (BPP in a large series of patients. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients with idiopathic BPP were identified from our population of 193,450 Finnish conscripts by means of computerised register. A physiotherapist provided instructions for proper hand use and rehabilitative exercises at disease onset. The patients were followed up for 2 to 8 years from the diagnosis. We also searched for genetic markers of hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to analyze continuous data. The Fischer's exact test was used to assess two-way tables. Results Eighty percent of the patients recovered totally within 9 months after the onset of weakness. Prolonged symptoms occurred in 15% of the patients, but daily activities were not affected. The weight of the carried load at the symptom onset significantly affected the severity of the muscle strength loss in the physiotherapeutic testing at the follow-up. The initial electromyography did not predict recovery. Genetic testing did not reveal de novo hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Conclusions The prognosis of BPP is favorable in the vast majority of cases. Electromyography is useful for diagnosis. To prevent brachial plexus lesions, backpack loads greater than 40 kg should be avoided.

  19. Ultrasound shear wave elastography in assessment of muscle stiffness in patients with Parkinson's disease: a primary observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li-Juan; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Shuo; Pan, Yue-Song; Gao, Jing

    The aim of this study was to assess the capability of ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) in evaluating the muscle stiffness in patients with Parkinson's diseases (PD). Ultrasound SWE of the longitudinal biceps brachii was performed on 46 patients with PD and 31 healthy controls from May 2013 to October 2013. The stiffness of the biceps brachii muscles measured with quantitative Young's modulus (kPa) was compared between the remarkably symptomatic arms and mildly symptomatic arms in the PD and between PD and controls with unpaired t test. The correlation between the Young's modulus of the biceps brachii measured by SWE and motion scores assessed by unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) part III was analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient. The reliability of SWE in assessment of biceps brachii stiffness was tested using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean Young's modulus of biceps brachii in remarkably symptomatic arms, mildly symptomatic arms, and healthy controls was 59.94±20.91 kPa, 47.77±24.00 kPa, and 24.28±5.09 kPa, respectively. A significant difference in Young's modulus of biceps brachii was found between healthy controls and all PD patients (all PYoung's modulus of the biceps brachii and the motion score by UPDRS in patients with PD (r=0.646, P=.000). The ICC for interobserver and intraobserver variation in measuring Young's modulus of the biceps brachii with SWE was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.68-0.78) and 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.75-0.82), respectively. SWE of the biceps brachii can be used as a quantitative assessment of muscle stiffness in the patients with PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Subpectoral biceps tenodesis for bicipital tendonitis with SLAP tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil K; Chalmers, Peter N; Klosterman, Emma L; Harris, Joshua D; Bach, Bernard R; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients undergoing subpectoral biceps tenodesis for bicipital tendonitis with a superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) tear. Patients undergoing primary subpectoral biceps tenodesis for arthroscopically confirmed SLAP tears with signs or findings of bicipital tendonitis were included. An independent observer collected data prospectively as part of a data repository, which was then analyzed retrospectively. Primary outcome measures were the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score and pain relief via visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcome measures included the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), Constant, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and Short Form 12 (SF-12) scores. Twenty-eight patients with a mean±SD age of 43.7±13.4 years and a mean±SD follow-up of 2.0±1.0 years met inclusion criteria. Workers' compensation was involved with 43% of cases, and 46% of the included patients were manual laborers. Eight (32%) patients were athletes, and 88% of the athletes were overhead athletes. Intraoperatively, 15 (54%) patients had type I SLAP tears, 10 (36%) had type II SLAP tears, 1 (3%) had a type III SLAP tear, and 2 (7%) had type IV SLAP tears. Significant improvements were seen in the following outcome measures pre- vs postoperatively: ASES score (58±23 vs 89±18; P=.001), SST score (6.3±3.6 vs 10.6±3.3; P=.001), SANE score (54±24 vs 88±25; P=.003), VAS score (3.8±2.0 vs 1.1±1.8; P=.001), SF-12 overall score (35±6 vs 42±6; P=.001), and SF-12 physical component score (39±6 vs 50±10; P=.001). Overall satisfaction was excellent in 80% of patients. Subpectoral biceps tenodesis demonstrates excellent clinical outcomes in select patients with SLAP tears. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(1):e48-e53.].

  1. The hamstring muscle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Made, A D; Wieldraaijer, T; Kerkhoffs, G M; Kleipool, R P; Engebretsen, L; van Dijk, C N; Golanó, P

    2015-07-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous inscription in the semitendinosus muscle known as the raphe. Fifty-six hamstring muscle groups were dissected in prone position from 29 human cadaveric specimens with a median age of 71.5 (range 45-98). Data pertaining to origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, MTJ length and length as well as width of the raphe were collected. Besides these data, we also encountered interesting findings that might lead to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern. These include overlapping proximal and distal tendons of both the long head of the biceps femoris muscle and the semimembranosus muscle (SM), a twist in the proximal SM tendon and a tendinous inscription (raphe) in the semitendinosus muscle present in 96 % of specimens. No obvious hypothesis can be provided purely based on either muscle length, tendon length or MTJ length. However, it is possible that overlapping proximal and distal tendons as well as muscle architecture leading to a resultant force not in line with the tendon predispose to muscle injury, whereas the presence of a raphe might plays a role in protecting the muscle against gross injury. Apart from these architectural characteristics that may contribute to a better understanding of the hamstring injury pattern, the provided reference values complement current knowledge on surgically relevant hamstring anatomy. IV.

  2. bicep2/ KECK ARRAY . IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P.A.R.; Aikin, R.W.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S.J.; Bischoff, C.A.; Bock, J.J.; Bradford, K.J.; Brevik, J.A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Dowell, C.D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J.P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S.R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hilton, G.C.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K.D.

    2015-06-18

    bicep2/KECK ARRAY. IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS P. A. R. Ade1, R. W. Aikin2, D. Barkats3, S. J. Benton4, C. A. Bischoff5, J. J. Bock2,6, K. J. Bradford5, J. A. Brevik2, I. Buder5, E. Bullock7Show full author list Published 2015 June 18 • © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 806, Number 2 Article PDF Figures Tables References Citations 273 Total downloads Cited by 6 articles Turn on MathJax Share this article Get permission to re-use this article Article information Abstract bicep2 and the Keck Array are polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. bicep2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). bicep2 and the Keck Array share a common optical design and employ the field-proven bicep1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of bicep2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.

  3. Satisfactory elbow flexion in complete (preganglionic) brachial plexus injuries: produced by suture of third and fourth intercostal nerves to musculocutaneous nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, M; Ishii, S

    1987-11-01

    The third and fourth intercostal nerves were sutured to the musculocutaneous nerve to restore flexion of the elbow joint in complete (preganglionic) brachial plexus injuries. Seventeen patients were followed on the average for 5 years and 7 months after surgery. The results were evaluated by means of manual muscle tests and electrical diagnostic tests. Good (grade IV), or better, flexion of the elbow joint occurred in 12 patients over 3 years after the operation.

  4. Initial Performance of BICEP3: A Degree Angular Scale 95 GHz Band Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, W L K; Ahmed, Z; Alexander, K D; Amiri, M; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bowens-Rubin, R; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J A; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Grayson, J A; Halpern, M; Harrison, S A; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Kang, J; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Megerian, K G; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Sorensen, C; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Sudiwala, R V; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C E; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Willmert, J; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    BICEP3 is a $550~mm$ aperture telescope with cold, on-axis, refractive optics designed to observe at the $95~GHz$ band from the South Pole. It is the newest member of the BICEP/Keck family of inflationary probes specifically designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree-angular scales. BICEP3 is designed to house 1280 dual-polarization pixels, which, when fully-populated, totals to $\\sim$9$\\times$ the number of pixels in a single Keck $95~GHz$ receiver, thus further advancing the BICEP/Keck program's $95~GHz$ mapping speed. BICEP3 was deployed during the austral summer of 2014-2015 with 9 detector tiles, to be increased to its full capacity of 20 in the second season. After instrument characterization measurements were taken, CMB observation commenced in April 2015. Together with multi-frequency observation data from Planck, BICEP2, and the Keck Array, BICEP3 is projected to set upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to $r$ $\\lesssim 0.03$ at $95\\%$ C.L..

  5. Initial Performance of Bicep3: A Degree Angular Scale 95 GHz Band Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W. L. K.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Alexander, K. D.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Grayson, J. A.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S. A.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Kang, J.; Karkare, K. S.; Karpel, E.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Megerian, K. G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Sorensen, C.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Steinbach, B.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Willmert, J.; Yoon, K. W.

    2016-08-01

    Bicep3 is a 550-mm aperture telescope with cold, on-axis, refractive optics designed to observe at the 95-GHz band from the South Pole. It is the newest member of the Bicep/ Keck family of inflationary probes specifically designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. Bicep3 is designed to house 1280 dual-polarization pixels, which, when fully populated, totals to ˜ 9× the number of pixels in a single Keck 95-GHz receiver, thus further advancing the Bicep/ Keck program's 95 GHz mapping speed. Bicep3 was deployed during the austral summer of 2014-2015 with nine detector tiles, to be increased to its full capacity of 20 in the second season. After instrument characterization, measurements were taken, and CMB observation commenced in April 2015. Together with multi-frequency observation data from Planck, Bicep2, and the Keck Array, Bicep3 is projected to set upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r lesssim 0.03 at 95 % C.L.

  6. Low incidence of failure after proximal biceps tenodesis with unicortical suture button.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jay B; Sedory, David M; Freidl, Michael C; Adams, Douglas R

    2017-09-01

    Recent interest in suture button fixation has developed with regard to proximal biceps tenodesis fixation. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated viability of a unicortical suture button technique in vitro. Despite this, no clinical data has been reported to validate the biomechanical data. The purpose of this study is to report on complication and failure rates in the early postoperative period after bicep tenodesis with a unicortical suture button. A retrospective review was performed of all biceps tenodesis performed at our institution over a 36-month period using a unicortical suture button for fixation. All included patients had a minimum 12 weeks follow up. Failures were defined as complete loss of fixation, change in biceps contour during the early postoperative period, acute pain at the tenodesis site, or acute loss of supination strength. 145 of 166 biceps tenodesis procedures performed by the 4 surgeons at our institution met inclusion criteria. 80.1% of the patients were active duty military at the time of surgery. The average age was 38.2 years. There were 7 total complications (4.8%), including one failure (0.7%) requiring revision. Failure and complication rates in the early postoperative period using a unicortical suture button for biceps tenodesis fixation are consistent with other reported techniques. This study adds clinical data to the existing biomechanical reports that this technique is strong enough to provide stable fixation of the biceps tendon to allow healing of the tendon to the humerus.

  7. The growth patterns of three hindlimb muscles in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, C; Cracraft, J

    1977-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the growth patterns of three hindlimb muscles of the chicken relative to the functional-biomechanical demands of increasing body size. The biceps femoris, a bipennate non-postural muscle, grew relatively faster in terms of wet and dry weight than did the parallel-fibred adductor superficialis or the unipennate adductor profundus, both postural muscles. All three muscles exhibited positive allometry (relative to body weight) in muscle length but only biceps femoris and adductor profundus showed positive allometry in cross sectional area adductor superficialis having isometric growth in this parameter. In biceps femoris and adductor superficialis the lengths of the longest and shortest fasciculi grew at equal rates, whereas in adductor profundus the shortest fasciculi grew faster than the longest. We conclude that muscle weight alone is an insufficient indicator of changing function in growing muscle. Hence, growth studies should include other functionally relevant parameters such as cross sectional area, which is proportional to the force-producing capabilities of the muscle, or fibre (fasciculus) length, which is indicative of the absolute amount of stretching or shortening that is possible and of the contraction velocity.

  8. Muscle ultrasound analysis : Normal values and differentiation between myopathies and neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, NM; Bollen, AE; Windhausen, A; De Jager, AEJ; Van der Hoeven, JH

    2003-01-01

    In this study, 145 healthy adults (20 to 94 years old, 69 women) were examined using ultrasound (US) imaging to obtain reference values of muscle parameters that were previously not available. We measured biceps and quadriceps sizes and subcutaneous fat thickness. To quantify muscle aspect, we defin

  9. Muscle ultrasound analysis : Normal values and differentiation between myopathies and neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, NM; Bollen, AE; Windhausen, A; De Jager, AEJ; Van der Hoeven, JH

    2003-01-01

    In this study, 145 healthy adults (20 to 94 years old, 69 women) were examined using ultrasound (US) imaging to obtain reference values of muscle parameters that were previously not available. We measured biceps and quadriceps sizes and subcutaneous fat thickness. To quantify muscle aspect, we defin

  10. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  11. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruquee Sajedur

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer. Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs. The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months. The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months. 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90. Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95. The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently

  12. Radiative inflation and dark energy RIDEs again after BICEP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Stephen F.; Merle, Alexander [Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield Campus, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Luhn, Christoph [Theoretische Physik 1, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultät, Universität Siegen, Walter-Flex-Straße 3, Siegen, D-57068 (Germany); Schmidt-May, Angnis, E-mail: P.Di-Bari@soton.ac.uk, E-mail: S.F.King@soton.ac.uk, E-mail: Christoph.Luhn@uni-siegen.de, E-mail: A.Merle@soton.ac.uk, E-mail: Angnis.Schmidt-May@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics and The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, Stockholm, SE-106 91 (Sweden)

    2014-08-01

    Following the ground-breaking measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r=0.20{sup +0.07}{sub -0.05} by the BICEP2 collaboration, we perform a statistical analysis of a model that combines Radiative Inflation with Dark Energy (RIDE) based on the M{sup 2}|Φ|{sup 2}ln(|Φ|{sup 2}/Λ{sup 2}) potential and compare its predictions to those based on the traditional chaotic inflation M{sup 2}|Φ|{sup 2} potential. We find a best-fit value in the RIDE model of r=0.18 as compared to r=0.17 in the chaotic model, with the spectral index being n{sub S}=0.96 in both models.

  13. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Garrett M; Mair, Scott D; Lattermann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain. As such, the anatomy and function of the tendon as well as its pathophysiology and different treatment methods have been studied extensively. The pathophysiology is a spectrum beginning with inflammation and leading to tendon degeneration. Different clinical tests and imaging modalities may all be employed to help aid in diagnosis. Conservative management is the first-line treatment, but surgical intervention may be warranted. In general, tenotomy or tenodesis is performed depending, among other things, on the age and activity level of the patient. There are several different methods for tenodesis, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. Patient factors must be considered when choosing the optimal treatment.

  14. Killing the Straw Man: Does BICEP Prove Inflation?

    CERN Document Server

    Dent, James B; Mathur, Harsh

    2014-01-01

    The surprisingly large value of $r$, the ratio of power in tensor to scalar density perturbations in the CMB reported by the BICEP2 Collaboration provides strong evidence for Inflation at the GUT scale. In order to provide compelling evidence, other possible sources of the signal need to be ruled out. While the Inflationary signal remains the best motivated source, the current measurement unfortunately still allows for the possibility that a comparable gravitational wave background might result from a self ordering scalar field transition that takes place later at somewhat lower energy. However even marginally improved limits on the possible isocurvature contribution to CMB anistropies could rule out this possibility, and essentially all other sources of the observed signal other than Inflation.

  15. BICEP2, non-Bunch–Davies and entanglement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namit Mahajan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BICEP2 result on the tensor to scalar ratio r indicates a blue tilt in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum. This blue tilt and the observed large value r=0.2 are difficult to accommodate within the single field inflationary scenarios under standard conditions. Non-Bunch–Davies vacuum states have been proposed as a possibility. Such vacua are known to lead to pathologies. In this note we point out that it is known that these states ought to be interpreted as excited/squeezed states built over the standard Bunch–Davies vacuum in order to avoid pathological issues. We discuss the associated entanglement properties due to de Sitter horizon, and how such an approach may be more natural in the context of inflation. In particular, we suggest to employ entanglement considerations in de Sitter background to study the nature and intrinsic properties of modified initial states.

  16. Probing nuclear rates with Planck and BICEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Lesgourgues, Julien; Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Miele, Gennaro; Pisanti, Ofelia

    2014-01-01

    Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) relates key cosmological parameters to the primordial abundance of light elements. In this paper, we point out that the recent observations of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies by the Planck satellite and by the BICEP2 experiment constrain these parameters with such a high level of accuracy that the primordial deuterium abundance can be inferred with remarkable precision. For a given cosmological model, one can obtain independent information on nuclear processes in the energy range relevant for BBN, which determine the eventual ^2H/H yield. In particular, assuming the standard cosmological model, we show that a combined analysis of Planck data and of recent deuterium abundance measurements in metal-poor damped Lyman-alpha systems provides independent information on the cross section of the radiative capture reaction d(p,\\gamma)^3He converting deuterium into helium. Interestingly, the result is higher than the values suggested by a fit of present experimental data in the B...

