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Sample records for br2 mixed core

  1. BR2 mixed core management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.; Beeckmans, A.

    1997-01-01

    The BR2 fuel cycle management can be optimized by the fabrication and the irradiation of fuel elements with uranium recovered from the reprocessing of BR2 spent fuel. The VIn E fuel performances could be upgraded by increasing the amount of burnable poisons, the fuel mass, the fuel density, ... in order to obtain a higher reactivity effect at a burnup of about β=12% and a longer cycle duration. The preliminary results of the calculations need however to be confirmed by measurements on effective reactor loads. (author)

  2. Mixed core management: Use of 93% and 72% enriched uranium in the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor, put into operation in 1963 and refurbished from July 1995 till April 1997, is a 100 MW high-flux Materials Testing Reactor, using 93% 235 U enriched uranium as standard fuel, light water as coolant and beryllium as moderator. The present operating regime consists of five irradiation cycles per year at an operating power between 50 and 70 MW; each cycle is characterized by 21 days operation. In the framework of a 'qualification programme', six 72% 235 U fuel elements fabricated with uranium recovered from the reprocessing of BR2 spent fuel at UKAEA-Dounreay have been successfully irradiated in the period 1994-1995 reaching a maximum mean burnup of 48% without the release of fission products. Since 1998, this type of fuel element is irradiated routinely together with standard 93% 235 U fuel elements in order to optimize the utilization of the available HEU inventory. The purpose of this paper is to present the strategy developed in order to optimize the mixed core management of the BR2 reactor. (author)

  3. BR2 reactor core steady state transient modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, A.; Petrova, T.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled neutronics/hydraulics/heat-conduction model of the BR2 reactor core is under development at SCK-CEN. The neutron transport phenomenon has been implemented as steady state and time dependent nodal diffusion. The non-linear heat conduction equation in-side fuel elements is solved with a time dependent finite element method. To allow coupling between functional modules and to simulate subcooled regimes, a simple single-phase hydraulics has been introduced, while the two-phase hydraulics is under development. Multiple tests, general benchmark cases as well as calculation/experiment comparisons demonstrated a good accuracy of both neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, numerical reliability and full code portability. A refinement methodology has been developed and tested for better neutronic representation in hexagonal geometry. Much effort is still needed to complete the development of an extended cross section library with kinetic data and two-phase flow representation. (author)

  4. Application of MCNPX 2.7.D for reactor core management at the research reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses application of the Monte Carlo burn up code MCNPX 2.7.D for whole core criticality and depletion analysis of the Material Testing Research Reactor BR2 at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. Two different approaches in the use of MCNPX 2.7.D are presented. The first methodology couples the evolution of fuel depletion, evaluated by MCNPX 2.7.D in an infinite lattice with a steady-state 3-D power distribution in the full core model. The second method represents fully automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations in the detailed 3-D heterogeneous geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The accuracy of the method and computational time as function of the number of used unique burn up materials in the model are being studied. The depletion capabilities of MCNPX 2.7.D are compared vs. the developed at the BR2 reactor department MCNPX & ORIGEN-S combined method. Testing of MCNPX 2.7.D on the criticality measurements at the BR2 reactor is presented. (author)

  5. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of lateral heat conduction, coolant azimuthal mixing and heat transfer predictions in a BR2 fuel assembly geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Dionne, B.

    2011-01-01

    To support the analyses related to the conversion of the BR2 core from highly-enriched (HEU) to low-enriched (LEU) fuel, the thermal-hydraulics codes PLTEMP and RELAP-3D are used to evaluate the safety margins during steady-state operation (PLTEMP), as well as after a loss-of-flow, loss-of-pressure, or a loss of coolant event (RELAP). In the 1-D PLTEMP and RELAP simulations, conduction in the azimuthal and axial directions is not accounted. The very good thermal conductivity of the cladding and the fuel meat and significant temperature gradients in the lateral directions (axial and azimuthal directions) could lead to a heat flux distribution that is significantly different than the power distribution. To evaluate the significance of the lateral heat conduction, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, using the CFD code STAR-CD, were performed. Safety margin calculations are typically performed for a hot stripe, i.e., an azimuthal region of the fuel plates/coolant channel containing the power peak. In a RELAP model, for example, a channel between two plates could be divided into a number of RELAP channels (stripes) in the azimuthal direction. In a PLTEMP model, the effect of azimuthal power peaking could be taken into account by using engineering factors. However, if the thermal mixing in the azimuthal direction of a coolant channel is significant, a stripping approach could be overly conservative by not taking into account this mixing. STAR-CD simulations were also performed to study the thermal mixing in the coolant. Section II of this document presents the results of the analyses of the lateral heat conduction and azimuthal thermal mixing in a coolant channel. Finally, PLTEMP and RELAP simulations rely on the use of correlations to determine heat transfer coefficients. Previous analyses showed that the Dittus-Boelter correlation gives significantly more conservative (lower) predictions than the correlations of Sieder-Tate and Petukhov. STAR-CD 3-D

  6. Reactor BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2000-07-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  7. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  8. BR2 Reactor: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    2007-01-01

    The irradiations in the BR2 reactor are in collaboration with or at the request of third parties such as the European Commission, the IAEA, research centres and utilities, reactor vendors or fuel manufacturers. The reactor also contributes significantly to the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to neutron silicon doping for the semiconductor industry and to scientific irradiations for universities. Along the ongoing programmes on fuel and materials development, several new irradiation devices are in use or in design. Amongst others a loop providing enhanced cooling for novel materials testing reactor fuel, a device for high temperature gas cooled fuel as well as a rig for the irradiation of metallurgical samples in a Pb-Bi environment. A full scale 3-D heterogeneous model of BR2 is available. The model describes the real hyperbolic arrangement of the reactor and includes the detailed 3-D space dependent distribution of the isotopic fuel depletion in the fuel elements. The model is validated on the reactivity measurements of several tens of BR2 operation cycles. The accurate calculations of the axial and radial distributions of the poisoning of the beryllium matrix by 3 He, 6 Li and 3T are verified on the measured reactivity losses used to predict the reactivity behavior for the coming decades. The model calculates the main functionals in reactor physics like: conventional thermal and equivalent fission neutron fluxes, number of displacements per atom, fission rate, thermal power characteristics as heat flux and linear power density, neutron/gamma heating, determination of the fission energy deposited in fuel plates/rods, neutron multiplication factor and fuel burn-up. For each reactor irradiation project, a detailed geometry model of the experimental device and of its neighborhood is developed. Neutron fluxes are predicted within approximately 10 percent in comparison with the dosimetry measurements. Fission rate, heat flux and

  9. Reactor BR2: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. A safety audit was conduced by the IAEA, the conclusions of which demonstrated the excellent performance of the plant in terms of operational safety. In 1999, the CALLISTO facility was extensively used for various programmes involving LWR pressure vessel materials, IASCC of LWR structural materials, fusion reactor materials and martensic steels for use in ADS systems. In 1999, BR2's commercial programmes were further developed

  10. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system

  11. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2001-01-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  12. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  13. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  14. Novel Co(III)/Co(II) mixed valence compound [Co(bapen)Br2]2[CoBr4] (bapen = N,N‧-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethane-1,2-diamine): Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolko, Lukáš; Černák, Juraj; Kuchár, Juraj; Miklovič, Jozef; Boča, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Green crystals of Co(III)/Co(II) mixed valence compound [Co(bapen)Br2]2[CoBr4] (bapen = N,N‧-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethane-1,2-diamine) were isolated from the aqueous system CoBr2 - bapen - HBr, crystallographically studied and characterized by elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy. Its ionic crystal structure is built up of [Co(bapen)Br2]+ cations and [CoBr4]2- anions. The Co(III) central atoms within the complex cations are hexacoordinated (donor set trans-N4Br2) with bromido ligands placed in the axial positions. The Co(II) atoms exhibit distorted tetrahedral coordination. Beside ionic forces weak Nsbnd H⋯Br intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions contribute to the stability of the structure. Temperature variable magnetic measurements confirm the S = 3/2 behavior with the zero-field splitting of an intermediate strength: D/hc = 8.7 cm-1.

  15. Approaching the limit of Cu(II)/Cu(I) mixed valency in a Cu(I)Br2-N-methylquinoxalinium hybrid compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Nicolas; Sproules, Stephen; Pasquier, Claude; Auban-Senzier, Pascale; Raffy, Helene; Powell, Annie K

    2015-08-18

    A novel 1D hybrid salt (MQ)[CuBr2]∞ (MQ = N-methylquinoxalinium) is reported. Structural, spectroscopic and magnetic investigations reveal a minimal Cu(II) doping of less than 0.1%. However it is not possible to distinguish Cu(I) and Cu(II). The unusually close packing of the organic moieties and the dark brown colour of the crystals suggest a defect electronic structure.

  16. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  17. Irradiation of novel MTR fuel plates in BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboomen, B.; Aoust, Th.; Beeckmans De Westmeerbeeck, A.; De Raedt, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    Since the end of 1999, novel MTR fuel plates with very high-density meat are being irradiated in BR2. The purpose of the irradiation is to investigate the behaviour of these fuel plates under very severe reactor operation conditions. The novel fuel plates are inserted in two standard six-tube BR2 fuel elements in the locations normally occupied by the standard outer fuel plates. The irradiation in BR2 was prepared by carrying out detailed neutron Monte Carlo calculations of the whole BR2 core containing the two experimental fuel elements for various positions in the reactor and for various azimuthal orientations of the fuel elements. Comparing the thus determined fission density levels and azimuthal profiles in the new MTR fuel plates irradiated in the various channels allowed the experimenters to choose the most appropriate BR2 channel and the most appropriate fuel element orientation. (author)

  18. Refurbishment programme for the BR2-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonen, E [Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, BR2 Department, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    1992-07-01

    BR2 is a high flux engineering test reactor, which differs from comparable material testing reactors by its specific core array (fig. 1). It is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-in-pool type reactor, moderated by beryllium and light water, which serves also as coolant. The fuel elements consist of cylindrical assemblies loaded in channels materialized by hexagonal beryllium prisms. The central 200 mm channel is vertical, while all others are inclined and form a hyperbolical arrangement around the central one. This feature combines a very compact core with the requirement of sufficient space for individual access to all channels through penetrations in the top cover of the aluminium pressure vessel. Each channel may hold a fuel element, a control rod, an experiment, an irradiation device or a beryllium plug. The refurbishment Program According to the present programme of C.E.N./S.C.K., BR2 will be in operation until 1996. At that time, the beryllium matrix will reach its foreseen end-of-life. In order to continue operation beyond this point, a thorough refurbishment of the reactor is foreseen, in addition to the unavoidable replacement of the matrix, to ensure quality of the installation and compliance with modern standards. Some fundamental options have been taken as a starting point: BR2 will continue to be used as a classical MTR, i.e. fuel and material irradiations and safety experiments with some additional service-activities. The present configuration is optimized for that use and there is no specific experimental requirement to change the basic concepts and performance characteristics. From the customers viewpoint, it is desirable to go ahead with the well-known features of BR2, to maintain a high degree of availability and reliability and to minimize the duration of the long shutdown. It is also important to limit the amount of nuclear liabilities. So the objective of the refurbishment programme is the life extension of BR2 for about 15 years, corresponding to

  19. Refurbishment programme for the BR2-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    1992-01-01

    BR2 is a high flux engineering test reactor, which differs from comparable material testing reactors by its specific core array (fig. 1). It is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-in-pool type reactor, moderated by beryllium and light water, which serves also as coolant. The fuel elements consist of cylindrical assemblies loaded in channels materialized by hexagonal beryllium prisms. The central 200 mm channel is vertical, while all others are inclined and form a hyperbolical arrangement around the central one. This feature combines a very compact core with the requirement of sufficient space for individual access to all channels through penetrations in the top cover of the aluminium pressure vessel. Each channel may hold a fuel element, a control rod, an experiment, an irradiation device or a beryllium plug. The refurbishment Program According to the present programme of C.E.N./S.C.K., BR2 will be in operation until 1996. At that time, the beryllium matrix will reach its foreseen end-of-life. In order to continue operation beyond this point, a thorough refurbishment of the reactor is foreseen, in addition to the unavoidable replacement of the matrix, to ensure quality of the installation and compliance with modern standards. Some fundamental options have been taken as a starting point: BR2 will continue to be used as a classical MTR, i.e. fuel and material irradiations and safety experiments with some additional service-activities. The present configuration is optimized for that use and there is no specific experimental requirement to change the basic concepts and performance characteristics. From the customers viewpoint, it is desirable to go ahead with the well-known features of BR2, to maintain a high degree of availability and reliability and to minimize the duration of the long shutdown. It is also important to limit the amount of nuclear liabilities. So the objective of the refurbishment programme is the life extension of BR2 for about 15 years, corresponding to

  20. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve de Mevergnies, M.

    1977-01-01

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  1. Effect of an in-plane ligand on the electronic structures of bromo-bridged nano-wire Ni-Pd mixed-metal complexes, [Ni(1-x)Pd(x)(bn)2Br]Br2 (bn = 2S,3S-diaminobutane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Mari; Wu, Hashen; Kawakami, Daisuke; Takaishi, Shinya; Kajiwara, Takashi; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Breedlove, Brian K; Yamashita, Masahiro; Kishida, Hideo; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shinichi

    2009-08-03

    Single crystals of quasi-one-dimensional bromo-bridged Ni-Pd mixed-metal complexes with 2S,3S-diaminobutane (bn) as an in-plane ligand, [Ni(1-x)Pd(x)(bn)(2)Br]Br(2), were obtained by using an electrochemical oxidation method involving mixed methanol/2-propanol (1:1) solutions containing different ratios of [Ni(II)(bn)(2)]Br(2) and [Pd(II)(bn)(2)]Br(2). To investigate the competition between the electron-correlation of the Ni(III) states, or Mott-Hubbard states (MH), and the electron-phonon interaction of the Pd(II)-Pd(IV) mixed valence states, or charge-density-wave states (CDW), in the Ni-Pd mixed-metal compounds, X-ray structure analyses, X-ray oscillation photograph, and Raman, IR, ESR, and single-crystal reflectance spectra were analyzed. In addition, the local electronic structures of Ni-Pd mixed-metal single crystals were directly investigated by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature and ambient pressure. The oxidation states of [Ni(1-x)Pd(x)(bn)(2)Br]Br(2) changed from a M(II)-M(IV) mixed valence state to a M(III) MH state at a critical mixing ratio (x(c)) of approximately 0.8, which is lower than that of [Ni(1-x)Pd(x)(chxn)(2)Br]Br(2) (chxn = 1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane) (x(c) approximately 0.9) reported previously. The lower value of x(c) for [Ni(1-x)Pd(x)(bn)(2)Br]Br(2) can be explained by the difference in their CDW dimensionalities because the three-dimensional CDW ordering in [Pd(bn)(2)Br]Br(2) observed by using X-ray diffuse scattering stabilizes the Pd(II)-Pd(IV) mixed valence state more than two-dimensional CDW ordering in [Pd(chxn)(2)Br]Br(2) does, which has been reported previously.

  2. Performance testing of a mixed TRIGA core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R F; Godsey, T A; Feltz, D E; Randall, J D [Texas A and M University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    The major operational problem experienced by the Nuclear Science Center Reactor at Texas A and M University is full burnup. With two shift operation caused by the high utilization of the facility, the reactor is operated more than 100 megawatt days per year. The solution chosen for this problem was conversion to FLIP fuel. Since funds were not available to load an entire FLIP core, a mixed core comprised of approximately one third FLIP fuel located in the central region was designed. The design core was loaded and went critical on July 1, 1973. The results of the following measurements on the mixed core are presented: Determination of Rod worths; Measurement of Reactivity Effects; Determination of Flux values; Measurement of Fuel temperatures; Preliminary Fuel Burnup Rate; Pulsing Calibration. (author)

  3. Refurbishing the BR2 materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Dekeyser, J.; Gubel, P.

    1995-01-01

    SCK/CEN is refurbishing its BR2 reactor to allow its further operation during the next 15 years; in doing so, it chooses to keep BR2 available for future scientific and technological irradiation programs within an international context. (author) 2 figs

  4. Qualification of high density aluminide fuels for the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, Andre; Gubel, Pol; Ponsard, Bernard; Pin, Thomas; Falgoux, Jean Louis

    2005-01-01

    The BR2 operation still relies on the use of 90..93% enriched HEU aluminide fuel. The availability of a limited batch of 73% enriched HEU from reprocessed BR2 uranium in Dounreay justified 10 years ago the qualification and use of this material. After some preliminary test irradiations, various batches of fuel elements were fabricated by the UKAEA-Dounreay and successfully irradiated. Due to their lower 235 U content (0.050 g 235 U/cm 2 ), these elements were always irradiated together with standard 90...93% HEU fuel elements. A mixed-core strategy was developed at this occasion for an optimal utilization, and was reported during the 4th RRFM conference (March 19-21, 2000, Colmar, France). The availability of a new batch of fresh 73% HEU material was the occasion, a few years ago, to initiate the development, fabrication and qualification of a new high density fuel element. An order was placed with CERCA to assess the optimal fabrication methods and tooling required to meet as far as possible the existing BR2 standard specifications and 235 U content (0.060 g 235 U/cm 2 ). This development phase has been already reported during the 7th RRFM conference (March 9-12, 2003, Aix-en-Provence, France). Afterwards, six lead test fuel elements were ordered for qualification by irradiation. The neutronic properties of the fuel elements were adjusted and optimized. After a short summary of the main results of the development program, this paper describes the nuclear characteristics of the high density fuel elements and comments on the nuclear follow-up of the lead test fuel elements during their irradiation for five cycles in the BR2 reactor and the return of experience for CERCA. (author)

  5. Irradiation techniques at BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, W.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1963 the material testing reactor BR2 at Mol is operated for the realisation of numerous research programs and experiments on the behavior of materials under nuclear radiation and in particular under intensive neutron exposure. During this period special irradiation techniques and experimental devices were developed according to the desiderata of the different experiments and to the irradiation possibilities offered at BR2. The design and the operating characteristics of quite a number of those irradiation rigs of proven reliability may be used or can be made available for new irradiation experiments. A brief description is given of some typical irradiation devices designed and constructed by CEN/SCK, Technology and Energy Dpt. They are compiled according to their main use for the different research and development programs realized at BR2. Their eventual application however for different objectives could be possible. A final chapter summarizes the principal irradiation conditions offered by BR2 reactor. (author)

  6. Solvation dynamics through Raman spectroscopy: hydration of Br2 and Br3(-), and solvation of Br2 in liquid bromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Edward T; Halberstadt, N; Apkarian, V A

    2011-05-07

    Raman spectroscopy of bromine in the liquid phase and in water illustrates uncommon principles and yields insights regarding hydration. In liquid Br(2), resonant excitation over the B((3)Π(0u)(+)) ← X((1)Σ(g)(+)) valence transition at 532 nm produces a weak resonant Raman (RR) progression accompanied by a five-fold stronger non-resonant (NR) scattering. The latter is assigned to pre-resonance with the C-state, which in turn must be strongly mixed with inter-molecular charge transfer states. Despite the electronic resonance, RR of Br(2) in water is quenched. At 532 nm, the homogeneously broadened fundamental is observed, as in the NR case at 785 nm. The implications of the quenching of RR scattering are analyzed in a simple, semi-quantitative model, to conclude that the inertial evolution of the Raman packet in aqueous Br(2) occurs along multiple equivalent water-Br(2) coordinates. In distinct contrast with hydrophilic hydration in small clusters and hydrophobic hydration in clathrates, it is concluded that the hydration shell of bromine in water consists of dynamically equivalent fluxional water molecules. At 405 nm, the RR progression of Br(3)(-) is observed, accompanied by difference transitions between the breathing of the hydration shell and the symmetric stretch of the ion. The RR scattering process in this case can be regarded as the coherent photo-induced electron transfer to the solvent and its radiative back-transfer.

  7. A comparative ab initio study of Br2*- and Br2 water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A K; Mukherjee, T; Maity, D K

    2006-01-14

    The work presents ab initio results on structure and electronic properties of Br2*-.nH2O(n=1-10) and Br2.nH2O(n=1-8) hydrated clusters to study the effects of an excess electron on the microhydration of the halide dimer. A nonlocal density functional, namely, Becke's half-and-half hybrid exchange-correlation functional is found to perform well on the present systems with a split valence 6-31++G(d,p) basis function. Geometry optimizations for all the clusters are carried out with several initial guess structures and without imposing any symmetry restriction. Br2*-.nH2O clusters prefer to have symmetrical double hydrogen-bonding structures. Results on Br2.nH2O(n>or=2) cluster show that the O atom of one H2O is oriented towards one Br atom and the H atom of another H2O is directed to other Br atom making Br2 to exist as Br+-Br- entity in the cluster. The binding and solvation energies are calculated for the Br2*-.nH2O and Br2.nH2O clusters. Calculations of the vibrational frequencies show that the formation of Br2*- and Br2 water clusters induces significant shifts from the normal modes of isolated water. Excited-state calculations are carried out on Br2*-.nH2O clusters following configuration interaction with single electron excitation procedure and UV-VIS absorption profiles are simulated. There is an excellent agreement between the present theoretical UV-VIS spectra of Br2*-.10H2O cluster and the reported transient optical spectra for Br2*- in aqueous solution.

  8. Status of the BR2 refurbishment programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of the BR2 reactor with its second beryllium matrix is foreseen up to mid-1995. A refurbishment programme has been established in order to allow for future operation during at least ten years. Recently a positive decision to effectively carry out this programme has been taken. The refurbishment action plan follows from a general assessment of the different systems of BR2, with respect to their actual status, the operational experience and the evolution of safety standards and criteria. Ageing considerations were of uppermost importance in those assessments, not only to assure safety of future operation, but also to guarantee future availability and reliability. (orig.)

  9. Production of radioisotopes with BR2 facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallais, C.J.; Morel de Westfaver, A.; Heeren, L.; Baugnet, J.M.; Gandolfo, J.M.; Boeykens, W.

    1978-01-01

    After a brief account on the isotopes production evolution in the industrialized countries the irradiation devices and the types of standardized capsules used in the BR2 reactor are described as well as the thermal neutron flux. Production of most important radioisotopes like 131 Iodine, 60 Cobalt, 192 Iridium and 99 Molybdenum and their main utilizations (uses)are described. The mean specific activities and the limit of use for different radioisotopes are reported. (A.F.)

  10. Polymorphism in Br2 clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschleger, I U; Kerenskaya, G; Janda, K C; Apkarian, V A

    2008-02-07

    The structure and composition of bromine clathrate hydrate has been controversial for more than 170 years due to the large variation of its observed stoichiometries. Several different crystal structures were proposed before 1997 when Udachin et al. (Udachin, K. A.; Enright, G. D.; Ratcliffe, C. I.; Ripmeester, J. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 11481) concluded that Br2 forms only the tetragonal structure (TS-I). We show polymorphism in Br2 clathrate hydrates by identifying two distinct crystal structures through optical microscopy and resonant Raman spectroscopy on single crystals. After growing TS-I crystals from a liquid bromine-water solution, upon dropping the temperature slightly below -7 degrees C, new crystals of cubic morphology form. The new crystals, which have a limited thermal stability range, are assigned to the CS-II structure. The two structures are clearly distinguished by the resonant Raman spectra of the enclathrated Br2, which show long overtone progressions and allow the extraction of accurate vibrational parameters: omega(e) = 321.2 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 0.82 +/- 0.05 cm(-1) in TS-I and omega(e) = 317.5 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 0.70 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) in CS-II. On the basis of structural analysis, the discovery of the CS-II crystals implies stability of a large class of bromine hydrate structures and, therefore, polymorphism.

  11. Operation of the BR2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2006-01-01

    The BR2 is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment of 22 months to compensate for the ageing of the installations, to enhance the reliability of operation and to comply with modern safety standards, it was restarted in April 1997. The facility is mainly used for the irradiation and testing of fuels and materials and for commercial productions - including radioisotopes for the medical and industrial uses, and NTD-Silicon. The article describes the main achievements and activities in 2005

  12. BR2 Reactor: Irradiation of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwimp, A.

    2005-01-01

    Safe, reliable and economical operation of reactor fuels, both UO 2 and MOX types, requires in-pile testing and qualification up to high target burn-up levels. In-pile testing of advanced fuels for improved performance is also mandatory. The objectives of research performed at SCK-CEN are to perform Neutron irradiation of LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuels in the BR2 reactor under relevant operating and monitoring conditions, as specified by the experimenter's requirements and to improve the on-line measurements on the fuel rods themselves

  13. Operation of the BR2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2005-01-01

    The BR2 is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment of 22 months to compensate for the ageing of the installations, to enhance the reliability of operation and to comply with modern safety standards, it was restarted in April 1997. The facility is mainly used for the irradiation and testing of fuels and materials and for commercial productions - including radioisotopes for the medical and industrial uses, and NTD-Silicon. The article describes the main activities and achievements in 2004

  14. BR2 reactor: medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.

    2005-01-01

    The radioisotopes are produced for various applications in the nuclear medicine (diagnostic, therapy, palliation of metastatic bone pain), industry (radiography of welds, ...), agriculture (radiotracers, ...) and basic research. Due to the availability of high neutron fluxes (thermal neutron flux up to 10 15 n/cm 2 .s), the BR2 reactor is considered as a major facility through its contribution for a continuous supply of products such 99 Mo ( 99 mTc), 131 I, 133 Xe, 192 Ir, 186 Re, 153 Sm, 90 Y, 32 P, 188 W ( 188 Re), 203 Hg, 82 Br, 41 Ar, 125 I, 177 Lu, 89 Sr, 60 Co, 169 Yb, 147 Nd, and others. Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) silicon is produced for the semiconductor industry in the SIDONIE (Silicon Doping by Neutron Irradiation Experiment) facility, which is designed to continuously rotate and traverse the silicon through the neutron flux. These combined movements produce exceptional dopant homogeneity in batches of silicon measuring 4 and 5-inches in diameter by up to 750 mm in length. The main objectives of work performed were to provide a reliable and qualitative supply of radioisotopes and NTD-silicon to the customers in accordance with a quality system that has been certified to the requirements of the EN ISO 9001: 2000. This new Quality System Certificate has been obtained in November 2003 for the Production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications and the Production of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) Silicon in the BR2 reactor

  15. UV-Induced Anisotropy In CdBr2-CdBr2: Cu Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Naggar A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have found an occurrence of anisotropy in the nanostructure CdBr2-CdBr2: Cu nanocrystalline films. The film thickness was varied from 4 nm up to 80 nm. The films were prepared by successive deposition of the novel layers onto the basic nanocrystals. The detection of anisotropy was performed by occurrence of anisotropy in the polarized light at 633 nm He-Ne laser wavelength. The occurrence of anisotropy was substantially dependent on the film thickness and the photoinduced power density. Possible mechanisms of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  16. Brominated methanes as photoresponsive molecular storage of elemental Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kazumitsu; Tsuda, Akihiko

    2012-10-01

    The photochemical generation of elemental Br(2) from brominated methanes is reported. Br(2) was generated by the vaporization of carbon oxides and HBr through oxidative photodecomposition of brominated methanes under a 20 W low-pressure mercury lamp, wherein the amount and situations of Br(2) generation were photochemically controllable. Liquid CH(2)Br(2) can be used not only as an organic solvent but also for the photoresponsive molecular storage of Br(2), which is of great technical benefit in a variety of organic syntheses and in materials science. By taking advantage of the in situ generation of Br(2) from the organic solvent itself, many organobromine compounds were synthesized in high practical yields with or without the addition of a catalyst. Herein, Br(2) that was generated by the photodecomposition of CH(2)Br(2) retained its reactivity in solution to undergo essentially the same reactions as those that were carried out with solutions of Br(2) dissolved in CH(2)Br(2) that were prepared without photoirradiation. Furthermore, HBr, which was generated during the course of the photodecomposition of CH(2)Br(2), was also available for the substitution of the OH group for the Br group and for the preparation of the HBr salts of amines. Furthermore, the photochemical generation of Br(2) from CH(2)Br(2) was available for the area-selective photochemical bleaching of natural colored plants, such as red rose petals, wherein Br(2) that was generated photochemically from CH(2)Br(2) was painted onto the petal to cause radical oxidations of the chromophoric anthocyanin molecules. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. MTR fuel testing in BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Verwimp, A.; Wirix, S.

    2000-01-01

    New fuel design for MTR 's requires to be qualified under representative conditions, that is geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermo hydraulic conditions. An irradiation device for fuel plates has been designed to derive the maximum benefit from the BR2 irradiation capacities. The fuel plates can be easily extracted from their support during a shutdown to undergo additional tests. One of these tests is the measurement of the thickness changes along the fuel plate. To that purpose, a facility in the reactor water pool has been designed to measure the fuel swelling with an accuracy of 5 μm using inductive probes. At SCK-CEN, the full range of destructive and non-destructive PIE can be performed, including γ-scanning, wet sipping, surface examination and other methods. (author)

  18. Scientific activities in support of the BR2 operation and irradiation programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major characteristics of the BR2 reactor is the fact that the core configuration is essentially variable. This allows to optimize the irradiation conditions of various experiments and to minimize the fuel consumption. In order to do that, BR2 has its own autonomous reactor physics cell. In order to allow for on-line measurements of the major irradiation parameters, BR2 has extended its own proven data acquisition system to serve this purpose. This system, called BIDASSE (for BR2 Integrated Data Acquisition System for Survey and Experiments), originally designed for the follow-up of all BR2 operational parameters, is since several years extensively used for experiments. The object rives of research at the BR2 are to evaluate and adjust provisional irradiation conditions by adjustments of the environment, axial and azimuthal positioning of the samples, global power level, ... ; to deliver reliable, well defined irradiation condition and fluence data during and after irradiation; to assist the designer of new irradiation devices by simulations and neutronic optimisations of design options and o provide the experimenters with accurate on-line information on the evolution of their ongoing irradiation projects

  19. The AGB bump: a calibrator for core mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossini Diego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of convection in stars affects many aspects of their evolution and remains one of the key-open questions in stellar modelling. In particular, the size of the mixed core in core-He-burning low-mass stars is still uncertain and impacts the lifetime of this evolutionary phase and, e.g., the C/O profile in white dwarfs. One of the known observables related to the Horizontal Branch (HB and Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB evolution is the AGB bump. Its luminosity depends on the position in mass of the helium-burning shell at its first ignition, that is affected by the extension of the central mixed region. In this preliminary work we show how various assumptions on near-core mixing and on the thermal stratification in the overshooting region affect the luminosity of the AGB bump, as well as the period spacing of gravity modes in core-He-burning models.

  20. Addition reaction of adamantylideneadamantane with Br2 and 2Br2: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shahidul M; Poirier, Raymond A

    2008-01-10

    Ab initio calculations were carried out for the reaction of adamantylideneadamantane (Ad=Ad) with Br2 and 2Br2. Geometries of the reactants, transition states, intermediates, and products were optimized at HF and B3LYP levels of theory using the 6-31G(d) basis set. Energies were also obtained using single point calculations at the MP2/6-31G(d)//HF/6-31G(d), MP2/6-31G(d)//B3LYP/6-31G(d), and B3LYP/6-31+G(d)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels of theory. Intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) calculations were performed to characterize the transition states on the potential energy surface. Only one pathway was found for the reaction of Ad=Ad with one Br2 producing a bromonium/bromide ion pair. Three mechanisms for the reaction of Ad=Ad with 2Br2 were found, leading to three different structural forms of the bromonium/Br3- ion pair. Activation energies, free energies, and enthalpies of activation along with the relative stability of products for each reaction pathway were calculated. The reaction of Ad=Ad with 2Br2 was strongly favored over the reaction with only one Br2. According to B3LYP/6-31G(d) and single point calculations at MP2, the most stable bromonium/Br3- ion pair would form spontaneously. The most stable of the three bromonium/Br3- ion pairs has a structure very similar to the observed X-ray structure. Free energies of activation and relative stabilities of reactants and products in CCl4 and CH2ClCH2Cl were also calculated with PCM using the united atom (UA0) cavity model and, in general, results similar to the gas phase were obtained. An optimized structure for the trans-1,2-dibromo product was also found at all levels of theory both in gas phase and in solution, but no transition state leading to the trans-1,2-dibromo product was obtained.

  1. Mixing core material into the envelopes of red grants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deupree, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion is presented of calculations of four core helium flashes in red giant stars. The starting point for these calculations is a point source explosion on the polar axis of a two-dimensional finite difference grid. The amount of residue of the core helium flash mixed into and above the hydrogen shell is calculated at four temperatures for the elements carbon, oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon, and sulfur. 7 refs., 1 tab

  2. Neutronics of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Hansen, G.E.

    1977-11-01

    The study was made to investigate the neutronic feasibility of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor. Three reactor concepts were studied: four- and seven-cell radial reactors and a seven-cell scallop reactor. The reactors were fueled with UF 6 (either U-233 or U-235) and various parameters were varied. A four-cell reactor is not practical nor is the U-235 fueled seven-cell radial reactor; however, the 7-cell U-233 radial and scallop reactors can satisfy all design criteria. The mixed flow gas core reactor is a very attractive reactor concept and warrants further investigation

  3. Monte Carlo modelling of the Belgian materials testing reactor BR2: present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboomen, B.; Aoust, Th.; Raedt, Ch. de; Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    A very detailed 3-D MCNP-4B model of the BR2 reactor was developed to perform all neutron and gamma calculations needed for the design of new experimental irradiation rigs. The Monte Carlo model of BR2 includes the nearly exact geometrical representation of fuel elements (now with their axially varying burn-up), of partially inserted control and regulating rods, of experimental devices and of radioisotope production rigs. The multiple level-geometry possibilities of MCNP-4B are fully exploited to obtain sufficiently flexible tools to cope with the very changing core loading. (orig.)

  4. In search of new neutrinos and dark matter. The return of fundamental research to BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A consortium of three French, two British, and four Flemish universities and research institutions, including the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN, started in 2014 on the construction of a neutrino experiment in the BR2 reactor. A reactor such as this is an extremely intense source of neutrinos: elementary particles that are generated as a by-product of nuclear beta decay. BR2 is particularly suitable with regard to carrying out this measurement because of the compact core, the high operating capacity, sufficient space for placing a fairly large detector, and the extremely low background radiation. The article discusses recent developments.

  5. A mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically. (author)

  6. Mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically

  7. Forced convection mixing transients in the MITR core tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Lin-Wen; Meyer, J.E.; Bernard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the results of forced convection mixing transient experiments that were studied in the core tank of the 5-MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) nuclear reactor as part of the studies being conducted to support a facility upgrade to 10 MW

  8. Supplemental Thermal-Hydraulic Transient Analyses of BR2 in Support of Conversion to LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The RELAP5/Mod 3.3 code has been used to perform transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. A RELAP5 model of BR2 has been validated against select transient BR2 reactor experiments performed in 1963 by showing agreement with measured cladding temperatures. Following the validation, the RELAP5 model was then updated to represent the current use of the reactor; taking into account core configuration, neutronic parameters, trip settings, component changes, etc. Simulations of the 1963 experiments were repeated with this updated model to re-evaluate the boiling risks associated with the currently allowed maximum heat flux limit of 470 W/cm2 and temporary heat flux limit of 600 W/cm2. This document provides analysis of additional transient simulations that are required as part of a modern BR2 safety analysis report (SAR). The additional simulations included in this report are effect of pool temperature, reduced steady-state flow rate, in-pool loss of coolant accidents, and loss of external cooling. The simulations described in this document have been performed for both an HEU- and LEU-fueled core.

  9. Inference of ICF Implosion Core Mix using Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Haynes, D.A.; Mancini, R.C.; Cooley, J.H.; Tommasini, R.; Golovkin, I.E.; Sherrill, M.E.; Haan, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model performed well in predicting trends in the width of the mix layer. With these results, we have contributed to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increased our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  10. Operation and Licensing of Mixed Cores in Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Nuclear fuel is a highly complex material that is subject to continuous development and is produced by a range of manufacturers. During operation of a nuclear power plant, the nuclear fuel is subject to extreme conditions of temperature, corroding environment and irradiation, and many different designs of fuel have been manufactured with differing fuel materials, cladding materials and assembly structure to ensure these conditions. The core of an operating power plant can contain hundreds of fuel assemblies, and where there is more than a single design of a fuel assembly in the core, whether through a change of fuel vendor, introduction of an improved design or for some other reason, the core is described as a mixed core. The task of ensuring that the different assembly types do not interact in a harmful manner, causing, for example, differing flow resistance resulting in under cooling, is an important part of ensuring nuclear safety. This report has compiled the latest information on the operational experience of mixed cores and the tools and techniques that are used to analyse the core operation and demonstrate that there are no safety related problems with its operation. This publication is a result of a technical meeting in 2011 and a series of consultants meetings

  11. Thermodynamic assessment of EuBr2 unary and LiBr-EuBr2 and NaBr-EuBr2 binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Weiping; Gaune-Escard, Marcelle

    2009-01-01

    As a basis for the design and development of molten salt mixtures, thermodynamic calculations of the phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties were carried out on the EuBr 2 unary and LiBr-EuBr 2 and NaBr-EuBr 2 binary systems over a wide temperature and composition range, respectively. The Gibbs energy of EuBr 2 was evaluated using an independent polynomial to fit the experimental heat capacity, the thermodynamic parameters for each phase in the LiBr-EuBr 2 and NaBr-EuBr 2 systems were optimized by using available experimental information on phase diagrams. A regular substitutional solution model for the liquid phase and Neumann-Kopp rule for the stoichiometric compound LiEu 2 Br 5 were adopted to reproduce the experimental data with reasonable excess Gibbs energy. Comparisons between the calculated phase diagrams and thermodynamic quantities show that all reliable experimental information is satisfactorily accounted for by the present thermodynamic description. Some thermodynamic properties were predicted to check the suitability of the present calculation.

  12. Experience with mixed cores in the IRR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilat, J.; Hirshfeld, H.; Wiener, A.

    1985-01-01

    Over twenty mixed core configurations composed of 'old' (18 curved plate) and 'new' 23 flat plate) MTR type fuel elements were irradiated in the IRR-1 swimming pool reactor. The number of 'new' fuel elements in the core varied from one to twenty. To establish the safety of these configurations, thermohydraulic calculations were carried out to derive the maximum allowed hot channel power, determined by the onset of flow instabilities. A core is considered safe if its hot channel power, obtained from a two-dimensional neutronic calculation of power distribution in the core, does not exceed the maximum allowed value. The conservative nature of the assumptions used in the above safety evaluation procedure was verified by measurements of pressure drops vs. coolant flow rates as well as of temperature and neutron flux distributions. (author)

  13. Introduction of mixed oxide fuel elements in the belgian cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, A.F.; Hollasky, N.A.

    1994-01-01

    The important amount of plutonium recovered from the reprocessing of spent fuel on the one hand, the national and international experience of the use of mixed oxide UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel in power reactors on the other hand, have led Belgian utilities to decide the introduction of Mixed-Oxide fuel in Doel unit 3 and Tihange unit 2 cores. The 'MOX' project has shown that it was possible without reducing safety or requiring modifications of the plant equipment. It has been approved by the Belgian 'Nuclear Safety Commission'. (authors). 1 tab., 2 figs

  14. Neutronic design of mixed oxide-silicide cores for the core conversion of rsg-gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Tukiran; Pinem surian; Febrianto

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of rsg-gas reactor from an all-oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) core, through a series of mixed oxide-silicide core, to an all-silicide (U 3 Si 2 -Al) core for the same meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is in progress. The conversion is first step of the step-wise conversion and will be followed by the second step that is the core conversion from low meat density of silicide core, through a series of mixed lower-higher density of silicide core, to an all-higher meat density of 3.55 g/cc core. Therefore, the objectives of this work is to design the mixed cores on the neutronic performance to achieve safety a first full-silicide core for the reactor with the low uranium meat density of 2.96gU/cc. The neutronic design of the mixed cores was performed by means of Batan-EQUIL-2D and Batan-3DIFF computer codes for 2 and 3 dimension diffusion calculation, respectively. The result shows that all mixed oxide-silicide cores will be feasible to achieve safety a fist full-silicide core. The core performs the same neutronic core parameters as those of the equilibrium silicide core. Therefore, the reactor availability and utilization during the core conversion is not changed

  15. Zn2(TeO3Br2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Johnsson

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of dizinc tellurium dibromide trioxide, Zn2(TeO3Br2, were synthesized via a transport reaction in sealed evacuated silica tubes. The compound has a layered crystal structure in which the building units are [ZnO4Br] distorted square pyramids, [ZnO2Br2] distorted tetrahedra, and [TeO3E] tetrahedra (E being the 5s2 lone pair of Te4+ joined through sharing of edges and corners to form layers of no net charge. Bromine atoms and tellurium lone pairs protrude from the surfaces of each layer towards adjacent layers. This new compound Zn2(TeO3Br2 is isostructural with the synthetic compounds Zn2(TeO3Cl2, CuZn(TeO32, Co2(TeO3Br2 and the mineral sophiite, Zn2(SeO3Cl2.

  16. Life extension of the BR2 aluminium vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, R.; Verwerft, M.; Raedt, C. de; Winckel, S. van; Wacquier, W.; Dadoumont, J.; Verwimp, A.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor has recently undergone a major refurbishment comprising the replacement of all vessel internals. The vessel itself however was not replaced. An important requalification programme has been executed to prove that the vessel would remain fit during the contemplated life extension period of BR2. Representative material samples could be obtained from the shroud surrounding the vessel. A comprehensive in-service inspection was carried out and a vessel surveillance programme has been established. (author)

  17. The influence of core materials and mix on the performance of a 100 kVA three phase transformer core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David E-mail: dave.snell@cogent-power.com; Coombs, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Various grades of grain-oriented electrical steel, and the effect of mixing domain refined and non-domain refined materials in the same three phase transformer core have been assessed using a developed computer-based test system. Ball unit domain refined material and non-domain refined material can be successfully mixed in the same core, without degrading performance.

  18. Oxidation mechanisms of CF2Br2 and CH2Br2 induced by air nonthermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiorlin, Milko; Marotta, Ester; Dal Molin, Marta; Paradisi, Cristina

    2013-01-02

    Oxidation mechanisms in air nonthermal plasma (NTP) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were investigated in a corona reactor energized by +dc, -dc, or +pulsed high voltage.. The two bromomethanes CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) were chosen as model organic pollutants because of their very different reactivities with OH radicals. Thus, they served as useful mechanistic probes: they respond differently to the presence of humidity in the air and give different products. By FT-IR analysis of the postdischarge gas the following products were detected and quantified: CO(2) and CO in the case of CH(2)Br(2), CO(2) and F(2)C ═ O in the case of CF(2)Br(2). F(2)C ═ O is a long-lived oxidation intermediate due to its low reactivity with atmospheric radicals. It is however removed from the NTP processed gas by passage through a water scrubber resulting in hydrolysis to CO(2) and HF. Other noncarbon containing products of the discharge were also monitored by FT-IR analysis, including HNO(3) and N(2)O. Ozone, an important product of air NTP, was never detected in experiments with CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) because of the highly efficient ozone depleting cycles catalyzed by BrOx species formed from the bromomethanes. It is concluded that, regardless of the type of corona applied, CF(2)Br(2) reacts in air NTP via a common intermediate, the CF(2)Br radical. The possible reactions leading to this radical are discussed, including, for -dc activation, charge exchange with O(2)(-), a species detected by APCI mass spectrometry.

  19. Ageing management of the BR2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verpoortem, J. R.; Van Dyck, S.

    2014-01-01

    At the Belgian nuclear research centre (SCK.CEN) several test reactors are operated. Among these, Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is the largest Material Test Reactor (MTR). This water-cooled, beryllium moderated reactor with a maximum thermal power of 100 MW became operational in 1962. Except for two major refurbishment campaigns of one year each, this reactor has been operated continuously over the past 50 years, with a frequency of 5-12 cycles per year. At present, BR2 is used for different research activities, the production of medical isotopes, the production of n-doped silicon and various training and education activities. (Author)

  20. Fuel characteristics needed for optimal operation of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Beeckmans, A.; Gubel, P.

    1998-01-01

    The standard BR2 fuel element contains 400 g 235 U under the form of UAl x with burnable absorbers homogeneously mixed into the fuel meat. The uranium is highly enriched with a density of ∼1.30 g U/cm 3 . This fuel element was developed in the early seventies to satisfy the irradiation conditions required by many experimental programmes: large reactivity available, cycle length, hard neutron spectrum, limited motion of the control rods during the cycle thereby stabilizing the irradiation conditions. Another benefit is the reduction of the fuel consumption by increasing the burnup at discharge. BR2 has recently been restarted after the completion of an important refurbishment programme. Future utilization will again be concentrated on engineering R and D in the field of nuclear fuels, materials and safety, and on radioisotope production. Therefore the required irradiation conditions and the corresponding fuel characteristics remain essentially the same as in the past. (author)

  1. PULSTRI-1 computer program for mixed core pulse calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Dimic, V.

    1990-01-01

    PUISTRI-1 is a computer code designed for calculations of the pulse parameters of TRIGA Mark II reactor with mixed core. The code is provided with data for four types of fuel elements: standard 8.5 and 12 w/o, LEU and FLIP. The pulse parameters, such as maximum power, prompt pulse energy and average fuel temperatures are calculated in adiabatic point kinetics, approximation, modified by taking into account temperature dependence of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient and thermal capacity factor averaged over all elements in the core. Maximal fuel temperature at power peaking location is calculated from total released energy using total power peaking factor and heat capacity of the element at the location of the power peaking. Results of the code were compared to data found in references (mainly General Atomics safety analysis reports) showing good agreement for all main pulse parameters. The most important parameters, average and maximal fuel temperature, are found to be systematically slightly overpredicted (20 C and 50 C, respectively). Other parameters (energy, peak power, width) agree within ± 10 % to the reference values. The code is written in FORTRAN for IBM PC computer. The input is user friendly. running time of IBM PC AT is a few seconds. It is designed for practical applications in pulse experiments as an analytical tool for predicting pulse parameters. (orig.)

  2. Zn2(TeO3)Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Johnsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    Single crystals of dizinc tellurium dibromide trioxide, Zn2(TeO3)Br2, were synthesized via a transport reaction in sealed evacuated silica tubes. The compound has a layered crystal structure in which the building units are [ZnO4Br] distorted square pyramids, [ZnO2Br2] distorted tetra­hedra, and [TeO3 E] tetra­hedra (E being the 5s 2 lone pair of Te4+) joined through sharing of edges and corners to form layers of no net charge. Bromine atoms and tellurium lone pairs protrude from the surfaces of each layer towards adjacent layers. This new compound Zn2(TeO3)Br2 is isostructural with the synthetic compounds Zn2(TeO3)Cl2, CuZn(TeO3)2, Co2(TeO3)Br2 and the mineral sophiite, Zn2(SeO3)Cl2. PMID:21202162

  3. Reactivity effects due to beryllium poisoning of BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Ponsard, B.; Koonen, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates the impact of the poisoning of the beryllium reflector on reactivity variations of the Belgian MTR BR2 in SCK.CEN. Detailed calculations by MCNP-4C of reactivity effects caused by strong neutron absorbers 3 He and 6 Li during reactor operation history are presented. The importance of beryllium poisoning for the accuracy of reactivity predictions is discussed. (authors)

  4. RESONANCE CARS IN BR2 MOLECULES AND BR-ATOMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, I.; Levelt, P.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hogervorst, W.

    1991-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced CARS processes were studied in molecular bromine. On the basis of the known spectroscopic constants of the two electronic states involved, the features in the spectra could be identified. CARS signals from Br-atoms produced from dissociation of Br2 were obtained by tuning (omega-1

  5. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Optically pumped ultraviolet BR2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Kozlov, N. P.; Protasov, Yu S.; Ushmarov, E. Yu

    1989-12-01

    A report is given of lasing achieved for the first time in optically pumped molecular bromine (D' 3Π2g→A' 3π2u, λL approx 292 nm). It was pumped by thermal vacuum ultraviolet radiation emitted by plasmadynamic discharges of magnetoplasma compressors, formed directly in the laser active medium. An output energy of ~ 1.1 J was obtained per laser pulse of ~ 5-μs duration from a Br2:Ar approx 1:450 active mixture at a pressure of ~ 4 atm. A comparison was made of the experimental output parameters of optically pumped Br2, I2, and XeF (B-X) lasers when their geometries and excitation energies were identical.

  6. Refurbishment of BR2 (Phase 4 and 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Van der Auwera, J.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive refurbishment of the BR-2 materials testing reactor should allow another 10 to 15 years of continued operation. The refurbishment programme is required in order to comply with modern safety standards, to enhance the reliability of operation, and to compensate for the ageing of the installations of a facility that has reached about 35 years of intensive service. The main objectives and achievements of phase 4 and 5 are described

  7. Refurbishment of BR2 (Phases 4 and 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Van Der Auwera, J.

    1998-01-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In phase 4 of the refurbishment programme, various activities were performed to allow reactor start-up. In phase 5, remaining refurbishment works were carried out as well as the extra studies and upgradings required by the licensing authorities. Major achievements in 1997 are described and discussed

  8. Refurbishment of BR2 (Phases 4 and 5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P; Dekeyser, J; Van Der Auwera, J

    1998-07-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In phase 4 of the refurbishment programme, various activities were performed to allow reactor start-up. In phase 5, remaining refurbishment works were carried out as well as the extra studies and upgradings required by the licensing authorities. Major achievements in 1997 are described and discussed.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic mixing in the split-core ANS reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorning, R.J.J.

    1988-01-01

    A design has been proposed for the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor that incorporates a split core, one purpose of which is to create a mixing plenum between the upper and lower cores. It was hoped that in addition to introducing various desirable neutronics features, such as decreasing the fast neutron flux contamination of thermal and cold neutron beams located in the reactor midplane, this mixing plenum would make possible higher operating powers by lowering the maximum core temperature. This lower temperature was to be achieved as a result of the mixing, of the hot D 2 O coolant exiting the upper-core channels, and the cold D 2 O leaving the large upper core bypass. It was expected that this mixing would bring about a significantly reduced lower core maximum coolant inlet temperature. The authors have carried out large-scale computer calculations to determine the extent to which this mixing occurs in current split-core design geometry, which does not incorporate baffles, mixing devices, or other design features introduced to enhance mixing. The large-scale self-consistent calculations summarized here indicate that innovative design ideas to enhance mixing will be necessary if the split-core concept is to achieve the amount of thermal mixing needed to make possible significantly higher power operation and corresponding higher flux sources

  10. Spent fuel strategy for the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.; Collard, G.

    1998-01-01

    The Belgian MTR reactor is fuelled with HEU UAl x elements and the fuel cycle was normally closed by reprocessing consecutively in Belgium (Eurochemic), France (Marcoule) and finally in the U.S.A. (Idaho Falls and Savannah River). When the acceptance of spent fuel by the U.S. was terminated, the facility was left with a huge backlog of used elements stored under water. After a few years, urgent and mandatory actions were required to maintain the BR2 facility operating. Later the accent was put on the evaluation of an optimum long term solution for the BR2 spent fuel during the projected 15 years life extension after the refurbishment executed between 1995 and 1997. The paper gives an overview of these successive actions taken during the last years as well as the handled various criteria for comparing and evaluating the available long-term alternatives. After commitment to reprocessing in existing facilities operated for aluminum fuels the focus of the BR2 fuel cycle strategy is now moving to the procurement of the necessary HEU fuel for securing the long-term operation of the facility. (author)

  11. Optimized Control Rods of the BR2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, E.

    2007-01-01

    At the present time the BR-2 reactor uses control elements with cadmium as neutron absorbing part. The lower section of the control element is a beryllium assembly cooled by light water. Due to the burn up of the lower end of the cadmium section during the reactor operation, the presently used rods for reactivity control of the BR-2 reactor have to be replaced by new ones. Considered are various types Control Rods with full active part of the following materials: cadmium (Cd), hafnium (Hf), europium oxide (Eu2O3) and gadolinium (Gd2O3). Options to decrease the burn up of the control rod material in the hot spot, such as use of stainless steel in the lower active part of the Control Rod are discussed. Comparison with the characteristics of the presently used Control Rods types is performed. The changing of the characteristics of different types Control Rods and the perturbation effects on the reactor neutronics during the BR-2 fuel cycle are investigated. The burn up of the Control Rod absorbing material, total and differential control rods worth, macroscopic and effective microscopic absorption cross sections, fuel and reactivity evolution are evaluated during approximately 30 operating cycles.

  12. Optimized Control Rods of the BR2 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, E.

    2007-09-15

    At the present time the BR-2 reactor uses control elements with cadmium as neutron absorbing part. The lower section of the control element is a beryllium assembly cooled by light water. Due to the burn up of the lower end of the cadmium section during the reactor operation, the presently used rods for reactivity control of the BR-2 reactor have to be replaced by new ones. Considered are various types Control Rods with full active part of the following materials: cadmium (Cd), hafnium (Hf), europium oxide (Eu2O3) and gadolinium (Gd2O3). Options to decrease the burn up of the control rod material in the hot spot, such as use of stainless steel in the lower active part of the Control Rod are discussed. Comparison with the characteristics of the presently used Control Rods types is performed. The changing of the characteristics of different types Control Rods and the perturbation effects on the reactor neutronics during the BR-2 fuel cycle are investigated. The burn up of the Control Rod absorbing material, total and differential control rods worth, macroscopic and effective microscopic absorption cross sections, fuel and reactivity evolution are evaluated during approximately 30 operating cycles.

  13. Loss-of-Flow and Loss-of-Pressure Simulations of the BR2 Research Reactor with HEU and LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor core of BR2 is located inside a pressure vessel that contains 79 channels in a hyperboloid configuration. The core configuration is highly variable as each channel can contain a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Because of this variability, a representative core configuration, based on current reactor use, has been defined for the fuel conversion analyses. The code RELAP5/Mod 3.3 was used to perform the transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. The input model has been modernized relative to that historically used at BR2 taking into account the best modeling practices developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and BR2 engineers.

  14. Development of two mix model postprocessors for the investigation of shell mix in indirect drive implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Haynes, D. A.; Haan, S. W.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of shell mix in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores is an important characteristic. Mixing in this experimental regime is primarily due to hydrodynamic instabilities, such as Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov, which can affect implosion dynamics. Two independent theoretical mix models, Youngs' model and the Haan saturation model, were used to estimate the level of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in a series of indirect drive experiments. The models were used to predict the radial width of the region containing mixed fuel and shell materials. The results for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing provided by Youngs' model are considered to be a lower bound for the mix width, while those generated by Haan's model incorporate more experimental characteristics and consequently have larger mix widths. These results are compared with an independent experimental analysis, which infers a larger mix width based on all instabilities and effects captured in the experimental data

  15. General outline of the operation and utilization of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Leonard, F.; Gandolfo, J.M.; Lenders, H.

    1978-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is a high-flux material testing reactor of the thermal heterogeneous type. The fuel is 93% 235 U enriched uranium in the form of plates clad in aluminium. The moderator consists of beryllium and light water, the water being pressurized (12.5kg/cm 2 )and acting also as coolant. The pressure vessel is of aluminium, and is placed in a pool of demineralized water. One should stress the following main features of the design: the experimental channels are skew, the tube bundle presenting the form of a hyperboloid of revolution (see figure 1)-this gives easy access at the top and bottom reactor covers allowing complex instrumented devices, while maintaining a very high neutron flux at the core; great flexibilty of utilization, due to the fact that it is possible to adapt the core configuration to the experimental loading as the fissile charge can be centred on different experimental channels; although BR2 is a thermal reactor, it is possible to achieve neutron spectra very similar to those obtained in a fast reactor, either by the use of absorbing screens or by the use of fissile material within the experimental device; five 200mm diameter channels are available for loading large experimental irradiation devices, as in-pile sodium, gas or water loops. (author)

  16. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  17. Refurbishment of BR2 (Phases 4 and 5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Van Der Auwera, J

    1998-07-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In phase 4 of the refurbishment programme, various activities were performed to allow reactor start-up. In phase 5, remaining refurbishment works were carried out as well as the extra studies and upgradings required by the licensing authorities. Major achievements in 1997 are described and discussed.

  18. The BR2 refurbishment: from concept to achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is one of the major research reactors in the world. It's operation started in the early 1960's. Two major refurbishments operation have been carried out since then. The report gives an overview of the methodology and inspections, which resulted in a refurbishment action plan. The main realizations and complementary actions required by the Licensing Authorities are summarized. Finally the operation experience feedback, four years now after start-up, is briefly discussed as well as the main aspects of the present safety reassessment [ru

  19. The probability safety assessment impact on the BR2 refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouleur, Yvan

    1995-01-01

    The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) study has proven its worth by establishing a sensitive safety screening of the reactor. It has focused engineering forces to technically improve safety systems and to measure the influence of functional modifications. In the future, the project will be developed in a living way, to reinforce the present structure along with continuous safety monitoring of the reactor and to develop engineers and operators safety skills. This paper presents the PSA impact on the BR2 (Belgian Reactor Two) refurbishment. (author)

  20. Matrix isolation and computational study of isodifluorodibromomethane (F2CBr-Br): a route to Br2 formation in CF2Br2 photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Lisa; Kalume, Aimable; El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Tarnovsky, Alexander; Reid, Scott A

    2010-02-28

    The photolysis products of dibromodifluoromethane (CF(2)Br(2)) were characterized by matrix isolation infrared and UV/Visible spectroscopy, supported by ab initio calculations. Photolysis at wavelengths of 240 and 266 nm of CF(2)Br(2):Ar samples (approximately 1:5000) held at approximately 5 K yielded iso-CF(2)Br(2) (F(2)CBrBr), a weakly bound isomer of CF(2)Br(2), which is characterized here for the first time. The observed infrared and UV/Visible absorptions of iso-CF(2)Br(2) are in excellent agreement with computational predictions at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Single point energy calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level on the B3LYP optimized geometries suggest that the isoform is a minimum on the CF(2)Br(2) potential energy surface, lying some 55 kcal/mol above the CF(2)Br(2) ground state. The energies of various stationary points on the CF(2)Br(2) potential energy surface were characterized computationally; taken with our experimental results, these show that iso-CF(2)Br(2) is an intermediate in the Br+CF(2)Br-->CF(2)+Br(2) reaction. The photochemistry of the isoform was also investigated; excitation into the intense 359 nm absorption band resulted in isomerization to CF(2)Br(2). Our results are discussed in view of the rich literature on the gas-phase photochemistry of CF(2)Br(2), particularly with respect to the existence of a roaming atom pathway leading to molecular products.

  1. Matrix isolation and computational study of isodifluorodibromomethane (F2CBr-Br): A route to Br2 formation in CF2Br2 photolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Lisa; Kalume, Aimable; Reid, Scott A.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Tarnovsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The photolysis products of dibromodifluoromethane (CF 2 Br 2 ) were characterized by matrix isolation infrared and UV/Visible spectroscopy, supported by ab initio calculations. Photolysis at wavelengths of 240 and 266 nm of CF 2 Br 2 :Ar samples (∼1:5000) held at ∼5 K yielded iso-CF 2 Br 2 (F 2 CBrBr), a weakly bound isomer of CF 2 Br 2 , which is characterized here for the first time. The observed infrared and UV/Visible absorptions of iso-CF 2 Br 2 are in excellent agreement with computational predictions at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Single point energy calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level on the B3LYP optimized geometries suggest that the isoform is a minimum on the CF 2 Br 2 potential energy surface, lying some 55 kcal/mol above the CF 2 Br 2 ground state. The energies of various stationary points on the CF 2 Br 2 potential energy surface were characterized computationally; taken with our experimental results, these show that iso-CF 2 Br 2 is an intermediate in the Br+CF 2 Br→CF 2 +Br 2 reaction. The photochemistry of the isoform was also investigated; excitation into the intense 359 nm absorption band resulted in isomerization to CF 2 Br 2 . Our results are discussed in view of the rich literature on the gas-phase photochemistry of CF 2 Br 2 , particularly with respect to the existence of a roaming atom pathway leading to molecular products.

  2. Double-wall carbon nanotubes doped with different Br2 doping levels: a resonance Raman study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Gustavo M; Hou, Taige; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Akuzawa, Noboru; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the effects of different Br2 doping levels on the radial breathing modes of "double-wall carbon nanotube (DWNT) buckypaper". The resonance Raman profile of the Br2 bands are shown for different DWNT configurations with different Br2 doping levels. Near the maximum intensity of the resonance Raman profile, mainly the Br2 molecules adsorbed on the DWNT surface contribute strongly to the observed omega(Br-Br) Raman signal.

  3. Face/core interface fracture characterization of mixed mode bending sandwich specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    and PVC H45, H100 and H250 foam core materials were evaluated. A methodology to perform precracking on fracture specimens in order to achieve a sharp and representative crack front is outlined. The mixed mode loading was controlled in the mixed mode bending (MMB) test rig by changing the loading......Debonding of the core from the face sheets is a critical failure mode in sandwich structures. This paper presents an experimental study on face/core debond fracture of foam core sandwich specimens under a wide range of mixed mode loading conditions. Sandwich beams with E‐glass fibre face sheets...... application point (lever arm distance). Finite element analysis was performed to determine the mode‐mixity at the crack tip. The results showed that the face/core interface fracture toughness increased with increased mode II loading. Post failure analysis of the fractured specimens revealed that the crack...

  4. Theoretical investigation of the Te4Br2 molecule in ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfgen, Roman; Holloczki, Oldamur; Ray, Promit; Kirchner, Barbara; Groh, Matthias F.; Ruck, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Material synthesis in ionic liquids, at or near room temperature, is currently a subject of immense academic interest. In order to illuminate molecular-level details and the underlying chemistry, we carried out molecular simulations of a single Te 4 Br 2 molecule dissolved in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, as well as in the ionic liquid mixed with aluminum chloride. Although the ethyl side chain is much too short to show detailed microheterogeneity, significant structuring with the small chloride anions is seen in case of the pure ionic liquid. In the case of the mixture, formation of larger anionic clusters is distinctly observed and analyzed. Due to the tendency of ionic liquids to dissociate, there is a pronounced shift to elongated Te-Br distances in both investigated solvents. However, only in the AlCl 3 -containing liquid, we observe the reaction of the open chain-like Te 4 Br 2 molecule to a closed square-like Te 4 Br + and AlCl 3 Br - ion. The molecular arrangement of the [Te 4 ] 2+ unit shows negligible deviation from that in the experimental crystal structure. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. 248 nm photolysis of CH2Br2 by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: Br2 molecular elimination at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pei-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Ping; Lee, Wei-Bin; Hu, Zhengfa; Huang, Hong-Yi; Lin, King-Chuen; Chen, K T; Chang, A H H

    2006-10-07

    Following photodissociation of CH2Br2 at 248 nm, Br2 molecular elimination is detected by using a tunable laser beam, as crossed perpendicular to the photolyzing laser beam in a ring-down cell, probing the Br2 fragment in the B 3Piou+ -X 1Sigmag+ transition. The nascent vibrational population is obtained, yielding a population ratio of Br2(v = 1)Br2(v = 0) to be 0.7 +/- 0.2. The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.2 +/- 0.1. Nevertheless, when CH2Br2 is prepared in a supersonic molecular beam under cold temperature, photofragmentation gives no Br2 detectable in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, a plausible pathway is proposed. Upon excitation to the 1B1 or 3B1 state, C-Br bond elongation may change the molecular symmetry of Cs and enhance the resultant 1 1,3A'-X 1A' (or 1 1,3B1-X 1A1 as C2v is used) coupling to facilitate the process of internal conversion, followed by asynchronous concerted photodissociation. Temperature dependence measurements lend support to the proposed pathway.

  6. Br2 elimination in 248-nm photolysis of CF2Br2 probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Yi; Huang, Hong-Yi; Lin, King-Chuen

    2005-10-01

    By using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy technique, we have observed the channel of Br2 molecular elimination following photodissociation of CF2Br2 at 248 nm. A tunable laser beam, which is crossed perpendicular to the photolyzing laser beam in a ring-down cell, is used to probe the Br2 fragment in the B 3Piou+-X1Sigmag+ transition. The vibrational population is obtained in a nascent state, despite ring-down time as long as 500-1000 ns. The population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is determined to be 0.4+/-0.2, slightly larger than the value of 0.22 evaluated by Boltzmann distribution at room temperature. The quantum yield of the Br2 elimination reaction is also measured to be 0.04+/-0.01. This work provides direct evidence to support molecular elimination occurring in the CF2Br2 photodissociation and proposes a plausible pathway with the aid of ab initio potential-energy calculations. CF2Br2 is excited probably to the 1B1 and 3B2 states at 248 nm. As the C-Br bond is elongated upon excitation, the coupling of the 1A'(1B1) state to the high vibrational levels of the ground state X 1A'(1A1) may be enhanced to facilitate the process of internal conversion. After transition, the highly vibrationally excited CF2Br2 feasibly surpasses a transition barrier prior to decomposition. According to the ab initio calculations, the transition state structure tends to correlate with the intermediate state CF2Br+Br(CF2Br...Br) and the products CF2+Br2. A sequential photodissociation pathway is thus favored. That is, a single C-Br bond breaks, and then the free-Br atom moves to form a Br-Br bond, followed by the Br2 elimination. The formed Br-Br bond distance in the transition state tends to approach equilibrium such that the Br2 fragment may be populated in cold vibrational distribution. Observation of a small vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)Br2(v=0) agrees with the proposed mechanism.

  7. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor mixed-core have been calculated. ► Burn-up effect on TRR kinetics parameters has been studied. ► Replacement of LEU-CFE with HEU-CFE in the TRR core has been investigated. ► Results of each mixed core were compared to the reference core. ► Calculation of kinetic parameters are necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. - Abstract: In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR P C package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change

  8. Use of highly enriched uranium in the material testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1979-05-01

    In the material testing reactor BR2, the use of highly enriched uranium is determined by the consideration of the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron flux effectively available for the experimental devices. The choice of the core configuration is defined by combining the localisation of the experimental devices and of fuel elements of various burnup, such as to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the experimental load, compatible with an economic use of the fuel elements and safe operation of the reactor. Taking into account the present manufacturing technology for MTR fuels (37 Wt % uranium density in the fuel meat) the highly enriched uranium cannot be avoided; if higher concentration of uranium could be realised by some new manufacturing technology, the 235 U density of fuel elements at elimination should be kept at the required level and the enrichment could be reduced accordingly

  9. Use of highly enriched uranium in the material testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1979-05-01

    In the material testing reactor BR2, the use of highly enriched uranium is determined by the consideration of the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron flux effectively available for the experimental devices. The choice of the core configuration is defined by combining the localisation of the experimental devices and of fuel elements of various burnup, such as to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the experimental load, compatible with an economic use of the fuel elements and safe operation of the reactor. Taking into account the present manufacturing technology for MTR fuels (37 Wt % uranium density in the fuel meat) the highly enriched uranium cannot be avoided: if higher concentration of uranium could be realised by some new manufacturing technology, the 235 U density of fuel elements at elimination should be kept at the required level and the enrichment could be reduced accordingly. (author)

  10. Experimental Irradiations of Materials and Fuels in the BR2 Reactor: An Overview of Current Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.; Koonen, E.; Verwerft, M.; Wéber, M.

    2013-01-01

    The BR2 material test reactor offers a variety of experimental irradiation possibilities for testing of materials, fuels and instruments. The current paper gives an overview of the recent and ongoing programmes in order to illustrate the experimental potential of the reactor. Three domains of applications are reviewed: Irradiation of materials and fuels for pressurised water reactors (PWR); irradiation of materials for accelerator driven systems (ADS), cooled by liquid lead alloys; and irradiation of fuel for Material Test Reactors (MTR). For PWR relevant tests, a dedicated loop is available, providing a full simulation of the thermo hydraulic conditions of a PWR. ADS related tests require particular control of the irradiation environment and the necessary safety precautions in order to avoid 210 Po contamination. In-core mechanical testing of materials is done in comparison and complimentarily to post-irradiation examinations in order to assess flux related effects on the deformation behaviour of materials. (author)

  11. Qualification of the on-line power determination of fuel elements in irradiation devices in the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Dekeyser, J.; Gouat, P.; Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Verwimp, A.; Weber, M.

    2005-01-01

    Fuel irradiation tests require an on-line monitoring of the fuel power. In the BR2 reactor, this is performed by continuously measuring the enthalpy change in the coolant of the irradiation device and complementing this information with data on power losses, heating of structure parts and spatial power profiles from mock-up test experiments and from calculations. Since a few years Monte Carlo codes (MCNP) are used, describing the BR2 core in great detail for every reactor cycle with its specific core load, yielding not only reliable relative values, but also calculated absolute local power values in agreement with data from PIE analyses. Several methods were conceived to combine the experimental and calculated data for the on-line calculation of the local linear power in the fuel elements; their internal consistency and the consistency with gamma spectroscopy data and data from radiochemical fission product analysis was checked. The data show that fuel irradiations in BR2 can be performed in a well-controlled way, with an accurate and reliable on-line follow-up of the fuel power. (author)

  12. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  13. Face/core debond fatigue crack growth characterization using the sandwich mixed mode bending specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manca, Marcello; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Face/core fatigue crack growth in foam-cored sandwich composites is examined using the mixed mode bending (MMB) test method. The mixed mode loading at the debond crack tip is controlled by changing the load application point in the MMB test fixture. Sandwich specimens were manufactured using H45...... and H100 PVC foam cores and E-glass/polyester face sheets. All specimens were pre-cracked in order to define a sharp crack front. The static debond fracture toughness for each material configuration was measured at different mode-mixity phase angles. Fatigue tests were performed at 80% of the static...

  14. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Kalcheva, S. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Sikik, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Koonen, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  15. Steering dissociation of Br2 molecules with two femtosecond pulses via wave packet interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Hu, Wen-Hui; Yan, Tian-Min; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2008-04-07

    The dissociation dynamics of Br2 molecules induced by two femtosecond pump pulses are studied based on the calculation of time-dependent quantum wave packet. Perpendicular transition from X 1Sigma g+ to A 3Pi 1u+ and 1Pi 1u+ and parallel transition from X 1Sigma g+ to B 3Pi 0u+, involving two product channels Br (2P3/2)+Br (2P3/2) and Br (2P3/2)+Br* (2P1/2), respectively, are taken into account. Two pump pulses create dissociating wave packets interfering with each other. By varying laser parameters, the interference of dissociating wave packets can be controlled, and the dissociation probabilities of Br2 molecules on the three excited states can be changed to different degrees. The branching ratio of Br*/(Br+Br*) is calculated as a function of pulse delay time and phase difference.

  16. The BR2 materials testing reactor. Past, ongoing and under-study upgradings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baugnet, J M; Roedt, Ch de; Gubel, P; Koonen, E [Centre d' Etude de I' Energie Nucleaire, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, C.E.N./S.C.K., Mol (Belgium)

    1990-05-01

    The BR2 reactor (Mol, Belgium) is a high-flux materials testing reactor. The fuel is 93% {sup 235}U enriched uranium. The nominal power ranges from 60 to 100 MW. The main features of the design are the following: 1) maximum neutron flux, thermal: 1.2 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} s; fast (E > 0.1 MeV) : 8.4 x 10{sup 14} n /cm{sup 2} s; 2) great flexibility of utilization: the core configuration and operation mode can be adapted to the experimental loading; 3) neutron spectrum tailoring; 4) availability of five 200 mm diameter channels besides the standard channels (84 mm diameter); 5) access to the top and bottom covers of the reactor authorizing the irradiation of loops. The reactor is used to study the behaviour of fuel elements and structural materials intended for future nuclear power stations of several types (fission and fusion). Irradiations are carried out in connection with performance tests up to very high burn-up or neutron fluence as well as for safety experiments, power cycling experiments, and generally speaking, tests under off-normal conditions. Irradiations for nuclear transmutation (production of high specific activity radio-isotopes and transplutonium elements), neutron-radiography, use of beam tubes for physics studies, and gamma irradiations are also carried out. The BR2 is used in support of Belgian programs, at the request of utilities, industry and universities and in the framework of international agreements. The paper reviews the past and ongoing upgrading and enhancement of reactor capabilities as well as those under study or consideration, namely with regard to: reactor equipment, fuel elements, irradiation facilities, reactor operation conditions and long-term strategy. (author)

  17. Br2 induced oxidative pore modification of a porous coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki

    2016-01-14

    Iodinated pores of a Zn-based coordination network were modified by Br2 oxidation to produce brominated pores in a polycrystalline-to-polycrystalline manner while maintaining the same network topology. Ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the brominated pore can trap Br2 or I2 by strong σ/π-type interactions. A kinetic study in solution revealed that the pore modification by Br2 oxidation is much faster than the Br2 encapsulation process.

  18. Contributions of BrCl, Br2, BrOCl, Br2O, and HOBr to regiospecific bromination rates of anisole and bromoanisoles in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivey, John D; Bickley, Mark A; Victor, Daniel A

    2015-04-21

    When bromide-containing waters are chlorinated, conventional wisdom typically assumes HOBr is the only active brominating agent. Several additional and often-overlooked brominating agents (including BrCl, Br2, BrOCl, Br2O) can form in chlorinated waters, albeit at generally lower concentrations than HOBr. The extent to which these additional brominating agents influence bromination rates of disinfection byproduct precursors is, however, poorly understood. Herein, the influence of BrCl, Br2, BrOCl, Br2O, and HOBr toward rates of sequential bromination of anisole was quantified. Conditions affecting bromine speciation (e.g., pH, concentrations of chloride, bromide, and chlorine) were varied, and regiospecific second-order rate constants were calculated for reactions of each brominating agent with anisole, 2-bromoanisole, and 4-bromoanisole. The regioselectivity of anisole bromination changed with pH, consistent with the participation of more than one brominating agent. Under conditions representative of chlorinated drinking water, contributions to bromination rates decreased as BrCl > BrOCl > HOBr > Br2O (Br2 negligible). The second-order rate constant determined for net bromination of anisole by HOBr is up to 3000-times less than reported in previous studies (which assumed HOBr was the only active brominating agent). Accordingly, models that assume HOBr is the only kinetically relevant brominating agent in solutions of free bromine may be insufficient for reactions involving modestly nucleophilic organic compounds.

  19. Structure and electronic properties of mixed (a + c) dislocation cores in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, M. K., E-mail: m.horton11@imperial.ac.uk [Department Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rhode, S. L. [Department Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Moram, M. A. [Department Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-14

    Classical atomistic models and atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of GaN films reveal that mixed (a + c)-type dislocations have multiple different core structures, including a dissociated structure consisting of a planar fault on one of the (12{sup ¯}10) planes terminated by two different partial dislocations. Density functional theory calculations show that all cores introduce localized states into the band gap, which affects device performance.

  20. Structure and electronic properties of mixed (a + c) dislocation cores in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, M. K.; Rhode, S. L.; Moram, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Classical atomistic models and atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of GaN films reveal that mixed (a + c)-type dislocations have multiple different core structures, including a dissociated structure consisting of a planar fault on one of the (12 ¯ 10) planes terminated by two different partial dislocations. Density functional theory calculations show that all cores introduce localized states into the band gap, which affects device performance

  1. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides.

  2. Synthesis and crystal structure determination of Br2SeIBr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    termined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. This compound was ... company and SeBr4 was prepared from the reaction of Se powder (0⋅1 g) with Br2 ... angles of Br2SeIBr and table 4 shows anisotropic displace- ment parameters.

  3. Optical and structural characterization of KBr crystals doped cadmium bromide (CdBr2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensouici, A.; Plaza, J.L.; Dieguez, E.; Halimi, O.; Guerbous, L.; Sebais, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the presence of CdBr 2 and cadmium aggregates in KBr matrix during Czochralski growth of KBr crystals. The chemical decomposition of CdBr 2 due to high temperature of crystallisation and reformation of cadmium bromide seems to be responsible for this effect.

  4. Preliminary investigations of a mixed standard-flip core for a TRIGA Mark II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.

    1974-01-01

    Several years ago it became apparent that due to our rapidly- increasing use rate, we would need a substantial amount of new fuel by late 1974 or early 1975. After investigations and discussions with GA, we decided that FLIP fuel would best meet our requirements for maximum fuel economy and high peak pulsing power. A proposal was submitted to the AEC for fuel assistance, and late in 1973 we were awarded a grant of $61,875. This will allow us to buy 3 FLIP-fueled-follower control rods, 1 instrumented FLIP fuel element, and 26 standard FLIP elements, giving us then a mixed core of approximately one-third FLIP and two-thirds standard elements. License amendments to accommodate this change are rather straightforward; modifications to the Technical Specifications will be somewhat more involved. The largest revisions which we envision are to our Safety Analysis Report. Although a few reactors have operated with a full FLIP core, and a few others have converted to mixed standard-FLIP cores, none of these has a standard Mark II core configuration. Those who have already converted to a mixed core have data and calculations which may be helpful to us, but the extent to which we can use these remains to be seen. The present status of our investigations into the analysis of a mixed standard-FLIP core will be presented. Any problems in calculational methods, finding appropriate data, modifications to Technical Specifications, etc., will be identified, and suggestions and help in these areas will be welcomed. (author)

  5. Preliminary investigations of a mixed standard-flip core for a TRIGA Mark II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringle, John C; Johnson, A G; Anderson, T V [Oregon State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Several years ago it became apparent that due to our rapidly- increasing use rate, we would need a substantial amount of new fuel by late 1974 or early 1975. After investigations and discussions with GA, we decided that FLIP fuel would best meet our requirements for maximum fuel economy and high peak pulsing power. A proposal was submitted to the AEC for fuel assistance, and late in 1973 we were awarded a grant of $61,875. This will allow us to buy 3 FLIP-fueled-follower control rods, 1 instrumented FLIP fuel element, and 26 standard FLIP elements, giving us then a mixed core of approximately one-third FLIP and two-thirds standard elements. License amendments to accommodate this change are rather straightforward; modifications to the Technical Specifications will be somewhat more involved. The largest revisions which we envision are to our Safety Analysis Report. Although a few reactors have operated with a full FLIP core, and a few others have converted to mixed standard-FLIP cores, none of these has a standard Mark II core configuration. Those who have already converted to a mixed core have data and calculations which may be helpful to us, but the extent to which we can use these remains to be seen. The present status of our investigations into the analysis of a mixed standard-FLIP core will be presented. Any problems in calculational methods, finding appropriate data, modifications to Technical Specifications, etc., will be identified, and suggestions and help in these areas will be welcomed. (author)

  6. Simulation tests for temperature mixing in a core bottom model of the HTR-module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Wehrlein, R.

    1992-01-01

    Interatom and Siemens are developing a helium-cooled Modular High Temperature Reactor. Under nominal operating conditions temperature differences of up to 120deg C will occur in the 700deg C hot helium flow leaving the core. In addition, cold gas leakages into the hot gas header can produce even higher temperature differences in the coolant flow. At the outlet of the reactor only a very low temperature difference of maximum ± 15deg C is allowed in order to avoid damages at the heat exchanging components due to alternating thermal loads. Since it is not possible to calculate the complex flow behaviour, experimental investigations of the temperature mixing in the core bottom had to be carried out in order to guarantee the necessary reduction of temperature differences in the helium. The presented air simulation tests in a 1:2.9 scaled plexiglas model of the core bottom showed an extremely high mixing rate of the hot gas header and the hot gas duct of the reactor. The temperature mixing of the simulated coolant flow as well as the leakage flows was larger than 95%. Transfered to reactor conditions this means a temperature difference of only ± 3deg C for the main flow at a quite resonable pressure drop. For the cold gas leakages temperature differences in the hot gas up to 400deg C proved to be permissible. The results of the simulation experiments in the Aerodynamic Test Facility of Interatom permitted to design a shorter bottom reflector of the core. (orig.)

  7. Br2 production from the heterogeneous reaction of gas-phase OH with aqueous salt solutions: Impacts of acidity, halide concentration, and organic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frinak, Elizabeth K; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2006-09-07

    This study reports the first laboratory measurement of gas-phase Br2 production from the reaction between gas-phase hydroxyl radicals and aqueous salt solutions. Experiments were conducted at 269 K in a rotating wetted-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer for analysis of gas-phase components. From both pure NaBr solutions and mixed NaCl/NaBr solutions, the amount of Br2 released was found to increase with increasing acidity, whereas it was found to vary little with increasing concentration of bromide ions in the sample. For mixed NaCl/NaBr solutions, Br2 was formed preferentially over Cl2 unless the Br- levels in the solution were significantly depleted by OH oxidation, at which point Cl2 formation was observed. Presence of a surfactant in solution, sodium dodecyl sulfate, significantly suppressed the formation of Br2; this is the first indication that an organic surfactant can affect the rate of interfacial mass transfer of OH to an aqueous surface. The OH-mediated oxidation of bromide may serve as a source of active bromine in the troposphere and contribute to the subsequent destruction of ozone that proceeds in marine-influenced regions of the troposphere.

  8. Liposomes equipped with cell penetrating peptide BR2 enhances chemotherapeutic effects of cantharidin against hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Lin, Congcong; Lu, Aiping; Lin, Ge; Chen, Huoji; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Zhijun; Zhang, Hongqi

    2017-11-01

    A main hurdle for the success of tumor-specific liposomes is their inability to penetrate tumors efficiently. In this study, we incorporated a cell-penetrating peptide BR2 onto the surface of a liposome loaded with the anticancer drug cantharidin (CTD) to create a system targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells more efficiently and effectively. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay comparing the loaded liposomes' effects on hepatocellular cancer HepG2 and the control Miha cells showed that CTD-loaded liposomes had a stronger anticancer effect after BR2 modification. The cellular uptake results of HepG2 and Miha cells further confirmed the superior ability of BR2-modified liposomes to penetrate cancer cells. The colocalization study revealed that BR2-modified liposomes could enter tumor cells and subsequently release drugs. A higher efficiency of delivery by BR2 liposomes as compared to unmodified liposomes was evident by evaluation of the HepG2 tumor spheroids penetration and inhibition. The biodistribution studies and anticancer efficacy results in vivo showed the significant accumulation of BR2-modified liposomes into tumor sites and an enhanced tumor inhibition. In conclusion, BR2-modified liposomes improve the anticancer potency of drugs for HCC.

  9. Transcription regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates ER stress-induced brown adipocytes dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Guifen; Whang Kong, Hyerim; Gil, Victoria; Liew, Chong Wee

    2017-01-09

    In contrast to white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is known to play critical roles for both basal and inducible energy expenditure. Obesity is associated with reduction of BAT function; however, it is not well understood how obesity promotes BAT dysfunction, especially at the molecular level. Here we show that the transcription regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates ER stress-induced inhibition of lipolysis and thermogenesis in BAT. Using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced inflammation upregulates brown adipocytes TRIP-Br2 expression via the ER stress pathway and amelioration of ER stress in mice completely abolishes high fat diet-induced upregulation of TRIP-Br2 in BAT. We find that increased TRIP-Br2 significantly inhibits brown adipocytes thermogenesis. Finally, we show that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates ER stress-induced inhibition on lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, oxidative metabolism, and thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. Taken together, our current study demonstrates a role for TRIP-Br2 in ER stress-induced BAT dysfunction, and inhibiting TRIP-Br2 could be a potential approach for counteracting obesity-induced BAT dysfunction.

  10. Photodissociation of dibromoethanes at 248 nm: an ignored channel of Br2 elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Lung; Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Kuo, H H; Chen, P H; Chang, A H H

    2009-05-14

    Br(2) molecular elimination is probed in the photodissociation of 1,1- and 1,2-C(2)H(4)Br(2) isomeric forms at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. Their photodissociation processes differ markedly from each other. The quantum yield of the Br(2) fragment in 1,2-dibromoethane is 0.36+/-0.18, in contrast to a value of 0.05+/-0.03 in 1,1-dibromoethane. The vibrational population ratios of Br(2)(v=1)/Br(2)(v=0) are 0.8+/-0.1 and 0.5+/-0.2 for 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethanes, respectively. The Br(2) yield densities are found to increase by a factor of 35% and 190% for 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethanes within the same temperature increment. In the ab initio potential energy calculations, the transition state (TS) along the adiabatic ground state surface may correlate to the Br(2) products. The TS energy for 1,2-dibromoethane is well below the excitation energy at 483 kJ/mol, whereas that for 1,1-dibromoethane is slightly above. Such a small TS energy barrier impedes the photodissociation of the ground state 1,1-dibromoethane such that the production yield of Br(2) may become relatively low, but rise rapidly with the temperature. The TS structure shows a larger bond distance of Br-Br in 1,2-dibromoethane than that in 1,1-dibromoethane. That explains why the former isomer may result in hotter vibrational population of the Br(2) fragments.

  11. Neutronic feasibility of PWR core with mixed oxide fuels in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Joo, H.K.; Jung, H.G.; Sohn, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Neutronic feasibility of a PWR core with mixed oxide (MOX) fuels has been investigated as part of the feasibility study for recycling spent fuels in Korea. A typical 3-loop PWR with 900 MWe capacity is selected as reference plant to develop equilibrium core designs with low-leakage fuel management scheme, while incorporating various MOX loading. The fuel management analyses and limited safety analyses show that, safely stated, MOX recycling with 1/3 reload fraction can be accommodated for both annual and 18 month fuel cycle schemes in Korean PWRs, without major design modifications on the reactor systems. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Continuum and discrete pulsed cavity ring down laser absorption spectra of Br2 vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh C; Huang, Hong-Yi; Chuang, Wang-Ting; Lin, King-Chuen

    2005-07-01

    The absorption cross-sections at room temperature are reported for the first time, of Br2 vapor in overlapping bound-free and bound-bound transition of A(3)pi1u Br2. We obtained discrete absorption cross-section in the rotational structure, the continuum absorption cross-sections, and were also able to measure the absorption cross-section in separate contribution of A(3)pi1u Br2. The absorption cross-sections are increasing with increasing excitation energy in the wavelength region 510-535 nm.

  13. Studies on the phase diagram of LiBr-SrBr2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahendran, K.H.; Sujatha, K.; Sridharan, R.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2003-01-01

    Binary LiBr-SrBr 2 system was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the equilibrium phases at different compositions were identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD). This system has a compound LiSr 2 Br 5 , and exhibits a eutectic reaction between this compound and LiBr at 434 deg. C and the eutectic has a composition of 35 mol% SrBr 2 . The compound LiSr 2 Br 5 undergoes peritectic decomposition at 484 deg. C. From the DSC and XRD results, phase diagram of the LiBr-SrBr 2 system is constructed

  14. Core polarisation and configuration mixing in 58Ni studied by high resolution electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleus 58 Ni is studied by inelastic electron-scattering. This nucleus has two valence neutrons outside a closed 58 Ni core which implies that no valence protons contribute to the transitions and thus, besides configuration mixing of the valence neutrons, proton-core polarization can be studied in detail. From inelastic electron-scattering data one obtains the charge- and current-transition densities by determining the Fourier-Bessel transform of the cross sections measured over a wide range of linear momenta transferred to the nucleus. The results of an analysis of the excitation of two 0 ++ states at low-momentum transfer are presented. These transitions are particularly interesting for studying core-polarization contributions. (Auth.)

  15. SoLid: Search for Oscillations with Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK-CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Buhour, J. M.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Moortgat, C.; Pronost, G.; Raes, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Shitov, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2016-04-01

    Sterile neutrinos have been considered as a possible explanation for the recent reactor and Gallium anomalies arising from reanalysis of reactor flux and calibration data of previous neutrino experiments. A way to test this hypothesis is to look for distortions of the anti-neutrino energy caused by oscillation from active to sterile neutrino at close stand-off (˜ 6- 8m) of a compact reactor core. Due to the low rate of anti-neutrino interactions the main challenge in such measurement is to control the high level of gamma rays and neutron background. The SoLid experiment is a proposal to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor. This experiment uses a novel approach to detect anti-neutrino with a highly segmented detector based on Lithium-6. With the combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localization of the Inverse Beta Decay products, a better experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other state-of-the-art technology. This compact system requires minimum passive shielding allowing for very close stand off to the reactor. The experimental set up of the SoLid experiment and the BR2 reactor will be presented. The new principle of neutrino detection and the detector design with expected performance will be described. The expected sensitivity to new oscillations of the SoLid detector as well as the first measurements made with the 8 kg prototype detector deployed at the BR2 reactor in 2013-2014 will be reported.

  16. Trapping molecular bromine: a one-dimensional bromobismuthate complex with Br2 as a linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, S A; Gorokh, I D; Abramov, P A; Plyusnin, P E; Sokolov, M N; Fedin, V P

    2016-03-07

    The reaction between solid (NMP)n{[BiBr4]}n (1) (NMP = N-methylpyridinium) and Br2, generated in situ in HBr solution, results in the formation of (NMP)3[Bi2Br9]·Br2 (2). In the structure of 2, dibromine molecules connect discrete binuclear [Bi2Br9](3-) anions into an extended network. Complex 2 is thermally stable (up to 150 °C).

  17. Thermodynamic and structural properties of high temperature solid and liquid EuBr2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rycerz, L.; Gadzuric, S.; Ingier-Stocka, E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat capacity of solid and liq. EuBr2 was measured by differential scanning calorimetry in the temp. range 300-1100 K. The temp. and enthalpy of fusion were also detd. exptl. By combination of these results with the literature data on the entropy at 298.15 K, S(o,m) (EuBr2, s, 298.15 K) , and the...

  18. New control system for BR2. Preventive approach to process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Branden, G.; Koonen, E.

    2011-01-01

    In 1961, the BR2 reactor became critical for the first time. Yet the multi-functional research reactor at SCK-CEN is not out of date, quite the contrary. Regular upgrades and innovations keep the reactor in step with the latest advancements in technology. In 2010, the control system of BR2, a vital part of the reactor, was replaced as a preventive measure.

  19. CaBr2 hydrolysis for HBr production using a direct sparging contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, R.D.; Yang, J.; Panchal, Ch.B.; Lottes, St.A.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a novel, continuous hybrid cycle for hydrogen production employing both heat and electricity. Calcium bromide (CaBr 2 ) hydrolysis, which is endothermic, generates hydrogen bromide (HBr), and this is electrolysed to produce hydrogen. CaBr 2 hydrolysis at 1050 K is endothermic with a 181.5 KJ/mol heat of reaction and the free energy change is positive at 99.6 kJ/mol. What makes this hydrolysis reaction attractive is both its rate and the fact that well over half the thermodynamic requirements for water-splitting free energy of ΔG T = 285.8 KJ/mol are supplied at this stage using heat rather than electricity. These experiments provide support for a second order hydrolysis reaction in CaBr 2 forming a complex involving CaBr 2 and CaO and the system appears to be: 3CaBr 2 + H 2 O → (CaBr 2 ) 2 .CaO + 2HBr. This reaction is highly endothermic and the complex also includes some water of hydration. COMSOL TM multi-physics modelling of sparging steam into a calcium bromide melt guided the design of an experiment using a mullite tube (ID 70 mm) capable of holding 0.3-0.5 kg (1.5-2.5 10 -3 kmol) CaBr 2 forming a melt with a maximum 0.08 m depth. Half of the experiments employed packings. Sparging steam at a steam rate of 0.02-0.04 mol/mol of CaBr 2 per minute into this molten bath promptly yielded HBr in a stable operation that converted up to 19 mol% of the calcium bromide. The kinetic constant derived from the experimental data was kinetic constant was 2.17 10 -12 kmol s -1 m -2 MPa -1 for the hydrolysis reaction. (authors)

  20. Validation of SCALE4.4a for Calculation of Xe-Sm Transients After a Scram of the BR2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Ponsard, B.; Koonen, E.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this report is to validate the computational modules system SCALE4.4a for evaluation of reactivity changes, macroscopic absorption cross sections and calculations of the positions of the Control Rods during their motion in Xe-Sm transient after a scram of the BR-2 reactor. The rapid shutting down of the reactor by inserting of negative reactivity by the Control Rods is known as a reactor scram. Following reactor scram, a large xenon and samarium buildup occur in the reactor, which may appreciably affect the multiplication factor of the core due to enormous neutron absorption. The validation of the calculations of Xe-Sm transients by SCALE4.4a has been performed on the measurements of the positions of the Control Rods during their motion in Xe-Sm transients of the BR-2 reactor and on comparison with the calculations by the standard procedure XESM, developed at the BR-2 reactor. A final conclusion is made that the SCALE4.4a modules system can be used for evaluation of Xe-Sm transients of the BR-2 reactor. The utilization of the code is simple, the computational time takes from few seconds.

  1. Fuel/propellant mixing in an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, X.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Three different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-var-epsilon model, RNG k-var-epsilon model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Proposed model for fuel-coolant mixing during a core-melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If complete failure of normal and emergency coolant flow occurs in a light water reactor, fission product decay heat would eventually cause melting of the reactor fuel and cladding. The core melt may then slump into the lower plenum and later into the reactor cavity and contact residual liquid water. A model is proposed to describe the fuel-coolant mixing process upon contact. The model is compared to intermediate scale experiments being conducted at Sandia. The modelling of this mixing process will aid in understanding three important processes: (1) fuel debris sizes upon quenching in water, (2) the hydrogen source term during fuel quench, and (3) the rate of steam production. Additional observations of Sandia data indicate that the steam explosion is affected by this mixing process

  3. First results of the deployment of a SoLid detector module at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, N.

    The SoLid experiment aims to resolve the reactor neutrino anomaly by searching for electron-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations. The search will be performed between 5.5 and 10 m from the highly enriched uranium core of the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The experiment utilises a novel approach to anti-neutrino detection based on a highly segmented, composite scintillator detector design. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved using a combination of high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6 LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localisation of the inverse beta decay products. This compact detector system requires limited passive shielding as it relies on spacial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. The first full scale, 288 kg, detector module was deployed at the BR2 reactor in November 2014. A phased three tonne experimental deployment will begin in the second half of 2016, allowing a precise search for oscillations that will resolve the reactor anomaly using a three tonne detector running for three years. In this talk the novel detector design is explained and initial detector performance results from the module level deployment are presented along with an estimation of the physics reach of the next phase.

  4. Atmospheric Transport and Mixing linked to Rossby Wave Breaking in GFDL Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Barnes, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric transport and mixing plays an important role in the global energy balance and the distribution of health-related chemical constituents. Previous studies suggest a close linkage between large-scale transport and Rossby wave breaking (RWB). In this work, we use the GFDL spectral dynamical core to investigate this relationship and study the response of RWB-related transport in different climate scenarios. In a standard control run, we quantify the contribution of RWB to the total transport and mixing of an idealized tracer. In addition, we divide the contribution further into the two types of RWB - anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) and cyclonic wave breaking (CWB) -- and contrast their efficiency at transport and mixing. Our results are compared to a previous study in which the transport ability of the two types of RWB is studied for individual baroclinic wave life-cycles. In a series of sensitivity runs, we study the response of RWB-related transport and mixing to various states of the jet streams. The responses of the mean strength, frequency, and the efficiency of RWB-related transport are documented and the implications for the transport and mixing in a warmer climate are discussed.

  5. Evolution of a 1 M(sun) star with a periodically mixed core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, M; Noels, A; Scuflaire, R; Boury, A [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Inst. d' Astrophysique

    1976-02-01

    To solve the neutrino problem, Dilke and Gough have suggested that the vibrational instability of g/sup +/ modes of non radial oscillation may be the cause of recurrent mixing in the sun. Supposing this to be correct, the evolution of the sun is completely different from the standard one. Unmixed solar models are stable when older than 3 x 10/sup 9/ years. It is therefore necessary to check whether in the modified evolution, instabilities still exist at the solar age. They do, provided that the mass fraction of the mixed core is large enough. However, the neutrino flux at its minimum during a thermal pulse occurring at the solar age remains too high. Constraints imposed by ice age records are also discussed.

  6. Calculation of mixed HEU-LEU cores for the HOR research reactor with the scale code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leege, P.F.A. de; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Vries, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    The HOR reactor of Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI), Delft, The Netherlands, will be converted to use low enriched fuel (LEU) assemblies. As there are still many usable high enriched (HEU) fuel assemblies present, there will be a considerable reactor operation time with mixed cores with both HEU and LEU fuel assemblies. At IRI a comprehensive reactor physics code system and evaluated nuclear data is implemented for detailed core calculations. One of the backbones of the IRI code system is the well-known SCALE code system package. Full core calculations are performed with the diffusion theory code BOLD VENTURE, the nodal code SILWER, and the Monte Carlo code KENO Va. Results are displayed of a strategy from a HEU core to a mixed HEU-LEU core and eventually a LEU core. (author)

  7. Ongoing refurbishment activities and strategy for the future operation of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Gubel, P.

    1994-01-01

    The operation of the BR2 reactor with its second Be-matrix is foreseen up to mid-1995 or mid-1996. A life extension for another 15 years is envisaged considering programmatic, financial and technical aspects. At present, the second phase of the refurbishment programme is being executed. The major activities of this programme can be grouped under two headings: safety reassessment and ageing issues. The expected outcome end '93 is an assessment report defining extent, choosen options, prioritized activities, budget and a tentative planning for the preparation and execution of the refurbishment. These aspects together with the prospects of possible cooperation with other parties for the refurbishment programme and the future operation of BR2 will be evaluated by the CEN/SCK Board who has to take a decision early in 1994. Various scenarios are now being considered and evaluated for the refurbishment and the future BR2 operation regime. (author)

  8. Transient photoelectron spectroscopy of the dissociative Br2(1Piu) state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Daniel; Goulay, Fabien; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-11-14

    Photodissociation of bromine on the Br2(1Piu) state is probed with ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (53.7 nm) single-photon ionization. Time-resolved photoelectron spectra show simultaneously the depletion of ground state bromine molecules as well as the rise of Br(2P3/2) products due to 402.5 nm photolysis. A partial photoionization cross-section ratio of atomic versus molecular bromine is obtained. Transient photoelectron spectra of a dissociative wave packet on the excited state are presented in the limit of low-power-density, single-photon excitation to the dissociative state. Transient binding energy shifts of "atomic-like" photoelectron peaks are observed and interpreted as photoionization of nearly separated Br atom pairs on the Br2(1Piu) state to repulsive dissociative ionization states.

  9. Ongoing refurbishment activities and strategy for the future operation of the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonen, E; Gubel, P [BR2 Department, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, CEN/SCK, Mol (Belgium)

    1993-07-01

    The operation of the BR2 reactor with its second Be-matrix is foreseen up to mid-1995 or mid-1996. A life extension for another 15 years is envisaged considering programmatic, financial and technical aspects. At present, the second phase of the refurbishment programme is being executed. The major activities of this programme can be grouped under two headings: safety reassessment and ageing issues. The expected outcome end '93 is an assessment report defining extent, choosen options, prioritized activities, budget and a tentative planning for the preparation and execution of the refurbishment. These aspects together with the prospects of possible cooperation with other parties for the refurbishment programme and the future operation of BR2 will be evaluated by the CEN/SCK Board who has to take a decision early in 1994. Various scenarios are now being considered and evaluated for the refurbishment and the future BR2 operation regime. (author)

  10. Kinetics of the Br2-CH3CHO Photochemical Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Shackelford, C. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was employed in conjunction with laser flash photolysis of Br2 to study the kinetics of the two elementary steps in the photochemical chain reaction nBr2 + nCH3CHO + hv yields nCH3CBrO + nHBr. In the temperature range 255-400 K, the rate coefficient for the reaction Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) + CH3CHO yields CH3CO + HBr is given by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 6)(T) = (1.51 +/- 0.20) x 10(exp -11) exp(-(364 +/- 41)/T)cu cm/(molecule.s). At 298 K, the reaction CH3CO + Br2 yields CH3CBrO + Br proceeds at a near gas kinetic rate, k(sub 7)(298 K) = (1.08 +/- 0.38) x 10(exp -10)cu cm/(molecule.s).

  11. Ongoing refurbishment activities and strategy for the future operation of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Gubel, P.