  17. MR imaging of the brachial plexus: comparison between 1.5-T and 3-T MR imaging: preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele; Calabrese, Massimo [National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Succio, Giulia; Serafini, Giovanni; Ghidara, Matteo [Santa Corona Hospital, Radiology Department, Savona (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Universita di Genova, Radiology Department, Genova (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    To compare 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brachial plexus. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers and 30 consecutive patients with brachial plexus disturbances. MR was prospectively performed with comparable sequence parameters and coils with a 1.5-T and a 3-T system. Imaging protocols at both field strengths included T1-weighted turbo spin-echo (tSE) sequences and T2-weighed turbo spin-echo (tSE) sequences with fat saturation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between muscle and nerve were calculated for both field strengths. The visibility of brachial plexus nerve at various anatomic levels (roots, interscalene area, costoclavicular space, and axillary level) was analyzed with a four-point grading scale by two radiologists. MR imaging diagnoses and pathological findings were also compared qualitatively. SNR and CNRs were significantly higher on 3-T MR images than on 1.5-T MR images (Friedman test) for all sequences. Nerve visibility was significantly better on 3-T MR images than on 1.5-T MR images (paired sign test). Pathological findings (n = 30/30) were seen equally well with both field strengths. MR imaging diagnoses did not differ for the 1.5- and 3-T protocols. High-quality MR images of the brachial plexus can be obtained with 3-T MR imaging by using sequences similar to those used at 1.5-T MR imaging. In patients and healthy volunteers, the visibility of nerve trunks and cords at 3-T MR imaging appears to be superior to that at 1.5-T MR imaging. (orig.)

  18. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  19. New approaches in imaging of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, M.I. [Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: maria.i.vargas@hcuge.ch; Viallon, M. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Nguyen, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Beaulieu, J.Y. [Unit of Hand Surgery, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Delavelle, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Becker, M. [Unit of Head and Neck Radiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    Imaging plays an essential role for the detection and analysis of pathologic conditions of the brachial plexus. Currently, several new techniques are used in addition to conventional 2D MR sequences to study the brachial plexus: the 3D STIR SPACE sequence, 3D heavily T2w MR myelography sequences (balanced SSFP = CISS 3D, True FISP 3D, bFFE and FIESTA), and the diffusion-weighted (DW) neurography sequence with fiber tracking reconstruction (tractography). The 3D STIR sequence offers complete anatomical coverage of the brachial plexus and the ability to slice through the volume helps to analyze fiber course modification and structure alteration. It allows precise assessment of distortion, compression and interruption of postganglionic nerve fibers thanks to the capability of performing maximum intensity projections (MIP) and multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs). The CISS 3D, b-SSFP sequences allow good visualization of nerve roots within the spinal canal and may be used for MR myelography in traumatic plexus injuries. The DW neurography sequence with tractography is still a work in progress, able to demonstrate nerves tracts, their structure alteration or deformation due to pathologic processes surrounding or located along the postganglionic brachial plexus. It may become a precious tool for the understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms in diseases affecting the brachial plexus and may play a role for surgical planning procedures in the near future.

  20. Repair of the torn distal biceps tendon by endobutton fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of techniques have been described to reattach the torn distal biceps tendon to the bicipital tuberosity. We report a retrospective analysis of single incision technique using an endobutton fixation in sports persons. Materials and Methods: The present series include nine torn distal biceps tendons in eight patients, fixed anatomically to the radial tuberosity with an endobutton by using a single incision surgical technique; seven patients had suffered the injuries during contact sports. The passage of the endobutton was facilitated by using a blunt tipped pin in order to avoid injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. The patients were evaluated by Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score and Mayo elbow score. Results: The average age of the patients was 27.35 years (range 21-42 years. Average follow-up was 41.5 months (range 24-102 months. The final average flexion extension arc was 0°-143°, while the average pronation and supination angles were 77° (range 70°-82° and 81° (range 78°-85°, respectively at the last followup. All the patients had a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score of 0 and a Mayo elbow score of 100 each. All the seven active sports persons were able to get back to their respective game. There was no nerve injury or any other complication. Conclusions: The surgical procedure used by us is a simple, safe and reproducible technique giving minimal morbidity and better cosmetic results.

  1. Joint analysis of BICEP2/keck array and Planck Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, P A R; Aghanim, N; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barkats, D; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Benton, S J; Bernard, J-P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Brevik, J A; Bucher, M; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Buza, V; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J-F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chary, R-R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Connors, J; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J-M; Désert, F-X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dowell, C D; Duband, L; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Dvorkin, C; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Filippini, J P; Finelli, F; Fliescher, S; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; Golwala, S R; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hasselfield, M; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hristov, V V; Huffenberger, K M; Hui, H; Hurier, G; Irwin, K D; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Karakci, A; Karkare, K S; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Keihänen, E; Kernasovskiy, S A; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kovac, J M; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kuo, C L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J-M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leitch, E M; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Lueker, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Mason, P; Matarrese, S; Megerian, K G; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M-A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Pryke, C; Puget, J-L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Richter, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schwarz, R; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sheehy, C D; Spencer, L D; Staniszewski, Z K; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A-S; Sygnet, J-F; Tauber, J A; Teply, G P; Terenzi, L; Thompson, K L; Toffolatti, L; Tolan, J E; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Turner, A D; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Vieregg, A G; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Weber, A C; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Yoon, K W; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-03-13

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400  deg^{2} patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5°. The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2  μK deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150  GHz to a lensed-ΛCDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r_{0.05}<0.12 at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0σ significance.

  2. Biomechanical Basis of Shoulder Osseous Deformity and Contracture in a Rat Model of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Dustin L; Hutchinson, Ian D; Plate, Johannes F; Antoniono, Jennifer; Gong, Hao; Cao, Guohua; Li, Zhongyu; Saul, Katherine R

    2015-08-05

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of two proposed mechanisms, strength imbalance and impaired longitudinal muscle growth, to osseous and postural deformity in a rat model of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP). Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rat pups were divided into four groups on the basis of surgical interventions to induce a strength imbalance, impaired growth, both a strength imbalance and impaired growth (a combined mechanism), and a sham condition in the left forelimb. Maximum passive external shoulder rotation angle (ERmax) was measured bilaterally at four and eight weeks postoperatively. After the rats were killed at eight weeks, the glenohumeral geometry (on microcomputed tomography) and shoulder muscle architecture properties were measured bilaterally. Bilateral muscle mass and optimal length differences were greatest in the impaired growth and combined mechanism groups, which also exhibited >15° lower ERmax (p muscle length was significantly correlated with at least one osseous deformity measure for six of fourteen muscle compartments crossing the shoulder on the affected side (p muscle growth and shoulder deformity were most pronounced in the impaired growth and combined mechanism groups, which underwent neurectomy. Strength imbalance was associated with osseous deformity to a lesser extent. Treatments to alleviate shoulder deformity should address mechanical effects of both strength imbalance and impaired longitudinal muscle growth, with an emphasis on developing new treatments to promote growth in muscles affected by BPBP. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  3. Reconstruction of posterior interosseous nerve injury following biceps tendon repair: case report and cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtee, David B; Brown, Justin M; Mackinnon, Susan E; Tung, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the terminal branches of the posterior interosseous nerve that makes this reconstruction possible. Finally, we advocate consideration for identification of the posterior interosseous nerve prior to reattachment of the biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity.

  4. Aberrant Dual Origin of the Dorsal Scapular Nerve and Its Communication with Long Thoracic Nerve: An Unusual Variation of the Brachial Plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilal, Poonam; Sarda, Rohit Kumar; Chhetri, Kalpana; Lama, Polly; Tamang, Binod Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Pre and post-fixed variations at roots of the brachial plexus have been well documented, however little is known about the variations that exist in the branches which arise from the brachial plexus. In this paper, we describe about one such rare variation related to the dorsal scapular and the long thoracic nerve, which are the branches arising from the roots of the brachial plexus. The variation was found during routine dissection. The dorsal scapular nerve, which routinely arises from the fifth cervical nerve root (C5), was seen to receive contributions from C5 as well as sixth cervical nerve (C6), while the long thoracic nerve arose from C6 and seventh cervical nerves (C7) only. Furthermore along with variations in origin of the dorsal scapular and long thoracic nerves, the brachial plexus was seen to exist as a prefixed plexus receiving a contribution from C4 nerve root. An aberrant communicating branch between the dorsal scapular and long thoracic nerve was also identified. Knowledge about the course and anatomy of such variations can be vital for understanding the aetiology of various conditions such as winging of scapula, interscapular pain, administration of cervical nerve blocks, surgeries and for effective management of regions and muscles supplied by dorsal scapular and long thoracic nerve.

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography for the assessment of brachial plexopathy in oncological practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreou, Adrian; Sohaib, Aslam; Collins, David J.; Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C.; Leach, Martin O.; MacVicar, David A.; Koh, Dow-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate diffusion-weighted MR neurography (DW-MRN) for visualizing the brachial plexus and for the assessment of brachial plexopathy. Methods: 40 oncological patients with symptoms of brachial plexopathy underwent 1.5 T MRI using conventional MR sequences and unidirectional DW-MRN. T

  6. Serial casting for elbow flexion contractures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, B J; Steenbeek, D; Nelissen, R G H H

    2016-09-02

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of serial casting of elbow flexion contractures in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. A prospective consecutive cohort study was performed with a median follow-up of 5 years. Forty-one patients with elbow flexion contractures ≥ 30° were treated with serial casting until the contracture was ≤ 10°, for a maximum of 8 weeks. Range of motion, number of recurrences and patient satisfaction were recorded and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank and Cox regression tests. Passive extension increased from a median of -40° (IQR -50 to -30) to -15° (IQR -10 to -20, p contractures, although recurrences were frequent. The severity of elbow flexion contracture is a predictor of recurrence. We recommend more research on muscle degeneration and determinants involved in elbow flexion contractures to improve treatment strategies and prevent side-effects.

  7. [Palsy of the upper limb: Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, arthrogryposis, cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Philandrianos, C; Tekpa, B

    2016-10-01

    "Palsy of the upper limb" in children includes various diseases which leads to hypomobility of the member: cerebral palsy, arthrogryposis and obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. These pathologies which differ on brain damage or not, have the same consequences due to the early achievement: negligence, stiffness and deformities. Regular entire clinical examination of the member, an assessment of needs in daily life, knowledge of the social and family environment, are key points for management. In these pathologies, the rehabilitation is an emergency, which began at birth and intensively. Splints and physiotherapy are part of the treatment. Surgery may have a functional goal, hygienic or aesthetic in different situations. The main goals of surgery are to treat: joints stiffness, bones deformities, muscles contractures and spasticity, paresis, ligamentous laxity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenyu Zhang; Hailiang Tang; Junming Zhou; Yudong Gu

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacu-puncture stimulation at bilateralQuchi(LI11),Hegu(LI04),Zusanli(ST36) andYanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was signiifcantly attenuated. Immunolfuorescence staining showed that the expression of β-endorphins in the arcuate nucleus was signiifcantly increased after therapy. Thus, experimental ifndings indi-cate that electroacupuncture can attenuate neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury through upregulatingβ-endorphin expression.

  9. Prognostic value of thumb pain sensation in birth brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of absent thumb pain sensation in newborns and young infants with birth brachial plexopathy. METHODS: We evaluated 131 patients with birth brachial plexopathy with less than two months of age. Pain sensation was evoked by thumb nail bed compression to evaluate sensory fibers of the upper trunk (C6. The patients were followed-up monthly. Patients with less than antigravity elbow flexion at six months of age were considered to have a poor outcome. RESULTS: Thirty patients had absent thumb pain sensation, from which 26 showed a poor outcome. Sensitivity of the test was 65% and specificity was 96%. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of thumb pain sensation should be included in the clinical assessment of infants with birth brachial plexopathy.

  10. Central motor conduction in brachial monomelic amyotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of subclinical involvement of motor pathways in clinically diagnosed Brachial Monomelic Amyotrophy (BMMA is unknown. Aims: To determine the prevalence of subclinical involvement of central motor pathways in BMMA using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Setting and Design: Prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: Central motor conduction time (CMCT was determined by ′F′ wave method using figure-of-eight coil attached to Magstim 200 stimulator, in 17 patients with BMMA. Motor evoked potentials were recorded from first dorsal interosseous of the affected (AFF and unaffected upper limbs (UNAFF at rest and during partial contraction. Comparison was made with data from 10 healthy controls (CTRL. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Results: Compared to controls, the mean CMCT of AFF was significantly prolonged, both at rest and contraction: (a Rest: AFF-6.68±1.78 ms, UNAFF-6.36±1.16 ms, CTRL-5.71±1.02 ms; Fisher′s PLSD for AFF vs. CTRL: P =0.037, (b Contraction: AFF-5.78±1.62 ms, UAFF - 4.86±1.38 ms, CTRL-4.06±0.80 ms; Fisher′s PLSD for AFF vs. CTRL; P =0.0002, AFF vs. UNAFF- P =0.044. Prolonged CMCT (>mean+2SD of controls was observed in 29.4% of AFF and 6.25% of UNAFF at rest, and in 47.1% and 23.5% respectively during contraction. Conclusions: Dysfunction of central motor pathways was observed in both affected and unaffected upper limbs of some patients with BMMA of upper limbs. The dysfunction was more pronounced during voluntary contraction. A larger study is needed to validate the significance of these findings.

  11. POSSIBLE ENTRAPMENT OF THE ULNAR ARTERY BY THE THIRD HEAD OF PRONATOR TERES MUSCLE. El posible atrapamiento de la arteria ulnar por el tercer fascículo del músculo pronador teres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El conocimiento de las variaciones en los alrededores de la fosa cubital es útil para cirujanos ortopédicos, cirujanos plásticos y médicos en general. Observamos las variaciones arteriales y musculares en y alrededor de la fosa cubital. La arteria braquial terminó 2 pulgadas por encima de la base de la fosa cubital. Las arterias radiales y cubitales entraron en la fosa cubital  pasando delante de los tendones de los músculos braquial y bíceps braquial respectivamente. La arteria cubital estaba rodeada por el tercer fascículo del pronador teres, que tuvo su origen en la fascia cubriendo la parte distal del músculo braquial. Este músculo se unió a tendón de pronador teres distalmente y fue suministrado por una rama del nervio mediano. Este músculo podría alterar el flujo sanguíneo en la arteria cubital y puede causar dificultades para el registro de la presión sanguínea. Knowledge of variations at and in the surroundings of cubital fossa is useful for the orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons and medical practitioners in general. During routine dissection, we observed arterial and muscular variations in and around the cubital fossa. The brachial artery terminated 2 inches above the base of the cubital fossa. The radial and ulnar arteries entered the cubital fossa by passing in front of the tendons of brachialis and biceps brachii respectively. The ulnar artery was surrounded by the third head of pronator teres which took its origin from the fascia covering the distal part of the brachialis muscle. This muscle joined pronator teres tendon distally and was supplied by a branch of median nerve. This muscle could alter the blood flow in the ulnar artery and may cause difficulties in recording the blood pressure.

  12. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Subash BS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Brachial neuritis (BN is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis.

  13. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques.

  14. Electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the normal anatomy of the brachial plexus and its major terminal branches, as well as the major causes and clinical presentations of lesions of these structures. An approach to electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies is provided, with an emphasis on those nerve conduction studies and portions of the needle examination, which permit localization of lesions to specific trunks, cords, and terminal branches. The importance of specific sensory nerve conduction studies for differentiating plexopathies from radiculopathies and mononeuropathies is emphasized.

  15. IMPACT OF OVERHEAT ON DISABLED SWIMMERS’ SKELETAL MUSCLE STIFFNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prystupa Tetyana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary athletic recovery involves the range of treatments combined with training and restitution processes and are designed to optimize rest as well as minimize the effects of sports overstrain. Sportsmen benefit enormously from recovery treatments during both preparation and competition phases as they help remove frequent pathogenic pre-start conditions which could reduce work capacity and affect adversely results achieved. Purpose: The paper is aimed to specify the impact of overheat on easing the stiffness of disabled sportspeople’s biceps muscle of arm and the central part of the deltoid muscle. It has been assumed that overheating in a Finnish sauna will facilitate muscle condition and recovery of a swimmer’s body. Material: The research involved 20 disabled swimmers - 10 competitors based in the Start sports club in Kalisz and 10 contestants based in Start sports club in Wroclaw. The Tonus-1 myotonometer was used to measure the stiffness of biceps muscle of arm (biceps brachii and the central part of the deltoid muscle (deltoideus - pars acromialic. The research was carried out in two stages: training mesocycle with no recovery and training mesocycle with recovery. The mesocycles comprised three one-week-long microcycles each. Results: The research proved the overheating to ease rest muscle stiffness . Conclusions: The upshot of the discussion was that the Finnish sauna has a tonic effect on a disable swimmer’s body. Reduction of post work-out muscle stiffness will facilitate effective recovery and bring forward next training activities.