    1993-01-01

    The operation of the BR2 reactor with its second Be-matrix is foreseen up to mid-1995 or mid-1996. A life extension for another 15 years is envisaged considering programmatic, financial and technical aspects. At present, the second phase of the refurbishment programme is being executed. The major activities of this programme can be grouped under two headings: safety reassessment and ageing issues. The expected outcome end '93 is an assessment report defining extent, choosen options, prioritized activities, budget and a tentative planning for the preparation and execution of the refurbishment. These aspects together with the prospects of possible cooperation with other parties for the refurbishment programme and the future operation of BR2 will be evaluated by the CEN/SCK Board who has to take a decision early in 1994. Various scenarios are now being considered and evaluated for the refurbishment and the future BR2 operation regime. (author)

  12. Two-color visible/vacuum ultraviolet photoelectron imaging dynamics of Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenge, Jürgen; Nicolas, Christophe; Caster, Allison G; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-10-07

    An experimental two-color photoionization dynamics study of laser-excited Br2 molecules is presented, combining pulsed visible laser excitation and tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation with photoelectron imaging. The X 1Sigmag + -B 3Pi0+u transition in Br2 is excited at 527 nm corresponding predominantly to excitation of the v' = 28 vibrational level in the B 3Pi0+u state. Tunable VUV undulator radiation in the energy range of 8.40-10.15 eV is subsequently used to ionize the excited molecules to the X 2Pi32,12 state of the ion, and the ionic ground state is probed by photoelectron imaging. Similar experiments are performed using single-photon synchrotron ionization in the photon energy range of 10.75-12.50 eV without any laser excitation. Photoelectron kinetic energy distributions are extracted from the photoelectron images. In the case of two-color photoionization using resonant excitation of the intermediate B 3Pi0+u state, a broad distribution of photoelectron kinetic energies is observed, and in some cases even a bimodal distribution, which depends on the VUV photon energy. In contrast, for single-photon ionization, a single nearly Gaussian-shaped distribution is observed, which shifts to higher energy with photon energy. Simulated spectra based on Franck-Condon factors for the transitions Br2(X 1Sigmag+, v" = 0)-Br2 +(X 2Pi12,32, v+) and Br2(B 3Pi0+u, v' = 28)-Br2 +(X 2Pi12,32, v+) are generated. Comparison of these calculated spectra with the measured images suggests that the differences in the kinetic energy distributions for the two ionization processes reflect the different extensions of the vibrational wave functions in the v" = 0 electronic ground state (X 1Sigmag+) versus the electronically and vibrationally excited state (B 3Pi0+u, v' = 28).

  13. Control rod drop accident analysis for the mixed core project in Ling Ao NPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shishun; Zhou Zhou; Xiao Min

    2004-01-01

    AFA-2G assemblies in Ling Ao NPS (LNPS) have been replaced gradually by AFA-3G assemblies from cycle 2 and subsequent cycles. the enrichment of the fuels will be increased from 3.2% to 3.7% from cycle 3 in Ling Ao. Therefore, the study of ling Ao mixed core and increased enrichment have been performed since 2001. Lots of accidents need to be re-analyzed in Ling Ao NPS in order to verify its safety requirements for the new fuel management. Control rod drop accident for LNPS was re-analyzed in 2001 in frame of FRAMATOME ANP analytical methodology. The analytical codes used in the accident analysis include SCIENCE, ESPADON, CINEMA, CANTAL and FLICA III. The control rod drop accident analysis is performed with respect to the 10 reference cycles of the generic fuel management design for Ling Ao mixed core and increased enrichment study. The pre-drop FδH for the first transition cycles and other cycles are 1.52 and 1.55, respectively. For detected dropped rod configurations, the negative flux rate protection system actuates a reactor trip. For the non-detected dropped rod configurations, the minimum DNBR values have been evaluated with conservative analysis methodology and assumptions and the DNBR fuel design limit is respected the analytical results shows that, for all the non-detected dropped rod configurations, the minimum DNB margin is about 2% which occurs in AFA-2G fuel assembly in the first transition cycle. (author)

  14. The possibilities of application of experimental Kfk results from BR2 on SNR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsten, G.; Elbel, K.; Dienst, W.; Schaefer, L.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the relevant results of the technological application for the SNR300 reactor, since the BR2 reactor has been used as a test facility for the material development. Special emphasis has been laid on the fuel pin behavior under the aspect of chemical and mechanical fuel-clad interaction and on the specification of the cladding in terms of high temperature mechanical behavior in the SNR 300 reactor. A systematic analysis of urgent research topics in BR2 test facility reactor is presented. (A.F.)

  15. Production of Sn-117m in the BR2 high-flux reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsard, B; Srivastava, S C; Mausner, L F; Russ Knapp, F F; Garland, M A; Mirzadeh, S

    2009-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is a 100MW(th) high-flux 'materials testing reactor', which produces a wide range of radioisotopes for various applications in nuclear medicine and industry. Tin-117m ((117m)Sn), a promising radionuclide for therapeutic applications, and its production have been validated in the BR2 reactor. In contrast to therapeutic beta emitters, (117m)Sn decays via isomeric transition with the emission of monoenergetic conversion electrons which are effective for metastatic bone pain palliation and radiosynovectomy with lesser damage to the bone marrow and the healthy tissues. Furthermore, the emitted gamma photons are ideal for imaging and dosimetry.

  16. The treatment of mixing in core helium-burning models - III. Suppressing core breathing pulses with a new constraint on overshoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Thomas; Campbell, Simon W.; Lattanzio, John C.

    2017-12-01

    Theoretical predictions for the core helium burning phase of stellar evolution are highly sensitive to the uncertain treatment of mixing at convective boundaries. In the last few years, interest in constraining the uncertain structure of their deep interiors has been renewed by insights from asteroseismology. Recently, Spruit proposed a limit for the rate of growth of helium-burning convective cores based on the higher buoyancy of material ingested from outside the convective core. In this paper we test the implications of such a limit for stellar models with a range of initial mass and metallicity. We find that the constraint on mixing beyond the Schwarzschild boundary has a significant effect on the evolution late in core helium burning, when core breathing pulses occur and the ingestion rate of helium is fastest. Ordinarily, core breathing pulses prolong the core helium burning lifetime to such an extent that models are at odds with observations of globular cluster populations. Across a wide range of initial stellar masses (0.83 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 5), applying the Spruit constraint reduces the core helium burning lifetime because core breathing pulses are either avoided or their number and severity reduced. The constraint suggested by Spruit therefore helps to resolve significant discrepancies between observations and theoretical predictions. Specifically, we find improved agreement for R2 (the observed ratio of asymptotic giant branch to horizontal branch stars in globular clusters), the luminosity difference between these two groups, and in asteroseismology, the mixed-mode period spacing detected in red clump stars in the Kepler field.

  17. A non-local mixing-length theory able to compute core overshooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, M.; Belkacem, K.

    2018-04-01

    Turbulent convection is certainly one of the most important and thorny issues in stellar physics. Our deficient knowledge of this crucial physical process introduces a fairly large uncertainty concerning the internal structure and evolution of stars. A striking example is overshoot at the edge of convective cores. Indeed, nearly all stellar evolutionary codes treat the overshooting zones in a very approximative way that considers both its extent and the profile of the temperature gradient as free parameters. There are only a few sophisticated theories of stellar convection such as Reynolds stress approaches, but they also require the adjustment of a non-negligible number of free parameters. We present here a theory, based on the plume theory as well as on the mean-field equations, but without relying on the usual Taylor's closure hypothesis. It leads us to a set of eight differential equations plus a few algebraic ones. Our theory is essentially a non-mixing length theory. It enables us to compute the temperature gradient in a shrinking convective core and its overshooting zone. The case of an expanding convective core is also discussed, though more briefly. Numerical simulations have quickly improved during recent years and enabling us to foresee that they will probably soon provide a model of convection adapted to the computation of 1D stellar models.

  18. Mixed PWR core loadings with inert matrix Pu-fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, A.; Kasemeyer, U.; Paratte, J.-M.; Chawla, R.

    1999-01-01

    The most efficient way to enhance plutonium consumption in light water reactors is to eliminate the production of plutonium all together. This requirement leads to fuel concepts in which the uranium is replaced by an inert matrix. At PSI, studies have focused on employing ZrO 2 as inert matrix. Adding a burnable poison to such a fuel proves to be necessary. As a result of scoping studies, Er 2 O 3 was identified as the most suitable burnable poison material. The results of whole-core three-dimensional neutronics analyses indicated, for a present-day 1000 MW e pressurised water reactor, the feasibility of an asymptotic equilibrium four-batch cycle fuelled solely with the proposed PuO 2 -Er 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 inert matrix fuel (IMF). The present paper presents the results of more recent investigations related to 'real-life' situations, which call for transition configurations in which mixed IMF and UO 2 assembly loadings must be considered. To determine the influence of the introduction of IMF assemblies on the characteristics of a UO 2 -fuelled core, three-dimensional full-core calculations have been performed for a present-day 1000 MW e PWR containing up to 12 optimised IMF assemblies. (author)

  19. TRIP-Br2 promotes oncogenesis in nude mice and is frequently overexpressed in multiple human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Yang, Christopher M; Sun, Xiaoming; Nasr, Susan L; Sim, Khe Guan; Peh, Bee Keow; Rashid, Suhaimi Bin Abdul; Bonventre, Joseph V; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Hsu, Stephen I

    2009-01-20

    Members of the TRIP-Br/SERTAD family of mammalian transcriptional coregulators have recently been implicated in E2F-mediated cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. We, herein, focus on the detailed functional characterization of the least understood member of the TRIP-Br/SERTAD protein family, TRIP-Br2 (SERTAD2). Oncogenic potential of TRIP-Br2 was demonstrated by (1) inoculation of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, which were engineered to stably overexpress ectopic TRIP-Br2, into athymic nude mice for tumor induction and (2) comprehensive immunohistochemical high-throughput screening of TRIP-Br2 protein expression in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Clinicopathologic analysis was conducted to assess the potential of TRIP-Br2 as a novel prognostic marker of human cancer. RNA interference of TRIP-Br2 expression in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells was performed to determine the potential of TRIP-Br2 as a novel chemotherapeutic drug target. Overexpression of TRIP-Br2 is sufficient to transform murine fibroblasts and promotes tumorigenesis in nude mice. The transformed phenotype is characterized by deregulation of the E2F/DP-transcriptional pathway through upregulation of the key E2F-responsive genes CYCLIN E, CYCLIN A2, CDC6 and DHFR. TRIP-Br2 is frequently overexpressed in both cancer cell lines and multiple human tumors. Clinicopathologic correlation indicates that overexpression of TRIP-Br2 in hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with a worse clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Small interfering RNA-mediated (siRNA) knockdown of TRIP-Br2 was sufficient to inhibit cell-autonomous growth of HCT-116 cells in vitro. This study identifies TRIP-Br2 as a bona-fide protooncogene and supports the potential for TRIP-Br2 as a novel prognostic marker and a chemotherapeutic drug target in human cancer.

  20. Temperature dependent absorption spectra of Br(-), Br2(•-), and Br3(-) in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mingzhang; Archirel, Pierre; Van-Oanh, Nguyen Thi; Muroya, Yusa; Fu, Haiying; Yan, Yu; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kumagai, Yuta; Katsumura, Yosuke; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2011-05-05

    The absorption spectra of Br(2)(•-) and Br(3)(-) in aqueous solutions are investigated by pulse radiolysis techniques from room temperature to 380 and 350 °C, respectively. Br(2)(•-) can be observed even in supercritical conditions, showing that this species could be used as a probe in pulse radiolysis at high temperature and even under supercritical conditions. The weak temperature effect on the absorption spectra of Br(2)(•-) and Br(3)(-) is because, in these two systems, the transition occurs between two valence states; for example, for Br(2)(-) we have (2)Σ(u) → (2)Σ(g) transition. These valence transitions involve no diffuse final state. However, the absorption band of Br(-) undergoes an important red shift to longer wavelengths. We performed classical dynamics of hydrated Br(-) system at 20 and 300 °C under pressure of 25 MPa. The radial distribution functions (rdf's) show that the strong temperature increase (from 20 to 300 °C) does not change the radius of the solvent first shell. On the other hand, it shifts dramatically (by 1 Å) the second maximum of the Br-O rdf and introduces much disorder. This shows that the first water shell is strongly bound to the anion whatever the temperature. The first two water shells form a cavity of a roughly spherical shape around the anion. By TDDFT method, we calculated the absorption spectra of hydrated Br(-) at two temperatures and we compared the results with the experimental data.

  1. Improved production of Br atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br2 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, L Z; Yin, J P

    2014-10-28

    We theoretically investigated the improvement on the production rate of the decelerated bromine (Br) atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br2 precursors. Adiabatic alignment of Br2 precursors exposed to long laser pulses with duration on the order of nanoseconds was investigated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The dynamical fragmentation of adiabatically aligned Br2 precursors was simulated and velocity distribution of the Br atoms produced was analyzed. Our study shows that the larger the degree of the precursor alignment, ⟨cos(2) θ⟩, the higher the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed. For Br2 molecules with an initial rotational temperature of ~1 K, a ⟨cos(2) θ⟩ value of ~0.88 can result in an improvement factor of over ~20 on the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed, requiring a laser intensity of only ~1 × 10(12) W/cm(2) for alignment.

  2. Time resolved high frequency spectrum of Br2 molecules using pulsed photoacoustic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Fahem; Chaudhary, A K

    2013-11-01

    The paper reports the time resolved spectral distribution of higher order acoustic modes generated in Br2 molecules using pulsed Photoacoustic (PA) technique. New time resolved vibrational spectrum of Br2 molecules are recorded using a single 532nm, pulses of 7ns duration at 10Hz repetition rate obtained from Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Frank-Condon principle based assignments confirms the presence of 12 numbers of (ν″-ν') vibrational transitions covered by a single 532+2nm pulse profile. Inclusions of higher order zeroth modes in Bassel's function expansion series shows the probability of overlapping of different types of acoustic modes in the designed PA cells. These modes appear in the form of clusters which occupies higher frequency range. The study of decay behavior of PA signal with respect to time confirms the photolysis of Br2 at 532nm wavelength. In addition, the shifting and clustering effect of cavity eigen modes in Br2 molecules have been studied between 1 and 10ms time scale. The estimated Q-factor of PA cell (l=16cm, R=1.4cm) is 145±4 at 27kHz frequency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in the utilization and the irradiation technology of the refurbished BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, J.; Benoit, P.; Decloedt, C.; Pouleur, Y.; Verwimp, A.; Weber, M.; Vankeerberghen, M.; Ponsard, B.

    1999-01-01

    Operation and utilization of the materials testing reactor BR2 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) has since its start in 1963 always followed closely the needs and developments of nuclear technology. In particular, a multitude of irradiation experiments have been carried out for most types of nuclear power reactors, existing or under design. Since the early 1990s and increased focus was directed towards more specific irradiation testing needs for light water reactor fuels and materials, although other areas of utilization continued as well (e.g. fusion reactor materials, safety research, ...), including also the growing activities of radioisotope production and silicon doping. An important milestone was the decision in 1994 to implement a comprehensive refurbishment programme for the BR2 reactor and plant installations. The scope of this programme comprised very substantial studies and hardware interventions, which have been completed in early 1997 within planning and budget. Directly connected to this strategic decision for reactor refurbishment was the reinforcement of our efforts to requalify and upgrade the existing irradiation facilities and to develop advanced devices in BR2 to support emerging programs in the following fields: - LWR pressure vessel steel, - LWR irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), - reliability and safety of high-burnup LWR fuel, - fusion reactor materials and blanket components, - fast neutron reactor fuels and actinide burning, - extension and diversification of radioisotope production. The paper highlights these advances in the areas of BR2 utilisation and the ongoing development activities for the required new generation of irradiations devices. (author)

  4. Quantum dynamics of Ne-Br2 vibrational predissociation: the role of continuum resonances as doorway states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vela, A; Janda, K C

    2006-01-21

    Wave-packet simulations of the Ne-Br2(B,upsilon') vibrational predissociation dynamics in the range upsilon' = 16-29 are reported. The aim is to interpret recent time-dependent pump-probe experiments [Cabrera et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 054311 (2005)]. Good agreement is found between the calculated and the experimental lifetimes corresponding to decay of the Ne-Br2(B,upsilon') initial state and to appearance of Br2(B,upsilonBr2(B,upsilonBr2(B,upsilonBr2 distances greater than 15 angstroms. In the light of the results, a structure of the spectrum of continuum resonances is suggested and discussed.

  5. Pathways for the OH + Br2 → HOBr + Br and HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Qiu, Yudong; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-02-11

    The OH radical reaction with Br2 and the subsequent reaction HOBr + Br are of exceptional importance to atmospheric chemistry and environmental chemistry. The entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex for both reactions have been determined using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations CCSD(T) with correlation consistent basis sets up to size cc-pV5Z and cc-pV5Z-PP. Coupled cluster effects with full triples (CCSDT) and full quadruples (CCSDTQ) are explicitly investigated. Scalar relativistic effects, spin-orbit coupling, and zero-point vibrational energy corrections are evaluated. The results from the all-electron basis sets are compared with those from the effective core potential (ECP) pseudopotential (PP) basis sets. The results are consistent. The OH + Br2 reaction is predicted to be exothermic 4.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol, compared to experiment, 3.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The entrance complex HO···BrBr is bound by 2.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The transition state lies similarly well below the reactants OH + Br2. The exit complex HOBr···Br is bound by 2.7 ± 0.6 kcal/mol relative to separated HOBr + Br. The endothermicity of the reaction HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO is 9.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, compared with experiment 8.7 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. For the more important reverse (exothermic) HBr + BrO reaction, the entrance complex BrO···HBr is bound by 1.8 ± 0.6 kcal/mol. The barrier for the HBr + BrO reaction is 6.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. The exit complex (Br···HOBr) for the HBr + BrO reaction is bound by 1.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol with respect to the products HOBr + Br.

  6. Safety analysis calculations for a mixed and full FLIP core in a TRIGA Mark II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Hornyik, K.; Robinson, A.H.; Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor will be reloading with FLIP fuel in August 1976. As we are the first Mark II TRIGA with a circular grid pattern and graphite reflector to utilize FLIP fuel, the safety analysis calculations performed at other facilities using FLIP were only of limited use to us. A multigroup, multiregion, one-dimensional diffusion theory code was used to calculate power densities in six different operational cores - mixed to full FLIP. Pulsing characteristics were obtained from a computer code based on point kinetics, with adiabatic heating of the fuel, linear temperature dependence of the specific heat, and prompt fuel temperature feedback coefficient. The results of all pertinent calculations will be presented. (author)

  7. Fuel element burnup determination in HEU-LEU mixed TRIGA research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, Tomaz; Ravnik, Matjaz

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a burnup calculations and burnup measurements for TRIGA FLIP HEU fuel elements and standard TRIGA LEU fuel elements used simultaneously in small TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenija. The fuel element burnup for approximately 15 years of operation was calculated with two different in house computer codes TRIGAP and TRIGLAV (both codes are available at OECD NEA Data Bank). The calculation is performed in one-dimensional radial geometry in TRIGAP and in two-dimensional (r,φ) geometry in TRIGLAV. Inter-comparison of results shows important influence of in-core water gaps, irradiation channels and mixed rings on burnup calculation accuracy. Burnup of 5 HEU and 27 LEU fuel elements was also measured with reactivity method. Measured and calculated burnup values are inter-compared for these elements (author)

  8. Validation of MCNP and ORIGEN-S 3-D computational model for reactivity predictions during BR2 operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Ponsard, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Belgian Material Test Reactor (MTR) BR2 is strongly heterogeneous high flux engineering test reactor at SCK-CEN (Centre d'Etude de l'energie Nucleaire) in Mol at a thermal power 60 to 100 MW. It deploys highly enriched uranium, water cooled concentric plate fuel elements, positioned inside a beryllium reflector with complex hyperboloid arrangement of test holes. The objective of this paper is the validation of a MCNP and ORIGEN-S 3D model for reactivity predictions of the entire BR2 core during reactor operation. We employ the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C for evaluating the effective multiplication factor k eff and 3D space dependent specific power distribution. The 1D code ORIGEN-S is used for calculation of isotopic fuel depletion versus burn up and preparation of a database (DB) with depleted fuel compositions. The approach taken is to evaluate the 3D power distribution at each time step and along with DB to evaluate the 3D isotopic fuel depletion at the next step and to deduce the corresponding shim rods positions of the reactor operation. The capabilities of the both codes are fully exploited without constraints on the number of involved isotope depletion chains or increase of the computational time. The reactor has a complex operation, with important shutdowns between cycles, and its reactivity is strongly influenced by poisons, mainly 3 He and 6 Li from the beryllium reflector, and burnable absorbers 149 Sm and 10 B in the fresh UAlx fuel. Our computational predictions for the shim rods position at various restarts are within 0.5$ (β eff =0.0072). (author)

  9. Study of the neutronic performances of cores with mixed nitride fuel [(U,Pu)N] for fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzouk, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    This paper proposes a core design of fast reactor using mixed nitride fuel [(U,Pu)N], having small loss of reactivity and reaching a maximum thermal burn-up rate from 150 GWd/t, while being managed in single batch (renewal of the fuel in only one time for all the subassemblies of the core). This work was completed with aid of the studies of sensibilities of the fast reactors cores to principal parameters: general design of the core, volumetric percentages of the various mixture of materials composing the core, initial enrichments of the fuel. A detailed optimization study on the selected core was conducted complying with safety criteria taking into consideration of consequences of nitride material presence on fuel assembly design rules. (author) [fr

  10. A mixed state core for melancholia: an exploration in history, art and clinical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiskal, H S; Akiskal, K K

    2007-01-01

    We argue for a mixed state core for melancholia comparing concepts of melancholia across centuries using examples from art, history and scientific literature. Literature reviews focusing on studies from Kraepelin onward, DSM-IV classification and view-points from clinical experience highlighting phenomenologic and biologic features as predictors of bipolar outcome in prospective studies of depression. Despite the implied chemical pathology in the term endogenous/melancholic depression, frequently reported glucocortical and sleep neurophysiologic abnormalities, there is little evidence that melancholia is inherited independently from more broadly defined depressions. Prospective follow-up of 'neurotic' depressions have shown melancholic outcomes in as many as a third; hypomania has also been observed in such follow-up. These findings and considerations overall do suggest that melancholia as defined today is more closely aligned with the depressive and/or mixed phase of bipolar disorder. Given the high suicidality from many of these patients the practice of treating them with antidepressant monotherapy needs re-evaluation.

  11. Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

  12. Cartesian coupled coherent states simulations: Ne(n)Br2 dissociation as a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Stewart K; González-Martínez, Maykel L; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesús; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2011-02-07

    In this article, we describe coupled coherent states (CCS) simulations of vibrational predissociation of weakly bounded complexes. The CCS method is implemented in the Cartesian frame in a manner that is similar to classical molecular dynamics. The calculated lifetimes of the vibrationally excited Ne-Br(2)(ν) complexes agree with experiment and previous calculations. Although the CCS method is, in principle, a fully quantum approach, in practice it typically becomes a semiclassical technique at long times. This is especially true following dissociation events. Consequently, it is very difficult to converge the quantum calculations of the final Br(2) vibrational distributions after predissociation and of the autocorrelation functions. However, the main advantage of the method is that it can be applied with relative ease to determine the lifetimes of larger complexes and, in order to demonstrate this, preliminary results for tetra- and penta-atomic clusters are reported.

  13. Electric and magnetic properties of the stage-2 FeBr2 graphite intercalation compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, P A; Barati, M; Ummat, P K; Luke, G; Datars, W R

    2003-01-01

    The stage-2 FeBr 2 graphite intercalation compound (GIC) was prepared by reacting FeBr 2 powder and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in a bromine atmosphere at 500 deg. C for 40 weeks. The dc magnetization, ac susceptibility, specific heat, resistivity and Hall effect were measured. The GIC is paramagnetic at temperatures above 14.5 K. There is short-range ordering at 14.5 K and longer-range magnetic ordering at 8.5 K. There is a spin glass phase below 3.2 K in which the ac susceptibility is frequency dependent. The in-plane and c-axis resistivities result from in-plane and out-of-plane electron-phonon scattering. The Hall coefficient is independent of temperature between 4.2 and 300 K and is explained by the single-carrier model

  14. Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics and laser control of Br2 in solid argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, A; Borowski, A; Kühn, O

    2009-07-02

    A five-dimensional reaction surface-vibronic coupling model is introduced to describe the B- to C-state predissociation dynamics of Br(2) occupying a double substitutional lattice site in a face-centered cubic argon crystal at low temperatures. The quantum dynamics driven by a Franck-Condon vertical excitation is investigated, revealing the role of matrix cage compression for efficient nonadiabatic transitions. Vibrational preexcitation of the Br(2) bond in the electronic ground state can be used to access a different regime of predissociation which does not require substantial matrix compression because the Franck-Condon window shifts into the energetic range of the B-C level crossing. Using optimal control theory, it is shown how vibrational preexcitation can be achieved via a pump-dump-type mechanism involving the repulsive C state.

  15. Manganese dioxide causes spurious gold values in flame atomic-absorption readings from HBr-Br2 digestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    False readings, apparently caused by the presence of high concentrations of manganese dioxide, have been observed in our current flame atomic-absorption procedure for the determination of gold. After a hydrobromic acid (HBr)-bromine (Br2) leach, simply heating the sample to boiling to remove excess Br2 prior to extraction with methyl-isobutyl-ketone (MIBK) eliminates these false readings. ?? 1981.

  16. Computations on the primary photoreaction of Br2 with CO2: stepwise vs concerted addition of Br atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kewei; Korter, Timothy M; Braiman, Mark S

    2015-04-09

    It was proposed previously that Br2-sensitized photolysis of liquid CO2 proceeds through a metastable primary photoproduct, CO2Br2. Possible mechanisms for such a photoreaction are explored here computationally. First, it is shown that the CO2Br radical is not stable in any geometry. This rules out a free-radical mechanism, for example, photochemical splitting of Br2 followed by stepwise addition of Br atoms to CO2-which in turn accounts for the lack of previously observed Br2+CO2 photochemistry in gas phases. A possible alternative mechanism in liquid phase is formation of a weakly bound CO2:Br2 complex, followed by concerted photoaddition of Br2. This hypothesis is suggested by the previously published spectroscopic detection of a binary CO2:Br2 complex in the supersonically cooled gas phase. We compute a global binding-energy minimum of -6.2 kJ mol(-1) for such complexes, in a linear geometry. Two additional local minima were computed for perpendicular (C2v) and nearly parallel asymmetric planar geometries, both with binding energies near -5.4 kJ mol(-1). In these two latter geometries, C-Br and O-Br bond distances are simultaneously in the range of 3.5-3.8 Å, that is, perhaps suitable for a concerted photoaddition under the temperature and pressure conditions where Br2 + CO2 photochemistry has been observed.

  17. The electrochemistry of InP in Br2/HBr solutions and its relevance to etching behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Damen, A.A.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Etch rate-potential curves of p-InP in HBr and Br2/HBr solutions in the dark and under illumination were correlated with current-potential curves. It was found that InP is etched via a "chemical" mechanism both by HBr and Br2. In aqueous HBr solutions InP is only etched at a significant rate at

  18. Bromine-rich Zinc Bromides: Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5, Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3, and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, David; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-06-20

    The bromine-rich zinc bromides Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1), Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3 (2), and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2 (3) are prepared by reaction of ZnBr2, 18-crown-6, and elemental bromine in the ionic liquid [MeBu3N][N(Tf)2] (N(Tf)2 = bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide). Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1) is formed instantaneously by the reaction. Even at room temperature, compound 1 releases bromine, which was confirmed by thermogravimetry (TG) and mass spectrometry (MS). The release of Br2 can also be directly followed by the color and density of the title compounds. With controlled conditions (2 weeks, 25 °C, absence of excess Br2) Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1) slowly releases bromine with conconcurrent generation of Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3 (2) (in ionic liquid) and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2 (3) (in inert oil). All bromine-rich zinc bromides contain voluminous uncharged (e.g., Zn3Br6(18-crown-6), Zn2Br4(18-crown-6)) or ionic (e.g., [Zn2Br3(18-crown-6)](+), [(Zn2Br6)×(Br2)2](2-)) building units with dibromine molecules between the Zn oligomers and partially interconnecting the Zn-containing building units. Due to the structural similarity, the bromine release is possible via crystal-to-crystal transformation with retention of the crystal shape.

  19. Surfactant-promoted reactions of Cl2 and Br2 with Br- in glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jennifer A; Dempsey, Logan P; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2013-10-17

    Gas-liquid scattering experiments are used to explore reactions of gaseous Cl2 and Br2 with a 0.03 M solution of the surfactant tetrahexylammonium bromide (THABr) dissolved in glycerol. At thermal collision energies, 79 ± 2% of incident Cl2 molecules react with Br(-) to form Cl2Br(-) in the interfacial region. This reaction probability is three times greater than the reactivity of Cl2 with 3 M NaBr-glycerol, even though the interfacial Br(-) concentrations are similar in each solution. We attribute the high 79% uptake to the presence of surface THA(+) ions that stabilize the Cl2Br(-) intermediate as it is formed in the charged, hydrophobic pocket created by the hexyl chains. Cl2Br(-) generates the single exchange product BrCl in a 1% yield close to the surface, while the remaining 99% desorbs as the double exchange product Br2 over >0.1 s after diffusing deeply into the bulk. When NaCl is added to the surfactant solution in a 20:1 Cl(-)/Br(-) ratio, the Cl2 reaction probability drops from 79% to 46 ± 1%, indicating that Cl(-) in the interfacial region only partially blocks reaction with Br(-). In parallel, we observe that gaseous Br2 molecules dissolve in 0.03 M THABr for 10(4) times longer than in 3 M NaBr. We attribute this change to formation of stabilizing interfacial and bulk-phase THA(+)Br3(-) ion pairs, in analogy with the capture of Cl2 and formation of THA(+)Cl2Br(-) pairs. The THA(+) ion appears to be a powerful interfacial catalyst for promoting reaction of Cl2 and Br2 with Br(-) and for ferrying the resultant ions into solution.

  20. Photoproduction of I2, Br2, and Cl2 on n-semiconducting powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, B.; Byvik, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic production of Br2 and Cl2 and the photocatalytic production of I2 from aqueous solutions of the respective halide ions in the presence of platinized semiconducting n-TiO2 powder are reported. Reactions were produced in 2-3 M oxygen-saturated aqueous solutions of KI, KBr or NaCl containing Pt-TiO2 powder which were irradiated by a high-pressure mercury lamp at a power of 400 mW/sq cm. Halogens are found to be produced in greater quantities when platinized TiO2 powders are used rather than pure TiO2, and rates of halogen production are observed to increase from Cl2 to Br2 to I2. The presence of the synthetic reactions producing Br2 and Cl2 with a net influx of energy indicates that an effective separation of the photoproduced electron-hole pair occurs in the semiconductor. Quantum efficiencies of the reaction, which increase with decreasing solution pH, are found to be as high as 30%, implying a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency between 0.03% and 3% for the case of chlorine production. It is concluded that the photoproduction of halogens may be of practical value if product halogens are efficiently removed from the reaction cell.

  1. Mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, C.W.; Verghese, K.; Huo, Y.G.

    1997-12-01

    The North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor license was renewed for an additional 20 years of operation on April 30, 1997. The relicensing period added additional years to the facility operating time through the end of the second license period, increasing the excess reactivity needs as projected in 1988. In 1995, the Nuclear Reactor Program developed a strategic plan that addressed the future maintenance, development, and utilization of the facility. Goals resulting from this plan included increased academic utilization of the facility in accordance with its role as a university research facility, and increased industrial service use in accordance with the mission of a land grant university. The strategic plan was accepted, and it is the intent of the College of Engineering to operate the PULSTAR Reactor as a going concern through at least the end of the current license period. In order to reach the next relicensing review without prejudice due to low excess reactivity, it is desired to maintain sufficient excess reactivity so that, if relicensed again, the facility could continue to operate without affecting users until new fuel assistance was provided. During the NC State University license renewal, the operation of the PULSTAR Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) was terminated. At that time, the SUNY Buffalo facility had about 240 unused PULSTAR Reactor fuel pins with 6% enrichment. The objective of the work reported here was to develop a mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR reactor which would: (1) demonstrate that 6% enriched SUNY buffalo fuel could be used in the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor within the existing technical specification safety limits for core physics parameters; (2) show that use of this fuel could permit operating the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor to 2017 with increased utilization; and (3) assure that the decision whether or not to relicense the facility would

  2. Probing the core structure and evolution of red giants using gravity-dominated mixed modes observed with Kepler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosser, B.; Goupil, M.J.; Belkacem, K.; Michel, E.; Stello, D.; Marques, J.P.; Elsworth, Y.; Barban, C.; Beck, P.G.; Bedding, T.R.; De Ridder, J.; García, R.A.; Hekker, S.; Kallinger, T.; Samadi, R.; Stumpe, M.C.; Barclay, T.; Burke, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. There are now more than 22 months of long-cadence data available for thousands of red giants observed with the Kepler space mission. Consequently, we are able to clearly resolve fine details in their oscillation spectra and see many components of the mixed modes that probe the stellar core.

  3. TRIP-Br2 promotes oncogenesis in nude mice and is frequently overexpressed in multiple human tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peh Bee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the TRIP-Br/SERTAD family of mammalian transcriptional coregulators have recently been implicated in E2F-mediated cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. We, herein, focus on the detailed functional characterization of the least understood member of the TRIP-Br/SERTAD protein family, TRIP-Br2 (SERTAD2. Methods Oncogenic potential of TRIP-Br2 was demonstrated by (1 inoculation of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, which were engineered to stably overexpress ectopic TRIP-Br2, into athymic nude mice for tumor induction and (2 comprehensive immunohistochemical high-throughput screening of TRIP-Br2 protein expression in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs. Clinicopathologic analysis was conducted to assess the potential of TRIP-Br2 as a novel prognostic marker of human cancer. RNA interference of TRIP-Br2 expression in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells was performed to determine the potential of TRIP-Br2 as a novel chemotherapeutic drug target. Results Overexpression of TRIP-Br2 is sufficient to transform murine fibroblasts and promotes tumorigenesis in nude mice. The transformed phenotype is characterized by deregulation of the E2F/DP-transcriptional pathway through upregulation of the key E2F-responsive genes CYCLIN E, CYCLIN A2, CDC6 and DHFR. TRIP-Br2 is frequently overexpressed in both cancer cell lines and multiple human tumors. Clinicopathologic correlation indicates that overexpression of TRIP-Br2 in hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with a worse clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Small interfering RNA-mediated (siRNA knockdown of TRIP-Br2 was sufficient to inhibit cell-autonomous growth of HCT-116 cells in vitro. Conclusion This study identifies TRIP-Br2 as a bona-fide protooncogene and supports the potential for TRIP-Br2 as a novel prognostic marker and a chemotherapeutic drug target in human cancer.

  4. Coolant Mixing in a Pressurized Water Reactor: Deboration Transients, Steam-Line Breaks, and Emergency Core Cooling Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael; Grunwald, Gerhard; Hoehne, Thomas; Kliem, Soeren; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2003-01-01

    The reactor transient caused by a perturbation of boron concentration or coolant temperature at the inlet of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) depends on the mixing inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Initial steep gradients are partially lessened by turbulent mixing with coolant from the unaffected loops and with the water inventory of the RPV. Nevertheless the assumption of an ideal mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of the reactor leads to unrealistically small reactivity inserts. The uncertainties between ideal mixing and total absence of mixing are too large to be acceptable for safety analyses. In reality, a partial mixing takes place. For realistic predictions it is necessary to study the mixing within the three-dimensional flow field in the complicated geometry of a PWR. For this purpose a 1:5 scaled model [the Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) facility] of the German PWR KONVOI was built. Compared to other experiments, the emphasis was put on extensive measuring instrumentation and a maximum of flexibility of the facility to cover as much as possible different test scenarios. The use of special electrode-mesh sensors together with a salt tracer technique provided distributions of the disturbance within downcomer and core entrance with a high resolution in space and time. Especially, the instrumentation of the downcomer gained valuable information about the mixing phenomena in detail. The obtained data were used to support code development and validation. Scenarios investigated are the following: (a) steady-state flow in multiple coolant loops with a temperature or boron concentration perturbation in one of the running loops, (b) transient flow situations with flow rates changing with time in one or more loops, such as pump startup scenarios with deborated slugs in one of the loops or onset of natural circulation after boiling-condenser-mode operation, and (c) gravity-driven flow caused by large density gradients, e.g., mixing of cold

  5. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling for the analysis of longitudinal body core temperature data in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Kok-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Ming Chai, Adam Kian; Yuen Fun, David Chiok; Teo, Ya Shi; Sze Tan, Pearl Min; Ang, Wee Hon; Wei Lee, Jason Kai

    2016-04-01

    Many longitudinal studies have collected serial body core temperature (T c) data to understand thermal work strain of workers under various environmental and operational heat stress environments. This provides the opportunity for the development of mathematical models to analyse and forecast temporal T c changes across populations of subjects. Such models can reduce the need for invasive methods that continuously measure T c. This current work sought to develop a nonlinear mixed effects modelling framework to delineate the dynamic changes of T c and its association with a set of covariates of interest (e.g. heart rate, chest skin temperature), and the structure of the variability of T c in various longitudinal studies. Data to train and evaluate the model were derived from two laboratory investigations involving male soldiers who participated in either a 12 (N  =  18) or 15 km (N  =  16) foot march with varied clothing, load and heat acclimatisation status. Model qualification was conducted using nonparametric bootstrap and cross validation procedures. For cross validation, the trajectory of a new subject's T c was simulated via Bayesian maximum a posteriori estimation when using only the baseline T c or using the baseline T c as well as measured T c at the end of every work (march) phase. The final model described T c versus time profiles using a parametric function with its main parameters modelled as a sigmoid hyperbolic function of the load and/or chest skin temperature. Overall, T c predictions corresponded well with the measured data (root mean square deviation: 0.16 °C), and compared favourably with those provided by two recently published Kalman filter models.

  6. Mechanical exfoliation of epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) enabled by Br2 intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Kaiser, Markus; Bendiab, Nedjma; Schumacher, Stefan; Förster, Daniel F; Coraux, Johann; Meerholz, Klaus; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten

    2012-08-08

    We show here that Br(2) intercalation is an efficient method to enable exfoliation of epitaxial graphene on metals by adhesive tape. We exemplify this method for high-quality graphene of macroscopic extension on Ir(111). The sample quality and the transfer process are monitored using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The developed process provides an opportunity for preparing graphene of strictly monatomic thickness and well-defined orientation including the transfer to poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foil.

  7. High-harmonic homodyne detection of the ultrafast dissociation of Br2 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörner, H J; Bertrand, J B; Corkum, P B; Villeneuve, D M

    2010-09-03

    We report the time-resolved observation of the photodissociation of Br2 using high-harmonic generation (HHG) as a probe. The simultaneous measurement of the high-harmonic and ion yields shows that high harmonics generated by the electronically excited state interfere with harmonics generated by the ground state. The resulting homodyne effect provides a high sensitivity to the excited state dynamics. We present a simple theoretical model that accounts for the main observations. Our experiment paves the way towards the dynamic imaging of molecules using HHG.

  8. Extended fine structure in the K-shell photoionization spectrum of Br2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dill, D.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The multiple-scattering approach to molecular wavefunctions in the electronic continuum has been used recently to elucidate the structure of the shape resonance just above threshold in the K-shell photoionization spectrum of N 2 . A similar calculation for Br 2 has yielded significantly different results, i.e., there is no shape resonance; appearing instead is a single resonance in the discrete spectrum, and the photoionization spectrum is found to oscillate with appreciable amplitude throughout the spectral range investigated, from threshold to 60 Ry

  9. Synthesis and crystal structure of Cd2SbBr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetova, L.N.; Shevel'kov, A.V.; Popovkin, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    A new cadmium antimonidobromide, i.e. Cd 2 SbBr 2 , has been synthesized by the standard ampoule method. The compound is crystallized in monoclinic system of sp. gr. P2 1 :a=8.244 (1), b=9.920(1), c=8.492(1) A, Β=116.80(1) deg. Binuclear anions of Sb 2 4- (Sb-Sb 2.78 A), octahedrically surrounded by six cadmium atoms, are a basic specific feature of the structure. Octahedrons of Sb 2 Cd 6 , by collectivizing the equatorial vertices. form layers, the alternation mode of which is similar to the one described for cadmium and mercury arsenidochlorides

  10. Three new chalcohalides, Ba4Ge2PbS8Br2, Ba4Ge2PbSe8Br2 and Ba4Ge2SnS8Br2: Syntheses, crystal structures, band gaps, and electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zuohong; Feng, Kai; Tu, Heng; Kang, Lei; Lin, Zheshuai; Yao, Jiyong; Wu, Yicheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three new chalcohalides: Ba 4 Ge 2 PbS 8 Br 2 , Ba 4 Ge 2 PbSe 8 Br 2 and Ba 4 Ge 2 SnS 8 Br 2 have been synthesized. • The MQ 5 Br octahedra and GeQ 4 tetrahedra form a three-dimensional framework with Ba 2+ in the channels. • Band Gaps and electronic structures of the three compounds were studied. - Abstract: Single crystals of three new chalcohalides: Ba 4 Ge 2 PbS 8 Br 2 , Ba 4 Ge 2 PbSe 8 Br 2 and Ba 4 Ge 2 SnS 8 Br 2 have been synthesized for the first time. These isostructural compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma. In the structure, the tetra-valent Ge atom is tetrahedrally coordinated with four Q (Q = S, Se) atoms, while the bi-valent M atom (M = Pb, Sn) is coordinated with an obviously distorted octahedron of five Q (Q = S, Se) atoms and one Br atom, showing the stereochemical activity of the ns 2 lone pair electron. The MQ 5 Br (M = Sn, Pb; Q = S, Se) distorted octahedra and the GeQ 4 (Q = S, Se) tetrahedra are connected to each other to form a three-dimensional framework with channels occupied by Ba 2+ cations. Based on UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy measurements and the electronic structure calculations, Ba 4 Ge 2 PbS 8 Br 2 , Ba 4 Ge 2 PbSe 8 Br 2 and Ba 4 Ge 2 SnS 8 Br 2 have indirect band gaps of 2.054, 1.952, and 2.066 eV respectively, which are mainly determined by the orbitals from the Ge, M and Q atoms (M = Pb, Sn; Q = S, Se)

  11. Elimination mechanisms of Br2+ and Br+ in photodissociation of 1,1- and 1,2-dibromoethylenes using velocity imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Linqiang; Zhang Bing; Lee, Wei-Bin; Chao, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, King-Chuen

    2011-01-01

    Elimination pathways of the Br 2 + and Br + ionic fragments in photodissociation of 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethylenes (C 2 H 2 Br 2 ) at 233 nm are investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with velocity ion imaging. The Br 2 + fragments are verified not to stem from ionization of neutral Br 2 , that is a dissociation channel of dibromoethylenes reported previously. Instead, they are produced from dissociative ionization of dibromoethylene isomers. That is, C 2 H 2 Br 2 is first ionized by absorbing two photons, followed by the dissociation scheme, C 2 H 2 Br 2 + + hv→Br 2 + + C 2 H 2 . 1,2-C 2 H 2 Br 2 gives rise to a bright Br 2 + image with anisotropy parameter of -0.5 ± 0.1; the fragment may recoil at an angle of ∼66 deg. with respect to the C = C bond axis. However, this channel is relatively slow in 1,1-C 2 H 2 Br 2 such that a weak Br 2 + image is acquired with anisotropy parameter equal to zero, indicative of an isotropic recoil fragment distribution. It is more complicated to understand the formation mechanisms of Br + . Three routes are proposed for dissociation of 1,2-C 2 H 2 Br 2 , including (a) ionization of Br that is eliminated from C 2 H 2 Br 2 by absorbing one photon, (b) dissociation from C 2 H 2 Br 2 + by absorbing two more photons, and (c) dissociation of Br 2 + . Each pathway requires four photons to release one Br + , in contrast to the Br 2 + formation that involves a three-photon process. As for 1,1-C 2 H 2 Br 2 , the first two pathways are the same, but the third one is too weak to be detected.

  12. Evaluation Of Oxide And Silicide Mixed Fuels Of The RSG-GAS Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Suparlina, Lily

    2000-01-01

    Fuel exchange of the RSG-GAS reactor core from uranium oxide to uranium silicide in the same loading, density, and enrichment, that is 250 gr, 2.98 gr/cm 3 , and 19.75%, respectively, will be performed in-step wise. In every cycle of exchange with 5/1 mode, it is needed to evaluate the parameter of reactor core operation. The parameters of the reactor operation observed are criticality mass of fuels, reactivity balance, and fuel reactivity that give effect to the reactor operation. The evaluation was done at beginning of cycle of the first and second transition core with compared between experiment and calculation results. The experiments were performed at transition core I and II, BOC, and low power. At transition core I, there are 2 silicide fuels (RI-224 and R1-225) in the core and then, added five silicide fuels (R1-226, R1-252, R1-263, and R1-264) to the core, so that there are seven silicide fuels in the transition core II. The evaluation was done based on the experiment of criticality, control rod calibration, fuel reactivity of the RSG-GAS transition core. For inserting 2 silicide fuels in the transition core I dan 7 fuels in the transition core II, the operation of RSG-GAS core fulfilled the safety margin and the parameter of reactor operation change is not occur drastically in experiment and calculation results. So that, the reactor was operated during 36 days at 15 MW, 540 MWD at the first transition core. The general result showed that the parameter of reactor operation change is small so that the fuel exchange from uranium oxide to uranium silicide in the next step can be done

  13. Characterization of LWR fuel rod irradiations with power transients in the BR2 reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.; Bodart, S.; Meer, K. van der; Raedt, C. de

    1996-01-01

    Fuel rod irradiations in reflector positions of the materials testing reactor BR2 are becoming increasingly important. A typical example is that of irradiation devices containing single LWR fuel rods, to be tested in the framework of a new international fuel investigation and development programme. Some of the irradiations will comprise power transients with central fuel melting (at 2800 deg. C), the power increase being obtained by decreasing the pressure in a He-3 neutron absorbing screen and/or by varying the BR2 reactor operating power. A total power variation by a factor of at least 2.5 in the fuel rod irradiated could thus be achieved. In some of the rods, central temperature measurements (up to 2000 deg. C) will be carried out. Both fresh and pre-irradiated fuel rods are concerned in the programme. For these irradiations, the accurate knowledge of the neutron-induced fission heating and of the gamma heating is required, as one of the purposes of the programme consists in establishing the correlation among the thermal conductivity, the burn-up and the irradiation temperature. Calibration work among various measuring methods and between measurements and one- and two-dimensional calculations is being pursued. (author). 10 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Photolysis of Br2 in CCl4 studied by time-resolved X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingyu; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lo Russo, Manuela; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lorenc, Maciej; Cammarata, Marco; Bratos, Savo; Buslaps, Thomas; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Wulff, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A time-resolved X-ray solution scattering study of bromine molecules in CCl(4) is presented as an example of how to track atomic motions in a simple chemical reaction. The structures of the photoproducts are tracked during the recombination process, geminate and non-geminate, from 100 ps to 10 micros after dissociation. The relaxation of hot Br(2)(*) molecules heats the solvent. At early times, from 0.1 to 10 ns, an adiabatic temperature rise is observed, which leads to a pressure gradient that forces the sample to expand. The expansion starts after about 10 ns with the laser beam sizes used here. When thermal artefacts are removed by suitable scaling of the transient solvent response, the excited-state solute structures can be obtained with high fidelity. The analysis shows that 30% of Br(2)(*) molecules recombine directly along the X potential, 60% are trapped in the A/A' state with a lifetime of 5.5 ns, and 10% recombine non-geminately via diffusive motion in about 25 ns. The Br-Br distance distribution in the A/A' state peaks at 3.0 A.

  15. Fast core rotation in red-giant stars as revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, P.G.; Montalban, J.; Kallinger, T.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; García, R.A.; Hekker, S.; Dupret, M.-A.; Mosser, B.; Eggenberger, P.; Stello, D.; Elsworth, Y.; Frandsen, S.; Carrier, F.; Hillen, M.; Gruberbauer, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Miglio, A.; Valentini, M.; Bedding, T.R.; Kjeldsen, H.; Girouard, F.R.; Hall, J.R.; Ibrahim, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant. Convection takes place over much of the star's radius. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars

  16. Face/core mixed mode debond fracture toughness characterization using the modified TSD test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Costache, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    The modified tilted sandwich debond (TSD) test method is used to examine face/core debond fracture toughness of sandwich specimens with glass/polyester face sheets and PVC H45 and H100 foam cores over a large range of mode-mixities. The modification was achieved by reinforcing the loaded face sheet....... The fracture process was inspected visually during and after testing. For specimens with H45 core the crack propagated in the core. For specimens with an H100 core, the crack propagated between the resin-rich layer and the face sheet. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub...... with a steel bar, and fracture testing of the test specimens was conducted over a range of tilt angles. The fracture toughness exhibited mode-mixity phase angle dependence, especially for mode II dominated loadings; although, the fracture toughness remained quite constant for mode I dominated crack loadings...

  17. Structure and bonding of transition metal-boryl compounds. Theoretical study of [(PH3)2(CO)ClOs-BR2] and [(PH3)2(CO)2ClOs-BR2] (BR2 = BH2, BF2, B(OH)2, B(OCH=CHO), Bcat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giju, K T; Bickelhaupt, F M; Frenking, G

    2000-10-16

    Quantum chemical DFT calculations using the B3LYP functionals have been carried out for the electronically unsaturated 16 VE five-coordinate osmium boryl-complexes [(PH3)2(CO)ClOs-BR2] and the 18 VE six-coordinate complexes [(PH3)2(CO)2ClOs-BR2] with BR2 = BH2, BF2, B(OH)2, B(OHC=CHO), and Bcat (cat = catecholate O2C6H4). The bonding situation of the Os-BR2 bond was analyzed with the help of the NBO partitioning scheme. The Os-B bond dissociation energies of the 16 VE complexes are very high, and they do not change very much for the different boryl ligands. The 18 VE complexes have only slightly lower bond energies than the 16 VE species. The Os-B bond in both classes of compounds is provided by a covalent sigma-bond which is polarized toward osmium and by strong charge attraction. Os-->B pi-donation is not important for the Os-B binding interactions, except for the Os-BH2 complexes. The stability of the boryl complexes [Os]-BR2 comes mainly from BB pi-donation. The intraligand charge distribution of the BR2 group changes little when the Os-B bond is formed, except for BH2. The CO ligand in [(PH3)2(CO)2ClOs-BR2] which is trans to BR2 has a relatively weak bond to the osmium atom.

  18. Ma and LLFP transmutation in MTPs and ADSs: the typical SCK.CEN case of transmutations in BR2 and Myrrha. Position with respect to the global needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raedt, Ch. de; Verboomen, B.; Aoust, Th.; Malambu, E.; Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.; Kupschus, P.; Benoit, Ph.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Baetsle, L.H.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed paper indicates the performances, in the domain of the transmutation of MAs and LLFPs, of the high flux materials testing reactor BR2 located at SCK-CEN, and compares them with those of the multipurpose ADS MYRRHA, the pre-design of which is at the present time being finalized at SCK-CEN. With thermal neutron fluxes reaching 9.10 14 n/cm 2 s in thermal positions and 4.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reactor core and, in the latter position, a fast flux (E>0.1 MeV) of 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s, BR2 has a transmutation throughput of the order of 1.5 kg Np+Am per 200 EFPD. This capacity can be used for investigating at the technological scale the transmutation of MAs and LLFPs in a thermal neutron spectrum with a high contribution of epithermal and fast neutrons. The metallurgical behaviour of the targets can hence be studied. In MYRRHA, higher fast fluxes are expected to be attained in irradiation positions near the spallation source, viz fast fluxes (E>0.75 MeV) up to 10. 15 n/cm 2 s. One of the purposes of MYRRHA is therefore its utilisation for the investigation of actinide transmutation feasibility with ADSs. (author)

  19. Theoretical study and experimental investigation of mixed and natural circulation in LMFBR core subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leteinturier, D.; Blanc, D.; Menant, B.; Basque, G.

    1980-02-01

    A presentation is made of theoretical and experimental studies carried out in France on mixed and natural convection in LMFBR wire wrapped bundles. Two codes are described, one for mixed convection THERNAT and the other for natural convection BACCHUS. THe related experimental program FETUNA, with electrically heated bundles in sodium loops, is also presented

  20. I/O Sharing in a Multi-core Kernel for Mixed-criticality Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Gang; Top, Søren

    2013-01-01

    In a mixed-criticality system, applications with different safety criticality levels are usually required to be implemented upon one platform for several reasons( reducing hardware cost, space, power consumption). Partitioning technology is used to enable the integration of mixed-criticality appl......In a mixed-criticality system, applications with different safety criticality levels are usually required to be implemented upon one platform for several reasons( reducing hardware cost, space, power consumption). Partitioning technology is used to enable the integration of mixed......, a certifiable I/O sharing approach is implemented based on a safe message mechanism, in order to support the partitioning architecture, enable individual certification of mixed-criticality applications and thus achieve minimized total certification cost of the entire system....

  1. Review of the accident source terms for aluminide fuel: Application to the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joppen, F.

    2005-01-01

    A major safety review of the BR2, a material test reactor, is to be conducted for the year 2006. One of the subjects selected for the safety review is the definition of source terms for emergency planning and in particular the development of accident scenarios. For nuclear power plants the behaviour of fuel under accident conditions is a well studied object. In case of non-power reactors this basic knowledge is rather scarce. The usefulness of information from power plant fuels is limited due to the differences in fuel type, power level and thermohydraulical conditions. First investigation indicates that using data from power plant fuel leads to an overestimation of the source terms. Further research on this subject could be very useful for the research reactor community, in order to define more realistic source terms and to improve the emergency preparedness. (author)

  2. An exopolysaccharide (EPS) from a Lactobacillus plantarum BR2 with potential benefits for making functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Keerthi; Kozhummal Vaikkath, Deepti; Devendra, Leena; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2017-10-01

    A high molecular weight EPS of glucomannan nature was recovered and purified to get an yield of 2.8±0.5g/L from Lb. plantarum BR2 and it displayed potent antioxidant activity with 29.8% radical scavenging activity and 19% total antioxidant capacity. At 100µg/ml concentration, it is capable of inhibiting the alpha amylase activity by 10% and at 300µg/ml, it drastically inhibited the alpha-glucosidase activity by 67% which indicates its antidiabetic potential. More interestingly, at a concentration level of 0.1%, it reduced the cholesterol level by a margin of 45% in an in vitro assay. The sample didn't reveal any cytotoxicity against H9C2 normal cells indicating its potential for safe use as a food additive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In-Pile Sub-Miniature Fission Chambers Testing in BR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, L.; Wéber, M.; Blandin, Ch.; Breaud, S.

    2003-06-01

    Three innovative sub-miniature fission chambers (SMFC), designed and manufactured at the Nuclear Measurement Systems Laboratory (LSMN) of CEA/Cadarache, were extensively tested in the BR2 research reactor at SCK•CEN, Mol. We present the experimental results for the (thermal) neutron sensitivity, the gamma-induced signal, the signal due to activation, the current picked up by the signal cable, the global current/voltage characteristics and the long term behaviour up to a thermal neutron fluence of 2.7·1021 n/cm2. We also compare the data with results from calculations with our FCD computer code. The onset of the saturation domain is well predicted by FCD; the neutron sensitivities can be accounted for perfectly after a refinement of the FCD model.

  4. The first report of a muoniated free radical formed from reaction of Mu with Br2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, Khashayar; Cottrell, Stephen P.; Fleming, Donald; Johnson, Clive

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report preliminary data for the first direct evidence of a free radical formed from Mu reactivity with Br 2 in the gas phase, in N 2 moderator at a total pressure of 3 bar. A new experimental setup and target vessel for μSR studies of reactive compounds, such as the halogens and hydrogen halides, suitable as well for RF measurements, is described. The experimental data, obtained from a longitudinal field repolarization curve, yields a hfc of 1770 MHz. We tentatively identify this as the [BrMuBr] radical, a non-conventional bond system, arising from the combination of a van der Waals interaction and dynamics on a repulsive surface. Studies of the dynamics and hfcs of possible radicals, which in principal could form, are also outlined here

  5. Irradiation tests in BR2 of miniature fission chambers in pulse, Campbelling and current mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeeren, L. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Geslot, B.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Legrand, A. [CEA/DEN/DRSN/SIREN/LASPI Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Barbot, L. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    The FNDS system ('Fast Neutron Detection System') for the on-line in-pile detection of the fast neutron flux in the presence of a significant thermal neutron flux and a high gamma dose rate is being developed in the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Laboratoire Commun. The system has been patented in 2008. The system consists of a miniature Pu-242 fission chamber as main detector, complemented by a U-235 fission chamber or a rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) for thermal neutron flux monitoring and a dedicated acquisition system that also takes care of the processing of the signals from both detectors to extract fast neutron flux data. This paper describes a FNDS qualification experiment in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor, with experimental results on a large set of fission chambers in current and Campbelling mode. (authors)

  6. Irradiation tests in BR2 of miniature fission chambers in pulse, Campbelling and current mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Geslot, B.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Legrand, A.; Barbot, L.

    2011-01-01

    The FNDS system ('Fast Neutron Detection System') for the on-line in-pile detection of the fast neutron flux in the presence of a significant thermal neutron flux and a high gamma dose rate is being developed in the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Laboratoire Commun. The system has been patented in 2008. The system consists of a miniature Pu-242 fission chamber as main detector, complemented by a U-235 fission chamber or a rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) for thermal neutron flux monitoring and a dedicated acquisition system that also takes care of the processing of the signals from both detectors to extract fast neutron flux data. This paper describes a FNDS qualification experiment in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor, with experimental results on a large set of fission chambers in current and Campbelling mode. (authors)

  7. Die Interhalogenkationen [Br2F5]+ und [Br3F8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, Sergei; Karttunen, Antti; Buchner, Magnus; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian

    2018-05-02

    Wir berichten über die Synthese und Charakterisierung der bislang einzigen Polyhalogenkationen, in denen verbrückende Fluoratome vorliegen. Das [Br2F5]+-Kation enthält eine symmetrische [F2Br-µ-F-BrF2]-Brücke, das [Br3F8]+-Kation enthält unsymmetrische µ-F-Brücken. Die Fluoronium-Ionen wurden in Form ihrer [SbF6]--Salze erhalten und Raman-, und 19F-NMR-spektroskopisch, sowie durch Röntgenbeugung am Einkristall untersucht. Quantenchemische Rechnungen, sowohl für die isolierten Kationen in der Gasphase, als auch für die Festkörper selbst, wurden durchgeführt. Populationsanalysen zeigen, dass die µ-F-Atome die am stärksten negativ partialgeladenen Atome der Kationen sind. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The BR2 refurbishment programme: achievements and two years operation feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Koonen, E.; Van der Auwera, J.

    1999-01-01

    The BR2 reactor was shutdown end of June 1995 for an extensive refurbishment after more than 30 years utilization. The beryllium matrix needed to be replaced and the aluminium vessel inspected for an envisaged 15 year life extension. Other aspects of the refurbishment programme aimed at the reliability and availability of the installations, safety of operation and compliance with modern safety standards. The reactor was started again in' April '97 and operated only for three cycles in 1997. These first irradiation cycles were intended as a demonstration of the safety and reliability of all components and systems after refurbishment. Also during the extended shutdowns non-critical refurbishment tasks were allowed to be continued and finalized. At the request of the Safety Authorities, some modifications and studies are still in progress without perturbation of the reactor operation. (author)

  9. Experimental determination of local heat flux variation in an electrically heated BR-2 rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.; Merschroth, F.

    1977-08-01

    The installation of thermocouples within the cladding of an electrically heated BR-2 rod might cause local variations of heat flux. In order to detect a resulting temperature variation at the outer surface, experiments with a single electrically heated rod with heat fluxes up to 30.80 W/cm 2 and heat transfer coefficients up to 1000 W/m 2 K by forced convection in air were conducted. The surface temperatures were measured with an optical pyrometer. The experiment showed about 0.6% variation in the surface temperature. An analysis with the TAC2D-code shows that local variation in the heat flux under these conditions is less than 1.2%. (orig.) [de

  10. Generation of counter ion radical (Br2(•-)) and its reactions in water-in-oil (CTAB or CPB)/n-butanol/cyclohexane/water) microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Apurav; Singh, Ajay K; Sarkar, Sisir K; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2011-09-15

    Herein we report the generation of counterion radicals and their reactions in quaternary water-in-oil microemulsion. Hydrated electrons in the microemulsion CTAB/H(2)O/n-butanol/cyclohexane have a remarkably short half-life (∼1 μs) and lower yield as compared to that in the pure water system. Electrons are solvated in two regions: one is the water core and other the interface; however, the electrons in the water core have a shorter half-life than those in the interface. The decay of the solvated electrons in the interface is found to be water content dependent and it has been interpreted in terms of increased interfacial fluidity with the increase in water content of the microemulsion. Interestingly another species, dibromide radical anion (Br(2)(•-)) in CTAB and CPB microemulsions have been observed after the electron beam irradiation. Assuming that the extinction coefficient of the radicals is the same as that in the aqueous solution, the yields of the radicals per 100 eV are 0.29 and 0.48 for the Br(2)(•-) radical in CTAB and CPB containing microemulsions (W(0) = 40), respectively, under N(2)O saturated conditions. Further, we intended to study electron transfer reactions, which occur at and through the interface. The reaction of the Br(2)(•-) radical anion with ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] has been studied to generate the ABTS radical in the water core, and further, its reaction has been investigated with the water-insoluble molecule vitamin E (tocopherol) and water-soluble vitamin C (ascorbic acid). In the present study, we were able to show that, even for molecules which are completely insoluble in water, ABTS scavenging assay is possible by pulse radiolysis technique. Furthermore, these results show that it is possible to follow the reaction of the hydrated inorganic radical with solutes dissolved in the organic phase in a microemulsion without use of a phase transfer catalyst. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R. [Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  12. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred

  13. I/O Sharing in a Multi-core Kernel for Mixed-Criticality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Li , Gang; Top , Søren

    2013-01-01

    Part 8: Real-Time Aspects in Distributed Systems; International audience; In a mixed-criticality system, applications with different safety criticality levels are usually required to be implemented upon one platform for several reasons( reducing hardware cost, space, power consumption). Partitioning technology is used to enable the integration of mixed-criticality applications with reduced certification cost. In the partitioning architecture of strong spatial and temporal isolation, fault pro...

  14. Photodissociation of 1,2-dibromoethylene at 248 nm: Br2 molecular elimination probed by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Ping-Chen; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Sun, B J; Chang, A H H

    2008-06-02

    The Br2 elimination channel is probed for 1,2-C2H2Br2 in the B(3)Pi(+)ou-X(1)Sigma(+)g transition upon irradiation at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). The nascent vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is obtained to be 0.7+/-0.2, thus indicating that the Br2 fragment is produced in hot vibrational states. The obtained Br2 products are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground-state cis isomer via four-center elimination or from cis/trans isomers via three-center elimination, each mechanism involving a transition state that has a Br-Br distance much larger than that of ground state Br2. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathways that lead to Br2 elimination may proceed either through the electronic ground state by internal conversion or through the triplet state by intersystem crossing. Temperature-dependence measurements are examined, thereby supporting the pathway that involves internal conversion--which was excluded previously by using product translational spectroscopy (PTS). The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.120.1, being substantially contributed by the ground-state Br2 product. The discrepancy of this value from that (of 0.2) obtained by PTS may rise from the lack of measurements in probing the triplet-state Br2 product.

  15. Development and thermochemical characterizations of vermiculite/SrBr_2 composite sorbents for low-temperature heat storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.N.; Wang, R.Z.; Zhao, Y.J.; Li, T.X.; Riffat, S.B.; Wajid, N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Novel EVM/SrBr_2 composite sorbents with different salt contents were developed for low-temperature thermal energy storage (TES). Simulative sorption experiment was conducted to obtain the sorption kinetics diagram and identify threshold salt content that composite sorbents can hold without solution leakage. Distribution of salt embedded in EVM was observed by extreme-resolution scanning electron microscopy (ER-SEM). Thermochemical characterizations including desorption performance and desorption heat were fully investigated by analyzing simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) results. Results reveal that sorption process of composite sorbents is divided into three parts: water adsorption of EVM, water adsorption of SrBr_2 crystal and liquid-gas absorption of SrBr_2 solution. Since SrBr_2 solution can be hold in macrospores of EVM, water uptake and energy storage density are greatly increased. It appears that the composite sorbent of EVMSrBr_240 is a promising material for thermal energy storage, with water uptake of 0.53 g/g, mass energy storage density of 0.46 kWh/kg and volume energy storage density of 105.36 kWh/m"3. - Highlights: • Vermiculite/SrBr_2 composite sorbents were developed for thermal energy storage. • Water uptake of composite sorbents is divided into three phases. • Energy storage density of each sorption phase is evaluated via calculations. • EVMSrBr_240 is chosen as optimal sorbent without solution leakage.

  16. Application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to mixed cores with Westinghouse Optima2 fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ming Yuan; Wheeler, John K.; Hoz, Carlos de la [Nuclear Fuels, Warrenville (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The first application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 reload cycle is described in this paper. The first Westinghouse Optima2 reload cycle in the U.S. is Exelon's Quad Cities Unit 2 Cycle 19 (Q2C19). The core contains fresh Optima2 fuel and once burned and twice burned GE14 fuel. Although the licensing analyses for the reload cycle are performed by Westinghouse with Westinghouse methodology, the core is monitored with AREVA's POWERPLEX-III core monitoring system that is based on the CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 (C4/B2) methodology. This necessitates the development of a core model based on the C4/B2 methodology for both reload design and operational support purposes. In addition, as expected, there are many differences between the two vendors' methodologies; they differ not only in modeling some of the physical details of the Optima2 bundles but also in the modeling capability of the computer codes. In order to have high confidence that the online core monitoring results during the cycle startup and operation will comply with the Technical Specifications requirements (e.g., thermal limits, shutdown margins), the reload core design generated by Westinghouse design methodology was confirmed by the C4/B2 model. The C4/B2 model also assures that timely operational support during the cycle can be provided. Since this is the first application of C4/B2 methodology to an Optima2 reload in the US, many issues in the lattice design, bundle design, and reload core design phases were encountered. Many modeling issues have to be considered in order to develop a successful C4/B2 core model for the Optima2/GE14 mixed core. Some of the modeling details and concerns and their resolutions are described. The Q2C19 design was successfully completed and the 2 year cycle successfully started up in April 2006 and shut down in March 2008. Some of the operating results are also presented.

  17. Application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to mixed cores with Westinghouse Optima2 fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ming Yuan; Wheeler, John K.; Hoz, Carlos de la [Nuclear Fuels, Warrenville (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The first application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 reload cycle is described in this paper. The first Westinghouse Optima2 reload cycle in the U.S. is Exelon's Quad Cities Unit 2 Cycle 19 (Q2C19). The core contains fresh Optima2 fuel and once burned and twice burned GE14 fuel. Although the licensing analyses for the reload cycle are performed by Westinghouse with Westinghouse methodology, the core is monitored with AREVA's POWERPLEX-III core monitoring system that is based on the CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 (C4/B2) methodology. This necessitates the development of a core model based on the C4/B2 methodology for both reload design and operational support purposes. In addition, as expected, there are many differences between the two vendors' methodologies; they differ not only in modeling some of the physical details of the Optima2 bundles but also in the modeling capability of the computer codes. In order to have high confidence that the online core monitoring results during the cycle startup and operation will comply with the Technical Specifications requirements (e.g., thermal limits, shutdown margins), the reload core design generated by Westinghouse design methodology was confirmed by the C4/B2 model. The C4/B2 model also assures that timely operational support during the cycle can be provided. Since this is the first application of C4/B2 methodology to an Optima2 reload in the US, many issues in the lattice design, bundle design, and reload core design phases were encountered. Many modeling issues have to be considered in order to develop a successful C4/B2 core model for the Optima2/GE14 mixed core. Some of the modeling details and concerns and their resolutions are described. The Q2C19 design was successfully completed and the 2 year cycle successfully started up in April 2006 and shut down in March 2008. Some of the operating results are also presented.

  18. Application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to mixed cores with Westinghouse Optima2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Ming Yuan; Wheeler, John K.; Hoz, Carlos de la

    2008-01-01

    The first application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 reload cycle is described in this paper. The first Westinghouse Optima2 reload cycle in the U.S. is Exelon's Quad Cities Unit 2 Cycle 19 (Q2C19). The core contains fresh Optima2 fuel and once burned and twice burned GE14 fuel. Although the licensing analyses for the reload cycle are performed by Westinghouse with Westinghouse methodology, the core is monitored with AREVA's POWERPLEX-III core monitoring system that is based on the CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 (C4/B2) methodology. This necessitates the development of a core model based on the C4/B2 methodology for both reload design and operational support purposes. In addition, as expected, there are many differences between the two vendors' methodologies; they differ not only in modeling some of the physical details of the Optima2 bundles but also in the modeling capability of the computer codes. In order to have high confidence that the online core monitoring results during the cycle startup and operation will comply with the Technical Specifications requirements (e.g., thermal limits, shutdown margins), the reload core design generated by Westinghouse design methodology was confirmed by the C4/B2 model. The C4/B2 model also assures that timely operational support during the cycle can be provided. Since this is the first application of C4/B2 methodology to an Optima2 reload in the US, many issues in the lattice design, bundle design, and reload core design phases were encountered. Many modeling issues have to be considered in order to develop a successful C4/B2 core model for the Optima2/GE14 mixed core. Some of the modeling details and concerns and their resolutions are described. The Q2C19 design was successfully completed and the 2 year cycle successfully started up in April 2006 and shut down in March 2008. Some of the operating results are also presented

  19. Studies of mixed HEU-LEU-MTR cores using 3D models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenggi, P.; Lehmann, E.; Hammer, J.; Christen, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-08-01

    Several different core loadings were assembled at the SAPHIR research reactor in Switzerland combining the available types of MTR-type fuel elements, consisting mainly of both HEU and LEU fuel. Bearing in mind the well known problems which can occur in such configurations (especially power peaking), investigations have been carried out for each new loading with a 2D neutron transport code (BOXER). The axial effects were approximated by a global buckling value and therefore the radial effects could be studied in considerably detail. Some of the results were reported at earlier RERTR meetings and were compared to those obtained by other methods and with experimental values. For the explicit study of the third dimension of the core, another code (SILWER), which has been developed in PSI for LWR power plant cores, has been selected. With the help of an adapted model for the MTR-core of SAPHIR, several important questions have been addressed. Among other aspects, the estimation of the axial contribution to the hot channel factors, the influence of the control rod position and of the Xe-poisoning on the power distribution were studied. Special attention was given to a core position where a new element was assumed placed near a empty, water filled position. The comparison of elements of low and high enrichments at this position was made in terms of the induced power peaks, with explicit consideration of axial effects. The program SILWER has proven to be applicable to MTR-cores for the investigation of axial effects. For routine use as for the support of reactor operation, this 3D code is a good supplement to the standard 2D model.

  20. Application of Ni-Oxide@TiO₂ Core-Shell Structures to Photocatalytic Mixed Dye Degradation, CO Oxidation, and Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; Lee, Jisuk; Nam, Kyusuk; Shin, Weon Gyu; Sohn, Youngku

    2016-12-20

    Performing diverse application tests on synthesized metal oxides is critical for identifying suitable application areas based on the material performances. In the present study, Ni-oxide@TiO₂ core-shell materials were synthesized and applied to photocatalytic mixed dye (methyl orange + rhodamine + methylene blue) degradation under ultraviolet (UV) and visible lights, CO oxidation, and supercapacitors. Their physicochemical properties were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. It was shown that their performances were highly dependent on the morphology, thermal treatment procedure, and TiO₂ overlayer coating.

  1. The role of MgBr2 to enhance the ionic conductivity of PVA/PEDOT:PSS polymer composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam M. Sheha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A solid polymer electrolyte system based on poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA and poly(3,4-Etylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS complexed with magnesium bromide (MgBr2 salt was prepared using solution cast technique. The ionic conductivity is observed to increase with increasing MgBr2 concentration. The maximum conductivity was found to be 9.89 × 10−6 S/cm for optimum polymer composite film (30 wt.% MgBr2 at room temperature. The increase in the conductivity is attributed to the increase in the number of ions as the salt concentration is increased. This has been proven by dielectric studies. The increase in conductivity is also attributable to the increase in the fraction of amorphous region in the electrolyte films as confirmed by their structural, thermal, electrical and optical properties.

  2. Optimization of binary breeder reactor IV - Conception of mixed fuel at central part of the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, A.F.; Ishiguro, Y.

    1986-04-01

    Neutronic characteristics of some LMFBRs are analized for a fueling mode that is different from those reported previously. In an inner part of the core both 233 U/ 232 Th and Pu/U assemblies are placed while the outer zone is fueled with Pu/U assemblies. Both oxide metal fuels and 232 Th and 238 U blankets are considered. (Author) [pt

  3. Production and evaluation of cytotoxic effects of DT386-BR2 fusion protein as a novel anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a fusion protein consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects for targeted eradication of cancer cells. For this purpose, The DT386-BR2 structure was predicted using Modeller 9.14 and the best predicted model was selected based on the minimum DOPE score. A synthetic gene encoding DT386-BR2 was cloned in pET28a expression vector, expressed and purified by affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the expression of the DT386-BR2 fusion protein by revealing a band of about 47kDa after the induction of the expression. Finally, the purified protein was subjected to MTT assay for evaluation of its cyto-lethal effects on cancer and normal cell lines. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in survival percent of HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells in comparison to negative control (PBS), while the cytotoxic effect was not significant on the normal cells, i.e. HUVEC and HEK 293. The IC50 of DT386-BR2 for HeLa and MCF-7 was about 0.55 and 2.08μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the production and purification of DT386-BR2 fusion protein was successfully achieved and its cytotoxic effects on the studied cancer cell lines was established. The promising cytotoxic effects of this newly constructed fusion protein made it a suitable candidate for targeted therapy of cancer, and further in vitro and in vivo studies on this fusion protein is underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fine mapping of shattering locus Br2 reveals a putative chromosomal inversion polymorphism between the two lineages of Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhi; Zhu, Huilan; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2015-04-01

    This work laid the foundation for cloning of shattering gene Br2 and provided first line of evidence that two major Aegilops tauschii lineages are differentiated by an inversion polymorphism. Chromosome inversions often accompany population differentiation and capture local adaptation during speciation. Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor species of hexaploid wheat, consists of two genetically isolated lineages, L1 and L2, but little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying the population differentiation in this diploid species. During fine mapping of the shattering gene Br2 using a large F2 population derived from a cross between TA1604 (an L1 accession) and AL8/78 (an L2 accession), we found contrasting patterns of crossover distribution in the Br2 interval and neighboring regions despite the high local gene synteny with Brachypodium distachyon and rice. Br2 was localized in a 0.08-cM interval, and 13 marker loci formed a block, where single-crossovers were completely suppressed, but double-crossovers were enriched with a recombination rate of ~11 cM/Mb. In contrast, in a neighboring region no double-crossover was recovered, but single-crossover rate reached 24 cM/Mb, which is much higher than the genome-wide average. This result suggests a putative inversion polymorphism between the parental lines in the Br2 region. Genotyping using the markers from the Br2 region divided a collection of 55 randomly sampled A. tauschii accessions into two major groups, and they are largely genetically isolated. The two groups correspond to the L1 and L2 lineages based on their geographic distribution patterns. This provides first evidence that inversions may underlie the evolution of A. tauschii lineages. The presence of inter-lineage inversions may complicate map-based cloning in A. tauschii and transfer of useful traits to wheat.

  5. A theoretical study on electronic predissociation in the NeBr2 van der Waals molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón; Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Roncero, Octavio; Pio, Jordan M.; Taylor, Molly A.; Janda, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: What is the chance that the Rg atom induces electronic coupling before it is ejected by vibrational predissociation? How does the competition depend on the initial vibrational level? Ab initio curve couplings are used in a wave packet calculation to successfully simulate experimental results. Highlights: ► We perform ab initio calculations of NeBr 2 PES’s in valence excited states. ► The ab initio PES’s and couplings are used in subsequent WP calculations. ► These WP calculations model the competition between EP and VP. ► The WP results using the ab initio data agree well with experimental results. - Abstract: We present the first comprehensive ab initio study of the Ne–Br 2 potential energy surfaces and the non-adiabatic couplings between the valence excited electronic states. These ab initio results are used to obtain 3-D approximate potentials for each electronic state, and these potentials are used in a wave packet calculation of the competing electronic predissociation and vibrational predissociation dynamics. The results of this calculation are in excellent agreement with both experimental results and a previous empirical fit to the experiments. The calculations allow us to observe not only the competition between vibrational and electronic dynamics for the dimer, but also the competition between two different electronic channels. Coupling to the 2 g state dominates for the levels studied here, but coupling to the C state is progressively more important for low vibrational levels, and may dominate at levels below which the current results pertain. The ability of ab initio surfaces and couplings to so accurately reproduce experimental data raises the hope of a complete understanding of the VP and EP dynamics for other Rg-halogen dimers. Success in the case presented here is largely due to the fact that the VP dynamics for the vibrational levels in this study are in the simple, direct regime. Understanding the simple case so

  6. Probing the ignored elimination channel of Br2 in the 248 nm photodissociation of 1,1-dibromoethylene by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hsiao, Ming-Kai; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Chang, A H H

    2009-03-09

    In the photodissociation of 1,1-C(2)H(2)Br(2) at 248 nm, the Br(2) elimination channel is probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). In terms of spectral simulation, the vibrational population ratio of Br(2)(v = 1)/Br(2)(v = 0) is found to be 0.55+/-0.05, which indicates that the Br(2) fragment is vibrationally hot. The rotational population is thermally equilibrated with a Boltzmann temperature of 349+/-38 K. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained fragments are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground electronic state that undergoes 1) H migration followed by three-center elimination, and 2) isomerization forming either trans- or cis-1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2) from which Br(2) is eliminated. RRKM calculations predict that the Br(2) dissociation rates through the ground singlet state prevail over those through the triplet state. Measurements of temperature and Ar pressure dependence are examined to support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. The quantum yield for the Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.07+/-0.04. This result is smaller than that obtained in 1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2), probably because the dissociation rates are slowed in the isomerization stage.

  7. Thermal Properties for the Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses of the BR2 Maximum Nominal Heat Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Kim, Y. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hofman, G. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2015-02-01

    This memo describes the assumptions and references used in determining the thermal properties for the various materials used in the BR2 HEU (93% enriched in 235U) to LEU (19.75% enriched in 235U) conversion feasibility analysis. More specifically, this memo focuses on the materials contained within the pressure vessel (PV), i.e., the materials that are most relevant to the study of impact of the change of fuel from HEU to LEU. Section 2 provides a summary of the thermal properties in the form of tables while the following sections and appendices present the justification of these values. Section 3 presents a brief background on the approach used to evaluate the thermal properties of the dispersion fuel meat and specific heat capacity. Sections 4 to 7 discuss the material properties for the following materials: i) aluminum, ii) dispersion fuel meat (UAlx-Al and U-7Mo-Al), iii) beryllium, and iv) stainless steel. Section 8 discusses the impact of irradiation on material properties. Section 9 summarizes the material properties for typical operating temperatures. Appendix A elaborates on how to calculate dispersed phase’s volume fraction. Appendix B provides a revised methodology for determining the thermal conductivity as a function of burnup for HEU and LEU.

  8. The bent crystal diffraction spectrometer at the BR2 reactor in Mol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaerts, E.; Jacobs, L.; Vandenput, G.; Van Assche, P. H. M.

    1988-05-01

    The DuMond-type bent crystal diffraction spectrometer installed at the BR2 reactor in Mol is presented. The spectrometer is mainly designed to study nuclear γ-transitions following thermal neutron capture. It covers the energy interval 25 ≦ Eγ ≦ 1500 keV. Instead of the traditionally used quartz crystals, a highly perfect silicium crystal is chosen as analysing crystal. Diffraction occurs from the (220) plane. The "quasi-mosaic" width, introduced by bending the crystal, is as small as 0.2″. The integrated reflecting power R of the bent crystal stays constant up to 1.5 MeV in first, 680 keV in second and 300 keV in third diffraction order. For higher photon energies, only an E-1 energy dependence is observed in second and third diffraction order. Consequently, besides improving the energy resolution, the use of these silicium crystals substantially increases the spectrometer efficiency and extends the high energy limit of bent crystal diffraction spectrometers. The diffraction angles are measured with a symmetrical interferometer system which covers an angular range of -6° to +6° with a precision of about 0.01″. Minimum diffraction line widths of 0.9″ have been measured, corresponding to an energy resolution ΔE = 1.35 × 10 -6E2n-1 keV -1. The dominant contribution to the observed line widths arises from the finite extent of the source.

  9. A Kinetic Study of the Gas-Phase Reaction of OH with Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukov, Mikhail G.; Dellinger, Barry; Knyazev, Vadim D.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental, temperature-dependent kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical with molecular bromine (reaction 1) has been performed using a pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed-laser-induced fluorescence technique over a wide temperature range of 297 – 766 K, and at pressures between 6.68 and 40.29 kPa of helium. The experimental rate coefficients for reaction 1 demonstrate no correlation with pressure and exhibit a negative temperature dependence with a slight negative curvature in the Arrhenius plot. A non-linear least-squares fit with two floating parameters of the temperature dependent k1(T) data set using an equation of the form k1(T) = ATn yields the recommended expression k1(T) = 1.85×10−9T − 0.66 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 for the temperature dependence of the reaction 1 rate coefficient. The potential energy surface (PES) of reaction 1 was investigated using quantum chemistry methods. The reaction proceeds through formation of a weakly bound OH···Br2 complex and a PES saddle point with an energy below that of the reactants. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient was modeled using the RRKM method on the basis of the calculated PES. PMID:16854030

  10. NMR evidence of charge fluctuations in multiferroic CuBr2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Qi; Zheng, Jia-Cheng; Chen, Tao; Wang, Peng-Shuai; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Cui, Yi; Wang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Xu, Sheng; Yuan, Feng; Yu, Wei-Qiang

    2018-03-01

    We report combined magnetic susceptibility, dielectric constant, nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR), and zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on single crystals of multiferroics CuBr2. High quality of the sample is demonstrated by the sharp magnetic and magnetic-driven ferroelectric transition at {T}{{N}}={T}{{C}}≈ 74 K. The zero-field 79Br and 81Br NMR are resolved below T N. The spin-lattice relaxation rates reveal charge fluctuations when cooled below 60 K. Evidences of an increase of NMR linewidth, a reduction of dielectric constant, and an increase of magnetic susceptibility are also seen at low temperatures. These data suggest an emergent instability which competes with the spiral magnetic ordering and the ferroelectricity. Candidate mechanisms are discussed based on the quasi-one-dimensional nature of the magnetic system. Project supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2016YFA0300504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374364), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China, and the Research Funds of Renmin University, China (Grant No. 14XNLF08).

  11. Calculation of fundamental parameters for the dynamical study of TRIGA-3-Salazar reactor (Mixed reactor core)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viais J, J.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetic parameters for dynamic study of two different configurations, 8 and 9, both with standard fuel, 20% enrichment and Flip (Fuel Life Improvement Program with 70% enrichment) fuel, for TRIGA Mark-III reactor from Mexico Nuclear Center, are obtained. A calculation method using both WIMS-D4 and DTF-IV and DAC1 was established, to decide which of those two configurations has the best safety and operational conditions. Validation of this methodology is done by calculate those parameters for a reactor core with new standard fuel. Configuration 9 is recommended to be use. (Author)

  12. Br2(X) microsolvation in helium clusters: effect of the interaction on the quantum solvent density distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Cono; Gianturco, Franco A; López-Durán, David; de Lara-Castells, Maria Pilar; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo; Villarreal, Pablo; Jellinek, Julius

    2005-07-11

    The Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the Br2(X) molecule interacting with a varying number of 4He bosons is constructed following two different schemes which employ either a full ab initio evaluation of the Br2-He interaction forces or an estimate of the latter through an empirical model. Both descriptions are employed by carrying out diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations of the ground-state energies and quantum wavefunctions for Br2-(He)n clusters with n up to 24. The results clearly indicate, for both interactions, the occurrence of the full solvation of the molecular dopant within the quantum bosonic "solvent" but also show differences between the two models in terms of the expected density distributions of the surrounding particles within the shorter-range region that makes up the clusters with smaller n values. Our calculations also show that such differences become insignificant for the larger 4He clusters surrounding the Br2 molecule, where density profiles and bulk behaviour are chiefly driven by the solvent structure, once n values reach the region of 15-20 adatoms.

  13. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-04-25

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that-given that these pathways are conserved in humans-might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity.

  14. Product state resolved excitation spectroscopy of He-, Ne-, and Ar-Br2 linear isomers: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Jordan M; van der Veer, Wytze E; Bieler, Craig R; Janda, Kenneth C

    2008-04-07

    Valence excitation spectra for the linear isomers of He-, Ne-, and Ar-Br2 are reported and compared to a two-dimensional simulation using the currently available potential energy surfaces. Excitation spectra from the ground electronic state to the region of the inner turning point of the Rg-Br2 (B,nu') stretching coordinate are recorded while probing the asymptotic Br2 (B,nu') state. Each spectrum is a broad continuum extending over hundreds of wavenumbers, becoming broader and more blueshifted as the rare gas atom is changed from He to Ne to Ar. In the case of Ne-Br2, the threshold for producing the asymptotic product state reveals the X-state linear isomer bond energy to be 71+/-3 cm(-1). The qualitative agreement between experiment and theory shows that the spectra can be correctly regarded as revealing the one-atom solvent shifts and also provides new insight into the one-atom cage effect on the halogen vibrational relaxation. The measured spectra provide data to test future ab initio potential energy surfaces in the interaction of rare gas atoms with the halogen valence excited state.

  15. Development of a core outcome set for orthodontic trials using a mixed-methods approach: protocol for a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsichlaki, Aliki; O'Brien, Kevin; Johal, Ama; Marshman, Zoe; Benson, Philip; Colonio Salazar, Fiorella B; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2017-08-04

    Orthodontic treatment is commonly undertaken in young people, with over 40% of children in the UK needing treatment and currently one third having treatment, at a cost to the National Health Service in England and Wales of £273 million each year. Most current research about orthodontic care does not consider what patients truly feel about, or want, from treatment, and a diverse range of outcomes is being used with little consistency between studies. This study aims to address these problems, using established methodology to develop a core outcome set for use in future clinical trials of orthodontic interventions in children and young people. This is a mixed-methods study incorporating four distinct stages. The first stage will include a scoping review of the scientific literature to identify primary and secondary outcome measures that have been used in previous orthodontic clinical trials. The second stage will involve qualitative interviews and focus groups with orthodontic patients aged 10 to 16 years to determine what outcomes are important to them. The outcomes elicited from these two stages will inform the third stage of the study in which a long-list of outcomes will be ranked in terms of importance using electronic Delphi surveys involving clinicians and patients. The final stage of the study will involve face-to-face consensus meetings with all stakeholders to discuss and agree on the outcome measures that should be included in the final core outcome set. This research will help to inform patients, parents, clinicians and commissioners about outcomes that are important to young people undergoing orthodontic treatment. Adoption of the core outcome set in future clinical trials of orthodontic treatment will make it easier for results to be compared, contrasted and combined. This should translate into improved decision-making by all stakeholders involved. The project has been registered on the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials ( COMET ) website

  16. Mixed first- and second-order transport method using domain decomposition techniques for reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardi, E.; Ruggieri, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the last developments made on a domain decomposition method applied to reactor core calculations. In this method, two kind of balance equation with two different numerical methods dealing with two different unknowns are coupled. In the first part the two balance transport equations (first order and second order one) are presented with the corresponding following numerical methods: Variational Nodal Method and Discrete Ordinate Nodal Method. In the second part, the Multi-Method/Multi-Domain algorithm is introduced by applying the Schwarz domain decomposition to the multigroup eigenvalue problem of the transport equation. The resulting algorithm is then provided. The projection operators used to coupled the two methods are detailed in the last part of the paper. Finally some preliminary numerical applications on benchmarks are given showing encouraging results. (authors)

  17. Component mode synthesis methods for 3-D heterogeneous core calculations applied to the mixed-dual finite element solver MINOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A.M.; Lautard, J.J.; Van Criekingen, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous three-dimensional calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis (CMS) technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions. In the first one (the CMS method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (factorized CMS method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher-order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher-order angular approximations-particularly easily to an SPN approximation-the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with uranium dioxide and mixed oxide assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  18. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  19. CRM1-mediated nuclear export is required for 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation of the TRIP-Br2 proto-oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Hsu, Stephen I-Hong

    2008-04-25

    Overexpression of the proto-oncogene TRIP-Br2 (SERTAD2) has been shown to induce E2F activity and promote tumorigenesis, whereas ablation of TRIP-Br2 arrests cell proliferation. Timely degradation of many cell cycle regulators is fundamental to the maintenance of proper cell cycle progression. Here we report novel mechanism(s) that govern the tight regulation of TRIP-Br2 levels during cell cycle progression. TRIP-Br2 was observed to be a short-lived protein in which the expression level peaks at the G(1)/S boundary. TRIP-Br2 accumulated in cells treated with 26 S proteasome inhibitors. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TRIP-Br2 forms ubiquitin conjugates. In silico analysis identified a putative leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif that overlaps with the PHD-Bromo interaction domain in the acidic C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of TRIP-Br2. This NES motif is highly conserved in widely divergent species and in all TRIP-Br family members. TRIP-Br2 was shown to be stabilized in G(2)/M phase cells through nuclear entrapment, either by deletion of the acidic C-terminal TAD, which includes the NES motif, or by leptomycin B-mediated inhibition of the CRM1-dependent nuclear export machinery. Mutation of leucine residue 238 of this NES motif abolished the interaction between CRM1 and TRIP-Br2, as well as the nuclear export of TRIP-Br2 and its subsequent 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation. These data suggest that CRM1-mediated nuclear export may be required for the proper execution of ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of TRIP-Br2.

  20. LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics were calculated for reference HEU and two proposed LEU fuel cycles using an 11-group diffusion-theory neutron flux solution in hexagonal-Z geometry. The diffusion theory model was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo core model. The two proposed LEU fuel designs increased the 235 U loading 20% and the fuel meat volume 51%. The first LEU design used 10 B as a burnable absorber. Either proposed LEU fuel element would provide equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics similar to those of the HEU fuel cycle. Irradiation rates of Co control followers and Ir disks in the center of the core were reduced 6 ± 1% in the LEU equilibrium core compared to reference HEU core. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  1. On-line fast flux measurements in the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2001, CEA-Cadarache and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are collaborating on the development and in-pile qualification of subminiature fission chambers (diameter of 1.5 mm). Initially, efforts concentrated on fission chambers for the in-pile measurement of thermal fluxes (with 235 U as fissile material). Meanwhile successful long-term tests of the prototypes have been performed in various environments: in low temperature (40-100 degress Celsius) BR2 pool water (up to a thermal neutron fluence of 3 1 0 21 n/cm 2 ) and in the CALLISTO PWR loop (300 degrees Celsius, 155 bars). The long-term qualification of derived industrial detectors (Photonis CFUZ53) in CALLISTO is still ongoing. However, for various types of irradiations in research reactors, the knowledge of the evolution of the fast neutron flux is even of more interest than the thermal flux data. Therefore the collaboration program was extended to the development and the in-pile qualification of subminiature or miniature fission chambers (with 3 mm diameter) for fast neutron detection, for which 242 Pu was selected as the optimal fissile material. In order to achieve the on-line in-pile measurement of fast neutron flux, the fission chambers will be operated in the Campbelling mode (based on the mean square fluctuation of the detector current). In this mode the gamma induced contribution to the signal can be efficiently suppressed. Moreover, a data processing software will take into account the evolution of the fissile deposit in order to assess on-line the fast flux sensitivity and to correct for the low energy neutron contributions. The final objective is to qualify a Fast Neutron Detector System (FNDS) able to provide on-line data for local fast neutron fluxes in Material Testing Reactors. The on-line measurement of the fast neutron flux would contribute significantly to the characterization of the irradiation conditions during test experiments with materials and innovative fuel elements

  2. 3+ and [Sb13Se16Br2] 5+ - Double and quadruple spiro cubanes from ionic liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2014-01-08

    The reaction of antimony and selenium in the bromine-rich Lewis acidic ionic liquid [BMIm]Br·4.7AlBr3 (BMIm: 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium) in the presence of a small amount of NbCl5 at 160 °C yielded dark-red crystals of [Sb7Se8Br 2][AlX4]3. For X = Cl0.15(1)Br 0.85(1), the compound is isostructural to [Sb7S 8Br2][AlCl4]3 [P212 121, a = 12.5132(5) Å, b = 17.7394(6) Å, c = 18.3013(6) Å]. For a higher chlorine content, X = Cl 0.58(1)Br0.42(1), a slightly disordered variant with a bisected unit cell is found [P21212, a = 12.3757(3) Å, b = 17.4116(5) Å, c = 9.0420(2) Å]. The [Sb 7Se8Br2]3+ heteropolycation (C 2 symmetry) is a spiro double-cubane with an antimony atom on the shared corner. From this distorted octahedrally coordinated central atom, tricoordinate selenium and antimony atoms alternate in the bonding sequence. The terminal antimony atoms each bind to a bromine atom. Quantum chemical calculations confirm polar covalent Sb-Se bonding within the cubes and indicate three-center, four-electron bonds for the six-coordinate spiro atoms. The calculated charge distribution reflects the electron-donor role of the antimony atoms. The use of a chlorine-rich ionic liquid resulted in the formation of triclinic [Sb13Se16Br2][AlX4] 5 with X = Cl0.80(1)Br0.20(1) [P$\\\\bar {1}$, a = 9.0842(5) Å, b = 19.607(1) Å, c = 21.511(1) Å, α = 64.116(6), β = 79.768(7), γ = 88.499(7)]. The cationic cluster [Sb13Se16Br2]5+ is a bromine-terminated spiro quadruple-cubane. This 31 atom concatenation of four cubes is assumed to be the largest known discrete main group polycation. A similar reaction in a chloride-free system yielded [Sb7Se 8Br2][Sb13Se16Br2] [AlBr4]8. In its monoclinic structure [P2/c, a = 27.214(5) Å, b = 9.383(2) Å, c = 22.917(4) Å, β = 101.68(1)], the two types of polycations alternate in layers along the a axis. In the series [Sb4+3nSe4+4nBr2](2+n)+, these cations are the members with n = 1 and 3. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  3. In situ Spectroscopy of Solid-State Chemical Reaction in PbBr2-Deposited CsBr Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Matsunaga, Toshihiro; Saito, Tadaaki; Asada, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    It is possible to measure the fundamental optical absorption spectra of CsPbBr3 and Cs4PbBr6, whose stability is predicted by the study of phase diagram in the binary system CsBr-PbBr2, by means of in situ optical absorption and reflection spectroscopy of thermally induced solid-state chemical reaction in PbBr2-deposited CsBr crystals. On heavy annealing of the crystals, the Pb2+ ions are uniformly dispersed in the crystal matrix. The present experiment provides a novel method for measuring intrinsic optical absorption of ternary metal halides and also for in situ monitoring of doping metal halide crystal with impurities (metal ions or halogen ions).

  4. Cage-Like Porous Carbon with Superhigh Activity and Br2 -Complex-Entrapping Capability for Bromine-Based Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenhui; Lai, Qinzhi; Xu, Pengcheng; Zheng, Daoyuan; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-06-01

    Bromine-based flow batteries receive wide attention in large-scale energy storage because of their attractive features, such as high energy density and low cost. However, the Br 2 diffusion and relatively low activity of Br 2 /Br - hinder their further application. Herein, a cage-like porous carbon (CPC) with specific pore structure combining superhigh activity and Br 2 -complex-entrapping capability is designed and fabricated. According to the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculation, the pore size of the CPC (1.1 nm) is well designed between the size of Br - (4.83 Å), MEP + (9.25 Å), and Br 2 complex (MEPBr 3 12.40 Å), wherein Br - is oxidized to Br 2 , which forms a Br 2 complex with the complexing agent immediately and is then entrapped in the cage via pore size exclusion. In addition, the active sites produced during the carbon dioxide activation process dramatically accelerate the reaction rate of Br 2 /Br - . In this way, combining a high Br 2 -entrapping-capability and high specific surface areas, the CPC shows very impressive performance. The zinc bromine flow battery assembled with the prepared CPC shows a Coulombic efficiency of 98% and an energy efficiency of 81% at the current density of 80 mA cm -2 , which are among the highest values ever reported. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Quantum state-to-state dynamics for the quenching process of Br(2P1/2) + H2(v(i) = 0, 1, j(i) = 0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Sun, Zhigang

    2012-03-21

    Quantum state-to-state dynamics for the quenching process Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v(i) = 0, 1, j(i) = 0) → Br((2)P(3/2)) + H(2)(v(f), j(f)) has been studied based on two-state model on the recent coupled potential energy surfaces. It was found that the quenching probabilities have some oscillatory structures due to the interference of reflected flux in the Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2) and Br((2)P(3/2)) + H(2) channels by repulsive potential in the near-resonant electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer process. The final vibrational state resolved integral cross sections were found to be dominated by the quenching process Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v) → Br((2)P(3/2)) + H(2)(v+1) and the nonadiabatic reaction probabilities for Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v = 0, 1, j(i) = 0) are quite small, which are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental results. Our calculated total quenching rate constant for Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0) at room temperature is in good agreement with the available experimental data. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  6. 3+ and [Sb13Se16Br2] 5+ - Double and quadruple spiro cubanes from ionic liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ejaz; Breternitz, Joachim; Groh, Matthias Friedrich; Isaeva, Anna A.; Ruck, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of antimony and selenium in the bromine-rich Lewis acidic ionic liquid [BMIm]Br·4.7AlBr3 (BMIm: 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium) in the presence of a small amount of NbCl5 at 160 °C yielded dark-red crystals of [Sb7Se8Br 2][AlX4]3. For X

  7. Refurbishment of BR2 (Phase 4 and 5)[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Van der Auwera, J.

    1998-07-01

    The extensive refurbishment of the BR-2 materials testing reactor should allow another 10 to 15years of continued operation. The refurbishment programme is required in order to comply with modern safety standards, to enhance the reliability of operation, and to compensate for the ageing of the installations of a facility that has reached about 35 years of intensive service. The main objectives and achievements of phase 4 and 5 are described.

  8. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli ( E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3), followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM). Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml). Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies.

  9. Safety challenges encountered during the operating life of the almost 40 year old research reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Joppen, F.; Gubel, P.

    2001-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is one of the major MTR-type research reactors in the world. Its operation started in the early 1960's. Two major refurbishment operations have been carried out since then. Several safety reassessments were carried out over the years in order to keep the safety level in line with modern standards and to enhance operational safety. This paper gives an overview of the safety challenges encountered over the years and how those were met. (author)

  10. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shafiee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Materials and Methods: Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3, followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM. Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Results: Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml. Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. Conclusion: In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies.

  11. Analysis Influence of Mixing Gd2O3 in the Silicide Fuel Element to Core Excess Reactivity of RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilo, Jati

    2004-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd 2 O 3 ) is a burnable poison material mixed in the pin fuel element of the LWR core used to decrease core excess reactivity. In this research, analysis influence of mixing Gd 2 O 3 in the silicide fuel element to excess reactivity of the RSG-GAS core had been done. Equivalent cell of the equilibrium core developed by L.E.Strawbridge from Westing House Co. burn-up calculation has been done using SRAC-PIJ computer code achieve infinite multiplication factor (k x ). Value of Gd 2 O 3 concentration in the fuel element (pcm) showed by mass ratio of Gd 2 O 3 (gram) to that U 3 Si 2 (gram) times 10 5 , that is 0 pcm ∼ 100 pcm. From the calculation results analysis showed that Gd 2 O 3 concentration added should be considered. because a large number of Gd 2 O 3 will result in not achieving criticality at the Beginning Of Cycle. The maximum concentration of Gd 2 O 3 for RSG-GAS equilibrium fueled silicide 2.96 grU/cc is 80 pcm or 52.02 mgram/fuel plate. Maximum reduction of core excess reactivity due to mixing of Gd 2 O 3 in the RSG-GAS silicide fuels was around 1.502 %Δk/k, and hence not achieving the standard nominal excess reactivity for RSG-GAS core using high density of U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel. (author)

  12. Reaction of Br2 with adsorbed CO on Pt, studied by the surface interrogation mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Bard, Allen J

    2009-12-02

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy surface interrogation (SI-SECM) in the cyclic voltammetry mode was successfully used to detect and quantify adsorbed CO on a Pt electrode by reaction with electrogenerated Br(2). The two-electrode setup used in this new technique allowed the production of Br(2) on an interrogator tip, which reported a transient positive feedback above a Pt substrate at open circuit as an indication of the reactivity of this halogen with CO((ads)). Br(-) and CO(2) are shown to be the main products of the reaction (in the absence of O(2)), which may involve the formation of bromophosgene as a hydrolyzable intermediate. Under saturation conditions, CO((ads)) was reproducibly quantified at the polycrystalline Pt surface with theta(CO) approximately = 0.5. The reaction is shown to be blocked by the action of pre-adsorbed cyanide, which demonstrates the surface character of the process. The formation of CO(2) as an end product was further tested in a bulk experiment: addition of Pt black to a mixture of Br(2) in 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) through which CO was bubbled gave a precipitate of BaCO(3) in a saturated solution of Ba(OH)(2). The use of SI-SECM allowed access to a reaction that would otherwise be difficult to prove through conventional electrochemistry on a single electrode.