  16. Entrapment of Common Peroneal Nerve by Surgical Suture following Distal Biceps Femoris Tendon Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Fukuda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe entrapment of the common peroneal nerve by a suture after surgical repair of the distal biceps femoris tendon. Complete rupture of the distal biceps femoris tendon of a 16-year-old male athlete was surgically repaired. Postoperative common peroneal nerve palsy was evident, but conservative treatment did not cause any neurological improvement. Reexploration revealed that the common peroneal nerve was entrapped by the surgical suture. Complete removal of the suture and external neurolysis significantly improved the palsy. The common peroneal nerve is prone to damage as a result of its close proximity to the biceps femoris tendon and it should be identified during surgical repair of a ruptured distal biceps femoris tendon.

  17. Acute distal biceps rupture in an adolescent weightlifter on chronic steroid suppression: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, David Y; LaMartina, Joey A; Zhang, Alan L; Pandya, Nirav K

    2016-09-01

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures are uncommon events in the adult population and exceedingly rare in the adolescent population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and only report of a distal biceps tendon rupture in an adolescent with a history of chronic corticosteroid suppression. We present a case of a 17-year-old male on chronic corticosteroid suppression who underwent a successful distal biceps tendon repair after an acute rupture following weightlifting. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient reports full range of motion and strength, and is able to return to his preinjury activity level with sports and weightlifting. Acute distal biceps ruptures are uncommon injuries in the pediatric population, but may occur in conjunction with chronic corticosteroid use. Anatomic repair, when possible, can restore function and strength. level IV, case report.

  18. Traumatic injuries of brachial plexus: present methods of surgical treatment Part II. Treatment policy for brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Novikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper is to familiarize practicing neurologists, neurosurgeons, traumatologists, and orthopedists with the current principles of diagnosis and treatment of different brachial plexus (BP injuries. Part I describes the anatomy of BP in detail, considers the main mechanisms of its injuries, and gives their current classification (Nervno-Myshechnye Bolezni (Neuromuscular Diseases 2012;4:19–27.Part II presents the author's approach to treatment of brachial plexus injuries according to the type of lesion and period of denervation: nonoperative methods; rehabilitation; preoperative management; indications for surgical treatment. The tactics and techniques of primary brachial plexus reconstructions are discussed in detail.

  19. Surface EMG based muscle activity analysis for aerobic cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Venkatesh; Jayaraman, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined the muscle activity of aerobic cyclist on biceps brachii medial, trapezius medial, latissimus dorsi medial, and erector spinae muscles bilaterally during 30 min of cycling. Thirteen male volunteers were chosen and placed in two groups (with and without low back pain (LBP)). Surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded bilaterally from selected muscle groups for 30 min of cycling for each subject. Statistical tests were performed to determine the difference in fatigue, using mean power frequency difference. LBP group showed a significantly higher fatigue (p<0.05) in left biceps brachii medial when compared to the control group. High fatigue in the back muscles in the LBP group was not found; however, when linear regression was performed for these individuals, the data showed a possibility of worsening in their condition due to 30 min of cycling.

  20. Reconstruction of Posterior Interosseous Nerve Injury Following Biceps Tendon Repair: Case Report and Cadaveric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtee, David B.; Brown, Justin M.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Tung, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the termin...

  1. Spontaneous resorption of calcification at the long head of the biceps tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Amri, Adriansyah; Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Hara, Michiharu; Yamanaka, Issei; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare cause of shoulder pain. Calcium deposits are often spontaneously resorbed or reduced in size in the rotator cuff tendons, which represent the most common sites of calcific tendinitis around the shoulder. To our knowledge, no case of spontaneous resorption of calcification in the long head of the biceps tendon has been reported in the literature. Here, we report one such case and describe its successful treatment using a conse...

  2. Evaluation of the Effusion within Biceps Long Head Tendon Sheath Using Ultrasonography

    OpenAIRE

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Yeol; Park, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Many shoulder diseases are related to glenohumeral joint synovitis and effusion. The purpose of the present study is to detect effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath as the sign of glenohumeral joint synovitis using ultrasonography, and to evaluate the clinical meaning of effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath. Methods A consecutive series of 569 patients who underwent ultrasonography for shoulder pain were reviewed retrospectively and ultimately, 303 patien...

  3. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  4. Biceps Tenotomy Versus Tenodesis in Active Patients Younger Than 55 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jamie L.; FitzPatrick, Jennifer L.; Rylander, Lucas S.; Bennett, Christine; Vidal, Armando F.; McCarty, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal biceps pathology is a significant factor in shoulder pain. Surgical treatment options include biceps tenotomy and subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Tenotomy is a simple procedure, but it may produce visible deformity, subjective cramping, or loss of supination strength. Tenodesis is a comparatively technical procedure involving a longer recovery, but it has been hypothesized to achieve better outcomes in younger active patients (Popeye” deformity, compared with 18.2% (4/22) of tenodesis patients. Strength prior to fatiguing exercise was similar between tenodesis and tenotomy for FS (6.9 vs 7.3 lbs; P < .05), EF in neutral (35.4 vs 35.4 lbs), and EF in supination (33.8 vs 34.2 lbs). Strength was not significantly different between groups for isometric strength and endurance measures. Subjective functional outcome measured by the DASH, ASES, and VAS scores were similar between groups. Frequency of complaints of cramping was higher in the tenotomy group (4/20 vs 1/22), and complaints of pain were higher in the tenodesis group (11/22 vs 5/20). Conclusion: Despite increased demands and activity placed on biceps function in a younger population, this study showed no differences in functional and subjective outcome measurements. The choice between biceps tenotomy and tenodesis for pathology of the proximal biceps tendon can continue to be based on surgeon and patient preference. PMID:26535382

  5. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    affect the characteristics of blood flow across the fistula.1 RCAVF is the preferred route for ... shoulder and neck were examined to detect any sign of previous trauma, muscle ... 48 hours after surgery, at 2 weeks and at 6 weeks postoperatively.

  6. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Cloning, Structural Analysis and Tissue Expression of Protein Phosphatase 3 Catalytic Subunit Alpha Isoform (PPP3CA Gene in Tianfu Goat Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays a critical role in controlling skeletal muscle fiber type. However, little information is available concerning the expression of calcineurin in goat. Therefore, protein phosphatase 3 catalytic subunit alpha isoform (PPP3CA gene, also called calcineurin Aα, was cloned and its expression characterized in Tianfu goat muscle. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR analyses revealed that Tianfu goat PPP3CA was detected in cardiac muscle, biceps femoris muscle, abdominal muscle, longissimus dors muscle, and soleus muscle. High expression levels were found in biceps femoris muscle, longissimus muscle and abdominal muscle (p < 0.01, and low expression levels were seen in cardiac muscle and soleus muscle (p > 0.05. In addition, the spatial-temporal mRNA expression levels showed different variation trends in different muscles with the age of the goats. Western blotting further revealed that PPP3CA protein was expressed in the above-mentioned tissues, with the highest level in biceps femoris muscle, and the lowest level in soleus muscle. In this study, we isolated the full-length coding sequence of Tianfu goat PPP3CA gene, analyzed its structure, and investigated its expression in different muscle tissues from different age stages. These results provide a foundation for understanding the function of the PPP3CA gene in goats.

  8. Molecular cloning, structural analysis and tissue expression of protein phosphatase 3 catalytic subunit alpha isoform (PPP3CA) gene in Tianfu goat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lu; Ma, Jisi; Xu, Gangyi; Wang, Daihua; Wang, Nianlu

    2014-02-07

    Calcineurin, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays a critical role in controlling skeletal muscle fiber type. However, little information is available concerning the expression of calcineurin in goat. Therefore, protein phosphatase 3 catalytic subunit alpha isoform (PPP3CA) gene, also called calcineurin Aα, was cloned and its expression characterized in Tianfu goat muscle. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses revealed that Tianfu goat PPP3CA was detected in cardiac muscle, biceps femoris muscle, abdominal muscle, longissimus dors muscle, and soleus muscle. High expression levels were found in biceps femoris muscle, longissimus muscle and abdominal muscle (p muscle and soleus muscle (p > 0.05). In addition, the spatial-temporal mRNA expression levels showed different variation trends in different muscles with the age of the goats. Western blotting further revealed that PPP3CA protein was expressed in the above-mentioned tissues, with the highest level in biceps femoris muscle, and the lowest level in soleus muscle. In this study, we isolated the full-length coding sequence of Tianfu goat PPP3CA gene, analyzed its structure, and investigated its expression in different muscle tissues from different age stages. These results provide a foundation for understanding the function of the PPP3CA gene in goats.

  9. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines re...

  10. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines re...

  11. Reconstruction of brachial pressure from finger arterial pressure during orthostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogert, Lysander W J; Harms, Mark P M; Pott, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In patients with recurrent syncope, monitoring of intra-arterial pressure during orthostatic stress testing is recommended because of the potentially sudden and rapid development of hypotension. Replacing brachial arterial pressure (BAP) by the non-invasively obtained finger arterial pressure (Fi...

  12. Reconstruction of brachial pressure from finger arterial pressure during orthostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogert, Lysander W J; Harms, Mark P M; Pott, Frank;

    2004-01-01

    In patients with recurrent syncope, monitoring of intra-arterial pressure during orthostatic stress testing is recommended because of the potentially sudden and rapid development of hypotension. Replacing brachial arterial pressure (BAP) by the non-invasively obtained finger arterial pressure (Fin...

  13. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassel, Christina L; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ∼50,000 SNPs across ∼2100 candidate genes...

  14. Postanesthetic brachial triceps myonecrosis in a Spanish-bred horse

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala, Ignacio; Rodríguez, M. Jesús; Aguirre, Carla; Buendía, Antonio J.; Belda, Eliseo; Laredo, Francisco G.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a case of postanesthetic brachial triceps myonecrosis affecting only the left forelimb of a horse. A fatal unilateral postanesthetic myonecrosis has not been previously reported in the horse. This article describes the factors in the horse’s history, the anesthetic protocol, and the treatment that may have led to this condition.

  15. Treatment for idiopathic and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (brachial neuritis) (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfen, N. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hughes, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuralgic amyotrophy (also know as Parsonage-Turner syndrome or brachial plexus neuritis) is a distinct peripheral nervous system disorder characterised by episodes (attacks) of extreme neuropathic pain and rapid multifocal weakness and atrophy in the upper limbs. Neuralgic amyotrophy ha

  16. Pre- and early-postnatal nutrition modify gene and protein expressions of muscle energy metabolism markers and phospholipid fatty acid composition in a muscle type specific manner in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Lei; Kongsted, Alice; Ghoreishi, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    determinants of insulin signalling in two types of skeletal muscles (longissimus dorsi (LD) and biceps femoris (BF)) and in the cardiac muscle (ventriculus sinister cordis (VSC)) of sheep from the same experiment. Twin-bearing ewes were fed either 100% (NORM) or 50% (LOW) of their energy and protein...

  17. Inflation in the light of BICEP2 and PLANCK

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhendra Mohanty

    2016-02-01

    The BICEP2/Keck+PLANCK joint analysis of the -model polarization and polarization by foreground dust sets an upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of 0.05 < 0.12 at 95% CL. The popular Starorbinsky model Higgs-inflation or the conformally equivalent Higgs-inflation model allow low values (∼10−3). We survey the generalizations of the Starobinsky–Higgs models which would allow larger values ( ∼ 0.1). The Starobinsky–Higgs inflation models require an exponential potential which can be naturally derived from SUGRA models. We show that a variation of the no-scale SUGRA model can give rise to the generalized Starobinsky models which give large . We also examine non-standard boundary conditions which would allow a large deviation of the tensor spectral index from the slow roll values and propose that the presence of a thermal component in the tensor spectrum arises from Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the de-Sitter space.

  18. Axion cold dark matter in view of BICEP2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondolo, Paolo; Visinelli, Luca

    2014-07-04

    The properties of axions that constitute 100% of cold dark matter (CDM) depend on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r at the end of inflation. If r=0.20(-0.05)(+0.07) as reported by the BICEP2 Collaboration, then "half" of the CDM axion parameter space is ruled out. Namely, in the context of single-field slow-roll inflation, for axions to be 100% of the CDM, the Peccei-Quinn symmetry must be broken after the end of inflation, so that axion nonadiabatic primordial fluctuations are compatible with observational constraints. The cosmic axion density is then independent of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, and the axion mass is expected to be in a narrow range that, however, depends on the cosmological model before primordial nucleosynthesis. In the standard Lambda CDM cosmology, the CDM axion mass range is ma=(71±2  μeV)(αdec+1)6/7, where αdec is the fractional contribution to the cosmic axion density from decays of axionic strings and walls.

  19. Reconstructing the local potential of inflation with BICEP2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yin-Zhe [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 Canada (Canada); Wang, Yi, E-mail: mayinzhe@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk [Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0WA U.K. (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    We locally reconstruct the inflationary potential by using the current constraints on r and n{sub s} from BICEP2 data. Assuming small and negligible α{sub s}, the inflationary potential is approximately linear in Δφ∼ M{sub pl} range but becomes non-linear in Δφ∼ 10 M{sub pl} range. However if we vary the value of α{sub s} within the range given by constraints from Planck measurement, the local reconstruction is only valid in the range of Δφ∼ 0.4 M{sub pl}, which challenges the inflationary background from the point of view of effective field theory. We show that, within the range of Δ φ ∼ 0.4 M{sub pl}, the inflation potential can be precisely reconstructed. With the current reconstruction, we show that V(φ) ∼ φ{sup 2} and φ{sup 3} are consistent, while φ model is ruled out by 95% confidence level of the reconstructed range of potential. This sets up a strong limit of large-field inflation models.

  20. Axion cold dark matter in view of BICEP2 results

    CERN Document Server

    Visinelli, L

    2014-01-01

    The properties of axions that constitute 100% of cold dark matter (CDM) depend on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ at the end of inflation. If $r=0.20^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ as reported by the BICEP2 collaboration, then ``half'' of the CDM axion parameter space is ruled out. Namely, the Peccei-Quinn symmetry must be broken after the end of inflation, and axions do not generate non-adiabatic primordial fluctuations. The cosmic axion density is then independent of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$, and the axion mass is expected to be in a narrow range that however depends on the cosmological model before primordial nucleosynthesis. In the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, the CDM axion mass range is $m_a = \\left(71 \\pm 2\\right) \\mu{\\rm eV} \\, (\\alpha^{\\rm dec}+1)^{6/7}$, where $\\alpha^{\\rm dec}$ is the fractional contributions to the cosmic axion density from decays of axionic strings and walls.

  1. Biceps instability and Slap type II tear in overhead athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Leonardo; Soldati, Francesco; Cheli, Andrea; Pari, Carlotta; Massari, Leo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Type II lesions are common lesions encountered in overhead athletes with controversies arising in term of timing for treatment, surgical approach, rehabilitation and functional results. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP tears in overhead athletes, focusing on the time elapsed from diagnosis and treatment, time needed to return to sport, rate of return to sport and to previous level of performance, providing an overview concerning evidence for the effectiveness of different surgical approaches to type II SLAP tears in overhead athletes. A internet search on peer reviewed Journal from 1990, first descriprion of this pathology, to 2012, have been conducted evaluating the outcomes for both isolated Slap II tear overhead athletes and those who presented associated lesions treated. The results have been analyzed according to the scale reported focusing on return to sport and level of activity. Apart from a single study, non prospective level I and II studies were detected. Return to play at the same level ranged form 22% to 94% with different range of technique utilized with the majority of the authors recommending the fixation of these lesions but biceps tenodesis can lead to higher satisfaction racte when directly compated to the anchor fixation. Associated pathologies such as partial or full tickness rotator cuff tear did not clearly affect the outcomes and complications rate. There is no consensus regarding timing and treatment for type II SLAP, especially in overhead athletes who need to regain a high level of performance.

  2. Evidence of long term muscle fatigue following prolonged intermittent contractions based on mechano- and electromyograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, K; Blangsted, A K; Jørgensen, L V

    2003-01-01

    performance of the biceps muscle are more strongly reflected in low than in high force test contractions, more prominent in the MMG than in the EMG signal and less pronounced following contractions controlled by visual compared to proprioceptive feedback. Further, it was investigated if fatigue induced by 30...... min intermittent contractions at 30% as well as 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) lasted more than 30 min recovery. In six male subjects the EMG and MMG were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle during three sessions with fatiguing exercise at 10% with visual feedback and at 30% MVC...