  13. PIRAMID 1: a prime European CEC experiment in BR2 at Mol, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, C.; Simoni, O.

    1987-01-01

    In the event of a core disruptive accident in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), molten core materials interacting with liquid sodium may form debris beds to settle on the retention structures or on the reactor vessel. The decay heat of retained fission products can induce high temperatures or high thermal loads on the retention structures or the reactor vessel with consequent fission product release. To assess the long-term coolability of core debris beds the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) decided to coordinate and fund the European PAHR (Post-Accident Heat Removal) program. The first work carried out for the program resulted in PIRAMID 1 (Pahr IRradiation According to a Mol Integrated Device), a unique irradiation device, designed, constructed and tested at Mol

  14. Dimensioning the EVITA semi-open loop at BR2 for qualification of full size JHR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Research reactor fuel (LEU) qualification as part of the licensing process of the JHR reactor. → Thermal-hydraulic dimensioning process of fuel irradiation installation. → We compare the predicted pressure profile in the installation with in situ measured values. - Abstract: The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the next generation research reactor from CEA and which commissioning is foreseen in 2014. Prior to acquiring the exploitation license, the fuel elements have to be qualified for their intended functioning power. The only facility capable to perform this task is the Belgian research reactor BR2, due to its similar thermal-hydraulic parameters. At the moment, one has already tested the fuel plates separately. The preparation of the JHR safety report still needs the test of full size elements. This JHR fuel element is broader and more powerful than a standard BR2 fuel element, and one cannot perform an irradiation by simply interchanging them. However, BR2 has 200 mm channels at its disposal, which can be adapted to give the correct hydraulic diameter. One also needs an additional pump to deliver the necessary cooling flow rate for the higher power. This paper describes the dimensioning of the EVITA semi-open loop, which has been built at BR2 to irradiate full size JHR fuel elements and qualify them for the foreseen exploitation parameters. One explains here the followed methodology to quantify the required additional head for the booster pump and to determine the pressure profile along the circuit and the safety margin on the fuel. This methodology relies only on a priori calculations without any measurement on full size installation subpart as usual before the assembly in controlled zone. The article also explains how the original JHR thermal hydraulic safety calculation scheme was adapted to the BR2 environment. One also compares the measurement results on the fully built installation with our previsions. Our models compare well

  15. Theoretical studies on photoelectron and IR spectral properties of Br2.-(H2O)n clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A K; Mukherjee, T; Maity, D K

    2007-07-28

    We report vertical detachment energy (VDE) and IR spectra of Br2.-.(H2O)n clusters (n=1-8) based on first principles electronic structure calculations. Cluster structures and IR spectra are calculated at Becke's half-and-half hybrid exchange-correlation functional (BHHLYP) with a triple split valence basis function, 6-311++G(d,p). VDE for the hydrated clusters is calculated based on second order Moller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) theory with the same set of basis function. On full geometry optimization, it is observed that conformers having interwater hydrogen bonding among solvent water molecules are more stable than the structures having double or single hydrogen bonded structures between the anionic solute, Br2.-, and solvent water molecules. Moreover, a conformer having cyclic interwater hydrogen bonded network is predicted to be more stable for each size hydrated cluster. It is also noticed that up to four solvent H2O units can reside around the solute in a cyclic interwater hydrogen bonded network. The excess electron in these hydrated clusters is localized over the solute atoms. Weighted average VDE is calculated for each size (n) cluster based on statistical population of the conformers at 150 K. A linear relationship is obtained for VDE versus (n+3)(-1/3) and bulk VDE of Br2.- aqueous solution is calculated as 10.01 eV at MP2 level of theory. BHHLYP density functional is seen to make a systematic overestimation in VDE values by approximately 0.5 eV compared to MP2 data in all the hydrated clusters. It is observed that hydration increases VDE of bromine dimer anion system by approximately 6.4 eV. Calculated IR spectra show that the formation of Br2.--water clusters induces large shifts from the normal O-H stretching bands of isolated water keeping bending modes rather insensitive. Hydrated clusters, Br2.-.(H2O)n, show characteristic sharp features of O-H stretching bands of water in the small size clusters.

  16. Finding the Missing Stratospheric Br(sub y): A Global Modeling Study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Q.; Stolarski, R. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Blake, D. R.; Atlas, E. L.; Ott, L. E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent in situ and satellite measurements suggest a contribution of 5 pptv to stratospheric inorganic bromine from short-lived bromocarbons. We conduct a modeling study of the two most important short-lived bromocarbons, bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to account for this missing stratospheric bromine. We derive a "top-down" emission estimate of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 using airborne measurements in the Pacific and North American troposphere and lower stratosphere obtained during previous NASA aircraft campaigns. Our emission estimate suggests that to reproduce the observed concentrations in the free troposphere, a global oceanic emission of 425 Gg Br yr(exp -1) for CHBr3 and 57 Gg Br yr(exp -l) for CH2Br2 is needed, with 60% of emissions from open ocean and 40% from coastal regions. Although our simple emission scheme assumes no seasonal variations, the model reproduces the observed seasonal variations of the short-lived bromocarbons with high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. This indicates that the seasonality of short-lived bromocarbons is largely due to seasonality in their chemical loss and transport. The inclusion of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 contributes 5 pptv bromine throughout the stratosphere. Both the source gases and inorganic bromine produced from source gas degradation (BrSLS) in the troposphere are transported into the stratosphere, and are equally important. Inorganic bromine accounts for half (2.5 pptv) of the bromine from the inclusion of CHBr3 and CHzBr2 near the tropical tropopause and its contribution rapidly increases to 100% as altitude increases. More than 85% of the wet scavenging of Br(sub y)(sup VSLS) occurs in large-scale precipitation below 500 hPa. Our sensitivity study with wet scavenging in convective updrafts switched off suggests that Br(sub y)(sup SLS) in the stratosphere is not sensitive to convection. Convective scavenging only

  17. Theoretical studies on photoelectron and IR spectral properties of Br2.-(H2O)n clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. K.; Mukherjee, T.; Maity, D. K.

    2007-07-01

    We report vertical detachment energy (VDE) and IR spectra of Br2•-•(H2O)n clusters (n=1-8) based on first principles electronic structure calculations. Cluster structures and IR spectra are calculated at Becke's half-and-half hybrid exchange-correlation functional (BHHLYP) with a triple split valence basis function, 6-311++G(d,p). VDE for the hydrated clusters is calculated based on second order Moller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) theory with the same set of basis function. On full geometry optimization, it is observed that conformers having interwater hydrogen bonding among solvent water molecules are more stable than the structures having double or single hydrogen bonded structures between the anionic solute, Br2•-, and solvent water molecules. Moreover, a conformer having cyclic interwater hydrogen bonded network is predicted to be more stable for each size hydrated cluster. It is also noticed that up to four solvent H2O units can reside around the solute in a cyclic interwater hydrogen bonded network. The excess electron in these hydrated clusters is localized over the solute atoms. Weighted average VDE is calculated for each size (n) cluster based on statistical population of the conformers at 150K. A linear relationship is obtained for VDE versus (n+3)-1/3 and bulk VDE of Br2•- aqueous solution is calculated as 10.01eV at MP2 level of theory. BHHLYP density functional is seen to make a systematic overestimation in VDE values by ˜0.5eV compared to MP2 data in all the hydrated clusters. It is observed that hydration increases VDE of bromine dimer anion system by ˜6.4eV. Calculated IR spectra show that the formation of Br2•--water clusters induces large shifts from the normal O-H stretching bands of isolated water keeping bending modes rather insensitive. Hydrated clusters, Br2•-•(H2O)n, show characteristic sharp features of O-H stretching bands of water in the small size clusters.

  18. Bonding in d9 complexes derived from EPR: Application to CuCl2-4, CuBr2-4, and CdCl2:Cu2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramburu, J. A.; Moreno, M.

    1985-12-01

    In this work are reported the theoretical expressions for the [g], hyperfine, and superhyperfine (shf) tensors of a d9 square-planar complex within a molecular orbital (MO) scheme. These expressions include contributions arising from crystal field and charge transfer excitations calculated up to third and second order perturbations, respectively. This makes the present framework more general than those previously used. Through those expressions we have derived from the experimental EPR and optical data the MO coefficients corresponding to the valence b1g(x2-y2), b2g(xy), and eg(xz,yz) levels and also the core polarization contribution K to the hyperfine tensor for the systems CuCl2-4, CuBr2-4, and CdCl2:Cu2+. The 3d charge obtained for CuCl2-4 is equal to 0.61, 0.83, and 0.85 for the antibonding 3b1g, 2b2g, and 2eg levels, respectively. These figures are much closer to the Xα results by Bencini and Gatteschi [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 5535 (1983)] than to those by Desjardins et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 4590 (1983)]. The σ and π covalency for CuBr2-4 are both higher than for CuCl2-4 in accord to the lower electronegativity for bromine. However, only for the antibonding 3b1g level of CuBr2-4 have we obtained an electronic charge lying mainly on ligands. The covalency of CdCl2:Cu2+ is smaller than that found for CuCl2-4, a fact associated to a higher metal-ligand distance for the former. Evidence of this statement are also given from the analysis of crystal-field spectra and isotropic shf constant. The values of K derived for CuCl2-4 (128.1×10-4 cm-1), CuBr2-4 (103.6×10-4 cm-1), and CdCl2:Cu2+ (123.9×10-4 cm-1) point out the dependence of K on the equatorial covalency but also on the existence of axial ligands. The [g] tensor of CuBr2-4 is dominated by the charge transfer contribution while the crystal field one is negative. Finally an analysis of the importance of each one of the involved contributions to the spin-Hamiltonian parameters is reported for the

  19. Neutronic analysis of the PBMR-400 full core using thorium fuel mixed with plutonium or minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acır, Adem; Coşkun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Neutronic calculations for PBMR 400 were conducted with the computer codes MCNP and MONTEBURNS 2.0. ► The criticality and burnup were investigated for reactor grade plutonium and minor actinides. ► We found that the use of these new fuels in PBMRs would reduce the nuclear waste repository significantly. -- Abstract: Time evolution of criticality and burnup grades of the PBMR were investigated for reactor grade plutonium and minor actinides in the spent fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) mixed with thoria. The calculations were performed by employing the computer codes MCNP and MONTEBURNS 2.0 and using the ENDF/B-V nuclear data library. Firstly, the plutonium–thorium and minor actinides–thorium ratio was determined by using the initial k eff value of the original uranium fuel design. After the selection of the plutonium/minor actinides–thorium mixture ratio, the time-dependent neutronic behavior of the reactor grade plutonium and minor actinides and original fuels in a PBMR-400 reactor was calculated by using the MCNP code. Finally, k eff , burnup and operation time values of the fuels were compared. The core effective multiplication factor (k eff ) for the original fuel which has 9.6 wt.% enriched uranium was computed as 1.2395. Corresponding to this k eff value the reactor grade plutonium/thorium and minor actinide/thorium oxide mixtures were found to be 30%/70% and 50%/50%, respectively. The core lives for the original, the reactor grade plutonium/thorium and the minor actinide/thorium fuels were calculated as ∼3.2, ∼6.5 and ∼5.5 years, whereas, the corresponding burnups came out to be 99,000, ∼190,000 and ∼166,000 MWD/T, respectively, for an end of life k eff set equal to 1.02.

  20. A cancer specific cell-penetrating peptide, BR2, for the efficient delivery of an scFv into cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Jung Lim

    Full Text Available Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2 was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49-57. The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V. BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity.

  1. A cancer specific cell-penetrating peptide, BR2, for the efficient delivery of an scFv into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ki Jung; Sung, Bong Hyun; Shin, Ju Ri; Lee, Young Woong; Kim, Da Jung; Yang, Kyung Seok; Kim, Sun Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2) was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49-57). The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V). BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity.

  2. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  3. Action plan for 1965, Annex 2; Prilog br. 2 - Plan zadataka u 1965. godini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-15

    Action plan presented in this annex includes tasks of the mechanics, electrical and electronic equipment services. It includes a detailed list of planned and preventive maintenance actions related to the heavy water system, technical water system, helium system, reactor core, transportation equipment, hot cells, heating and ventilation systems in the reactor building, power supply system, auxiliary systems in the RA reactor building. [Serbo-Croat] Plan zadataka obuhvata aktivnosti masinske i elektro grupe na preventivnom odrzavanju i planskom remontu sistema teske vode, sistema tehnicke vode, sistema helijuma, centralnog tela reaktora, sistema grejanja i ventilacije, sistema za snabdevanje elektricnom energijom, i ostalih pomocnih sistema u zgradi reaktora RA.

  4. Preliminary LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel cycle calculations have been performed with reference HEU fuel and LEU fuel using Cd wires or boron as burnable absorbers. The 235 U content in the LEU element has increased 20% to 480g compared to the reference HEU element. The number of fuel plates has remained unchanged while the fuel meat thickness has increased to 0.76 mm from 0.51 mm. The LEU meat density is 5.1 Mg U/m 3 . The reference fuel cycle was a 31 element core operating at 56 MW with a 19.8 day cycle length and eight fresh elements loaded per cycle. Comparable fuel cycle characteristics can be achieved using the proposed LEU fuel element with either Cd wires or boron burnable absorbers. The neutron flux for E/sub n/ > 1 eV changes very little (<5%) in LEU relative to HEU cores. Thermal flux reductions are 5 to 10% in non-fueled positions, and 20 to 30% in fuel elements

  5. Diethylenetriamine/diamines/copper (II complexes [Cu(dien(NN]Br2: Synthesis, solvatochromism, thermal, electrochemistry, single crystal, Hirshfeld surface analysis and antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Abu Saleemh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two dicationic water soluble mixed triamine/diamine copper (II complexes, of general formula [Cu(dienNN]Br2 (1–2 [dien = diethelenetriamine and NN is en = ethylenediamine or Me4en = N,N′,N,N′-tetramethylethylenediamine] were prepared under ultrasonic mode with a relatively high yield. These complexes were characterized by elemental microanalysis, UV visible IR spectroscopy, and thermal and electrochemical techniques. In addition, complex 2 structure was solved by X-ray single crystal and Hirshfeld surface analysis. The complex exhibits a distorted square pyramidal coordination environment around Cu(II centre. The solvatochromism of the desired complexes was investigated in water and other suitable organic solvents. The results show that the Guttmann’s DN parameter values of the solvents have mainly contributed to the shift of the d–d absorption band towards the linear increase in the wavelength of the absorption maxima of the complexes. The complex 1 showed higher antibacterial activity against the studied microorganisms compared to complex 2. Both complexes revealed promising antibacterial activities.

  6. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tunable Size Synthesis and Analysis in Terms of the Core-Shell Structure and Mixed Coercive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, P. T.; Oanh, V. T. K.; Lam, T. D.; Phuc, N. X.; Tung, L. D.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Manh, D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are currently a very active research field. To date, a comprehensive study of iron oxide NPs is still lacking not only on the size dependence of structural phases but also in the use of an appropriate model. Herein, we report on a systematic study of the structural and magnetic properties of iron oxide NPs prepared by a co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the NPs have an inverse spinel structure of iron oxide phase (Fe3O4) with average crystallite sizes ( D XRD) of 6-19 nm, while grain sizes ( D TEM) are of 7-23 nm. In addition, the larger the particle size, the closer the experimental lattice constant value is to that of the magnetite structure. Magnetic field-dependent magnetization data and analysis show that the effective anisotropy constants of the Fe3O4 NPs are about five times larger than that of their bulk counterpart. Particle size ( D) dependence of the magnetization and the non-saturating behavior observed in applied fields up to 50 kOe are discussed using the core-shell structure model. We find that with decreasing D, while the calculated thickness of the shell of disordered spins ( t ˜ 0.3 nm) remains almost unchanged, the specific surface areas S a increases significantly, thus reducing the magnetization of the NPs. We also probe the coercivity of the NPs by using the mixed coercive Kneller and Luborsky model. The calculated results indicate that the coercivity rises monotonously with the particle size, and are well matched with the experimental ones.

  7. Assessing the occurrence of the dibromide radical (Br2−·) in natural waters: Measures of triplet-sensitised formation, reactivity, and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Mailhot, Gilles; Sarakha, Mohamed; Brigante, Marcello; Vione, Davide

    2012-01-01

    The triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate (AQ2S) is able to oxidise bromide to Br · /Br 2 −· , with rate constant (2–4) ⋅ 10 9 M −1 s −1 that depends on the pH. Similar processes are expected to take place between bromide and the triplet states of naturally occurring chromophoric dissolved organic matter ( 3 CDOM*). The brominating agent Br 2 −· could thus be formed in natural waters upon oxidation of bromide by both · OH and 3 CDOM*. Br 2 −· would be consumed by disproportionation into bromide and bromine, as well as upon reaction with nitrite and most notably with dissolved organic matter (DOM). By using the laser flash photolysis technique, and phenol as model organic molecule, a second-order reaction rate constant of ∼ 3 ⋅ 10 2 L (mg C) −1 s −1 was measured between Br 2 −· and DOM. It was thus possible to model the formation and reactivity of Br 2 −· in natural waters, assessing the steady-state [Br 2 −· ] ≈ 10 −13 –10 −12 M. It is concluded that bromide oxidation by 3 CDOM* would be significant compared to oxidation by · OH. The 3 CDOM*-mediated process would prevail in DOM-rich and bromide-rich environments, the latter because elevated bromide would completely scavenge · OH. Under such conditions, · OH-assisted formation of Br 2 −· would be limited by the formation rate of the hydroxyl radical. In contrast, the formation rate of 3 CDOM* is much higher compared to that of · OH in most surface waters and would provide a large 3 CDOM* reservoir for bromide to react with. A further issue is that nitrite oxidation by Br 2 −· could be an important source of the nitrating agent · NO 2 in bromide-rich, nitrite-rich and DOM-poor environments. Such a process could possibly account for significant aromatic photonitration observed in irradiated seawater and in sunlit brackish lagoons. Highlights: ► The triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate oxidises bromide to Br 2 −· . ► Dissolved organic matter is

  8. SoLid: An innovative anti-neutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Yamiel; SoLid Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline from the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite polyvinyl-toluene and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and SiPM. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, good neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a new generation of an anti-neutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalisation and energy calibration. The performance of the first 288 kg SoLid module (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 from February to September 2015, will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, which will start in 2016, and the future plans of the experiment.

  9. Qualification program for JHR fuel elements: Irradiation of the first JHR test assembly in the BR2-Evita loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmet, M.-C.; Lemoine, P.; Koonen, E.; Benoit, P.; Gouat, P.; Claes, W.; Geens, F.; Miras, G.; Brisson, S.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed by CEA to qualify the behaviour of the JHR fuel under conditions representative of the reactor operating ones. This program uses the SCK.CEN facilities, irradiating JHR lead test elements in the BR2 reactor, inside its central channel which has been particularly arranged for this objective (Evita loop). As a first step in the program, a two cycle irradiation (4 weeks by cycle) started mid-July 2009 and ended mid-November (EVITA-1). After a cooling phase, this first JHR lead test element will be submitted to post-irradiation examination. The second JHR test element began its irradiation in the first quarter of 2010; its unloading is planned before the end of 2010, after 5 cycles in the BR2 reactor. The results of these two experiments are expected as input information for the Safety Authority Report. This paper presents the qualification program with the objectives assigned to each phase (irradiation, examination). A first interpretation of the irradiation data for the first element is presented, so as the information available on the progress of the following phases of the programme. (author)

  10. Tuning patterning conditions by co-adsorption of gases: Br2 and H2 on Si(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sananda; Deshpande, Sadanand V; Dunn, Derren N; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2013-11-14

    We have studied the co-adsorption of Br2 and H2 on Si(001), and obtained co-adsorption energies and the surface phase diagram as a function of the chemical potential and pressure of the two gases. To do this, we have used density functional theory calculations in combination with ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. Over large ranges of bromine and hydrogen chemical potentials, the favored configuration is found to be either one with only Br atoms adsorbed on the surface, at full coverage, in a (3 × 2) pattern, or a fully H-covered surface in a (2 × 1) structure. However, we also find regions of the phase diagram where there are configurations with either only Br atoms, or Br and H atoms, arranged in a two-atom-wide checkerboard pattern with a (4 × 2) surface unit cell. Most interestingly, we find that by co-adsorbing with H2, we bring this pattern into a region of the phase diagram corresponding to pressures that are significantly higher than those where it is observed with Br2 alone. We also find small regions of the phase diagram with several other interesting patterns.

  11. The dynamics of the Hg + Br2 reaction: elucidation of the reaction mechanism for the Br exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P G; Menéndez, M; Aoiz, F J

    2017-06-28

    In spite of its importance in the Hg atmospheric chemistry, the dynamics of the Hg + Br 2 → HgBr + Br reaction is poorly understood. In this article, we have carried out a comprehensive study of the reaction mechanism of this reaction by means of quasiclassical trajectories (QCTs) on an existing ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The reaction has a non trivial dynamics, as a consequence of its large endothermicity, the presence of a deep potential well, and the competition between the Br exchange and the collision induced dissociation processes. Our calculations demonstrate that insertion is only relevant at energies just above the reaction threshold and that, at energies above 2.3 eV, HgBr formation typically takes place via a sort of frustrated dissociation. In order to compare directly with the results obtained in extensive cross molecular beam experiments for the homologous reaction with I 2 , angular distributions in the laboratory frame for Hg + Br 2 have been simulated under similar experimental conditions. The lack of agreement at the highest energies considered suggests that either the two reactions have substantially different mechanisms or that calculations on a single PES cannot account for the dynamics at those energies.

  12. SoLid: An innovative anti-neutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK• CEN BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Yamiel, E-mail: yamiel.abreu@uantwerpen.be

    2017-02-11

    The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline from the SCK• CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite polyvinyl-toluene and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and SiPM. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, good neutron–gamma discrimination using {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a new generation of an anti-neutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalisation and energy calibration. The performance of the first 288 kg SoLid module (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 from February to September 2015, will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, which will start in 2016, and the future plans of the experiment.

  13. Molecular elimination of Br2 in photodissociation of CH2BrC(O)Br at 248 nm using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, He; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Yan, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shu-Wei; Chang, A H H

    2012-12-07

    The primary elimination channel of bromine molecule in one-photon dissociation of CH(2)BrC(O)Br at 248 nm is investigated using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population in v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.5 ± 0.1):(0.2 ± 0.1), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 581 ± 45 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.24 ± 0.08. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained Br(2) fragments are anticipated to dissociate on the electronic ground state, yielding vibrationally hot Br(2) products. The temperature-dependence measurements support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. For comparison, the Br(2) yields are obtained analogously from CH(3)CHBrC(O)Br and (CH(3))(2)CBrC(O)Br to be 0.03 and 0.06, respectively. The trend of Br(2) yields among the three compounds is consistent with the branching ratio evaluation by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus method. However, the latter result for each molecule is smaller by an order of magnitude than the yield findings. A non-statistical pathway so-called roaming process might be an alternative to the Br(2) production, and its contribution might account for the underestimate of the branching ratio calculations.

  14. Br2 molecular elimination in photolysis of (COBr)2 at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: A photodissociation channel being ignored

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Po-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Ying; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen; Francisco, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    A primary dissociation channel of Br 2 elimination is detected following a single-photon absorption of (COBr) 2 at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The technique contains two laser beams propagating in a perpendicular configuration. The tunable laser beam along the axis of the ring-down cell probes the Br 2 fragment in the B 3 Π ou + -X 1 Σ g + transition. The measurements of laser energy- and pressure-dependence and addition of a Br scavenger are further carried out to rule out the probability of Br 2 contribution from a secondary reaction. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population for v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.65 ± 0.09):(0.34 ± 0.07), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 893 ± 31 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br 2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.11 ± 0.06. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathway of molecular elimination is proposed on the energetic ground state (COBr) 2 via internal conversion. A four-center dissociation mechanism is followed synchronously or sequentially yielding three fragments of Br 2 + 2CO. The resulting Br 2 is anticipated to be vibrationally hot. The measurement of a positive temperature effect supports the proposed mechanism.

  15. Br2 molecular elimination in photolysis of (COBr)2 at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: a photodissociation channel being ignored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Po-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Ying; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen; Francisco, J S

    2011-12-21

    A primary dissociation channel of Br(2) elimination is detected following a single-photon absorption of (COBr)(2) at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The technique contains two laser beams propagating in a perpendicular configuration. The tunable laser beam along the axis of the ring-down cell probes the Br(2) fragment in the B(3)Π(ou)(+)-X(1)Σ(g)(+) transition. The measurements of laser energy- and pressure-dependence and addition of a Br scavenger are further carried out to rule out the probability of Br(2) contribution from a secondary reaction. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population for v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.65 ± 0.09):(0.34 ± 0.07), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 893 ± 31 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.11 ± 0.06. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathway of molecular elimination is proposed on the energetic ground state (COBr)(2) via internal conversion. A four-center dissociation mechanism is followed synchronously or sequentially yielding three fragments of Br(2) + 2CO. The resulting Br(2) is anticipated to be vibrationally hot. The measurement of a positive temperature effect supports the proposed mechanism.

  16. Bluish-white-light-emitting diodes based on two-dimensional lead halide perovskite (C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbCl2Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Peiqing; Wang, Xiangfu; Seo, Hyo Jin; Yan, Xiaohong

    2018-04-01

    Bluish-white-light-emitting diodes (BWLEDs) are designed based on the two-dimensional mixed halide perovskite (C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbCl2Br2 at room temperature. Bluish-white electroluminescence devices were fabricated by a spin-coating method. The BWLEDs can be turned on at 4.9 V and depict a maximum luminance of ˜70 cd/m2 at 7 V. Low and room temperature photoluminescence spectra show the coexistence of free exciton and self-trapped exciton luminescence in a deformable lattice. The strategy of achieving white electroluminescence (EL) from mixed halide perovskite reported here can be applied to other two-dimensional perovskites to increase the optoelectronic efficiency of the device in the future.

  17. Higher fine-scale genetic structure in peripheral than in core populations of a long-lived and mixed-mating conifer - eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Fine-scale or spatial genetic structure (SGS) is one of the key genetic characteristics of plant populations. Several evolutionary and ecological processes and population characteristics influence the level of SGS within plant populations. Higher fine-scale genetic structure may be expected in peripheral than core populations of long-lived forest trees, owing to the differences in the magnitude of operating evolutionary and ecological forces such as gene flow, genetic drift, effective population size and founder effects. We addressed this question using eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) as a model species for declining to endangered long-lived tree species with mixed-mating system. Results We determined the SGS in two core and two peripheral populations of eastern white cedar from its Maritime Canadian eastern range using six nuclear microsatellite DNA markers. Significant SGS ranging from 15 m to 75 m distance classes was observed in the four studied populations. An analysis of combined four populations revealed significant positive SGS up to the 45 m distance class. The mean positive significant SGS observed in the peripheral populations was up to six times (up to 90 m) of that observed in the core populations (15 m). Spatial autocorrelation coefficients and correlograms of single and sub-sets of populations were statistically significant. The extent of within-population SGS was significantly negatively correlated with all genetic diversity parameters. Significant heterogeneity of within-population SGS was observed for 0-15 m and 61-90 m between core and peripheral populations. Average Sp, and gene flow distances were higher in peripheral (Sp = 0.023, σg = 135 m) than in core (Sp = 0.014, σg = 109 m) populations. However, the mean neighborhood size was higher in the core (Nb = 82) than in the peripheral (Nb = 48) populations. Conclusion Eastern white cedar populations have significant fine-scale genetic structure at short distances. Peripheral

  18. Higher fine-scale genetic structure in peripheral than in core populations of a long-lived and mixed-mating conifer - eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Madhav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fine-scale or spatial genetic structure (SGS is one of the key genetic characteristics of plant populations. Several evolutionary and ecological processes and population characteristics influence the level of SGS within plant populations. Higher fine-scale genetic structure may be expected in peripheral than core populations of long-lived forest trees, owing to the differences in the magnitude of operating evolutionary and ecological forces such as gene flow, genetic drift, effective population size and founder effects. We addressed this question using eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis as a model species for declining to endangered long-lived tree species with mixed-mating system. Results We determined the SGS in two core and two peripheral populations of eastern white cedar from its Maritime Canadian eastern range using six nuclear microsatellite DNA markers. Significant SGS ranging from 15 m to 75 m distance classes was observed in the four studied populations. An analysis of combined four populations revealed significant positive SGS up to the 45 m distance class. The mean positive significant SGS observed in the peripheral populations was up to six times (up to 90 m of that observed in the core populations (15 m. Spatial autocorrelation coefficients and correlograms of single and sub-sets of populations were statistically significant. The extent of within-population SGS was significantly negatively correlated with all genetic diversity parameters. Significant heterogeneity of within-population SGS was observed for 0-15 m and 61-90 m between core and peripheral populations. Average Sp, and gene flow distances were higher in peripheral (Sp = 0.023, σg = 135 m than in core (Sp = 0.014, σg = 109 m populations. However, the mean neighborhood size was higher in the core (Nb = 82 than in the peripheral (Nb = 48 populations. Conclusion Eastern white cedar populations have significant fine-scale genetic structure at short

  19. Amphiphilic Quantum Dots with Asymmetric, Mixed Polymer Brush Layers: From Single Core-Shell Nanoparticles to Salt-Induced Vesicle Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Coleman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A mixed micelle approach is used to produce amphiphilic brush nanoparticles (ABNPs with cadmium sulfide quantum dot (QD cores and surface layers of densely grafted (σ = ~1 chain/nm2 and asymmetric (fPS = 0.9 mixed polymer brushes that contain hydrophobic polystyrene (PS and hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate (PMAA chains (PS/PMAA-CdS. In aqueous media, the mixed brushes undergo conformational rearrangements that depend strongly on prior salt addition, giving rise to one of two pathways to fluorescent and morphologically disparate QD-polymer colloids. (A In the absence of salt, centrosymmetric condensation of PS chains forms individual core-shell QD-polymer colloids. (B In the presence of salt, non-centrosymmetric condensation of PS chains forms Janus particles, which trigger anisotropic interactions and amphiphilic self-assembly into the QD-polymer vesicles. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an ABNP building block that can form either discrete core-shell colloids or self-assembled superstructures in water depending on simple changes to the chemical conditions (i.e., salt addition. Such dramatic and finely tuned morphological variation could inform numerous applications in sensing, biolabeling, photonics, and nanomedicine.

  20. Photoluminescence and photostimulated luminescence in the X-ray storage phosphor BaBr2 doped with cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradi, G.; Secu, M.; Schweizer, S.; Spaeth, J.-M.

    2004-01-01

    In orthorhombic BaBr 2 : Ce 3+ two kinds of luminescence bands at room temperature have been attributed to charge-compensated Ce 3+ centres. One type was associated with potassium (or some other monovalent cation) on a neighbouring Ba site and another one associated with an unidentified defect. A third kind of emission, observed only as low temperature photoluminescence (PL), is ascribed to isolated Ce 3+ ions. The charge-compensated Ce 3+ complexes are active both in PL and photostimulated luminescence (PSL) following X-ray irradiation. The PSL is nearly as efficient as in the case of the commercially used X-ray storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu 2+ . The X-ray induced electrons are trapped in F-type centres whose band position is characteristic for the nearby Ce complex. As shown by the fingerprint character of the PSL itself, the hole partner in the recombination is also associated or identical with the same Ce complex

  1. Resonance dielectric dispersion of TEA-CoCl2Br2 nanocrystals incorporated into the PMMA matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustianyk, V.; Shchur, Ya; Kityk, I.; Rudyk, V.; Lach, G.; Laskowski, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Swiatek, J.; Davydov, V.

    2008-09-01

    The dielectric properties of TEA-CoCl2Br2 nanocrystals incorporated into the polymethylmethacrylate matrix within the frequency range of 3 × 105-2.6 × 109 Hz in the temperature region of 90-300 K were investigated. The considerable difference in the dielectric spectra of the nanocomposite compared to those of the bulk crystal and the pure polymer matrix was observed. The dielectric dispersion of the composite material reveals a resonance type (resonance frequency was found to be near 1.3 GHz) and may be qualitatively explained as the result of piezoelectric resonance on the nanocrystals. The model interpretation of this phenomenon based on the forced-dumped oscillator is presented.

  2. Band gap opening in silicene on MgBr2(0001) induced by Li and Na

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2014-11-12

    Silicene consists of a monolayer of Si atoms in a buckled honeycomb structure and is expected to be well compatible with the current Si-based technology. However, the band gap is strongly influenced by the substrate. In this context, the structural and electronic properties of silicene on MgBr2(0001) modified by Li and Na are investigated by first-principles calculations. Charge transfer from silicene (substrate) to substrate (silicene) is found for substitutional doping (intercalation). As compared to a band gap of 0.01 eV on the pristine substrate, strongly enhanced band gaps of 0.65 eV (substitutional doping) and 0.24 eV (intercalation) are achieved. The band gap increases with the dopant concentration.

  3. Magnetic properties of CoBr2.6[(1-x)H2O.xD2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijmans, J.P.A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic properties of CoBr 2 .6H 2 O and the anomalous effects upon deuteration have been studied. The experimental techniques employed are described and the high-temperature behaviour of the susceptibility analysed in terms of a crystal-field model combined with a high-temperature expansion for the exchange contribution. The high-temperature behaviour of the specific heat is studied and several kinds of experiments performed in the ordered state below Tsub(N). The XY plane anisotropy is deduced from antiferromagnetic resonance data and attention paid to the spatial dimensionality of the system. A comparison of parameters determined from experiments below and above Tsub(N) is made and the effects of deuteration discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Qualification for Absolute On-Line In-Pile Neutron Flux Measurements in BR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, L.; Wéber, M.

    2003-06-01

    A set of ten Self-Powered Neutron Detectors with Co, Rh and Ag emitters has been irradiated in several channels of the BR2 research reactor at SCK•CEN aiming at a comparison of their performance as thermal neutron flux detectors under various conditions. To allow for a correct interpretation of their signals, all detector sensitivity contributions (prompt and delayed) were calculated using a dedicated Monte Carlo model. The various contributions were also measured separately; the agreement between calculated and experimental data, including data from activation dosimetry, was excellent. Detailed neutron flux profiles were obtained from the SPND data, after correction for the finite detector lengths and for the slow response of delayed SPNDs.

  5. A Theoretical Study of the Oxidation of Hg0 to HgBr2 in the Troposphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodsite, M. E.; Plane, J. M C; Skov, H.

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) to the divalent gaseous mercury dibromide (HgBr2) has been proposed to account for the removal of Hg0 during depletion events in the springtime Arctic. The mechanism of this process is explored in this paper by theoretical calculations of the relevant rate...... coefficients. Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory, together with ab initio quantum calculations where required, are used to estimate the following: recombination rate coefficients of Hg with Br, I, and O; the thermal dissociation rate coefficient of HgBr; and the recombination rate coefficients of Hg......Br with Br, I, OH, and O2. A mechanism based on the initial recombination of Hg with Br, followed by the addition of a second radical (Br, I, or OH) in competition with thermal dissociation of HgBr, is able to account for the observed rate of Hg 0 removal, both in Arctic depletion events and at lower...

  6. Efficient blue emission from ambient processed all-inorganic CsPbBr2Cl perovskite cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, T.; Chatterjee, B. K.; Maiti, S.; Besra, N.; Thakur, S.; Sarkar, S.; Chanda, K.; Das, A.; Sardar, K.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    The recent resurgence of photovoltaic research has empowered all inorganic perovskite materials to take the center stage thus leading to a plethora of interesting results. Here, via a facile room-temperature synthesis protocol high quality cesium lead halide perovskite (CsPbBr2Cl) cubes has been realized. Surface morphology and crystallinity of the synthesized sample were investigated by FESEM and XRD respectively. To attain detail information of its chemical composition EDX analysis and elemental mapping were carried out. These single crystalline cubes crystallize in orthorhombic phase and exhibit strong photoluminescence emission at 482 nm with narrow FWHM value (˜18nm) and photoluminescence decay time of 10.44 ns. We believe, this facile synthesis protocol will pave the way for realization other perovskite cube and thereby their usage in several optoelectronic arena like as lasing, LEDs and photo detector etc.

  7. Neutron diffraction instruments at the BR2 reactor and their use in the study of crystal and magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, E.

    1977-01-01

    The study of structural properties of condensed matted is frequently performed by means of methods based on X-ray, electron or neutron scattering. In many particular cases, the latter technique offers definite advantages which are mainly based on the following characteristics of neutron-matter interaction: The large penetration depth for neutrons in matter (with the exception of a few elements), which allow the study of large samples and the use of wavelengths from 0.5 to 5A, and even to 10 A; the absence of an atomic form factor; the irregular dependence of the scattering length for the different elements as a function of their atomic number; the large cross section for magnetic scattering; the energy of thermal neutrons which allows the direct measuremtment of the enrgy exchange between the neutrons and the scatterer. Three of the four neutron diffraction instruments for solid state research, installed at the BR2 reactor, are described in detail. (author)

  8. Understanding overpressure in the FAA aerosol can test by C3H2F3Br (2-BTP)✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linteris, Gregory Thomas; Babushok, Valeri Ivan; Pagliaro, John Leonard; Burgess, Donald Raymond; Manion, Jeffrey Alan; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath Reddy; Baker, Patrick Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, as well as perfectly-stirred reactor (PSR) simulations with detailed reaction kinetics, are performed for a potential halon replacement, C3H2F3Br (2-BTP, C3H2F3Br, 2-Bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene), to understand the reasons for the unexpected enhanced combustion rather than suppression in a mandated FAA test. The high pressure rise with added agent is shown to depend on the amount of agent, and is well-predicted by an equilibrium model corresponding to stoichiometric reaction of fuel, oxygen, and agent. A kinetic model for the reaction of C3H2F3Br in hydrocarbon-air flames has been applied to understand differences in the chemical suppression behavior of C3H2F3Br vs. CF3Br in the FAA test. Stirred-reactor simulations predict that in the conditions of the FAA test, the inhibition effectiveness of C3H2F3Br at high agent loadings is relatively insensitive to the overall stoichiometry (for fuel-lean conditions), and the marginal inhibitory effect of the agent is greatly reduced, so that the mixture remains flammable over a wide range of conditions. Most important, the flammability of the agent-air mixtures themselves (when compressively preheated), can support low-strain flames which are much more difficult to extinguish than the easy-to extinguish, high-strain primary fireball from the impulsively released fuel mixture. Hence, the exothermic reaction of halogenated hydrocarbons in air should be considered in other situations with strong ignition sources and low strain flows, especially at preheated conditions. PMID:29628525

  9. Understanding overpressure in the FAA aerosol can test by C3H2F3Br (2-BTP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linteris, Gregory Thomas; Babushok, Valeri Ivan; Pagliaro, John Leonard; Burgess, Donald Raymond; Manion, Jeffrey Alan; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath Reddy; Baker, Patrick Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, as well as perfectly-stirred reactor (PSR) simulations with detailed reaction kinetics, are performed for a potential halon replacement, C 3 H 2 F 3 Br (2-BTP, C 3 H 2 F 3 Br, 2-Bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene), to understand the reasons for the unexpected enhanced combustion rather than suppression in a mandated FAA test. The high pressure rise with added agent is shown to depend on the amount of agent, and is well-predicted by an equilibrium model corresponding to stoichiometric reaction of fuel, oxygen, and agent. A kinetic model for the reaction of C 3 H 2 F 3 Br in hydrocarbon-air flames has been applied to understand differences in the chemical suppression behavior of C 3 H 2 F 3 Br vs. CF 3 Br in the FAA test. Stirred-reactor simulations predict that in the conditions of the FAA test, the inhibition effectiveness of C 3 H 2 F 3 Br at high agent loadings is relatively insensitive to the overall stoichiometry (for fuel-lean conditions), and the marginal inhibitory effect of the agent is greatly reduced, so that the mixture remains flammable over a wide range of conditions. Most important, the flammability of the agent-air mixtures themselves (when compressively preheated), can support low-strain flames which are much more difficult to extinguish than the easy-to extinguish, high-strain primary fireball from the impulsively released fuel mixture. Hence, the exothermic reaction of halogenated hydrocarbons in air should be considered in other situations with strong ignition sources and low strain flows, especially at preheated conditions.

  10. In-core LOCA-s: analytical solution for the delayed mixing model for moderator poison concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firla, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to dynamic moderator poison concentration model with delayed mixing under single pressure tube / calandria tube rupture scenario are discussed. Such a model is described by a delay differential equation, and for such equations the standard ways of solution are not directly applicable. In the paper an exact, direct time-domain analytical solution to the delayed mixing model is presented and discussed. The obtained solution has a 'marching' form and is easy to calculate numerically. Results of the numerical calculations based on the analytical solution indicate that for the expected range of mixing times the existing uniform mixing model is a good representation of the moderator poison mixing process for single PT/CT breaks. However, for postulated multi-pipe breaks ( which is very unlikely to occur ) the uniform mixing model is not adequate any more; at the same time an 'approximate' solution based on Laplace transform significantly overpredicts the rate of poison concentration decrease, resulting in excessive increase in the moderator dilution factor. In this situation the true, analytical solution must be used. The analytical solution presented in the paper may also serve as a bench-mark test for the accuracy of the existing poison mixing models. Moreover, because of the existing oscillatory tendency of the solution, special care must be taken in using delay differential models in other applications. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs

  11. A possible role for acetylated intermediates in diaminopimelate and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The deduced product of an open reading frame (ORF3) located in the tabtoxinine-beta-lactam (T beta L) biosynthetic region of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 (BR2.024) has significant sequence homology to the dapD products of other bacteria. dapD encodes L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate succinyl coenzyme A succinyltransferase (THDPA-ST), an enzyme in the diaminopimelate (DAP) and lysine biosynthetic pathway. Complementation studies, in vitro transcription-translation experiments, and enzymatic assays indicated that ORF3 encodes a product with THDPA-ST activity in Escherichia coli dapD mutant beta 274. However, a BR2.024 mutant with an insert in ORF3 was prototrophic, and only basal THDPA-ST activity was detected in extracts of both parent and mutant. This finding suggested that ORF3 was not required for DAP biosynthesis and that it did not encode a product with THDPA-ST activity. The results of enzymatic studies, indicating that BR2.024 uses acetylated intermediates for DAP biosynthesis, are consistent with the hypothesis that BR2.024 does not need THDPA-ST for DAP biosynthesis. The ORF3 mutant produced reduced levels of tabtoxin, indicating that ORF3 may have a role in T beta L biosynthesis. We have named the gene tabB and have proposed a possible function for the gene product. PMID:9294453

  12. Polymeric anionic networks using dibromine as a crosslinker; the preparation and crystal structure of [(C4H9)4N]2[Pt2Br10].(Br2)7 and [(C4H9)4N]2[PtBr4Cl2].(Br2)6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkei, Michael; Bickley, Jamie F; Heaton, Brian T; Steiner, Alexander

    2002-09-21

    The reaction of M[PtX3(CO)] (M+ = [(C4H9)4N]+, X = Br, Cl) with an excess of Br2 gives the new platinum(IV) salts, [(C4H9)4N]2[Pt2Br10].(Br2)7, 1, and [(C4H9)4N]2[PtBr4Cl2].(Br2)6, 2, which, in the solid state, contain strong Br Br interactions resulting in the formation of polymeric networks; they could provide useful solid storage reservoirs for elemental bromine.

  13. KARAKTERISASI DAN AKTIVITAS KATALITIK BERBAGAI VARIASI KOMPOSISI KATALIS Ni DAN ZnBr2 DALAM Γ-Al2O3 UNTUK ISOMERISASI DAN HIDROGENASI (R-(+-SITRONELAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ED Iftitah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh sifat dan karakter berbagai variasi komposisi katalis Ni dan ZnBr2 yang terimpregnasi dalam γ-Al2O3 terhadap aktivitas dan selektivitasnya untuk reaksi isomerisasi dan hidrogenasi (R-(+-Sitronelal telah dilakukan. Dalam penelitian ini, terdapat tiga jenis variasi komposisi Ni dan ZnBr2 dalam γ-Al2O3, yaitu: A1=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (3:2, A2=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (1:1 dan A3=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (2:3. Katalis dikarakterisasi menggunakan X-ray diffraction (XRD, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area, dan SEM-EELS. Luas area permukaan spesifik dan porositasnya ditentukan berdasarkan adsorption-desorption gas nitrogen pada 77 K. Distribusi dan volume pori ditentukan dengan desorption isotherm pada P/Po ≥ 0,3. Hasil yang didapat menunjukkan bahwa terdapat hubungan antara karakter dan sifat katalis dengan aktivitas katalitiknya terhadap produk isomerisasi dan hidrogenasi (R-(+-Sitronelal. Uji aktivitas dilakukan dalam sebuah reaktor mini dengan 0,5 g katalis dan 3 mL (R-(+-Sitronelal menggunakan atmosfir gas N2 dan/atau H2 dalam waktu 5 dan 24 jam masing-masing pada suhu 90 dan 120 °C. Komposisi katalis, pemilihan jenis atmosfir gas dan suhu sangat berpengaruh terhadap aktivitas dan selektivitas pembentukan produk isomerisasi dan hidrogenasi. Konversi (R-(+-Sitronelal tertinggi ditunjukkan oleh katalis A3=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (2:3 dengan kondisi reaksi selama 5 jam (4 jam N2 + 1 jam H2 pada suhu 90 °C dan 24 jam (4 jam N2 + 20 jam H2 pada suhu 120 °C. The influence of catalyst properties and characteristics of Ni and ZnBr2 catalysts impregnated in γ-Al2O3 on the activity and selectivity of (R-(+-Citronellal isomerisation and hydrogenation has been done. In this study, there were three sets of Ni and ZnBr2 in γ-Al2O3 with various composition, they were A1=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (3:2, A2=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (1:1, A3=Ni/ZnBr2/γ-Al2O3 (2:3. The catalysts were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area and SEM

  14. Reactions of N2O5 with Salty and Surfactant-Coated Glycerol: Interfacial Conversion of Br- to Br2 Mediated by Alkylammonium Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaloski, Michael A; Gord, Joseph R; Staudt, Sean; Quinn, Sarah L; Bertram, Timothy H; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2017-05-18

    Gas-liquid scattering and product-yield experiments are used to investigate reactions of N 2 O 5 with glycerol containing Br - and surfactant ions. N 2 O 5 oxidizes Br - to Br 2 for every solution tested: 2.7 M NaBr, 0.03 M tetrahexylammonium bromide (THABr), 0.03 M THABr + 0.5 M NaBr, 0.03 M THABr + 0.5 M NaCl, 0.03 M THABr + 0.01 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 0.01 M cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr). N 2 O 5 also reacts with glycerol itself to produce mono- and dinitroglycerin. Surface tension measurements indicate that 0.03 M THABr and 2.7 M NaBr have similar interfacial Br - concentrations, though their bulk Br - concentrations differ by 90-fold. We find that twice as much Br 2 is produced in the presence of THA + , implying that the conversion of Br - to Br 2 is initiated at the interface, perhaps mediated by the charged, hydrophobic pocket within the surface THA + cation. The addition of 0.5 M NaBr, 0.5 M NaCl, or 0.01 M SDS to 0.03 M THABr lowers the Br 2 production rate by 23%, 63%, and 67% of the THABr value, respectively. When CTA + is substituted for THA + , Br 2 production drops to 12% of the THABr value. The generation of Br 2 under such different conditions implies that trace amounts of surface-active alkylammonium ions can catalyze interfacial N 2 O 5 reactions, even when salts and other surfactants are present.

  15. Effective enhancement of gas separation performance in mixed matrix membranes using core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingzhong; Pan, Xinglong; Li, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jianqiang; Guo, Qikai

    2017-02-01

    Novel core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons (MWCNT@GONRs) nanohybrids were successfully prepared using a modified chemical longitudinal unzipping method. Subsequently, the MWCNT@GONRs nanohybrids were used as fillers to enhance the gas separation performance of polyimide based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). It is found that MMMs concurrently exhibited higher gas selectivity and higher gas permeability compared to pristine polyimide. The high gas selectivity could be attributed to the GONRs shell, which provided a selective barrier and large gas adsorbed area, while the high gas permeability resulted from the hollow structured MWCNTs core with smooth internal surface, which acted as a rapid transport channel. MWCNT@GONRs could be promising candidates to improve gas separation performance of MMMs due to the unique microstructures, ease of synthesis and low filling loading.

  16. MATTER MIXING IN ASPHERICAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: A SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE CONDITIONS FOR CONVEYING {sup 56}Ni INTO HIGH VELOCITY REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masaomi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ito, Hirotaka; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Tolstov, Alexey [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, Masa-aki, E-mail: masaomi.ono@riken.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-08-20

    We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions of a 16.3 M{sub Sun} star with a compact hydrogen envelope. Observations of SN 1987A have provided evidence that {sup 56}Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis is mixed into fast moving matter ({approx}>3500 km s{sup -1}) in the exploding star. In order to clarify the key conditions for reproducing such high velocity of {sup 56}Ni, we revisit matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions. Explosions are initiated artificially by injecting thermal and kinetic energies around the interface between the iron core and the silicon-rich layer. Perturbations of 5% or 30% amplitude in the radial velocities are introduced at several points in time. We find that no high velocity {sup 56}Ni can be obtained if we consider bipolar explosions with perturbations (5% amplitude) of pre-supernova origins. If large perturbations (30% amplitude) are introduced or exist due to some unknown mechanism in a later phase just before the shock wave reaches the hydrogen envelope, {sup 56}Ni with a velocity of 3000 km s{sup -1} can be obtained. Aspherical explosions that are asymmetric across the equatorial plane with clumpy structures in the initial shock waves are investigated. We find that the clump sizes affect the penetration of {sup 56}Ni. Finally, we report that an aspherical explosion model that is asymmetric across the equatorial plane with multiple perturbations of pre-supernova origins can cause the penetration of {sup 56}Ni clumps into fast moving matter of 3000 km s{sup -1}. We show that both aspherical explosions with clumpy structures and perturbations of pre-supernova origins may be necessary to reproduce the observed high velocity of {sup 56}Ni. To confirm this, more robust three-dimensional simulations are required.