  3. Transfer of a fascicle from the posterior cord to the suprascapular nerve after injury of the upper roots of the brachial plexus: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Roberto Sergio; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Heise, Carlos Otto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2009-10-01

    A new nerve transfer technique using a healthy fascicle of the posterior cord for suprascapular nerve reconstruction is presented. This technique was used in a patient with posttraumatic brachial plexopathy resulting in upper trunk injury with proximal root stumps that were unavailable for grafting associated with multiple nerve dysfunction. A 45-year-old man sustained a right brachial plexus injury after a bicycle accident. Clinical evaluation and electromyography indicated upper trunk involvement. Trapezius muscle function and triceps strength were normal on physical examination. The patient underwent a combined supra- and infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus. A neuroma-in-continuity of the upper trunk and fibrotic C5 and C6 roots were identified. Electrical stimulation of the phrenic and spinal accessory nerves produced no response. The suprascapular nerve was dissected from the upper trunk, transected, and rerouted to the infraclavicular fossa. A healthy fascicle of the posterior cord to the triceps muscle was transferred to the suprascapular nerve. At the time of the 1-year follow-up evaluation, arm abduction against gravity and external rotation reached 40 and 34 degrees, respectively. The posterior cord can be used as a source of donor fascicle to the suprascapular nerve after its infraclavicular relocation. This new intraplexal nerve transfer could be applied in patients with isolated injury of the upper trunk and concomitant lesion of the extraplexal nerve donors usually used for reinnervation of the suprascapular nerve.

  4. Early detection of skeletal muscle injury by assay of creatine kinase MM isoforms in serum after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apple, F. S.; Hellsten, Ylva; Clarkson, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    We could detect skeletal muscle injury early after an acute exercise bout by measuring creatine kinase (CK, EC 2.7.3.2) MM isoforms in serum. Eleven men performed 120 alternating-arm, eccentric (muscle lengthening) biceps contractions with the intensity of each contraction being 110% of maximal...

  5. Muscle force estimation with surface EMG during dynamic muscle contractions: a wavelet and ANN based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fengjun; Chew, Chee-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Human muscle force estimation is important in biomechanics studies, sports and assistive devices fields. Therefore, it is essential to develop an efficient algorithm to estimate force exerted by muscles. The purpose of this study is to predict force/torque exerted by muscles under dynamic muscle contractions based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) approaches. Mean frequency (MF) of the surface electromyography (EMG) signals power spectrum was calculated from CWT. ANN models were trained to derive the MF-force relationships from the subset of EMG signals and the measured forces. Then we use the networks to predict the individual muscle forces for different muscle groups. Fourteen healthy subjects (10 males and 4 females) were voluntarily recruited in this study. EMG signals were collected from the biceps brachii, triceps, hamstring and quadriceps femoris muscles to evaluate the proposed method. Root mean square errors (RMSE) and correlation coefficients between the predicted forces and measured actual forces were calculated.

  6. Evaluation of the hamstring muscle complex following acute injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouris, George; Connell, David [Department of Radiology, St Francis X Cabrini, Wattletree Rd, 3144, Malvern, Victoria (Australia)

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings following acute hamstring injury. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of hamstring muscle complex (HMC) strain in 170 patients referred to our institution over a 3-year period. A total of 179 injuries to the HMC were demonstrated in 170 patients (154 male, 16 female, mean age 28.2 years). The mean duration of symptoms was 4.7 days (range 1-10 days). MR imaging was performed in 97 cases and sonography in 102 cases (both modalities were performed in 20 examinations). Attention was directed to the frequency of muscle involvement, the location of the injury within the muscle-tendon unit, the extent of the injury and discriminating avulsion from muscle injury. Twenty-one patients had proximal tendon injury, with sixteen avulsions and five partial tears. Sixteen of these patients had surgical confirmation of hamstring avulsion from the ischial tuberosity (14 conjoint, 2 biceps femoris alone) and all were reliably diagnosed with MR imaging (16/16), but less so with sonography (7/12). Four distal tendon avulsions were also observed (three semitendinosus, one biceps femoris). With respect to muscle injury, the biceps femoris was most commonly injured (124/154). Semimembranosus was an uncommon muscle injury (21/154) and semitendinosus rare (9/154). Imaging can discriminate a hamstring tendon avulsion from musculotendinous strain and helps identify which patients necessitate surgical management as opposed to conservative treatment. (orig.)

  7. The surface mechanomyogram as a tool to describe the influence of fatigue on biceps brachii motor unit activation strategy. Historical basis and novel evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizio, Claudio; Gobbo, Massimiliano; Diemont, Bertrand; Esposito, Fabio; Veicsteinas, Arsenio

    2003-10-01

    The surface mechanomyogram (MMG) (detectable at the muscle surface as MMG by accelerometers, piezoelectric contact sensors or other transducers) is the summation of the activity of single motor units (MUs). Each MU contribution is related to the pressure waves generated by the active muscle fibres. The first part of this article will review briefly the results obtained by our group studying the possible role of motor unit recruitment and firing rate in determining the characteristics of the MMG during stimulated and voluntary contractions. The second part of this article will study the MMG and EMG during a short isometric force ramp from 0 to 90% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) in fresh and fatigued biceps brachii. The aim is to verify whether changes in motor unit activation strategy in voluntarily fatigued muscle could be specifically reflected in the time and frequency domain parameters of the MMG. MMG-RMS vs. %MVC: at fatigue the MMG-RMS did not present the well known increment, when effort level increases, followed by a clear decrement at near-maximal contraction levels. MMG-MF vs. %MVC: compared to fresh muscle the fatigued biceps brachii showed an MF trend significantly shifted towards lower values and the steeper MF increment, from 65 to 85% MVC, was not present. The alteration in the MMG and EMG parameters vs. %MVC relationships at fatigue seems to be related to the impossibility of recruiting fast, but more fatigable MUs, and to the lowering of the global MUs firing during the short isometric force ramp investigated.

  8. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M

    2017-01-10

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the "slow" and "fast" fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist.

  9. Intratendinous ganglion of the long head of the biceps tendon: US and MRI features (2010: 9b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Jong, Mathijn D.F. de; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Radiology, ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    We present a case report and literature review of the ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of an intratendinous ganglion originating from the long head of the biceps tendon. Intratendinous ganglia are very rare entities and intratendinous ganglion of the long head of the biceps tendon has only been described once. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report presenting the sonographic features of an intratendinous ganglion originating from the long head of the biceps tendon. (orig.)

  10. Influence of extended aging on beef quality characteristics and sensory perception of steaks from the biceps femoris and semimembranosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, M J; Richard, R P; Killinger, K M; Bohlscheid, J C; Gray, A R; Loucks, W I; Day, R N; Cochran, A S; Nasados, J A; Doumit, M E

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to determine the influence of post-fabrication aging (2, 14, 21, 42, and 63days) on beef quality characteristics and consumer sensory perception of biceps femoris (BF) and semimembranosus (SM) steaks. Lipid oxidation and aerobic plate counts increased (P<0.05) with longer aging periods and retail display times. An aging period by day of retail display interaction (P<0.05) was observed for a* and b* values of the BF and SM. Warner-Bratzler shear force values decreased (P<0.05) with longer aging for the SM, while no difference was observed for the BF. Consumer panel results revealed that longer aging periods increased (P<0.05) acceptability of the SM, tenderness of both muscles, and tended to increase (P=0.07) juiciness of the SM. Our results show that extended aging reduces retail color stability yet has positive effects on consumer perception of tenderness of both muscles and overall acceptability of the SM.

  11. BICEP2 / Keck Array VII: Matrix based E/B Separation applied to BICEP2 and the Keck Array

    CERN Document Server

    Array, Keck; Ade, P; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bowens-Rubin, R; Brevik, J A; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Crill, B P; Duband, L; Dvorkin, C; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Grayson, J; Halpern, M; Harrison, S; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Kang, J; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Namikawa, T; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; W., R; Orlando, A; Pryke, C; Richter, S; Schwarz, R; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Sudiwala, R V; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Wu, W L; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    A linear polarization field on the sphere can be uniquely decomposed into an E-mode and a B-mode component. These two components are analytically defined in terms of spin-2 spherical harmonics. Maps that contain filtered modes on a partial sky can also be decomposed into E-mode and B-mode components. However, the lack of full sky information prevents orthogonally separating these components using spherical harmonics. In this paper, we present a technique for decomposing an incomplete map into E and B-mode components using E and B eigenmodes of the pixel covariance in the observed map. This method is found to orthogonally define E and B in the presence of both partial sky coverage and spatial filtering. This method has been applied to the BICEP2 and the Keck Array maps and results in reducing E to B leakage from LCDM E-modes to a level corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of $r<1\\times10^{-4}$.

  12. Effects of handgrip training with venous restriction on brachial artery vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P; Hollis, Brandon C; Welsch, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 4 wk of handgrip exercise training, with and without venous restriction, on handgrip strength and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD). Twelve participants (mean +/- SD: age = 22 +/- 1 yr, men = 5, women = 7) completed 4 wk of bilateral handgrip exercise training (duration = 20 min, intensity = 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction, cadence = 15 grips per minute, frequency = three sessions per week). During each session, venous blood flow was restricted in one arm (experimental (EXP) arm) using a pneumatic cuff placed 4 cm proximal to the antecubital fossa and inflated to 80 mm Hg for the duration of each exercise session. The EXP and the control (CON) arms were randomly selected. Handgrip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Brachial diameters and blood velocity profiles were assessed, using Doppler ultrasonography, before and after 5 min of forearm occlusion (200 mm Hg) before and at the end of the 4-wk exercise. After exercise training, handgrip strength increased 8.32% (P = 0.05) in the CON arm and 16.17% (P = 0.05) in the EXP arm. BAFMD increased 24.19% (P = 0.0001) in the CON arm and decreased 30.36% (P = 0.0001) in the EXP arm. The data indicate handgrip training combined with venous restriction results in superior strength gains but reduced BAFMD compared with the nonrestricted arm.

  13. Effects of Handgrip Training With Venous Restriction on Brachial Artery Vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Hollis, Brandon C.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols. Purpose To examine the effects of 4 weeks of handgrip exercise training, with and without venous restriction, on handgrip strength and brachial artery flow mediated dilation (BAFMD). Methods Twelve participants (age=22±1yr; male = 5, female = 7), completed 4 weeks of bilateral handgrip exercise training (Duration: 20 min; Intensity: 60% of the MVC; Cadence: 15 grips*min−1; Frequency: 3 sessions*week−1). During each session venous blood flow was restricted in one arm (Experimental arm = EXP) using a pneumatic cuff placed 4 cm proximal to the antecubital fossa, and inflated to 80 mmHg for the duration of each exercise session. The EXP and control (CON) arm were randomly selected. Handgrip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Brachial diameters and blood velocity profiles were assessed, using Doppler ultrasonography, before and after 5 min of forearm occlusion (200 mmHg), prior to and at the end of 4 weeks exercise. Results Following exercise training, handgrip strength increased 8.32% (p=0.05) in the CON arm and 16.17% (p=0.05) in the EXP arm. BAFMD increased 24.19% (p=0.0001) in the CON arm, and decreased 30.36% (p=0.0001) in the EXP arm. Conclusion The data indicate handgrip training combined with venous restriction results in superior strength gains, but reduced BAFMD compared to the non-restricted arm. PMID:20019641

  14. BICEP3: a 95 GHz refracting telescope for degree-scale CMB polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bowens-Rubin, R; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Connors, J; Filippini, J P; Grayson, J A; Halpern, M; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Kang, J; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Thompson, K L; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2014-01-01

    BICEP3 is a 550 mm-aperture refracting telescope for polarimetry of radiation in the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz. It adopts the methodology of BICEP1, BICEP2 and the Keck Array experiments - it possesses sufficient resolution to search for signatures of the inflation-induced cosmic gravitational-wave background while utilizing a compact design for ease of construction and to facilitate the characterization and mitigation of systematics. However, BICEP3 represents a significant breakthrough in per-receiver sensitivity, with a focal plane area 5$\\times$ larger than a BICEP2/Keck Array receiver and faster optics ($f/1.6$ vs. $f/2.4$). Large-aperture infrared-reflective metal-mesh filters and infrared-absorptive cold alumina filters and lenses were developed and implemented for its optics. The camera consists of 1280 dual-polarization pixels; each is a pair of orthogonal antenna arrays coupled to transition-edge sensor bolometers and read out by multiplexed SQUIDs. Upon deployment at the South Pole duri...

  15. Subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium ulcerans causes necrosis, chronic inflammatory response and fibrosis in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngbédji, Mabèrou Germain; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, G Michel; Frenette, Jérôme

    2008-10-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans) causes Buruli ulcer, a very debilitating disease that affects the skin and other tissues. The disease occurs mainly in children in sub-Sahara Africa. While contracture, fibrosis and functional limitation of range of motion are frequent complications of Buruli ulcer, no fundamental or clinical studies have investigated the impact of M. ulcerans infections on skeletal muscle. In the present study, we subcutaneously infected mice in the proximity of the right biceps muscle to evaluate the histological, biochemical and functional impact of M. ulcerans on skeletal muscles. The concentration of mast cells decreased but the number of neutrophils and macrophages increased steadily in proximate-infected biceps muscles. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as fibrogenic growth factor mRNA also increased. Significantly more membrane damage and fibrosis occurred in proximate-infected biceps muscles than in control and sham muscles. Passive biomechanical testing also revealed that the presence of M. ulcerans increased muscle stiffness. These findings show for the first time that M. ulcerans can induce local and chronic inflammatory responses in skeletal muscles that are associated with muscle fiber damage and fibrosis.

  16. Changes of Intramuscular Fat Composition, Lipid Oxidation and Lipase Activity in Biceps femoris and Semimembranosus of Xuanwei Ham During Controlled Salting Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-yu; GAO Xiao-guang; ZHANG Ji-hong; ZHANG De-quan; MA Chang-wei

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid composition of neutral lipids (NLs), phospholipids (PLs) and free fatty acids (FFAs) from intramuscular fat (IMF), lipid oxidation and lipase activity in muscle Semimembranosus (SM) and msucle Biceps femoris (BF) of dry-cured Xuanwei ham during the 90-d salting stages were analysed. The salt content increased from 0.34 to 3.52%in BF and from 0.10 to 5.42%in SM during the 90 d salting stage, respectively. PLs of IMF in both BF and SM decreased 54.70%(P<0.001) and 34.64%(P<0.05), furthermore, the saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of PLs in both muscles were hydrolysed almost isochronously. FFAs were increased from 0.46 g 100 g-1 lipids to 2.92 g 100 g-1 lipids in BF at the end of salting, which was lower than SM (from 1.29 g 100 g-1 lipids to 9.70 g 100 g-1 lipids). The activities of acid lipase, neutral lipase and acid phospholipase all remained active in the 90 d. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was slowly increased to 1.34 mg kg-1 muscle in BF and to 2.44 mg kg-1 muscle in SM during the salting stage. In conclusion, the controlled salting process prompted the hydrolysis of PLs of IMF notably and increased the lipid oxidation of muscles within some limits.

  17. Use of a Bicortical Button to Safely Repair the Distal Biceps in a Two-Incision Approach: A Cadaveric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jonathan D; McNeilan, Ryan J; Speeckaert, Amy; Beals, Corey T; Awan, Hisham M

    2017-07-01

    No consensus has been reached on the most effective anatomic approach or fixation method for distal biceps repair. It is our hypothesis that, using a cortical biceps button through a 2-incision technique, the distal biceps can be safely and anatomically repaired. A 2-incision biceps button distal biceps repair was completed on 10 fresh-frozen cadavers. The proximity of the guide pin to the critical structures of the forearm, including the posterior interosseous nerve and recurrent radial artery, was measured. The location of repair was mapped and compared with anatomic insertion. The average distance from the tip of the guide pin to the posterior interosseous nerve was 11.4 mm (range, 8-14 mm). The average distance from the tip of the guide pin to the recurrent radial artery was 12.5 mm (range, 8-19 mm). The distal biceps tendon was repaired to the anatomic insertion site on the tuberosity using the biceps button technique in all specimens. The 2-incision biceps button repair described here allows safe and accurate repair of the tendon to the radial tuberosity in this cadaveric study. The goal of distal biceps repair is to safely, securely, and anatomically repair the torn biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity. The most commonly performed techniques (single anterior incision with cortical button and the double-incision procedure with bone tunnels and trough) have limitations. A 2-incision button repair safely and anatomically repairs the distal biceps tendon. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [A case of brachial plexus neuropathy who presented with acute paralysis of the hand after sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Makiko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Ohizumi, Hideki; Fujishima, Kenji; Goto, Keigo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2002-09-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute paresis of the right hand and arm. She was well until when she noted a paresis and dysesthesia in her right hand in the morning. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the muscles which were supplied by lower cervical segments, with increased deep tendon reflexes in the right arm. Allen's test and Wright's test were positive. The nerve conduction studies disclosed a reduced CMAPs more severely by right median than ulnar nerve stimulation. The frequency and amplitude of the F waves was also reduced. Needle electromyogram showed a mild neurogenic pattern in the right hand muscles. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a tapering of the subclavian artery when the right arm was abducted. She underwent decompression surgery. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms was observed after surgery. Our patient suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy should be considered in the acute paresis of the hand after sleep, and that surgical procedure would lead to a successful outcome.

  19. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  20. Brachial plexus impingement: an unusual complication of bilateral breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M G; Stanek, J J

    2008-03-01

    Breast augmentation is one of the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures, with many studies documenting the early and long-term complications that might be expected. This report describes the case of an active young woman who experienced severe pain, particularly with movement. Surgical exploration showed the cause of this pain to be impingement of the patient's lower brachial plexus by the mammary prosthesis. Such a complication has not, to the authors' knowledge, been reported previously.

  1. Brachial plexus birth palsy: an overview of early treatment considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Pettrone, Sarah; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2009-01-01

    Since the description by Smellie in 1764, in a French midwifery text, that first suggested an obstetric origin for upper limb birth palsy, great strides have been made in both diagnosis and early and late treatment. This report presents an overview of selected aspects of this complex and extensive subject. Early treatment options are reviewed in the context of the present controversies regarding the natural history and the indications for and timing of microsurgical intervention in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

  2. Delayed presentation of a traumatic brachial artery pseudoaneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, James C

    2009-09-01

    Delayed presentation of a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm following penetrating trauma is infrequently reported. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented three months following a penetrating trauma to his antecubital fossa with a sudden exacerbation of swelling and tenderness of his elbow. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography arteriography confirmed the presence of a large pseudoaneurysm. Surgical reconstruction was performed using the long saphenous vein as an interposition vein graft, restoring normal arterial circulation.

  3. Tendinopathy of the tendon of the long head of the biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Marineo, Gianluca; Khan, Wasim S; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-12-01

    Pathologies of tendon of the long head of the biceps (LHB) are an important cause of shoulder pain. They include tendinopathy, rupture, superior labrum anterior and posterior lesions, pulley tears, and tendon instability. Conservative management of symptomatic LHB tendinopathy is commonly accepted as the first-line treatment. It consists of rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. Biceps tenotomy and tenodesis are the most common surgical procedures to manage both isolated LHB pathology and biceps-glenoid complex tears combined with rotator cuff tears. However, controversy persists about the superiority of one of them because there is no evidence of significant differences in functional scores or patient satisfaction between the 2 techniques. This article provides an overview on biomechanical function of the LHB and current strategies for treatment of LHB disorders.

  4. A CMB B-mode Search with Three Years of BICEP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Colin; BICEP Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The search for B-mode, or curl-type, polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background is the most promising technique to constrain or detect primordial gravitational waves predicted by the theory of inflation. The Bicep telescope, which observed from the South Pole for three years from 2006 through 2008, is the first experiment specifically designed to target this signal. We review the observational motivations for inflation, the advantages of B-mode observations as a technique for detecting the gravitational wave background, and the design features of Bicep that optimize it for this search. The final analysis of all three seasons of Bicep data is in progress, representing a 50% increase in integration time compared to the result from Chiang et al. (2010). A preview of the three year result includes E-mode and B-mode maps, as well as the projected constraint on r, the tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  5. A comparison of physical examinations with musculoskeletal ultrasound in the diagnosis of biceps long head tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lin, Shu-Hsien; Hsu, Yen-Hsia; Chen, Shih-Ching; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2011-09-01

    Provocative tests are useful in diagnosing biceps tendon tendinitis. This is the first study to establish the reliability of these tests by comparing the resuts with musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) findings. This study examined 125 patients (69 women and 56 men) and 143 shoulders with shoulder pain. Yergason's test, Speed's test and a bicipital groove tenderness test were performed and musculoskeletal US findings were used as standard reference. Biceps tendon tendinitis was diagnosed with US in 39.1% of the patients and, of those, 55.3% had coexisting rotator cuff injury. The sensitivity and specificity of Yergason's test were 32% and 78%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of Speed's test were 63% and 58%, respectively. In conclusion, all three tests are limited by poor sensitivity. US can be an image modality choice in diagnosing biceps pathology.

  6. The Relationship between Multiple Health Behaviours and Brachial Artery Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The effects of smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle on endothelial function (EF have only been examined separately. The relative contributions of these behaviours on EF have therefore not been compared. Purpose. To compare the relative associations between these four risk factors and brachial artery reactivity in the same sample. Methods. 328 patients referred for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT exercise stress tests completed a nuclear-medicine-based forearm hyperaemic reactivity test. Self-reported exercise behaviour, smoking habits, and alcohol consumption were collected and waist circumference was measured. Results. Adjusting for relevant covariates, logistic regression analyses revealed that waist circumference, abstinence from alcohol, and past smoking significantly predicted poor brachial artery reactivity while physical activity did not. Only waist circumference predicted continuous variations in EF. Conclusions. Central adiposity, alcohol consumption, and smoking habits but not physical activity are each independent predictors of poor brachial artery reactivity in patients with or at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  7. Tenotomy versus Tenodesis in the treatment of the long head of biceps brachii tendon lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galasso Olimpio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superiority of tenotomy vs. tenodesis for surgery on lesions of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon is still under debate. Indeed, high-quality evidence is lacking, mainly because of methodological problems, such as retrospective design, population sample size or lack of patient randomization. Methods/Design The study will be a two-center, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial to compare patients treated with biceps tenotomy or tenodesis for lesions of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon over a 2-year follow-up period. The study participants will be 128 adults with biceps brachii tendinopathy and supraspinatus tendon tears. The primary end point will be the postoperative difference in the Constant-Murley score (CMS between the 2 groups at the two-year follow-up. A comparison of the mean improvement with standard age- and gender-related CMS will be performed. The secondary end point will be evaluation of the postoperative general health of patients, as evaluated with Short Form 36 (SF-36 scores. The number and severity of complications associated with use of the different surgical techniques will be assessed. Discussion This study will be the first randomized and appropriately powered clinical trial to directly compare tenotomy and biceps tenodesis. The results of this study will help to establish clinical practice guidelines for patients suffering from lesions of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon, providing important information to patients and health care providers about the possible complications, outcome predictors and effectiveness of the targeted interventions. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN38839558

  8. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis compared with repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions in patients older than 35 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with biceps repair for isolated type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions in patients older than 35 years. The authors identified isolated type II SLAP lesions that were surgically managed over a 5-year period. Minimum 2-year follow-up data were available for 22 patients who underwent biceps repair (repair group) and for 15 patients who underwent a primary biceps tenodesis (tenodesis group). Mean age at surgery was 45.2±5.5 years in the repair group and 52.0±8.0 years in the tenodesis group. In the repair group, functional outcome improved from baseline to final follow-up using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) (47.5 to 87.4, respectively; PSLAP lesion had a shorter postoperative recovery, a more predictable functional outcome, and a higher rate of satisfaction and return to activity with a biceps tenodesis compared with a biceps repair. Based on these observations, biceps tenodesis is preferable to biceps repair for isolated type II SLAP lesions in nonoverhead athletes older than 35 years.

  9. Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2³-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association with antibiotic therapy in this case could be incidental, indeed it is intriguing and requires further studies.

  10. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  11. Evaluation of an education day for families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emily S; Ulster, Alissa A

    2011-09-01

    Children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may have chronic physical impairment in their affected upper extremity. Affected children and their families may benefit from psychosocial interventions including therapeutic relationships with health professionals, meeting other families living with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, support groups, and social work. One method of addressing psychosocial needs is through a support and education day. The purpose of this quality improvement project is to evaluate parental perceptions of a support and education day called the "Brachial Plexus Family Day." Families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day completed a questionnaire to evaluate the different programs offered during the day. The families also ranked the importance of different psychosocial supports offered in the clinic. Sixty-three out of 69 families completed the questionnaire. Each program of the Brachial Plexus Family Day was rated as good or excellent by the respondents. Ninety-seven percent of respondents rated meeting other families and children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy as helpful supports. Attending a Brachial Plexus Family day event (86%), followed by connecting with a doctor (60%), and physical or occupational therapist (59%) were the highest ranked supports reported by the families. The parents and caregivers that attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day rated the program highly. This group also valued the opportunity to connect with other families and children affected with the same condition.

  12. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  13. “ROCAMBOLE-LIKE” BICEPS TENODESIS: TECHNIQUE AND RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Mesquita, Fabrício Augusto Silva; França, Flávio de Oliveira; Freitas, José Márcio Alves

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a new technique for bicipital tenodesis and its results: accomplished partially via arthroscopy and grounded in concepts of the normal and pathological anatomy of the tendon of the biceps long head. It is based on the predisposition of this tendon towards becoming attached to the intertubercular sulcus after rupture or tenotomy (auto-tenodesis). Methods: Evaluations were conducted on 63 patients (63 shoulders), aged from 32 to 77 years (average 55), consisting of 32 females (51%) and 31 males (49%). Thirty-five of the patients (55.6%) were over 60 years of age and 28 patients (44.4%) were under 60 years of age. Eighteen were sports participants (28.6%). Fourteen had injuries associated with the subscapularis (22.2%). The average follow up was 43 months (ranging from 12 to 74 months). The right shoulder accounted for 48 cases (76.2%), of which one was a left-handed individual and 47 were right-handed. The left shoulder accounted for 15 (23%) of the patients, of whom two were left-handed and 13 were right-handed. There were no bilateral occurrences. The statistical analysis were done using SPSS version 18. Pearson's chi-square test and continuity corrections were used to investigate the statistical significance of associations between variables. Associations were taken to be statistically significant when p was less than 0.05. Results: Residual Popeye deformity was perceived by seven patients (11.1%); it was only observed by the examiner in 15 cases (23.8%); and neither the patient nor the examiner observed it in 41 cases (65%). There were no statistically valid influences from age, participation in contact or throwing sports, subscapularis tendon-associated injury or Popeye deformity. Fifty-eight patients (92.06%) were satisfied, two patients were dissatisfied (3.17%) and three patients were indifferent (4.76%). Conclusion: The technique presented high patient satisfaction rates (92.06%) and residual deformity was perceived by 11.1% of the

  14. Unusual late sequel of ruptured distal tendon of biceps brachii mimicking a soft-tissue tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Sajid S.; Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish [Department of Bone and Soft Tissue, Tata Memorial Hospital, E. Borges Road, Parel, Bombay (India); Merchant, N.H.; Sheth, Tanuja; Jambhekar, Nirmala [Department of Radiology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India)

    2004-07-01

    We report a rare case of chronic, neglected rupture of the distal biceps brachii which presented with gradually increasing swelling over the left lower arm. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was reported as indicative of a soft-tissue neoplasm. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were unable to rule out a neoplastic mass. Final histopathology after surgical excision revealed a reparative process. Such a presentation of ruptured biceps brachii wherein the clinicoradiological features are misleading and suggestive of a soft-tissue tumor is quite unusual. (orig.)

  15. Posterior dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon: case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullaney, P.J.; Bleakney, R.; White, L. [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X5 (Canada); Tuchscherer, P. [Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Boynton, E. [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-08-15

    Posterior or lateral dislocation of the long head of biceps is a rare complication of shoulder dislocation that can result in inability to relocate the humerus. The diagnosis should be suspected when certain radiographic features are present at the initial presentation. Other imaging modalities can aid diagnosis when clinical management is unsuccessful or protracted. We present a case of surgically proven posterior dislocation of the biceps tendon with conventional radiographic, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging assessment. The literature on this subject is reviewed, and imaging features associated with the diagnosis are described. (orig.)

  16. Calcific tendinitis of the biceps-labral complex: a rare cause of acute shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo

    2008-06-01

    Calcific tendinitis most commonly affects the rotator cuff and has not been previously reported affecting the biceps-labral complex. We report a case of calcific tendinitis of the biceps-labral complex attachment, a rare cause of acute, severe shoulder pain. Clinically, it can be misdiagnosed as supraspinatus tendinitis or septic arthritis of the shoulder joint. Non-operative treatment failed to resolve the symptoms. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcific deposit resulted in resolution of symptoms. Knowledge of this clinical condition and its imaging features is crucial for a correct diagnosis of this uncommon cause of shoulder pain.

  17. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case demonstrates an excellent result of an Oberlin's nerve transfer for restoration of flexion of the elbow joint in Erb's birth palsy. However, at this time partial ulnar nerve transfer for Erb's birth palsy is an optional procedure; a larger number of cases will need to be studied for it to be widely accepted as a standard procedure for Erb's palsy at birth.

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRICAL AND VIBRATORY OUTPUT OF MUSCLE DURING VOLUNTARY CONTRACTION AND FATIGUE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZWARTS, MJ; KEIDEL, M

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were done on the biceps muscles of 6 healthy volunteers to record simultaneously the surface electromyogram (EMG) and vibromyogram (VMG) by means of a piezoelectric device (accelerometer). The VMG is generated by mechanical waves due to the contraction mechanism and often measured as so

  19. Agonist and Antagonist Muscle EMG Activity Pattern Changes with Skill Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhorn, Richard

    1983-01-01

    Using electromyography (EMG), researchers studied changes in the control of biceps and triceps brachii muscles that occurred as women college students learned two elbow flexion tasks. Data on EMG activity, angular kinematics, training, and angular displacement were analyzed. (Author/PP)

  20. Eccentric muscle damage has variable effects on motor unit recruitment thresholds and discharge patterns in elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnall, Tamara J; Rogasch, Nigel C; Nordstrom, Michael A; Semmler, John G

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of eccentric muscle damage on recruitment threshold force and repetitive discharge properties of low-threshold motor units. Ten subjects performed four tasks involving isometric contraction of elbow flexors while electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from human biceps brachii and brachialis muscles. Tasks were 1) maximum voluntary contraction (MVC); 2) constant-force contraction at various submaximal targets; 3) motor unit recruitment threshold task; and 4) minimum motor unit discharge rate task. These tasks were performed on three separate days before, immediately after, and 24 h after eccentric exercise of elbow flexor muscles. MVC force declined (42%) immediately after exercise and remained depressed (29%) 24 h later, indicative of muscle damage. Mean motor unit recruitment threshold for biceps brachii was 8.4+/-4.2% MVC, (n=34) before eccentric exercise, and was reduced by 41% (5.0+/-3.0% MVC, n=34) immediately after and by 39% (5.2+/-2.5% MVC, n=34) 24 h after exercise. No significant changes in motor unit recruitment threshold were observed in the brachialis muscle. However, for the minimum tonic discharge rate task, motor units in both muscles discharged 11% faster (10.8+/-2.0 vs. 9.7+/-1.7 Hz) immediately after (n=29) exercise compared with that before (n=32). The minimum discharge rate variability was greater in brachialis muscle immediately after exercise (13.8+/-3.1%) compared with that before (11.9+/-3.1%) and 24 h after exercise (11.7+/-2.4%). No significant changes in minimum discharge rate variability were observed in the biceps brachii motor units after exercise. These results indicate that muscle damage from eccentric exercise alters motor unit recruitment thresholds for >or=24 h, but the effect is not the same in the different elbow flexor muscles.

  1. Arthroscopic tenodesis in the treatment of long head of biceps tendon lesions%关节镜下肌腱固定术治疗肱二头肌腱近端病损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高庆峰; 鄂刚; 何耀华; 张尧; 赵金忠; 皇甫小桥; 沈继; 刘闻欣

    2015-01-01

    .4;after operation,the average Constant score was 89.1,the average UCLA score was 31.2.This means that the arthroscopic biceps tenodesis can improve pain relief,range of motion,elbow flexion,muscle strength,functional score significantly.Conclusion Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is a convenient technique.Patients suffered from biceps problems can benefit from this procedure.

  2. Warner-Bratzler shear evaluations of 40 bovine muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belew, J B; Brooks, J C; McKenna, D R; Savell, J W

    2003-08-01

    Forty muscles from each of 20 beef carcass sides were used to perform Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force determinations for within and among muscle effects. The M. triceps brachii differed (P psoas major, and M. semimembranosus all had significant location effects. Muscles were allocated into "very tender," "tender," "intermediate" or "tough" categories. Those muscles considered "very tender" (WBS iliacus, M. psoas major, M. serratus ventralis, M. biceps brachii, M. obliquus internus abdominis, and M. vastus medius. Muscles considered "tender" (3.2 kg 4.6 kg) were the M. extensor carpi radialis, M. trapezius, M. brachialis, M. pectoralis profundus, and M. flexor digitorum superficialis (hind limb). The diaphragm muscle was the most tender (WBS=2.03 kg), and the M. flexor digitorum superficialis was the toughest (WBS=7.74 kg). Tenderness, as measured by WBS, varied among and within bovine muscles, and knowledge of this variation allows for more appropriate use for specific purposes in the marketplace.