  17. MATTER MIXING IN ASPHERICAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: A SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE CONDITIONS FOR CONVEYING 56Ni INTO HIGH VELOCITY REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masaomi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ito, Hirotaka; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Tolstov, Alexey; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2013-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions of a 16.3 M ☉ star with a compact hydrogen envelope. Observations of SN 1987A have provided evidence that 56 Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis is mixed into fast moving matter (∼>3500 km s –1 ) in the exploding star. In order to clarify the key conditions for reproducing such high velocity of 56 Ni, we revisit matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions. Explosions are initiated artificially by injecting thermal and kinetic energies around the interface between the iron core and the silicon-rich layer. Perturbations of 5% or 30% amplitude in the radial velocities are introduced at several points in time. We find that no high velocity 56 Ni can be obtained if we consider bipolar explosions with perturbations (5% amplitude) of pre-supernova origins. If large perturbations (30% amplitude) are introduced or exist due to some unknown mechanism in a later phase just before the shock wave reaches the hydrogen envelope, 56 Ni with a velocity of 3000 km s –1 can be obtained. Aspherical explosions that are asymmetric across the equatorial plane with clumpy structures in the initial shock waves are investigated. We find that the clump sizes affect the penetration of 56 Ni. Finally, we report that an aspherical explosion model that is asymmetric across the equatorial plane with multiple perturbations of pre-supernova origins can cause the penetration of 56 Ni clumps into fast moving matter of 3000 km s –1 . We show that both aspherical explosions with clumpy structures and perturbations of pre-supernova origins may be necessary to reproduce the observed high velocity of 56 Ni. To confirm this, more robust three-dimensional simulations are required

  18. Application of Ni-Oxide@TiO2 Core-Shell Structures to Photocatalytic Mixed Dye Degradation, CO Oxidation, and Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing diverse application tests on synthesized metal oxides is critical for identifying suitable application areas based on the material performances. In the present study, Ni-oxide@TiO2 core-shell materials were synthesized and applied to photocatalytic mixed dye (methyl orange + rhodamine + methylene blue degradation under ultraviolet (UV and visible lights, CO oxidation, and supercapacitors. Their physicochemical properties were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. It was shown that their performances were highly dependent on the morphology, thermal treatment procedure, and TiO2 overlayer coating.

  19. A detailed research study of learning and teaching core chemical engineering to a high standard in a mixed-ability small class in industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Kenneth

    2017-11-01

    A detailed study of learning and teaching (L&T) of chemical engineering distillation to a mixed-ability small class of 13 students who are ordinarily full-time in-house employees in industry is reported. The course consisted of 9 × 2-h lectures (18 hours) and 9 × 2-h tutorials (18 hours). It was delivered over nine business days in situ in an established distillery. The purpose was to (re)learn core distillation of ethanol-water mixes at the level of higher education of a bachelor programme. There was 90% broad agreement that the course encouraged more learning. Students (40%) felt the course was too mathematical, however. Pointedly, there was good agreement (63%) that the course stimulated communication with each other professionally, and customers of the distillery. Results overall provide good evidence that students valued their L&T. The experimental design(s) could be readily applied to a range of fields of knowledge.

  20. Relativistic four-component potential energy curves for the lowest 23 covalent states of molecular bromine (Br2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José da Silva; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L; M de Macedo, Luiz Guilherme

    2014-08-07

    The covalent excited states and ground state of the Br2 molecule has been investigated by using four-component relativistic COSCI and MRCISD methods. These methods were performed for all covalent states in the representation Ω((±)). Calculated potential energy curves (PECs) were obtained at the four-component COSCI level, and spectroscopic constants (R(e), D(e), D0, ω(e), ω(e)x(e), ω(e)y(e), B(e), α(e), γ(e), Te, Dv) for bounded states are reported. The vertical excitations for all covalent states are reported at COSCI, MRCISD, and MRCISD+Q levels. We also present spectroscopic constants for two weakly bounded states (A':(1)2u and B':(1)0(-)u) not yet reported in the literature, as well as accurate analytical curves for all five relativistic molecular bounded sates [the ground state X:0 g(+) and the excited states A:(1)1(u), B:(1)0(u)(+), C:(2)1(u), and B':(1)0(u)(-)] found in this work.

  1. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO2 to a mixed (U,Th)O2 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo de; Maiorino, José Rubens; Moreira, João Manoel de Losada; Santos, Thiago Augusto dos; Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O 2 core, rather than the traditional uranium dioxide, for the purpose of reducing long-lived actinides, especially plutonium, and generates a stock pile of 233 U, which could in the future be used in advanced fuel cycles, in a more sustainable process and taking advantage of the large stock of thorium available on the planet and especially in Brazil. The reactor chosen as reference was the AP1000, which is considered to be one of the most reliable and modern reactor of the current Generation III, and its similarity to the reactors already consolidated and used in Brazil for electric power generation. The results show the feasibility and potentiality of the concept, without the necessity of changes in the core of the AP1000, and even with advantages over this. The neutron calculations were made by the SERPENT code. The results provided a maximum linear power density lower than the AP1000, favoring safety. In addition, the delayed neutron fraction and the reactivity coefficients proved to be adequate to ensure the safety of the concept. The results show that a production of about 260 Kg of 233 U per cycle is possible, with a minimum production of fissile plutonium that favors the use of the concept in U-Th cycles. (author)

  2. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA/LENR, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  3. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  4. Two new 3-D cadmium bromoplumbates: the only example of heterometallic bromoplumbate based on crown [Cd(Pb4O4)Br2] clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Xing

    2018-04-03

    Two new cadmium bromoplumbates [CdPb2Br2L2]n (1, L = ethylene glycol) and [CdPb6Br6L4]n (2) have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. 1 contains 1-D neutral heterometallic chains [CdPb2Br2L2]n, which are further connected via weak Pb-Br bonds, resulting in a 3-D network structure. The 3-D framework of 2 is constructed by the interconnection of a 2-D neutral layer [CdPb6Br6L4]nvia weak Pb-Br bonds. The [CdPb6Br6L4]n layer is based on the linkages of dimeric [Pb2Br4] units and heterometallic crown [Cd(Pb4O4)Br2] clusters containing a rare eight-membered [Pb4O4] ring. Although a few heterometallic bromoplumbate clusters have been reported, they usually exhibit molecular moieties. 2 represents the only example of 3-D heterometallic bromoplumbate based on the combination of heterometallic crown [Cd(Pb4O4)Br2] clusters and dimeric [Pb2Br4] units. Their optical properties are studied and density functional theory calculations for 1 and 2 have also been performed.

  5. Dosimetry work and calculations in connection with the irradiation of large devices in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Raedt, C.; Leenders, L.; Tourwe, H.; Farrar, H. IV.

    1982-01-01

    For about fifteen years the high flux reactor BR2 has been involved in the testing of fast reactor fuel pins. In order to simulate the fast reactor neutron environment most devices are irradiated under cadmium screen, cutting off the thermal flux component. Extensive neutronic calculations are performed to help the optimization of the fuel bundle design. The actual experiments are preceded by irradiations of their mock-ups in BR02, the zero power model of BR2. The mock-up irradiations, supported by supplementary calculations, are performed for the determination of the main neutronic characteristics of the irradiation proper in BR2 and for the determination of the corresponding operation data. At the end of the BR2 irradiation, the experimental results, such as burn-ups, neutron fluences, helium production in the fuel pin claddings, etc. are correlated by neutronic calculations in order to examine the consistency of the post-irradiation results and to validate the routine calculation procedure and cross-section data employed. A comparison is made in this paper between neutronic calculation results and some post-irradiation data for MOL 7D, a cadmium screened sodium cooled loop containing a nineteen fuel pin bundle

  6. Ablation of TRIP-Br2, a regulator of fat lipolysis, thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chong Wee; Boucher, Jeremie; Cheong, Jit Kong; Vernochet, Cecile; Koh, Ho-Jin; Mallol, Cristina; Townsend, Kristy; Langin, Dominique; Kawamori, Dan; Hu, Jiang; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Hellerstein, Marc K; Farmer, Stephen R; Goodyear, Laurie; Doria, Alessandro; Blüher, Matthias; Hsu, Stephen I-Hong; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2013-02-01

    Obesity develops as a result of altered energy homeostasis favoring fat storage. Here we describe a new transcription co-regulator for adiposity and energy metabolism, SERTA domain containing 2 (TRIP-Br2, also called SERTAD2). TRIP-Br2-null mice are resistant to obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance. Adipocytes of these knockout mice showed greater stimulated lipolysis secondary to enhanced expression of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and β3-adrenergic (Adrb3) receptors. The knockout mice also have higher energy expenditure because of increased adipocyte thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism caused by upregulating key enzymes in their respective processes. Our data show that a cell-cycle transcriptional co-regulator, TRIP-Br2, modulates fat storage through simultaneous regulation of lipolysis, thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism. These data, together with the observation that TRIP-Br2 expression is selectively elevated in visceral fat in obese humans, suggests that this transcriptional co-regulator is a new therapeutic target for counteracting the development of obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia.

  7. Ablation of TRIP-Br2, a novel regulator of fat lipolysis, thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chong Wee; Boucher, Jeremie; Cheong, Jit Kong; Vernochet, Cecile; Koh, Ho-Jin; Mallol, Cristina; Townsend, Kristy; Langin, Dominique; Kawamori, Dan; Hu, Jiang; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Hellerstein, Marc K; Farmer, Stephen R; Goodyear, Laurie; Doria, Alessandro; Blüher, Matthias; Hsu, Stephen I-Hong; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity develops due to altered energy homeostasis favoring fat storage. Here we describe a novel transcription co-regulator for adiposity and energy metabolism, TRIP-Br2 (also called SERTAD2). TRIP-Br2 null mice are resistant to obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance. Adipocytes of the knockout (KO) mice exhibited greater stimulated lipolysis secondary to enhanced expression of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and β3-adrenergic (Adrb3) receptors. The KOs also exhibit higher energy expenditure due to increased adipocyte thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism by up-regulating key enzymes in respective processes. Our data show for the first time that a cell cycle transcriptional co-regulator, TRIP-Br2, modulates fat storage through simultaneous regulation of lipolysis, thermogenesis and oxidative metabolism. These data together with the observation that TRIP-BR2 expression is selectively elevated in visceral fat in obese humans suggests that this transcriptional co-regulator is a novel therapeutic target for counteracting the development of obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. PMID:23291629

  8. The post irradiation examination of a sphere-pac (UPu)C fuel pin irradiated in the BR-2 reactor (MFBS 7 experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.; Aerne, E.T.; Buergisser, B.; Flueckiger, U.; Hofer, R.; Petrik, F.

    1979-09-01

    A pin fuelled with Swiss made (UPu)C microspheres has been successfully irradiated to a peak burn-up of 6% fima in the Belgian BR2 Reactor. The pin, rated up to 95 kW/m, was intact after irradiation and exhibited a peak strain of just over 0.5%. The results of the post irradiation examination are reported. (Auth.)

  9. Enhanced E3 transitions and mixed configurations for core excited isomers in 210At and 211At

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracoulis, G.D.; Steed, C.A.; Byrne, A.P.; Poletti, S.J.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Bark, R.A.

    1986-09-01

    The lifetime and branching ratio of the 19 + isomer in 210 At have been measured. Its enhanced E3 decay and g-factor, and those of the related 39/2 - isomer in 211 At are compared with the results of a semi-empirical shell model calculation which includes couplings to the 3 - octupole vibration, resulting in mixed configurations. Lifetimes were also obtained for the 15 - isomer in 210 At, and he 29/2 + isomer in 209 At

  10. The accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs: No mixing with core material implies that the mass of the white dwarf is increasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumner Starrfield

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic Variables (CVs are close binary star systems with one component a white dwarf (WD and the other a larger cooler star that fills its Roche Lobe. The cooler star is losing mass through the inner Lagrangian point of the binary and some unknown fraction of this material is accreted by the WD. One consequence of the WDs accreting material, is the possibility that they are growing in mass and will eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit. This evolution could result in a Supernova Ia (SN Ia explosion and is designated the Single Degenerate Progenitor (SD scenario. This paper is concerned with the SD scenario for SN Ia progenitors. One problem with the single degenerate scenario is that it is generally assumed that the accreting material mixes with WD core material at some time during the accretion phase of evolution and, since the typical WD has a carbon-oxygen CO core, the mixing results in large amounts of carbon and oxygen being brought up into the accreted layers. The presence of enriched carbon causes enhanced nuclear fusion and a Classical Nova explosion. Both observations and theoretical studies of these explosions imply that more mass is ejected than is accreted. Thus, the WD in a Classical Nova system is losing mass and cannot be a SN Ia progenitor. However, the composition in the nuclear burning region is important and, in new calculations reported here, the consequences to the WD of no mixing of accreted material with core material have been investigated so that the material involved in the explosion has only a Solar composition. WDs with a large range in initial masses and mass accretion rates have been evolved. I find that once sufficient material has been accreted, nuclear burning occurs in all evolutionary sequences and continues until a thermonuclear runaway (TNR occurs and the WD either ejects a small amount of material or its radius grows to about 1012 cm and the evolution is ended. In all cases where mass ejection occurs

  11. Experiments on simulation of coolant mixing in fuel assembly head and core exit channel of WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, L.L; Oleksyuk, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' has performed coolant mixing investigation in a head of a full-size simulator of WWER-440 fuel assembly. The experiments were focused on obtaining the data important for investigating the trends in temperature difference between the value registered by a ICIS thermocouple and the value of average temperature. The completed experiments ensure representative of configuration simulation by reproducing every construction peculiar feature of flow part of fuel assembly in the domain between the lower spacing grid and thermocouple location, and also by slightly modified fuel assembly regular elements (or analogues thereof). For the purpose of effectiveness of coolant mixing assessment within the head cross section of FA simulator, we measured coolant temperature distribution both in the place where coolant flow leaves the rod bundle simulator (in 39 data points along the cross section) and in the cross section location of regular ICIS thermocouple simulator (30 data points). The testing was conducted with pressure of (90 - 95) bar, mass coolant flow rates up to 2000 kg/(m 2 .s), temperature of coolant heating in 'hot' parts of the bundle up to 35.. and differences between coolant temperature extremes measured in rod bundle simulator outlet up to 20... Temperature fields were registered in 63 conditions that differ in coolant flow and inlet coolant temperature, electrical heating rate of FA simulator, and radial coolant distribution. In certain registered conditions we simulated coolant leakage to the space between the fuel assemblies. The received test data may be important both for investigation of dependencies between the coolant temperature in regular thermocouple location or average outlet temperature in assembly head, and for validation of CFD codes or subchannel codes (Authors)

  12. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO2 to a mixed U/ThO2 core – Part I: Parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo; Moreira, João M.L.; Rossi, Pedro C.R.; Santos, Thiago A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronics calculation using SERPENT code. • Conversion of an advanced PWR from a UO 2 to (U-Th)O 2 core. • AP 1000-advanced PWR. • Parametric studies to define a converted core. • Demonstration of the feasibility to convert the AP 1000 by using mixed uranium thorium oxide fuel with advantages. - Abstract: This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO 2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O 2 core by performing a parametric study varying the type of geometry of the pins in fuel elements, using the heterogeneous seed blanket concept and the homogeneous concept. In the parametric study, all geometry and materials for the burnable poison were kept the same as the AP 1000, and the only variable was the fuel pin material, in which we use several mass proportion of uranium and thorium but keeping the enrichment in 235 U, as LEU (20 w/o). The neutronics calculations were made by SERPENT code, and to validate the thermal limits we used a homemade code. The optimization criteria were to maximize the 233 U, and conversion factor, and minimize the plutonium production. The results obtained showed that the homogeneous concept with three different mass proportion zones, the first containing (32% UO 2 -68%ThO 2 ); the second with (24% UO 2 -76% ThO 2 ), and the third with (20% UO 2 -80% ThO 2 ), using 235 U LEU (20 w/o), and corresponding with the 3 enrichment zones of the AP 1000 (4.45 w/o; 3.40 w/o; 2.35 w/o), satisfies the optimization criteria as well as attending all thermal constrain. The concept showed advantages compared with the original UO 2 core, such a lower power density, and keeping the same 18 months of cycle a reduction of B-10 concentration at the soluble poison as well as eliminating in the integral boron poison coated (IFBA).

  13. Theoretical evaluation of the production of the poisons Xe-135 and Sm-149 of the TRIGA Mark III reactor with mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    It was theoretically determined the accumulation of the Xe 135 and Sm 149 in function, of the time during a stationary state of 72 h. continuous for the reactor TRIGA Mark III to 1 MW of thermal power with mixed core. The values of negative reactivity due to these isotopes are of 2.04 dollars and 0.694 dollars to the 72 h, quantities that will have to be compensated if wants that the reactor continues working to this power. Under the same conditions but considering a core with standard fuel, it was found a value of ρ = 1.70 dollars, resulting a difference of 0.30 dollars of negative reactivity in function of the type of analyzed core. This difference is important for the calculations of fuel management of a reactor. The concentration in balance of the xenon was reaches after an operation to constant power of 1 MW by 50 h, contrary to the samarium that reaches it balance after 3 weeks of operation starting from the initial start up and it stays constant along the useful life of the reactor while a change of fuel doesn't exist. It was obtained that for operation times greater to 60 h. at 1 MW, a peak of negative reactivity of the Xe 135 is generated between the 7 and 11 h after the instantaneous shut down, with a value of 2.43 dollars, that is to say 0.39 additional dollars to those taken place during the continuous irradiation. (Author)

  14. Simple and Regioselective Bromination of 5,6-Disubstituted-indan-1-ones with Br2 Under Acidic and Basic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsook Ma

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromination of 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one with Br2 in acetic acid at room temperature produced exclusively the corresponding 2,4-dibromo compound in 95% yield. Reaction of 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one with Br2 in the presence of KOH, K2CO3 or Cs2CO3 at ~0°C gave the monobrominated product 4-bromo-5,6-dimethoxyindan-3-one in 79%, 81% and 67% yield, respectively. 5,6-Dihydroxyindan-1-one was dibrominated on the aromatic ring affording 4,7-dibromo-5,6-dihydroxyindan-1-one both in acetic acid at room temperature and in the presence of KOH at ~0°C. 5,6-Difluoroindan-1-one and 1-indanone were α-monobrominated in acetic acid and α,α-dibrominated under KOH conditions at room temperature.

  15. A pilot application of the RELAP file to the steady state and transient analysis of a test section inside the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, M. G.; D'Auria, F.; Forasassi, G.; Giot, M.

    2000-01-01

    BR2 is a material test reactor sited in the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre in Mol. The main research programs carried out in BR2 are related to the safety of nuclear reactor structural materials and fuels, in normal and accidental conditions, plant lifetime evaluation and ageing of components. In this framework, a computer program that allows the performance of detailed, steady state analysis of several kinds of in-pile sections with an axisymmetrical geometry has been developed. Furthermore, comparing its results with those of the well known, extensively used, Relap5/Mod 3.2 code on a test problem has validated this program. This was performed in three steps: 1. modalisation development of a subsystem of a typical in-pile section. 2. steady state analysis and comparison with the above-mentioned program. 3. transient simulation of the same system; the considered transient consists of a loss of coolant flow. (author)

  16. CdBr2 complexes of 1,2-bis-[2-(5-H/methyl/chloro/nitro)-1H-benzimidazolyl]-1,2-ethanediols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin Tavman

    2005-01-01

    The complexes of 1,2-bis-[2-(5-H/methyl/chloro/nitro)-1H-benzimidazolyl]-1,2-ethanediols with CdBr 2 were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, IR and NMR spectra. The ligands act as a bidentate only through both oxygen atoms of hydroxyl groups in complexes with ratio M:L=1:1 [ru

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of irradiation of MTR fuel plates in the BR2 reactor using a full-scale 3-d model with inclined channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminov, V. V; Koonen, E.; Ponsard, B.

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional full-scale Monte Carlo model of the BR2 reactor has been developed for simulation of irradiation conditions of materials and fuel loaded in various irradiation devices. This new reactor model includes a detailed geometrical description of the inclined reactor channels, the irradiation devices loaded in these channels including the materials to be tested/loaded in these devices, the burn-up of the BR2 fuel elements and the poisoning of the beryllium matrix. Recently a benchmark irradiation of new irradiation device for testing and qualification of MTR fuel plates has been performed. For this purpose the detailed irradiation conditions of fuel plates had to be predetermined. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluxes and heat load distributions in irradiated MTR fuel plates were performed taking into account the contents of all loaded experimental devices in the reactor channels. A comparison of the calculated and measured values of neutron fluxes and of heat loads in the BR2 reactor is presented in this paper. The comparison is part of the validation process of the new reactor model. It also serves to establish the capability to conduct a fuel plate irradiation program under requested and well- known irradiation conditions. (author)

  18. Mixed-metal cluster chemistry. 28. Core enlargement of tungsten-iridium clusters with alkynyl, ethyndiyl, and butadiyndiyl reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gulliver T; Viau, Lydie; Waterman, Susan M; Humphrey, Mark G; Bruce, Michael I; Low, Paul J; Roberts, Rachel L; Willis, Anthony C; Koutsantonis, George A; Skelton, Brian W; White, Allan H

    2005-05-02

    Reaction of [WIr3(mu-CO)3(CO)8(eta-C5Me5)] (1c) with [W(C[triple bond]CPh)(CO)3(eta-C5H5)] afforded the edge-bridged tetrahedral cluster [W2Ir3(mu4-eta2-C2Ph)(mu-CO)(CO)9(eta-C5H5)(eta-C5Me5)] (3) and the edge-bridged trigonal-bipyramidal cluster [W3Ir3(mu4-eta2-C2Ph)(mu-eta2-C=CHPh)(Cl)(CO)8(eta-C5Me5)(eta-C5H5)2] (4) in poor to fair yield. Cluster 3 forms by insertion of [W(C[triple bond]CPh)(CO)3(eta-C5H5)] into Ir-Ir and W-Ir bonds, accompanied by a change in coordination mode from a terminally bonded alkynyl to a mu4-eta2 alkynyl ligand. Cluster 4 contains an alkynyl ligand interacting with two iridium atoms and two tungsten atoms in a mu4-eta2 fashion, as well as a vinylidene ligand bridging a W-W bond. Reaction of [WIr3(CO)11(eta-C5H5)] (1a) or 1c with [(eta-C5H5)(CO)2 Ru(C[triple bond]C)Ru(CO)2(eta-C5H5)] afforded [Ru2WIr3(mu5-eta2-C2)(mu-CO)3(CO)7(eta-C5H5)2(eta-C5R5)] [R = H (5a), Me (5c)] in low yield, a structural study of 5a revealing a WIr3 butterfly core capped and spiked by Ru atoms; the diruthenium ethyndiyl precursor has undergone Ru-C scission, with insertion of the C2 unit into a W-Ir bond of the cluster precursor. Reaction of [W2Ir2(CO)10(eta-C5H5)2] with the diruthenium ethyndiyl reagent gave [RuW2Ir2{mu4-eta2-(C2C[triple bond]C)Ru(CO)2(eta-C5H5)}(mu-CO)2(CO)6(eta-C5H5)3] (6) in low yield, a structural study of 6 revealing a butterfly W2Ir2 unit capped by a Ru(eta-C5H5) group resulting from Ru-C scission; the terminal C2 of a new ruthenium-bound butadiyndiyl ligand has been inserted into the W-Ir bond. Reaction between 1a, [WIr3(CO)11(eta-C5H4Me)] (1b), or 1c and [(eta-C5H5)(CO)3W(C[triple bond]CC[triple bond]C)W(CO)3(eta-C5H5)] afforded [W2Ir3{mu4-eta2-(C2C[triple bond]C)W(CO)3(eta-C5H5)}(mu-CO)2(CO)2(eta-C5H5)(eta-C5R5)] [R = H (7a), Me (7c); R5 = H4Me (7b)] in good yield, a structural study of 7c revealing it to be a metallaethynyl analogue of 3.

  19. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  20. Kinetics of the Reactions of O((sup 3)P) and Cl((sup 2)P) with HBr and Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of reactions (1)-(4) as a function of temperature. (1) O((sup 3)P) + Br2 yields BrO + Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) at 255-350 K; (2) Cl((sup 2)P) + Br2 yields BrCl + Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) at 298-401 K; (3) O((sup 3)P) + HBr yields OH + Br((sup 2)P(sub J)) at 250-402 K; (4) Cl((sup 2)P) + HBr yields HCl + Br((sup 2)P(sub J)) at 257-404 K. In all cases, the concentration of the excess reagent, i.e, HBr or Br2, was measured in situ in the slow flow system by UV-visible photometry. Heterogeneous dark reactions between XBr (X equals H or Br) and the photolytic precursors for Cl((sup 2)P) and O((sup 3)P) (Cl2 and O3, respectively) were avoided by injecting minimal amounts of precursor into the reaction mixture immediately upstream from the reaction zone. The following Arrhenius expressions summarize our results (errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only, units are cu cm/(molecule.s): k(sub 1) = (1.76 +/- 0.80) x 10(exp -11 exp[(40 +/- 100)/T]; k(sub 2) = (2.40 +/- 1.25) x 12(exp -10) exp[-(144 +/- 176)/T]; k(sub 3) = (5.11 +/- 2.82) x 10(exp -12) exp[-(1450 +/- 160)/T]; k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/- 0.56) x 10(exp -11) exp[-(400 +/- 80)/T]. The consistency (or lack thereof) of our results with those reported in previous kinetics and dynamics studies of reactions (1)-(4) is discussed.

  1. Et2NH2C6H3(CO23SnBr2.4H2O: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAOUDA NDOYE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound has been obtained on allowing [C6H3(CO23(Et2NH23] to react with SnBr4. The molecular structure of Et2NH2C6H3(CO23SnBr2.4H2O has been determined on the basis of the infrared data. The suggested structure is a dimer in which each tin atom is hexacoordinated by two chelating C6H3(CO233- anions and two Br atoms. Cy2NH2+cations are involved through hydrogen bonds with non-coordinating CO2 groups. The suggested structure is a cage.

  2. Fluorescence Blinking and Photoactivation of All-Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals CsPbBr3 and CsPbBr2I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Sudipta; Mondal, Navendu; Patra, Satyajit; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-01-21

    Study of the emission behavior of all-inorganic perovskite nanocrystals CsPbBr3 and CsPbBr2I as a function of the excitation power employing fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and conventional techniques reveals fluorescence blinking in the microsecond time scale and photoinduced emission enhancement. The observation provides insight into the radiative and nonradiative deactivation pathways of these promising substances. Because both blinking and photoactivation processes are intimately linked to the charge separation efficiency and dynamics of the nanocrystals, these key findings are likely to be helpful in realizing the true potential of these substances in photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications.

  3. Core indicators evaluation of effectiveness of HIV-AIDS preventive-control programmes carried out by nongovernmental organizations. A mixed method study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansilla Rosa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of nongovernmental organizations working on AIDS has grown. There is great diversity in the type of activities and population groups that have been targeted. The purposes of this study are: to describe and analyze the objectives and HIV-AIDS preventive activities that are carried out by the AIDS-NGOs that work with AIDS in Catalonia and that receive subsidies from the Department of Health; and to develop a comprehensive proposal for measurable and agreed upon core quality evaluation indicators to monitor and assess those objectives and activities that can have an impact on the fight against inequalities and stigmatization, and incorporate the perspectives of the service providers and users. Methods A mixed method study has been carried out with professionals from the 36 NGOs that work with HIV/AIDS in Catalonia, as well as their users. This study achieved the completeness model using the following phases: 1. A systematic review of AIDS-NGOs annual reports and preparation of a catalogue of activities grouped by objectives, level of prevention and AIDS-NGOs target population; 2. A transversal study through an ad-hoc questionnaire administered to the AIDS-NGOs representatives; 3. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach through focus groups, individual interviews and observations; 4. Consensus meetings between AIDS-NGOs professionals and the research team using Haddon matrices in order to establish a proposal of evaluation indicators. Results The information was classified according to level of prevention and level of intervention. A total of 248 objectives and 258 prevention activities were identified. 1564 evaluation indicators, addressed to 7 target population groups, were produced. Thirty core activities were selected. The evaluation indicators proposed for these activities were: 76 indicators for 15 primary prevention activities, 43 for 5 secondary prevention activities and 68 for 10 tertiary

  4. Core indicators evaluation of effectiveness of HIV-AIDS preventive-control programmes carried out by nongovernmental organizations. A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguera, Anna; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Violan, Concepció; Romaguera, Amparo; Mansilla, Rosa; Giménez, Albert; Ascaso, Carlos; Almeda, Jesús

    2011-07-28

    The number of nongovernmental organizations working on AIDS has grown. There is great diversity in the type of activities and population groups that have been targeted. The purposes of this study are: to describe and analyze the objectives and HIV-AIDS preventive activities that are carried out by the AIDS-NGOs that work with AIDS in Catalonia and that receive subsidies from the Department of Health; and to develop a comprehensive proposal for measurable and agreed upon core quality evaluation indicators to monitor and assess those objectives and activities that can have an impact on the fight against inequalities and stigmatization, and incorporate the perspectives of the service providers and users. A mixed method study has been carried out with professionals from the 36 NGOs that work with HIV/AIDS in Catalonia, as well as their users. This study achieved the completeness model using the following phases:1. A systematic review of AIDS-NGOs annual reports and preparation of a catalogue of activities grouped by objectives, level of prevention and AIDS-NGOs target population; 2. A transversal study through an ad-hoc questionnaire administered to the AIDS-NGOs representatives; 3. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach through focus groups, individual interviews and observations; 4. Consensus meetings between AIDS-NGOs professionals and the research team using Haddon matrices in order to establish a proposal of evaluation indicators. The information was classified according to level of prevention and level of intervention. A total of 248 objectives and 258 prevention activities were identified. 1564 evaluation indicators, addressed to 7 target population groups, were produced. Thirty core activities were selected. The evaluation indicators proposed for these activities were: 76 indicators for 15 primary prevention activities, 43 for 5 secondary prevention activities and 68 for 10 tertiary prevention activities. The results could help to homogeneously

  5. A new cell for temperature-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid solutions: application to PbBr2 solutions in diethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Oldag, T; Keil, P; Keller, H L; Frahm, R

    2005-03-01

    An in situ cell has been constructed for temperature-dependent X-ray absorption experiments (EXAFS and XANES) of lead bromine (PbBr2) solutions in diethylene glycol in the temperature range from room temperature up to about 433 K. The solution is kept in a thermostated container made of carbon-reinforced teflon between two thin chemically inert quartz glass windows with a high transmission for hard X-rays. The construction of the cell ensures that these X-ray windows are thermalized so that any possible precipitation of solid products from the solution is inhibited. The cell consists mainly of two hermetically sealed teflon containers for the thermostating fluid (silicon oil) that were fitted together in such a way that a small and variable volume (approximately 2-4 cm3) for the liquid under investigation was achieved. A small thermocouple in a glass enclosure was placed in the solution to maintain temperature control and feedback to the thermostat. The cell design and its performance for temperature-dependent in situ investigations with X-rays are reported. Some preliminary results obtained for PbBr2 solutions in diethylene glycol are given.

  6. Large shift and small broadening of Br2 valence band upon dimer formation with H2O: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin-Mergarejo, Ricardo; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Halberstadt, Nadine; Ayed, Tahra; Bernal-Uruchurtu, Margarita I; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón; Janda, Kenneth C

    2011-06-16

    Valence electronic excitation spectra are calculated for the H(2)O···Br(2) complex using highly correlated ab initio potentials for both the ground and the valence electronic excited states and a 2-D approximation for vibrational motion. Due to the strong interaction between the O-Br and the Br-Br stretching motions, inclusion of these vibrations is the minimum necessary for the spectrum calculation. A basis set calculation is performed to determine the vibrational wave functions for the ground electronic state and a wave packet simulation is conducted for the nuclear dynamics on the excited state surfaces. The effects of both the spin-orbit interaction and temperature on the spectra are explored. The interaction of Br(2) with a single water molecule induces nearly as large a shift in the spectrum as is observed for an aqueous solution. In contrast, complex formation has a remarkably small effect on the T = 0 K width of the valence bands due to the fast dissociation of the dihalogen bond upon excitation. We therefore conclude that the widths of the spectra in aqueous solution are mostly due to inhomogeneous broadening. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Kinetics and Products of the Reactions of Fluorine Atoms with ClNO and Br2 from 295 to 950 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedjanian, Yuri

    2017-11-09

    The kinetics and products of the reactions of F atoms with Br 2 and ClNO have been studied in a flow reactor coupled with an electron impact ionization mass spectrometer at nearly 2 Torr total pressure of helium and over a wide temperature range, T = 295-950 K. The rate constant of the reaction F + ClNO → products (1) was determined under pseudo-first order conditions, monitoring the kinetics of F atom consumption in excess of ClNO. The measured temperature independent rate constant, k 1 = (1.29 ± 0.13) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 (T = 299-950 K), was found to be in excellent agreement with the only previous low temperature study which allowed to recommend the value of k 1 in an extended temperature range, 228-950 K. FCl and Cl atoms were observed as the reactions products (corresponding to two reaction pathways: Cl-atom abstraction and replacement with fluorine atom, respectively) with the independent of temperature, in the range 295-948 K, yields of 0.68 ± 0.10 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. Rate constant of the reaction F + Br 2 (2), k 2 = (1.28 ± 0.20) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , determined using both absolute and relative rate methods, was found to be independent of temperature at T = 299-940 K.

  8. Formation of T-shaped versus charge-transfer molecular adducts in the reactions between bis(thiocarbonyl) donors and Br2 and I2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Annalisa; Aragoni, M Carla; Bricklebank, Neil; Castellano, Carlo; Demartin, Francesco; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Pintus, Anna; Arca, Massimiliano

    2013-03-01

    The reactions of 4,5,6,7-tetrathiocino-[1,2-b:3,4-b']-1,3,8,10-tetrasubstituted-diimidazolyl-2,9-dithiones (R(2),R'(2)-todit; 1: R=R'=Et; 2: R=R'=Ph; 3: R=Et, R'=Ph) with Br(2) exclusively afforded 1:1 and 1:2 "T-shaped" adducts, as established by FT-Raman spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the case of complex 1·2Br(2). On the other hand, the reactions of compounds 1-3 with molecular I(2) provided charge-transfer (CT) "spoke" adducts, among which the solvated species 3·2I(2)·(1-x)I(2)·xCH(2)Cl(2) (x=0.94) and (3)(2)·7I(2)·xCH(2)Cl(2), (x=0.66) were structurally characterized. The nature of all of the reaction products was elucidated based on elemental analysis and FT-Raman spectroscopy and supported by theoretical calculations at the DFT level. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. [UO2(NH3)5]Br2·NH3: synthesis, crystal structure, and speciation in liquid ammonia solution by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woidy, Patrick; Bühl, Michael; Kraus, Florian

    2015-04-28

    Pentaammine dioxido uranium(VI) dibromide ammonia (1/1), [UO2(NH3)5]Br2·NH3, was synthesized in the form of yellow crystals by the reaction of uranyl bromide, UO2Br2, with dry liquid ammonia. The compound crystallizes orthorhombic in space group Cmcm and is isotypic to [UO2(NH3)5]Cl2·NH3 with a = 13.2499(2), b = 10.5536(1), c = 8.9126(1) Å, V = 1246.29(3) Å(3) and Z = 4 at 123 K. The UO2(2+) cation is coordinated by five ammine ligands and the coordination polyhedron can be best described as pentagonal bipyramid. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are reported for [UO2(NH3)5](2+) in the gas phase and in liquid NH3 solution (using the BLYP density functional). According to free-energy simulations, solvation by ammonia has only a small effect on the uranyl-NH3 bond strength.

  10. A study of the atmospherically important reactions between dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and molecular halogens (X2 = Cl2, Br2, and I2) with ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyman, Lydia; Armata, Nerina; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Dyke, John M

    2012-06-14

    The atmospherically relevant reactions between dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and the molecular halogens (X(2) = Cl(2), Br(2), and I(2)) have been studied with ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. Geometry optimization calculations showed that the reactions proceed from the reagents to the products (CH(3)SeCH(2)X + HX) via three minima, a van der Waals adduct (DMSe:X(2)), a covalently bound intermediate (DMSeX(2)), and a product-like complex (CH(3)SeCH(2)X:HX). The computed potential energy surfaces are used to predict what molecular species are likely to be observed in spectroscopic experiments such as gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy. It is concluded that, for the reactions of DMSe with Cl(2) and Br(2), the covalent intermediate should be seen in spectroscopic experiments, whereas, in the DMSe + I(2) reaction, the van der Waals adduct DMSe:I(2) should be observed. Comparison is made with previous related calculations and experiments on dimethyl sulfide (DMS) with molecular halogens. The relevance of the results to atmospheric chemistry is discussed. The DMSeX(2) and DMSe:X(2) intermediates are likely to be reservoirs of molecular halogens in the atmosphere which will lead on photolysis to ozone depletion.

  11. Characterization of dapB, a gene required by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 for lysine and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The dapB gene, which encodes L-2,3-dihydrodipicolinate reductase, the second enzyme of the lysine branch of the aspartic amino acid family, was cloned and sequenced from a tabtoxin-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 60 to 90% identity to known dapB gene products from gram-negative bacteria and 19 to 21% identity to the dapB products from gram-positive bacteria. The consensus sequence for the NAD(P)H binding site [(V/I)(A/G)(V/I)XGXXGXXG)] and the proposed substrate binding site (HHRHK) were conserved in the polypeptide. A BR2.024 dapB mutant is a diaminopimelate auxotroph and tabtoxin negative. The addition of a mixture of L-,L-, D,D-, and meso-diaminopimelate to defined media restored growth but not tabtoxin production. Cloned DNA fragments containing the parental dapB gene restored the ability to grow in defined media and tabtoxin production to the dapB mutant. These results indicate that the dapB gene is required for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis, thus providing the first genetic evidence that the biosynthesis of tabtoxin proceeds in part along the lysine biosynthetic pathway. These data also suggest that L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate is a common intermediate for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis. PMID:8990304

  12. Electronic structure of Co(III) doped bromo-bridged Ni complexes, [Ni1-xCox(chxn)2Br]Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jimin; Wu, Hashen; Kawakami, Daisuke; Iguchi, Hiroaki; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-ichi

    2008-03-17

    This article describes the electronic structure of the Co(III) doped Br bridged Ni(III) complexes, [Ni(1-x)Cox(chxn)2Br]Br2 (x = 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.11) by using a optical spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In the optical reflectivity spectrum, the new band was formed at about 0.5 eV, which is reasonably recognized as the d(z2) band of doped Co(III) ions. In the STM images of [Ni(1-x)Cox(chxn)2Br]Br2, the bright spots attributable to the tunnel current from the Fermi level of the STM tip to the conduction band of the sample were observed. In addition, some brighter spots were also observed. Because the number of the brighter spots is in good agreement with that of doped Co species, the brighter spots can be assigned to doped Co(III) sites. These are reasonably explained by the tunnel current from the Fermi level of the tip to the d(z2) band of Co(III). The Curie spin concentration was gradually increased with increasing Co(III) ions, which is explained by the scissions of the S = 1/2 1D antiferromagnetic chains.

  13. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J; Softley, Timothy P

    2015-05-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80,000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  14. In-Plane Angular Effect of Magnetoresistance of Quasi-One-Dimensional Organic Metals, (DMET) 2AuBr 2 and (TMTSF) 2ClO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Harukazu; Saito, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Ikemoto, Isao

    1997-08-01

    Comparative study is presented for the in-plane angular effect of magnetoresistance of quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors, (DMET)2AuBr2 and (TMTSF)2ClO4. The magnetoresistance for the magnetic and electrical fields parallel and perpendicular to the most conducting plane, respectively, was measured at 4.2 K and up to 7.0 T. (DMET)2AuBr2 shows an anomalous hump in the field-orientation dependence of the magnetoresistance for the magnetic field nearly parallel to the most conducting axis and this is very similar to what previously reported for (DMET)2I3. Weak anomaly was detected for the magnetoresistance of (TMTSF)2ClO4 in the Relaxed state, while no anomaly was observed in the SDW phase in the Quenched state. By comparing the numerical angular derivatives of the magnetoresistance, it is shown that the anomaly in the in-plane angular effect continuously develops from zero magnetic field and is closely related to the quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surface. A simple method is proposed to estimate the anisotropy of the transfer integral from the width of the hump anomaly.

  15. arXiv Performance of a full scale prototype detector at the BR2 reactor for the SoLid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Y.; Arnold, L.; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Castle, B.C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B.; Cussans, D.; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Ghys, L.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Ihantola, S.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Kalousis, L.N.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Lehaut, G.; Manzanillas, L.; Mermans, J.; Michiels, I.; Moortgat, C.; Newbold, D.; Park, J.; Pestel, V.; Petridis, K.; Piñera, I.; Pommery, G.; Popescu, L.; Pronost, G.; Rademacker, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Saunders, D.; Schune, M.-H.; Simard, L.; Vacheret, A.; Van Dyck, S.; Van Mulders, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vercaemer, S.; Verstraeten, M.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2018-05-03

    The SoLid collaboration has developed a new detector technology to detect electron anti-neutrinos at close proximity to the Belgian BR2 reactor at surface level. A 288 kg prototype detector was deployed in 2015 and collected data during the operational period of the reactor and during reactor shut-down. Dedicated calibration campaigns were also performed with gamma and neutron sources. This paper describes the construction of the prototype detector with a high control on its proton content and the stability of its operation over a period of several months after deployment at the BR2 reactor site. All detector cells provide sufficient light yields to achieve a target energy resolution of better than 20%/√E(MeV). The capability of the detector to track muons is exploited to equalize the light response of a large number of channels to a precision of 3% and to demonstrate the stability of the energy scale over time. Particle identification based on pulse-shape discrimination is demonstrated with calibration so...

  16. Electronic structure calculations and optical properties of a new organic-inorganic luminescent perovskite: (C9H19NH3)2PbI2Br2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, H.; Samet, A.; Dammak, T.; Mlayah, A.; Hlil, E.K.; Abid, Y.

    2011-01-01

    (C 9 H 19 NH 3 ) 2 PbI 2 Br 2 compound is a new crystal belonging to the large hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites compounds family. Optical properties are investigated by optical absorption UV-visible and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. Bands to band absorption peak at 2.44 eV as well as an extremely strong yellow-green photoluminescence emission at 2.17 eV is observed at room temperature. First principle calculations based on the DFT and FLAPW methods combined with LDA approximation are performed as well. Density of state close to the gap is presented and discussed in terms of optical absorption and photoluminescence experimental results. The perfect agreement between experimental data and electronic structure calculations is highlighted. - Highlights: → (C 9 H 19 NH 3 ) 2 PbI 2 Br 2 compound is a new crystal with strong yellow-green PL emission at 2.17 eV. → Calculations based on DFT and FLAPW method combined with LDA approximation are performed. → Gap, optical transitions and exciton presence were predicted from density of states. → Agreement between experimental data and electronic structure calculations.

  17. Results of water chemistry control in the in-pile ''Callisto'' loop (an experimental PWR rig installed in the BR2 reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.; Benoit, P.; Dekeyser, J.; Verwimp, A.

    1994-01-01

    Since June 1992, a new experimental facility, called CALLISTO, is being irradiated in the BR2 materials testing reactor at Mol, Belgium. The main objective of the present test campaign is to study the behaviour of advanced fuel to high burn-up rates in a realistic PWR environment. Three in-pile sections, containing each 9 fuel rods, are loaded inside the reactor vessel and are connected to a common out-of-pile pressurized water circulation loop (ref.1). The later is branched-off into a purification circuit (feed-bleed concept) and further equipped with safety and auxiliary systems. To cope with the test programme, the equipments are designed so that the guidelines of a PWR primary water chemistry can be followed (ref.2). Real steady-state conditions cannot be observed because the typical BR2 cycle (3 weeks running/3 weeks shut-down) is much shorter and because the rig is cooled down during each reactor shut-down. The purpose of this poster is to provide results of chemical parameters recorded during the cycling behaviour of the CALLISTO primary water. (authors). 4 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs

  18. An empirical, quantitative approach to predict the reactivity of some substituted aromatic compounds towards reactive radical species (Cl2-*, Br2-*, *NO2, SO3-*, SO4-*) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minero, Claudio; Maurino, Valter; Pelizzetti, Ezio; Vione, Davide

    2006-07-01

    The Hammett approach, applied to the reaction of various classes of aromatic compounds with the radicals Cl2-*, Br2-*, *NO2, SO3-*, and SO4-* yielded good predictive models, supported by high values of the correlation coefficient r2 in the case of phenols with Cl2-* and of phenolates with *NO2 and SO3-*. Lower but statistically significant correlation coefficients could be obtained for benzoates with Cl2-*, phenolates with Br2-*, and benzoates and anisoles with SO4-*.

  19. Homeless people's access to primary care physiotherapy services: an exploratory, mixed-method investigation using a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Jo; Deaton, Stuart; Greenwood, Nan

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to appraise referrals of homeless patients to physiotherapy services and explore perceptions of barriers to access. This exploratory mixed-method study used a follow-up qualitative extension to core quantitative research design. Over 9 months, quantitative data were gathered from the healthcare records of homeless patients referred to physiotherapy by a general practitioner (GP) practice, including the number of referrals and demographic data of all homeless patients referred. Corresponding physiotherapy records of those people referred to physiotherapy were searched for the outcome of their care. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews, based on the quantitative findings, were carried out with staff involved with patient care from the referring GP practice and were used to expand insight into the quantitative findings. Two primary care sites provided data for this study: a GP practice dedicated exclusively to homeless people and the physiotherapy department receiving their referrals. Quantitative data from the healthcare records of 34 homeless patient referrals to physiotherapy were collected and analysed. In addition, five staff involved in patient care were interviewed. 34 referrals of homeless people were made to physiotherapy in a 9-month period. It was possible to match 25 of these to records from the physiotherapy department. Nine (36%) patients did not attend their first appointment; seven (28%) attended an initial appointment, but did not attend a subsequent appointment and were discharged from the service; five (20%) completed treatment and four patients (16%) had ongoing treatment. Semi-structured interviews revealed potential barriers preventing homeless people from accessing physiotherapy services, the complex factors being faced by those making referrals and possible ways to improve physiotherapy access. Homeless people with musculoskeletal problems may fail to access physiotherapy treatment, but opportunities

  20. Theoretical study and rate constant calculation for the reactions of SH (SD) with Cl2, Br2, and BrCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2005-01-30

    The mechanisms of the SH (SD) radicals with Cl2 (R1), Br2 (R2), and BrCl (R3) are investigated theoretically, and the rate constants are calculated using a dual-level direct dynamics method. The optimized geometries and frequencies of the stationary points are calculated at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) and MPW1K/6-311G(d,p) levels. Higher-level energies are obtained at the approximate QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 2pd) level using the MP2 geometries as well as by the multicoefficient correlation method based on QCISD (MC-QCISD) using the MPW1K geometries. Complexes with energies less than those of the reactants or products are located at the entrance or the exit channels of these reactions, which indicate that the reactions may proceed via an indirect mechanism. The enthalpies of formation for the species XSH/XSD (X = Cl and Br) are evaluated using hydrogenation working reactions method. By canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT), the rate constants of SH and SD radicals with Cl2, Br2, and BrCl are calculated over a wide temperature range of 200-2000 K at the a-QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 2pd)//MP2/6-311G(d, p) level. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental rate constants is obtained in the measured temperature range. Our calculations show that for SH (SD) + BrCl reaction bromine abstraction (R3a or R3a') leading to the formation of BrSH (BrSD) + Cl in a barrierless process dominants the reaction with the branching ratios for channels 3a and 3a' of 99% at 298 K, which is quite different from the experimental result of k3a'/k3' = 54 +/- 10%. Negative activation energies are found at the higher level for the SH + Br2 and SH + BrCl (Br-abstraction) reactions; as a result, the rate constants show a slightly negative temperature dependence, which is consistent with the determination in the literature. The kinetic isotope effects for the three reactions are "inverse". The values of kH/kD are 0.88, 0.91, and 0.69 at room temperature, respectively, and they increase

  1. Higher fine-scale genetic structure in peripheral than in core populations of a long-lived and mixed-mating conifer--eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Madhav; Rajora, Om P

    2012-04-05

    Fine-scale or spatial genetic structure (SGS) is one of the key genetic characteristics of plant populations. Several evolutionary and ecological processes and population characteristics influence the level of SGS within plant populations. Higher fine-scale genetic structure may be expected in peripheral than core populations of long-lived forest trees, owing to the differences in the magnitude of operating evolutionary and ecological forces such as gene flow, genetic drift, effective population size and founder effects. We addressed this question using eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) as a model species for declining to endangered long-lived tree species with mixed-mating system. We determined the SGS in two core and two peripheral populations of eastern white cedar from its Maritime Canadian eastern range using six nuclear microsatellite DNA markers. Significant SGS ranging from 15 m to 75 m distance classes was observed in the four studied populations. An analysis of combined four populations revealed significant positive SGS up to the 45 m distance class. The mean positive significant SGS observed in the peripheral populations was up to six times (up to 90 m) of that observed in the core populations (15 m). Spatial autocorrelation coefficients and correlograms of single and sub-sets of populations were statistically significant. The extent of within-population SGS was significantly negatively correlated with all genetic diversity parameters. Significant heterogeneity of within-population SGS was observed for 0-15 m and 61-90 m between core and peripheral populations. Average Sp, and gene flow distances were higher in peripheral (Sp = 0.023, σg = 135 m) than in core (Sp = 0.014, σg = 109 m) populations. However, the mean neighborhood size was higher in the core (Nb = 82) than in the peripheral (Nb = 48) populations. Eastern white cedar populations have significant fine-scale genetic structure at short distances. Peripheral populations have several

  2. New insight on the local structure of Cu2+ ion in the solution of CuBr2 by EXAFS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Meijuan; Chu Wangsheng; Chen Xing; Wu Ziyu

    2009-01-01

    CuBr 2 solutions at different concentrations were studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Cu K edge. In the saturated solution Cu 2+ ions have chemical bonds with 3.0 oxygen atoms and 0.9 Br ion at about 1.96 A and 2.42 A, respectively. It indicates that the CuBr 4 -2 configuration exists with a ratio of 25% under this condition. In the dilute solutions no evidence of Br ions contributions in the first shell around Cu 2+ ions occurs. The almost identical X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and EXAFS characters address similar local environments around Cu 2+ in agreement with results of the EXAFS fit taking into account only the contributions of Cu-O bonds.