  3. Simulating the activation, contraction and movement of skeletal muscles using the bidomain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Rincon, A; Cantu, C; Soto, R; Shimoda, S

    2016-08-01

    A simulation of the muscle activation, contraction and movement is here presented. This system was developed based on the Bidomain mathematical model of the electrical propagation in muscles. This study shows an electrical stimuli input to a muscle and how this behave. The comparison between healthy subject and patient with muscle activation impairment is depicted, depending on whether the signal reaches a threshold. A 3D model of a bicep muscle and a forearm bone connected was constructed using OpenGL. This platform could be used for development of controllers for biomechatronic systems in future works. This kind of bioinspired model could be used for a better understanding of the neuromotor system.

  4. Interference Screw vs. Suture Anchor Fixation for Open Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis: Does it Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobezie Reuben

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioabsorbable interference screw fixation has superior biomechanical properties compared to suture anchor fixation for biceps tenodesis. However, it is unknown whether fixation technique influences clinical results. Hypothesis We hypothesize that subpectoral interference screw fixation offers relevant clinical advantages over suture anchor fixation for biceps tenodesis. Study Design Case Series. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive series of 88 patients receiving open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with either interference screw fixation (34 patients or suture anchor fixation (54 patients. Average follow up was 13 months. Outcomes included Visual Analogue Pain Scale (0–10, ASES score, modified Constant score, pain at the tenodesis site, failure of fixation, cosmesis, deformity (popeye and complications. Results There were no failures of fixation in this study. All patients showed significant improvement between their preoperative and postoperative status with regard to pain, ASES score, and abbreviated modified Constant scores. When comparing IF screw versus anchor outcomes, there was no statistical significance difference for VAS (p = 0.4, ASES score (p = 0.2, and modified Constant score (P = 0.09. One patient (3% treated with IF screw complained of persistent bicipital groove tenderness, versus four patients (7% in the SA group (nonsignificant. Conclusion Subpectoral biceps tenodesis reliably relieves pain and improves function. There was no statistically significant difference in the outcomes studied between the two fixation techniques. Residual pain at the site of tenodesis may be an issue when suture anchors are used in the subpectoral location.

  5. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: BICEP Intercambio de la Cultura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Marietta Saravia; Nafus, Charles

    This content analysis schedule for BICEP Intercambio de la Cultura (San Bernardino, California), presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the…

  6. Motor unit properties of biceps brachii during dynamic contractions in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, L.A.C.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    The aim of this study was to investigate motor unit (MU) characteristics of the biceps brachii during sinusoidal contractions in chronic stroke patients using high-density surface electromyography. Ten sinusoidal elbow flexion and extension movements were performed both passively and actively by 18

  7. Intra-tendinous ganglion in the long head of the biceps humeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Kenta; Akisue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Takuya; Kawamoto, Teruya; Hara, Hitomi; Kurosaka, Masahiro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe (Japan); Hitora, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Tetuji [Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kita-gun, Kagawa (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We present details of a case of intra-tendinous ganglion arising from the long head of the biceps at an unusual location. MRI scans have important implications for surgical planning and treatment. After excision of the ganglion, the tendon remaining could be repaired. Five months after surgery, there was no sign of recurrence. (orig.)

  8. Functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris reflex response during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend S.; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the functionality of the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) reflex response following ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations during the late stance phase of the gait cycle [1]. Stevenson et al. [1] proposed that the cBF reflex acts to slow the forward progression...

  9. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: BICEP Intercambio de la Cultura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Marietta Saravia; Nafus, Charles

    This content analysis schedule for BICEP Intercambio de la Cultura (San Bernardino, California), presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the…

  10. Clinical and Sonographic Evaluation of Bicortical Button for Proximal Biceps Tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, James R; Diesselhorst, Matthew M; Finnoff, Jonathan T; Swanson, Britta L; Swanson, Kyle E

    2016-01-01

    Use of a cortical button for proximal biceps tenodesis has demonstrated strength comparable to that of other types of fixation in biomechanical models, but few studies have evaluated the clinical outcome of such fixation. In the study reported here, 18 patients who underwent open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with a bicortical button were assessed, at minimum 12-month follow-up, with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, a pain scale, physical examination, biceps supination strength testing, and ultrasonographic evaluation (to determine tenodesis integrity and proximity of the button to the axillary nerve). No patient had symptoms of axillary nerve damage, clinical deformity, or tenodesis failure. Mean DASH score was 15.15 (scale range: 0, none to 100, extreme difficulty), and mean pain score was 12.6 (scale range: 0, none to 100, worst pain). Seventy-eight percent of patients had no bicipital groove tenderness, 89% had full elbow range of motion, and 94% had full shoulder range of motion. Mean forearm supination strength of the operated arm (125.04 lb) was significantly (P = .01) less than that of the nonoperated arm (134.39 lb). Mean (SD) distance from button to posterior circumflex humeral artery was 18.17 (9.0) mm. The study results suggest that subpectoral biceps tenodesis with a bicortical button is a safe, stable procedure that results in excellent functional outcomes.

  11. Toward an Understanding of Foreground Emission in the BICEP2 Region

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    BICEP2 has reported the detection of a degree-scale B-mode polarization pattern in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and has interpreted the measurement as evidence for primordial gravitational waves. Motivated by the profound importance of the discovery of gravitational waves from the early Universe, I will discuss to what extent a combination of Galactic foregrounds and lensed E-modes could be responsible for the signal. I will present independent estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region using several different approaches. These estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region are consistent with each other, but the expected amplitude of the dust polarization power spectrum is uncertain by about a factor of three. The lower end of the prediction leaves room for a primordial contribution, but at the higher end the dust in combination with the standard CMB lensing signal could account for the BICEP2 observations, without requiring the existence of primordial gravitatio...

  12. Bilateral Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) Tears With Abnormal Anatomy of Biceps Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Dan; Guettler, Joseph; Morris, Sean

    2015-08-01

    There have been several descriptions of variant anatomy of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT). A recent literature review identified 8 cases of anomalous intracapsular attachment of the LHBT. In this report, we discuss a distinctive case of a young athlete who presented with symptoms consistent with bilateral superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears that were unresponsive to conservative measures. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic findings of this patient confirmed that the patient had type II SLAP tears, a Buford complex anteriorly, and perhaps most important, confluence of the biceps tendon itself to the undersurface of the capsule within the rotator interval. Our case proposes that anomalous insertion of the LHBT, as well as other labral and biceps anchor variations, are not always a benign finding at the time of arthroscopy. In this particular case, the tethering of the biceps tendon to the capsule is thought to have increased stress on the superior labrum and contributed to the development of the bilateral symptomatic type II SLAP tears that were identified and treated in this young athlete.

  13. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayoa, Santiago Amillo; Romero-Muñoz, Luis M; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm requires immediate treatment to avoid damage of the soft tissues and a poor functional outcome for the forearm. Muscular and bone lesions are the main causes of acute compartment syndromes. We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by a calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

  14. Reconstruction of scalar field theories realizing inflation consistent with the Planck and BICEP2 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Kazuharu [Leading Graduate School Promotion Center, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Ohtsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Nojiri, Shin' ichi [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, ICE/CSIC-IEEC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-Parell-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, 634061 Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-07

    We reconstruct scalar field theories to realize inflation compatible with the BICEP2 result as well as the Planck. In particular, we examine the chaotic inflation model, natural (or axion) inflation model, and an inflationary model with a hyperbolic inflaton potential. We perform an explicit approach to find out a scalar field model of inflation in which any observations can be explained in principle.

  15. Effect of low-level laser therapy (808 nm) on markers of muscle damage: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felismino, Amanda Soares; Costa, Eduardo Caldas; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha; Ferraresi, Cleber; de Araújo Moura Lemos, Telma Maria; de Brito Vieira, Wouber Hérickson

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase (CK) and strength performance) in the biceps brachii. Twenty-two physically active men were randomized into two groups: placebo and laser. All volunteers were submitted to an exercise-induced muscle damage protocol for biceps brachii (biceps curl, 10 sets of 10 repetitions with load of 50% of one-repetition maximum test (1RM)). Active LLLT (808 nm; 100 mW; 35.7 W/cm(2), 357.14 J/cm(2) per point, energy of 1 J per point applied for 10 s on four points of the biceps brachii belly of each arm) or placebo was applied between the sets of the biceps curl exercise. CK activity and maximum strength performance (1RM) were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, and 72 h after the exercise-induced muscle damage protocol. There was an increase in CK activity after the muscle damage protocol in both groups; however, this increase was attenuated in the laser group compared to the placebo group at 72 h (placebo = 841 vs. laser = 357%; p effect on the recovery of strength performance.

  16. Use of quantitative intra-operative electrodiagnosis during partial ulnar nerve transfer to restore elbow flexion: the treatment of eight patients following a brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O; Sunagawa, T; Yokota, K; Nakashima, Y; Shinomiya, R; Nakanishi, K; Ochi, M

    2011-03-01

    The transfer of part of the ulnar nerve to the musculocutaneous nerve, first described by Oberlin, can restore flexion of the elbow following brachial plexus injury. In this study we evaluated the additional benefits and effectiveness of quantitative electrodiagnosis to select a donor fascicle. Eight patients who had undergone transfer of a simple fascicle of the ulnar nerve to the motor branch of the musculocutaneous nerve were evaluated. In two early patients electrodiagnosis had not been used. In the remaining six patients, however, all fascicles of the ulnar nerve were separated and electrodiagnosis was performed after stimulation with a commercially available electromyographic system. In these procedures, recording electrodes were placed in flexor carpi ulnaris and the first dorsal interosseous. A single fascicle in the flexor carpi ulnaris in which a high amplitude had been recorded was selected as a donor and transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve. In the two patients who had not undergone electrodiagnosis, the recovery of biceps proved insufficient for normal use. Conversely, in the six patients in whom quantitative electrodiagnosis was used, elbow flexion recovered to an M4 level. Quantitative intra-operative electrodiagnosis is an effective method of selecting a favourable donor fascicle during the Oberlin procedure. Moreover, fascicles showing a high-amplitude in reading flexor carpi ulnaris are donor nerves that can restore normal elbow flexion without intrinsic loss.

  17. Anisotropic photon migration in human skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binzoni, T [Departement de Neurosciences Fondamentales, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Courvoisier, C [Departement d' optique PM Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR CNRS 6174, Universite de Franche Comte, Besancon (France); Giust, R [Departement d' optique PM Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR CNRS 6174, Universite de Franche Comte, Besancon (France); Tribillon, G [Departement d' optique PM Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR CNRS 6174, Universite de Franche Comte, Besancon (France); Gharbi, T [Departement d' optique PM Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR CNRS 6174, Universite de Franche Comte, Besancon (France); Hebden, J C [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Leung, T S [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Roux, J [Hamamatsu Photonics, Grenoble (France); Delpy, D T [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-07

    It is demonstrated in the short head of the human biceps brachii of 16 healthy subjects (12 males and 4 females) that near infrared photon migration is anisotropic. The probability for a photon to travel along the direction of the muscle fibres is higher ({approx}0.4) than that of travelling along a perpendicular axis ({approx}0.3) while in the adipose tissue the probability is the same ({approx}0.33) in all directions. Considering that the muscle fibre orientation is different depending on the type of muscle considered, and that inside a given skeletal muscle the orientation may change, the present findings in part might explain the intrasubject variability observed in the physiological parameters measured by near infrared spectroscopy techniques. In other words, the observed regional differences might not only be physiological differences but also optical artefacts. (note)

  18. Electromyographic analysis of thigh muscles during track cycling on a velodrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Sato, Takayuki; Mukaimoto, Takahiro; Takashima, Wataru; Yamagishi, Michio; Nishiyama, Tetsunari

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate neuromuscular activation of thigh muscles during track cycling at various speeds. Eight male competitive cyclists volunteered to participate in this study. Surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and adductor magnus muscles of the bilateral legs was recorded during track cycling on velodromes with a 250-m track. The participants were instructed to maintain three different lap times: 20, 18 and 16 s. The average rectified value (ARV) was calculated from the sampled surface electromyography. Significantly higher ARVs were observed in the right compared to left leg for the biceps femoris muscle during both straight and curved sections at 18- and 16-s lap times (P muscle, significant changes in ARVs during the recovery phase with an increase in speed were seen in the right leg only (P muscles (P > 0.05). From our findings, it was suggested that during track cycling on a velodrome the laterality of the biceps femoris muscle activity is a key strategy to regulate the speed, and fixed neuromuscular strategies are adopted between straight and curved sections for thigh muscles.

  19. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  20. Structure of the brachial plexus root and adjacent regions displayed by ultrasound imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengyi Li; Xun Xia; Xiaoming Rong; Yamei Tang; Dachuan Xu

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexuses of 110 healthy volunteers were examined using high resolution color Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasonic characteristics and anatomic variation in the intervertebral foramen, interscalene, supraclavicular and infraclavicular, as well as the axillary brachial plexus were investigated. Results confirmed that the normal brachial plexus on cross section exhibited round or elliptic hypoechoic texture. Longitudinal section imaging showed many parallel linear hypo-moderate echoes, with hypo-echo. The transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra, the scalene space, the subclavian artery and the deep cervical artery are important markers in an examination. The display rates for the interscalene, and supraclavicular and axillary brachial plexuses were 100% each, while that for the infraclavicular brachial plexus was 97%. The region where the normal brachial plexus root traversed the intervertebral foramen exhibited a regular hypo-echo. The display rate for the C5-7 nerve roots was 100%, while those for C8 and T1 were 83% and 68%, respectively. A total of 20 of the 110 subjects underwent cervical CT scan. High-frequency ultrasound can clearly display the outline of the transverse processes of the vertebrae, which were consistent with CT results. These results indicate that high-frequency ultrasound provides a new method for observing the morphology of the brachial plexus. The C7 vertebra is a marker for identifying the position of brachial plexus nerve roots.

  1. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanato

  2. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  3. 3T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: structural and microstructural evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouhi, Ammar; Marik, Wolfgang; Prayer, Daniela; Kainberger, Franz; Bodner, Gerd; Kasprian, Gregor

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vibration sensation as an indicator of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Jindal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Vibration sense serves as a reliable indicator for the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block. Vibration sense testing with 128 Hz Rydel–Seiffer tuning fork along with motor power assessment should be used as an objective tool to assess the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block.

  5. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  6. Partial tears of the distal biceps tendon: MR appearance and associated clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.D.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Weishaupt, D.; Miller, L.S. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lerman, J. [Lerman Imaging, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Rubenstein, D.L. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rosenberg, Z.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and associated clinical findings of partial distal biceps tendon tears. Design: Twenty elbow MR images at 1.5 T, performed over a 7 year period, were reviewed for an appearance of partial tears in the distal biceps. These images were assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists for the extent of: (a) abnormal signal intensity within the tendon, and the presence of (b) bicipitoradial bursitis, and (c) bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity. Medical records for nine of the 20 cases were reviewed for the clinical findings of ecchymosis, trauma, sensation of a ''pop'', loss of function, and acuity of onset. Results: Twenty partial distal biceps tendon tears were seen. All displayed an abnormally increased signal in the distal biceps tendon. Three of 20 (15%) showed a 25% to 50% tear, ten of 20 (50%) showed a 50% tear, and seven of 20 (35%) showed a 75% to 90% tear. Bicipitoradial bursitis was seen in 11 of 20 (55%) cases. Bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity was observed in 10 of 20 (50%). Of the nine cases reviewed for associated clinical findings, surprisingly, only three (33%) experienced an acute traumatic episode with an abrupt onset of pain. An insidious onset was reported in four of nine (44%). Sensation of a ''pop'' was recorded in only two of nine (22%) cases. Ecchymosis and loss of function were not seen in any of the cases. Finally, surgical conformation was obtained for three cases. Conclusion: Partial distal biceps tendon tears have a characteristic MR appearance, demonstrate little functional deficit, and may be attritional in their etiology due to the observation of a low number of patients reporting trauma or an acute onset. (orig.)

  7. Brachial artery aneurysms following brachio-cephalic AV fistula ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Usman; Parkinson, Frances; Mohiuddin, Kamran; Davies, Paula; Woolgar, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery aneurysms proximal to a long-standing arteriovenous (AV) fistula can be a serious complication. It is important to be aware of this and manage it appropriately. Vascular access nurses input all data regarding patients undergoing dialysis access procedures into a securely held database prospectively. This was retrospectively reviewed to identify cases of brachial artery aneurysms over the last 3 years. In Morriston Hospital, around 200 forearm and arm AV fistulas are performed annually for vascular access in renal dialysis patients. Of these, approximately 15 (7.5%) are ligated. Three patients who had developed brachial artery aneurysms following AV fistula ligation were identified. All 3 patients had developed brachial artery aneurysms following ligation of a long-standing brachio-cephalic AV fistula. Two patients presented with pain and a pulsatile mass in the arm, and one presented with pins and needles and discoloration of fingertips. Two were managed with resection of the aneurysm and reconstruction with a reversed long saphenous vein interposition graft, the third simply required ligation of a feeding arterial branch. True aneurysm formation proximal to an AV fistula that has been ligated is a rare complication. There are several reasons for why these aneurysms develop in such patients, the most plausible one being the increase in blood flow and resistance following ligation of the AV fistula. Of note, all the patients in this study were on immunosuppressive therapy following successful renal transplantation. Vigilance by the vascular access team and nephrologists is paramount to identify those patients who may warrant further evaluation and investigation by the vascular surgeon.

  8. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixin Sun; Zuopei Wu; Xinhong Wang; Xiaoxiao Tan; Yudong Gu

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are trans-ferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachi-al plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury.

  10. Force-controlled ultrasound to measure passive mechanical properties of muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigula, Anne J; Wu, Jim S; Gilbertson, Matthew W; Darras, Basil T; Rutkove, Seward B; Anthony, Brian W

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess differences in skeletal muscle compressibility between patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and normal subjects. The transverse passive mechanical properties of muscle, particularly those related to stiffness and elasticity, can be measured using force-controlled ultrasound. We acquired ultrasound videos of muscle compression under known pressures in the biceps and quadriceps in 23 boys with DMD and 20 age-matched healthy controls. We calculated the bulk linear spring constant, nonlinear stress-strain response, and average Young's modulus for each. Young's modulus was found to be significantly higher in the DMD population in both the biceps (normal: 33 ± 6 kPa, DMD: 45 ± 14, p Muscle compressibility measured by force-controlled ultrasound is an objective and robust technique to quantitatively monitor the effects of DMD and distinguish from normal subjects.

  11. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity.

  12. Relation between systemic inflammatory markers, peripheral muscle mass, and strength in limb muscles in stable COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Renata; Caram, Laura M O; Faganello, Marcia M; Sanchez, Fernanda F; Tanni, Suzana E; Godoy, Irma

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between systemic inflammatory mediators and peripheral muscle mass and strength in COPD patients. Fifty-five patients (69% male; age: 64±9 years) with mild/very severe COPD (defined as forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] =54%±23%) were evaluated. We evaluated serum concentrations of IL-8, CRP, and TNF-α. Peripheral muscle mass was evaluated by computerized tomography (CT); midthigh cross-sectional muscle area (MTCSA) and midarm cross-sectional muscle area (MACSA) were obtained. Quadriceps, triceps, and biceps strength were assessed through the determination of the one-repetition maximum. The multiple regression results, adjusted for age, sex, and FEV1%, showed positive significant association between MTCSA and leg extension (0.35 [0.16, 0.55]; P=0.001), between MACSA and triceps pulley (0.45 [0.31, 0.58]; P=0.001), and between MACSA and biceps curl (0.34 [0.22, 0.47]; P=0.001). Plasma TNF-α was negatively associated with leg extension (-3.09 [-5.99, -0.18]; P=0.04) and triceps pulley (-1.31 [-2.35, -0.28]; P=0.01), while plasma CRP presented negative association with biceps curl (-0.06 [-0.11, -0.01]; P=0.02). Our results showed negative association between peripheral muscle mass (evaluated by CT) and muscle strength and that systemic inflammation has a negative influence in the strength of specific groups of muscles in individuals with stable COPD. This is the first study showing association between systemic inflammatory markers and strength in upper limb muscles.

  13. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A. [Department of Neurology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Pillen, Sigrid [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Biesma, Douwe H. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vogels, Oscar J.M. [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Alfen, Nens van [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  14. Progressive muscle atrophy and weakness after treatment by mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H; Vogels, Oscar J M; van Alfen, Nens

    2012-02-01

    To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical research of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating brachial plexus injury patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jun-ming; GU Yu-dong; XU Xiao-jun; ZHANG Shen-yu; ZHAO Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus injury is one of the difficult medical problems in the world.The aim of this study was to observe the clinical therapeutic effect of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury.Methods Forty-three cases of dysfunction after brachial plexus injury were divided into two groups randomly.The treatment group,which totaled 21 patients (including 14 cases of total brachial plexus injury and seven cases of branch brachial plexus injury),was treated with comprehensive rehabilitation including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation,mid-frequency electrotherapy,Tuina therapy,and occupational therapy.The control group,which totaled 22patients (including 16 cases of total brachial plexus injury and six cases of branch brachial plexus injury),was treated with home-based electrical nerve stimulation and occupational therapy.Each course was of 30 days duration and the patients received four courses totally.After four courses,the rehabilitation effect was evaluated according to the brachial plexus function evaluation standard and electromyogram (EMG) assessment.Results In the treatment group,there was significant difference in the scores of brachial plexus function pre- and post-treatment (P <0.01 ) in both "total" and "branch" injury.The scores of two "total injury" groups had statistical differences (P <0.01),while the scores of two "branch injury" groups had statistical differences (P<0.05) after four courses.EMG suggested that the.appearance of regeneration potentials of the recipient nerves in the treatment group was earlier than the control group and had significant differences (P <0.05).Conclusion Comprehensive rehabilitation was more effective in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury thannonintegrated rehabilitation.

  16. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Internal Rotation Contractures in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy. A Minimum 5-Year Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van Wijlen-Hempel, Marie S; Hogendoorn, Simone; de Boer, Kees S; Malessy, Martijn J A; Keurentjes, J Christiaan; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    Brachial plexus birth palsy is frequently associated with internal rotation contractures of the shoulder as a result of muscle imbalance. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in the subscapular (SC) muscle on external rotation and the need for tendon transfer for external rotation of the shoulder. A prospective comparative study was performed including 15 consecutive patients treated with BTX-A and a historic control group of 67 patients with mean age 30 months (SD 10). The BTX-A injection (2 IU/kg body weight) was performed immediately following MRI under general anesthesia in the SC muscle. Passive external rotation, the need for tendon transfer surgery, glenohumeral deformity, and muscle degeneration were evaluated. The hazard ratio for no relapse of internal rotation contracture after BTX-A injection compared with no BTX-A injection was calculated. In the BTX-A group, the passive external rotation in adduction increased from -1 degree (95% CI, -10 to 8) to 32 degrees (95% CI, 17-46) at 3 months and 6 patients were indicated for surgery compared with a decline from -2 degrees (95% CI, -7 to 3) to -11 degrees (95% CI, -17 to -6) in the control group with 66 indications for surgery. At 5 years of follow-up, 10 patients in the BTX-A group were indicated for surgery with a hazard ratio of 4.0 (95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4). BTX-A injection in the SC muscle of brachial plexus birth palsy patients can reduce internal rotation contractures and subsequently the need for tendon transfer surgery. At 5 years of follow-up a relapse was seen in 67% of the patients treated with BTX-A. Because at MRI less SC degeneration was found in the good responders on BTX-A treatment, this group seems to be the best target group. Further research is needed on patient selection for BTX-A injection including glenohumeral deformity, SC degeneration, as well as doses of BTX-A to be used. Level II-prospective comparative study.

  17. The Effects of Force and Joint Angle on Muscle Conduction Velocity Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of New Brunswick Abstract - Conduction velocity estimated from the surface myoelectric signal has been...changes in joint angle and/or muscle force. Results from this study using myoelectric signals collected from the biceps brachii, indicate that conduction... myoelectric signal (MES) to track changes in muscle biochemistry which are caused by fatigue. By estimating the power spectrum of the surface MES during

  18. Upright MRI of glenohumeral dysplasia following obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K; Paizi, Melia; Melcher, Sonya E; Farina, Kim L

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of upright magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shoulder scanning in the diagnosis of glenohumeral deformity following obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI). Eighty-nine children (ages 0.4 to 17.9 years) with OBPI who have medial rotation contracture and reduced passive and active lateral rotation of the shoulder were evaluated via upright MRI of the affected glenohumeral joint. Qualitative impressions of glenoid form were recorded, and quantitative measurements were made of glenoid version and posterior subluxation. Glenoid version of the affected shoulder averaged -16.8 +/- 11.0 degrees (range, -55 degrees to 1 degrees ), and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the glenoid fossa (PHHA) averaged 32.6 +/- 16.5% (range, -17.8% to 52.4%). The glenoid form was normal in 43 children, convex in 19 children and biconcave in 27 children. Standard MRI protocols were used to obtain bilateral images from 14 of these patients. Among the patients with bilateral MR images, glenoid version and PHHA were significantly different between the involved and uninvolved shoulders (Pclaustrophobic potential and, most important, natural, gravity-influenced position, enabling the surgeon to visualize the true preoperative picture of the shoulder. It is an effective tool for demonstrating glenohumeral abnormalities resulting from brachial plexus injury worthy of surgical exploration.

  19. USE OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE ALONG WITH BUPIVACAINE FOR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Gandhi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block provides safe, effective, low cost anaesthesia with good postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the postoperative analgesic efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine for brachial plexus blockade along with bupivacaine. Methodology: This prospective double blind study was conducted on 70 patients of age 18 to 60 years posted for various upper limb surgeries and randomly allocated into two equal groups of 35 each. Control group-C received injection bupivacaine (0.25% 38 milliliter plus 2 milliliter normal saline, dexmedetomidine group-D received injection bupivacaine (0.25% 38 milliliter plus dexmedetomidine 30 microgram (2 milliliter. Assessment of motor and sensory blockade, pulse, systolic blood pressure, respiration and side effects were noted every 5 minutes for first 30 minute and every 10 minute till end of surgery. Duration of analgesia and incidence of various complications following the procedure were observed. Results: It was observed that in control group onset of motor and sensory blockade was faster. Where as, dexmedetomidine group have better hemodynamic stability and greater postoperative analgesia. Only two cases of bradycardia and two cases of hypotension were noticed in dexmedetomidine group-D. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 67-69

  20. Our experience on brachial plexus blockade in upper extremity surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Uslukaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral nerve blocks are usually used either alone or along with general anesthesia for postoperative analgesia. We also aimed to present the results and experiences.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted to scan the files of patients who underwent orthopedic upper extremity surgery with peripheral nerve block between September 2009 and October 2010. After ethics committee approval was obtained, 114 patients who were ASA physical status I-III, aged 18-70, performed upper extremity surgery in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic were included to study. Patients’ demographic data, clinical diagnoses, premedication status, peripheral block type, local anesthetic dose, stimuplex needle types, hemodynamic parameters at the during surgery, the first postoperative analgesic requirements, complications and patient satisfaction were recorded.Results: Demographic data were similar to each other. Brachial plexus block was commonly performed for the forearm surgery. Infraclavicular block was performed the most frequently to patients. As the classical methods in the supine position were preferred in 98.2% of patients, Stimuplex A needle (B. Braun, Melsungen AG, Germany have been used for blockage in 80.7% of patients. Also, in 54.4% of patients, 30 ml of local anesthetic solution composed of bupivacaine + prilocaine was used for blockade. Blocks applied to patients had provided adequate anesthesia.Conclusion: Since the brachial plexus blockade guided peripheral nerve stimulator for upper extremity surgery provide adequate depth of anesthesia and analgesia, it may be a good alternative to general anesthesia because of unwanted side effects

  1. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  2. [Bursitis with severe tendon and muscle necrosis on the lateral stifle area in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, K; Räber, M; Sydler, T; Muggli, E; Hässig, M; Guscetti, F

    2011-11-01

    In 21 animals, chronic swelling on the lateral aspect of the stifle also known as «perigonitis», «stable-syndrome» or «bursitis bicipitalis femoris» were evaluated. Ultrasonography showed increased fluid in the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle and structural changes in the tendons, muscles, subcutis and fasciae. Soft tissue swelling and an irregular contour of the lateral tibial condyle were typical signs on radiographs. Macroscopic changes were found at the insertion of the biceps femoris muscle, the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle, the lateral collateral ligament of the stifle, the origin of muscles on the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle. They mainly consisted of tendon and muscle tissue necrosis with granulation tissue. Histology revealed areas of coagulation necrosis in tendons and ligaments, in which occasionally Onchocerca spp. were seen. The severity of lesions correlated well with the clinical signs, which were associated with a poor prognosis in advanced cases.

  3. 'Serious thigh muscle strains': beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-02-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in 'muscle strain'. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh 'muscle strain'.

  4. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff - An uncommon anatomical variation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vicente Andreoli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it.

  5. Use of StarClose for brachial artery closure after percutaneous endovascular interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puggioni, Alessandra; Boesmans, Evelyne; Deloose, Koen; Peeters, Patrick; Bosiers, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a percutaneous extravascular closure device (StarClose, Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, CA) after brachial endovascular approach. From 2004 to 2006, 29 patients received StarClose for brachial closure. Primary endpoints were successful deployment and absence of procedure-related morbidity, secondary endpoints were brachial artery patency on duplex and absence of late (> 30 days) complications. The device was successfully deployed in all patients. In two patients (6.8%) local complications occurred: one patient developed a large hematoma successfully treated with prolonged compression and a second patient presented with brachial artery occlusion requiring operative intervention. After a mean follow-up of 7.5+/-7.2 months, all patients had a palpable brachial/radial pulse; none had signs of infection, distal embolization or neurological deficits. On ultrasound b-mode imaging, the clip was visible as a 4 mm echolucent area at the outer anterior wall of the artery. Based on the peak systolic velocity ratios between the site of StarClose and proximal brachial artery (mean 1.08+/-0.2), none of the studied patients had a significant stenosis at the site of closure. StarClose is safe and effective in providing hemostasis following interventional procedures through the brachial artery; further advantages include patients comfort and early discharge.

  6. RELATIONS OF ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION AND BLOOD FLOW IN BRACHIAL ARTERY AND CORONARY ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙寅光; 沈卫峰; 施仲伟; 张大东

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the relations between endothelium dependent vasodilator function and blood flow in the brachial and coronary arteries in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.MethodsTwenty eight patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent brachial artery endothelial function test by using high resolution B mode ultrasound before coronary angiography (CAG) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) test by using intracoronary Doppler technique. The correlation of coronary artery dilatation induced by an increase in blood flow after intracoronary adenosine infusion and brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD) following reactive hyperemia was evaluated. The relation between the change of brachial artery blood flow and CFR was also studied.ResultsThere was a positive correlation between brachial FMD and percent change of coronary diameter after adenosine infusion (12.50%±9.35% vs 11.38%±7.55%, r=0.425,P=0.02). There was also a weak negative relation between brachial flow change following reactive hyperemia and CFR (r=0.397, P=0.04).ConclusionThere is a correlation between the coronary endothelial function and the CFR by ultrasonic determination of brachial flow changes following reactive hyperemia.

  7. Brachial index does not reflect upper extremity functionality following surgery for vascular trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Simsek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vascular injuries to the upper extremities requiring surgical repair are common after accidents. However, neither postoperative functionality nor hemodynamic status of the extremity are routinely described. We evaluated the postoperative functional and hemodynamic status of patients with vascular traumas in the upper extremities. METHODS: 26 patients who suffered penetrating vascular traumas in the upper extremities from November 2008 to December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. Data on first approach, surgical technique employed and early postoperative outcomes were recorded. Further data on the post-discharge period, including clinical functional status of the arm, Doppler ultrasonography and brachial-brachial index were also evaluated. RESULTS: Average follow up was 33.5±10.8 months. Right (1.05±0.09 and left (1.04±0.08 brachial indexes were measured during follow up,. Doppler ultrasonography showed arterial occlusion in 4 patients (15%. Near-normal brachial-brachial indexes was observed in all four of these patients with occlusion of one of the upper extremity arteries, even though they exhibited limited arm function for daily work. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the postoperative outcomes of this small series of patients with penetrating vascular traumas in the upper extremity revealed that 15% of them suffered occlusion of one artery of the upper extremity. Artery occlusion did not correlate with brachial-brachial Doppler index, probably due to rich collateral circulation, but occlusion was associated with an extremity that was dysfunctional for the purposes of daily work. The result of the brachial-brachial index does not therefore correlate with functionality.

  8. Stimulus-response characteristics of motor evoked potentials and silent periods in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.A. van; Anker, L.C.; Pasman, J.W.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare stimulus-response characteristics of both motor evoked potentials (MEP) and silent periods (SP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles. METHODS: Stimulus-response curves of MEPs and SPs were obtained from the biceps bra

  9. Stimulus-response characteristics of motor evoked potentials and silent periods in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.A. van; Anker, L.C.; Pasman, J.W.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare stimulus-response characteristics of both motor evoked potentials (MEP) and silent periods (SP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles. METHODS: Stimulus-response curves of MEPs and SPs were obtained from the biceps bra

  10. Effect of 5 weeks horizontal bed rest on human muscle thickness and architecture of weight bearing and non-weight bearing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Maarten D; Seynnes, Olivier R; di Prampero, Pietro E; Pisot, Rado; Mekjavić, Igor B; Biolo, Gianni; Narici, Marco V

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes in thickness, fascicle length (L (f)) and pennation angle (theta) of the antigravity gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles, and the non-antigravity tibialis anterior (TA) and biceps brachii (BB) muscles measured by ultrasonography in ten healthy males (aged 22.3 +/- 2.2 years) in response to 5 weeks of horizontal bed rest (BR). After BR, muscle thickness decreased by 12.2 +/- 8.8% (P antigravity muscles of the lower limbs, the GM deteriorated to a greater extent than the VL is possibly related to the differences in relative load that this muscle normally experiences during daily loading. The dissimilar response in antigravity and non-antigravity muscles to unloading likely reflects differences in loading under normal conditions. The significant structural alterations of the GM and VL muscles highlight the rapid remodelling of muscle architecture occurring with disuse.

  11. Restoration of hand function in C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies using a staged approach with nerve and tendon transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Dong, Zhen; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Brachial plexus palsies of C7-T1 result in the complete loss of hand function, including finger and thumb flexion and extension as well as intrinsic muscle function. The task of reanimating such a hand remains challenging, and so far there has been no reliable neurological reconstructive method for restoring hand function. The authors aimed to establish a reliable strategy to reanimate the paralyzed hand. Two patients had sustained C7-T1 complete lesions. In the first stage of the operative procedure, a supinator motor branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer was performed with brachialis motor branch transfer to the median nerve to restore finger and thumb extension and flexion. In the second stage, the intact brachioradialis muscle was used for abductorplasty to restore thumb opposition. Both patients regained good finger extension and flexion. Thumb opposition was also attained, and overall hand function was satisfactory. The described strategy proved effective and reliable in restoring hand function after C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies.

  12. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-07-29

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Refining intermediate inflation in the light of Planck 2013 and BICEP2 results

    CERN Document Server

    Rezazadeh, K; Karimi, P

    2014-01-01

    Here, we first study the intermediate inflation in the standard canonical framework and conclude that it is not compatible with observational results deduced from the Planck 2013 and BICEP2. Then, we consider the intermediate inflation in a non-canonical context with a power-like Lagrangian. We obtain that within this framework, the intermediate inflation can be consistent with the observations of Planck 2013 and BICEP2. Also, we estimate the non-Gaussianity parameter in our model and we see that it lies in the range predicted by Planck 2013. Furthermore, we propose an idea in our non-canonical model to overcome the central drawback of intermediate inflation which is the fact that intermediate inflation never ends. We show explicitly that this modification doesn't alter the nature of intermediate inflation until the time of horizon exit.

  14. "Relaxed" biceps proximal tenodesis: an arthroscopic technique with decreased residual tendon tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Philippe; Benedetto, Ivan; Maqdes, Ali; Lima, Sara; Moraiti, Constantina

    2014-10-01

    Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB) at the upper part of the bicipital groove has been related to persistent postoperative bicipital pain. This is possibly due to the inflammation of the remaining tendon within the groove. This, in turn, could be attributed to the continual mechanical stress placed on the tendon in the narrow bicipital groove. Theoretically, should the LHB be more "relaxed," the mechanical stress applied on it would be diminished. On the basis of this rationale, we present an arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, according to which the tendon is fixed at the entrance of the bicipital groove, using a bioabsorbable screw, relaxed by 5 mm. In this lax position, the residual LHB tension is expected to be decreased compared with the initial tension, whereas no cosmetic deformity (Popeye sign) or impaired muscular performance is anticipated.

  15. A viable Starobinsky-like inflationary scenario in the light of Planck and BICEP2 results

    CERN Document Server

    Basilakos, S; Solà, J

    2014-01-01

    The recent CMB data from Planck and BICEP2 observations have opened a new window for inflationary cosmology. In this Essay we compare three Starobinsky-like inflationary scenarios: (i) the original Starobinsky proposal; (ii) a family of dynamically broken SUGRA models; and (iii) a class of "decaying" vacuum $\\Lambda(H)$ cosmologies. We then focus on the $\\Lambda(H)$ variant, which spans the complete cosmic history of the universe from an early inflationary stage, followed by the "graceful exit" into the standard radiation regime, the matter epoch and, finally, the late-time accelerated expansion. Computing the effective potential we find that the "running" $\\Lambda(H)$ models also provide a prediction for the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the CMB spectrum, $r \\simeq 0.16$, which is compatible to within $1\\sigma$ with the value $r=0.20^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ recently measured by the BICEP2 collaboration.

  16. Ultrasound-guided injection for the biceps brachii tendinitis: results and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Ebraheim, Nabil; Lause, Gregory E

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the results of ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid for biceps brachii tendinitis. In this randomized and prospective study, we evaluated 45 patients who were treated by free-hand injection without ultrasound guidance (group A) and 53 patients who were treated by ultrasound-guided injection (group B). The mean age was 47 y (range, 28 to 72). The average follow-up was 33 weeks (range, 24 to 56). The visual analog scale score decreased from 7.1 ± 2.3 before injection to 4.2 ± 3.1 at follow-up in group A and from 6.9 ± 2.6 to 2.1 ± 1.9 in group B (p biceps brachii tendinitis.

  17. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  18. Reconstruction of scalar field theories realizing inflation consistent with the Planck and BICEP2 results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuharu Bamba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We reconstruct scalar field theories to realize inflation compatible with the BICEP2 result as well as the Planck. In particular, we examine the chaotic inflation model, natural (or axion inflation model, and an inflationary model with a hyperbolic inflaton potential. We perform an explicit approach to find out a scalar field model of inflation in which any observations can be explained in principle.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of a unicortical button versus interference screw for subpectoral biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amarpal S; Singh, Anshu; Koonce, Ryan C

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the biomechanical properties of a unicortical button with an interference screw used for subpectoral biceps tenodesis. We also describe the anatomic dangers of bicortical button use in the subpectoral location. Twenty-eight fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders with a mean age of 52 years were studied. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 experimental biceps tenodesis groups (n = 7): unicortical button, interference screw, bicortical suspensory button, and bicortical suspensory with interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Each tenodesis specimen was mounted on a mechanical testing machine, preloaded for 2 minutes at 5 N, cycled from 5 to 70 N for 500 cycles (1 Hz), and loaded to failure (1 mm/s). We determined the mode of failure and computed the ultimate load to failure, yield load, pullout stiffness, and displacement at peak load. Calculations of the distance between the axillary and radial nerves with respect to the bicortical buttons were also calculated in 6 specimens. There was no statistically significant difference (P > .05) among groups in terms of age, ultimate load to failure, pullout stiffness, or displacement at peak load. Suture-tendon interface failure was the most commonly observed mode of failure. The axillary nerve was on average 7.8 mm from the bicortical button; however, in 6 specimens the nerve was less than 3 mm away. The use of a unicortical button for subpectoral biceps tenodesis provides biomechanical properties similar to the use of an interference screw. In addition, the use of a bicortical button in this area of the proximal humerus puts the axillary nerve at risk. Using a unicortical button subpectoral biceps method may provide a surgeon with a safe and technically easy and reproducible technique while providing similar biomechanical properties to a known standard implant. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Assessment of instability of the long head of the biceps tendon by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spritzer, C.E.; Collins, A.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Cooperman, A. [Center for Diagnostic Imaging, Winter Park, FL (United States); Speer, K.P. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Objective. To determine whether MRI can identify instability of the long head of the biceps tendon (LBT) in the rotator interval.Design and patients. A retrospective review was carried out of 19 patients, all arthroscopically examined, nine of whom had surgically confirmed instability of the LBT.Results. A LBT perched on the lesser tuberosity correctly indicated all nine cases of instability with one false positive. In six of seven cases where the LBT was oval in shape, no instability of the biceps tendon existed, whereas LBT instability was present in eight of 12 patients with a flat long head of the biceps tendon. In seven of eight acutely angled intertubercular sulci there was no instability of the LBT while eight of 11 obtusely angled sulci were associated with LBT instability. By consensus impression, instability of the LBT could be determined with 67% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 86% positive predictive value, and 75% negative predictive value.Conclusions. A flat LBT perched on the lesser tuberosity with an obtusely angled intertubercular sulcus suggests the diagnosis of instability of the LBT in the correct clinical setting. (orig.)

  1. Killing the straw man: Does BICEP prove inflation at the GUT scale?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dent, James B. [Department of Physics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504 (United States); Krauss, Lawrence M. [Department of Physics and School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Mount Stromlo Observatory, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Mathur, Harsh [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7079 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    The surprisingly large value of r, the ratio of power in tensor to scalar density perturbations in the CMB reported by the BICEP2 Collaboration, if confirmed, provides strong evidence for Inflation at the GUT scale. While the Inflationary signal remains the best motivated source, a large value of r alone would still allow for the possibility that a comparable gravitational wave background might result from a self ordering scalar field (SOSF) transition that takes place later at somewhat lower energy. We find that even without detailed considerations of the predicted BICEP signature of such a transition, simple existing limits on the isocurvature contribution to CMB anisotropies would definitively rule out a contribution of more than 5% to r≈0.2. We also present a general relation for the allowed fractional SOSF contribution to r as a function of the ultimate measured value of r. These results point strongly not only to an inflationary origin of the BICEP2 signal, if confirmed, but also to the fact that if the GUT scale is of order 10{sup 16} GeV then either the GUT transition happens before Inflation or the Inflationary transition and the GUT transition must be one and the same.

  2. Optical Characterization of the BICEP3 CMB Polarimeter at the South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Karkare, K S; Ahmed, Z; Alexander, K D; Amiri, M; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Boenish, H; Bowens-Rubin, R; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S T; Grayson, J A; Halpern, M; Harrison, S A; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Kang, J H; Karpel, E; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Monticue, V; Namikawa, T; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Germaine, M T St; Schwarz, R; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Wandui, A; Weber, A; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    BICEP3 is a small-aperture refracting cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescope designed to make sensitive polarization maps in pursuit of a potential B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. It is the latest in the BICEP/Keck Array series of CMB experiments at the South Pole, which has provided the most stringent constraints on inflation to date. For the 2016 observing season, BICEP3 was outfitted with a full suite of 2400 optically coupled detectors operating at 95 GHz. In these proceedings we report on the far field beam performance using calibration data taken during the 2015-2016 summer deployment season in situ with a thermal chopped source. We generate high-fidelity per-detector beam maps, show the array-averaged beam profile, and characterize the differential beam response between co-located, orthogonally polarized detectors which contributes to the leading instrumental systematic in pair differencing experiments. We find that the levels of differential pointing, beamwidth, and elliptici...

  3. Simple brane-world inflationary models in light of BICEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Nobuchika

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the recent CMB $B$-mode observation announced by the BICEP2 collaboration, we study simple inflationary models in the Randall-Sundrum brane-world cosmology. Brane-world cosmological effects alter the inflationary predictions of the spectral index ($n_s$) and the tensor-to-scalar ratio ($r$) from those obtained in the standard cosmology. In particular, the tensor-to-scalar ratio is enhanced in the presence of the 5th dimension, and simple inflationary models which predict small $r$ values in the standard cosmology can yield $r$ values being compatible with the BICEP2 result, $r=0.2^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$. Confirmation of the BICEP2 result and more precise measurements of $n_s$ and $r$ in the near future allow us to constrain the 5-dimensional Planck mass ($M_5$) of the brane-world scenario. We also discuss the post inflationary scenario, namely, reheating of the universe through inflaton decay to the Standard Model particles. When we require the renormalizability of the inflationary models, the inflaton...

  4. Metastatic Brachial Plexopathy in a Case of Recurrent Breast Carcinoma Demonstrated on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan J.; Srivastava, Anurag; Bal, ChandraSekhar; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2014-03-15

    This case highlights the importance of recognition of the pattern of metastatic brachialplexopathy in breast cancer patients undergoing {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for evaluation of recurrent disease.This pattern can be appreciated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) and coronal {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images as a linear extension of tracer activity from superomedial aspect(supra/infraclavicular) to lateral aspect of the axilla closely related to the subclavian/axillary vessels). A 35-year-old woman diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast had undergone six cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by wide local incision and radiotherapy. She had local recurrence, for which she was operated upon and given chemotherapy. She presented to her oncologist with pain and swelling in the right breast, nodules in the right axilla and restriction of movement of the right upper limb. The patient was referred for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to evaluate the extent of recurrent/metastatic disease. Whole-body PET/CT was acquired 1 h following the intravenous injection of 296 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG on a Biograph mCT scanner (Siemens). Evaluation of the MIP image revealed abnormal FDG accumulation at multiple sites in the thorax, along with a linear pattern of FDG uptake in the right lateral aspect of the upper chest (Fig. 1a, arrow). The coronal fused PET/CT image revealed a linear pattern of FDG uptake corresponding to an ill-defined mass extending from just behind the right clavicle into the right axilla (arrow). In addition, abnormal FDG accumulation was seen in a soft tissue density mass in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast, skin of the right breast laterally, both pectoral muscles (discrete foci) and in a few subpectoral nodes. Soft tissue nodular opacities in both lungs showed FDG accumulation suggestive of pulmonary metastasis (Fig. 1b, thick arrow). The patient was

  5. Lack of evidence of the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants (under the age of two years) diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Gelding, Bronwyn

    2006-12-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, which occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births, results from traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus in utero, during descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that range in extent of damage and severity and can lead to a lifelong impairment and functional difficulties associated with the use of the affected upper limb. Most infants diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy receive treatment, such as surgery to the brachial plexus, physiotherapy or occupational therapy, within the first months of life. However, there is controversy regarding the most effective form of management. This review follows on from our previous systematic review which investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management in infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. This systematic review focuses on the effects of primary surgery. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess and collate all available evidence on effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 13 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, the Australian Digital Thesis program. Those studies that were reported in English and published between July 1992 to June 2004 were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion into this review. This excluded studies where infants were solely managed conservatively or with pharmacological agents, or underwent surgery for the management of

  6. Quantitative muscle ultrasound measures rapid declines over time in children with SMA type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kay W; Connolly, Anne M; Zaidman, Craig M

    2015-11-15

    Muscles are small in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It is not known if muscle size changes over time in SMA type 1. We quantified changes over time in muscle size and echointensity during two repeated ultrasound examinations of unilateral proximal (biceps brachii/brachialis and quadriceps) and distal (anterior forearm flexors and tibialis anterior) muscles in three children with SMA type 1. We compared muscle thickness (MT) to body weight-dependent normal reference values. Children were 1, 6, and 11months old at baseline and had 2, 2 and 4 months between ultrasound examinations, respectively. At baseline, MT was normal for weight in all muscles except an atrophic quadriceps in the oldest child. MT decreased and echointensity increased (worsened) over time. At follow up, MT was below normal for weight in the quadriceps in all three children, in the biceps/brachioradialis in two, and in the anterior forearm in one. Tibialis anterior MT remained normal for weight in all three children. Muscle echointensity increased over time in all muscles and, on average, more than doubled in two children. In children with SMA type 1, muscle atrophies and becomes hyperechoic over time. Quantitative muscle ultrasound measures disease progression in SMA type 1 that warrants additional study in more children. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Brachial plexus injury: the London experience with supraclavicular traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Rolfe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author details the experiences of his hospital and other London hospitals in treating brachial plexus injury. As noted, important advances have been made in methods of diagnosis and repair. Myelography was replaced by CT scan and later by MRI. Among the topics the author explores are diagnosis (including pain, the presence or absence of the Tinel sign, and the irradiation of pins and needles) and the principles of repair. The author emphasizes that it is imperative that ruptured nerves be repaired as soon as possible, with the closed traction lesion coming, in urgency, close behind reattachment of the amputated hand or repair of a great artery and a trunk nerve in the combined lesion. Finally, the article concludes that the surgeon must be actively engaged in the whole process of rehabilitation and treatment of pain. This is part of a Point-Counterpoint discussion with Dr. David G. Kline's presentation of "A Personal Experience."

  8. Misdiagnosis of Brachial Plexus Schwannoma as Cervical Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khajepour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are relatively rare but benign nerve sheath tumors deriving from Schwann cells with low tendency of transformation to malignancy. Extracranial shwannomas usually present insidiously and thus are often diagnosed incorrectly or after lengthy delays. We present the case of a 51 years old female patient with chronic cervical pain radiating in left upper limb who was treated as cervical radiculopathy for 5 years. By aggrevation of pain and paresthesia, imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed schwannoma of brachial plexus. In case of radiating pain and paresthesia in upper limb (such as this case symptoms can be misleading for cervical radiculopathy but careful examination especialy in persistence of symptoms with negative imaging results for radiculopathies are important and electrodiagnostic study can be helpful.

  9. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  10. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  11. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set