  3. Electrical properties and Raman studies of phase transitions in ferroelectric [N(CH3)4]2CoCl2Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mohamed, C.; Karoui, K.; Bulou, A.; Ben Rhaiem, A.

    2018-03-01

    The present paper accounted for the synthesis, electric properties and vibrational spectroscopy of [N(CH3)4]2CoCl2Br2. The dielectric spectra were measured in the frequency range 10-1-105 Hz and temperature interval from 223 to 393 K. The dielectical properties confirm the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition at 290 K, which is reported by Abdallah Ben Rhaiem et al. (2013). The equivalent circuit based on the Z-View-software was proposed and the conduction mechanisms were determined. The obtained results have been discussed in terms of the correlated barrier hopping model (CBH) in phase I and non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model (NSPT) in phases II and III. Raman spectra as function temperature have been used to characterize the phase transitions and their nature, which indicates a change of the some peak near the transitions phase.

  4. Radiation-induced defects and their recombination processes in the x-ray storage phosphor BaBr2:Eu2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secu, M; Schweizer, S; Rogulis, U; Spaeth, J-M

    2003-01-01

    The recombination processes in the x-ray storage phosphor BaBr 2 :Eu 2+ were investigated by optical and magneto-optical methods. A structure-sensitive investigation of the defects involved in the recombination processes was performed by detecting the microwave-induced changes in the recombination luminescence in a high magnetic field. F centres as well as V K hole centres are created after x-irradiation at low temperatures. The low-energy recombination band peaking at about 460 nm is due to F-V K centre recombinations, whereas the two high energy bands at 282 and 315 nm are probably due to recombinations of self-trapped excitons

  5. Vapor pressures and isopiestic molalities of concentrated CaCl2(aq), CaBr2(aq), and NaCl(aq) to T = 523 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Simonson, John M.

    2005-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory high-temperature isopiestic apparatus was outfitted with precise pressure gauges to allow for direct vapor pressure measurements. Vapor pressures over concentrated solutions of CaCl 2 (aq), and CaBr 2 (aq) were measured at temperatures between (380.15 and 523.15) K in the range of water activities between 0.2 and 0.85. Isopiestic molalities were used to determine osmotic coefficients at the conditions where NaCl reference standard solutions remained undersaturated. The main goal of this work was to improve the accuracy of isopiestic comparisons based on the calcium chloride reference standard. Osmotic coefficients for CaCl 2 (aq) and CaBr 2 (aq) calculated from both isopiestic and direct vapor pressure results were combined with the literature data and used to build general thermodynamic models based on a variant of extended Pitzer ion-interaction equations and valid at the saturation pressure of water. While these empirical models approach the accuracy of the experimental data in a wider range of concentrations and temperatures than any previously published equations, considerable amounts of accurate data and a substantial effort are required in order to obtain a satisfactory representation using power series-based virial equations. The effect of experimental uncertainties on the accuracy of the direct vapor pressure results is discussed, including in particular the error caused by the presence in the apparatus of a small amount of CO 2 . The substantial decrease of the solubility product of CaCO 3 in concentrated chloride solutions at temperatures above 423 K is a serious defect of calcium chloride as a water activity reference standard

  6. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ∼29 J g(-1) for Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g(-1) K(-1) for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.

  7. Comparison of aggregation behaviors between ionic liquid-type imidazolium gemini surfactant [C12-4-C12im]Br2 and its monomer [C12mim]Br on silicon wafer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mingqi; Xu, Guiying; Pang, Jinyu; Zhao, Taotao

    2009-09-01

    The aggregation of ionic liquid-type imidazolium gemini surfactant [C(12)-4-C(12)im]Br(2) on silicon wafer, which is compared with its monomer [C(12)mim]Br, have been studied. AFM morphology images and contact angle measurements suggest that the aggregations of [C(12)-4-C(12)im]Br(2) and [C(12)mim]Br on silicon wafer follow different mechanisms. Below the critical surface aggregation concentrations (CSAC), both surfactant molecules are adsorbed with their hydrophobic tails facing the air. But above the CSAC, [C(12)-4-C(12)im]Br(2) molecules finally form a bilayer structure with hydrophilic head groups facing the air, whereas [C(12)mim]Br molecules form a multilayer structure, and with increasing its concentration, the layer numbers increase with the hydrophobic chains and hydrophilic head groups facing the air by turns. Besides, the watery wettability of [C(12)-4-C(12)im]Br(2)-treated silica surface is lower than that of [C(12)mim]Br at the concentration of 5.0 cmc, and the infrared spectroscopy suggests that the poorer watery wettability of [C(12)-4-C(12)im]Br(2) may be relative to the less-ordered packing of methylene chains inside the aggregate. These different aggregation behaviors for the two surfactants ascribe to the different molecular structures and electrostatic interactions. This work would have certain theoretical guidance meaning on the modification of solid surface.

  8. New results for the formation of a muoniated radical in the Mu + Br2 system: a van der Waals complex or evidence for vibrational bonding in Br-Mu-Br?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain; Macrae, Roderick M

    2012-08-21

    New evidence is presented for the observation of a muoniated radical in the Mu + Br(2) system, from μSR longitudinal field (LF) repolarisation studies in the gas phase, at Br(2) concentrations of 0.1 bar in a Br(2)/N(2) mixture at 300 K and at 10 bar total pressure. The LF repolarisation curve, up to a field of 4.5 kG, reveals two paramagnetic components, one for the Mu atom, formed promptly during the slowing-down process of the positive muon, with a known Mu hyperfine coupling constant (hfcc) of 4463 MHz, and one for a muoniated radical formed by fast Mu addition. From model fits to the Br(2)/N(2) data, the radical component is found to have an unusually high muon hfcc, assessed to be ∼3300 MHz with an overall error due to systematics expected to exceed 10%. This high muon hfcc is taken as evidence for the observation of either the Br-Mu-Br radical, and hence of vibrational bonding in this H[combining low line]-L[combining low line]-H[combining low line] system, or of a MuBr(2) van der Waals complex formed in the entrance channel. Preliminary ab initio electronic structure calculations suggest the latter is more likely but fully rigorous calculations of the effect of dynamics on the hfcc for either system have yet to be carried out.

  9. Recent Progress in the Design of Advanced Cathode Materials and Battery Models for High-Performance Lithium-X (X = O2 , S, Se, Te, I2 , Br2 ) Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Ma, Jianmin; Fan, Qinghua; Guo, Shaojun; Dou, Shixue

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances and achievements in emerging Li-X (X = O 2 , S, Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries with promising cathode materials open up new opportunities for the development of high-performance lithium-ion battery alternatives. In this review, we focus on an overview of recent important progress in the design of advanced cathode materials and battery models for developing high-performance Li-X (X = O 2 , S, Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries. We start with a brief introduction to explain why Li-X batteries are important for future renewable energy devices. Then, we summarize the existing drawbacks, major progress and emerging challenges in the development of cathode materials for Li-O 2 (S) batteries. In terms of the emerging Li-X (Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries, we systematically summarize their advantages/disadvantages and recent progress. Specifically, we review the electrochemical performance of Li-Se (Te) batteries using carbonate-/ether-based electrolytes, made with different electrode fabrication techniques, and of Li-I 2 (Br 2 ) batteries with various cell designs (e.g., dual electrolyte, all-organic electrolyte, with/without cathode-flow mode, and fuel cell/solar cell integration). Finally, the perspective on and challenges for the development of cathode materials for the promising Li-X (X = O 2 , S, Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries is presented. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  11. Feasibility study of the design of homogeneously mixed thorium-uranium oxide and all-uranium fueled reactor cores for civil nuclear marine propulsion - 15082

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, S.B.; Lindley, B.A.; Parks, G.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this reactor physics study, we attempt to design a civil marine reactor core that can operate over a 10 effective-full-power-years life at 333 MWth using ThUO 2 and all-UO 2 fuel. We use WIMS to develop subassembly designs and PANTHER to examine whole-core arrangements, optimizing: subassembly and core geometry; fuel enrichment; burnable and moveable poison design; and whole-core loading patterns. We compare designs with a 14% fissile loading for ThUO 2 and all-UO 2 fuel in 13*13 assemblies with ZrB 2 integral fuel burnable absorber pins for reactivity control. Taking advantage of self-shielding effects, the ThUO 2 option shows greater promise in the final burnable poison design while maintaining low, stable reactivity with minimal burnup penalty. For the final poisoning design with ZrB 2 , ThUO 2 contributes 2.5% more initial reactivity suppression, although the all-UO 2 design exhibits lower reactivity swing. All the candidate materials show greater rod worth for the ThUO 2 design. For both fuels, B 4 C has the highest reactivity worth, providing 10% higher control rod worth for ThUO 2 fuel than all-UO 2 . Finally, optimized assemblies were loaded into a 3D reactor model in PANTHER. The PANTHER results show that after 10 years, the core is on the border of criticality, confirming the fissile loading is well-designed. (authors)

  12. Near infrared imaging-guided photodynamic therapy under an extremely low energy of light by galactose targeted amphiphilic polypeptide micelle encapsulating BODIPY-Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Ruan, Zheng; Li, Tuanwei; Yuan, Pan; Yan, Lifeng

    2016-10-18

    Near infrared (NIR) imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) is attractive, especially the utilization of one dye as both a photosensitizer and fluorescent probe, and the as-synthesized BODIPY-Br 2 molecule is a candidate. Here, a galactose targeted amphiphilic copolymer of a polypeptide was synthesized and its micelles work as nanocarriers for BODIPY for targeting the NIR imaging-guided PDT of hepatoma cancer cells. At the same time, BODIPY could light up the cytoplasm for real-time imaging and kill cancer cells when the light was switched on. In vitro tests performed on both HepG2 and HeLa cells confirmed that the as-prepared PMAGP-POEGMA-PLys-B micelles showed efficient cell suppression of the cells with galactose receptors in the presence of light under an extremely low energy density (6.5 J cm -2 ). This protocol highlights the potential of polypeptides as biodegradable carriers for NIR image-guided and confined targeting photodynamic therapy.

  13. An investigation on the structure, spectroscopy and thermodynamic aspects of Br2((-))(H2O)n clusters using a conjunction of stochastic and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Pulak; Chaudhury, Pinaki

    2016-06-28

    In this work we obtained global as well as local structures of Br2((-))(H2O)n clusters for n = 2 to 6 followed by the study of IR-spectral features and thermochemistry for the structures. The way adopted by us to obtain structures is not the conventional one used in most cases. Here we at first generated excellent quality pre-optimized structures by exploring the suitable empirical potential energy surface using stochastic optimizer simulated annealing. These structures are then further refined using quantum chemical calculations to obtain the final structures, and spectral and thermodynamic features. We clearly showed that our approach results in very quick and better convergence which reduces the computational cost and obviously using the strategy we are able to get one [i.e. global] or more than one [i.e. global and local(s)] energetically lower structures than those which are already reported for a given cluster size. Moreover, IR-spectral results and the evolutionary trends in interaction energy, solvation energy and vertical detachment energy for global structures of each size have also been presented to establish the utility of the procedure employed.

  14. Synthesis and structure of [(NH2)2CSSC(NH2)2]2[OsBr6]Br2 . 3H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnitskaya, O. V.; Kultyshkina, E. K.; Stash, A. I.; Glukhova, A. A.; Venskovskii, N. U.

    2008-01-01

    The complex [(NH 2 ) 2 CSSC(NH 2 ) 2 ] 2 [OsBr 6 ]Br 2 . 3H 2 O is synthesized by the reaction of K 2 OsBr 6 with thiocarbamide in concentrated HBr and characterized using electronic absorption and IR absorption spectroscopy. Its crystal structure is determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystals are orthorhombic, a = 11.730(2) A, b = 14.052(3) A, c = 16.994(3) A, space group Cmcm, and Z = 4. The [OsBr 6 ] 2- anionic complex has an octahedral structure. The Os-Br distances fall in the range 2.483-2.490 A. The α,α'-dithiobisformamidinium cation is a product of the oxidation of thiocarbamide. The S-S and C-S distances are 2.016 and 1.784 A, respectively. The H 2 O molecules, Br - ions, and NH 2 groups of the cation are linked by hydrogen bonds.

  15. Aggregation behavior of gemini pyrrolidine-based ionic liquids 1,1'-(butane-1,4-diyl)bis(1-alkylpyrrolidinium) bromide ([C(n)py-4-C(n)py][Br2]) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Yan, Han; Zhao, Mingwei; Zheng, Liqiang

    2012-04-15

    Three gemini pyrrolidine-based ionic liquids, 1,1'-(butane-1,4-diyl)bis(1-alkylpyrrolidinium) bromide ([C(n)py-4-C(n)py][Br(2)], n=10, 12, 14), were synthesized. Their aggregation behavior in aqueous solution was systematically investigated by surface tension, electrical conductivity, and steady-state fluorescence. Compared with their corresponding monomers, N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bromide (C(n)MPB), [C(n)py-4-C(n)py][Br(2)], have higher surface activity. The special structure of [C(n)py-4-C(n)py][Br(2)] that has a spacer in their hydrophilic head groups results in a lower surface excess concentration (Γ(max)) and a larger molecular cross-sectional area (A(min)). Electrical conductivity studies show a lower degree of counter-ion binding to the aggregates. A smaller aggregation number (N(agg)) is observed by the pyrene fluorescence quenching method. A series of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(agg)(0),ΔH(agg)(0),-TΔS(agg)(0)) of aggregation derived from electrical conductivity indicate that the aggregation of [C(n)py-4-C(n)py][Br(2)] is enthalpy-driven, while aggregation of C(n)MPB is entropy-driven at low temperatures but enthalpy-driven at high temperatures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Airborne Measurements of BrO and the Sum of HOBr and Br2 over the Tropical West Pacific from 1 to 15 Km During the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dexian; Huey, L. Gregory; Tanner, David J.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Anderson, Daniel C.; Wales, Pamela A.; Pan, Laura L.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometer was used to measure BrO and HOBr + Br2 over the Tropical West Pacific Ocean within the altitude range of 1 to 15 km, during the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) campaign in 2014. Isolated episodes of elevated BrO (up to 6.6 pptv) and/or HOBr + Br2 (up to 7.3 pptv) were observed in the tropical free troposphere (TFT) and were associated with biomass burning. However, most of the time we did not observe significant BrO or HOBr + Br2 in the TFT and the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) above our limits of detection (LOD). The 1 min average LOD for BrO ranged from 0.6 to 1.6 pptv and for HOBr + Br2 ranged from 1.3 to 3.5 pptv. During one flight, BrO observations from the TTL to the extratropical lowermost stratosphere were used to infer a profile of inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)). Based on this profile, we estimated the product gas injection of bromine species into the stratosphere to be 2 pptv. Analysis of Br(sub y) partitioning further indicates that BrO levels are likely very low in the TFT environment and that future studies should target the measurement of HBr or atomic Br.

  17. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO{sub 2} to a mixed (U,Th)O{sub 2} core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo de; Maiorino, José Rubens; Moreira, João Manoel de Losada; Santos, Thiago Augusto dos, E-mail: giovanni_laranjo@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo [Department of Energy, System, Territory, and Construction Engineering (DESTEC), Pisa (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O{sub 2} core, rather than the traditional uranium dioxide, for the purpose of reducing long-lived actinides, especially plutonium, and generates a stock pile of {sup 233}U, which could in the future be used in advanced fuel cycles, in a more sustainable process and taking advantage of the large stock of thorium available on the planet and especially in Brazil. The reactor chosen as reference was the AP1000, which is considered to be one of the most reliable and modern reactor of the current Generation III, and its similarity to the reactors already consolidated and used in Brazil for electric power generation. The results show the feasibility and potentiality of the concept, without the necessity of changes in the core of the AP1000, and even with advantages over this. The neutron calculations were made by the SERPENT code. The results provided a maximum linear power density lower than the AP1000, favoring safety. In addition, the delayed neutron fraction and the reactivity coefficients proved to be adequate to ensure the safety of the concept. The results show that a production of about 260 Kg of {sup 233}U per cycle is possible, with a minimum production of fissile plutonium that favors the use of the concept in U-Th cycles. (author)

  18. Paclitaxel loaded folic acid targeted nanoparticles of mixed lipid-shell and polymer-core: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peiqi; Wang, Hanjie; Yu, Man; Liao, Zhenyu; Wang, Xianhuo; Zhang, Fei; Ji, Wei; Wu, Bing; Han, Jinghua; Zhang, Haichang; Wang, Huaqing; Chang, Jin; Niu, Ruifang

    2012-06-01

    A functional drug carrier comprised of folic acid modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs) including poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core, PEGylated octadecyl-quaternized lysine modified chitosan (PEG-OQLCS) as lipid-shell, folic acid as targeting ligand and cholesterol was prepared and evaluated for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). Confocal microscopy analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid-shell on the polymer-core. Physicochemical characterizations of FLPNPs, such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro PTX release, were also evaluated. The internalization efficiency and targeting ability of FLPNPs were demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. PTX loaded FLPNPs showed a significantly higher cytotoxicity than the commercial PTX formulation (Taxol®). The intravenous administration of PTX encapsulated FLPNPs led to tumor regression and improvement of animal survival in a murine model, compared with that observed with Taxol® and biodistribution study showed that PTX concentration in tumor for PTX encapsulated FLPNPs was higher than other PTX formulations. Our data indicate that PTX loaded FLPNPs are a promising nano-sized drug formulation for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenaers, A., E-mail: aleenaer@sckcen.be [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V. [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Detavernier, C. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK• CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% {sup 235}U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL–matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium–Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)–matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  20. Rotationally adiabatic pair interactions of para- and ortho-hydrogen with the halogen molecules F2, Cl2, and Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthias; Accardi, Antonio; Paulus, Beate; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2014-08-21

    The present work is concerned with the weak interactions between hydrogen and halogen molecules, i.e., the interactions of pairs H2-X2 with X = F, Cl, Br, which are dominated by dispersion and quadrupole-quadrupole forces. The global minimum of the four-dimensional (4D) coupled cluster with singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) pair potentials is always a T shaped structure where H2 acts as the hat of the T, with well depths (De) of 1.3, 2.4, and 3.1 kJ/mol for F2, Cl2, and Br2, respectively. MP2/AVQZ results, in reasonable agreement with CCSD(T) results extrapolated to the basis set limit, are used for detailed scans of the potentials. Due to the large difference in the rotational constants of the monomers, in the adiabatic approximation, one can solve the rotational Schrödinger equation for H2 in the potential of the X2 molecule. This yields effective two-dimensional rotationally adiabatic potential energy surfaces where pH2 and oH2 are point-like particles. These potentials for the H2-X2 complexes have global and local minima for effective linear and T-shaped complexes, respectively, which are separated by 0.4-1.0 kJ/mol, where oH2 binds stronger than pH2 to X2, due to higher alignment to minima structures of the 4D-pair potential. Further, we provide fits of an analytical function to the rotationally adiabatic potentials.

  1. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  2. Anisotropic magnetic interactions and spin dynamics in the spin-chain compound Cu (py) 2Br2 : An experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisner, J.; Brockmann, M.; Zimmermann, S.; Weiße, A.; Thede, M.; Ressouche, E.; Povarov, K. Yu.; Zheludev, A.; Klümper, A.; Büchner, B.; Kataev, V.; Göhmann, F.

    2017-07-01

    We compare theoretical results for electron spin resonance (ESR) properties of the Heisenberg-Ising Hamiltonian with ESR experiments on the quasi-one-dimensional magnet Cu (py) 2Br2 (CPB). Our measurements were performed over a wide frequency and temperature range giving insight into the spin dynamics, spin structure, and magnetic anisotropy of this compound. By analyzing the angular dependence of ESR parameters (resonance shift and linewidth) at room temperature, we show that the two weakly coupled inequivalent spin-chain types inside the compound are well described by Heisenberg-Ising chains with their magnetic anisotropy axes perpendicular to the chain direction and almost perpendicular to each other. We further determine the full g tensor from these data. In addition, the angular dependence of the linewidth at high temperatures gives us access to the exponent of the algebraic decay of a dynamical correlation function of the isotropic Heisenberg chain. From the temperature dependence of static susceptibilities, we extract the strength of the exchange coupling (J /kB=52.0 K ) and the anisotropy parameter (δ ≈-0.02 ) of the model Hamiltonian. An independent compatible value of δ is obtained by comparing the exact prediction for the resonance shift at low temperatures with high-frequency ESR data recorded at 4 K . The spin structure in the ordered state implied by the two (almost) perpendicular anisotropy axes is in accordance with the propagation vector determined from neutron scattering experiments. In addition to undoped samples, we study the impact of partial substitution of Br by Cl ions on spin dynamics. From the dependence of the ESR linewidth on the doping level, we infer an effective decoupling of the anisotropic component J δ from the isotropic exchange J in these systems.

  3. Spectroscopic study of the reaction between Br2 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and comparison with a parallel study made on Cl2 + DMS: possible atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaceci, Sonya; Ogden, J Steven; Dyke, John M

    2010-03-07

    The reaction between molecular bromine and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) has been studied both as a co-condensation reaction in low temperature matrices by infrared (IR) matrix isolation spectroscopy and in the gas-phase at low pressures by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). The co-condensation reaction leads to the formation of the molecular van der Waals adduct DMS-Br(2). This was identified by IR spectroscopy supported by results of electronic structure calculations. Calculation of the minimum energy structures in important regions of the reaction surface and computed IR spectra of these structures, which could be compared with the experimental spectra, allowed the structure of the adduct (C(s)) to be determined. The low pressure (ca. 10(-5) mbar) gas-phase reaction was studied by UV-PES, but did not yield any observable products, indicating that a third body is necessary for the adduct to be stabilised. These results are compared with parallel co-condensation and gas-phase reactions between DMS and Cl(2). For this reaction, a similar van der Waals adduct DMS-Cl(2) is observed by IR spectroscopy in the co-condensation reactions, but in the gas-phase, this adduct converts to a covalently bound structure Me(2)SCl(2), observed in PES studies, which ultimately decomposes to monochlorodimethylsulfide and HCl. For these DMS + X(2) reactions, computed relative energies of minima and transition states on the potential energy surfaces are presented which provide an interpretation for the products observed from the two reactions studied. The implications of the results obtained to atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  4. A Detailed Research Study of Learning and Teaching Core Chemical Engineering to a High Standard in a Mixed-Ability Small Class in Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    A detailed study of learning and teaching (L&T) of chemical engineering distillation to a mixed-ability small class of 13 students who are ordinarily full-time in-house employees in industry is reported. The course consisted of 9 × 2-h lectures (18 hours) and 9 × 2-h tutorials (18 hours). It was delivered over nine business days "in…

  5. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  6. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2007-10-01

    Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of

  7. Synthesis of sol–gel silica particles in reverse micelles with mixed-solvent polar cores: tailoring nanoreactor structure and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bürglová, Kristýna; Hlaváč, Jan [Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (Czech Republic); Bartlett, John R., E-mail: jbartlett@usc.edu.au [University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach for producing metal oxide nano- and microparticles via sol–gel processing in confined media (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelles), in which the chemical and physical properties of the polar aqueous core of the reverse micelles are modulated by the inclusion of a second polar co-solvent. The co-solvents were selected for their capacity to solubilise compounds with low water solubility and included dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, ethylene glycol, n-propanol, dimethylacetamide and N-methylpyrrolidone. A broad range of processing conditions across the sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate/cyclohexane/water phase diagram were identified that are suitable for preparing particles with dimensions <50 to >500 nm. In contrast, only a relatively narrow range of processing conditions were suitable for preparing such particles in the absence of the co-solvents, highlighting the role of the co-solvent in modulating the properties of the polar core of the reverse micelles. A mechanism is proposed that links the interactions between the various reactive sites on the polar head group of the surfactant and the co-solvent to the nucleation and growth of the particles.

  8. A sublimation technique for high-precision measurements of δ13CO2 and mixing ratios of CO2 and N2O from air trapped in ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide high precision stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13CO2 or δ13C of CO2 from small bubbly, partially and fully clathrated ice core samples we developed a new method based on sublimation coupled to gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS. In a first step the trapped air is quantitatively released from ~30 g of ice and CO2 together with N2O are separated from the bulk air components and stored in a miniature glass tube. In an off-line step, the extracted sample is introduced into a helium carrier flow using a minimised tube cracker device. Prior to measurement, N2O and organic sample contaminants are gas chromatographically separated from CO2. Pulses of a CO2/N2O mixture are admitted to the tube cracker and follow the path of the sample through the system. This allows an identical treatment and comparison of sample and standard peaks. The ability of the method to reproduce δ13C from bubble and clathrate ice is verified on different ice cores. We achieve reproducibilities for bubble ice between 0.05 ‰ and 0.07 ‰ and for clathrate ice between 0.05 ‰ and 0.09 ‰ (dependent on the ice core used. A comparison of our data with measurements on bubble ice from the same ice core but using a mechanical extraction device shows no significant systematic offset. In addition to δ13C, the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios can be volumetrically derived with a precision of 2 ppmv and 8 ppbv, respectively.

  9. Assessment of the French and US embrittlement trend curves applied to RPV materials irradiated in the BR2 materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Gerard, R.; Boagaerts, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) in monitored through the surveillance programs associated with predictive formulas, the so-called embrittlement trend curves. These formulas are generally empirically derived and contain the major embrittlement-inducing elements such as copper, nickel and phosphorus. There are a number of such trend curves used in various regulatory guides used in the US, France, Germany, Russia and Japan. These trend curves are often supported by surveillance data and regularly assessed in view of updated surveillance databases. With the recent worldwide move towards life extension of existing reactors above their initially-scheduled lifetime of 40 years, adequate and accurate modeling of irradiation embrittlement becomes a concern for long term operation. The aim of this work is to assess the performance of the embrittlement trend curves used in a regulatory perspective. The work presented here is limited to US and French trend curves because the reactor pressure vessels of the Belgian nuclear power plants are either Westinghouse or Framatome design. The chemical composition of the Belgian RPVs being very close to the one of the French 900 MW units, the French trend curve is used except for the Doel 1-2 units for which these curves are not applicable due to the higher copper content of the welds. In this case, the U.S. trend curves are used. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of the embrittlement trend curves used in a regulatory perspective to represent the experimental data obtained in the BR2 reactor. In particular, the French (FIM, FIS) and the US (Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2, ASTM E900-02, EWO and EONY) formulas are of prime interest. The results obtained clearly show that the French trend curves tend to over-estimate the actual irradiation hardening while the US curves under-estimate it. Within the long term operation perspective, both over- and under-estimating are undesirable and therefore the

  10. The structure of a mixed GluR2 ligand-binding core dimer in complex with (S)-glutamate and the antagonist (S)-NS1209

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Christina; Pickering, Darryl S; Mirza, Osman

    2006-01-01

    domains has been observed. (S)-NS1209 adopts a novel binding mode, including hydrogen bonding to Tyr450 and Gly451 of D1. Parts of (S)-NS1209 occupy new areas of the GluR2 ligand-binding cleft, and bind near residues that are not conserved among receptor subtypes. The affinities of (RS)-NS1209 at the Glu....... The thermodynamics of binding of the antagonists (S)-NS1209, DNQX and (S)-ATPO to the GluR2 ligand-binding core have been determined by displacement isothermal titration calorimetry. The displacement of (S)-glutamate by all antagonists was shown to be driven by enthalpy....

  11. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  12. Research of natural resources saving by design studies of Pressurized Light Water Reactors and High Conversion PWR cores with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, V.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of innovative neutronic conception of Pressurized Light Water Reactors (PWR) of 3. generation, saving of natural resources is of paramount importance for sustainable nuclear energy production. This study consists in the one hand to design high Conversion Reactors exploiting mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and in the other hand, to elaborate multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, in order to maximize natural resources economy. This study has two main objectives: first the design of High Conversion PWR (HCPWR) with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and secondly the setting up of multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233 U, to better natural resources economy. The approach took place in four stages. Two ways of introducing thorium into PWR have been identified: the first is with low moderator to fuel volume ratios (MR) and ThPuO 2 fuel, and the second is with standard or high MR and ThUO 2 fuel. The first way led to the design of under-moderated HCPWR following the criteria of high 233 U production and low plutonium consumption. This second step came up with two specific concepts, from which multi-recycling strategies have been elaborated. The exclusive production and recycling of 233 U inside HCPWR limits the annual economy of natural uranium to approximately 30%. It was brought to light that the strong need in plutonium in the HCPWR dedicated to 233 U production is the limiting factor. That is why it was eventually proposed to study how the production of 233 U within PWR (with standard MR), from 2020. It was shown that the anticipated production of 233 U in dedicated PWR relaxes the constraint on plutonium inventories and favours the transition toward a symbiotic reactor fleet composed of both PWR and HCPWR loaded with thorium fuel. This strategy is more adapted and leads to an annual economy of natural uranium of about 65%. (author) [fr

  13. One-pot oxidation and bromination of 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dihydrothiophenes using Br2: synthesis and application of 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dibromothiophenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yizhe; Chen, Yi

    2007-08-31

    A class of 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dibromothiophenes (1b-5b) was synthesized by a one-pot reaction of 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dihydrothiophenes with Br2 reagent in excellent yield (83-92%). It was found that Br2 performed a double function (oxidation and bromination) during the conversion of 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dihydrothiophenes to 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dibromothiophenes. The application of 3,4-diaryl-2,5-dibromothiophenes used as building blocks was also investigated. Employing 3,4-diphenyl-2,5-dibromothiophene (1b) as a template, a class of 2,3,4,5-tetraarylthiophenes was prepared by the Suzuki coupling reaction. This provided a new and simple approach to the preparation of 2,3,4,5-tetraarylthiophenes.

  14. Mechanistic aspects of the reaction between Br2 and chalcogenone donors (LE; E=S, Se): competitive formation of 10-E-3, T-shaped 1:1 molecular adducts, charge-transfer adducts, and [ (LE)2]2+ dications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragoni, M C; Arca, M; Demartin, F; Devillanova, F A; Garau, A; Isaia, F; Lelj, F; Lippolis, V; Verani, G

    2001-07-16

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterisation of the products obtained by treatment of N,N'-dimethylimidazolidine-2-thione (1), N,N'-dimethylimidazolidine-2-selone (2), N,N'-dimethylbenzoimidazole-2-thione (3) and N,N'-dimethylbenzoimidazole-2-selone (4) with Br2 in MeCN are reported, together with the crystal structures of the 10-E-3, T-shaped adducts 2 . Br2 (12), 3 . Br2 (13) and 4 . Br2 (14). A conductometric and spectrophotometric investigation into the reaction between 1-4 and Br2, carried out in MeCN, allows the equilibria involved in the formation of the isolated 10-E-3 (E = S, Se) hypervalent compounds to be hypothesised. In order to understand the reasons why S and Se donors can give different product types on treatment with Br2 and I2, DFT calculations have been carried out on 1-8, 19 and 20, and on their corresponding hypothetical [LEX]+ cations (L = organic framework; E = S, Se; X = Br, I), which are considered to be key intermediates in the formation of the different products. The results obtained in terms of NBO charge distribution on [LEX]+ species explain the different behaviour of 1-8, 19 and 20 in their reactions with Br2 and I2 fairly well. X-ray diffraction studies show 12-14 to have a T-shaped (10-E-3; E = S, Se) hypervalent chalcogen nature. They contain an almost linear Br-E-Br (E = S, Se) system roughly perpendicular to the average plane of the organic molecules. In 12, the Se atom of each adduct molecule has a short interaction with the Br(1) atom of an adjacent unit, such that the Se atom displays a roughly square planar coordination. The Se-Br distances are asymmetric [2.529(1) vs. 2.608(1) A], the shorter distance being that with the Br(1) atom involved in the short intermolecular contact. In contrast, in the molecular adducts 13 and 14, which lie on a two-fold crystallographic axis, the Br-E-Br system is symmetric and no short intermolecular interactions involving chalcogen and bromine atoms are observed. The adducts are arranged in

  15. Pyrazole complexes of rhenium. Synthesis and crystal structure of trans-[Re(O)(OMe)L4]Br2 · L · 4H2O (L - 3,5-dimethylpyrazole)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.N.; Fedorova, N.Eh.; Fedorov, V.E.; Virovets, A.V.; Nun'es, P.

    2002-01-01

    The first rhenium (V) mononuclear complex featuring composition [Re(O)(OMe)L 4 ]Br 2 (L = 3,5-dimethylpyrazole), which is resistant to hydrolysis in neutral aqueous solution, along with its molecular adduct of the composition [Re(O)(OMe)L 4 ]Br 2 · L · 4H 2 O were synthesized. The reaction products were characterized by the methods of elementary analysis, absorption spectroscopy in visible, UV and IR ranges, mass spectrometry. Besides, the adduct structure was studied by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis. It was ascertained that the adduct is crystallized in tetragonal crystal system with unit cell parameters as follows: a = 14.912 (3), c = 17.108 (4) A, sp. gr. I4/m, Z = 4. In the complex molecule linear grouping Re(O)(OMe)] 2+ (Re-O-C angle being equal to 180 deg) is coordinated by four L ligand molecules [ru

  16. Определение энтальпии сублимации EuBr2

    OpenAIRE

    Бутман, М.; Сергеев, Д.; Моталов, В.; Кудин, Л.

    2010-01-01

    Методом высокотемпературной масс-спектрометрии определено парциальное давление молекул EuBr2 в насыщенном паре над дибромидом европия (1049-1261 K): ln p(EuBr2)Па = (-36.224 ± 0.643) ⋅103/T + (18.611 ± 0.558). На основе данных дифференциальной сканирующей калориметрии и газовой электронографии рассчитаны термодинамические функции EuBr2 в конденсированном и газообразном состоянии. Для реакции сублимации EuBr2, кр = EuBr2, г рекомендовано значение: ∆ s H °(298.15 K) = 354 ± 5 кДж/моль.The parti...

  17. Sedimentology and Rock Magnetism of Bailey River Peat Cores, Sudbury Area: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, A.; Cioppa, M. T.; Dean, K.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic measurements on peat can reveal atmospheric anthropogenic contamination. Two cores were collected from a marsh surrounding the Bailey River, 10 km north of Sudbury, Ontario, using a Russian peat borer. The BR1 core (1.4 m) was collected right at the river's edge, whereas the BR2 core (2.5 m) was collected about 50 m away from the river's edge, close to the edge of the marsh and near the forest. Significant sedimentological variation between the two cores was observed: core BR1 had several centimeter to decimeter scale fine to coarse grey sand layers at 0.14 m, 0.46 m and 0.87 m between thicker organic-rich (peat) zones, whereas core BR2 had only one 5 cm sand-rich layer at 0.94 m within the organic-rich material. The cores were subsampled at 2.5 cm intervals for laboratory magnetic analysis. Volume susceptibility was measured using a Bartington MS2B meter, and mass-specific susceptibility was then calculated. In core BR1, the sand layers had relatively higher susceptibility (13 x 10-8 m3/kg) , while the organic rich layers had very low susceptibility (0 - 2 x 10-8 m3/kg). In core BR2, which had little sand, the susceptibility variation was dominated by higher values near-surface (10 x 10-8 m3/kg), and very low susceptibility (0.3 x 10-8 m3/kg) below 0.3 m depth. Since the lithology in this core did not vary substantially, susceptibility variations may be controlled by anthropogenic deposition in the near-surface during the peak mining and smelting decades. These preliminary results suggest that any anthropogenic signal in core BR1 appears to be masked by the sedimentological variation. On pilot results from eight samples in core BR1, saturation isothermal remanence acquisition showed 95% saturation by 200 mT, and the S-ratios (0.3T/0.9T) were above 0.93, suggesting that magnetite is the major magnetization carrier. In core BR2, six out of eight samples showed similar results; however, two samples had slightly more higher coercivity minerals (90% saturation

  18. Two-dimensional H2O-Cl2 and H2O-Br2 potential surfaces: an ab initio study of ground and valence excited electronic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lamoneda, Ramón; Rosas, Victor Hugo Uc; Uruchurtu, Margarita I Bernal; Halberstadt, Nadine; Janda, Kenneth C

    2008-01-10

    All electron ab initio calculations for the interaction of H2O with Cl2 and Br2 are reported for the ground state and the lowest triplet and singlet Pi excited states as a function of both the X-X and O-X bond lengths (X = Cl or Br). For the ground state and lowest triplet state, the calculations are performed with the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triple excitation level of correlation using an augmented triple-zeta basis set. For the 1Pi state the multireference average quadratic coupled cluster technique was employed. For several points on the potential, the calculations were repeated with the augmented quadruple-zeta basis set. The ground-state well depths were found to be 917 and 1,183 cm-1 for Cl2 and Br2, respectively, with the triple-zeta basis set, and they increased to 982 and 1,273 cm-1 for the quadruple-zeta basis set. At the geometry of the ground-state minimum, the lowest energy state corresponding to the unperturbed 1Pi states of the halogens increases in energy by 637 and 733 cm-1, respectively, relative to the ground-state dissociation limit of the H2O-X2 complex. Adding the attractive ground-state interaction energy to that of the repulsive excited state predicts a blue-shift, relative to that of the free halogen molecules, of approximately 1,600 cm-1 for H2O-Cl2 and approximately 2,000 cm-1 for H2O-Br2. These vertical blue-shifts for the dimers are greater than the shift of the band maximum upon solvation of either halogen in liquid water.

  19. NMR spectroscopic characterization and DFT calculations of zirconium(IV)-3,3'-Br2-BINOLate and related complexes used in an enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Gonzalo; Cano, Joan; Cardona, Luz; Fernández, Isabel; Muñoz, M Carmen; Pedro, José R; Vila, Carlos

    2012-12-07

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the structure of several complexes based on (R)-3,3'-Br(2)-BINOL ligand and group (IV) metals used as catalysts in an enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones have been carried out. NMR spectroscopic studies of these catalysts have been performed, which suggested that at room temperature the catalysts would form a monomeric structure in the case of Ti(IV) and a dimeric structure in the cases of Zr(IV) and Hf(IV). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations clearly corroborate the conclusions of these experimental spectroscopic studies. The dimeric structure with a doubly bridged motif [Zr(IV)(2)(μ-(R)-3,3'-Br(2)-BINOL)(2)] where each binaphthol ligand acts as bridge between the metal centers (Novak's model) is more stable than the dimeric structure with a doubly bridged motif [Zr(IV)(2)(μ-O(t)Bu)(2)] where the tert-butoxide groups act as bridging ligands (Kobayashi's model). The scope of the Friedel-Crafts alkylation with regard to the indole structure has been studied. Finally a plausible mechanism for the Friedel-Crafts reaction and a stereomodel for the mode of action of the catalyst that explain the observed stereochemistry of the reaction products have been proposed.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic and theoretical study of 3,5-dimethyl-1-thiocarboxamide pyrazole (L) and the complexes Co2L2Cl4, Cu2L2Cl4 and Cu2L2Br2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemcsok, Denes; Kovacs, Attila; Szecsenyi, Katalin Meszaros; Leovac, Vukadin M.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we report a joint experimental and theoretical study of 3,5-dimethyl-1-thiocarboxamide pyrazole (L) and its complexes Co 2 L 2 Cl 4 , Cu 2 L 2 Cl 4 and Cu 2 L 2 Br 2 . DFT computations were used to model the structural and bonding properties of the title compounds as well as to derive a reliable force field for the normal coordinate analysis of L. The computations indicated the importance of hydrogen bonding interactions in stabilising the global minimum structures on the potential energy surfaces. In contrast to the S-bridged binuclear Cu 2 L 2 Br 2 complex found in the crystal, our computations predicted the formation of (CuLBr) 2 dimers in the isolated state stabilized by very strong (53 kJ/mol) N-H...Br hydrogen bonding interactions. On the basis of FT-IR and FT-Raman experiments and the DFT-derived scaled quantum mechanical force field we carried out a complete normal coordinate analysis of L. The FT-IR spectra of the three complexes were interpreted using the present assignment of L, literature data and computed results

  1. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  2. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  3. Using NJOY99 and MCNP4B2 to Estimate the Radiation Damage Displacements per Atom per Second in Steel Within the Boiling Water Reactor Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade Mixed-Oxide/Uranium Oxide Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest in utilizing the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 to 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons.There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239 Pu wt%) would increase the radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s -1 ) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation damage within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.The primary uniqueness of this paper is the computation of radiation damage (dpa-s -1 ) using NJOY99-processed cross sections for steel within the core shroud and vessel wall. Specifically, the unique radiation damage results are several orders of magnitude greater than results of previous works. In addition, the conclusion of this paper was that the addition of the maximum fraction of one-third MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly increase the radiation damage in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall such that without mitigation of radiation damage by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as neutron fluence, core temperature, and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor

  4. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  5. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for main group elements Na to Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadt, W.R.; Hay, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A consistent set of ab initio effective core potentials (ECP) has been generated for the main group elements from Na to Bi using the procedure originally developed by Kahn. The ECP's are derived from all-electron numerical Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions and fit to analytical representations for use in molecular calculations. For Rb to Bi the ECP's are generated from the relativistic Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions of Cowan which incorporate the Darwin and mass--velocity terms. Energy-optimized valence basis sets of (3s3p) primitive Gaussians are presented for use with the ECP's. Comparisons between all-electron and valence-electron ECP calculations are presented for NaF, NaCl, Cl 2 , Cl 2 - , Br 2 , Br 2 - , and Xe 2 + . The results show that the average errors introduced by the ECP's are generally only a few percent

  6. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  7. How cores grow by pebble accretion. I. Direct core growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, M. G.; Vazan, A.; Ormel, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Planet formation by pebble accretion is an alternative to planetesimal-driven core accretion. In this scenario, planets grow by the accretion of cm- to m-sized pebbles instead of km-sized planetesimals. One of the main differences with planetesimal-driven core accretion is the increased thermal ablation experienced by pebbles. This can provide early enrichment to the planet's envelope, which influences its subsequent evolution and changes the process of core growth. Aims: We aim to predict core masses and envelope compositions of planets that form by pebble accretion and compare mass deposition of pebbles to planetesimals. Specifically, we calculate the core mass where pebbles completely evaporate and are absorbed before reaching the core, which signifies the end of direct core growth. Methods: We model the early growth of a protoplanet by calculating the structure of its envelope, taking into account the fate of impacting pebbles or planetesimals. The region where high-Z material can exist in vapor form is determined by the temperature-dependent vapor pressure. We include enrichment effects by locally modifying the mean molecular weight of the envelope. Results: In the pebble case, three phases of core growth can be identified. In the first phase (Mcore mixes outwards, slowing core growth. In the third phase (Mcore > 0.5M⊕), the high-Z inner region expands outwards, absorbing an increasing fraction of the ablated material as vapor. Rainout ends before the core mass reaches 0.6 M⊕, terminating direct core growth. In the case of icy H2O pebbles, this happens before 0.1 M⊕. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pebble accretion can directly form rocky cores up to only 0.6 M⊕, and is unable to form similarly sized icy cores. Subsequent core growth can proceed indirectly when the planet cools, provided it is able to retain its high-Z material.

  8. Effects of Core Cavity on a Flow Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Kim, Kihwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The axial pressure drop is removed in the free core condition, But the actual core has lots of fuel bundles and mixing vanes to the flow direction. The axial pressure drop induces flow uniformity. In a uniform flow having no shear stress, the cross flow or cross flow mixing decreases. The mixing factor is important in the reactor safety during a Steam Line Break (SLB) or Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) transients. And the effect of core cavity is needed to evaluate the realistic core mixing factor quantification. The multi-dimensional flow mixing phenomena in a core cavity has been studied using a CFD code. The 1/5-scale model was applied for the reactor flow analysis. A single phase water flow conditions were considered for the 4-cold leg and DVI flows. To quantify the mixing intensity, a boron scalar was introduced to the ECC injection water at cold legs and DVI nozzles. The present CFD pre-study was performed to quantify the effects of core structure on the mixing phenomena. The quantified boron mixing scalar in the core simulator model represented the effect of core cavity on the core mixing phenomena. This simulation results also give the information for sensor resolution to measure the boron concentration in the experiments and response time to detect mixing phenomena at the core and reactor vessel.

  9. Evaluation of In-Core Fuel Management for the Transition Cores of RSG-GAS Reactor to Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; MS, Tagor; P, Surian

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 gU/cc has been done. The core-of RSG-GAS reactor has been operated full core of silicide fuels which is started with the mixed core of oxide-silicide start from core 36. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 9 transition cores (core 36 - 44) to achieve a full-silicide core (core 45). The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters. Conversion core was achieved by transition cores mixed oxide-silicide fuels. Each transition core is calculated and measured core parameter such as, excess reactivity and shutdown margin. Calculation done by Batan-EQUIL-2D code and measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The results of calculation and experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safely to a full-silicide core

  10. Photochemistry of xenon-halogen Van der Waals complexes (X2 = Cl2, Br2, I2): evidence for the intermediate states in the (Xe-X2)*→ XeX* + X reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivineau, Michel

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the reactivity of excited states of xenon-halogen Van der Waals complexes (Cl 2 , Br 2 , I 2 ) submitted to a multi-photonic excitation. The objective of this study is, by means of a specific experimental approach, to highlight the R*+ X 2 *- to better understand the reaction mechanism, and to study the reactivity of rare gas/halogen systems depending on the halogen nature. After having reported a bibliographical study on each studied system, the author describes the experimental system, reports and discusses experimental results obtained on the different complex systems (chlorine-, bromine- or iodine-based). He finally comments a possible and original application of these works in the development of an excimer laser with a new active medium (the rare gas/halogen Van der Waals complex) which would allow a continuous operation and an easy discharge production [fr

  11. MIXED AND MIXING SYSTEMS WORLDWIDE: A PREFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán Patrick Donlan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This issue of the Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal (South Africa sees thepublication of a selection of articles derived from the Third International Congress ofthe World Society of Mixed Jurisdiction Jurists (WSMJJ. That Congress was held atthe Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel in the summer of 2011. It reflected athriving Society consolidating its core scholarship on classical mixed jurisdictions(Israel, Louisiana, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Quebec, Scotland, and South Africawhile reaching to new horizons (including Cyprus, Hong Kong and Macau, Malta,Nepal, etc. This publication reflects in microcosm the complexity of contemporaryscholarship on mixed and plural legal systems. This complexity is, of course, wellunderstoodby South African jurists whose system is derived both from the dominantEuropean traditions as well as from African customary systems, including both thosethat make up part of the official law of the state as well as those non-state norms thatcontinue to be important in the daily lives of many South Africans.

  12. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  13. Why does the disorder of R-pn and rac-pn ligands in the quasi-one-dimensional bromo-bridged NiIII complexes, [Ni(pn)2Br]Br2 (pn=1,2-diaminopropane) afford similar STM patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hashen; Kawakami, Daisuke; Sasaki, Mari; Xie, Jimin; Takaishi, Shinya; Kajiwara, Takashi; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-03

    The disordered patterns of R- and rac-1,2-diaminopropane (pn) in quasi-one-dimensional bromo-bridged Ni(III) complexes, [NiIII(pn)2Br]Br2, have been investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure determination and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). X-ray structure determination shows that the methyl moieties are disordered on the right- and left-hand sides with half occupancies in both compounds, while the carbon atoms of the ethylene moieties of pn ligands are disordered in [Ni(rac-pn)2Br]Br2 and not disordered in [Ni(R-pn)2Br]Br2. In the STM images of both compounds, the bright spots are not straight but fluctuated with the similar patterns. We have concluded that tunnel current from the STM tip to metal ions are detected via methyl groups of pn ligands.

  14. Sneutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Y.

    1997-10-01

    In supersymmetric models with nonvanishing Majorana neutrino masses, the sneutrino and antisneutrino mix. The conditions under which this mixing is experimentally observable are studied, and mass-splitting of the sneutrino mass eigenstates and sneutrino oscillation phenomena are analyzed

  15. Design Analysis of the Mixed Mode Bending Sandwich Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-01-01

    A design analysis of the mixed mode bending (MMB) sandwich specimen for face–core interface fracture characterization is presented. An analysis of the competing failure modes in the foam cored sandwich specimens is performed in order to achieve face–core debond fracture prior to other failure modes...... for the chosen geometries and mixed mode loading conditions....

  16. Formation of new halogenothiocarbonylsulfenyl halides, XC(S)SY, through photochemical matrix reactions starting from CS2 and a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Yeny A; Romano, Rosana M; Védova, Carlos O Della; Downs, Anthony J

    2007-05-28

    Isolation of a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl) with CS2 in a solid Ar matrix at about 15 K leads, by broad-band UV-vis photolysis (200

  17. Two different one-dimensional structural motifs in [catena-{Cu(tacn)}2Pd(CN)4]Br2.[catena-Cu(tacn)Pd(CN)4]2.H2O (tacn is 1,4,7-triazacyclononane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchár, Juraj; Cernák, Juraj

    2009-07-01

    The title compound, catena-poly[[bis[(triazacyclononane-kappa(3)N,N',N'')copper(II)]-di-mu-cyanido-kappa(4)N:C-palladate(II)-di-mu-cyanido-kappa(4)C:N] dibromide bis[[(triazacyclononane-kappa(3)N,N',N'')copper(II)]-mu-cyanido-kappa(2)N:C-[dicyanidopalladate(II)]-mu-cyanido-kappa(2)C:N] monohydrate], {[Cu(2)Pd(CN)(4)(C(6)H(15)N(3))(2)]Br(2).[Cu(2)Pd(2)(CN)(8)(C(6)H(15)N(3))(2)].H(2)O}(n), (I), was isolated from an aqueous solution containing tacn.3HBr (tacn is 1,4,7-triazacyclononane), Cu(2+) and tetracyanidopalladate(2-) anions. The crystal structure of (I) is essentially ionic and built up of 2,2-electroneutral chains, viz. [Cu(tacn)(NC)-Pd(CN)(2)-(CN)-], positively charged 2,4-ribbons exhibiting the composition {[Cu(tacn)(NC)(2)-Pd(CN)(2)-Cu(tacn)](2n+)}(n), bromide anions and one disordered water molecule of crystallization. The O atom of the water molecule occupies two unique crystallographic positions, one on a centre of symmetry, which is half occupied, and the other in a general position with one-quarter occupancy. One of the tacn ligands also exhibits disorder. The formation of two different types of one-dimensional structural motif within the same structure is a unique feature of this compound.

  18. Compact heat and mass exchangers of the plate fin type in thermal sorption systems: Application in an absorption heat pump with the working pair CH3OH-LiBr/ZnBr2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Harry

    The possible application of Compact Heat and Mass Exchangers (CHME) in a gas fired Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) for domestic heating is studied. The above mentioned heat and mass exchangers are of the plate type. The space between the parallel and plain plates is filled up with corrugated plates of a certain height. The plain and finned plates are stacked and welded together. This gives a heat and mass exchanger which is very compact, expressed by a high area density (m2/m3). This leads to heat and mass transfer processes with small temperature and concentration differences. For testing purposes a pilot plant was built using the above type of components in order to test their heat and/or mass transfer performance. Only the generator is of the Shell And Tube (SAT) type. As the working pair, CH3OH - LiBr/ ZnBr2 was chosen, with the alcohol as the solvent and the salt mixture as the absorbent. This leads to sub atmospheric working pressures with only solvent in the vapor phase. Three series of experiments have been carried out, during which the input parameters were varied over a certain range. It is concluded that the plate fin CHMES are very suitable for application in an AHP for domestic heating purposes.

  19. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  20. Analysis Of Core Management For The Transition Cores Of RSG-GAS Reactor To Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malem Sembiring, Tagor; Suparlina, Lily; Tukiran

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is still doing. At the end of 2000, the reactor has been operated for 3 transition cores which is the mixed core of oxide-silicide. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 10 transition cores to achieve a full-silicide core. The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters such as excess reactivity and shutdown margin. The measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safety to a full-silicide core

  1. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  2. Core-shell rhodium sulfide catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction / hydrogen oxidation reaction in hydrogen-bromine reversible fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nguyen, Trung Van

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) core-shell RhxSy catalysts for hydrogen evolution oxidation (HER)/hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in H2-Br2 fuel cell are discussed. Catalysts with RhxSy as shell and different percentages (5%, 10%, and 20%) of platinum on carbon as core materials are synthesized. Cyclic voltammetry is used to evaluate the Pt-equivalent mass specific ECSA and durability of these catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques are utilized to characterize the bulk and surface compositions and to confirm the core-shell structure of the catalysts, respectively. Cycling test and polarization curve measurements in the H2-Br2 fuel cell are used to assess the catalyst stability and performance in a fuel cell. The results show that the catalysts with core-shell structure have higher mass specific ECSA (50 m2 gm-Rh-1) compared to a commercial catalyst (RhxSy/C catalyst from BASF, 6.9 m2 gm-Rh-1). It also shows better HOR/HER performance in the fuel cell. Compared to the platinum catalyst, the core-shell catalysts show more stable performance in the fuel cell cycling test.

  3. Dissociative multiple photoionization of Br2, IBr, and I2 in the VUV and X-ray regions: a comparative study of the inner-shell processes involving Br(3d,3p,3s) and I(4d,4p,4s,3d,3p)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boo, Bong Hyun; Saito, Norio

    2002-01-01

    Dissociative multiple photoionization of the bromine, the iodine monobromide, and the iodine molecules in the Br(3d,3p,3s) and I(4d,4p,4s,3d,3p) inner-shell regions has been studied by using time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry coupled to synchrotron radiation in the ranges of 90∼978 eV for Br 2 , 60∼133 eV for IBr, and 86∼998 eV for I 2 . Total photoion and photoion-photoion coincidence (PIPICO) yields have been recorded as functions of the photon energy. Here, giant shape resonances have been observed beyond the thresholds of the inner-shells owing to the Br(3d 10 )→Br(3d 9 -f), I(4d 10 )→I(4d 9 -f), and I(3d 10 )→I(3d 9 -f) transitions. The dissociation processes of the multiply charged parent ions have also been evaluated from variations of photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) and PIPICO spectra with the photon energy. From each Br(3p 3/2 ) (189.9 eV) and I(4p 3/2 ) threshold (129.9 eV), quintuple ionization of the molecules begins to play important roles in the photoionization, subsequently yielding ion pairs of X 3+ -X 2+ (X=Br, I). From the I(3d 5/2 ) threshold (627.3 eV), loss of six electrons from iodine molecule additionally begins to play a minor role in the multiple photoionization, giving rise to the formation of ion pairs of either I 3+ -I 3+ or I 4+ -I 2+ . A direct comparison of the strengths and the ranges of the I(4d) and Br(3d) giant resonances was successfully made from dissociative photoionization of IBr. Over the entire energy range examined, 60< E<133 eV, biased charge spread relevant to the specific core-hole states of IBr is observed, presumably reflecting the fact that charge localizes mostly in the excited atoms, which can be accounted for mainly by a two step decay via a fast dissociation followed by autoionization upon the VUV absorption

  4. Immobilization of [Cu(bpy)2]Br2 complex onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with alpha-SiMo12O40(4-) and single walled carbon nanotubes: application to nanomolar detection of hydrogen peroxide and bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Korani, Aazam; Hallaj, Rahman; Khoshnavazi, Roshan; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2009-03-02

    A simple procedure has been used for preparation of modified glassy carbon electrode with carbon nanotubes and copper complex. Copper complex [Cu(bpy)(2)]Br(2) was immobilized onto glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with silicomolybdate, alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Copper complex and silicomolybdate irreversibly and strongly adsorbed onto GC electrode modified with CNTs. Electrostatic interactions between polyoxometalates (POMs) anions and Cu-complex, cations mentioned as an effective method for fabrication of three-dimensional structures. The modified electrode shows three reversible redox couples for polyoxometalate and one redox couple for Cu-complex at wide range of pH values. The electrochemical behavior, stability and electron transfer kinetics of the adsorbed redox couples were investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Due to electrostatic interaction, copper complex immobilized onto GC/CNTs/alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) electrode shows more stable voltammetric response compared to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex modified electrode. In comparison to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex the GC/CNTs/alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) modified electrodes shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction H(2)O(2) and BrO(3)(-) at more reduced overpotential. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction hydrogen peroxide and bromate were 4.5(+/-0.2)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.0(+/-0.10)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The hydrodynamic amperommetry technique at 0.08 V was used for detection of nanomolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide and bromate. Detection limit, sensitivity and linear concentration range proposed sensor for bromate and hydrogen peroxide detection were 1.1 nM and 6.7 nA nM(-1), 10 nM-20 microM, 1 nM, 5.5 nA nM(-1) and 10 nM-18 microM, respectively.

  5. Limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Moses, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor explosion process involves the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have identified limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a sim plified approach is suggested to estimate the upper limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing pos sible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicat that water depth is an important parameter as well as the mixing length scale D /SUB mix/ , and for large values of D /SUB mix/ the fuel mass mixed is limited to <7% of the core mass

  6. GNPS 18-months fuel cycles core thermal hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changwen; Zhou Zhou

    2002-01-01

    GNPS begins to implement the 18-month fuel cycles from the initial annual reload at cycle 9, thus the initial core thermal hydraulic design is not valid any more. The new critical heat flux (CHF) correlation, FC, which is developed by Framatome, is used in the design, and the generalized statistical methodology (GSM) instead of the initial deterministic methodology is used to determine the DNBR design limit. As the AFA 2G and AFA 3G are mixed loaded in the transition cycle, it will result that the minimum DNBR in the mixed core is less than that of AFA 3G homogenous core, the envelop mixed core DNBR penalty is given. Consequently the core physical limit for mixed core and equilibrium cycles, and the new over temperature ΔT overpower ΔT are determined

  7. Metallic nanoshells with semiconductor cores: optical characteristics modified by core medium properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Ali, Tamer; Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-26

    It is well-known that the geometry of a nanoshell controls the resonance frequencies of its plasmon modes; however, the properties of the core material also strongly influence its optical properties. Here we report the synthesis of Au nanoshells with semiconductor cores of cuprous oxide and examine their optical characteristics. This material system allows us to systematically examine the role of core material on nanoshell optical properties, comparing Cu(2)O core nanoshells (ε(c) ∼ 7) to lower core dielectric constant SiO(2) core nanoshells (ε(c) = 2) and higher dielectric constant mixed valency iron oxide nanoshells (ε(c) = 12). Increasing the core dielectric constant increases nanoparticle absorption efficiency, reduces plasmon line width, and modifies plasmon energies. Modifying the core medium provides an additional means of tailoring both the near- and far-field optical properties in this unique nanoparticle system.

  8. Group IB Organometallic Chemistry XIX.Synthesis and characterization of mixed-organocopper cluster compounds R4R'2Cu6 containing aryl and acetylide ligands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Noltes, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Mixed-organocopper cluster compounds Ar4Cu6(CCR)2 (Ar = 2-Me2NC6H4, R = phenyl, 4-tolyl, 2,4-xylyl or mesityl) have been prepared in high yield by the ligand-substitution reaction of Ar4Cu6Br2 with two equivalents of LiCCR. Ar4Cu6(CCC6H4CH3-4)2 has also been prepared via the aryl¡ªarylacetylide

  9. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C 30 H 62 ) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ( 1 H and 2 H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  10. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  11. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are

  12. Mixed parentage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Appel, Helene; Singla, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increase in cross border intimate relationships and children of mixed parentage, there is little mention or scholarship about them in the area of childhood and migrancy in the Nordic countries. The international literature implies historical pathologisation, contestation and current...... of identity formation in the . They position themselves as having an “in-between” identity or “ just Danes” in their every day lives among friends, family, and during leisure activities. Thus a new paradigm is evolving away- from the pathologisation of mixed children, simplified one-sided categories...

  13. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  14. Lateral Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    negative (right panel c) and the kinetic energy dissipation is larger than that expected from meterological forcing alone (right panel a). This is...10.1002/grl.50919. Shcherbina, A. et al., 2014, The LatMix Summer Campaign: Submesoscale Stirring in the Upper Ocean., Bull. American Meterological

  15. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  16. Parity mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1975-01-01

    The field of parity mixing in light nuclei bears upon one of the exciting and active problems of physics--the nature of the fundamental weak interaction. It is also a subject where polarization techniques play a very important role. Weak interaction theory is first reviewed to motivate the parity mixing experiments. Two very attractive systems are discussed where the nuclear physics is so beautifully simple that the experimental observation of tiny effects directly measures parity violating (PV) nuclear matrix elements which are quite sensitive to the form of the basic weak interaction. Since the measurement of very small analyzing powers and polarizations may be of general interest to this conference, some discussion is devoted to experimental techniques

  17. Theoretical evaluation of the production of the poisons Xe-135 and Sm-149 of the TRIGA Mark III reactor with mixed core; Evaluacion teorica de la produccion de los venenos Xe-135 y Sm-149 del reactor TRIGA Mark III con nucleo mixto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.C

    1991-11-15

    It was theoretically determined the accumulation of the Xe{sup 135} and Sm {sup 149} in function, of the time during a stationary state of 72 h. continuous for the reactor TRIGA Mark III to 1 MW of thermal power with mixed core. The values of negative reactivity due to these isotopes are of 2.04 dollars and 0.694 dollars to the 72 h, quantities that will have to be compensated if wants that the reactor continues working to this power. Under the same conditions but considering a core with standard fuel, it was found a value of {rho} = 1.70 dollars, resulting a difference of 0.30 dollars of negative reactivity in function of the type of analyzed core. This difference is important for the calculations of fuel management of a reactor. The concentration in balance of the xenon was reaches after an operation to constant power of 1 MW by 50 h, contrary to the samarium that reaches it balance after 3 weeks of operation starting from the initial start up and it stays constant along the useful life of the reactor while a change of fuel doesn't exist. It was obtained that for operation times greater to 60 h. at 1 MW, a peak of negative reactivity of the Xe{sup 135} is generated between the 7 and 11 h after the instantaneous shut down, with a value of 2.43 dollars, that is to say 0.39 additional dollars to those taken place during the continuous irradiation. (Author)

  18. Design of full MOX core in ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Hirose, T.; Sasagawa, M.; Sakuma, T

    1999-01-01

    A Full MOX-ABWR, loaded with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels of up to 100% of the core, is planned. Increased MOX fuel utilization will result in greater savings of uranium. Studies on the fuel rod thermal-mechanical design, the core design and the safety evaluation have been made, and the results are summarized in this paper. To sum it all up, the safety of the Full MOX-ABWR has been confirmed through design evaluations adequately considering the MOX fuel and core characteristics. (author)

  19. Conceptual core model for the reactor core test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, L.D.

    1970-01-01

    Several design options for the ZrH Flight System Reactor were investigated which involved tradeoffs of core excess reactivity, reactor control, coolant mixing and cladding thickness. A design point was selected which is to be the basis for more detailed evaluation in the preliminary design phase. The selected design utilizes 295 elements with 0.670 inch element-to-element pitch, 32 mil thick Incoloy cladding, 18.00 inches long fuel meat, hydrogen content of 6.3 x 10 22 atoms/cc fuel, 10.5 w/o uranium, and a spiraled fin configuration with alternate elements having fins with spiral to the right, spiral to the left, and no fin at all (R-L-N fin configuration). Fin height is 30 mils for the center region of the core and 15 mils for the outer region. (U.S.)

  20. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  1. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  2. Improving Deterrence of Hard-Core Cartels

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Tavares de Araujo

    2010-01-01

    Holding perpetrators accountable and tailoring the optimal mix of sanctions through a combination of administrative and criminal penalties are two core elements of Brazil’s anti-cartel enforcement. Mariana Tavares de Araujo (SDE, Brazil)

  3. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  4. Fuel and core design study of the sodium-cooled fast reactors. Studies on metallic fuel cores in the JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Kazuteru; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2003-06-01

    Based on the results obtained in the former feasibility study, the metallic fueled core of ordinary-type, that is, 2-region homogeneous core, has been established aiming at the improvement in the core performance, and subsequent comparison has been performed with the mixed oxide fueled core. Further, the attractive concept of the metallic fueled core of high outlet temperature has been constructed which has good nuclear features as a metallic fueled core and has identical outlet temperature to mixed oxide fuelled core. Following items have been found as a result of the investigation on the ordinary-type core. The metallic fueled core whose maximum fast neutron fluence (En>0.1MeV) is set identical (5x10 23 n/cm 2 ) to the mixed oxide fueled cores with core discharge burnup 150GWd/t has sufficient core performances as a metallic fueled core, e.g. higher breeding ratio and longer operation period compared with mixed oxide fueled cores, but the core discharge burnup is limited up to 100GWd/t. However effective discharge burnup including the contribution of the blanket region is comparative to mixed oxide cores under the same breeding ratio condition. In order to enlarge the core discharge burnup to 150GWd/t keeping the core performance identical to above mentioned core's, the irradiation deformation of structural material should be reduced to that of mixed oxide fueled cores. Further the maximum fast neutron fluence reaches to 7-8x10 23 n/cm 2 (En>0.1MeV). The investigations on the core of high outlet temperature have clarified following items. Even in the change of core regions by pin-diameter form 3-region to 2-region and in the limited maximum fuel pin diameter 8.5 mm, realization of the identical outlet/inlet temperatures to the mixed oxide cores (550/395degC) is feasible under the criteria of the maximum temperature 650degC at the inner surface of the cladding. The constructed core accommodates the targets of breeding ratio from about 1.0 to 1.2 only by adjusting

  5. Functional requirements for core surveillance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Operating experience at Ringhals-2 has demonstrated the feasibility of a mixed core surveillance system comprised of fixed in-core detectors combined with the original movable detector system. A small number of fixed in-core detectors provide continuous measurement of the thermal margins while the movable detectors are used mainly at start-up to verify the expected power distribution. Reactor noise diagnostics and neural networks can further improve the monitoring system. The reliability of the movable detector system can be improved by mechanical simplification. Wear and maintenance costs are lowered if the required flux-mapping frequency is reduced. Improved computer codes make the measurement uncertainties less dependent on the number of instrumented positions. A mixed system requires new types of technical specifications. (author)

  6. Continuous greenhouse gas measurements from ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stowasser, Christopher

    Ice cores offer the unique possibility to study the history of past atmospheric greenhouse gases over the last 800,000 years, since past atmospheric air is trapped in bubbles in the ice. Since the 1950s, paleo-scientists have developed a variety of techniques to extract the trapped air from...... individual ice core samples, and to measure the mixing ratio of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide in the extracted air. The discrete measurements have become highly accurate and reproducible, but require relatively large amounts of ice per measured species and are both time......-consuming and labor-intensive. This PhD thesis presents the development of a new method for measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios from ice cores based on a melting device of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. The coupling to a CFA melting device enables time-efficient measurements of high resolution...

  7. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangyue, E-mail: wangxiangyue1986@163.com [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores. - Highlights: • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores were prepared with low core loss. • Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the core loss. • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores exhibited a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. • The softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  8. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  10. Seismic core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Mullooly, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A core shroud is provided, comprising: a coolant boundary, following the shape of the core boundary, for channeling the coolant through the fuel assemblies; a cylindrical band positioned inside the core barrel and surrounding the coolant boundary; and support members extending from the coolant boundary to the band, for transferring load from the coolant boundary to the band. The shroud may be assembled in parts using automated welding techniques, and it may be adjusted to fit the reactor core easily

  11. Core Values | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core Values Core Values NREL's core values are rooted in a safe and supportive work environment guide our everyday actions and efforts: Safe and supportive work environment Respect for the rights physical and social environment Integrity Maintain the highest standard of ethics, honesty, and integrity

  12. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  13. Full MOX core design in ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Toshiteru; Mochida, Takaaki; Izutsu, Sadayuki; Fujimaki, Shingo

    2003-01-01

    Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (EPDC) has been investigating an ABWR plant for construction at Oma-machi in Aomori Prefecture. The reactor, termed FULL MOX-ABWR will have its reactor core eventually loaded entirely with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. Extended use of MOX fuel in the plant is expected to play important roles in the country's nuclear fuel recycling policy. MOX fuel bundles will initially be loaded only to less than one-third of the reactor, but will be increased to cover its entire core eventually. The number of MOX fuel bundles in the core thus varies anywhere from 0 to 264 for the initial cycle and, 0 to 872 for equilibrium cycles. The safety design of the FULL MOX-ABWR briefly stated next considers any probable MOX loading combinations out of such MOX bundle usage scheme, starting from full UO 2 to full MOX cores. (author)

  14. Conceptual design of PFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.M.; Govindarajan, S.; Indira, R.; John, T.M.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Shankar Singh, R.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    The design options selected for the core of the 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor are presented. PFBR has a conventional mixed oxide fuel core of homogeneous type with two enrichment zones for power flattening and with radial and axial blankets to make the reactor self-sustaining in fissile material. Pin diameter has been selected for minimization of fissile inventory. Considerations for the choice of number of pins per subassembly, integrated versus separate axial blankets, and other pin and subassembly parameters are discussed. As the core size is moderate, no special schemes for reducing the maximum positive sodium voiding coefficient is envisages. Two independent, diverse fast acting shutdown systems working in fail-safe mode are selected. The number of absorber rods has been minimized by choosing a layout for maximum antishadow effect. Nine control and safety rods are distributed in two rods for power flattening by differential insertion. Three Diverse Safety Rods, are also provided which are normally fully withdrawn. The optimization of layout of radial and axial shielding and adequacy of flux at detector location are also discussed. (author). 2 figs

  15. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  16. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  17. A 350 MW HTR with an annular pebble bed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dazhong; Jiang Zhiqiang; Gao Zuying; Xu Yuanhui

    1992-12-01

    A conceptual design of HTR-module with an annular pebble bed core was proposed. This design can increase the unit power capacity of HTR-Module from 200 MWt to 350 MWt while it can keep the inherent safety characteristics of modular reactor. The preliminary safety analysis results for 350 MW HTR are given. In order to solve the problem of uneven helium outlet temperature distribution a gas flow mixing structure at bottom of core was designed. The experiment results of a gas mixing simulation test rig show that the mixing function can satisfy the design requirements

  18. Developments in gaseous core reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1979-01-01

    An effort to characterize the most promising concepts for large, central-station electrical generation was done under the auspices of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). The two leading candidates were identified from this effort: The Mixed-Flow Gaseous Core Reactor (MFGCR) and the Heterogeneous Gas Core Reactor (HGCR). Key advantages over other nuclear concepts are weighed against the disadvantages of an unproven technology and the cost-time for deployment to make a sound decision on RandD support for these promising reactor alternatives. 38 refs

  19. Basic criticality relations for gas core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Minimum critical fissile concentrations are calculated for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Am-242m mixed homogeneously with hydrogen at temperatures to 15,000K. Minimum critical masses of the same mixtures in a 1000 liter sphere are also calculated. It is shown that propellent efficiencies of a gas core fizzler engine using Am-242m as fuel would exceed those in a solid core engine as small as 1000L operating at 100 atmospheres pressure. The same would be true for Pu-239 and possibly U-233 at pressures of 1000 atm. or at larger volumes

  20. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  1. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  2. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  3. A Search for Starless Core Substructure in Ophiuchus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Density substructure is expected in evolved starless cores: a single peak to form a protostar, or multiple peaks from fragmentation. Searches for this substructure have had mixed success. In an ALMA survey of Ophiuchus, we find two starless cores with signs of substructure, consistent with simulation predictions. A similar survey in Chameleon (Dunham et al. 2016) had no detections, despite expecting at least two. Our results suggest that Chamleon may lack a more evolved starless cores. Future ALMA observations will better trace the influence of environment on core substructure formation.

  4. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  5. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  6. Fluid mixing III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnby, N.

    1988-01-01

    Covering all aspects of mixing, this work presents research and developments in industrial applications, flow patterns and mixture analysis, mixing of solids into liquids, and mixing of gases into liquids

  7. Ice core carbonyl sulfide measurements from a new South Pole ice core (SPICECORE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, M.; Nicewonger, M. R.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the troposphere with a present-day mixing ratio of about 500 ppt. Direct and indirect emissions from the oceans are the predominant sources of atmospheric COS. The primary removal mechanism is uptake by terrestrial plants during photosynthesis. Because plants do not respire COS, atmospheric COS levels are linked to terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP). Ancient air trapped in polar ice cores has been used to reconstruct COS records of the past atmosphere, which can be used to infer past GPP variability and potential changes in oceanic COS emission. We are currently analyzing samples from a newly drilled intermediate depth ice core from South Pole, Antarctica (SPICECORE). This core is advantageous for studying COS because the cold temperatures of South Pole ice lead to very slow rates of in situ loss due to hydrolysis. One hundred and eighty-four bubbly ice core samples have been analyzed to date with gas ages ranging from about 9.2 thousand (733 m depth) to 75 years (126 m depth) before present. After a 2% correction for gravitational enrichment in the firn, the mean COS mixing ratio for the data set is 312±15 ppt (±1s), with the data set median also equal to 312 ppt. The only significant long-term trend in the record is a 5-10% increase in COS during the last 2-3 thousand years of the Holocene. The SPICECORE data agree with previously published ice core COS records from other Antarctic sites during times of overlap, confirming earlier estimates of COS loss rates to in situ hydrolysis in ice cores. Antarctic ice core data place strict constraints on the COS mixing ratio and its range of variability in the southern hemisphere atmosphere during the last several millennia. Implications for the atmospheric COS budget will be discussed.

  8. Seismic Wave Velocity in Earth's Shallow Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Eaton, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of the outer core indicate that it is composed of liquid Fe and Ni alloyed with a ~10% fraction of light elements such as O, S or Si. Recently, unusual features, such as sediment accumulation, immiscible fluid layers or stagnant convection, have been predicted in the shallow core region. Secular cooling and compositional buoyancy drive vigorous convection that sustains the geodynamo, although critical details of light-element composition and thermal regime remain uncertain. Seismic velocity models can provide important constraints on the light element composition, however global reference models, such as Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM), IASP91 and AK135 vary significantly in the 200 km below the core-mantle boundary. Past studies of the outermost core velocity structure have been hampered by traveltime uncertainties due to lowermost mantle heterogeneities. The recently published Empirical Transfer Function (ETF) method has been shown to reduce the uncertainty using a waveform stacking approach to improve global observations of SmKS teleseismic waves. Here, we apply the ETF method to achieve a precise top-of-core velocity measurement of 8.05 ± 0.03 km/s. This new model accords well with PREM. Since PREM is based on the adiabatic form of the Adams-Williamson equation, it assumes a well mixed (i.e. homogeneous) composition. This result suggests a lack of heterogeneity in the outermost core due to layering or stagnant convection.

  9. Mixed plastics recycling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hegberg, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of mixed plastics recycling technology. In addition, it characterizes mixed plastics wastes and describes collection methods, costs, and markets for reprocessed plastics products.

  10. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  11. Frontogenesis and turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Chen, F.; Shang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    A hydrological investigation was conducted in the shelf of eastern Hainan island during July 2012. With the in-situ measurements from four cross-shelf sections and satellite data, the submesoscale process of the fronts are discussed in this paper, the seasonal variation characteristics of thermal front, the three-dimensional structure, dynamic characteristics of frontal and mixed characteristics in the shelf sea of eastern Hainan island. It's obviously that the thermal front has a seasonal variation: the front is strongest in winter, and decreased gradually in spring and summer. However, it fade and disappear in fall. The core region of the front also changes with the seasons, it moved southward gradually from mainly distributed in the upwelling zone and the front center is not obvious in summer. it is a typical upwelling front in summer, the near shore is compensated with the underlying low-temperature and high-sale water , while the offshore is the high-temperature and low-salinity shelf water. The thermal front distribution is located in the 100m isobaths. The frontal intensity is reduced with increasing depth, and position goes to offshore. Subsurface temperature front is significantly higher in the surface of the sea, which may cause by the heating of nearshore sea surface water and lead to the weakening horizontal temperature gradient. Dynamic characteristics of the front has a great difference in both sides. The O(1) Rossby number is positive on the dense side and negative on the light side. The maximum of along-frontal velocity is 0.45m/s and the stretching is strengthened by strong horizontal shear, also is the potential vorticity, which can trace the cross front Ekman transport. We obtained the vertical velocity with by quasi-geostrophic omega equation and grasped the ageostrophic secondary circulation. The magnitude of frontal vertical velocity is O(10-5) and causes downwelling on the dense side and upwelling on the light side, which constitute the

  12. Optimized core loading sequence for Ukraine WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, M.; Shah, H.

    2015-01-01

    Fuel Assemblies (WFAs) experienced mechanical damage of the grids during loading at both South Ukraine 2 (SU2) and South Ukraine 3 (SU3). The grids were damaged due to high lateral loads exceeding their strength limit. The high lateral loads were caused by a combination of distortion and stiffness of the mixed core fuel assemblies and significant fuel assembly-to-fuel assembly interaction combined with the core loading sequence being used. To prevent damage of the WFA grids during core loading, Westinghouse has developed a loading sequence technique and loading aides (smooth sided dummies and top nozzle loading guides) designed to minimize fuel assembly-to-fuel assembly interaction while maximizing the potential for successful loading (i.e., no fuel assembly damage and minimized loading time). The loading sequence technique accounts for cycle-specific core loading patterns and is based on previous Westinghouse WWER core loading experience and fundamental principles. The loading aids are developed to “open-up” the target core location or to provide guidance into a target core location. The Westinghouse optimized core loading sequence and smooth sided dummies were utilized during the successful loading of SU3 Cycle 25 mixed core in March 2015, with no instances of fuel assembly damage and yet still provided considerable time savings relative to the 2012 and 2013 SU3 reload campaigns. (authors)

  13. Replaceable LMFBR core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding material and component performance in the high temperature, fast neutron environment of the LMFBR. Current data have provided strong assurance that the initial core component lifetime objectives of FFTF and CRBR can be met. At the same time, this knowledge translates directly into the need for improved core designs that utilize improved materials and advanced fuels required to meet objectives of low doubling times and extended core component lifetimes. An industrial base for the manufacture of quality core components has been developed in the US, and all procurements for the first two core equivalents for FFTF will be completed this year. However, the problem of fabricating recycled plutonium while dramatically reducing fabrication costs, minimizing personnel exposure, and protecting public health and safety must be addressed

  14. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  15. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  16. Synthesis and the crystal and molecular structures of 4-(piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 Mono- and dibromohydrates (HL)Br . 3H2O and (H2L)Br2 . 3H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalchukova, O. V.; Stash, A. I.; Belsky, V. K.; Strashnova, S. B.; Zaitsev, B. E.; Ryabov, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    4-(Piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 monobromohydrate (HL)Br . 3H 2 O (I) and 4-(piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 dibromohydrate (H 2 L)Br 2 . 3H 2 O (II) are isolated in the crystalline state. The crystal structures of compounds I and II are determined using X-ray diffraction. It is established that the protonation of 4-(piperidyl-1)-2-phenylpyrido[2,3-a]anthraquinone-7,12 proceeds primarily through the pyridine atom at pH 2-3. The attachment of the second proton occurs through the piperidine nitrogen atom at pH ∼ 1.

  17. In-core fuel management: New challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmayer, A.; Vallee, A.; Mondot, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experience accumulated by pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities allows them to improve their strategies in the use of eventual margins to core design limits. They are used for nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) power upgrading, to improve operating margins, or to adapt fuel management to specific objectives. As a result, in-core fuel management strategies have become very diverse: UO 2 or mixed-oxide loading, out-in or in-out fuel loading patterns, extended or annual cycle lengths with margins on design limits such as moderator temperature coefficients, boron concentrations, or peaking factors. Perspectives also appear concerning use of existing plutonium stocks or actinide incineration. Burnable poisons are most often needed to satisfactorily achieve these goals. Among them, gadolinia are now largely used, owing to their excellent performance. More than 24 Framatome first cores and reloads, representing more than 3000 gadolinia-bearing rods, have been irradiated since 1983

  18. Mixing ratio sensor of alcohol mixed fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Shigeru; Matsubara, Yoshihiro

    1987-08-07

    In order to improve combustion efficiency of an internal combustion engine using gasoline-alcohol mixed fuel and to reduce harmful substance in its exhaust gas, it is necessary to control strictly the air-fuel ratio to be supplied and the ignition timing and change the condition of control depending upon the mixing ratio of the mixed fuel. In order to detect the mixing ratio of the mixed fuel, the above mixing ratio has so far been detected by casting a ray of light to the mixed fuel and utilizing a change of critical angle associated with the change of the composition of the fluid of the mixed fuel. However, in case when a light emitting diode is used for the light source above, two kinds of sensors are further needed. Concerning the two kinds of sensors above, this invention offers a mixing ratio sensor for the alcohol mixed fuel which can abolish a temperature sensor to detect the environmental temperature by making a single compensatory light receiving element deal with the compensation of the amount of light emission of the light emitting element due to the temperature change and the compensation of the critical angle caused by the temperature change. (6 figs)

  19. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  20. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  1. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  2. Windscale pile core surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.; Mathews, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The two Windscale Piles were closed down, defueled as far as possible and mothballed for thirty years following a fire in the core of Pile 1 in 1957 resulting from the spontaneous release of stored Wigner energy in the graphite moderator. Decommissioning of the reactors commenced in 1987 and has reached the stage where the condition of both cores needs to be determined. To this end, non-intrusive and intrusive surveys and sampling of the cores have been planned and partly implemented. The objectives for each Pile differ slightly. The location and quantity of fuel remaining in the damaged core of Pile 1 needed to be established, whereas the removal of all fuel from Pile 2 needed to be confirmed. In Pile 1, the possible existence of a void in the core is to be explored and in Pile 2, the level of Wigner energy remaining required to be quantified. Levels of radioactivity in both cores needed to be measured. The planning of the surveys is described including strategy, design, safety case preparation and the remote handling and viewing equipment required to carry out the inspection, sampling and monitoring work. The results from the completed non-intrusive survey of Pile 2 are summarised. They confirm that the core is empty and the graphite is in good condition. The survey of Pile 1 has just started. (UK)

  3. Continuous mixing of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raouf, M.S.

    1963-01-01

    The most important literature on theoretical aspects of mixing solids was reviewed.

    Only when the mixed materials showed no segregation it was possible to analyse the mixing process quantitatively. In this case the mixture could be described by the 'χ' Square test. Longitudinal mixing could be

  4. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  5. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  6. European mixed forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo-Oviedo, Andres; Pretzsch, Hans; Ammer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: We aim at (i) developing a reference definition of mixed forests in order to harmonize comparative research in mixed forests and (ii) review the research perspectives in mixed forests. Area of study: The definition is developed in Europe but can be tested worldwide. Material...... and Methods: Review of existent definitions of mixed forests based and literature review encompassing dynamics, management and economic valuation of mixed forests. Main results: A mixed forest is defined as a forest unit, excluding linear formations, where at least two tree species coexist at any...... density in mixed forests, (iii) conversion of monocultures to mixed-species forest and (iv) economic valuation of ecosystem services provided by mixed forests. Research highlights: The definition is considered a high-level one which encompasses previous attempts to define mixed forests. Current fields...

  7. The application of mixed methods designs to trauma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W; Zhang, Wanqing

    2009-12-01

    Despite the use of quantitative and qualitative data in trauma research and therapy, mixed methods studies in this field have not been analyzed to help researchers designing investigations. This discussion begins by reviewing four core characteristics of mixed methods research in the social and human sciences. Combining these characteristics, the authors focus on four select mixed methods designs that are applicable in trauma research. These designs are defined and their essential elements noted. Applying these designs to trauma research, a search was conducted to locate mixed methods trauma studies. From this search, one sample study was selected, and its characteristics of mixed methods procedures noted. Finally, drawing on other mixed methods designs available, several follow-up mixed methods studies were described for this sample study, enabling trauma researchers to view design options for applying mixed methods research in trauma investigations.

  8. Mixed methods research in music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Burns, Debra S; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Music therapists have an ethical and professional responsibility to provide the highest quality care possible to their patients. Much of the time, high quality care is guided by evidence-based practice standards that integrate the most current, available research in making decisions. Accordingly, music therapists need research that integrates multiple ways of knowing and forms of evidence. Mixed methods research holds great promise for facilitating such integration. At this time, there have not been any methodological articles published on mixed methods research in music therapy. The purpose of this article is to introduce mixed methods research as an approach to address research questions relevant to music therapy practice. This article describes the core characteristics of mixed methods research, considers paradigmatic issues related to this research approach, articulates major challenges in conducting mixed methods research, illustrates four basic designs, and provides criteria for evaluating the quality of mixed methods articles using examples of mixed methods research from the music therapy literature. Mixed methods research offers unique opportunities for strengthening the evidence base in music therapy. Recommendations are provided to ensure rigorous implementation of this research approach.

  9. CFD simulation on reactor flow mixing phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, T.S.; Kim, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    A pre-test calculation for multi-dimensional flow mixing in a reactor core and downcomer has been studied using a CFD code. To study the effects of Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) and core zone on the boron mixing behaviors in a lower downcomer and core inlet, a 1/5-scale CFD model of flow mixing test facility for the APR+ reference plant was simulated. The flow paths of the 1/5-scale model were scaled down by the linear scaling method. The aspect ratio (L/D) of all flow paths was preserved to 1. To preserve a dynamic similarity, the ratio of Euler number was also preserved to 1. A single phase water flow at low pressure and temperature conditions was considered in this calculation. The calculation shows that the asymmetric effect driven by RCPs shifted the high velocity field to the failed pump's flow zone. The borated water flow zone at the core inlet was also shifted to the failed RCP side. (author)

  10. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  11. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  12. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  13. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  14. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directly restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements. (Official Gazette)

  15. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  16. AP1000 core design with 50% MOX loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The European uility requirements (EUR) document states that the next generation European passive plant (EPP) reactor core design shall be optimized for UO 2 fuel assemblies, with provisions made to allow for up to 50% mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies. The use of MOX in the core design will have significant impacts on key physics parameters and safety analysis assumptions. Furthermore, the MOX fuel rod design must also consider fuel performance criterion important to maintaining the integrity of the fuel rod over its intended lifetime. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AP1000 is capable of complying with the EUR requirement for MOX utilization without significant changes to the design of the plant. The analyses documented within will compare a 100% UO 2 core design and a mixed MOX/UO 2 core design, discussing relevant results related to reactivity management, power margin and fuel rod performance

  17. AP1000 core design with 50% MOX loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Robert J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The European Utility Requirements (EUR) document states that the next generation European Passive Plant (EPP) reactor core design shall be optimized for UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies, with provisions made to allow for up to 50% mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies. The use of MOX in the core design will have significant impacts on key physics parameters and safety analysis assumptions. Furthermore, the MOX fuel rod design must also consider fuel performance criterion important to maintaining the integrity of the fuel rod over its intended lifetime. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AP1000 is capable of complying with the EUR requirement for MOX utilization without significant changes to the design of the plant. The analyses documented within will compare a 100% UO{sub 2} core and a mixed MOX / UO{sub 2} core design, discussing relevant results related to reactivity management, power margin and fuel rod performance. (authors)

  18. AP1000 core design with 50% MOX loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The European Utility Requirements (EUR) document states that the next generation European Passive Plant (EPP) reactor core design shall be optimized for UO 2 fuel assemblies, with provisions made to allow for up to 50% mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies. The use of MOX in the core design will have significant impacts on key physics parameters and safety analysis assumptions. Furthermore, the MOX fuel rod design must also consider fuel performance criterion important to maintaining the integrity of the fuel rod over its intended lifetime. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AP1000 is capable of complying with the EUR requirement for MOX utilization without significant changes to the design of the plant. The analyses documented within will compare a 100% UO 2 core and a mixed MOX / UO 2 core design, discussing relevant results related to reactivity management, power margin and fuel rod performance. (authors)

  19. AP1000 core design with 50% MOX loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Robert J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)], E-mail: fetterrj@westinghouse.com

    2009-04-15

    The European uility requirements (EUR) document states that the next generation European passive plant (EPP) reactor core design shall be optimized for UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies, with provisions made to allow for up to 50% mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies. The use of MOX in the core design will have significant impacts on key physics parameters and safety analysis assumptions. Furthermore, the MOX fuel rod design must also consider fuel performance criterion important to maintaining the integrity of the fuel rod over its intended lifetime. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AP1000 is capable of complying with the EUR requirement for MOX utilization without significant changes to the design of the plant. The analyses documented within will compare a 100% UO{sub 2} core design and a mixed MOX/UO{sub 2} core design, discussing relevant results related to reactivity management, power margin and fuel rod performance.

  20. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  1. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  2. Mixing ratio sensor for alcohol mixed fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Shigeru; Matsubara, Yoshihiro

    1987-08-24

    In order to improve the combustion efficiency of an internal combustion engine using gasoline-alcohol mixed fuel and to reduce harmful substance in its exhaust gas, it is necessary to control strictly the air-fuel ratio to be supplied and the ignition timing. In order to detect the mixing ratio of the mixed fuel, a mixing ratio sensor has so far been proposed to detect the above mixing ratio by casting a ray of light to the mixed fuel and utilizing a change of critical angle associated with the change of the composition of the fluid of the mixed fuel. However, because of the arrangement of its transparent substance in the fuel passage with the sealing material in between, this sensor invited the leakage of the fluid due to deterioration of the sealing material, etc. and its cost became high because of too many parts to be assembled. In view of the above, in order to reduce the number of parts, to lower the cost of parts and the assembling cost and to secure no fluid leakage from the fuel passage, this invention formed the above fuel passage and the above transparent substance both concerning the above mixing ratio sensor in an integrated manner using light transmitting resin. (3 figs)

  3. Core polarization and the Coulomb energy difference of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the core polarization on the Coulomb displacement energies of mirror nuclei with a LS doubly closed shell plus or minus one nucleon is studied. Using the Kallio-Kolltveit interaction it is found that the first-order configuration mixing including 2p-2h core excitations is too small and sometimes of the wrong sign to explain the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly. (Auth.)

  4. Automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations by MCNPX 2.7.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Different approaches to perform automatic whole core criticality and depletion calculations in a research reactor using MCNPX 2.7.0 are presented. An approximate method is to use the existing symmetries of the burned fuel material distribution in the core, i.e., the axial, radial and azimuth symmetries around the core center, in order to significantly reduce the computation time. In this case it is not necessary to give a unique material number to each burn up cell. Cells having similar burn up and power, achieved during similar irradiation history at same initial fuel composition, will experience similar composition evolution and can therefore be given the same material number. To study the impact of the number of unique burn up materials on the computation time and utilized RAM memory, several MCNPX models have been developed. The paper discusses the accuracy of the model on comparison with measurements of BR2 operation cycles in function of the number of unique burn up materials and the impact of the used Q-value (MeV/fission) of the recoverable fission energy. (authors)

  5. Neutronic characteristics of FLWR in the transition phase changing from high conversion core to breeder core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is a low moderation type boiling water reactor which can realize plutonium multiple recycling and breeding. For the introduction stage of FLWR, a high conversion (HC) type FLWR is proposed to keep technical continuity from current light water reactors. The HC core of FLWR has a less tight fuel lattice with lower coolant void fraction than the breeder (BR) type core. The HC type FLWR core is to be shifted to the BR core by only replacing the fuel assemblies of the same outer shape and size in the same reactor system. In the HC to BR transition phase of FLWR, there exist both types of fuel assemblies in the same core configuration. In the HC assembly, neutron spectrum is softer than in the BR assembly, and the axial fuel and blanket arrangement is different from the BR assembly. Due to these differences, there might appear a power peaking in the adjacent region between HC and BR assemblies. The power distribution in the HC + BR assemblies mixed core configuration is studied by performing assembly calculations and core calculations on a few assemblies local geometry and the whole core geometry. As a result, although a power peaking can be locally very large in the HC and BR assemblies adjacent regions, such local power peakings are shown to be effectively reduced by considering a rod-wise fuel enrichment distribution. In the whole core calculation, it seems possible to optimize the fuel assembly loading and shuffling pattern to avoid large power level mismatch between the assemblies. It is expected that FLWR can be shifted from HC type to BR type without major neutronic difficulties. (author)

  6. Synthesis of CuO-NiO core-shell nanoparticles by homogeneous precipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayal, Nisha; Jeevanandam, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CuO-NiO core-shell nanoparticles have been synthesized using a simple homogeneous precipitation method for the first time. ► Mechanism of the formation of core-shell nanoparticles has been investigated. ► The synthesis route may be extended for the synthesis of other mixed metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles. - Abstract: Core-shell CuO–NiO mixed metal oxide nanoparticles in which CuO is the core and NiO is the shell have been successfully synthesized using homogeneous precipitation method. This is a simple synthetic method which produces first a layered double hydroxide precursor with core-shell morphology which on calcination at 350 °C yields the mixed metal oxide nanoparticles with the retention of core-shell morphology. The CuO–NiO mixed metal oxide precursor and the core-shell nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The chemical reactivity of the core-shell nanoparticles was tested using catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol with NaBH 4 . The possible growth mechanism of the particles with core-shell morphology has also been investigated.

  7. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  8. R and D on thermal hydraulics of core and core-bottom structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hino, Ryutaro; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Takase, Kazuyuki; Ioka, Ikuo; Maruyama, So

    2004-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic tests on the core and core-bottom structure of the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) were carried out with the helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) under simulated reactor operating conditions. The HENDEL was composed of helium gas circulation loops, mother sections (M 1 and M 2 ) and adaptor section (A), and two test sections, i.e. the fuel stack test section (T 1 ) and in-core structure test section (T 2 ). In the T 1 test section simulating a fuel stack of the core, thermal and hydraulic performances of helium gas flowing through a fuel block were investigated for thermal design of the HTTR core. In the T 2 test section simulating the core-bottom structure, demonstration tests were performed to verify the structural integrity of graphite and metal components, seal performance against helium gas leakage among the graphite permanent blocks and thermal mixing performance of helium gas. The above test results in the T 1 and T 2 test sections were applied to the detailed design and licensing works of the HTTR and the HENDEL-loop was dismantled in 1999

  9. Arctic Mixed Layer Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morison, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Over the years we have sought to understand the heat and mass balance of the mixed layer, marginal ice zone processes, the Arctic internal wave and mixing environment, summer and winter leads, and convection...

  10. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  11. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  12. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. SPORT MARKETING MIX STRATEGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Lucian MIHAI

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of a significant element of the sport marketing management model called the marketing mix. The marketing mix is crucial because it defines the sport business, and much of the sport marketer’s time is spent on various functions within the marketing mix. The marketing mix is the strategic combination of the product, price, place and promotion elements. These elements are typically called the four Ps of marketing. Decisions and strategies for each are importa...

  14. THE MARKETING MIX OPTIMIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    SABOU FELICIA

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the marketing mix and the necessity of the marketing mix optimization. In the marketing mix a particularly important issue is to choose the best combination of its variables, this lead to the achievement objectives, in time. Choosing the right marketing mix is possible only by reporting information to some clear benchmarks, these criteria a related to the objective of the company at the time of analyze. The study shows that the companies must give a great importance to opti...

  15. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  16. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  17. LMFBR core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Yang, J.C.; Yoh, K.C.; Suk, S.D.; Soh, D.S.; Kim, Y.M.

    1980-01-01

    The design parameters of a commercial-scale fast breeder reactor which is currently under construction by regeneration of these data is preliminary analyzed. The analysis of nuclear and thermal characteristics as well as safety features of this reactor is emphasized. And the evaluation of the initial core mentioned in the system description is carried out in the areas of its kinetics and control system, and, at the same time, the flow distribution of sodium and temperature distribution of the initial FBR core system are calculated. (KAERI INIS Section)

  18. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  19. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  20. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  1. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  2. Mixed methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  3. The whole-core LEU fuel demonstration in the ORR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Hobbs, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    A whole-core demonstration of LEU fuel in the ORR is expected to begin during November 1985. Fuel elements will contain U 3 Si 2 at 4.8 Mg U/m 3 and shim rod fuel followers will contain U 3 Si 2 at 3.5 Mg U/m 3 . Fuel fabrication is underway at B and W, CERCA, and NUKEM, with shipments scheduled to commence in October. The primary objectives of the demonstration are to provide data for validation of LEU and mixed-core fuel cycle calculations and to provide a large-scale demonstration of the acceptable performance of production-line U 3 Si 2 fuel elements. It is planned to approach the full LEU core through a series of mixed cores. Measurements to be made include flux distribution, reactivity swing, control rod worth, cycle length, fuel discharge burn-up, gamma heating rate, β eff /l, and isothermal temperature coefficient. Measurements will also be made on fresh LEU and fresh HEU critical configurations. Preliminary safety approval has been received and the final safety assessment is being reviewed. Key issues being addressed in the safety assessment are fuel performance, radiological consequences, margin to burnout and transient behavior. The LEU core is comparable in all safety aspects to the HEU core and the transition core is only marginally worse owing to higher power seeking factors. (author)

  4. Manufacturing of Mn-Zn ferrite transformer cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waqas, H.; Qureshi, A.H.; Hussain, N.; Ahmed, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development of soft ferrite transformer cores, which are extensively used in electronic devices such as switch mode power supplies, electromagnetic devices, computers, amplifiers etc. Mn-Zn Ferrite (soft ferrite) powders were prepared by conventional mixed oxide and auto combustion routes. These powders were calcined and then pressed in toroid shapes. Sintering was done at different temperatures to develop desired magnetic phase. Impedance resistance of sintered toroid cores was measured at different frequencies. Results revealed that Mn-Zn Ferrite cores synthesized by auto combustion route worked more efficiently in a high frequency range i.e. > 2MHz than the cores developed by conventional mixed oxide method. It was noticed that compact size, light weight and high impedance resistance are the prime advantages of auto combustion process which supported the performance of core in MHz frequency range. Furthermore, these compact size cores were successfully tested in linear pulse amplifier circuit of Pakistan Atomic Research Reactor-I. The fabrication of soft ferrite (Mn-Zn Ferrite) cores by different processing routes is an encouraging step towards indigenization of ferrite technology. (Orig./A.B.)

  5. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  6. CFD simulation for thermal mixing of a SMART flow mixing header assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young In; Bae, Youngmin; Chung, Young Jong; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal mixing performance of a FMHA installed in SMART is investigated numerically. • Effects of operating condition and discharge hole configuration are examined. • FMHA performance satisfies the design requirements under various abnormal conditions. - Abstract: A flow mixing header assembly (FMHA) is installed in a system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART) to enhance the thermal mixing capability and create a uniform core flow distribution under both normal operation and accident conditions. In this study, the thermal mixing characteristics of the FMHA are investigated for various steam generator conditions using a commercial CFD code. Simulations include investigations for the effects of FMHA discharge flow rate differences, turbulence models, and steam generator conditions. The results of the analysis show that the FMHA works effectively for thermal mixing in various conditions and makes the temperature difference at the core inlet decrease noticeably. We verified that the mixing capability of the FMHA is excellent and satisfies the design requirement in all simulation cases tested here

  7. Mixing vane grid spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.F.; Galbraith, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    An improved mixing vane grid spacer having enhanced flow mixing capability by virtue of mixing vanes being positioned at welded intersecting joints of the spacer wherein each mixing vane has an opening or window formed therein substantially directly over the welded joint to provide improved flow mixing capability is described. Some of the vanes are slotted, depending on their particular location in the spacers. The intersecting joints are welded by initially providing consumable tabs at and within each window, which are consumed during the welding of the spacer joints

  8. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  9. The Uncommon Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will…

  10. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  11. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  12. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  13. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  14. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  15. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  16. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  17. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  18. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  19. Nanoparticles of [Fe(NH2-trz)3]Br2.3H2O (NH2-trz=2-amino-1,2,4-triazole) prepared by the reverse micelle technique: influence of particle and coherent domain sizes on spin-crossover properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, Thibaut; Kaiba, Abdellah; Pechev, Stanislav; Denux, Dominique; Guionneau, Philippe; Etrillard, Céline; Daro, Nathalie; Freysz, Eric; Létard, Jean-François

    2009-06-15

    This paper describes the synthesis of iron(II) spin-crossover nanoparticles prepared by the reverse micelle technique by using the non-ionic surfactant Lauropal (Ifralan D0205) from the polyoxyethylenic family. By changing the surfactant/water ratio, the size of the particles of [Fe(NH2-trz)3]Br2.3H2O (with NH2trz=4-amino-1,2,4-triazole) can be controlled. On the macroscopic scale this complex exhibits cooperative thermal spin crossovers at 305 and 320 K. We find that when the size is reduced down to 50 nm, the spin transition becomes gradual and no hysteresis can be detected. For our data it seems that the critical size, for which the existence of a thermal hysteresis can be detected, is around 50 nm. Interestingly, the change of the particle size induces almost no change in the temperature of the thermal spin transition. A systematic determination of coherent domain size carried out on the nanoparticles by powder X-ray diffraction indicates that at approximately 30 nm individual particles consist of one coherent domain.

  20. CORE annual report 2006; CORE Jahresbericht 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A

    2007-04-15

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed.