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Sample records for box specifically binds

  1. RNA-binding specificity of Y-box protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinjiang; Akcakanat, Argun; Stivers, David N; Zhang, Jiexin; Kim, Doyil; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2009-01-01

    Y-box protein 1 (YB-1) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. The specificity of YB-1's RNA binding and its consequences are unknown. Because expression and subcellular localization of YB-1 have been reported to be important in breast cancer, we determined the specificity and functional impact of YB-1 mRNA-binding in MCF7 breast cancer cells. We used YB-1 antibodies to immunoprecipitate YB-1 and microarray profiling to compare YB-1-bound and total poly(A) RNA. We demonstrated that YB-1 mRNA-binding was preferential. Transcript sequences significantly associated with this binding had high GC content. Selected YB-1 mRNA-binding targets were confirmed by QRT-PCR. However, downregulation of YB-1 levels by siRNA did not affect their RNA or protein expression. Thus, YB-1 has RNA-binding specificity; however, YB-1 binding does not necessarily regulate the stability or translation of its mRNA targets. Further study is needed to determine the functional consequences of selective YB-1 mRNA binding.

  2. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry–exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R.; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry–exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. PMID:24829456

  3. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry-exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry-exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Brief Report: Endothelial-Specific X-Box Binding Protein 1 Deficiency Limits Tumor Necrosis Factor-Induced Leukocyte Recruitment and Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziogas, Athanasios; Muders, Michael H; Economopoulou, Matina; Sprott, David; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Siegert, Gabriele; Baretton, Gustavo B; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell activation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and associated leukocyte infiltration are hallmarks of vasculitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of the cellular stress-associated endothelial X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) transcription factor in TNF-induced endothelial cell inflammation and vasculitis. Mice with an endothelial cell-specific XBP-1 deficiency were used in a modified local Shwartzman reaction (LSR) model of TNF-induced small vessel vasculitis. To address the contribution of XBP-1 to the TNF-mediated inflammatory response in endothelial cells, we examined the activation of XBP-1 expression by TNF as well as the effect of XBP-1 knockdown in endothelial cells on TNF-induced signaling, proinflammatory gene expression, and leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. The active spliced form of XBP-1 in endothelial cells was triggered by TNF. In addition, endothelial XBP-1 contributed to the sustained TNF-triggered NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activation of proinflammatory molecules, which was associated with leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. In the LSR model, endothelial cell-specific XBP-1-deficient mice displayed significantly less vascular damage, accompanied by reduced perivascular neutrophil infiltration, as compared with wild-type mice. Endothelial XBP-1 is activated by TNF and regulates leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion in vitro as well as neutrophil infiltration and vascular damage in murine vasculitis. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Cell differentiation by interaction of two HMG-box proteins: Mat1-Mc activates M cell-specific genes in S.pombe by recruiting the ubiquitous transcription factor Ste11 to weak binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Dooijes, D; Clevers, H

    1997-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mfm1 gene is expressed in an M cell-specific fashion. This regulation requires two HMG-box proteins: the ubiquitous Ste11 transcription factor and the M cell-controlling protein Mat1-Mc. Here we report that the mfm1 promoter contains a single, weak Stell-binding site...

  6. Identification of novel putative-binding proteins for cellular prion protein and a specific interaction with the STIP1 homology and U-Box-containing protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Ana Paula Lappas; Richter, Larissa Morato Luciani; Atherino, Mariana Campos; Beirão, Breno Castello Branco; Fávaro, Celso; Costa, Michele Dietrich Moura; Zanata, Silvio Marques; Malnic, Bettina; Mercadante, Adriana Frohlich

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases involve the conversion of the endogenous cellular prion protein, PrP(C), into a misfolded infectious isoform, PrP(Sc). Several functions have been attributed to PrP(C), and its role has also been investigated in the olfactory system. PrP(C) is expressed in both the olfactory bulb (OB) and olfactory epithelium (OE) and the nasal cavity is an important route of transmission of diseases caused by prions. Moreover, Prnp(-/-) mice showed impaired behavior in olfactory tests. Given the high PrP(C) expression in OE and its putative role in olfaction, we screened a mouse OE cDNA library to identify novel PrP(C)-binding partners. Ten different putative PrP(C) ligands were identified, which were involved in functions such as cellular proliferation and apoptosis, cytoskeleton and vesicle transport, ubiquitination of proteins, stress response, and other physiological processes. In vitro binding assays confirmed the interaction of PrP(C) with STIP1 homology and U-Box containing protein 1 (Stub1) and are reported here for the first time. Stub1 is a co-chaperone with ubiquitin E3-ligase activity, which is associated with neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Physiological and pathological implications of PrP(C)-Stub1 interaction are under investigation. The PrP(C)-binding proteins identified here are not exclusive to the OE, suggesting that these interactions may occur in other tissues and play general biological roles. These data corroborate the proposal that PrP(C) is part of a multiprotein complex that modulates several cellular functions and provide a platform for further studies on the physiological and pathological roles of prion protein.

  7. Effects of spectator ligands on the specific recognition of intrastrand platinum-DNA cross-links by high mobility group box and TATA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M; Cohen, S M; Silverman, A P; Lippard, S J

    2001-10-19

    The results presented describe the effects of various spectator ligands, attached to a platinum 1,2-intrastand d(GpG) cross-link in duplex DNA, on the binding of high mobility group box (HMGB) domains and the TATA-binding protein (TBP). In addition to cisplatin-modified DNA, 15-base pair DNA probes modified by [Pt(1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)](2+), cis-[Pt(NH(3))(cyclohexylamine)](2+), [Pt(ethylenediamine)](2+), cis-[Pt(NH(3))(cyclobutylamine)](2+), and cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2-picoline)](2+) were examined. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that both the A and B domains of HMGB1 as well as TBP discriminate between different platinum-DNA adducts. HMGB1 domain A is the most sensitive to the nature of the spectator ligands on platinum. The effect of the spectator ligands on protein binding also depends highly on the base pairs flanking the platinated d(GpG) site. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the AG*G*C sequence, where the asterisks denote the sites of platination, with different spectator ligands are only moderately discriminated by the HMGB proteins and TBP, but the recognition of dsTG*G*A is highly dependent on the ligands. The effects of HMGB1 overexpression in a BG-1 ovarian cancer cell line, induced by steroid hormones, on the sensitivity of cells treated with [Pt(1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)Cl(2)] and cis-[Pt(NH(3))(cyclohexylamine)Cl(2)] were also examined. The results suggest that HMGB1 protein levels influence the cellular processing of cis-[Pt(NH(3))- (cyclohexylamine)](2+), but not [Pt((1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane)](2+), DNA lesions. This result is consistent with the observed binding of HMGB1a to platinum-modified dsTG*G*A probes but not with the binding affinity of HMGB1a and HMGB1 to platinum-damaged dsAG*G*C oligonucleotides. These experiments reinforce the importance of sequence context in platinum-DNA lesion recognition by cellular proteins.

  8. A sugar beet chlorophyll a/b binding protein promoter void of G-box like elements confers strong and leaf specific reporter gene expression in transgenic sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kloos Dorothee U

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modification of leaf traits in sugar beet requires a strong leaf specific promoter. With such a promoter, expression in taproots can be avoided which may otherwise take away available energy resources for sugar accumulation. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH was utilized to generate an enriched and equalized cDNA library for leaf expressed genes from sugar beet. Fourteen cDNA fragments corresponding to thirteen different genes were isolated. Northern blot analysis indicates the desired tissue specificity of these genes. The promoters for two chlorophyll a/b binding protein genes (Bvcab11 and Bvcab12 were isolated, linked to reporter genes, and transformed into sugar beet using promoter reporter gene fusions. Transient and transgenic analysis indicate that both promoters direct leaf specific gene expression. A bioinformatic analysis revealed that the Bvcab11 promoter is void of G-box like regulatory elements with a palindromic ACGT core sequence. The data indicate that the presence of a G-box element is not a prerequisite for leaf specific and light induced gene expression in sugar beet. Conclusions This work shows that SSH can be successfully employed for the identification and subsequent isolation of tissue specific sugar beet promoters. These promoters are shown to drive strong leaf specific gene expression in transgenic sugar beet. The application of these promoters for expressing resistance improving genes against foliar diseases is discussed.

  9. Nuclear factor ETF specifically stimulates transcription from promoters without a TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, R; Merlino, G T; Pastan, I

    1989-09-15

    Transcription factor ETF stimulates the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene which does not have a TATA box in the promoter region. Here, we show that ETF recognizes various GC-rich sequences including stretches of deoxycytidine or deoxyguanosine residues and GC boxes with similar affinities. ETF also binds to TATA boxes but with a lower affinity. ETF stimulated in vitro transcription from several promoters without TATA boxes but had little or no effect on TATA box-containing promoters even though they had strong ETF-binding sites. These inactive ETF-binding sites became functional when placed upstream of the EGFR promoter whose own ETF-binding sites were removed. Furthermore, when a TATA box was introduced into the EGFR promoter, the responsiveness to ETF was abolished. These results indicate that ETF is a specific transcription factor for promoters which do not contain TATA elements.

  10. Oligomerization of Hmo1 mediated by box A is essential for DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Koji; Higashino, Ayako; Unzai, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2016-12-01

    Hmo1, a member of HMGB family proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, binds to and regulates the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins. The functional motifs of Hmo1 include two HMG-like motifs, box A and box B, and a C-terminal tail. To elucidate the molecular roles of the HMG-like boxes in DNA binding in vivo, we analyzed the DNA-binding activity of various Hmo1 mutants using ChIP or reporter assays that enabled us to conveniently detect Hmo1 binding to the promoter of RPS5, a major target gene of Hmo1. Our mutational analyses showed that box B is a bona fide DNA-binding motif and that it also plays other important roles in cell growth. However, box A, especially its first α-helix, contributes to DNA binding of Hmo1 by inducing self-assembly of Hmo1. Intriguingly, box A mediated formation of oligomers of more than two proteins on DNA in vivo. Furthermore, duplication of the box B partially alleviates the requirement for box A. These findings suggest that the principal role of box A is to assemble multiple box B in the appropriate orientation, thereby stabilizing the binding of Hmo1 to DNA and nucleating specific chromosomal architecture on its target genes. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Ovule-specific MADS box proteins have conserved protein-protein interactions in monocots and dicot plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favaro, R.; Immink, R.G.H.; Ferioli, V.; Bernasconi, B.; Byzova, M.; Angenent, G.C.; Kater, M.; Colombo, L.

    2002-01-01

    OsMADS13 is a rice MADS-box gene that is specifically expressed in developing ovules. The amino acid sequence of OsMADS13 shows 74␜imilarity to those of FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN 7 (FBP7) and FBP11, the products of two MADS-box genes that are necessary and sufficient to determine ovule identity in

  12. How the ankyrin and SOCS box protein, ASB9, binds to creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Deepa; Schiffer, Jamie; Parnell, Jonathan; Mir, Stephan P; Amaro, Rommie E; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-03

    The ankyrin repeat and SOCS box (ASB) family is composed of 18 proteins and belongs to the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) box protein superfamily. The ASB proteins function as the substrate-recognition subunits of ECS-type (ElonginBC-Cullin-SOCS-box) Cullin RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes that specifically transfer ubiquitin to cellular proteins targeting them for degradation by the proteasome. ASB9 binds to creatine kinase (CK) and targets it for degradation; however, the way in which ASB9 interacts with CK is not yet known. We present a complete characterization of the binding of ASB9 to CK. One ASB9 molecule binds to a dimer of CK. The binding affinity of ASB9(1-252) was extremely tight, and no dissociation could be observed. Deletion of the 34 N-terminal amino acids forming ASB9(35-252) resulted in weakening of the binding, so that a binding affinity of 2.6 nM could be measured. Amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDXMS) experiments showed that both ASB9(1-252) and ASB9(35-252) protected the same region of CK, residues 182-203, which forms one side of the active site. The HDXMS experiments indicated that the N-terminal disordered region and first ankyrin repeat of ASB9 are protected from exchange in the complex. Molecular docking yielded a structural model consistent with all of the data that suggested the N-terminal residues of ASB9(1-252) may lie in one CK active site. This model was corroborated by enzymatic activity assays and mutational analysis.

  13. Identification and expression analysis of the SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein (SBP)-box gene family in Prunus mume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongda; Sun, Lidan; Zhou, Yuzhen; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2015-10-01

    SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein (SBP)-box family genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant development, especially flower and fruit development. However, little information on this gene family is available for Prunus mume, an ornamental and fruit tree widely cultivated in East Asia. To explore the evolution of SBP-box genes in Prunus and explore their functions in flower and fruit development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the SBP-box gene family in P. mume. Fifteen SBP-box genes were identified, and 11 of them contained an miR156 target site. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses revealed that different groups of SBP-box genes have undergone different evolutionary processes and varied in their length, structure, and motif composition. Purifying selection has been the main selective constraint on both paralogous and orthologous SBP-box genes. In addition, the sequences of orthologous SBP-box genes did not diverge widely after the split of P. mume and Prunus persica. Expression analysis of P. mume SBP-box genes revealed their diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns. Three duplicated SBP-box genes may have undergone subfunctionalization in Prunus. Most of the SBP-box genes showed high transcript levels in flower buds and young fruit. The four miR156-nontargeted genes were upregulated during fruit ripening. Together, these results provide information about the evolution of SBP-box genes in Prunus. The expression analysis lays the foundation for further research on the functions of SBP-box genes in P. mume and other Prunus species, especially during flower and fruit development.

  14. A Unique HMG-Box Domain of Mouse Maelstrom Binds Structured RNA but Not Double Stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzor, Pavol; Bortvin, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Piwi-interacting piRNAs are a major and essential class of small RNAs in the animal germ cells with a prominent role in transposon control. Efficient piRNA biogenesis and function require a cohort of proteins conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Here we studied Maelstrom (MAEL), which is essential for piRNA biogenesis and germ cell differentiation in flies and mice. MAEL contains a high mobility group (HMG)-box domain and a Maelstrom-specific domain with a presumptive RNase H-fold. We employed a combination of sequence analyses, structural and biochemical approaches to evaluate and compare nucleic acid binding of mouse MAEL HMG-box to that of canonical HMG-box domain proteins (SRY and HMGB1a). MAEL HMG-box failed to bind double-stranded (ds)DNA but bound to structured RNA. We also identified important roles of a novel cluster of arginine residues in MAEL HMG-box in these interactions. Cumulatively, our results suggest that the MAEL HMG-box domain may contribute to MAEL function in selective processing of retrotransposon RNA into piRNAs. In this regard, a cellular role of MAEL HMG-box domain is reminiscent of that of HMGB1 as a sentinel of immunogenic nucleic acids in the innate immune response. PMID:25807393

  15. A unique HMG-box domain of mouse Maelstrom binds structured RNA but not double stranded DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Genzor

    Full Text Available Piwi-interacting piRNAs are a major and essential class of small RNAs in the animal germ cells with a prominent role in transposon control. Efficient piRNA biogenesis and function require a cohort of proteins conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Here we studied Maelstrom (MAEL, which is essential for piRNA biogenesis and germ cell differentiation in flies and mice. MAEL contains a high mobility group (HMG-box domain and a Maelstrom-specific domain with a presumptive RNase H-fold. We employed a combination of sequence analyses, structural and biochemical approaches to evaluate and compare nucleic acid binding of mouse MAEL HMG-box to that of canonical HMG-box domain proteins (SRY and HMGB1a. MAEL HMG-box failed to bind double-stranded (dsDNA but bound to structured RNA. We also identified important roles of a novel cluster of arginine residues in MAEL HMG-box in these interactions. Cumulatively, our results suggest that the MAEL HMG-box domain may contribute to MAEL function in selective processing of retrotransposon RNA into piRNAs. In this regard, a cellular role of MAEL HMG-box domain is reminiscent of that of HMGB1 as a sentinel of immunogenic nucleic acids in the innate immune response.

  16. AvrXa27 binding influences unwinding of the double-stranded DNA in the UPT box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Junpeng; Liu, Nanv; Wei, Qi; Xi, Xuguang; Fu, Jing

    2017-03-04

    Transcription-Activator Like (TAL) effectors, delivered by Xanthomonas pathogens bind specifically to UP-regulated by TAL effectors (UPT) box of the host gene promoter to arouse disease or trigger defense response. This type of protein-DNA interaction model has been applied in site-directed genome editing. However, the off-target effects of TAL have severely hindered the development of this promising technology. To better exploit the specific interaction and to deeper understand the TAL-induced host transcription rewiring, the binding between the central repeat region (CRR) of the TAL effector AvrXa27 and its UPT box variants was studied by kinetics analysis and TAL-blocked helicase unwinding assay. The results revealed that while AvrXa27 exhibited the highest affinity to the wild type UPT box, it could also bind to mutated UPT box variants, implying the possibility of non-specific interactions. Furthermore, some of these non-specific combinations restricted the helicase-elicited double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) separation to a greater extent. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of TAL transcriptional activation and are beneficial to TAL-mediated genome modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 77 FR 38705 - Draft Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Draft Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings... comment on the Draft ``Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and... recommendations for airport light bases, transformer housings, junction boxes and accessories. The FAA has posted...

  18. TATA box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 2 (TRF2), a third member of the TBP family

    OpenAIRE

    Rabenstein, Mark D.; Zhou, Sharleen; Lis, John T.; Tjian, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) is an essential component of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was thought that the general transcriptional machinery was largely invariant and relied on a single TBP, whereas a large and diverse collection of activators and repressors were primarily responsible for imparting specificity to transcription initiation. However, it now appears that the “basal” transcriptional machinery also contributes to speci...

  19. A new mode of DNA binding distinguishes Capicua from other HMG-box factors and explains its mutation patterns in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forés, Marta; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Ajuria, Leiore; Samper, Núria; González-Crespo, Sergio; Drosten, Matthias; Barbacid, Mariano; Jiménez, Gerardo

    2017-03-01

    HMG-box proteins, including Sox/SRY (Sox) and TCF/LEF1 (TCF) family members, bind DNA via their HMG-box. This binding, however, is relatively weak and both Sox and TCF factors employ distinct mechanisms for enhancing their affinity and specificity for DNA. Here we report that Capicua (CIC), an HMG-box transcriptional repressor involved in Ras/MAPK signaling and cancer progression, employs an additional distinct mode of DNA binding that enables selective recognition of its targets. We find that, contrary to previous assumptions, the HMG-box of CIC does not bind DNA alone but instead requires a distant motif (referred to as C1) present at the C-terminus of all CIC proteins. The HMG-box and C1 domains are both necessary for binding specific TGAATGAA-like sites, do not function via dimerization, and are active in the absence of cofactors, suggesting that they form a bipartite structure for sequence-specific binding to DNA. We demonstrate that this binding mechanism operates throughout Drosophila development and in human cells, ensuring specific regulation of multiple CIC targets. It thus appears that HMG-box proteins generally depend on auxiliary DNA binding mechanisms for regulating their appropriate genomic targets, but that each sub-family has evolved unique strategies for this purpose. Finally, the key role of C1 in DNA binding also explains the fact that this domain is a hotspot for inactivating mutations in oligodendroglioma and other tumors, while being preserved in oncogenic CIC-DUX4 fusion chimeras associated to Ewing-like sarcomas.

  20. DEAD-box Helicases as Integrators of RNA, Nucleotide and Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Andrea A.

    2013-01-01

    DEAD-box helicases perform diverse cellular functions in virtually all steps of RNA metabolism from Bacteria to Humans. Although DEAD-box helicases share a highly conserved core domain, the enzymes catalyze a wide range of biochemical reactions. In addition to the well established RNA unwinding and corresponding ATPase activities, DEAD-box helicases promote duplex formation and displace proteins from RNA. They can also function as assembly platforms for larger ribonucleoprotein complexes, and as metabolite sensors. This review aims to provide a perspective on the diverse biochemical features of DEAD-box helicases and connections to structural information. We discuss these data in the context of a model that views the enzymes as integrators of RNA, nucleotide, and protein binding. PMID:23416748

  1. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  2. Meiosis-specific regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S-phase cyclin CLB5 is dependent on MluI cell cycle box (MCB) elements in its promoter but is independent of MCB-binding factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithatha, Sheetal A; Stuart, David T

    2005-03-01

    In proliferating S. cerevisiae, genes whose products function in DNA replication are regulated by the MBF transcription factor composed of Mbp1 and Swi6 that binds to consensus MCB sequences in target promoters. We find that during meiotic development a subset of DNA replication genes exemplified by TMP1 and RNR1 are regulated by Mbp1. Deletion of Mbp1 deregulated TMP1 and RNR1 but did not interfere with premeiotic S-phase, meiotic recombination, or spore formation. Surprisingly, deletion of MBP1 had no effect on the expression of CLB5, which is purportedly controlled by MBF. Extensive analysis of the CLB5 promoter revealed that the gene is largely regulated by elements within a 100-bp fragment containing a cluster of MCB sequences. Surprisingly, induction of the CLB5 promoter requires MCB sequences, but not Mbp1, implying that another MCB-binding factor may exist in cells undergoing meiosis. In addition, full activation of CLB5 during meiosis requires Clb5 activity, suggesting that CLB5 may be regulated by a positive feedback mechanism. We further demonstrate that during meiosis MCBs function as effective transcriptional activators independent of MBP1.

  3. Essential Role of X-Box Binding Protein-1 during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hossam; Tian, Xuefei; Inoue, Kazunori; Chai, Nathan; Liu, Chang; Soda, Keita; Moeckel, Gilbert; Tufro, Alda; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Somlo, Stefan; Fedeles, Sorin; Ishibe, Shuta

    2016-04-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated epithelial cells that reside along the glomerular filtration barrier. Evidence suggests that after podocyte injury, endoplasmic reticulum stress response is activated, but the molecular mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. In a mouse model, we confirmed that podocyte injury induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and upregulated unfolded protein response pathways, which have been shown to mitigate damage by preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, simultaneous podocyte-specific genetic inactivation of X-box binding protein-1 (Xbp1), a transcription factor activated during endoplasmic reticulum stress and critically involved in the untranslated protein response, and Sec63, a heat shock protein-40 chaperone required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulted in progressive albuminuria, foot process effacement, and histology consistent with ESRD. Finally, loss of both Sec63 and Xbp1 induced apoptosis in podocytes, which associated with activation of the JNK pathway. Collectively, our results indicate that an intact Xbp1 pathway operating to mitigate stress in the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for the maintenance of a normal glomerular filtration barrier. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Stepwise bending of DNA by a single TATA box binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolic-Nørrelykke, Simon F; Rasmussen, Mette B; Pavone, Francesco S

    2006-01-01

    cerevisiae TBPs interacting with single DNA molecules containing a TATA-box. Using video microscopy, we observed the Brownian motion of the beads tethered by short surface-bound DNA. When TBP binds to and bends the DNA, the conformation of the DNA changes and the amplitude of Brownian motion of the tehtered......-defined free and bound classes of Brownian motion, we observed another two classes of motion. These extra classes were identified with intermediate states of a three-step, linear binding pathway. Biological implications of the intermediate states are discussed....

  5. Exploring the binding nature of pyrrolidine pocket-dependent interactions in the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran N Murugan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the years, a great deal of effort has been focused on the design and synthesis of potent, linear peptide inhibitors targeting the polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1, which is critically involved in multiple mitotic processes and has been established as an adverse prognostic marker for tumor patients. Plk1 localizes to its intracellular anchoring sites via its polo-box domain, and inhibiting the Plk1 polo-box domain has been considered as an approach to circumvent the specificity problems associated with inhibiting the conserved adenosine triphosphate-binding pocket. The polo-box domain consists of two different binding regions, such as the unique, broader pyrrolidine-binding pocket and the conserved, narrow, Tyr-rich hydrophobic channel, among the three Plk polo-box domains (Plks 1-3, respectively. Therefore, the studies that provide insights into the binding nature of the unique, broader pyrrolidine-binding pocket might lead to the development of selective Plk1-inhibitory compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to retain the monospecificity by targeting the unique, broader pyrrolidine-binding pocket, here, for the first time, a systematic approach was undertaken to examine the structure-activity relationship of N-terminal-truncated PLHSpTM derivatives, to apply a site-directed ligand approach using bulky aromatic and non-aromatic systems, and to characterize the binding nature of these analogues using X-ray crystallographic studies. We have identified a new mode of binding interactions, having improved binding affinity and retaining the Plk1 polo-box domain specificity, at the pyrrolidine-binding pocket. Furthermore, our data revealed that the pyrrolidine-binding pocket was very specific to recognize a short and bulky hydrophobic ligand like adamantane, whereas the Tyr-rich hydrophobic channel was specific with lengthy and small hydrophobic groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The progress made using our site

  6. Elucidating the evolutionary conserved DNA-binding specificities of WRKY transcription factors by molecular dynamics and in vitro binding assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Harter, Klaus; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein family in plants that is involved in the regulation of developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli. The question arises how stimulus-specific responses are mediated given that the highly conserved WRKY DNA-binding domain (DBD) exclusively recognizes the ‘TTGACY’ W-box consensus. We speculated that the W-box consensus might be more degenerate and yet undetected differences in the W-box consensus of WRKYs of different evolutionary descent exist. The phylogenetic analysis of WRKY DBDs suggests that they evolved from an ancestral group IIc-like WRKY early in the eukaryote lineage. A direct descent of group IIc WRKYs supports a monophyletic origin of all other group II and III WRKYs from group I by loss of an N-terminal DBD. Group I WRKYs are of paraphyletic descent and evolved multiple times independently. By homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro DNA–protein interaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with AtWRKY50 (IIc), AtWRKY33 (I) and AtWRKY11 (IId) DBDs, we revealed differences in DNA-binding specificities. Our data imply that other components are essentially required besides the W-box-specific binding to DNA to facilitate a stimulus-specific WRKY function. PMID:23975197

  7. Crystal structure of the UBR-box from UBR6/FBXO11 reveals domain swapping mediated by zinc binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2017-10-01

    The UBR-box is a 70-residue zinc finger domain present in the UBR family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that directly binds N-terminal degradation signals in substrate proteins. UBR6, also called FBXO11, is an UBR-box containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that does not bind N-terminal signals. Here, we present the crystal structure of the UBR-box domain from human UBR6. The dimeric crystal structure reveals a unique form of domain swapping mediated by zinc coordination, where three independent protein chains come together to regenerate the topology of the monomeric UBR-box fold. Analysis of the structure suggests that the absence of N-terminal residue binding arises from the lack of an amino acid binding pocket. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  8. Binding specificity of Escherichia coli trigger factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Holger; Rüdiger, Stefan; Brehmer, Dirk; Kramer, Günter; Vorderwülbecke, Sonja; Schaffitzel, Elke; Waitz, Andreas; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Dong, Liying; Schneider-Mergener, Jens; Bukau, Bernd; Deuerling, Elke

    2001-01-01

    The ribosome-associated chaperone trigger factor (TF) assists the folding of newly synthesized cytosolic proteins in Escherichia coli. Here, we determined the substrate specificity of TF by examining its binding to 2842 membrane-coupled 13meric peptides. The binding motif of TF was identified as a stretch of eight amino acids, enriched in basic and aromatic residues and with a positive net charge. Fluorescence spectroscopy verified that TF exhibited a comparable substrate specificity for peptides in solution. The affinity to peptides in solution was low, indicating that TF requires ribosome association to create high local concentrations of nascent polypeptide substrates for productive interaction in vivo. Binding to membrane-coupled peptides occurred through the central peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domain of TF, however, independently of prolyl residues. Crosslinking experiments showed that a TF fragment containing the PPIase domain linked to the ribosome via the N-terminal domain is sufficient for interaction with nascent polypeptide substrates. Homology modeling of the PPIase domain revealed a conserved FKBP(FK506-binding protein)-like binding pocket composed of exposed aromatic residues embedded in a groove with negative surface charge. The features of this groove complement well the determined substrate specificity of TF. Moreover, a mutation (E178V) in this putative substrate binding groove known to enhance PPIase activity also enhanced TF's association with a prolyl-free model peptide in solution and with nascent polypeptides. This result suggests that both prolyl-independent binding of peptide substrates and peptidyl-prolyl isomerization involve the same binding site. PMID:11724963

  9. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  10. CLOCKWORK ORANGE Enhances PERIOD Mediated Rhythms in Transcriptional Repression by Antagonizing E-box Binding by CLOCK-CYCLE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila circadian oscillator controls daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC heterodimers initiate feedback loop function by binding E-box elements to activate per and tim transcription. PER-TIM heterodimers then accumulate, bind CLK-CYC to inhibit transcription, and are ultimately degraded to enable the next round of transcription. The timing of transcriptional events in this feedback loop coincide with, and are controlled by, rhythms in CLK-CYC binding to E-boxes. PER rhythmically binds CLK-CYC to initiate transcriptional repression, and subsequently promotes the removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes. However, little is known about the mechanism by which CLK-CYC is removed from DNA. Previous studies demonstrated that the transcription repressor CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO contributes to core feedback loop function by repressing per and tim transcription in cultured S2 cells and in flies. Here we show that CWO rhythmically binds E-boxes upstream of core clock genes in a reciprocal manner to CLK, thereby promoting PER-dependent removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes, and maintaining repression until PER is degraded and CLK-CYC displaces CWO from E-boxes to initiate transcription. These results suggest a model in which CWO co-represses CLK-CYC transcriptional activity in conjunction with PER by competing for E-box binding once CLK-CYC-PER complexes have formed. Given that CWO orthologs DEC1 and DEC2 also target E-boxes bound by CLOCK-BMAL1, a similar mechanism may operate in the mammalian clock.

  11. CLOCKWORK ORANGE Enhances PERIOD Mediated Rhythms in Transcriptional Repression by Antagonizing E-box Binding by CLOCK-CYCLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Wangjie; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-11-01

    The Drosophila circadian oscillator controls daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate feedback loop function by binding E-box elements to activate per and tim transcription. PER-TIM heterodimers then accumulate, bind CLK-CYC to inhibit transcription, and are ultimately degraded to enable the next round of transcription. The timing of transcriptional events in this feedback loop coincide with, and are controlled by, rhythms in CLK-CYC binding to E-boxes. PER rhythmically binds CLK-CYC to initiate transcriptional repression, and subsequently promotes the removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes. However, little is known about the mechanism by which CLK-CYC is removed from DNA. Previous studies demonstrated that the transcription repressor CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO) contributes to core feedback loop function by repressing per and tim transcription in cultured S2 cells and in flies. Here we show that CWO rhythmically binds E-boxes upstream of core clock genes in a reciprocal manner to CLK, thereby promoting PER-dependent removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes, and maintaining repression until PER is degraded and CLK-CYC displaces CWO from E-boxes to initiate transcription. These results suggest a model in which CWO co-represses CLK-CYC transcriptional activity in conjunction with PER by competing for E-box binding once CLK-CYC-PER complexes have formed. Given that CWO orthologs DEC1 and DEC2 also target E-boxes bound by CLOCK-BMAL1, a similar mechanism may operate in the mammalian clock.

  12. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M

    2000-01-01

    , 12, and 10 base pairs, respectively. Footprinting with a deletion mutant of Ste11 reveals a novel interaction between the 3' base pairs of the extended DNA motif and amino acids C-terminal to the HMG domain. The sequence-specific interaction of Ste11 with these 3' base pairs contributes significantly......Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment...... of promoter elements controlled by the yeast genes ste11 and Rox1 has indicated strict conservation of a larger DNA motif. By site selection, we identify a highly specific 12-base pair motif for Ste11, AGAACAAAGAAA. Similarly, we show that Tcf1, MatMc, and Sox4 bind unique, highly specific DNA motifs of 12...

  13. Inhibition of forkhead boxO-specific transcription prevents mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuder, Ashley J; Sollanek, Kurt J; Min, Kisuk; Nelson, W Bradley; Powers, Scott K

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a lifesaving measure for patients with respiratory failure. However, prolonged mechanical ventilation results in diaphragm weakness, which contributes to problems in weaning from the ventilator. Therefore, identifying the signaling pathways responsible for mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm weakness is essential to developing effective countermeasures to combat this important problem. In this regard, the forkhead boxO family of transcription factors is activated in the diaphragm during mechanical ventilation, and forkhead boxO-specific transcription can lead to enhanced proteolysis and muscle protein breakdown. Currently, the role that forkhead boxO activation plays in the development of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm weakness remains unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that mechanical ventilation-induced increases in forkhead boxO signaling contribute to ventilator-induced diaphragm weakness. University research laboratory. Young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Cause and effect was determined by inhibiting the activation of forkhead boxO in the rat diaphragm through the use of a dominant-negative forkhead boxO adeno-associated virus vector delivered directly to the diaphragm. Our results demonstrate that prolonged (12 hr) mechanical ventilation results in a significant decrease in both diaphragm muscle fiber size and diaphragm-specific force production. However, mechanically ventilated animals treated with dominant-negative forkhead boxO showed a significant attenuation of both diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction. In addition, inhibiting forkhead boxO transcription attenuated the mechanical ventilation-induced activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, the autophagy/lysosomal system, and caspase-3. Forkhead boxO is necessary for the activation of key proteolytic systems essential for mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these results suggest that

  14. High- and low-affinity cre boxes for CcpA binding in Bacillus subtilis revealed by genome-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Bogumiła C; Pabijaniak, Monika; de Jong, Anne; Dűhring, Robert; Seidel, Gerald; Hillen, Wolfgang; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2012-08-17

    In Bacillus subtilis and its relatives carbon catabolite control, a mechanism enabling to reach maximal efficiency of carbon and energy sources metabolism, is achieved by the global regulator CcpA (carbon catabolite protein A). CcpA in a complex with HPr-Ser-P (seryl-phosphorylated form of histidine-containing protein, HPr) binds to operator sites called catabolite responsive elements, cre. Depending on the cre box position relative to the promoter, the CcpA/HPr-Ser-P complex can either act as a positive or a negative regulator. The cre boxes are highly degenerate semi-palindromes with a lowly conserved consensus sequence. So far, studies aimed at revealing how CcpA can bind such diverse sites were focused on the analysis of single cre boxes. In this study, a genome-wide analysis of cre sites was performed in order to identify differences in cre sequence and position, which determine their binding affinity. The transcriptomes of B. subtilis cultures with three different CcpA expression levels were compared. The higher the amount of CcpA in the cells, the more operons possessing cre sites were differentially regulated. The cre boxes that mediated regulation at low CcpA levels were designated as strong (high affinity) and those which responded only to high amounts of CcpA, as weak (low affinity). Differences in the sequence and position in relation to the transcription start site between strong and weak cre boxes were revealed. Certain residues at specific positions in the cre box as well as, to a certain extent, a more palindromic nature of cre sequences and the location of cre in close vicinity to the transcription start site contribute to the strength of CcpA-dependent regulation. The main factors contributing to cre regulatory efficiencies, enabling subtle differential control of various subregulons of the CcpA regulon, are identified.

  15. High- and low-affinity cre boxes for CcpA binding in Bacillus subtilis revealed by genome-wide analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciniak Bogumiła C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Bacillus subtilis and its relatives carbon catabolite control, a mechanism enabling to reach maximal efficiency of carbon and energy sources metabolism, is achieved by the global regulator CcpA (carbon catabolite protein A. CcpA in a complex with HPr-Ser-P (seryl-phosphorylated form of histidine-containing protein, HPr binds to operator sites called catabolite responsive elements, cre. Depending on the cre box position relative to the promoter, the CcpA/HPr-Ser-P complex can either act as a positive or a negative regulator. The cre boxes are highly degenerate semi-palindromes with a lowly conserved consensus sequence. So far, studies aimed at revealing how CcpA can bind such diverse sites were focused on the analysis of single cre boxes. In this study, a genome-wide analysis of cre sites was performed in order to identify differences in cre sequence and position, which determine their binding affinity. Results The transcriptomes of B. subtilis cultures with three different CcpA expression levels were compared. The higher the amount of CcpA in the cells, the more operons possessing cre sites were differentially regulated. The cre boxes that mediated regulation at low CcpA levels were designated as strong (high affinity and those which responded only to high amounts of CcpA, as weak (low affinity. Differences in the sequence and position in relation to the transcription start site between strong and weak cre boxes were revealed. Conclusions Certain residues at specific positions in the cre box as well as, to a certain extent, a more palindromic nature of cre sequences and the location of cre in close vicinity to the transcription start site contribute to the strength of CcpA-dependent regulation. The main factors contributing to cre regulatory efficiencies, enabling subtle differential control of various subregulons of the CcpA regulon, are identified.

  16. Calculating an optimal box size for ligand docking and virtual screening against experimental and predicted binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Wei P; Brylinski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Computational approaches have emerged as an instrumental methodology in modern research. For example, virtual screening by molecular docking is routinely used in computer-aided drug discovery. One of the critical parameters for ligand docking is the size of a search space used to identify low-energy binding poses of drug candidates. Currently available docking packages often come with a default protocol for calculating the box size, however, many of these procedures have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, we investigate how the docking accuracy of AutoDock Vina is affected by the selection of a search space. We propose a new procedure for calculating the optimal docking box size that maximizes the accuracy of binding pose prediction against a non-redundant and representative dataset of 3,659 protein-ligand complexes selected from the Protein Data Bank. Subsequently, we use the Directory of Useful Decoys, Enhanced to demonstrate that the optimized docking box size also yields an improved ranking in virtual screening. Binding pockets in both datasets are derived from the experimental complex structures and, additionally, predicted by eFindSite. A systematic analysis of ligand binding poses generated by AutoDock Vina shows that the highest accuracy is achieved when the dimensions of the search space are 2.9 times larger than the radius of gyration of a docking compound. Subsequent virtual screening benchmarks demonstrate that this optimized docking box size also improves compound ranking. For instance, using predicted ligand binding sites, the average enrichment factor calculated for the top 1 % (10 %) of the screening library is 8.20 (3.28) for the optimized protocol, compared to 7.67 (3.19) for the default procedure. Depending on the evaluation metric, the optimal docking box size gives better ranking in virtual screening for about two-thirds of target proteins. This fully automated procedure can be used to optimize docking protocols in order to

  17. Identification of Four-Jointed Box 1 (FJX1-Specific Peptides for Immunotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Jiun Chai

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is highly prevalent in South East Asia and China. The poor outcome is due to late presentation, recurrence, distant metastasis and limited therapeutic options. For improved treatment outcome, immunotherapeutic approaches focusing on dendritic and autologous cytotoxic T-cell based therapies have been developed, but cost and infrastructure remain barriers for implementing these in low-resource settings. As our prior observations had found that four-jointed box 1 (FJX1, a tumor antigen, is overexpressed in NPCs, we investigated if short 9-20 amino acid sequence specific peptides matching to FJX1 requiring only intramuscular immunization to train host immune systems would be a better treatment option for this disease. Thus, we designed 8 FJX1-specific peptides and implemented an assay system to first, assess the binding of these peptides to HLA-A2 molecules on T2 cells. After, ELISPOT assays were used to determine the peptides immunogenicity and ability to induce potential cytotoxicity activity towards cancer cells. Also, T-cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the potential of MHC class II peptides to stimulate the expansion of isolated T-cells. Our results demonstrate that these peptides are immunogenic and peptide stimulated T-cells were able to induce peptide-specific cytolytic activity specifically against FJX1-expressing cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the MHC class II peptides were capable of inducing T-cell proliferation. Our results suggest that these peptides are capable of inducing specific cytotoxic cytokines secretion against FJX1-expressing cancer cells and serve as a potential vaccine-based therapy for NPC patients.

  18. Identification of Four-Jointed Box 1 (FJX1)-Specific Peptides for Immunotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, San Jiun; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Foo, Yoke Ching; Yap, Lee Fah; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Teo, Soo Hwang; Cheong, Sok Ching; Patel, Vyomesh; Lim, Kue Peng

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in South East Asia and China. The poor outcome is due to late presentation, recurrence, distant metastasis and limited therapeutic options. For improved treatment outcome, immunotherapeutic approaches focusing on dendritic and autologous cytotoxic T-cell based therapies have been developed, but cost and infrastructure remain barriers for implementing these in low-resource settings. As our prior observations had found that four-jointed box 1 (FJX1), a tumor antigen, is overexpressed in NPCs, we investigated if short 9–20 amino acid sequence specific peptides matching to FJX1 requiring only intramuscular immunization to train host immune systems would be a better treatment option for this disease. Thus, we designed 8 FJX1-specific peptides and implemented an assay system to first, assess the binding of these peptides to HLA-A2 molecules on T2 cells. After, ELISPOT assays were used to determine the peptides immunogenicity and ability to induce potential cytotoxicity activity towards cancer cells. Also, T-cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the potential of MHC class II peptides to stimulate the expansion of isolated T-cells. Our results demonstrate that these peptides are immunogenic and peptide stimulated T-cells were able to induce peptide-specific cytolytic activity specifically against FJX1-expressing cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the MHC class II peptides were capable of inducing T-cell proliferation. Our results suggest that these peptides are capable of inducing specific cytotoxic cytokines secretion against FJX1-expressing cancer cells and serve as a potential vaccine-based therapy for NPC patients. PMID:26536470

  19. Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein peptides specifically bind to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Marisol; Vera, Ricardo; Eduardo Rodriguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Lopez, Ramsés; Trujillo, Mary; Torres, Elizabeth; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (Pv-DBP) is essential during merozoite invasion of reticulocytes. Reticulocyte binding region identification is important for understanding Pv-DBP reticulocyte recognition. Fifty 20 mer non-overlapping peptides, spanning Pv-DBP sequences, were tested in erythrocyte and reticulocyte binding assays. Ten HARBPs, mainly located in region II (Kd 50-130 nM), were High Activity Reticulocyte Binding Peptides (HARBPs); one bound to erythrocytes. Reticulocyte trypsin-, chymotrypsin- or neuraminidase- treatment affects HARBP binding differently, suggesting that these peptides have different reticulocyte-binding-sites. Some peptides bound to a Coomasie non-stainable 40 Kda band. Some HARBPs were able to block recombinant PvRII binding (Pv-DBP region II) to Duffy positive reticulocytes.

  20. The Y-Box Binding Protein 1 Suppresses Alzheimer's Disease Progression in Two Animal Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Bobkova

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is a member of the family of DNA- and RNA binding proteins. It is involved in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent events including cell proliferation and differentiation, stress response, and malignant cell transformation. Previously, YB-1 was detected in neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus, but its precise role in the brain remains undefined. Here we show that subchronic intranasal injections of recombinant YB-1, as well as its fragment YB-11-219, suppress impairment of spatial memory in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX mice with Alzheimer's type degeneration and improve learning in transgenic 5XFAD mice used as a model of cerebral amyloidosis. YB-1-treated OBX and 5XFAD mice showed a decreased level of brain β-amyloid. In OBX animals, an improved morphological state of neurons was revealed in the neocortex and hippocampus; in 5XFAD mice, a delay in amyloid plaque progression was observed. Intranasally administered YB-1 penetrated into the brain and could enter neurons. In vitro co-incubation of YB-1 with monomeric β-amyloid (1-42 inhibited formation of β-amyloid fibrils, as confirmed by electron microscopy. This suggests that YB-1 interaction with β-amyloid prevents formation of filaments that are responsible for neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Our data are the first evidence for a potential therapeutic benefit of YB-1 for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. An in silico analysis of T-box regulated genes and T-box evolution in prokaryotes, with emphasis on prediction of substrate specificity of transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleerebezem Michiel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-box anti-termination is an elegant and sensitive mechanism by which many bacteria maintain constant levels of amino acid-charged tRNAs. The amino acid specificity of the regulatory element is related to a so-called specifier codon and can in principle be used to guide the functional annotation of the genes controlled via the T-box anti-termination mechanism. Results Hidden Markov Models were defined to search the T-box regulatory element and were applied to all completed prokaryotic genomes. The vast majority of the genes found downstream of the retrieved elements encoded functionalities related to transport and synthesis of amino acids and the charging of tRNA. This is completely in line with findings reported in literature and with the proposed biological role of the regulatory element. For several species, the functional annotation of a large number of genes encoding proteins involved in amino acid transport could be improved significantly on basis of the amino acid specificity of the identified T-boxes. In addition, these annotations could be extrapolated to a larger number of orthologous systems in other species. Analysis of T-box distribution confirmed that the element is restricted predominantly to species of the phylum Firmicutes. Furthermore, it appeared that the distribution was highly species specific and that in the case of amino acid transport some boxes seemed to "pop-up" only recently. Conclusion We have demonstrated that the identification of the molecular specificity of a regulatory element can be of great help in solving notoriously difficult annotation issues, e.g. by defining the substrate specificity of genes encoding amino acid transporters on basis of the amino acid specificity of the regulatory T-box. Furthermore, our analysis of the species-dependency of the occurrence of specific T-boxes indicated that these regulatory elements propagate in a semi-independent way from the genes that they control.

  2. Computational analysis of phosphopeptide binding to the polo-box domain of the mitotic kinase PLK1 using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Huggins

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1 acts as a central regulator of mitosis and is over-expressed in a wide range of human tumours where high levels of expression correlate with a poor prognosis. PLK1 comprises two structural elements, a kinase domain and a polo-box domain (PBD. The PBD binds phosphorylated substrates to control substrate phosphorylation by the kinase domain. Although the PBD preferentially binds to phosphopeptides, it has a relatively broad sequence specificity in comparison with other phosphopeptide binding domains. We analysed the molecular determinants of recognition by performing molecular dynamics simulations of the PBD with one of its natural substrates, CDC25c. Predicted binding free energies were calculated using a molecular mechanics, Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach. We calculated the per-residue contributions to the binding free energy change, showing that the phosphothreonine residue and the mainchain account for the vast majority of the interaction energy. This explains the very broad sequence specificity with respect to other sidechain residues. Finally, we considered the key role of bridging water molecules at the binding interface. We employed inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory to consider the free energy of water molecules on the protein surface with respect to bulk water molecules. Such an analysis highlights binding hotspots created by elimination of water molecules from hydrophobic surfaces. It also predicts that a number of water molecules are stabilized by the presence of the charged phosphate group, and that this will have a significant effect on the binding affinity. Our findings suggest a molecular rationale for the promiscuous binding of the PBD and highlight a role for bridging water molecules at the interface. We expect that this method of analysis will be very useful for probing other protein surfaces to identify binding hotspots for natural binding partners and small molecule inhibitors.

  3. [A precise equilibrium equation for four steps of binding between TBP and TATA-box allows for the prediction of phenotypical expression upon mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, P M; Suslov, V V; Savinkova, L K; Ponomarenko, M P; Kolchanov, N A

    2010-01-01

    Among the main events of transcription initiation of TATA-containing genes in eukayotes are the recognition and binding of the TATA-box by the TATA-binding protein (TBP) to start the preinitiation complex formation on the nucleosomal DNA. Using the equilibrium equation for step-by-step TBP/TATA-binding, we have analyzed 69 experimental datasets on the characteristics of biologicacally important features altered by TATA-box mutations. Among these features, the TBP/TATA-complex parameters, the transcription level, the activity of gene products, yeast colony growth at a dose of growth inhibitor (phenotype), and the heterogenity of the response of a population to unspecific environmental stress have been described. Significant correlations were found between in silico prediction for TBP/TATA affinity and experimental data for in vivo and in vitro test-systems based on 15 cell types of 19 species, RNA polymerases II and III, and natural, recombinant or mutant TBP. Such an invariant impact of the step-by-step TBP/TATA-binding on the biological activity of complex systems, from a molecule to a population, might be due to the fact that TBP/TATA-complex formation precedes specific steps of transcription machinery assembly, which provide the multivariant jigsaw puzzle according to the expression pattern of each eukaryotic gene.

  4. Alterations in the expression of DEAD-box and other RNA binding proteins during HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeichner Steven L

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent results showed that certain DEAD box protein RNA helicases, DDX3 and DDX1, play an important role in the HIV infection cycle by facilitating the export of long, singly spliced or unspliced HIV RNAs from the nucleus via the CRM1-Rev pathway. Close examination of an extensive microarray expression profiling dataset obtained from cells latently infected with HIV induced to undergo lytic viral replication indicated that additional DEAD box proteins, beyond DDX3 and DDX1, exhibit differential expression during lytic HIV replication, and in latently infected cells prior to induction into active replication. This finding provides additional evidence that the involvement of DEAD box proteins and other RNA-binding proteins may play roles in active HIV replication and in the control of viral latency. Agents targeting these functions may offer new approaches to antiretroviral therapy and the therapeutic manipulation of HIV latency.

  5. Evaluation of the Schistosoma mansoni Y-box-binding protein (SMYB1 potential as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis

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    Silvia Regina Costa Dias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, and after malaria, is the second most important tropical disease in public health. A vaccine that reduces parasitemia is desirable to achieve mass treatment with a low cost. Although potential antigens have been identified and tested in clinical trials, no effective vaccine against schistosomiasis is available. Y-box-binding proteins (YBPs regulate gene expression and participate in a variety of cellular processes, including transcriptional and translational regulation, DNA repair, cellular proliferation, drug resistance and stress responses. The Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of the human YB-1, SMYB1, is expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. Although SMYB1 binds to DNA or RNA oligonucleotides, immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that it is primarily localized in the cytoplasm of parasite cells. In addition, SMYB1 interacts with a protein involved in mRNA processing, suggesting that SMYB1 functions in the turnover, transport and/or stabilization of RNA molecules during post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we report the potential of SMYB1 as a vaccine candidate. We demonstrate that recombinant SMYB1 stimulates the production of high levels of specific IgG1 antibodies in a mouse model. The observed levels of specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies indicate an actual protection against cercariae challenge. Animals immunized with rSMYB1 exhibited a 26% reduction in adult worm burden and a 28% reduction in eggs retained in the liver. Although proteins from the worm tegument are considered optimal targets for vaccine development, this study demonstrates that unexposed cytoplasmic proteins can reduce the load of intestinal worms and the number of eggs retained in the liver.

  6. Evaluation of the Schistosoma mansoni Y-box-binding protein (SMYB1) potential as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sílvia R C; Boroni, Mariana; Rocha, Elizângela A; Dias, Thomaz L; de Laet Souza, Daniela; Oliveira, Fabrício M S; Bitar, Mainá; Macedo, Andrea M; Machado, Carlos R; Caliari, Marcelo V; Franco, Glória R

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, and after malaria, is the second most important tropical disease in public health. A vaccine that reduces parasitemia is desirable to achieve mass treatment with a low cost. Although potential antigens have been identified and tested in clinical trials, no effective vaccine against schistosomiasis is available. Y-box-binding proteins (YBPs) regulate gene expression and participate in a variety of cellular processes, including transcriptional and translational regulation, DNA repair, cellular proliferation, drug resistance, and stress responses. The Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of the human YB-1, SMYB1, is expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. Although SMYB1 binds to DNA or RNA oligonucleotides, immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that it is primarily localized in the cytoplasm of parasite cells. In addition, SMYB1 interacts with a protein involved in mRNA processing, suggesting that SMYB1 functions in the turnover, transport, and/or stabilization of RNA molecules during post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we report the potential of SMYB1 as a vaccine candidate. We demonstrate that recombinant SMYB1 stimulates the production of high levels of specific IgG1 antibodies in a mouse model. The observed levels of specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies indicate an actual protection against cercariae challenge. Animals immunized with rSMYB1 exhibited a 26% reduction in adult worm burden and a 28% reduction in eggs retained in the liver. Although proteins from the worm tegument are considered optimal targets for vaccine development, this study demonstrates that unexposed cytoplasmic proteins can reduce the load of intestinal worms and the number of eggs retained in the liver.

  7. F-box protein specificity for g1 cyclins is dictated by subcellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Landry

    Full Text Available Levels of G1 cyclins fluctuate in response to environmental cues and couple mitotic signaling to cell cycle entry. The G1 cyclin Cln3 is a key regulator of cell size and cell cycle entry in budding yeast. Cln3 degradation is essential for proper cell cycle control; however, the mechanisms that control Cln3 degradation are largely unknown. Here we show that two SCF ubiquitin ligases, SCF(Cdc4 and SCF(Grr1, redundantly target Cln3 for degradation. While the F-box proteins (FBPs Cdc4 and Grr1 were previously thought to target non-overlapping sets of substrates, we find that Cdc4 and Grr1 each bind to all 3 G1 cyclins in cell extracts, yet only Cln3 is redundantly targeted in vivo, due in part to its nuclear localization. The related cyclin Cln2 is cytoplasmic and exclusively targeted by Grr1. However, Cdc4 can interact with Cdk-phosphorylated Cln2 and target it for degradation when cytoplasmic Cdc4 localization is forced in vivo. These findings suggest that Cdc4 and Grr1 may share additional redundant targets and, consistent with this possibility, grr1Δ cdc4-1 cells demonstrate a CLN3-independent synergistic growth defect. Our findings demonstrate that structurally distinct FBPs are capable of interacting with some of the same substrates; however, in vivo specificity is achieved in part by subcellular localization. Additionally, the FBPs Cdc4 and Grr1 are partially redundant for proliferation and viability, likely sharing additional redundant substrates whose degradation is important for cell cycle progression.

  8. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic acids...

  9. Selection of the optimal Box-Cox transformation parameter for modelling and forecasting age-specific fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Han Lin

    2015-01-01

    The Box-Cox transformation can sometimes yield noticeable improvements in model simplicity, variance homogeneity and precision of estimation, such as in modelling and forecasting age-specific fertility. Despite its importance, there have been few studies focusing on the optimal selection of Box-Cox transformation parameters in demographic forecasting. A simple method is proposed for selecting the optimal Box-Cox transformation parameter, along with an algorithm based on an in-sample forecast ...

  10. An L1 box binding protein, GbML1, interacts with GbMYB25 to control cotton fibre development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Zuo, Kaijing; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Lida; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2010-08-01

    Transcription factors play key roles in plant development through their interaction with cis-elements and/or other transcription factors. A HD-Zip IV family transcription factor, Gossypium barbadense Meristem Layer 1 (GbML1) has been identified and characterized here. GbML1 specifically bound to the L1 box and the promoters of GbML1 and GbRDL1. GbML1 physically interacted with a key regulator of cotton fibre development, GbMYB25. Truncated and point mutation assays indicated the START-SAD domain was required for the binding to the C terminal domain (CTD) of GbMYB25. GbML1 overexpression in Arabidopsis increased the number of trichomes on stems and leaves and increased the accumulation of anthocyanin in leaves. Taken together, the L1 box binding protein, GbML1 was identified as the first partner for GbMYB25 and the role of START domain was discovered to be a protein binding domain in plants. Our findings will help the improvement of cotton fibre production and the understanding of the key role of HD-Zip family and MYB family in plants.

  11. PU.1 and a TTTAAA element in the myeloid defensin-1 promoter create an operational TATA box that can impose cell specificity onto TFIID function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, Mariana; Kippenberger, Serena; Wang, Nan; Su, Qin; McGarvey, Margaret; Nazarian, Arpi; Lacomis, Lynne; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Defensins are major components of a peptide-based, antimicrobial system in human neutrophils. While packed with peptide, circulating cells contain no defensin-1 (def1) transcripts, except in some leukemia patients and in derivative promyelocytic leukemia cell lines. Expression is modulated by serum factors, mediators of inflammation, and kinase activators and inhibitors, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. A minimal def1 promoter drives transcription in HL-60 cells under control of PU.1 and a def1-binding protein ("D1BP"), acting through, respectively, proximal (-22/-19) and distal (-62/-59) GGAA elements. In this study, we identify D1BP, biochemically and functionally, as GA-binding protein (GABP)alpha/GABPbeta. Whereas GABP operates as an essential upstream activator, PU.1 assists the flanking "TTTAAA" element (-32/-27), a "weak" but essential TATA box, to bring TBP/TFIID to the transcription start site. PU.1 thus imparts a degree of cell specificity to the minimal promoter and provides a potential link between a number of signaling pathways and TFIID. However, a "strong" TATA box ("TATAAA") eliminates the need for the PU.1 binding site and for PU.1, but not for GABP. As GABP is widely expressed, a strong TATA box thus alleviates promyelocytic cell specificity of the def1 promoter. These findings suggest how the myeloid def1 promoter may have evolutionarily acquired its current properties.

  12. Two CCAAT-box-binding transcription factors redundantly regulate early steps of the legume-rhizobia endosymbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloum, Tom; Baudin, Maël; Frances, Lisa; Lepage, Agnes; Billault-Penneteau, Benjamin; Cerri, Marion R; Ariel, Federico; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    During endosymbiotic interactions between legume plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, successful root infection by bacteria and nodule organogenesis requires the perception and transduction of bacterial lipo-chitooligosaccharidic signal called Nod factor (NF). NF perception in legume roots leads to the activation of an early signaling pathway and of a set of symbiotic genes which is controlled by specific early transcription factors (TFs) including CYCLOPS/IPD3, NSP1, NSP2, ERN1 and NIN. In this study, we bring convincing evidence that the Medicago truncatula CCAAT-box-binding NF-YA1 TF, previously associated with later stages of rhizobial infection and nodule meristem formation is, together with its closest homolog NF-YA2, also an essential positive regulator of the NF-signaling pathway. Here we show that NF-YA1 and NF-YA2 are both expressed in epidermal cells responding to NFs and their knock-down by reverse genetic approaches severely affects the NF-induced expression of symbiotic genes and rhizobial infection. Further over-expression, transactivation and ChIP-PCR approaches indicate that NF-YA1 and NF-YA2 function, at least in part, via the direct activation of ERN1. We thus propose a model in which NF-YA1 and NF-YA2 appear as early symbiotic regulators acting downstream of DMI3 and NIN and possibly within the same regulatory complexes as NSP1/2 to directly activate the expression of ERN1. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules.

  14. Drug-binding properties of rat alpha-foetoprotein. Specificities of the phenylbutazone-binding and warfarin-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, F; Rajkowski, K M; Martin, M T; Dessen, P; Cittanova, N

    1986-01-01

    Rat alpha-foetoprotein (alpha-FP) strongly binds the drugs warfarin and phenylbutazone, as does albumin; however, the binding sites for the two drugs seemed to be different. This possibility and the specificity of this/these drug-binding site(s) of rat alpha-FP were investigated by competitive protein-binding experiments with a variety of drugs, representing different pharmacological groups, and biomolecules that are strongly bound by the foetal protein and that are suspected to play a specific role during foetal development. The binding mechanisms were further investigated by using comparisons between computer-derived theoretical displacement curves and experimental points in order to distinguish different possible binding models. The results indicate: that warfarin and phenylbutazone are bound at two distinct sites on rat alpha-FP and that a negative modulatory effect is exerted between the two sites; that the degree of specificity of these two drug-binding sites is different, since the warfarin-binding site appears to be specific for the binding of coumarinic and anthranilic drugs whereas that for phenylbutazone is able to bind substances of very varied chemical structure and is more hydrophobic; that the phenylbutazone-binding site is the site that binds oestrogens that thyroid hormones and, probably, fatty acids and bilirubin are bound at (an)other site(s) but exert negative modulatory effects on phenylbutazone binding. The nature of the different binding areas of rat alpha-FP is compared with that of those already proposed for albumin. The potential risks of toxicity of such interactions between drugs and/or biomolecules on foetal development are also discussed. PMID:2434073

  15. Specific binding of neoglycoproteins to Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, R; de la Jarrige, P L; Mahaza, C; Cottin, J; Marot-Leblond, A; Senet, J M

    1991-01-01

    Several studies have shown that protozoa bind to glycoproteins or neoglycoproteins. Here we report that Toxoplasma gondii binds strongly to bovine serum albumin-glucosamide. The binding was rapid, time dependent, partially reversible, saturable, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed about 40,000 molecules of bovine serum albumin-glucosamide per toxoplasma cell. The apparent dissociation constant was found to be 4.46 x 10(-8) M. Images PMID:1937826

  16. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  17. Processing Binding Relations in Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Hestvik, Arild; Seiger-Gardner, Liat; Almodovar, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This sentence processing experiment examined the abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language development (TD) to establish relations between pronouns or reflexives and their antecedents in real time. Method: Twenty-two children with SLI and 24 age-matched children with TD (7;3-10;11…

  18. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function.

  19. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. SMRT has tissue-specific isoform profiles that include a form containing one CoRNR box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Stephen; Malartre, Marianne; Sharpe, Colin

    2005-09-02

    SMRT acts as a corepressor for a range of transcription factors. The amino-terminal part of the protein includes domains that mainly mediate transcriptional repression whilst the carboxy-terminal part includes domains that interact with nuclear receptors using up to three motifs called CoRNR boxes. The region of the SMRT primary transcript encoding the interaction domains is subject to alternative splicing that varies the inclusion of the third CoRNR box. The profile in mice includes an abundant, novel SMRT isoform that possesses just one CoRNR box. Mouse tissues therefore express SMRT isoforms containing one, two or three CoRNR boxes. In frogs, the SMRT isoform profile is tissue-specific. The mouse also shows distinct profiles generated by differential expression levels of the SMRT transcript isoforms. The formation of multiple SMRT isoforms and their tissue-specific regulation indicates a mechanism, whereby cells can define the repertoire of transcription factors regulated by SMRT.

  1. Self-assembled Pt2L2 boxes strongly bind G-quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domarco, O; Lötsch, D; Schreiber, J; Dinhof, C; Van Schoonhoven, S; García, M D; Peinador, C; Keppler, B K; Berger, W; Terenzi, A

    2017-01-03

    Supramolecular Pt(ii) quadrangular boxes bind native and G-quadruplex DNA motifs in a size-dependent fashion. Three Pt molecular squares of distinct size show biological activity against cancer cells and heavily influence the expression of genes known to form G-quadruplexes in their promoter regions. The smallest Pt-box displays less activity but more selectivity for a quadruplex formed in the c-Kit gene.

  2. Plasmodium falciparum normocyte binding protein (PfNBP-1) peptides bind specifically to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, John Jairo; Vera, Ricardo; García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Urquiza, Mauricio; Rivera, Zuly; Guzmán, Fanny; Torres, Elizabeth; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2003-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum normocyte binding protein-1 (PfNBP-1), a Plasmodium vivax RBP-1 orthologue is expressed in the apical merozoite area. PfNBP-1 binds directly to human erythrocyte membrane in a sialic acid-dependent but trypsin-resistant way. Erythrocyte binding assays were done with synthetic peptides covering the sequence reported as PfNBP-1. Two specific erythrocyte high activity binding peptides were found: 101VFINDLDTYQYEYFYEWNQ(120), peptide 26332, and 181NTKETYLKELNKKKMLQNKK(200), peptide 26336. These two peptides' binding was saturable and presenting nanomolar affinity constants. The critical binding residues (those residues underlined and highlighted in bold) were determined by competition assays with glycine-scan analogue peptides. These peptides were able to block merozoite in vitro invasion of erythrocytes.

  3. Specific binding and mineralization of calcified surfaces by small peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Daniel K; Hagerman, Elizabeth; Eckert, Randal; He, Jian; Choi, Hyewon; Cao, Nga; Le, Karen; Hedger, Jennifer; Qi, Fengxia; Anderson, Maxwell; Rutherford, Bruce; Wu, Ben; Tetradis, Sotiris; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Several small (dentin phosphoprotein, one of the major noncollagenous proteins thought to be involved in the mineralization of the dentin extracellular matrix during tooth development. These peptides, consisting of multiple repeats of the tripeptide aspartate-serine-serine (DSS), bind with high affinity to calcium phosphate compounds and, when immobilized, can recruit calcium phosphate to peptide-derivatized polystyrene beads or to demineralized human dentin surfaces. The affinity of binding to hydroxyapatite surfaces increases with the number of (DSS)(n) repeats, and though similar repeated sequences-(NTT)(n), (DTT)(n), (ETT)(n), (NSS)(n), (ESS)(n), (DAA)(n), (ASS)(n), and (NAA)(n)-also showed HA binding activity, it was generally not at the same level as the natural sequence. Binding of the (DSS)(n) peptides to sectioned human teeth was shown to be tissue-specific, with high levels of binding to the mantle dentin, lower levels of binding to the circumpulpal dentin, and little or no binding to healthy enamel. Phosphorylation of the serines of these peptides was found to affect the avidity, but not the affinity, of binding. The potential utility of these peptides in the detection of carious lesions, the delivery of therapeutic compounds to mineralized tissues, and the modulation of remineralization is discussed.

  4. Binding of upstream stimulatory factor 1 to the E-box regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jhun, Bongsook; Jung, Sandy Y; Oh, Chad K

    2008-04-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a key regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 levels are markedly elevated in the asthmatic airways. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with allergic asthma. To characterize the mechanisms of the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 expression in mast cells (MCs), a major source of PAI-1 and key effector cells in asthma. Transcription of PAI-1 was assessed by transiently transfecting human MC line (HMC-1) cells with the luciferase-tagged PAI-1 promoters containing the 4G or 5G allele (4G-PAI-1 or 5G-PAI-1 promoter). Upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and the E-box interactions were studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and supershift assays. Expression of USF-1 was determined by Western blot analysis. The 4G-PAI-1 promoter has higher promoter activity than the 5G-PAI-1 promoter in stimulated HMC-1 cells, and the E-box adjacent to the 4G/5G site (E-4G/5G) regulates the genotype-specific PAI-1 transcription. USF-1 binds to the E-4G with greater affinity than to the E-5G. USF-1 level is increased in HMC-1 cells after stimulation, and elevated USF-1 enhances PAI-1 transcription. Overexpression of wild-type USF-1 or dominant-negative USF remedies the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 transcription. Binding of USF-1 to the E-4G/5G regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent PAI-1 expression in MCs.

  5. Design of sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervan, P B

    1986-04-25

    Base sequence information can be stored in the local structure of right-handed double-helical DNA (B-DNA). The question arises as to whether a set of rules for the three-dimensional readout of the B-DNA helix can be developed. This would allow the design of synthetic molecules that bind DNA of any specific sequence and site size. There are four stages of development for each new synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding molecule: design, synthesis, testing for sequence specificity, and reevaluation of the design. This approach has produced bis(distamycin)fumaramide, a synthetic, crescent-shaped oligopeptide that binds nine contiguous adenine-thymine base pairs in the minor groove of double-helical DNA.

  6. A single, specific thymine mutation in the ComK-Binding site severely decreases binding and transcription activation by the competence transcription factor ComK of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanna, Kim A.; Mironczuk, Aleksandra M.; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    The competence transcription factor ComK plays a central role in competence development in Bacillus subtilis by activating the transcription of the K regulon. ComK-activated genes are characterized by the presence of a specific sequence to which ComK binds, a K-box, in their upstream DNA region.

  7. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1

  8. The Y-Box Binding Protein 1 Suppresses Alzheimer’s Disease Progression in Two Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, N. V.; Lyabin, D. N.; Medvinskaya, N. I.; Samokhin, A. N.; Nekrasov, P. V.; Nesterova, I. V.; Aleksandrova, I. Y.; Tatarnikova, O. G.; Bobylev, A. G.; Vikhlyantsev, I. M.; Kukharsky, M. S.; Ustyugov, A. A.; Polyakov, D. N.; Eliseeva, I. A.; Kretov, D. A.; Guryanov, S. G.; Ovchinnikov, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a member of the family of DNA- and RNA binding proteins. It is involved in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent events including cell proliferation and differentiation, stress response, and malignant cell transformation. Previously, YB-1 was detected in neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus, but its precise role in the brain remains undefined. Here we show that subchronic intranasal injections of recombinant YB-1, as well as its fragment YB-11−219, suppress impairment of spatial memory in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice with Alzheimer’s type degeneration and improve learning in transgenic 5XFAD mice used as a model of cerebral amyloidosis. YB-1-treated OBX and 5XFAD mice showed a decreased level of brain β-amyloid. In OBX animals, an improved morphological state of neurons was revealed in the neocortex and hippocampus; in 5XFAD mice, a delay in amyloid plaque progression was observed. Intranasally administered YB-1 penetrated into the brain and could enter neurons. In vitro co-incubation of YB-1 with monomeric β-amyloid (1–42) inhibited formation of β-amyloid fibrils, as confirmed by electron microscopy. This suggests that YB-1 interaction with β-amyloid prevents formation of filaments that are responsible for neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Our data are the first evidence for a potential therapeutic benefit of YB-1 for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26394155

  9. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten

    . We find preference for hydrophobic residues at the peptide C-terminus for all HLA-C molecules. Most molecules were found to have an additional strong anchor at P2 or P3, with auxiliary anchor observed at P1, P2, P3, and P7. The binding affinity is measured for peptides fitting the specificity matrix...

  10. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key ... [Roy S, Dutta S, Khanna K, Singla S and Sundar D 2012 Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. J. Biosci. .... well as protection from HIV infection (Reynolds, et al. 2003).

  11. A Pit-1 Binding Site Adjacent to E-box133 in the Rat PRL Promoter is Necessary for Pulsatile Gene Expression Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sudeep; Ganguly, Surajit; Kumar, Sachin; Boockfor, Fredric R

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence reveals that prolactin gene expression (PRL-GE) in mammotropes occurs in pulses, but the molecular process(es) underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. Earlier, we have identified an E-box (E-box133) in the rat PRL promoter that binds several circadian elements and is critical for this dynamic process. Preliminary analysis revealed a Pit-1 binding site (P2) located immediately adjacent to this E-box133 raising the possibility that some type of functional relationship may exist between these two promoter regions. In this study, using serum shocked GH3 cell culture system to synchronize PRL-GE activity, we determined that Pit-1 gene expression occurred in pulses with time phases similar to that for PRL. Interestingly, EMSA analysis not only confirmed Pit-1 binding to the P2 site, but also revealed an interaction with factor(s) binding to the adjacent E-box133 promoter element. Additionally, down-regulation of Pit-1 by siRNA reduced PRL levels during pulse periods. Thus, using multiple evidences, our results demonstrate clearly that the Pit-1 P2 site is necessary for PRL-GE elaboration. Furthermore, the proximity of this critical Pit-1 binding site (P2) and the E-box133 element coupled with the evidences of a site-to-site protein interactions suggest that the process of PRL-GE pulse activity might involve more dynamic and intricate cross-talks between promoter elements that may span some, or all, of the proximal region of the PRL promoter in driving its pulsatile expression.

  12. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1 and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rodríguez-Lima

    Full Text Available TATA-box binding protein (TBP is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1. Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5 and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene.

  13. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  14. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in E-box motifs ACAT|GTG and ACAC|GTG increases DNA-binding of the B-HLH transcription factor TCF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khund-Sayeed, Syed; He, Ximiao; Holzberg, Timothy; Wang, Jun; Rajagopal, Divya; Upadhyay, Shriyash; Durell, Stewart R; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Weirauch, Matthew T; Rose, Robert; Vinson, Charles

    2016-09-12

    We evaluated DNA binding of the B-HLH family members TCF4 and USF1 using protein binding microarrays (PBMs) containing double-stranded DNA probes with cytosine on both strands or 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) on one DNA strand and cytosine on the second strand. TCF4 preferentially bound the E-box motif (CAN|NTG) with strongest binding to the 8-mer CAG|GTGGT. 5mC uniformly decreases DNA binding of both TCF4 and USF1. The bulkier 5hmC also inhibited USF1 binding to DNA. In contrast, 5hmC dramatically enhanced TCF4 binding to E-box motifs ACAT|GTG and ACAC|GTG, being better bound than any 8-mer containing cytosine. Examination of X-ray structures of the closely related TCF3 and USF1 bound to DNA suggests TCF3 can undergo a conformational shift to preferentially bind to 5hmC while the USF1 basic region is bulkier and rigid precluding a conformation shift to bind 5hmC. These results greatly expand the regulatory DNA sequence landscape bound by TCF4.

  15. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  16. The VirD2 pilot protein of Agrobacterium-transferred DNA interacts with the TATA box-binding protein and a nuclear protein kinase in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakó, László; Umeda, Masaaki; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Schell, Jeff; Koncz, Csaba

    2003-08-19

    The bacterial virulence protein VirD2 plays an important role in nuclear import and chromosomal integration of Agrobacterium-transferred DNA in fungal, plant, animal, and human cells. Here we show that in nuclei of alfalfa cells, VirD2 interacts with and is phosphorylated by CAK2Ms, a conserved plant ortholog of cyclin-dependent kinase-activating kinases. CAK2Ms binds to and phosphorylates the C-terminal regulatory domain of RNA polymerase II largest subunit, which can recruit the TATA box-binding protein. VirD2 is found in tight association with the TATA box-binding protein in vivo. These results indicate that recognition of VirD2 is mediated by widely conserved nuclear factors in eukaryotes.

  17. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  18. RNA Bind-n-Seq: quantitative assessment of the sequence and structural binding specificity of RNA binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nicole; Robertson, Alex; Jangi, Mohini; McGeary, Sean; Sharp, Phillip A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Specific protein-RNA interactions guide post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we describe RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), a method that comprehensively characterizes sequence and structural specificity of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), and its application to the developmental alternative splicing factors RBFOX2, CELF1/CUGBP1 and MBNL1. For each factor, we recovered both canonical motifs and additional near-optimal binding motifs. RNA secondary structure inhibits binding of RBFOX2 and CELF1, while MBNL1 favors unpaired Us but tolerates C/G pairing in motifs containing UGC and/or GCU. Dissociation constants calculated from RBNS data using a novel algorithm correlated highly with values measured by surface plasmon resonance. Motifs identified by RBNS were conserved, were bound and active in vivo, and distinguished the subset of motifs enriched by CLIP-Seq that had regulatory activity. Together, our data demonstrate that RBNS complements crosslinking-based methods and show that in vivo binding and activity of these splicing factors is driven largely by intrinsic RNA affinity. PMID:24837674

  19. Binding of DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 to the 5'-untranslated region of ASH1 mRNA represses localized translation of ASH1 in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianjun; Meng, Xiuhua; Li, Delin; Chen, Shaoyin; Luo, Jianmin; Zhu, Linjie; Singer, Robert H; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-09

    Local translation of specific mRNAs is regulated by dynamic changes in their subcellular localization, and these changes are due to complex mechanisms controlling cytoplasmic mRNA transport. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well suited to studying these mechanisms because many of its transcripts are transported from the mother cell to the budding daughter cell. Here, we investigated the translational control of ASH1 mRNA after transport and localization. We show that although ASH1 transcripts were translated after they reached the bud tip, some mRNAs were bound by the RNA-binding protein Puf6 and were non-polysomal. We also found that the DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 complexed with the untranslated ASH1 mRNA and Puf6. Loss of Dhh1 affected local translation of ASH1 mRNA and resulted in delocalization of ASH1 transcript in the bud. Forcibly shifting the non-polysomal ASH1 mRNA into polysomes was associated with Dhh1 dissociation. We further demonstrated that Dhh1 is not recruited to ASH1 mRNA co-transcriptionally, suggesting that it could bind to ASH1 mRNA within the cytoplasm. Of note, Dhh1 bound to the 5'-UTR of ASH1 mRNA and inhibited its translation in vitro These results suggest that after localization to the bud tip, a portion of the localized ASH1 mRNA becomes translationally inactive because of binding of Dhh1 and Puf6 to the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of ASH1 mRNA. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Beads task vs. box task: The specificity of the jumping to conclusions bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzan, Ryan P; Ephraums, Rachel; Delfabbro, Paul; Andreou, Christina

    2017-09-01

    Previous research involving the probabilistic reasoning 'beads task' has consistently demonstrated a jumping-to-conclusions (JTC) bias, where individuals with delusions make decisions based on limited evidence. However, recent studies have suggested that miscomprehension may be confounding the beads task. The current study aimed to test the conventional beads task against a conceptually simpler probabilistic reasoning "box task" METHODS: One hundred non-clinical participants completed both the beads task and the box task, and the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (PDI) to assess for delusion-proneness. The number of 'draws to decision' was assessed for both tasks. Additionally, the total amount of on-screen evidence was manipulated for the box task, and two new box task measures were assessed (i.e., 'proportion of evidence requested' and 'deviation from optimal solution'). Despite being conceptually similar, the two tasks did not correlate, and participants requested significantly less information on the beads task relative to the box task. High-delusion-prone participants did not demonstrate hastier decisions on either task; in fact, for box task, this group was observed to be significantly more conservative than low-delusion-prone group. Neither task was incentivized; results need replication with a clinical sample. Participants, and particularly those identified as high-delusion-prone, displayed a more conservative style of responding on the novel box task, relative to the beads task. The two tasks, whilst conceptually similar, appear to be tapping different cognitive processes. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to the JTC bias and the theoretical mechanisms thought to underlie it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  2. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  3. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  4. Urinary high-mobility group box-1 associates specifically with lupus nephritis class V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, N R; Blanco, I; Lee, I; Putterman, C; Caricchio, R

    2016-12-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). There is increased HMGB-1 expression in the kidneys and increased levels are observed in serum and urine of patients with LN. This study was performed to determine whether the increased urinary HMGB-1 was specific for active lupus or secondary to renal damage. Urine from 61 lupus patients (32 had active LN and 29 had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with no evidence of LN) and 14 control proteinuric patients (all with hypertension and eight also with diabetes) were included in this study. HMGB-1 was detected by Western blot. Urine protein was normalized to urine creatinine to account for volume of the specimen. Median normalized urine HMGB-1 levels were significantly elevated in LN patients compared to lupus patients without kidney disease (53.81 vs 9.46, p classes, with a significant difference between proliferative and membranous disease (33.4 vs 138.8, p = 0.003). Urine protein to urine creatinine ratio (P/C) correlated with urinary HMGB-1 (r = 0.52, p classes this was true only for membranous disease (r = 0.71, p = 0.022, proliferative, p = 0.63; mixed, p = 0.34). HMGB-1 is elevated in the urine of patients with active LN. Levels are associated with LN class, and higher levels of urinary HMGB-1 are seen in patients with class V when compared to both proliferative and mixed classes. Therefore, urinary HMGB-1 may be suggestive of membranous LN and warrants further evaluation in a large lupus cohort. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. The N-terminal domain of y-box binding protein-1 induces cell cycle arrest in g2/m phase by binding to cyclin d1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Payal; Padala, Mythili K; Cox, John; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2009-01-01

    Y-box binding protein YB-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in cell proliferation, regulation of transcription and translation. Our previous study indicated that disruption of one allele of Chk-YB-1b gene in DT-40 cells resulted in major defects in the cell cycle. The abnormalities seen in heterozygous mutants could be attributed to a dominant negative effect exerted by the disrupted YB-1 allele product. To test this hypothesis the N-terminal sequence of the YB-1 was fused with the third helix of antennapedia and the green fluorescent protein. These purified fusion proteins were introduced into rat hepatoma cells and their effect on cell proliferation was studied. Results indicate that the N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of the YB-1 protein induced the cells to arrest in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and undergo apoptosis. Additional deletion analysis indicated that as few as 26 amino acids of the N-terminus of YB-1 can cause these phenotypic changes. We further demonstrated that this N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of YB-1 sequesters cyclin D1 in the cytoplasm of cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of YB-1 plays a major role in cell cycle progression through G2/M phase of cell cycle.

  6. The N-Terminal Domain of Y-Box Binding Protein-1 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G2/M Phase by Binding to Cyclin D1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Khandelwal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Y-box binding protein YB-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in cell proliferation, regulation of transcription and translation. Our previous study indicated that disruption of one allele of Chk-YB-1b gene in DT-40 cells resulted in major defects in the cell cycle. The abnormalities seen in heterozygous mutants could be attributed to a dominant negative effect exerted by the disrupted YB-1 allele product. To test this hypothesis the N-terminal sequence of the YB-1 was fused with the third helix of antennapedia and the green fluorescent protein. These purified fusion proteins were introduced into rat hepatoma cells and their effect on cell proliferation was studied. Results indicate that the N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of the YB-1 protein induced the cells to arrest in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and undergo apoptosis. Additional deletion analysis indicated that as few as 26 amino acids of the N-terminus of YB-1 can cause these phenotypic changes. We further demonstrated that this N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of YB-1 sequesters cyclin D1 in the cytoplasm of cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of YB-1 plays a major role in cell cycle progression through G2/M phase of cell cycle.

  7. Allosteric regulation of helicase core activities of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by RNA binding to its RNA recognition motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatanga, Brighton; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2017-02-28

    DEAD-box proteins share a structurally similar core of two RecA-like domains (RecA_N and RecA_C) that contain the conserved motifs for ATP-dependent RNA unwinding. In many DEAD-box proteins the helicase core is flanked by ancillary domains. To understand the regulation of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by its C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM), we investigated the effect of RNA binding to the RRM on its position relative to the core, and on core activities. RRM/RNA complex formation substantially shifts the RRM from a position close to the RecA_C to the proximity of RecA_N, independent of RNA contacts with the core. RNA binding to the RRM is communicated to the core, and stimulates ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The conformational space of the core depends on the identity of the RRM-bound RNA. Allosteric regulation of core activities by RNA-induced movement of ancillary domains may constitute a general regulatory mechanism of DEAD-box protein activity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  9. Functional characterization of the ER stress induced X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp-1 in the porcine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Dong-Il

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR is an evolutionary conserved adaptive reaction for increasing cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress conditions. X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp1 is a key transcription factor of UPR that activates genes involved in protein folding, secretion, and degradation to restore ER function. The UPR induced by ER stress was extensively studied in diseases linked to protein misfolding and aggregations. However, in the porcine system, genes in the UPR pathway were not investigated. In this study, we isolated and characterized the porcine Xbp1 (pXbp1 gene in ER stress using porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF cells and porcine organs. ER stress was induced by the treatment of tunicamycin and cell viability was investigated by the MTT assay. For cloning and analyzing the expression pattern of pXbp1, RT-PCR analysis and Western blot were used. Knock-down of pXbp1 was performed by the siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Results We found that the pXbp1 mRNA was the subject of the IRE1α-mediated unconventional splicing by ER stress. Knock-down of pXbp1 enhanced ER stress-mediated cell death in PEF cells. In adult organs, pXbp1 mRNA and protein were expressed and the spliced forms were detected. Conclusions It was first found that the UPR mechanisms and the function of pXbp1 in the porcine system. These results indicate that pXbp1 plays an important role during the ER stress response like other animal systems and open a new opportunity for examining the UPR pathway in the porcine model system.

  10. Identification of High Affinity Polo-like Kinase 1 (Plk1) Polo-box Domain Binding Peptides Using Oxime-based Diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa; Park, Jung-Eun; Qian, Wen-Jian; Lim, Dan; Scharow, Andrej; Berg, Thorsten; Yaffe, Michael B.; Lee, Kyung S.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop improved binding antagonists of the polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domain (PBD), we optimized interactions of the known high affinity 5-mer peptide, PLHSpT using oxime-based post-solid-phase peptide diversification of the N-terminal Pro residue. This allowed us to achieve up to two orders-of-magnitude potency enhancement. An X-ray crystal structure of the highest affinity analogue in complex with Plk1 PBD revealed new binding interactions in a hydrophobic channel that had been occluded in X-ray structures of the unliganded protein. This study represents an important example where amino acid modification by post solid-phase oxime ligation can facilitate the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors by identifying new binding pockets that would not otherwise be accessible to coded amino acid residues. PMID:22292814

  11. DNA binding specificity and cleavage activity of Pacmmar transposase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaurière, Laurence; Chénais, Benoît; Pradier, Elisabeth; Hardivillier, Yann; Renault, Sylvaine; Casse, Nathalie

    2009-08-04

    Mariner-like elements (MLEs) are members of the Tc1/mariner superfamily of transposable elements which transpose by a "cut and paste" mechanism. Most of the MLEs characterized to date are transpositionally inactive due to the accumulation of mutations in their transposase gene. Here, we report the biochemical study of two copies of the Pacmmar element (Pacmmar1.1 and Pacmmar1.2), isolated from the coastal crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus. These two copies present an open reading frame encoding a putative active transposase. Using an in vitro transposition assay, we show that Pacmmar transposases are unable to perform by themselves the transposition reaction. However, we demonstrate by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay that both transposases bind specifically to the inverted terminal repeat of the Pacmmar element. Moreover, an in vitro cleavage assay showed that both transposases have the capacity to cleave the transposon. The in vitro cleavage activity of Pacmmar transposases appears imprecise, suggesting the requirement of specific host factors or the presence of mutations which have modified the cleavage specificity of the enzyme.

  12. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-p...

  13. SrmB, a DEAD-box helicase involved in Escherichia coli ribosome assembly, is specifically targeted to 23S rRNA in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Trubetskoy, Dmitrii; Proux, Florence; Allemand, Fr?d?ric; Dreyfus, Marc; Iost, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins play specific roles in remodeling RNA or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Yet, in vitro, they generally behave as nonspecific RNA-dependent ATPases, raising the question of what determines their specificity in vivo. SrmB, one of the five Escherichia coli DEAD-box proteins, participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Moreover, when overexpressed, it compensates for a mutation in L24, the ribosomal protein (r-protein) thought to initiate assembly. Here, using the ...

  14. MiRNAs regulate oxidative stress related genes via binding to the 3' UTR and TATA-box regions: a new hypothesis for cataract pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changrui; Liu, Zhao; Ma, Le; Pei, Cheng; Qin, Li; Gao, Ning; Li, Jun; Yin, Yue

    2017-08-14

    Age-related cataracts are related to oxidative stress. However, the genome-wide screening of cataract related oxidative stress related genes are not thoroughly investigated. Our study aims to identify cataract regulated miRNA target genes that are related to oxidative stress and to propose a new possible mechanism for cataract formation. Microarrays were used to determine the mRNA expression profiles of both transparent and cataractous lenses. The results were analyzed by significance analyses performed by the microarray software, and bioinformatics analysis was further conducted using Molecular Annotation System. The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) was used to retrieve promoter sequences and identify TATA-box motifs. Online resource miRWalk was exploited to screen for validated miRNAs targeting mRNAs related to oxidative stress. RNAhybrid online tool was applied to predict the binding between significantly regulated miRNAs in cataract lenses and target mRNAs. Oxidative stress pathway was significantly regulated in cataractous lens samples. Pro-oxidative genes were half up-regulated (11/20), with a small number of genes down-regulated (4/20) and the rest of them with no significant change (5/20). Anti-oxidative genes were partly up-regulated (17/69) and partly down-regulated (17/69). Four down-regulated miRNAs (has-miR-1207-5p, has-miR-124-3p, has-miR-204-3p, has-miR-204-5p) were found to target 3' UTR of pro-oxidative genes and could also bind to the TATA-box regions of anti-oxidative genes (with the exception of has-miR-204-3p), whilst two up-regulated miRNAs (has-miR-222-3p, has-miR-378a-3p) were found to target 3' UTR of anti-oxidative genes and could simultaneously bind to the TATA-box regions of pro-oxidative genes. We propose for the first time a hypothesis that cataract regulated miRNAs could contribute to cataract formation not only by targeting 3' UTR but also by targeting TATA-box region of oxidative stress related genes. This results in the

  15. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  16. A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, Shahin; Koldkjaer, Ole G; Møller, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: High-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) has been known as a chromosomal protein for many years. HMGB1 has recently been shown to be a proinflammatory cytokine with a role in the immunopathogenesis of sepsis. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has a central role in the innate...... cell count and neutrophils) were measured with commercially available laboratory techniques. RESULTS: A total of 185 adult patients were included in the study; 154 patients fulfilled our definition of infection. Levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT were higher in infected patients compared with a healthy...

  17. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  18. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, S; Lokhande, N; González, D; Cassill, A; Renthal, R

    2013-02-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins, using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila odorant-binding protein that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in Escherichia coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ∼100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ∼200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ∼90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the Laughlin, Ha, Jones and Smith model of pheromone reception are discussed. © 2012 Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes...... relative to that of the perfectly matched sequence with a corresponding free energy penalty of about 15 kJ mol(-1) bp(-1). The average cost of a single mismatch is therefore estimated to be on the order of or larger than the gain of two matched base pairs, resulting in an apparent binding constant of only...

  20. Transcription factor ThWRKY4 binds to a novel WLS motif and a RAV1A element in addition to the W-box to regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongyun; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Zhibo; Gao, Caiqiu; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yucheng

    2017-08-01

    WRKY transcription factors play important roles in many biological processes, and mainly bind to the W-box element to regulate gene expression. Previously, we characterized a WRKY gene from Tamarix hispida, ThWRKY4, in response to abiotic stress, and showed that it bound to the W-box motif. However, whether ThWRKY4 could bind to other motifs remains unknown. In this study, we employed a Transcription Factor-Centered Yeast one Hybrid (TF-Centered Y1H) screen to study the motifs recognized by ThWRKY4. In addition to the W-box core cis-element (termed W-box), we identified that ThWRKY4 could bind to two other motifs: the RAV1A element (CAACA) and a novel motif with sequence of GTCTA (W-box like sequence, WLS). The distributions of these motifs were screened in the promoter regions of genes regulated by some WRKYs. The results showed that the W-box, RAV1A, and WLS motifs were all present in high numbers, suggesting that they play key roles in gene expression mediated by WRKYs. Furthermore, five WRKY proteins from different WRKY subfamilies in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected and confirmed to bind to the RAV1A and WLS motifs, indicating that they are recognized commonly by WRKYs. These findings will help to further reveal the functions of WRKY proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Using FRET to Measure the Angle at Which a Protein Bends DNA: TBP Binding a TATA Box as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2008-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment that will teach the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) while analyzing protein-induced DNA bending is described. The experiment uses the protein TATA binding protein (TBP), which is a general transcription factor that recognizes and binds specific DNA sequences known as…

  2. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  3. Differential Utilization of TATA Box-binding Protein (TBP) and TBP-related Factor 1 (TRF1) at Different Classes of RNA Polymerase III Promoters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neha; Hung, Ko-Hsuan; Kang, Jin Joo; Barakat, Nermeen H.; Stumph, William E.

    2013-01-01

    In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, RNA polymerase III transcription was found to be dependent not upon the canonical TATA box-binding protein (TBP) but instead upon the TBP-related factor 1 (TRF1) (Takada, S., Lis, J. T., Zhou, S., and Tjian, R. (2000) Cell 101, 459–469). Here we confirm that transcription of fly tRNA genes requires TRF1. However, we unexpectedly find that U6 snRNA gene promoters are occupied primarily by TBP in cells and that knockdown of TBP, but not TRF1, inhibits U6 transcription in cells. Moreover, U6 transcription in vitro effectively utilizes TBP, whereas TBP cannot substitute for TRF1 to promote tRNA transcription in vitro. Thus, in fruit flies, different classes of RNA polymerase III promoters differentially utilize TBP and TRF1 for the initiation of transcription. PMID:23955442

  4. Differential utilization of TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-related factor 1 (TRF1) at different classes of RNA polymerase III promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neha; Hung, Ko-Hsuan; Kang, Jin Joo; Barakat, Nermeen H; Stumph, William E

    2013-09-20

    In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, RNA polymerase III transcription was found to be dependent not upon the canonical TATA box-binding protein (TBP) but instead upon the TBP-related factor 1 (TRF1) (Takada, S., Lis, J. T., Zhou, S., and Tjian, R. (2000) Cell 101, 459-469). Here we confirm that transcription of fly tRNA genes requires TRF1. However, we unexpectedly find that U6 snRNA gene promoters are occupied primarily by TBP in cells and that knockdown of TBP, but not TRF1, inhibits U6 transcription in cells. Moreover, U6 transcription in vitro effectively utilizes TBP, whereas TBP cannot substitute for TRF1 to promote tRNA transcription in vitro. Thus, in fruit flies, different classes of RNA polymerase III promoters differentially utilize TBP and TRF1 for the initiation of transcription.

  5. Specific binding of nerve growth factor to normal and denervated canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D J; Strehlo, B L; Kaye, M P

    1981-11-01

    Preparations of membranes from normal and surgically denervated canine heart were tested for binding of radiolabeled nerve growth factor. Specific binding was detected in both normal and denervated hearts. Binding was nonsaturable and complex for normal atria and ventricles and denervated atria but appeared to be saturable for denervated ventricles. Nerve growth factor bound per microgram of protein was lower in denervated ventricles than normal ventricles, whereas slightly higher binding to denervated atria than normal atria was observed. This binding could not be displaced by cytochrome c, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. The data indicate that a large part of binding to normal ventricles could be due to nerve terminals attached to the heart, but specific binding detected in the denervated ventricles may be an intrinsic property of the tissue itself. These sites may serve as storage or uptake sites to direct sympathetic innervation in the developing or reinnervating myocardium.

  6. An Improved Method for Identifying Specific DNA-Protein-Binding Sites In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangyan; Lu, Huizhi; Wang, Yunguang; Yang, Su; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2017-03-01

    Binding of proteins to specific DNA sequences is essential for a variety of cellular processes such as DNA replication, transcription and responses to external stimuli. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is widely used for determining intracellular DNA fragments bound by a specific protein. However, the subsequent specific or accurate DNA-protein-binding sequence is usually determined by DNA footprinting. Here, we report an alternative method for identifying specific sites of DNA-protein-binding (designated SSDP) in vitro. This technique is mainly dependent on antibody-antigen immunity, simple and convenient, while radioactive isotope labeling and optimization of partial degradation by deoxyribonuclease (DNase) are avoided. As an example, the specific binding sequence of a target promoter by DdrO (a DNA damage response protein from Deinococcus radiodurans) in vitro was determined by the developed method. The central sequence of the binding site could be easily located using this technique.

  7. The DNA-binding box of human SPARTAN contributes to the targeting of Polη to DNA damage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Agnes; Hegedus, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Haracska, Lajos; Burkovics, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate repair of UV-induced DNA damage results in human diseases such as Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is associated with an extremely high risk of skin cancer. A variant form of XP is caused by the absence of Polη, which is normally able to bypass UV-induced DNA lesions in an error-free manner. However, Polη is highly error prone when replicating undamaged DNA and, thus, the regulation of the proper targeting of Polη is crucial for the prevention of mutagenesis and UV-induced cancer formation. Spartan is a novel regulator of the damage tolerance pathway, and its association with Ub-PCNA has a role in Polη targeting; however, our knowledge about its function is only rudimentary. Here, we describe a new biochemical property of purified human SPARTAN by showing that it is a DNA-binding protein. Using a DNA binding mutant, we provide in vivo evidence that DNA binding by SPARTAN regulates the targeting of Polη to damage sites after UV exposure, and this function contributes highly to its DNA-damage tolerance function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. LOVD: easy creation of a locus-specific sequence variation database using an "LSDB-in-a-box" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, Ivo F A C; den Dunnen, Johan T; Taschner, Peter E M

    2005-08-01

    The completion of the human genome project has initiated, as well as provided the basis for, the collection and study of all sequence variation between individuals. Direct access to up-to-date information on sequence variation is currently provided most efficiently through web-based, gene-centered, locus-specific databases (LSDBs). We have developed the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) software approaching the "LSDB-in-a-Box" idea for the easy creation and maintenance of a fully web-based gene sequence variation database. LOVD is platform-independent and uses PHP and MySQL open source software only. The basic gene-centered and modular design of the database follows the recommendations of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) and focuses on the collection and display of DNA sequence variations. With minimal effort, the LOVD platform is extendable with clinical data. The open set-up should both facilitate and promote functional extension with scripts written by the community. The LOVD software is freely available from the Leiden Muscular Dystrophy pages (www.DMD.nl/LOVD/). To promote the use of LOVD, we currently offer curators the possibility to set up an LSDB on our Leiden server. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Identification of Y-box binding protein 1 as a core regulator of MEK/ERK pathway-dependent gene signatures in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Jürchott

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional signatures are an indispensible source of correlative information on disease-related molecular alterations on a genome-wide level. Numerous candidate genes involved in disease and in factors of predictive, as well as of prognostic, value have been deduced from such molecular portraits, e.g. in cancer. However, mechanistic insights into the regulatory principles governing global transcriptional changes are lagging behind extensive compilations of deregulated genes. To identify regulators of transcriptome alterations, we used an integrated approach combining transcriptional profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines treated with inhibitors targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, computational prediction of regulatory elements in promoters of co-regulated genes, chromatin-based and functional cellular assays. We identified commonly co-regulated, proliferation-associated target genes that respond to the MAPK pathway. We recognized E2F and NFY transcription factor binding sites as prevalent motifs in those pathway-responsive genes and confirmed the predicted regulatory role of Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1 by reporter gene, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We also validated the MAPK-dependent gene signature in colorectal cancers and provided evidence for the association of YBX1 with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. This suggests that MEK/ERK-dependent, YBX1-regulated target genes are involved in executing malignant properties.

  10. Virtual box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard, Malthe Kirkhoff

    2007-01-01

    . This paper reports on the design, implementation and initial evaluation of Virtual Box. Virtual Box attempts to create a physical and engaging context in order to support reciprocal interactions with expressive content. An implemented version of Virtual Box is evaluated in a location-aware environment...

  11. HMG-box sequences from microbats homologous to the human SOX30 HMG-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Barragán, M J; Sánchez, A

    2000-01-01

    SOX genes are a family of genes that encode for proteins which are characterised by the presence of a HMG-domain related to that of the mammalian sex-determining gene (SRY). By definition, the DNA binding domain of SOX genes is at least 50% identical to the 79 amino acid HMG domain of the SRY gene. We report here two HMG-box sequences from two microbat species (R. ferrumequinum and P. Pipistrellus) which were PCR amplified using a primer pair specific to the mouse Sry HMG-box. The high percentage of identity of this sequences with the human and mouse SOX30 HMG-box suggests that they are the SOX30 HMG-box for these two bat species.

  12. Identification and polymorphism of Plasmodium vivax RBP-1 peptides which bind specifically to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Marí, Viviana; Ocampo, Marisol; Suarez, Jorge; Lopez, Ramses; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; García, Javier; Rodríuez, Luis E; Vera, Ricardo; Torres, Angela; Laverde, Marilu; Robles, Ana P; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2002-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax merozoite preferentially invades reticulocytes probably using PvRBP-1 as ligand. One hundred and ninety-five, 15-mer peptides has been synthesised from PvRBP-1 sequence; tested in reticulocyte- or erythrocyte-binding assays. Twenty-five peptides (K(d)=76-380 nM) specifically defined four reticulocyte-binding regions. It has been reported that a highly conserved Region-I recombinant fragment binds specifically to reticulocytes. HABP-critical residues for reticulocyte-binding were highly conserved in 20 Colombian P. vivax clinical isolates, suggesting an important biological function. There were six overlapping reticulocyte-binding sites for these peptides according to enzyme sensitivity and mutual competition-binding assays; located on 26- and 41-kDa reticulocyte membrane surface proteins.

  13. BjMYB1, a transcription factor implicated in plant defence through activating BjCHI1 chitinase expression by binding to a W-box-like element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Jia, Shuangwei; Wang, Chunlian; Wang, Fujun; Wang, Fajun; Zhao, Kaijun

    2016-08-01

    We previously identified the W-box-like-4 (Wbl-4) element (GTAGTGACTCAT), one of six Wbl elements in the BjC-P promoter of the unusual chitinase gene BjCHI1 from Brassica juncea, as the core element responsive to fungal infection. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the cognate transcription factor interacting with the Wbl-4 element. Using Wbl-4 as a target, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening of a B. juncea cDNA library and isolated an R2R3-MYB transcription factor designated as BjMYB1. BjMYB1 was localized in the nucleus of plant cells. EMSA assays confirmed that BjMYB1 binds to the Wbl-4 element. Transiently expressed BjMYB1 up-regulated the activity of the BjC-P promoter through its binding to the Wbl-4 element in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves. In B. juncea, BjMYB1 displayed a similar induced expression pattern as that of BjCHI1 upon infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea Moreover, heterogeneous overexpression of BjMYB1 significantly elevated the resistance of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to the fungus B. cinerea These results suggest that BjMYB1 is potentially involved in host defence against fungal attack through activating the expression of BjCHI1 by binding to the Wbl-4 element in the BjC-P promoter. This finding demonstrates a novel DNA target of plant MYB transcription factors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Detection and comparison of specific hemin binding by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins, G R; Wood, D P; Birchmeier, K R

    1997-01-01

    A radioligand assay was designed to detect and compare specific hemin binding by the periodontal anaerobic black-pigmenting bacteria (BPB) Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. The assay included physiological concentrations of the hemin-binding protein rabbit serum albumin (RSA) to prevent self-aggregation and nonspecific interaction of hemin with cellular components. Under these conditions, heme-starved P. intermedia cells (two strains) expressed a single binding site species ...

  15. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  16. Binding of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator to its receptor: residues involved in species specificity and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quax, P H; Grimbergen, J M; Lansink, M; Bakker, A H; Blatter, M C; Belin, D; van Hinsbergh, V W; Verheijen, J H

    1998-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA), particularly when bound to its receptor (UPAR), is thought to play a major role in local proteolytic processes, thus facilitating cell migration as may occur during angiogenesis, neointima and atherosclerotic plaque formation, and tumor cell invasion. To facilitate understanding of the need and function of the UPA/UPAR interaction in cell migration and vascular remodeling, we changed several amino acid residues in UPA so as to interfere with its interaction with its receptor. The receptor-binding domain of UPA has been localized to a region in the growth factor domain between residues 20 and 32. Since the binding of UPA to UPAR appears to be species specific, we used the differences in amino acid sequences in the growth factor domain of UPA between various species to construct a human UPA variant that does not bind to the human UPAR. We substituted Asn22 for its mouse equivalent Tyr by site-directed mutagenesis. This mutant UPA had similar plasminogen activator characteristics as wild-type UPA, including its specific activity and interaction with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. However, no UPA/UPAR complexes could be observed in cross-linking experiments using DFP-treated 125I-labeled mutant UPA and lysates of various cells, including U937 histiocytic lymphoma cells, phorbol myristate acetate-treated human ECs, and mouse LB6 cells transfected with human UPAR cDNA. In direct binding experiments, DFP-treated 125I-labeled mutant UPA could not bind to phorbol myristate acetate-treated ECs, whereas wild-type UPA did bind. Furthermore, a 25-fold excess of wild-type UPA completely prevented the binding of DFP-treated 125I-labeled wild-type UPA to the human receptor on transfected LB6 cells, whereas an equal amount of mutant UPA had only a very small effect. In ligand blotting assays, very weak binding of mutant UPA to human UPAR could be observed. Changing Asn22 into the other amino acid residues alanine or glutamine had no

  17. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. © 2013 The Author.

  19. Specificity and commonality of the phosphoinositide-binding proteome analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungmichel, Stephanie; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play key roles in signaling and disease. Using high-resolution quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified PIP-interacting proteins and profiled their binding specificities toward all seven PIP variants. This analysis revealed 405 PIP-binding proteins, which is greater...... than the total number of phospho- or ubiquitin-binding domains. Translocation and inhibitor assays of identified PIP-binding proteins confirmed that our methodology targets direct interactors. The PIP interactome encompasses proteins from diverse cellular compartments, prominently including the nucleus...

  20. The Remarkably Diverse Family of T-Box Factors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkema, P G

    2017-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple metazoan animal that is widely used as a model to understand the genetic control of development. The completely sequenced C. elegans genome contains 22 T-box genes, and they encode factors that show remarkable diversity in sequence, DNA-binding specificity, and function. Only three of the C. elegans T-box factors can be grouped into the conserved subfamilies found in other organisms, while the remaining factors are significantly diverged and unlike those in most other animals. While some of the C. elegans factors can bind canonical T-box binding elements, others bind and regulate target gene expression through distinct sequences. The nine genetically characterized T-box factors have varied functions in development and morphogenesis of muscle, hypodermal tissues, and neurons, as well as in early blastomere fate specification, cell migration, apoptosis, and sex determination, but the functions of most of the C. elegans T-box factors have not yet been extensively characterized. Like T-box factors in other animals, interaction with a Groucho-family corepressor and posttranslational SUMOylation have been shown to affect C. elegans T-box factor activity, and it is likely that additional mechanisms affecting T-box factor activity will be discovered using the effective genetic approaches in this organism. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Species specific effect of nest-box cleaning on settlement selection decisions in an artificial colony system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehérvári Péter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Selecting a suitable breeding habitats and a nest-site within are crucial decisions birds have to make. Free ranging solitary Kestrels may use public information derived from leftover pellets and prey remnants from previous conspecific breeding attempts to assess location quality. However, this information may also indicate potentially higher nestling ectoparasite load. In colonies where habitat quality is similar for all available nests, the only information of previous nest usage may reflect expected future parasite pressure. In this study we explored whether Kestrels, Red-footed Falcons and Jackdaws rely on nest-material consisting of pellets and prey remnants when choosing a nest in a multi species artificial colony system. We also assessed potential effects of these decisions on reproductive success. We randomly selected and cleaned half (n=102 of all available nest-boxes in each of the studied 4 colonies before the breeding season. We then monitored occupancy, egg-laying date, hatching and fledging success. In case of Red-footed Falcons, we also acquired adult age and nestling condition data. Our results show that Kestrels were more likely to breed in uncleaned nest-boxes, however, eggs laid in cleaned nest-boxes were more likely to develop into fledged nestlings. There was a weak indication that lower hatching rate was responsible for this effect, rather than increased parasite load. Nest box cleaning had no effect on measured variables in case of Red-footed Falcons and Jackdaws. Colonial breeding of Kestrels, the only species to react to nest-box cleaning, is rare and is probably a consequence of extreme nest-site shortage in our study site. We conclude that Kestrels are not adapted to interpret the information carried by pellets and prey-remnants in colony nest-boxes.

  2. Reading RNA methylation codes through methyl-specific binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    N (6)-methyladenosine (m (6)A) is a prevalent modification of eukaryotic mRNAs. It regulates yeast cell fate and is essential to the development and fertility of metazoans. Although its presence in mRNA has been known since the early 1970s, the function of m (6)A remained a mystery until the spate of discoveries in the past three years. Here, we focus on the discovery of m (6)A "readers" (proteins that specifically recognize m (6)A), and their functions in tuning mRNA stability, as well as the broader significance of such m (6)A-dependent regulation of gene expression.

  3. Cross-modal working memory binding and word recognition skills: how specific is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shinmin; Allen, Richard J

    2017-10-04

    Recent research has suggested that the creation of temporary bound representations of information from different sources within working memory uniquely relates to word recognition abilities in school-age children. However, it is unclear to what extent this link is attributable specifically to the binding ability for cross-modal information. This study examined the performance of Grade 3 (8-9 years old) children on binding tasks requiring either temporary association formation of two visual items (i.e., within-modal binding) or pairs of visually presented abstract shapes and auditorily presented nonwords (i.e., cross-modal binding). Children's word recognition skills were related to performance on the cross-modal binding task but not on the within-modal binding task. Further regression models showed that cross-modal binding memory was a significant predictor of word recognition when memory for its constituent elements, general abilities, and crucially, within-modal binding memory were taken into account. These findings may suggest a specific link between the ability to bind information across modalities within working memory and word recognition skills.

  4. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Direct modulation of T-box riboswitch-controlled transcription by protein synthesis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Apostolidi, Maria; Li, Shuang; Lamprinou, Katerina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zhang, Jinwei; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2017-09-29

    Recently, it was discovered that exposure to mainstream antibiotics activate numerous bacterial riboregulators that control antibiotic resistance genes including metabolite-binding riboswitches and other transcription attenuators. However, the effects of commonly used antibiotics, many of which exhibit RNA-binding properties, on the widespread T-box riboswitches, remain unknown. In Staphylococcus aureus, a species-specific glyS T-box controls the supply of glycine for both ribosomal translation and cell wall synthesis, making it a promising target for next-generation antimicrobials. Here, we report that specific protein synthesis inhibitors could either significantly increase T-box-mediated transcription antitermination, while other compounds could suppress it, both in vitro and in vivo. In-line probing of the full-length T-box combined with molecular modelling and docking analyses suggest that the antibiotics that promote transcription antitermination stabilize the T-box:tRNA complex through binding specific positions on stem I and the Staphylococcal-specific stem Sa. By contrast, the antibiotics that attenuate T-box transcription bind to other positions on stem I and do not interact with stem Sa. Taken together, our results reveal that the transcription of essential genes controlled by T-box riboswitches can be directly modulated by commonly used protein synthesis inhibitors. These findings accentuate the regulatory complexities of bacterial response to antimicrobials that involve multiple riboregulators. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  7. Circulating pathogen-associated molecular pattern - binding proteins and High Mobility Group Box protein 1 in nascent metabolic syndrome: implications for cellular Toll-like receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialal, I; Rajamani, U; Adams-Huet, B; Kaur, H

    2014-09-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome, (MetS) a global epidemic, is a state of low grade chronic inflammation and confers an increased risk for diabetes and CVD. We have previously reported increased activity of the pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), TLR2 and TLR4 in MetS. We hypothesized that increased TLR activity in MetS is due in part to increased levels of circulating PAMP-binding proteins, soluble CD14 (sCD14), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and the damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP), High Mobility Group Box protein 1 (HMGB-1). We measured sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 in fasting plasma from nascent MetS (n = 37) and healthy control subjects (n = 32) by ELISA. We also investigated the effects of sCD14 and LBP on TLR4 activity in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Following adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference, sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 levels remained significantly increased in MetS. Also their levels increased with increasing numbers of MetS risk factors. Only sCD14 correlated significantly with monocyte TLR4 protein and activity. None of these soluble biomarkers correlated with TLR2 protein. Both sCD14 and HMGB-1 correlated significantly with HOMA-IR. In LPS primed HAECs, sCD14 compared to LBP, resulted in a greater increase in both TLR4 abundance and inflammatory biomediators (NF-κB, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α). Thus, we make the novel observation that sCD14 reflects increased monocyte TLR4 protein and activity in nascent MetS and by contributing to increased cellular inflammation could explain, in part, the increased risk for diabetes and CVD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Molecular decoy to the Y-box binding protein-1 suppresses the growth of breast and prostate cancer cells whilst sparing normal cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Law

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1 is an oncogenic transcription/translation factor that is activated by phosphorylation at S102 whereby it induces the expression of growth promoting genes such as EGFR and HER-2. We recently illustrated by an in vitro kinase assay that a novel peptide to YB-1 was highly phosphorylated by the serine/threonine p90 S6 kinases RSK-1 and RSK-2, and to a lesser degree PKCα and AKT. Herein, we sought to develop this decoy cell permeable peptide (CPP as a cancer therapeutic. This 9-mer was designed as an interference peptide that would prevent endogenous YB-1(S102 phosphorylation based on molecular docking. In cancer cells, the CPP blocked P-YB-1(S102 and down-regulated both HER-2 and EGFR transcript level and protein expression. Further, the CPP prevented YB-1 from binding to the EGFR promoter in a gel shift assay. Notably, the growth of breast (SUM149, MDA-MB-453, AU565 and prostate (PC3, LNCap cancer cells was inhibited by ∼90% with the CPP. Further, treatment with this peptide enhanced sensitivity and overcame resistance to trastuzumab in cells expressing amplified HER-2. By contrast, the CPP had no inhibitory effect on the growth of normal immortalized breast epithelial (184htert cells, primary breast epithelial cells, nor did it inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. These data collectively suggest that the CPP is a novel approach to suppressing the growth of cancer cells while sparing normal cells and thereby establishes a proof-of-concept that blocking YB-1 activation is a new course of cancer therapeutics.

  9. Physicochemical characteristics of structurally determined metabolite-protein and drug-protein binding events with respect to binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To better understand and ultimately predict both the metabolic activities as well as the signaling functions of metabolites, a detailed understanding of the physical interactions of metabolites with proteins is highly desirable. Focusing in particular on protein binding specificity vs. promiscuity, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties of compound-protein binding events as reported in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We compared the molecular and structural characteristics obtained for metabolites to those of the well-studied interactions of drug compounds with proteins. Promiscuously binding metabolites and drugs are characterized by low molecular weight and high structural flexibility. Unlike reported for drug compounds, low rather than high hydrophobicity appears associated, albeit weakly, with promiscuous binding for the metabolite set investigated in this study. Across several physicochemical properties, drug compounds exhibit characteristic binding propensities that are distinguishable from those associated with metabolites. Prediction of target diversity and compound promiscuity using physicochemical properties was possible at modest accuracy levels only, but was consistently better for drugs than for metabolites. Compound properties capturing structural flexibility and hydrogen-bond formation descriptors proved most informative in PLS-based prediction models. With regard to diversity of enzymatic activities of the respective metabolite target enzymes, the metabolites benzylsuccinate, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine N-oxide, oleoylglycerol, and resorcinol showed very narrow process involvement, while glycine, imidazole, tryptophan, succinate, and glutathione were identified to possess broad enzymatic reaction scopes. Promiscuous metabolites were found to mainly serve as general energy currency compounds, but were identified to also be involved in signaling processes and to appear in diverse organismal systems (digestive and nervous

  10. Physicochemical characteristics of structurally determined metabolite-protein and drug-protein binding events with respect to binding specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To better understand and ultimately predict both the metabolic activities as well as the signaling functions of metabolites, a detailed understanding of the physical interactions of metabolites with proteins is highly desirable. Focusing in particular on protein binding specificity vs. promiscuity, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties of compound-protein binding events as reported in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We compared the molecular and structural characteristics obtained for metabolites to those of the well-studied interactions of drug compounds with proteins. Promiscuously binding metabolites and drugs are characterized by low molecular weight and high structural flexibility. Unlike reported for drug compounds, low rather than high hydrophobicity appears associated, albeit weakly, with promiscuous binding for the metabolite set investigated in this study. Across several physicochemical properties, drug compounds exhibit characteristic binding propensities that are distinguishable from those associated with metabolites. Prediction of target diversity and compound promiscuity using physicochemical properties was possible at modest accuracy levels only, but was consistently better for drugs than for metabolites. Compound properties capturing structural flexibility and hydrogen-bond formation descriptors proved most informative in PLS-based prediction models. With regard to diversity of enzymatic activities of the respective metabolite target enzymes, the metabolites benzylsuccinate, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine N-oxide, oleoylglycerol, and resorcinol showed very narrow process involvement, while glycine, imidazole, tryptophan, succinate, and glutathione were identified to possess broad enzymatic reaction scopes. Promiscuous metabolites were found to mainly serve as general energy currency compounds, but were identified to also be involved in signaling processes and to appear in diverse organismal systems (digestive and nervous

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins. PMID:16131654

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-09-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins.

  13. SOCS3 binds specific receptor-JAK complexes to control cytokine signaling by direct kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Nadia J; Murphy, James M; Liau, Nicholas P D; Varghese, Leila N; Laktyushin, Artem; Whitlock, Eden L; Lucet, Isabelle S; Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2013-04-01

    The inhibitory protein SOCS3 plays a key part in the immune and hematopoietic systems by regulating signaling induced by specific cytokines. SOCS3 functions by inhibiting the catalytic activity of Janus kinases (JAKs) that initiate signaling within the cell. We determined the crystal structure of a ternary complex between mouse SOCS3, JAK2 (kinase domain) and a fragment of the interleukin-6 receptor β-chain. The structure shows that SOCS3 binds JAK2 and receptor simultaneously, using two opposing surfaces. While the phosphotyrosine-binding groove on the SOCS3 SH2 domain is occupied by receptor, JAK2 binds in a phosphoindependent manner to a noncanonical surface. The kinase-inhibitory region of SOCS3 occludes the substrate-binding groove on JAK2, and biochemical studies show that it blocks substrate association. These studies reveal that SOCS3 targets specific JAK-cytokine receptor pairs and explains the mechanism and specificity of SOCS action.

  14. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis.

  15. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC.

  16. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  17. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellis Manolis

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Results Here we analyse the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikatae to study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artefacts of computational motif finding algorithms. Conclusion As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will

  18. Control of Pathogenicity and Disease Specificity of a T-Lymphomagenic Gammaretrovirus by E-Box Motifs but Not by an Overlapping Glucocorticoid Response Element▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejegod, Ditte; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schmidt, Jörg; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2009-01-01

    Although transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family have been shown to regulate enhancers of lymphomagenic gammaretroviruses through E-box motifs, the overlap of an E-box motif (Egre) with the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) has obscured their function in vivo. We report here that Egre, but not the GRE, affects disease induction by the murine T-lymphomagenic SL3-3 virus. Mutating all three copies of Egre prolonged the tumor latency period from 60 to 109 days. Further mutating an E-box motif (Ea/s) outside the enhancer prolonged the latency period to 180 days, suggesting that Ea/s works as a backup site for Egre. While wild-type SL3-3 and GRE and Ea/s mutants exclusively induced T-cell lymphomas with wild-type latencies mainly of the CD4+ CD8− phenotype, Egre as well as the Egre and Ea/s mutants induced B-cell lymphomas and myeloid leukemia in addition to T-cell lymphomas. T-cell lymphomas induced by the two Egre mutants had the same phenotype as those induced by wild-type SL3-3, indicating the incomplete disruption of T-cell lymphomagenesis, which is in contrast to previous findings for a Runx site mutant of SL3-3. Mutating the Egre site or Egre and Ea/s triggered several tumor phenotype-associated secondary enhancer changes encompassing neighboring sites, none of which led to the regeneration of an E-box motif. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for the E-box but not the GRE in T lymphomagenesis by SL3-3, unveil an inherent broader disease specificity of the virus, and strengthen the notion of selection for more potent enhancer variants of mutated viruses during tumor development. PMID:18945767

  19. Sequence analyses of fimbriae subunit FimA proteins on Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and Actinomyces odontolyticus with variant carbohydrate binding specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Karina

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 express type-2 fimbriae (FimA subunit polymers with variant Galβ binding specificities and Actinomyces odontolyticus a sialic acid specificity to colonize different oral surfaces. However, the fimbrial nature of the sialic acid binding property and sequence information about FimA proteins from multiple strains are lacking. Results Here we have sequenced fimA genes from strains of A.naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 4 and genospecies 2 (n = 4, both of which harboured variant Galβ-dependent hemagglutination (HA types, and from A.odontolyticus PK984 with a sialic acid-dependent HA pattern. Three unique subtypes of FimA proteins with 63.8–66.4% sequence identity were present in strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and A. odontolyticus. The generally high FimA sequence identity (>97.2% within a genospecies revealed species specific sequences or segments that coincided with binding specificity. All three FimA protein variants contained a signal peptide, pilin motif, E box, proline-rich segment and an LPXTG sorting motif among other conserved segments for secretion, assembly and sorting of fimbrial proteins. The highly conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs are present in fimbriae proteins from other Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, only strains of genospecies 1 were agglutinated with type-2 fimbriae antisera derived from A. naeslundii genospecies 1 strain 12104, emphasizing that the overall folding of FimA may generate different functionalities. Western blot analyses with FimA antisera revealed monomers and oligomers of FimA in whole cell protein extracts and a purified recombinant FimA preparation, indicating a sortase-independent oligomerization of FimA. Conclusion The genus Actinomyces involves a diversity of unique FimA proteins with conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs, depending on subspecies and associated binding specificity. In addition, a sortase independent

  20. Sequence analyses of fimbriae subunit FimA proteins on Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and Actinomyces odontolyticus with variant carbohydrate binding specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobni, Mirva; Hallberg, Kristina; Öhman, Ulla; Birve, Anna; Persson, Karina; Johansson, Ingegerd; Strömberg, Nicklas

    2006-01-01

    Background Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 express type-2 fimbriae (FimA subunit polymers) with variant Galβ binding specificities and Actinomyces odontolyticus a sialic acid specificity to colonize different oral surfaces. However, the fimbrial nature of the sialic acid binding property and sequence information about FimA proteins from multiple strains are lacking. Results Here we have sequenced fimA genes from strains of A.naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 4) and genospecies 2 (n = 4), both of which harboured variant Galβ-dependent hemagglutination (HA) types, and from A.odontolyticus PK984 with a sialic acid-dependent HA pattern. Three unique subtypes of FimA proteins with 63.8–66.4% sequence identity were present in strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and A. odontolyticus. The generally high FimA sequence identity (>97.2%) within a genospecies revealed species specific sequences or segments that coincided with binding specificity. All three FimA protein variants contained a signal peptide, pilin motif, E box, proline-rich segment and an LPXTG sorting motif among other conserved segments for secretion, assembly and sorting of fimbrial proteins. The highly conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs are present in fimbriae proteins from other Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, only strains of genospecies 1 were agglutinated with type-2 fimbriae antisera derived from A. naeslundii genospecies 1 strain 12104, emphasizing that the overall folding of FimA may generate different functionalities. Western blot analyses with FimA antisera revealed monomers and oligomers of FimA in whole cell protein extracts and a purified recombinant FimA preparation, indicating a sortase-independent oligomerization of FimA. Conclusion The genus Actinomyces involves a diversity of unique FimA proteins with conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs, depending on subspecies and associated binding specificity. In addition, a sortase independent oligomerization of FimA subunit

  1. Bento Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Bento boxes are common objects in Japanese culture, designed to hold enough lunch for one person. They have individual compartments and sometimes multiple tiers for rice, vegetables, and other side dishes. They are made of materials ranging from wood, cloth, aluminum, or plastic. In general, the greater the number of foods, the better the box is…

  2. Arg156 in the AP2-domain exhibits the highest binding activity among the 20 individuals to the GCC box in BnaERF-B3-hy15, a mutant ERF transcription factor from Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhuang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To develop mutants of the ERF factor with more binding activities to the GCC box, we performed in vitro directed evolution by using DNA shuffling and screened mutants through yeast one-hybrid assay. Here, a series of mutants were obtained and used to reveal key amino acids that induce changes in the DNA binding activity of the BnaERF-B3 protein. With the BnaERF-B3-hy15 as the template, we produced 12 mutants which host individual mutation of potential key residues. We found that amino acid 156 is the key site, and the other 18 mutants host the 18 corresponding individual amino acid residues at site 156. Among the 20 individuals comprising WT (Gly156, Mu3 (Arg156, and 18 mutants with other 18 amino acid residues, Arg156 in the AP2-domain is the amino acid residue with the highest binding activity to the GCC box. The structure of the α-helix in the AP2-domain affects the binding activity. Other residues within AP2-domain modulated binding activity of ERF protein, suggesting that these positions are important for binding activity. Comparison of the mutant and wild-type transcription factors revealed the relationship of protein function and sequence modification. Our result provides a potential useful resource for understanding the trans-activation of ERF proteins.

  3. Arg156 in the AP2-Domain Exhibits the Highest Binding Activity among the 20 Individuals to the GCC Box in BnaERF-B3-hy15, a Mutant ERF Transcription Factor from Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jing; Li, Meng-Yao; Wu, Bei; Liu, Yan-Jun; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To develop mutants of the ERF factor with more binding activities to the GCC box, we performed in vitro directed evolution by using DNA shuffling and screened mutants through yeast one-hybrid assay. Here, a series of mutants were obtained and used to reveal key amino acids that induce changes in the DNA binding activity of the BnaERF-B3 protein. With the BnaERF-B3-hy15 as the template, we produced 12 mutants which host individual mutation of potential key residues. We found that amino acid 156 is the key site, and the other 18 mutants host the 18 corresponding individual amino acid residues at site 156. Among the 20 individuals comprising WT (Gly156), Mu3 (Arg156), and 18 mutants with other 18 amino acid residues, Arg156 in the AP2-domain is the amino acid residue with the highest binding activity to the GCC box. The structure of the α-helix in the AP2-domain affects the binding activity. Other residues within AP2-domain modulated binding activity of ERF protein, suggesting that these positions are important for binding activity. Comparison of the mutant and wild-type transcription factors revealed the relationship of protein function and sequence modification. Our result provides a potential useful resource for understanding the trans-activation of ERF proteins.

  4. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela [Department of Life Sciences and the NIBN, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Israelson, Adrian [Department of Physiology, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda, E-mail: vardasb@bgu.ac.il [Department of Life Sciences and the NIBN, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities but not the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca{sup 2+}, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca{sup 2+} as a key bio-regulator.

  5. Plasmodium vivax MSP-1 peptides have high specific binding activity to human reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis Eduardo; Urquiza, Mauricio; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Suárez, Jorge; García, Javier; Vera, Ricardo; Puentes, Alvaro; López, Ramses; Pinto, Martha; Rivera, Zuly; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-01-31

    Plasmodium vivax merozoites have high preferential ability to interact with and invade reticulocytes, although these cells correspond to only 2% of the red blood cells (RBC) population. P. vivax merozoite surface protein-1 (Pv-MSP-1) is believed to have an important role in attachment and invasion process. Using 88 non-overlapping 20-mer peptides, covering the entire Pv-MSP-1 Belem strain sequence, RBC and reticulocyte binding assays were performed. Fourteen sequences were identified with high specific binding activity to reticulocytes, but only three had high specific binding activity to mature erythrocytes. These peptides showed affinity constant values between 20 and 150nM, indicating a strong interaction between these sequences and reticulocyte receptors. Critical residues in binding to reticulocytes for these peptides were determined by competition binding assays with glycine scanning analogues. All high binding peptides bind to reticulocyte surface proteins having a molecular mass of around 18-20kDa which are not present in mature RBC. Interestingly, some high activity binding peptides (HABPs) are located close to the hypothesised 42 and 19kDa fragment cleavage sites for this protein, suggesting that these sequences have an important role in target cell attachment and invasion process by Pv-MSP-1.HABPs may be clustered in two regions, with region I being located between amino acids 280-719, and region II between amino acids 1060-1599 with higher than 25% identity level. A P. falciparum MSP-1 antigenic domain binds to RBCs and inhibits parasite invasion. Peptides 1721 and 1724 bind with high activity to reticulocytes in homologous Pv-MSP-1, suggesting similar functions for these two sequences.

  6. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  7. Bee species-specific nesting material attracts a generalist parasitoid: implications for co-occurring bees in nest box enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macivor, J Scott; Salehi, Baharak

    2014-08-01

    Artificial nests (e.g., nest boxes) for bees are increasingly being used to contribute to nesting habitat enhancement for bees that use preexisting cavities to provision brood. They usually incorporate additional nesting materials that vary by species. Cavity-nesting bees are susceptible to brood parasitoids that recognize their host(s) using visual and chemical cues. Understanding the range of cues that attract parasitoids to bee nests, including human-made analogues, is important if we wish to control parasitism and increase the potential value of artificial nests as habitat-enhancement strategies. In this study, we investigated the cues associated with the orientation of the generalist brood parasitoid Monodontomerus obscurus Westwood (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) to the nests of a common cavity-nesting resin bee Megachile campanulae (Robertson) (Megachilidae). The parasitoids were reared from previously infested M. campanulae brood cells and placed into choice trials where they were presented with pairs of different nest material cues. Among different materials tested, we found that Mo. obscurus was most attracted to fresh resin collected directly from Pinus strobus trees followed by previously used resin collected from the bee nest. The parasitoid also attacked other bee species in the same nest boxes, including those that do not use resin for nesting. Our findings suggest that M. campanulae could act as a magnet, drawing parasites away from other bee hosts co-occurring in nest boxes, or, as an attractant of Mo. obscurus to nest boxes, increasing attacks on co-occurring host bee species, potentially undermining bee diversity enhancement initiatives.

  8. An analysis of the sequence requirements of EDEN-BP for specific RNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnet-Corven, Sylvie; Audic, Yann; Omilli, Francis; Osborne, Howard Beverley

    2002-01-01

    International audience; EDEN-BP (embryo deadenylation element-binding protein) binds specifically to the EDEN motif in the 3'-untranslated regions of maternal mRNAs and targets these mRNAs for deadenylation and translational repression in Xenopus laevis embryos. EDEN-BP contains three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and is related to the elav family of RNA-binding proteins. In the present study we show that the two N-terminal RRMs of EDEN-BP are necessary for the interaction with EDEN as well a...

  9. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Niessen, Carien M; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domai...

  10. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  11. FOXO3a Expression Regulated by ERK Signaling is Inversely Correlated With Y-Box Binding Protein-1 Expression in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Kenjiro; Shiota, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Masaaki; Abe, Tatsuro; Kohashi, Kenichi; Yokomizo, Akira; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-02-01

    FOXO3a is a member of the forkhead O transcription factors. FOXO3a induces the factors that contribute to cell cycle arrest and is considered a tumor suppressor in several malignant tumors. Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is a multifunctional protein whose high expression is correlated with poor prognoses in various malignant tumors. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between FOXO3a and YB-1 to validate their functional roles in prostate cancer. Western blotting and cytotoxicity assays were conducted in prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, and 22Rv1 cells. We also evaluated the protein expressions of FOXO3a and YB-1 in human prostate cancer tissues, using radical prostatectomy specimens. Then, we investigated the correlations between protein expressions and clinicopathologic parameters. We found that both FOXO3a and YB-1 proteins were phosphorylated by ERK signaling, resulting in FOXO3a inactivation and YB-1 activation in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells. Inversely, inhibition of MEK or treatment with metformin activated FOXO3a through inactivation of ERK signaling and suppressed the viability of LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In immunohistochemical analysis, FOXO3a nuclear expression was inversely correlated with YB-1 nuclear expression (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, high FOXO3a nuclear expression was inversely correlated with a higher Gleason grade (P < 0.0001) and higher preoperative PSA (P = 0.0437). These results showed that in prostate cancer, FOXO3a, and YB-1 play inverse reciprocal roles as a tumor-suppressor gene and oncogene, respectively, through their master regulator ERK. Prostate 77:145-153, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 and transforming growth factor-beta2 expression in bladder cancer tissue in comparison with healthy adjacent tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mahdavinezhad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The fifth most common cancer is allocated to bladder cancer (BC worldwide. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of BC invasion and metastasis to identify target therapeutic strategies will improve disease survival. So the aim of this study was to measure expression rate of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1 and transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2 mRNA in tissue samples of patients with BC and its healthy adjacent tissue samples and their association with muscle invasion, size and grade of the tumor. Materials and Methods: Tissue samples were collected from 35 newly diagnosed untreated patients with BC from 2013 to 2014. Total RNA was extracted from about 50-mg tissue samples using TRIzol reagent. TAKARA SYBR Premix EX Tag II was applied to determine the rate of mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. To obtain final validation, PCR product of ZEB1 and TGF-β2 were sequenced. STATA 11 software was used to analyze the data. Results: The expression level of ZEB1 in tumor samples was significantly more than of in healthy adjacent tissue samples. Up-regulation of TGF-β2 showed a strong association with muscle invasion (p=0.017. There was also demonstrated a relationship between over expression of ZEB1 with the tumor size (p=0.050. Conclusions: It looks ZEB1 and TGF-β2 had a role in BC patients. In this study ZEB1 expression was higher in BC tissues than that of in healthy control tissues. There was demonstrated a markedly association between overexpression of TGF-β2 and muscle invasion. Therefore, they are supposed to be candidate as potential biomarkers for early detection and progression of BC.

  13. Decreased cytoplasmic X-box binding protein-1 expression is associated with poor prognosis and overall survival in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Ting; Hsing, Ming-Tai; Yeh, Chung-Min; Chen, Chih-Jung; Yang, Jia-Sin; Yeh, Kun-Tu

    2018-01-02

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cancer of the oral cavity. In spite of advancements in surgical, chemoradiological and targeted therapies, these therapeutic strategies still have had little impact on survival rates. X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) is a potent transcription factor that is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, which itself is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress as a method to restore cellular homeostasis. The role XBP-1 plays in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has yet to be determined. In this study, we used molecular and immunohistochemical analyses to investigate the role of XBP-1 protein playing in the OSCC carcinogenesis. We used immunohistochemical analyses to investigate XBP-1 expression in 255 OSCC tissue specimens, as well as migration and invasion assays with XBP-1 siRNA transfection of oral cancer cell lines to confirm its role in OSCC. The XBP-1 immunostaining was dichotomized as low-level expression and high-level expression. We found that low-level cytoplasmic XBP-1expression was significantly correlated with larger tumor size (p=0.047), more advanced clinical stage (pCox regression analysis revealed that cytoplasmic XBP-1 expression was a prognostic factor for overall survival of patients with OSCC. We also found that inhibition of XBP-1 promoted OSCC cell migration and invasion. Our results suggest that XBP-1 expression may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of OSCC and that targeting XBP-1 may be a sound therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Binding specificity of the G1/S transcriptional regulators in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Harris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G1/S transcriptional regulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three main transcriptional components, Swi4, Swi6 and Mbp1. These proteins constitute two transcription factor complexes that regulate over 300 G1/S transcripts, namely SBF (Swi4-Swi6 and MBF (Mbp1-Swi6. SBF and MBF are involved in regulating largely non-overlapping sets of G1/S genes via clearly distinct mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we establish and confirm protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions using specific polyclonal antisera to whole Swi6 and to the C-terminal domains of related proteins Swi4 and Mbp1. Our data confirm the protein-protein binding specificity of Swi4 and Mbp1 to Swi6 but not to each other, and support the binding specificity of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi5 to SBF and of the corepressor Nrm1 to MBF. We also show the DNA binding preference of Swi4 to the CLN2 promoter and Mbp1 to the RNR1 promoter, while Swi6 binds both promoters. Finally, we establish the binding dynamics of Swi4 and Whi5 to the CLN2 promoter during the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data confirm the binding specificity of the G1/S transcriptional regulators. Whereas previous observations were made using tagged Swi4, Swi6 and Mbp1, here we use specific polyclonal antisera to reestablish the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions of these G1/S transcriptional components. Our data also reveal the dynamic changes in promoter binding of Swi4 during the cell cycle, which suggests a possible positive feedback loop involving Swi4.

  15. Achieving peptide binding specificity and promiscuity by loops: case of the forkhead-associated domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Chang, Chia-En A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of a series of cellular events requires specific protein-protein interactions, which are usually mediated by modular domains to precisely select a particular sequence from diverse partners. However, most signaling domains can bind to more than one peptide sequence. How do proteins create promiscuity from precision? Moreover, these complex interactions typically occur at the interface of a well-defined secondary structure, α helix and β sheet. However, the molecular recognition primarily controlled by loop architecture is not fully understood. To gain a deep understanding of binding selectivity and promiscuity by the conformation of loops, we chose the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as our model system. The domain can bind to diverse peptides via various loops but only interact with sequences containing phosphothreonine (pThr). We applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for multiple free and bound FHA domains to study the changes in conformations and dynamics. Generally, FHA domains share a similar folding structure whereby the backbone holds the overall geometry and the variety of sidechain atoms of multiple loops creates a binding surface to target a specific partner. FHA domains determine the specificity of pThr by well-organized binding loops, which are rigid to define a phospho recognition site. The broad range of peptide recognition can be attributed to different arrangements of the loop interaction network. The moderate flexibility of the loop conformation can help access or exclude binding partners. Our work provides insights into molecular recognition in terms of binding specificity and promiscuity and helpful clues for further peptide design.

  16. Specific binding of 15 HETE to lymphocytes. Effects on the fluidity of plasmatic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexmain, S; Gualde, N; Aldigier, J C; Motta, C; Chable-Rabinovitch, H; Rigaud, M

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding of mouse lymphocytes for 15 HETE was examined by incubating cells with [14C]-15 HETE, 1 X 10(-8) to 1 X 10(-10)M. It was observed that the specific binding of radiolabeled 15 HETE is a function of time, of temperature and is modified by Ca2+ and dithiothreitol. When a fluorescent probe was embedded in the phospholipid core of the lymphocyte membrane and its motion analysed by fluorescence polarization, it was observed that 15 HETE increases the viscosity of the plasmatic membrane.

  17. DNA binding by the plant-specific NAC transcription factors in crystal and solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Ditte Hededam; Lindemose, Søren; Grossmann, J. Günter

    2012-01-01

    angle X-ray scattering on complexes with oligonucleotides, mutagenesis and (DNase I and uranyl photo-) footprinting, is combined to form a structural view of DNA-binding, and for the first time provide experimental evidence for the speculated relationship between plant-specific NAC proteins, WRKY....... The structure of the DNA-binding NAC domain of ANAC019 has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography, revealing a dimeric and predominantly ß-fold structure, but the mode of binding to cognate DNA has remained elusive. In the present study, information from low resolution X-ray structures and small...... transcription factors and the mammalian GCM (Glial cell missing) transcription factors, which all use a ß-strand motif for DNA-binding. The structure shows that the NAC domain inserts the edge of its core ß-sheet into the major groove, while leaving the DNA largely undistorted. The structure of the NAC-DNA...

  18. Factors influencing the specificity of inhibitor binding to the human and malaria parasite dihydroorotate dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedingfield, Paul T P; Cowen, Deborah; Acklam, Paul; Cunningham, Fraser; Parsons, Mark R; McConkey, Glenn A; Fishwick, Colin W G; Johnson, A Peter

    2012-06-28

    The de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase is an emerging drug target for the treatment of malaria. In this context a key property of Plasmodium falciparum DHODH (PfDHODH) is that it can be selectively inhibited over its human homologue (HsDHODH). However, HsDHODH is also a validated drug target for autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. Here a series of novel inhibitors is described that includes compounds that switch specificity between the two enzymes as a result of small alterations in chemical structure. Structure-activity relationship (SAR), crystallography, docking, and mutagenesis studies are used to examine the binding modes of the compounds within the two enzymes and to reveal structural changes induced by inhibitor binding. Within this series, compounds with therapeutically relevant HsDHODH activity are described and their binding modes characterized using X-ray crystallography, which reveals a novel conformational shift within the inhibitor binding site.

  19. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  20. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  1. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domains of either human E-cadherin or Xenopus C-cadherin, and the specificity of adhesion was compared with cell-sorting assays. None of the different cadherin-expressing cells exhibited any adhesive specificity toward either of the two purified cadherin substrates, even though these cadherins differ considerably in their primary sequence. In addition, all cells exhibited similar strengthening of adhesion on both substrates. However, this lack of adhesive specificity did not determine whether different cadherin-expressing cells would sort from each other, and the tendency to sort was not predictable by the extent of sequence diversity in their extracellular domains. These results show that cadherins are far more promiscuous in their adhesive-binding capacity than had been expected and that the ability to sort out must be determined by mechanisms other than simple adhesive-binding specificity. PMID:11790800

  3. T-Box Genes in Human Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Brook, J D; Wilsdon, A

    2017-01-01

    T-box genes are important development regulators in vertebrates with specific patterns of expression and precise roles during embryogenesis. They encode transcription factors that regulate gene transcription, often in the early stages of development. The hallmark of this family of proteins is the presence of a conserved DNA binding motif, the "T-domain." Mutations in T-box genes can cause developmental disorders in humans, mostly due to functional deficiency of the relevant proteins. Recent studies have also highlighted the role of some T-box genes in cancer and in cardiomyopathy, extending their role in human disease. In this review, we focus on ten T-box genes with a special emphasis on their roles in human disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TCF-1, a T cell-specific transcription factor of the HMG box family, interacts with sequence motifs in the TCR beta and TCR delta enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwegel, M A; van de Wetering, M L; Holstege, F C; Prosser, H M; Owen, M J; Clevers, H C

    1991-11-01

    We have recently identified and cloned TCF-1, a T cell-specific transcription factor with specificity for the AACAAAG motif in the CD3 epsilon enhancer and for the TTCAAAG motif in the TCR alpha enhancer. TCF-1 belongs to the family of transcription-regulating proteins which share a region of homology termed the HMG-box. Here, we show by gel retardation analysis that TCF-1 specifically recognizes the T beta 5 element of the TCR beta enhancer and the T delta 7 element of the TCR delta enhancer. Comparison of the sequences of all elements recognized by TCF-1 defines a consensus motif A/T A/T C A A/G A G. These observations imply that TCF-1 is involved in the control of several T cell-specific genes and might thus play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of the mature T cell phenotype.

  5. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng (NIH); (Beijing U); (UNC)

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  6. Receptor binding specificity of recent human H3N2 influenza viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Richard D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human influenza viruses are known to bind to sialic acid linked α2-6 to galactose, but the binding specificity beyond that linkage has not been systematically examined. H3N2 human influenza isolates lost binding to chicken red cells in the 1990s but viruses isolated since 2003 have re-acquired the ability to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes. We have investigated specificity of binding, changes in hemagglutinin sequence of the recent viruses and the role of sialic acid in productive infection. Results Viruses that agglutinate, or do not agglutinate, chicken red cells show identical binding to a Glycan Array of 264 oligosaccharides, binding exclusively to a subset of α2-6-sialylsaccharides. We identified an amino acid change in hemagglutinin that seemed to correlate with chicken red cell binding but when tested by mutagenesis there was no effect. Recombinant hemagglutinins expressed on Sf-9 cells bound chicken red cells but the released recombinant baculoviruses agglutinated only human red cells. Similarly, an isolate that does not agglutinate chicken red cells show hemadsorption of chicken red cells to infected MDCK cells. We suggest that binding of chicken red cells to cell surface hemagglutinin but not to virions is due to a more favorable hemagglutinin density on the cell surface. We investigated whether a virus specific for α2-6 sialyloligosaccharides shows differential entry into cells that have varying proportions of α2-6 and α2-3 sialic acids, including human A549 and HeLa cells with high levels of α2-6 sialic acid, and CHO cells that have only α2-3 sialic acid. We found that the virus enters all cell types tested and synthesizes viral nucleoprotein, localized in the nucleus, and hemagglutinin, transported to the cell surface, but infectious progeny viruses were released only from MDCK cells. Conclusion Agglutination of chicken red cells does not correlate with altered binding to any oligosaccharide on the Glycan

  7. Thermodynamics of the fragile X mental retardation protein RGG box interactions with G quartet forming RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Kimberly J; Lackey, Patrick E; Evans, Genevieve L; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2006-07-11

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is the result of an unstable expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5' UTR of the fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) gene. The abnormal hypermethylation of the expanded CGG repeats causes the transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene and, consequently, the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA binding protein that binds to G quartet forming RNA using its RGG box motif. In this study we have performed a thermodynamic analysis of the interactions between the FMRP RGG box domain and Sc1, an RNA molecule which had been previously shown to be bound with high affinity by both the full-length FMRP and by its RGG box domain. We have determined that the association between the FMRP RGG box and Sc1 RNA is dominated by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions, with minor contributions from electrostatic interactions, and that the FMRP RGG box binding increases the stability of the G quartet RNA structure significantly. Interestingly, we found that the G quartet recognition is necessary but not sufficient for the FMRP RGG box binding to this RNA target, indicating that additional interactions of the peptide, possibly with the stem and/or stem-G quartet junction region, are required. Our results also indicate that the G quartet RNA recognition is not a general feature of the RGG box motif but rather carries some sequence, protein and/or RNA, specificity.

  8. The binding problem in population neurodynamics: a network model for stimulus-specific coherent oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlásek, J

    1998-12-01

    A hypothesis is presented that coherent oscillatory discharges of spatially distributed neuronal groups (the supposed binding mechanism) are the result of the convergence of stimulus-dependent activity in modality-specific afferent pathways with oscillatory activity generated in unspecific sensory systems. This view is supported by simulation experiments on model networks.

  9. Specific Binding of Liposomal Nanoparticles through Inverse Electron-Demand Diels-Alder Click Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Christian; Iacono, Pasquale; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Kircher, Moritz F.; Reiner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a method to specifically bind liposomal radiopharmaceuticals to a CoCrMo alloy, which can be used in arterial stents, via an irreversible inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction. Inspired by recent accomplishments in pre-targeted imaging using tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene click

  10. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data...

  11. Griffonia simplicifolia lectins bind specifically to endothelial cells and some epithelial cells in mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L

    1987-04-01

    The binding of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I (GSA-I) and the isolectins GSA-I-AB3 and GSA-I-B4, having affinity for some alpha-D-galactosyl and N-acetyl galactosaminyl residues was studied in different mouse tissues. In brain, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle, the GSA-I-lectin conjugates showed prominent binding only to blood vessel endothelia. Similarly, in the liver and kidney cortex the GSA-I-conjugates selectively reacted with endothelial cells of the sinusoids and with intertubular and glomerular capillaries, respectively. However, a strong reactivity with the GSA-I-conjugates was additionally seen in the acinar cells of the pancreas, in the stratified squamous epithelia of skin and tongue, and in transitional epithelium. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis combined with the lectin-blotting technique indicated that a similar set of glycoproteins are responsible for the GSA-I binding, even in different tissues. Another lectin with specificity for alpha-D-galactose, the Maclura pomifera agglutinin, displayed a distinctly different distribution of binding sites, mainly in the basement membranes, of all mouse tissues studied. The results suggest that some alpha-D-galactosyl residues, recognized by the binding of GSA-I lectins, are preferentially expressed in endothelial cells of mouse tissues, and also provide further evidence that endothelial cells can present a highly specific surface glycosylation pattern.

  12. RNA-binding specificity landscape of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein PPR10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rafael G; Rojas, Margarita; Montgomery, Michael P; Gribbin, Kyle P; Barkan, Alice

    2017-04-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins comprise a large family of helical repeat proteins that influence gene expression in mitochondria and chloroplasts. PPR tracts can bind RNA via a modular one repeat-one nucleotide mechanism in which the nucleotide is specified by the identities of several amino acids in each repeat. This mode of recognition, the so-called PPR code, offers opportunities for the prediction of native PPR binding sites and the design of proteins to bind specified RNAs. However, a deep understanding of the parameters that dictate the affinity and specificity of PPR-RNA interactions is necessary to realize these goals. We report a comprehensive analysis of the sequence specificity of PPR10, a protein that binds similar RNA sequences of ∼18 nucleotides (nt) near the chloroplast atpH and psaJ genes in maize. We assessed the contribution of each nucleotide in the atpH binding site to PPR10 affinity in vitro by analyzing the effects of single-nucleotide changes at each position. In a complementary approach, the RNAs bound by PPR10 from partially randomized RNA pools were analyzed by deep sequencing. The results revealed three patches in which nucleotide identity has a major impact on binding affinity. These include 5 nt for which protein contacts were not observed in a PPR10-RNA crystal structure and 4 nt that are not explained by current views of the PPR code. These findings highlight aspects of PPR-RNA interactions that pose challenges for binding site prediction and design. © 2017 Miranda et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Deep convolutional neural networks for pan-specific peptide-MHC class I binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngmahn; Kim, Dongsup

    2017-12-28

    Computational scanning of peptide candidates that bind to a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can speed up the peptide-based vaccine development process and therefore various methods are being actively developed. Recently, machine-learning-based methods have generated successful results by training large amounts of experimental data. However, many machine learning-based methods are generally less sensitive in recognizing locally-clustered interactions, which can synergistically stabilize peptide binding. Deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) is a deep learning method inspired by visual recognition process of animal brain and it is known to be able to capture meaningful local patterns from 2D images. Once the peptide-MHC interactions can be encoded into image-like array(ILA) data, DCNN can be employed to build a predictive model for peptide-MHC binding prediction. In this study, we demonstrated that DCNN is able to not only reliably predict peptide-MHC binding, but also sensitively detect locally-clustered interactions. Nonapeptide-HLA-A and -B binding data were encoded into ILA data. A DCNN, as a pan-specific prediction model, was trained on the ILA data. The DCNN showed higher performance than other prediction tools for the latest benchmark datasets, which consist of 43 datasets for 15 HLA-A alleles and 25 datasets for 10 HLA-B alleles. In particular, the DCNN outperformed other tools for alleles belonging to the HLA-A3 supertype. The F1 scores of the DCNN were 0.86, 0.94, and 0.67 for HLA-A*31:01, HLA-A*03:01, and HLA-A*68:01 alleles, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other tools. We found that the DCNN was able to recognize locally-clustered interactions that could synergistically stabilize peptide binding. We developed ConvMHC, a web server to provide user-friendly web interfaces for peptide-MHC class I binding predictions using the DCNN. ConvMHC web server can be accessible via http://jumong.kaist.ac.kr:8080/convmhc

  14. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Paramelle

    Full Text Available Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the

  15. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  16. Specific /sup 3/H-DMCM binding to a non-benzodiazepine binding site after silver ion treatment of rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honore, T.; Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1984-11-26

    Specific binding of the BZ-receptor ligand /sup 3/H-DMCM to rat cortical membranes was dramatically enhanced by preincubation of the homogenate with 0.1 mM silver (Ag/sup +/) nitrate. The binding was completely inhibited by midazolam. Nevertheless, the pharmacological specificity of the Ag/sup +/-enhanced /sup 3/H-DMCM binding was different from that of BZ-receptors. Furthermore, the B/sub max/ value, the regional distribution and the molecular target size determined by radiation inactivation analysis of the Ag/sup +/-enhanced binding site were different from those of BZ-receptors. The results indicate that Ag/sup +/-enhanced /sup 3/H-DMCM binding represent a high affinity metal complex formation between /sup 3/H-DMCM and an unknown brain specific protein of approximately 100,000 daltons molecular weight. 11 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  17. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...... of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan......-specific methods, PickPocket was shown to be robust both when data is scarce and when the similarity to MHC molecules with characterized binding specificity is low. A consensus method combining the PickPocket and NetMHCpan methods was shown to achieve superior predictive performance. This study demonstrates how...

  18. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-05-31

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1 and -2, respectively), and their receptors (IR and IGF-1R) are the key elements of a complex hormonal system that is essential for the development and functioning of humans. The C and D domains of IGFs (absent in insulin) likely play important roles in the differential binding of IGF-1 and -2 to IGF-1R and to the isoforms of IR (IR-A and IR-B) and specific activation of these receptors. Here, we attempted to probe the impact of IGF-1 and IGF-2 D domains (DI and DII, respectively) and the IGF-2 C domain (CII) on the receptor specificity of these hormones. For this, we made two types of insulin hybrid analogues: (i) with the C-terminus of the insulin A chain extended by the amino acids from the DI and DII domains and (ii) with the C-terminus of the insulin B chain extended by some amino acids derived from the CII domain. The receptor binding affinities of these analogues and their receptor autophosphorylation potentials were characterized. Our results indicate that the DI domain has a more negative impact than the DII domain does on binding to IR, and that the DI domain Pro-Leu-Lys residues are important factors for a different IR-A versus IR-B binding affinity of IGF-1. We also showed that the additions of amino acids that partially "mimic" the CII domain, to the C-terminus of the insulin B chain, change the binding and autophosphorylation specificity of insulin in favor of the "metabolic" IR-B isoform. This opens new venues for rational enhancement of insulin IR-B specificity by modifications beyond the C-terminus of its B chain.

  19. Measurement of specific [3H]-ouabain binding to different types of human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, Arnold; Oh, V M; Taylor, John E.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the specific binding of [3H]-ouabain to intact mononuclear leucocytes (82% lymphocytes) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes. In both types of cells [3H]-ouabain binding was saturable, confined to a single site of high affinity, slow to reach equilibrium, slow to reverse, temperature...... were expressed per square micron of cell surface area the difference between the two cell types was proportionately greater (83 and 186 sites per micron 2 respectively). We conclude that the [3H]-ouabain binding sites on mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leucocytes are similar in nature, but different...... in both number and density on the cell surface. Measurements of Bmax in mixed cell populations should therefore take account of cell type as well as cell size and number....

  20. Displacement of specific serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide binding by Ergalgin, a new antiserotonin drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelszner, W

    1980-01-01

    [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) bind with a high affinity, KD = 12 nM and 6 nM, respectively, to distinct receptors of rat caudate membranes in vitro. Displacement experiments with unlabeled serotonin and LSD support the hypothesis of serotonin receptors existing in an agonist and antagonist state. Methysergide and Ergalgin display quite similar potencies in displacing [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-LSD from their specific binding sites (Ki = 46,7 and 53,4 nM; 22,3 and 36,5 nM, respectively). Contrary to pharmacological findings these binding results are in favour of mixed agonist/antagonist properties of these compounds.

  1. Enhancement of damage-specific DNA binding of XPA by interaction with the ERCC1 DNA repair protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagai; M. Saijo (Masafumi); I. Kuraoka; T. Matsuda (Toshiro); N. Kodo (Naohiko); Y. Nakatsu (Yoshimichi); T. Mimaki; M. Mino; M. Biggerstaff (Maureen); R.D. Wood (Richard); A.M. Sijbers (Anneke); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe human XPA and ERCC1 proteins, which are involved in early steps of nucleotide excision repair of DNA, specifically interacted in an in vitro binding assay and a yeast two-hybrid assay. A stretch of consecutive glutamic acid residues in XPA was needed for binding to ERCC1. Binding of

  2. The fine specificity of mannose-binding and galactose-binding lectins revealed using outlier motif analysis of glycan array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Kevin A; Liden, Daniel; Haab, Brian B

    2012-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are commonly used as analytical reagents to detect the levels of specific glycan structures in biological samples. A detailed knowledge of the specificities of glycan-binding proteins is required for properly interpreting their binding data. A powerful technology for characterizing glycan-binding specificity is the glycan array. However, the interpretation of glycan-array data can be difficult due to the complex fine specificities of certain glycan-binding proteins. We developed a systematic approach, called outlier-motif analysis, for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data, and we applied the method to the study of four commonly used lectins: two mannose binders (concanavalin A and Lens culinaris) and two galactose binders (Bauhinia purpurea and peanut agglutinin). The study confirmed the known, primary specificity of each lectin and also revealed new insights into their binding preferences. Lens culinaris's main specificity may be non-terminal, α-linked mannose with a single linkage at its 2' carbon, which is more restricted than previous definitions. We found broader specificity for bauhinea purpurea (BPL) than previously reported, showing that BPL can bind terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and penultimate β-linked galactose under certain limitations. Peanut agglutinin may bind terminal Galβ1,3Gal, a glycolipid motif, in addition to terminal Galβ1,3GalNAc, a common O-linked glycoprotein motif. These results could be used to more accurately interpret data obtained using these well-studied lectins. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a systematic and general approach for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data.

  3. High-mobility group box-1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in children with community acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalnins Imants

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Even though sepsis is one of the common causes of children morbidity and mortality, specific inflammatory markers for identifying sepsis are less studied in children. The main aim of this study was to compare the levels of high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1, Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP, Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP between infected children without systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and children with severe and less severe sepsis. The second aim was to examine HMGB1, LBP, IL6 and CRP as markers for of bacteraemia. Methods Totally, 140 children with suspected or proven infections admitted to the Children's Clinical University Hospital of Latvia during 2008 and 2009 were included. Clinical and demographical information as well as infection focus were assessed in all patients. HMGB1, LBP, IL-6 and CRP blood samples were determined. Children with suspected or diagnosed infections were categorized into three groups of severity of infection: (i infected without SIRS (n = 36, (ii sepsis (n = 91 and, (iii severe sepsis (n = 13. They were furthermore classified according bacteraemia into (i bacteremia (n = 30 and (ii no bacteraemia (n = 74. Results There was no statistically significant difference in HMGB1 levels between children with different levels of sepsis or with and without bacteraemia. The levels of LBP, IL-6 and CRP were statistically significantly higher among patients with sepsis compared to those infected but without SIRS (p p Conclusion Elevated levels of LBP, IL-6 and CRP were associated with a more severe level of infection in children. Whereas LBP, IL-6 and CRP seem to be good markers to detect patients with bacteraemia, HMGB1 seem to be of minor importance. LBP, IL-6 and CRP levels may serve as good biomarkers for identifying children with severe sepsis and bacteraemia and, thus, may be routinely used in clinical practice.

  4. Development of recombinant Aleuria aurantia lectins with altered binding specificities to fucosylated glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Patrick R; Mackay, Andrew; Vong, Minh; DeSa, Johann; Lamontagne, Anne; Comunale, Mary Ann; Hafner, Julie; Block, Timothy; Lec, Ryszard; Mehta, Anand

    2011-10-14

    Changes in glycosylation have long been associated with disease. While there are many methods to detect changes in glycosylation, plant derived lectins are often used to determine changes on specific proteins or molecules of interest. One change in glycosylation that has been observed by us and by others is a disease or antigen associated increase in fucosylation on N-linked glycans. To measure this change, the fucose binding Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) is often utilized in plate and solution based assays. AAL is a mushroom derived lectin that contains five fucose binding sites that preferentially bind fucose linked (α-1,3, α-1,2, α-,4, and α-1,6) to N-acetyllactosamine related structures. Recently, several reports by us and by others have indicated that specific fucose linkages found on certain serum biomarker glycoprotein's are more associated with disease than others. Taking a site-directed mutagenesis approach, we have created a set of recombinant AAL proteins that display altered binding affinities to different analytes containing various fucose linkages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-03

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of sequence variation underlying tissue-specific transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Karen M; De Gobbi, Marco; Hughes, Jim R; Derry, Christopher J; Ayyub, Helena; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Vernimmen, Douglas; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-08-01

    Although mutations causing monogenic disorders most frequently lie within the affected gene, sequence variation in complex disorders is more commonly found in noncoding regions. Furthermore, recent genome- wide studies have shown that common DNA sequence variants in noncoding regions are associated with "normal" variation in gene expression resulting in cell-specific and/or allele-specific differences. The mechanism by which such sequence variation causes changes in gene expression is largely unknown. We have addressed this by studying natural variation in the binding of key transcription factors (TFs) in the well-defined, purified cell system of erythropoiesis. We have shown that common polymorphisms frequently directly perturb the binding sites of key TFs, and detailed analysis shows how this causes considerable (~10-fold) changes in expression from a single allele in a tissue-specific manner. We also show how a SNP, located at some distance from the recognized TF binding site, may affect the recruitment of a large multiprotein complex and alter the associated chromatin modification of the variant regulatory element. This study illustrates the principles by which common sequence variation may cause changes in tissue-specific gene expression, and suggests that such variation may underlie an individual's propensity to develop complex human genetic diseases. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce (Picea abies) belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subclass of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed cones and pollen cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsbecker, Annelie; Sundström, Jens; Tandre, Karolina; Englund, Marie; Kvarnheden, Anders; Johanson, Urban; Engström, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Transcription factors encoded by different members of the MADS-box gene family have evolved central roles in the regulation of reproductive organ development in the flowering plants, the angiosperms. Development of the stamens and carpels, the pollen- and seed-bearing organs, involves the B- and C-organ-identity MADS-box genes. B- and C-type gene orthologs with activities specifically in developing pollen- and seed-bearing organs are also present in the distantly related gymnosperms: the conifers and the gnetophytes. We now report on the characterization of DAL10, a novel MADS-box gene from the conifer Norway spruce, which unlike the B- and C-type conifer genes shows no distinct orthology relationship to any angiosperm gene or clade in phylogenetic analyses. Like the B- and C-type genes, it is active specifically in developing pollen cones and seed cones. In situ RNA localization experiments show DAL10 to be expressed in the cone axis, which carry the microsporophylls of the young pollen cone. In contrast, in the seed cone it is expressed both in the cone axis and in the bracts, which subtend the ovuliferous scales. Expression data and the phenotype of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing DAL10 suggest that the gene may act upstream to or in concert with the B- and C-type genes in the establishment of reproductive identity of developing cones.

  8. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  9. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    by T helper lymphocytes. NetMHCIIpan is a state-of-the-art method for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to any human or mouse MHC class II molecule of known sequence. In this paper, we describe an updated version of the method with improved peptide binding register identification. Binding...... with known binding registers, the new method NetMHCIIpan-3.1 significantly outperformed the earlier 3.0 version. We illustrate the impact of accurate binding core identification for the interpretation of T cell cross-reactivity using tetramer double staining with a CMV epitope and its variants mapped...... to the epitope binding core. NetMHCIIpan is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.1....

  10. Effect of Y-box binding protein 1 overexpression on the prognosis of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma undergoing postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Heng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the association between Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 overexpression and the prognosis of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC undergoing postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. MethodsThe paraffin-embedded specimens were collected from 58 patients with ICC who underwent surgical treatment and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University from January 2010 to January 2015. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of YB-1 in ICC tissue; after ICC cells were transfected with YB-1 plasmid, the thiazolyl blue method was used to observe the change in gemcitabine sensitivity, and qPCR was used to observe the changes in the expression of multidrug resistance genes. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups and a one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups; the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates and the log-rank test was used for survival difference analysis. ResultsAmong the 58 patients, 44 (75.9% had high expression of YB-1 in the cytoplasm of ICC cells (cytoplasm YB-1 positive group and 14 (24.1% had no expression of YB-1 in the cytoplasm of ICC cells (cytoplasm YB-1 negative group. Of all patients in the cytoplasm YB-1 positive group, 18 (40.9% also had positive nuclear expression of YB-1 (nuclear YB-1 positive group; the other 40 patients had no nuclear expression of YB-1 (nuclear YB-1 negative group. The nuclear YB-1 negative group had a significantly longer survival time than the nuclear YB-1 positive group (63 months vs 28 months, χ2=17.99, P<0.05. In the control plasmid group, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of gemcitabine in HCCC-9810 cells was 0.054 μmol, and in the pSG5-YB-1 plasma transfection group, IC50 increased to 0

  11. Identification of Specific Hydroxyapatite {001} Binding Heptapeptide by Phage Display and Its Nucleation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With recent developments of molecular biomimetics that combine genetic engineering and nanotechnology, peptides can be genetically engineered to bind specifically to inorganic components and execute the task of collagen matrix proteins. In this study, using biogenous tooth enamel as binding substrate, we identified a new heptapeptide (enamel high-affinity binding peptide, EHBP from linear 7-mer peptide phage display library. Through the output/input affinity test, it was found that EHBP has the highest affinity to enamel with an output/input ratio of 14.814 × 10−7, while a random peptide (RP displayed much lower output/input ratio of 0.00035 × 10−7. This binding affinity was also verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis. It was found that EHBP absorbing onto the enamel surface exhibits highest normalized fluorescence intensity (5.6 ± 1.2, comparing to the intensity of EHBP to enamel longitudinal section (1.5 ± 0.9 (p < 0.05 as well as to the intensity of a low-affinity binding peptide (ELBP to enamel (1.5 ± 0.5 (p < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Attenuated total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD studies further confirmed that crystallized hydroxyapatite were precipitated in the mineralization solution containing EHBP. To better understand the nucleation effect of EHBP, EHBP was further investigated on its interaction with calcium phosphate clusters through in vitro mineralization model. The calcium and phosphate ion consumption as well as zeta potential survey revealed that EHBP might previously adsorb to phosphate (PO43− groups and then initiate the precipitation of calcium and phosphate groups. This study not only proved the electrostatic interaction of phosphate group and the genetically engineering solid-binding peptide, but also provided a novel nucleation motif for potential applications in guided hard tissue biomineralization and

  12. Cable Tester Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Cables are very important electrical devices that carry power and signals across multiple instruments. Any fault in a cable can easily result in a catastrophic outcome. Therefore, verifying that all cables are built to spec is a very important part of Electrical Integration Procedures. Currently, there are two methods used in lab for verifying cable connectivity. (1) Using a Break-Out Box and an ohmmeter this method is time-consuming but effective for custom cables and (2) Commercial Automated Cable Tester Boxes this method is fast, but to test custom cables often requires pre-programmed configuration files, and cables used on spacecraft are often uniquely designed for specific purposes. The idea is to develop a semi-automatic continuity tester that reduces human effort in cable testing, speeds up the electrical integration process, and ensures system safety. The JPL-Cable Tester Box is developed to check every single possible electrical connection in a cable in parallel. This system indicates connectivity through LED (light emitting diode) circuits. Users can choose to test any pin/shell (test node) with a single push of a button, and any other nodes that are shorted to the test node, even if they are in the same connector, will light up with the test node. The JPL-Cable Tester Boxes offers the following advantages: 1. Easy to use: The architecture is simple enough that it only takes 5 minutes for anyone to learn how operate the Cable Tester Box. No pre-programming and calibration are required, since this box only checks continuity. 2. Fast: The cable tester box checks all the possible electrical connections in parallel at a push of a button. If a cable normally takes half an hour to test, using the Cable Tester Box will improve the speed to as little as 60 seconds to complete. 3. Versatile: Multiple cable tester boxes can be used together. As long as all the boxes share the same electrical potential, any number of connectors can be tested together.

  13. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  14. DNA-binding specificities of plant transcription factors and their potential to define target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; López-Vidriero, Irene; Carrasco, José L; Godoy, Marta; Vera, Pablo; Solano, Roberto

    2014-02-11

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression through binding to cis-regulatory specific sequences in the promoters of their target genes. In contrast to the genetic code, the transcriptional regulatory code is far from being deciphered and is determined by sequence specificity of TFs, combinatorial cooperation between TFs and chromatin competence. Here we addressed one of these determinants by characterizing the target sequence specificity of 63 plant TFs representing 25 families, using protein-binding microarrays. Remarkably, almost half of these TFs recognized secondary motifs, which in some cases were completely unrelated to the primary element. Analyses of coregulated genes and transcriptomic data from TFs mutants showed the functional significance of over 80% of all identified sequences and of at least one target sequence per TF. Moreover, combining the target sequence information with coexpression analysis we could predict the function of a TF as activator or repressor through a particular DNA sequence. Our data support the correlation between cis-regulatory elements and the sequence determined in vitro using the protein-binding microarray and provides a framework to explore regulatory networks in plants.

  15. Cooperative and specific binding of Vif to the 5' region of HIV-1 genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Simon; Richer, Delphine; Bernacchi, Serena; Decroly, Etienne; Vigne, Robert; Ehresmann, Bernard; Ehresmann, Chantal; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2005-11-18

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for viral replication in vivo. Packaging of Vif into viral particles is mediated by an interaction with viral genomic RNA and association with viral nucleoprotein complexes. Despite recent findings on the RNA-binding properties of Vif suggesting that Vif could be involved in retroviral assembly, no RNA sequence or structure specificity has been determined so far. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which Vif might regulate viral replication, we studied the interactions of Vif with HIV-1 genomic RNA in vitro. Using extensive biochemical analysis, we have measured the affinity of recombinant Vif proteins for synthetic RNAs corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. We found that recombinant Vif proteins bind specifically to HIV-1 viral RNA fragments corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), gag and the 5' part of pol (K(d) between 45 nM and 65 nM). RNA encompassing nucleotides 1-497 or 499-996 of the HIV-1 genomic RNA bind 9+/-2 and 21+/-3 Vif molecules, respectively, and at least some of these proteins bind in a cooperative manner (Hill constant alpha(H) = 2.3). In contrast, RNAs corresponding to other parts of the HIV-1 genome or heterologous RNAs showed poor binding capacity and weak cooperativity (K(d) > 200 nM). Moreover, RNase T1 footprinting revealed a hierarchical binding of Vif, pointing to TAR and the poly(A) stem-loop structures as primary strong affinity targets, and downstream structures as secondary sites with moderate affinity. Taken together, our findings suggest that Vif may assist other proteins to maintain a correct folding of the genomic RNA in order to facilitate its packaging and further steps such as reverse transcription. Interestingly, our results suggest also that Vif could bind the viral RNA in order to protect it from the action of the antiviral factor APOBEC-3G/3F.

  16. Crucial Roles of Single Residues in Binding Affinity, Specificity, and Promiscuity in the Cellulosomal Cohesin-Dockerin Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzki, Michal; Reshef, Dan; Barak, Yoav; Haimovitz, Rachel; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules play a crucial role in the assembly of multienzyme cellulosome complexes. Although intraspecies cohesin and dockerin modules bind in general with high affinity but indiscriminately, cross-species binding is rare. Here, we combined ELISA-based experiments with Rosetta-based computational design to evaluate the contribution of distinct residues at the Clostridium thermocellum cohesin-dockerin interface to binding affinity, specificity, and promiscuity. We found that single mutations can show distinct and significant effects on binding affinity and specificity. In particular, mutations at cohesin position Asn37 show dramatic variability in their effect on dockerin binding affinity and specificity: the N37A mutant binds promiscuously both to cognate (C. thermocellum) as well as to non-cognate Clostridium cellulolyticum dockerin. N37L in turn switches binding specificity: compared with the wild-type C. thermocellum cohesin, this mutant shows significantly increased preference for C. cellulolyticum dockerin combined with strongly reduced binding to its cognate C. thermocellum dockerin. The observation that a single mutation can overcome the naturally observed specificity barrier provides insights into the evolutionary dynamics of this system that allows rapid modulation of binding specificity within a high affinity background. PMID:25833947

  17. Specific binding sites for alcohols and anesthetics on ligand-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2000-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are a target for inhaled anesthetics and alcohols in the central nervous system. The inhibitory strychnine-sensitive glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors are positively modulated by anesthetics and alcohols, and site-directed mutagenesis techniques have identified amino acid residues important for the action of volatile anesthetics and alcohols in these receptors. A key question is whether these amino acids are part of an alcohol/anesthetic-binding site. In the present study, we used an alkanethiol anesthetic to covalently label its binding site by mutating selected amino acids to cysteine. We demonstrated that the anesthetic propanethiol, or alternatively, propyl methanethiosulfonate, covalently binds to cysteine residues introduced into a specific second transmembrane site in glycine receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunits and irreversibly enhances receptor function. Moreover, upon permanent occupation of the site by propyl disulfide, the usual ability of octanol, enflurane, and isoflurane to potentiate the function of the ion channels was lost. This approach provides strong evidence that the actions of anesthetics in these receptors are due to binding at a single site. PMID:10908659

  18. Structure of P-Glycoprotein Reveals a Molecular Basis for Poly-Specific Drug Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Stephen G.; Yu, Jodie; Ward, Andrew; Weng, Yue; Chittaboina, Srinivas; Zhuo, Rupeng; Harrell, Patina M.; Trinh, Yenphuong T.; Zhang, Qinghai; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Chang, Geoffrey; (Scripps); (TTU)

    2009-04-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) detoxifies cells by exporting hundreds of chemically unrelated toxins but has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the treatment of cancers. Substrate promiscuity is a hallmark of P-gp activity, thus a structural description of poly-specific drug-binding is important for the rational design of anticancer drugs and MDR inhibitors. The x-ray structure of apo P-gp at 3.8 angstroms reveals an internal cavity of -6000 angstroms cubed with a 30 angstrom separation of the two nucleotide-binding domains. Two additional P-gp structures with cyclic peptide inhibitors demonstrate distinct drug-binding sites in the internal cavity capable of stereoselectivity that is based on hydrophobic and aromatic interactions. Apo and drug-bound P-gp structures have portals open to the cytoplasm and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer for drug entry. The inward-facing conformation represents an initial stage of the transport cycle that is competent for drug binding.

  19. Opto-Box

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Welch, Steven; Smith, Dale Shane; Che, Siinn; Gan, K.K.; Boyd, George Russell Jr

    2015-01-01

    The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules, which process and transfer optoelectronic data. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35x10x8 cm^3. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain.

  20. Tb3+-cleavage assays reveal specific Mg2+ binding sites necessary to pre-fold the btuB riboswitch for AdoCbl binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pallavi K.; Gallo, Sofia; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2017-03-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind specific metabolites in order to regulate the gene expression involved in controlling the cellular concentration of the respective molecule or ion. Ligand recognition is mostly facilitated by Mg2+ mediated pre-organization of the riboswitch to an active tertiary fold. To predict these specific Mg2+ induced tertiary interactions of the btuB riboswitch from E. coli, we here report Mg2+ binding pockets in its aptameric part in both, the ligand-free and the ligand-bound form. An ensemble of weak and strong metal ion binding sites distributed over the entire aptamer was detected by terbium(III) cleavage assays, Tb3+ being an established Mg2+ mimic. Interestingly many of the Mn+ (n = 2 or 3) binding sites involve conserved bases within the class of coenzyme B12-binding riboswitches. Comparison with the published crystal structure of the coenzyme B12 riboswitch of S. thermophilum aided in identifying a common set of Mn+ binding sites that might be crucial for tertiary interactions involved in the organization of the aptamer. Our results suggest that Mn+ binding at strategic locations of the btuB riboswitch indeed facilitates the assembly of the binding pocket needed for ligand recognition. Binding of the specific ligand, coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl), to the btuB aptamer does however not lead to drastic alterations of these Mn+ binding cores, indicating the lack of a major rearrangement within the three-dimensional structure of the RNA. This finding is strengthened by Tb3+ mediated footprints of the riboswitch's structure in its ligand-free and ligand-bound state indicating that AdoCbl indeed induces local changes rather than a global structural rearrangement.

  1. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  2. Mutations in the substrate binding site of human heat-shock protein 70 indicate specific interaction with HLA-DR outside the peptide binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Karin M; Haug, Markus; Schwörer, Daniela; Kalbacher, Hubert; Holzer, Ursula

    2014-06-01

    Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70)-peptide complexes are involved in MHC class I- and II-restricted antigen presentation, enabling enhanced activation of T cells. As shown previously, mammalian cytosolic Hsp70 (Hsc70) molecules interact specifically with HLA-DR molecules. This interaction might be of significance as Hsp70 molecules could transfer bound antigenic peptides in a ternary complex into the binding groove of HLA-DR molecules. The present study provides new insights into the distinct interaction of Hsp70 with HLA-DR molecules. Using a quantitative binding assay, it could be demonstrated that a point mutation of amino acids alanine 406 and valine 438 in the substrate binding pocket led to reduced peptide binding compared with the wild-type Hsp70 whereas HLA-DR binding remains unaffected. The removal of the C-terminal lid neither altered the substrate binding capacity nor the Hsp70 binding characteristics to HLA-DR. A truncated variant lacking the nucleotide binding domain showed no binding interactions with HLA-DR. Furthermore, the truncated ATPase subunit of constitutively expressed Hsc70 revealed similar binding affinities to HLA-DR compared with the complete Hsc70. Hence, it can be assumed that the Hsp70-HLA-DR interaction takes place outside the peptide binding groove and is attributed to the ATPase domain of HSP70 molecules. The Hsp70-chaperoned peptides might thereby be directly transferred into the binding groove of HLA-DR, so enabling enhanced presentation of the peptide on antigen-presenting cells and leading to an improved proliferation of responding T cells as shown previously. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Unlocking the "Black box": internal female genitalia in Sepsidae (Diptera) evolve fast and are species-specific

    OpenAIRE

    Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Kotrba, Marion; Meier, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The species-specificity of male genitalia has been well documented in many insect groups and sexual selection has been proposed as the evolutionary force driving the often rapid, morphological divergence. The internal female genitalia, in sharp contrast, remain poorly studied. Here, we present the first comparative study of the internal reproductive system of Sepsidae. We test the species-specificity of the female genitalia by comparing recently diverged sister taxa. We al...

  4. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, David; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne K; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Turkenburg, Johan P; Nielsen, Anders D; Koldsø, Heidi; Petersen, Evamaria; Schiøtt, Birgit; De Maria, Leonardo; Wilson, Keith S; Svendsen, Allan; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown to specifically interact with the loops surrounding the catalytic triad with medium affinity (Ka ≈ 105 M−1). The mode of binding is closely similar to that seen previously for binding of amphiphilic molecules and substrate analogues to cutinases, and hence SDS acts as a substrate mimic. In addition, the structure of the enzyme has been solved by X-ray crystallography in its apo form and after cocrystallization with diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP) leading to a complex with monoethylphosphate (MEP) esterified to the catalytically active serine. The enzyme has the same fold as reported for other cutinases but, unexpectedly, esterification of the active site serine is accompanied by the ethylation of the active site histidine which flips out from its usual position in the triad. PMID:24832484

  5. Halenaquinone, a chemical compound that specifically inhibits the secondary DNA binding of RAD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Motoki; Kainuma, Takashi; Ishida-Takaku, Takako; Ishigami, Shintaro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tashiro, Satoshi; van Soest, Rob W M; Nakao, Yoichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    Mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms affecting RAD51 gene function have been identified in several tumors, suggesting that the inappropriate expression of RAD51 activity may cause tumorigenesis. RAD51 is an essential enzyme for the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) of DNA double-strand breaks. In the HRR pathway, RAD51 catalyzes the homologous pairing between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is the central step of the HRR pathway. To identify a chemical compound that regulates the homologous-pairing activity of RAD51, in the present study, we screened crude extract fractions from marine sponges by the RAD51-mediated homologous-pairing assay. Halenaquinone was identified as an inhibitor of the RAD51 homologous-pairing activity. A surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that halenaquinone directly bound to RAD51. Intriguingly, halenaquinone specifically inhibited dsDNA binding by RAD51 alone or the RAD51-ssDNA complex, but only weakly affected the RAD51-ssDNA binding. In vivo, halenaquinone significantly inhibited the retention of RAD51 at double-strand break sites. Therefore, halenaquinone is a novel type of RAD51 inhibitor that specifically inhibits the RAD51-dsDNA binding. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J. (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  7. The G-Box Transcriptional Regulatory Code in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Daphne; Shepherd, Samuel J K; Brestovitsky, Anna; Dickinson, Patrick; Cortijo, Sandra; Charoensawan, Varodom; Box, Mathew S; Biswas, Surojit; Jaeger, Katja E; Wigge, Philip A

    2017-10-01

    Plants have significantly more transcription factor (TF) families than animals and fungi, and plant TF families tend to contain more genes; these expansions are linked to adaptation to environmental stressors. Many TF family members bind to similar or identical sequence motifs, such as G-boxes (CACGTG), so it is difficult to predict regulatory relationships. We determined that the flanking sequences near G-boxes help determine in vitro specificity but that this is insufficient to predict the transcription pattern of genes near G-boxes. Therefore, we constructed a gene regulatory network that identifies the set of bZIPs and bHLHs that are most predictive of the expression of genes downstream of perfect G-boxes. This network accurately predicts transcriptional patterns and reconstructs known regulatory subnetworks. Finally, we present Ara-BOX-cis (araboxcis.org), a Web site that provides interactive visualizations of the G-box regulatory network, a useful resource for generating predictions for gene regulatory relations. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. RNAa Induced by TATA Box-Targeting MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijun; Zhang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies reveal that some nuclear microRNAs (miRNA) and synthesized siRNAs target gene promoters to activate gene transcription (RNAa). Interestingly, our group identified a novel HIV-1-encoded miRNA, miR-H3, which targets specifically the core promoter TATA box of HIV-1 and activates viral gene expression. Depletion of miR-H3 significantly impaired the replication of HIV-1. miR-H3 mimics could activate viruses from CD4(+) T cells isolated from patients receiving suppressive highly active antiretroviral therapy, which is very intriguing for reducing HIV-1 latent reservoir. Further study revealed that many cellular miRNAs also function like miR-H3. For instance, let-7i targets the TATA box of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) promoter and upregulates IL-2 expression in T-lymphocytes. In RNAa induced by TATA box-targeting miRNAs, Argonaute (AGO) proteins are needed, but there is no evidence for the involvement of promoter-associated transcripts or epigenetic modifications. We propose that the binding of small RNA-AGO complex to TATA box could facilitate the assembly of RNA Polymerase II transcription preinitiation complex. In addition, synthesized small RNAs targeting TATA box can also efficiently activate transcription of interested genes, such as insulin, IL-2, and c-Myc. The discovery of RNAa induced by TATA box-targeting miRNA provides an easy-to-use tool for activating gene expression.

  9. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  10. Specific detection of avidin-biotin binding using liquid crystal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2015-03-01

    Poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4'-undecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP)-functionalized 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) droplets were made by using microfluidic technique. The PAA chains on the 5CB droplets, were biotinylated, and used to specifically detect avidin-biotin binding at the 5CB/aqueous interface. The avidin-biotin binding was characterized by the configurational change (from radial to bipolar) of the 5CB droplets, as observed through a polarized optical microscope. The maximum biotinylation was obtained by injecting a >100 μg/mL biotin aqueous solution, which enabled a limit of detection of 0.5 μg/mL avidin. This droplet biosensor could specifically detect avidin against other proteins such as bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, hemoglobin, and chymotrypsinogen solutions. Avidin detection with 5CBPAA-biotin droplets having high sensitivity, specificity, and stability demonstrates new applications of the functionalized liquid crystal droplets that can detect specific proteins or other analytes through a ligand/receptor model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro selection of zinc fingers with altered DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, A C; Kim, S H; Wells, J A

    1994-05-17

    We have used random mutagenesis and phage display to alter the DNA-binding specificity of Zif268, a transcription factor that contains three zinc finger domains. Four residues in the helix of finger 1 of Zif268 that potentially mediate DNA binding were identified from an X-ray structure of the Zif268-DNA complex. A library was constructed in which these residues were randomly mutated and the Zif268 variants were fused to a truncated version of the gene III coat protein on the surface of M13 filamentous phage particles. The phage displayed the mutant proteins in a monovalent fashion and were sorted by repeated binding and elution from affinity matrices containing different DNA sequences. When the matrix contained the natural nine base pair operator sequence 5'-GCG-TGG-GCG-3', native-like zinc fingers were isolated. New finger 1 variants were found by sorting with two different operators in which the singly modified triplets, GTG and TCG, replaced the native finger 1 triplet, GCG. Overall, the selected finger 1 variants contained a preponderance of polar residues at the four sites. Interestingly, the net charge of the four residues in any selected finger never derived more that one unit from neutrality despite the fact that about half the variants contained three or four charged residues over the four sites. Measurements of the dissociation constants for two of these purified finger 1 variants by gel-shift assay showed their specificities to vary over a 10-fold range, with the greatest affinity being for the DNA binding site for which they were sorted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Cytotoxic protein from the mushroom Coprinus comatus possesses a unique mode for glycan binding and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peilan; Li, Kunhua; Yang, Guang; Xia, Changqing; Polston, Jane E; Li, Gengnan; Li, Shiwu; Lin, Zhao; Yang, Li-Jun; Bruner, Steven D; Ding, Yousong

    2017-08-22

    Glycans possess significant chemical diversity; glycan binding proteins (GBPs) recognize specific glycans to translate their structures to functions in various physiological and pathological processes. Therefore, the discovery and characterization of novel GBPs and characterization of glycan-GBP interactions are significant to provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention of many diseases. Here, we report the biochemical, functional, and structural characterization of a 130-amino-acid protein, Y3, from the mushroom Coprinus comatus Biochemical studies of recombinant Y3 from a yeast expression system demonstrated the protein is a unique GBP. Additionally, we show that Y3 exhibits selective and potent cytotoxicity toward human T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells compared with a panel of cancer cell lines via inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Screening of a glycan array demonstrated GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDNF) as a specific Y3-binding ligand. To provide a structural basis for function, the crystal structure was solved to a resolution of 1.2 Å, revealing a single-domain αβα-sandwich motif. Two monomers were dimerized to form a large 10-stranded, antiparallel β-sheet flanked by α-helices on each side, representing a unique oligomerization mode among GBPs. A large glycan binding pocket extends into the dimeric interface, and docking of LDNF identified key residues for glycan interactions. Disruption of residues predicted to be involved in LDNF/Y3 interactions resulted in the significant loss of binding to Jurkat T-cells and severely impaired their cytotoxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate Y3 to be a GBP with selective cytotoxicity toward human T-cell leukemia cells and indicate its potential use in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Identification of calconectin, a calcium-binding protein specifically expressed by the mantle of Pinctada margaritifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, D; Puisségur, M; Bédouet, L; Rousseau, M; Boulzaguet, H; Milet, C; Sellos, D; Van Wormhoudt, A; Lopez, E

    2006-05-01

    Nacre or mother-of-pearl in the shell of Pinctada margaritifera is composed of 95-99% calcium carbonate and 1-5% organic matrix. In this study, we developed an original technique to characterize the genes differentially expressed in nacre-forming cells (NFC) by combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), to establish a cDNA subtractive library, with rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR. Seventy-two specific cDNA sequences have been obtained so far. These include a protein containing two EF-hand Ca2+-binding domains which was completely sequenced after amplification by RACE-PCR. Its specific expression as well as the specificity of the SSH method was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR on NFC and mantle cells.

  14. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  15. Prothrombin requires two sequential metal-dependent conformational transitions to bind phospholipid. Conformation-specific antibodies directed against the phospholipid-binding site on prothrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowski, M.; Furie, B.C.; Bauminger, S.; Furie, B.

    1986-11-15

    Prothrombin is a gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein that binds to phospholipid vesicles in the presence of calcium ions after undergoing a metal ion-induced conformational transition. To integrate recent data into a scheme that is compatible with our knowledge of prothrombin-metal interaction, we have proposed a new model of prothrombin structure. In this model prothrombin undergoes two metal-dependent conformational transitions: PT----PT'----PT*. The first transition is not cation-specific, but the second transition is metal-selective for Ca(II), Sr(II), or Ba(II). Only the PT* conformer binds to phospholipid surfaces. To test this model, anti-prothrombin antibodies that only bind to prothrombin in the presence of Ca(II) but not Mg(II) (PT*-specific) were isolated, and termed anti-prothrombin X Ca(II)-specific. Half-maximal binding of antibody to prothrombin was observed at 0.1 mM CaCl/sub 2/ or 1 mM SrCl/sub 2/, but no binding was observed with Mg(II), Mn(II), or Ba(II). However, prothrombin in the presence of both Mg(II)/Ba(II) or Mn(II)/Ba(II) demonstrated significant interaction with the antibody. Prothrombin binding to phospholipid vesicles was inhibited by the anti-prothrombin X Ca(II)-specific antibody or its Fab fragment, but was not inhibited by anti-prothrombin X Mg(II) antibody or its Fab fragment directed at the PT' conformer. These results support this three-state model for prothrombin. The metal specificity characteristic of prothrombin-phospholipid interaction is a property required for the expression of the phospholipid-binding site in the binary prothrombin-metal complex.

  16. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  17. Task-Specific Scoring Functions for Predicting Ligand Binding Poses and Affinity and for Screening Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtawy, Hossam; Mahapatra, Nihar Ranjan

    2017-11-30

    Molecular docking, scoring, and virtual screening play an increasingly important role in computer-aided drug discovery. Scoring functions (SFs) are typically employed to predict the binding conformation (docking task), binding affinity (scoring task), and binary activity level (screening task) of ligands against a critical protein target in a disease's pathway. In most molecular docking software packages available today, a generic binding affinity-based (BA-based) SF is invoked for all three tasks to solve three different, but related, prediction problems. The limited predictive accuracies of such SFs in these three tasks has been a major roadblock toward cost-effective drug discovery. Therefore, in this work, we develop BT-Score, an ensemble machine-learning (ML) SF of boosted decision trees and thousands of predictive descriptors to estimate BA. BT-Score reproduced BA of out-of-sample test complexes with correlation of 0.825. Even with this high accuracy in the scoring task, we demonstrate that the docking and screening performance of BT-Score and other BA-based SFs is far from ideal. This has motivated us to build two task-specific ML SFs for the docking and screening problems. We propose BT-Dock, a boosted-tree ensemble model trained on a large number of native and computer-generated ligand conformations and optimized to predict binding poses explicitly. The model has shown an average improvement of 25% over its BA-based counterparts in different ligand pose prediction scenarios. Similar improvement has also been obtained by our screening-based SF, BT-Screen, which directly models the ligand activity labels as a classification problem. BT-Screen is trained on thousands of active and inactive protein-ligand complexes to optimize it for finding real actives from databases of ligands not seen in its training set. In addition to the three task-specific SFs, we propose a novel multi-task deep neural network (MT-Net) that is trained on data from the three tasks to

  18. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  19. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  20. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, M; Bachmann, M; Uhlenbruck, G; Dorn, A; Müller, W E

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from the same species. After dissociation of the AF by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, followed by electrophoretical fractionation, a 47-kD protein was identified by immunoblotting which interacted with the McAbs: 5D2-D11. During this dissociation procedure, the sunburst structure of the AF was destroyed. In a second approach, the 47-kD protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation; 12 molecules of this protein species were calculated to be associated with the intact AF particle. The 47-kD AF fragment bound to dissociated Geodia cells with a high affinity (Ka of 7 X 10(8) M-1) even in the absence of Ca++ ions; the number of binding sites was approximately 4 X 10(6)/cell. This interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor to the 47-kD protein in the homologous cell system. Moreover, it was established that this binding occurs species-specifically. The 47-kD fragment of the AF was localized only extracellularly by indirect immunofluorescence staining in cryostat slices. These data suggest that the 47-kD protein is the cell binding molecule of the AF from Geodia.

  1. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators.

  2. Unlocking the "Black box": internal female genitalia in Sepsidae (Diptera) evolve fast and are species-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Kotrba, Marion; Meier, Rudolf

    2010-09-10

    The species-specificity of male genitalia has been well documented in many insect groups and sexual selection has been proposed as the evolutionary force driving the often rapid, morphological divergence. The internal female genitalia, in sharp contrast, remain poorly studied. Here, we present the first comparative study of the internal reproductive system of Sepsidae. We test the species-specificity of the female genitalia by comparing recently diverged sister taxa. We also compare the rate of change in female morphological characters with the rate of fast-evolving, molecular and behavioral characters. We describe the ectodermal parts of the female reproductive tract for 41 species representing 21 of the 37 described genera and define 19 morphological characters with discontinuous variation found in eight structures that are part of the reproductive tract. Using a well-resolved molecular phylogeny based on 10 genes, we reconstruct the evolution of these characters across the family [120 steps; Consistency Index (CI): 0.41]. Two structures, in particular, evolve faster than the rest. The first is the ventral receptacle, which is a secondary sperm storage organ. It accounts for more than half of all the evolutionary changes observed (7 characters; 61 steps; CI: 0.46). It is morphologically diverse across genera, can be bi-lobed or multi-chambered (up to 80 chambers), and is strongly sclerotized in one clade. The second structure is the dorsal sclerite, which is present in all sepsids except Orygma luctuosum and Ortalischema albitarse. It is associated with the opening of the spermathecal ducts and is often distinct even among sister species (4 characters; 16 steps; CI: 0.56). We find the internal female genitalia are diverse in Sepsidae and diagnostic for all species. In particular, fast-evolving structures like the ventral receptacle and dorsal sclerite are likely involved in post-copulatory sexual selection. In comparison to behavioral and molecular data, the

  3. Unlocking the "Black box": internal female genitalia in Sepsidae (Diptera evolve fast and are species-specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puniamoorthy Nalini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The species-specificity of male genitalia has been well documented in many insect groups and sexual selection has been proposed as the evolutionary force driving the often rapid, morphological divergence. The internal female genitalia, in sharp contrast, remain poorly studied. Here, we present the first comparative study of the internal reproductive system of Sepsidae. We test the species-specificity of the female genitalia by comparing recently diverged sister taxa. We also compare the rate of change in female morphological characters with the rate of fast-evolving, molecular and behavioral characters. Results We describe the ectodermal parts of the female reproductive tract for 41 species representing 21 of the 37 described genera and define 19 morphological characters with discontinuous variation found in eight structures that are part of the reproductive tract. Using a well-resolved molecular phylogeny based on 10 genes, we reconstruct the evolution of these characters across the family [120 steps; Consistency Index (CI: 0.41]. Two structures, in particular, evolve faster than the rest. The first is the ventral receptacle, which is a secondary sperm storage organ. It accounts for more than half of all the evolutionary changes observed (7 characters; 61 steps; CI: 0.46. It is morphologically diverse across genera, can be bi-lobed or multi-chambered (up to 80 chambers, and is strongly sclerotized in one clade. The second structure is the dorsal sclerite, which is present in all sepsids except Orygma luctuosum and Ortalischema albitarse. It is associated with the opening of the spermathecal ducts and is often distinct even among sister species (4 characters; 16 steps; CI: 0.56. Conclusions We find the internal female genitalia are diverse in Sepsidae and diagnostic for all species. In particular, fast-evolving structures like the ventral receptacle and dorsal sclerite are likely involved in post-copulatory sexual selection

  4. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  5. Enriching peptide libraries for binding affinity and specificity through computationally directed library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T. Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model. PMID:28236241

  6. Specific IgE and IgG antibody-binding patterns to recombinant cockroach allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satinover, Shama M; Reefer, Amanda J; Pomes, Anna; Chapman, Martin D; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2005-04-01

    The specificity of serum antibody responses to different cockroach allergens has not been studied. We sought to quantitate serum IgE and IgG antibodies to a panel of purified cockroach allergens among cockroach-sensitized subjects. IgE antibodies to recombinant cockroach allergens (rBla g 1, rBla g 2, rBla g 4, rBla g 5, and rPer a 7) were measured in sera containing IgE antibodies to Blattella germanica extract (n = 118) by using a streptavidin CAP assay and a multiplex flow cytometric assay. Specific IgG antibodies were determined by using radioimmunoprecipitation techniques. Specific IgE antibodies measured by means of CAP assay and multiplex assay were strongly correlated ( r = 0.8, P < .001). The sum of IgE antibodies (in international units per milliliter) against all 5 allergens equated to IgE antibodies to cockroach extract. Although the prevalence of IgE antibodies was highest for rBla g 2 (54.4%) and rBla g 5 (37.4%), patterns of IgE antibody binding were unique to each subject. Surprisingly, only 16% of cockroach-sensitized subjects with IgE antibodies to house dust mite exhibited IgE antibody binding to cockroach tropomyosin (rPer a 7). Specific IgE antibodies were associated with increased IgG antibody levels, although detection of IgG in the absence of IgE was not uncommon. The techniques described offer a new approach for defining the hierarchy of purified allergens. IgE antibodies directed against 5 allergens constitute the majority of the IgE antibody repertoire for cockroach. Such distinct patterns of IgE-IgG responsiveness to different cockroach allergens highlight the complexity of B-cell responses to environmental allergens.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the SBP-box gene family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hua-Wei; Song, Xiao-Ming; Duan, Wei-Ke; Wang, Yan; Hou, Xi-Lin

    2015-11-01

    The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP)-box gene family contains highly conserved plant-specific transcription factors that play an important role in plant development, especially in flowering. Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) is a leafy vegetable grown worldwide and is used as a model crop for research in genome duplication. The present study aimed to characterize the SBP-box transcription factor genes in Chinese cabbage. Twenty-nine SBP-box genes were identified in the Chinese cabbage genome and classified into six groups. We identified 23 orthologous and 5 co-orthologous SBP-box gene pairs between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. An interaction network among these genes was constructed. Sixteen SBP-box genes were expressed more abundantly in flowers than in other tissues, suggesting their involvement in flowering. We show that the MiR156/157 family members may regulate the coding regions or 3'-UTR regions of Chinese cabbage SBP-box genes. As SBP-box genes were found to potentially participate in some plant development pathways, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was performed and showed that Chinese cabbage SBP-box genes were also sensitive to the exogenous hormones methyl jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. The SBP-box genes have undergone gene duplication and loss, evolving a more refined regulation for diverse stimulation in plant tissues. Our comprehensive genome-wide analysis provides insights into the SBP-box gene family of Chinese cabbage.

  8. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, Griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The glycans on HIV-1 gp120 play an important role in shielding neutralization-sensitive epitopes from antibody recognition. They also serve as targets for lectins that bind mannose-rich glycans. In this study, the authors investigated...

  9. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  10. Analysis of the sugar-binding specificity of mannose-binding-type Jacalin-related lectins by frontal affinity chromatography--an approach to functional classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family comprises galactose-binding-type (gJRLs) and mannose-binding-type (mJRLs) lectins. Although the documented occurrence of gJRLs is confined to the family Moraceae, mJRLs are widespread in the plant kingdom. A detailed comparison of sugar-binding specificity was made by frontal affinity chromatography to corroborate the structure-function relationships of the extended mJRL subfamily. Eight mJRLs covering a broad taxonomic range were used: Artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit, Moraceae), BanLec from Musa acuminata (banana, Musaceae), Calsepa from Calystegia sepium (hedge bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CCA from Castanea crenata (Japanese chestnut, Fagaceae), Conarva from Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CRLL from Cycas revoluta (King Sago palm tree, Cycadaceae), Heltuba from Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke, Asteraceae) and MornigaM from Morus nigra (black mulberry, Moraceae). The result using 103 pyridylaminated glycans clearly divided the mJRLs into two major groups, each of which was further divided into two subgroups based on the preference for high-mannose-type N-glycans. This criterion also applied to the binding preference for complex-type N-glycans. Notably, the result of cluster analysis of the amino acid sequences clearly corresponded to the above specificity classification. Thus, marked correlation between the sugar-binding specificity of mJRLs and their phylogeny should shed light on the functional significance of JRLs.

  11. Effect of receptor binding specificity on the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of influenza virus A H1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Cao, Weiping; Pappas, Claudia; Liu, Feng; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-09-01

    The biological basis for the poor immunogenicity of unadjuvanted avian influenza A virus vaccines in mammals is not well understood. Here, we mutated the hemagglutinin (HA) of two H1N1 virus vaccines to determine whether virus receptor binding specificity contributes to the low immunogenicity of avian influenza virus vaccines. Mutations were introduced into the HA of an avian influenza virus, A/Duck/New York/15024-21/96 (Dk/96) which switched the binding preference from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA). A switch in receptor specificity of the human A/South Carolina/1/18 (SC/18) virus generated a mutant virus with α2,3 SA (avian) binding preference. Inactivated vaccines were generated and administered to mice and ferrets intramuscularly. We found that the vaccines with human receptor binding preference induced slightly higher antibody titers and cell-mediated immune responses compared to their isogenic viruses with avian receptor binding specificity. Upon challenge with DK/96 or SC18 virus, differences in lung virus titers between the vaccine groups with different receptor-binding specificities were minimal. Overall, our data suggest that receptor binding specificity contributes only marginally to the immunogenicity of avian influenza vaccines and that other factors may also be involved. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS Box Protein, a Probable Constituent of Flowering and Fruit Ripening Regulatory System in Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Roy, Sujit; Nag, Anish; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N.

    2012-01-01

    The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish) has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ∼95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development. PMID:22984496

  13. Characterization of an AGAMOUS-like MADS box protein, a probable constituent of flowering and fruit ripening regulatory system in banana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Roy Choudhury

    Full Text Available The MADS-box family of genes has been shown to play a significant role in the development of reproductive organs, including dry and fleshy fruits. In this study, the molecular properties of an AGAMOUS like MADS box transcription factor in banana cultivar Giant governor (Musa sp, AAA group, subgroup Cavendish has been elucidated. We have detected a CArG-box sequence binding AGAMOUS MADS-box protein in banana flower and fruit nuclear extracts in DNA-protein interaction assays. The protein fraction in the DNA-protein complex was analyzed by mass spectrometry and using this information we have obtained the full length cDNA of the corresponding protein. The deduced protein sequence showed ~95% amino acid sequence homology with MA-MADS5, a MADS-box protein described previously from banana. We have characterized the domains of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein involved in DNA binding and homodimer formation in vitro using full-length and truncated versions of affinity purified recombinant proteins. Furthermore, in order to gain insight about how DNA bending is achieved by this MADS-box factor, we performed circular permutation and phasing analysis using the wild type recombinant protein. The AGAMOUS MADS-box protein identified in this study has been found to predominantly accumulate in the climacteric fruit pulp and also in female flower ovary. In vivo and in vitro assays have revealed specific binding of the identified AGAMOUS MADS-box protein to CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes in banana fruit. Overall, the expression patterns of this MADS-box protein in banana female flower ovary and during various phases of fruit ripening along with the interaction of the protein to the CArG-box sequence in the promoters of major ripening genes lead to interesting assumption about the possible involvement of this AGAMOUS MADS-box factor in banana fruit ripening and floral reproductive organ development.

  14. Molecular and Functional Characterization of ssDNA Aptamers that Specifically Bind Leishmania infantum PABP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Ramos, Edurne; García-Hernández, Marta; Pinto, Celia; Soto, Manuel; Martín, M. Elena; González, Víctor M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A poly (A)-binding protein from Leishmania infantum (LiPABP) has been recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. Although this protein shows a very high homology with PABPs from other eukaryotic organisms including mammals and other parasites, exist divergences along the sequence that convert them in potential diagnostic markers and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania proteins is essential for the progress of this kind of study. Results We have selected a ssDNA aptamer population against a recombinant 6xHIS–LiPABP protein (rLiPABP) that is able to recognize the target with a low Kd. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of the aptamers obtained from the population yielded three aptamers (ApPABP#3, ApPABP#7 and ApPABP#11) that significantly bound to PABP with higher affinity than the naïve population. These aptamers were analyzed by ELONA and slot blot to establish affinity and specificity for rLiPABP. Results demonstrated that the three aptamers have high affinity and specificity for the target and that they are able to detect an endogenous LiPABP (eLiPABP) protein amount corresponding to 2500 L. infantum promastigotes in a significant manner. The functional analysis of the aptamers also revealed that ApPABP#11 disrupts the binding of both Myc-LiPABP and eLiPABP to poly (A) in vitro. On the other hand, these aptamers are able to bind and purify LiPABP from complex mixes. Conclusion Results presented here demonstrate that aptamers represent new reagents for characterization of LiPABP and that they can affect LiPABP activity. At this respect, the use of these aptamers as therapeutic tool affecting the physiological role of PABP has to be

  15. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...... with a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. Although this putative motif is shared by other archaeal proteins, orthologs of SSO454 were only detected in species within the Sulfolobus genus and in the closely related Acidianus genus. We infer that the genus-specific protein induces an opening of the structure...

  16. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    2010-09-01

    and metacyclic forms. Further they show that although gut binding may be necessary for parasite establishment, in several vector-parasite pairs the specificity of such in vitro binding alone is insufficient to explain overall vector specificity. Other significant barriers to development must exist in certain refractory Leishmania parasite-sand fly vector combinations. A re-appraisal of the specificity of the Leishmania-sand fly relationship is required.

  17. Conformational and physicochemical DNA features specific for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, J V; Ponomarenko, M P; Frolov, A S; Vorobyev, D G; Overton, G C; Kolchanov, N A

    1999-01-01

    A reliable recognition of transcription factor binding sites is essential for analysis of regulatory genomic sequences. The experimental data make evident an important role of DNA conformational features for site functioning. However, Internet-available tools for revealing conformational and physicochemical DNA features significant for the site functioning and subsequent use of these features for site recognition have not been developed up to now. We suggest an approach for revealing significant conformational and physicochemical properties of functional sites implemented in the database B-DNA-VIDEO. This database is designed to study the sets of various transcription factor binding sites, providing evidence that transcription factor binding sites are characterized by specific sets of significant conformational and physicochemical DNA properties. For a fixed site, by using the B-DNA features selected for this site recognition, the C-program recognizing this site may be generated, control tested and stored in the database B-DNA-VIDEO. Each B-DNA-VIDEO entry links to the Web-applet recognizing the site, whose significant B-DNA features are stored in this entry as the 'site recognition programs'. The pairwise linked entry-applet pairs are compiled within the B-DNA-VIDEO system, which is simultaneously the database and the program tools package applicable immediately for recognizing the sites stored in the database. Indeed, this is the novelty. Hence, B-DNA-VIDEO is the Web resource of both 'searching for static data' and 'active computation' type, that is why it was called an 'activated database'. B-DNA-VIDEO is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/systems/BDNAVideo/ and the mirror site at http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/mgs/systems/c onsfreq/.

  18. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binds to a specific receptor and releases microsomal calcium in the arterior pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, G.; Balla, T.; Baukal, A.J.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The properties of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/) receptor sites in the anterior pituitary were evaluated by binding studies with InsP/sub 3/ labeled with /sup 32/P to high specific radioactivity. Specific binding of Ins(/sup 32/P)P/sub 3/ was demonstrable in pituitary membrane preparations and was linearly proportional to the amount of membrane added over the range 0.5-2 mg of protein. Kinetic studies showed that specific InsP/sub 3/ binding was half-maximal in about 40 sec and reached a plateau after 15 min at 0/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data was consistent with a single set of high affinity sites. The specificity of Ins(/sup 32/P)P/sub 3/ binding to these sites was illustrated by the much weaker affinity for structural analogs such as inositol 1-phosphate, phytic acid, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. To assess the functional relevance of the InsP/sub 3/ binding sites, the Ca/sup 2 +/-releasing activity of InsP/sub 3/ was measured in pituitary membrane preparations. Under physiological conditions within the cytosol, the high-affinity InsP/sub 3/ binding sites characterized in pituitary membranes could serve as the putative receptors through which InsP/sub 3/ triggers Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in the anterior pituitary gland.

  19. F-box genes: Genome-wide expansion, evolution and their contribution to pollen growth in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Ming; Yin, Hao; Qiao, Xin; Tan, Xu; Gu, Chao; Wang, Bao-Hua; Cheng, Rui; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-12-01

    F-box gene family, as one of the largest gene families in plants, plays crucial roles in regulating plant development, reproduction, cellular protein degradation and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, comprehensive analysis of the F-box gene family in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and other Rosaceae species has not been reported yet. Herein, we identified a total of 226 full-length F-box genes in pear for the first time. And these genes were further divided into various subgroups based on specific domains and phylogenetic analysis. Intriguingly, we observed that whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication have a major contribution to F-box family expansion. Furthermore, the dynamic evolution for different modes of gene duplication was dissected. Interestingly, we found that dispersed and tandem duplicate have been evolving at a high rate. In addition, we found that F-box genes exhibited functional specificity based on GO analysis, and most of the F-box genes were significantly enriched in the protein binding (GO: 0005515) term, supporting that F-box genes might play a critical role for gene regulation in pear. Transcriptome and digital expression profiles revealed that F-box genes are involved in the development of multiple pear tissues. Overall, these results will set stage for elaborating the biological role of F-box genes in pear and other plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbohydrate-binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.) bulb lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1990-06-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus; NPA) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.; HHA) lectins, isolated from extracts of their bulbs by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose, was studied by quantitative precipitation, sugar hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on the immobilized lectins. These lectins gave strong precipitation reactions with several yeast mannans, but did not precipitate with alpha-D-glucans (e.g., dextrans and glycogen). Interestingly, both lectins reacted strongly with yeast galactomannans having multiple nonreducing terminal alpha-D-galactosyl groups, a synthetic linear alpha-1,6-mannan, and an alpha-1,3-mannan (DP = 30). Treatment of the linear alpha-1,3-mannan with periodate, resulting in oxidation of the terminal, nonreducing mannosyl group, did not reduce its reactivity with NPA or HHA. Taken together, these observations suggest that NPA and HHA react not only with terminal but also with internal alpha-D-mannosyl residues. Sugar hapten inhibition studies showed these lectins to possess the greatest specific activity for alpha-D-mannosyl units whereas D-Glc and D-GlcNAc did not inhibit either lectin precipitation system. Of the oligosaccharides tested, the best inhibitor of NPA interaction was alpha-1,6-linked mannotriose, which was twice as good an inhibitor as Man alpha 1,6Man alpha-O-Me and 10 times better than methyl alpha-D-mannoside. On the other hand, oligosaccharides containing either 1,3- or 1,6-linked mannosyl units were good inhibitors of the HHA-mannan precipitation system (6- to 20-fold more active than D-Man). These results indicate that both lectins appear to possess an extended binding site(s) complementary to at least three 1,6-linked alpha-mannosyl units. Various glycosylasparagine glycopeptides which contain alpha-1,6-Man units were retarded on the immobilized NPA column. On the other hand, those containing either alpha-1,3- or alpha-1,6-mannosyl residues were

  1. Highly specific sites of prolactin binding in benign and malignant breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, P K; Tandon, S; Agrawal, A K; Kumar, S

    1989-12-01

    An immunocytochemical method involving the application of polyclonal antisera to human prolactin (PRL) followed by a highly sensitive and a modified version of dinitrophenyl (DNP) hapten sandwich staining procedure using anti-DNP IgM monoclonal antibody has been used to detect PRL binding in benign and malignant breast tissue. The technique was applied to 5 microns thick sections of paraffin embedded formalin fixed tissue. Out of 107 breast biopsies 40 were carcinomas, 41 were fibroadenomas, 18 were benign cystic disease and 8 were gynaecomastia. In cases of carcinoma positive staining was observed in 82.5% cases whereas in fibroadenoma the positivity was in 57% cases only. The positive reaction in fibroadenoma was mainly due to the presence of apocrine metaplasia associated with the tumour. Also PRL was present in greater proportion in post menopausal patients as compared to premenopausal cancer patients. These findings suggest the presence of specific PRL binding sites in breast tissue. The staining was restricted to epithelial cells and background staining of the stroma was minimally seen in these cases. Positively stained breast carcinoma may represent an apocrine subset of the carcinoma.

  2. Evidence for an Important Role of WRKY DNA Binding Proteins in the Regulation of NPR1 Gene Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Diqiu; Chen, Chunhong; Chen, Zhixiang

    2001-01-01

    .... In the present study, we report the identification of W-box sequences in the promoter region of the NPR1 gene that are recognized specifically by SA-induced WRKY DNA binding proteins from Arabidopsis...

  3. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm–oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm–oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  4. Specific deficit of colour-colour short-term memory binding in sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Sala, Sergio Della; Abrahams, Sharon; Logie, Robert H; Méndez, Luis Guillermo; Lopera, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Short-term memory binding of visual features which are processed across different dimensions (shape-colour) is impaired in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, familial Alzheimer's disease, and in asymptomatic carriers of familial Alzheimer's disease. This study investigated whether Alzheimer's disease also impacts on within-dimension binding processes. The study specifically explored whether visual short-term memory binding of features of the same type (colour-colour) is sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. We used a neuropsychological battery and a short-term memory binding task to assess patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 1), familial Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 2) due to the mutation E280A of the Presenilin-1 gene and asymptomatic carriers of the mutation. The binding task assessed change detection within arrays of unicoloured objects (Colour Only) or bicoloured objects the colours of which had to be remembered separately (Unbound Colours) or together (Bound Colours). Performance on the Bound Colours condition (1) explained the largest proportion of variance between patients (sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease), (2) combined more sensitivity and specificity for the disease than other more traditional neuropsychological tasks, (3) identified asymptomatic carriers of the mutation even when traditional neuropsychological measures and other measures of short-term memory did not and, (4) contrary to shape-colour binding, correlated with measures of hippocampal functions. Colour-colour binding and shape-colour binding both appear to be sensitive to AD even though they seem to rely on different brain mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  6. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Daniel; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds...... a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown...... of the enzyme has been solved by X-ray crystallography in its apo form and after cocrystallization with diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP) leading to a complex with monoethylphosphate (MEP) esterified to the catalytically active serine. The enzyme has the same fold as reported for other cutinases but...

  7. Delta-thalassemia due to a mutation in an erythroid-specific binding protein sequence 3' to the delta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, P; Loudianos, G; Lavinha, J; Murru, S; Cossu, P; Casu, R; Oggiano, L; Longinotti, M; Cao, A; Pirastu, M

    1992-01-15

    We have previously described a family of Northern Sardinian descent in which the propositus was affected by thalassemia major resulting from compound heterozygosity for codon 39 nonsense mutation and the beta +IVS II nt 745 mutation and in which all heterozygotes for the beta +IVS II nt 745 mutation had normal hemoglobin (Hb) A2 levels. To define the reasons for normal HbA2 levels in otherwise typical beta-thalassemia heterozygotes, we cloned and sequenced the delta-thalassemia gene in cis to the beta +IVS II nt 745 mutation. The sequence analysis showed a single nucleotide substitution (G----A) at position 69 nts (delta +69) downstream to the polyA addition site. Dot blot analysis with an oligonucleotide probe complementary to the delta +69 mutation detected this mutation in several heterozygotes for the beta +IVS II nt 745 mutation from the proband's family, but failed to show it either in a group of normal individuals of the same origin or in nonrelated heterozygotes for the beta +IVS II nt 745 mutation of the same or different descent from the proband. The delta +69 (G----A) mutation may be responsible for the low delta-globin output from the beta +IVS II nt 745 chromosome or could be a silent polymorphism not affecting the function of the delta-globin gene. The normal G at position 69 is part of a sequence very similar to the core DNA (A/T)GATA(A/G) motif (GATA box) that is a binding site for the GATA-1 protein. Gel-retardation assay has shown that a DNA fragment containing the GATA motif with the G----A at position +69 has increased binding affinity for erythroid-specific DNA binding protein(s) as compared with the wild-type sequence. These findings may suggest that the delta +69 mutation is responsible for the deficient function of the in cis delta-globin gene.

  8. The hydrophobic core of twin-arginine signal sequences orchestrates specific binding to Tat-pathway related chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Shanmugham

    Full Text Available Redox enzyme maturation proteins (REMPs bind pre-proteins destined for translocation across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane via the twin-arginine translocation system and enable the enzymatic incorporation of complex cofactors. Most REMPs recognize one specific pre-protein. The recognition site usually resides in the N-terminal signal sequence. REMP binding protects signal peptides against degradation by proteases. REMPs are also believed to prevent binding of immature pre-proteins to the translocon. The main aim of this work was to better understand the interaction between REMPs and substrate signal sequences. Two REMPs were investigated: DmsD (specific for dimethylsulfoxide reductase, DmsA and TorD (specific for trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, TorA. Green fluorescent protein (GFP was genetically fused behind the signal sequences of TorA and DmsA. This ensures native behavior of the respective signal sequence and excludes any effects mediated by the mature domain of the pre-protein. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that these chimeric pre-proteins specifically bind to the cognate REMP. Furthermore, the region of the signal sequence that is responsible for specific binding to the corresponding REMP was identified by creating region-swapped chimeric signal sequences, containing parts of both the TorA and DmsA signal sequences. Surprisingly, specificity is not encoded in the highly variable positively charged N-terminal region of the signal sequence, but in the more similar hydrophobic C-terminal parts. Interestingly, binding of DmsD to its model substrate reduced membrane binding of the pre-protein. This property could link REMP-signal peptide binding to its reported proofreading function.

  9. Exquisite binding specificity of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin toward TF-related O-linked mucin-type glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Yu, Lu-Gang; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Swamy, Bale M

    2011-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL), a secretory protein from the soil borne phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, has shown in our previous studies to bind strongly to the oncofetal Thomson-Friedenreich carbohydrate (Galβ1-3GalNAc-ser/thr, T or TF) antigen. TF antigen is widely expressed in many types of human cancers and the strong binding of SRL toward such a cancer-associated carbohydrate structure led us to characterize the carbohydrate binding specificity of SRL. Glycan array analysis, which included 285 glycans, shows exclusive binding of SRL to the O-linked mucin type but not N-linked glycans and amongst the mucin type O-glycans, lectin recognizes only mucin core 1, core 2 and weakly core 8 but not to other mucin core structures. It binds with high specificity to "α-anomers" but not the "β-anomers" of the TF structure. The axial C4-OH group of GalNAc and C2-OH group of Gal is both essential for SRL interaction with TF disaccharide, and substitution on C3 of galactose by sulfate or sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine, significantly enhances the avidity of the lectin. SRL differs in its binding to TF structures compared to other known TF-binding lectins such as the Arachis hypogea (peanut) agglutinin, Agaricus bisporus (mushroom) lectin, Jackfruit, Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) and Amaranthus caudatus (Amaranthin) lectin. Thus, SRL has unique carbohydrate-binding specificity toward TF-related O-linked carbohydrate structures. Such a binding specificity will make this lectin a very useful tool in future structural as well as functional analysis of the cellular glycans in cancer studies.

  10. Species-specific chitin-binding module 18 expansion in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramyan, John; Stajich, Jason E

    2012-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis, which is considered one of the driving forces behind the worldwide decline in populations of amphibians. As a member of the phylum Chytridiomycota, B. dendrobatidis has diverged significantly to emerge as the only pathogen of adult vertebrates. Such shifts in lifestyle are generally accompanied by various degrees of genomic modifications, yet neither its mode of pathogenicity nor any factors associated with it have ever been identified. Presented here is the identification and characterization of a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18), specific to B. dendrobatidis. CBM (chitin-binding module) expansions have been likened to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungus species, making this expanded group a prime candidate for the identification of potential pathogenicity factors. Furthermore, the CBM18 expansions are confined to three categories of genes, each having been previously implicated in host-pathogen interactions. These correlations highlight this specific domain expansion as a potential key player in the mode of pathogenicity in this unique fungus. The expansion of CBM18 in B. dendrobatidis is exceptional in its size and diversity compared to other pathogenic species of fungi, making this genomic feature unique in an evolutionary context as well as in pathogenicity. Amphibian populations are declining worldwide at an unprecedented rate. Although various factors are thought to contribute to this phenomenon, chytridiomycosis has been identified as one of the leading causes. This deadly fungal disease is cause by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a chytrid fungus species unique in its pathogenicity and, furthermore, its specificity to amphibians. Despite more than two decades of research, the biology of this fungus species and its deadly interaction with amphibians had been notoriously difficult to unravel. Due to the alarming rate of worldwide

  11. Binding proteins enhance specific uptake rate by increasing the substrate-transporter encounter rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosdriesz, E.; Magnúsdóttir, S.; Bruggeman, F.J.; Teusink, B.; Molenaar, D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms rely on binding-protein assisted, active transport systems to scavenge for scarce nutrients. Several advantages of using binding proteins in such uptake systems have been proposed. However, a systematic, rigorous and quantitative analysis of the function of binding proteins is

  12. Opto-Box

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00377159; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules, which process and transfer optoelectronic data. Many novel solutions were developed for the custom design and manufacturing. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35x10x8 cm$^{3}$. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain.

  13. Shot-gun proteome and transcriptome mapping of the jujube floral organ and identification of a pollen-specific S-locus F-box gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruihong; Chen, Guoliang

    2017-01-01

    The flower is a plant reproductive organ that forms part of the fruit produced as the flowering season ends. While the number and identity of proteins expressed in a jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) flower is currently unknown, integrative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses provide a systematic strategy of characterizing the floral biology of plants. We conducted a shotgun proteomic analysis on jujube flowers by using a filter-aided sample preparation tryptic digestion, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In addition, transcriptomics analyses were performed on HiSeq2000 sequencers. In total, 7,853 proteins were identified accounting for nearly 30% of the ‘Junzao’ gene models (27,443). Genes identified in proteome generally showed higher RPKM (reads per kilobase per million mapped reads) values than undetected genes. Gene ontology categories showed that ribosomes and intracellular organelles were the most dominant classes and accounted for 17.0% and 14.0% of the proteome mass, respectively. The top-ranking proteins with iBAQ >1010 included non-specific lipid transfer proteins, histones, actin-related proteins, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Bet v I type allergens, etc. In addition, we identified one pollen-specificity S-locus F-box-like gene located on the same chromosome as the S-RNase gene. Both of these may activate the behaviour of gametophyte self-incompatibility in jujube. These results reflected the protein profile features of jujube flowers and contributes new information important to the jujube breeding system. PMID:28729959

  14. Shot-gun proteome and transcriptome mapping of the jujube floral organ and identification of a pollen-specific S-locus F-box gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihong Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flower is a plant reproductive organ that forms part of the fruit produced as the flowering season ends. While the number and identity of proteins expressed in a jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. flower is currently unknown, integrative proteomic and transcriptomic analyses provide a systematic strategy of characterizing the floral biology of plants. We conducted a shotgun proteomic analysis on jujube flowers by using a filter-aided sample preparation tryptic digestion, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. In addition, transcriptomics analyses were performed on HiSeq2000 sequencers. In total, 7,853 proteins were identified accounting for nearly 30% of the ‘Junzao’ gene models (27,443. Genes identified in proteome generally showed higher RPKM (reads per kilobase per million mapped reads values than undetected genes. Gene ontology categories showed that ribosomes and intracellular organelles were the most dominant classes and accounted for 17.0% and 14.0% of the proteome mass, respectively. The top-ranking proteins with iBAQ >1010 included non-specific lipid transfer proteins, histones, actin-related proteins, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Bet v I type allergens, etc. In addition, we identified one pollen-specificity S-locus F-box-like gene located on the same chromosome as the S-RNase gene. Both of these may activate the behaviour of gametophyte self-incompatibility in jujube. These results reflected the protein profile features of jujube flowers and contributes new information important to the jujube breeding system.

  15. Specific contribution of Tyk2 JH regions to the binding and the expression of the interferon alpha/beta receptor component IFNAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M F; Duménil, G; Uzé, G; Fellous, M; Pellegrini, S

    1998-09-18

    Cytokine signaling involves the activation of the Janus kinase (JAK) family of tyrosine kinases. These enzymes are physically associated with cytokine receptor components. Here, we sought to define the molecular basis of the interaction between Tyk2 and IFNAR1, a component of the interferon alpha/beta receptor, by delimiting a minimal IFNAR1 binding region in the Tyk2 protein. Using an in vitro assay system, we narrowed down the interaction domain to a region comprising the JH7 and part of the JH6 homology boxes (amino acids 22-221). When expressed in Tyk2-negative cells, the JH7-6 region was unable to stabilize IFNAR1 protein levels, a critical function that we previously attributed to the N region (amino acids 1-591) of Tyk2. Moreover, substitution of the JH7-JH6 domain in JAK1 with that of Tyk2 did not restore IFNAR1 level nor interferon alpha signaling in Tyk2-negative cells. Thus, the major interaction surface lies within JH7-6, but additional JH regions (JH5-4-3) contribute in a specific manner to the in vivo assembly of Tyk2 and IFNAR1. Evidence is also provided of the lack of specificity of the Tyk2 kinase-like and tyrosine kinase domains in interferon alpha/beta receptor signaling.

  16. Exploring the specificities of glycan-binding proteins using glycan array data and the GlycoSearch software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletter, Doron; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin A; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    The glycan array is a powerful tool for investigating the specificities of glycan-binding proteins. By incubating a glycan-binding protein on a glycan array, the relative binding to hundreds of different oligosaccharides can be quantified in parallel. Based on these data, much information can be obtained about the preference of a glycan-binding protein for specific subcomponents of oligosaccharides or motifs. In many cases, the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data can be time consuming and imprecise if done manually. Recently we developed software, called GlycoSearch, to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data based on the previously developed methods called Motif Segregation and Outlier Motif Analysis. Here we describe the principles behind the software, the use of the software, and an example application. The automated, objective, and precise analysis of glycan array data should enhance the value of the data for a broad range of research applications.

  17. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, C. V.; Alemany, A.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na+]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg2+ salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  18. Nitric Oxide Binds to and Modulates the Activity of a Pollen Specific Arabidopsis Diacylglycerol Kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  19. Specific binding of the glycosaminoglycan /sup 3/H-heparin to bull, monkey, and rabbit spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrow, R.R.; Boehm, S.K.; Lenz, R.W.; Robinson, J.A.; Ax, R.L.

    In Vitro binding and some binding parameters of the glycosaminoglycan heparin to viable epididymal or ejaculated bull spermatozoa, ejaculated rabbit spermatozoa, and frozen-thawed rhesus monkey spermatozoa were investigated. Nonspecific binding was affected only by the concentration of /sup 3/H-heparin, whereas specific binding was saturable, reversible, and dependent on the pH, temperature, and calcium concentration of the incubation medium. Magnesium concentration dependence was observed in the presence of calcium but could not be detected in the absence of calcium. Bound /sup 3/H-heparin was displaced by several orders of magnitude greater concentrations of chondroitin sulfate. Scatchard plot analysis suggested multiple binding affinities for /sup 3/H-heparin to spermatozoa. /sup 3/H-heparin was shown to bind to sperm heads and flagella. Fluorescein-labeled heparin bound to acrosomal, postacrosomal, and flagellar membranes. It was concluded that the specific binding of heparin involved a proteinaceous component on, or intercalated with, spermatozoal membranes. Thus, glycosaminoglycans present in the female reproductive tract may contribute to sperm capacitation and enhance the likelihood of successful fertilization in mammals.

  20. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  1. Identification of specific Hep G2 cell binding regions in Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite-threonine-asparagine-rich protein (STARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ramsés; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Vera, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Luis Eduardo; Suarez, Jorge; Urquiza, Mauricio; Rodríguez, Ana Liliana; Reyes, Claudia Alexandra; Granados, Carmen Giovana; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-06-02

    It has been demonstrated that Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite threonine-asparagine-rich protein (PfSTARP) is located on the sporozoite surface. This protein's non-overlapping consecutive peptides were synthesised and tested in Hep G2 cell binding assays. Twelve high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified in the resulting 31 peptides. Three were found in 5' non-repeat region (amino acids 41-80). Peptides 20546 (41VIKHNRFLSEYQSNFLGGGY(60)), 20547 (61SAALKLVNSKKSGTNVNVTKY(80)) and 20548 (81NSENTNTNNNIPESSSTYTN(100)) were located in the conserved amino terminal region, as well as peptide 20548 which shared the sequence with the M region (amino acids 85-134). Six HABPs were located in region 10 (Rp10) (STDNNNTKTI). HABPs 20569 (501TSDDELNKDSCDYSEEKENI(520)) and 20570 (521KSMINAYLDKLDLETVRKIH(40)) were found in 3' non-repeat region. All these HABPs showed saturable binding and presented dissociation constants between 18 and 219 nM. The number of binding sites per Hep G2 cell ranged from 45000 to 370000. High binding peptides' critical amino acids involved in Hep G2 cell binding were determined by competition binding assays. SDS-PAGE results showed that both peptides 20570 and 20547 had at least two different sets of 44 and 38 kDa HABP receptors on Hep G2 cells. Specific modification of peptide 20546 and 20570 critical binding residues rendered these peptides immunogenic in Aotus monkeys, inducing high antibody titres against sporozoites, as assessed by IFA.

  2. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to MHC class I molecules using specificity matrices and anchor-stratified calibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauemøller, S L; Holm, A; Hilden, J

    2001-01-01

    and predictions of peptide-MHC interactions are therefore important. Quantitative matrices representing MHC class I specificity can be used to search any query protein for the presence of MHC binding peptides. Assuming that each peptide residue contributes to binding in an additive and sequence independent manner...... predictions, we have measured the MHC class I binding of a large number of peptides. In an attempt to further improve predictions and to include sequence dependency, we subdivided the panel of peptides according to whether the peptides had zero, one or two primary anchor residues. This allowed us to define...

  3. Specific triplex binding capacity of mixed base sequence duplex nucleic acids used for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daksis, Jasmine I; Erikson, Glen H

    2005-01-01

    Specific base recognition and binding between native double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of mixed base sequence is presented. Third-strand binding, facilitated and stabilized by a DNA intercalator, YOYO-1, occurs within 5 min at room temperature. This triplex binding capability has been used to develop a homogeneous assay that accurately detects 1-, 2-, or 3-bp mutations or deletions in the dsDNA target. Every type of 1-bp mismatch can be identified. The assay can reliably distinguish homozygous from heterozygous polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic dsDNA, thus providing a highly sensitive clinical diagnostic assay.

  4. Comprehensive Identification and Annotation of Cell Type-Specific and Ubiquitous CTCF-Binding Sites in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA elements that regulate the level of gene expression either by preventing gene silencing through the maintenance of heterochromatin boundaries or by preventing gene activation by blocking interactions between enhancers and promoters. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a ubiquitously expressed 11-zinc-finger DNA-binding protein, is the only protein implicated in the establishment of insulators in vertebrates. While CTCF has been implicated in diverse regulatory functions, CTCF has only been studied in a limited number of cell types across human genome. Thus, it is not clear whether the identified cell type-specific differences in CTCF-binding sites are functionally significant. Here, we identify and characterize cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites in the human genome across 38 cell types designated by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) consortium. These cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites show uniquely versatile transcriptional functions and characteristic chromatin features. In addition, we confirm the insulator barrier function of CTCF-binding and explore the novel function of CTCF in DNA replication. These results represent a critical step toward the comprehensive and systematic understanding of CTCF-dependent insulators and their versatile roles in the human genome. PMID:22829947

  5. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M; Huang, Wanzhi; Kou, Baijun; Estes, Mary K; Atmar, Robert L; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs)-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs) through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD) values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  7. Identification of specific binding sites for glucagon-like peptide-1 on the posterior lobe of the rat pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, R; Larsen, P J; Mikkelsen, J D; Sheikh, S P

    1995-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immunoreactivity has been found in autonomic and neuroendocrine brain regions, whereas only limited data are available regarding the characterization and localization of brain GLP-1 receptors. In the present study, using quantitative in vitro autoradiography, a high density of specific binding sites for GLP-1 was characterized on sections of the posterior pituitary lobe of the rat. Low specific binding of radiolabeled GLP-1 was found in the anterior lobe and no specific binding in the intermediate lobe. To examine the specificity of GLP-1 binding sites, sections of the posterior lobe were incubated with radiolabeled GLP-1 in the presence of various peptides. Radiolabeled [Tyr39]exendin-4, a specific GLP-1 agonist, bound to these receptor sites with the same affinity as GLP-1, while glucagon and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were unable to displace 125I-GLP-1. Both unlabeled exendin-4 and GLP-1 inhibited this binding with equally high affinity. Using 125I-[Tyr39]exendin-4 as radiolabel, the concentration of biding sites was found to be 7.8 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg tissue. Further analysis of the binding data from experiments with tissue slices revealed the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. In experiments with unlabeled [Tyr39]exendin-4, the KdS were 6.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-12) and 9.3 +/- 1.5 x 10(-10) M, respectively, and in experiments with unlabeled GLP-1, 3.4 +/- 1.8 x 10(-12) and 5.9 +/- 1.5 x 10(-10) M, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Examination of a Method to Determine the Reference Region for Calculating the Specific Binding Ratio in Dopamine Transporter Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ayumi; Inoue, Yusuke; Asano, Yuji; Kikuchi, Kei; Miyatake, Hiroki; Tokushige, Takanobu

    2017-01-01

    The specific binding ratio (SBR) was first reported by Tossici-Bolt et al. for quantitative indicators for dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging. It is defined as the ratio of the specific binding concentration of the striatum to the non-specific binding concentration of the whole brain other than the striatum. The non-specific binding concentration is calculated based on the region of interest (ROI), which is set 20 mm inside the outer contour, defined by a threshold technique. Tossici-Bolt et al. used a 50% threshold, but sometimes we couldn't define the ROI of non-specific binding concentration (reference region) and calculate SBR appropriately with a 50% threshold. Therefore, we sought a new method for determining the reference region when calculating SBR. We used data from 20 patients who had undergone DAT imaging in our hospital, to calculate the non-specific binding concentration by the following methods, the threshold to define a reference region was fixed at some specific values (the fixing method) and reference region was visually optimized by an examiner at every examination (the visual optimization method). First, we assessed the reference region of each method visually, and afterward, we quantitatively compared SBR calculated based on each method. In the visual assessment, the scores of the fixing method at 30% and visual optimization method were higher than the scores of the fixing method at other values, with or without scatter correction. In the quantitative assessment, the SBR obtained by visual optimization of the reference region, based on consensus of three radiological technologists, was used as a baseline (the standard method). The values of SBR showed good agreement between the standard method and both the fixing method at 30% and the visual optimization method, with or without scatter correction. Therefore, the fixing method at 30% and the visual optimization method were equally suitable for determining the reference region.

  9. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianwei; Yao, Peng; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qunye

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs. Methods and Results Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye) could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela) and suspended cells (K562) even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein) to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it. Conclusions These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results. PMID

  10. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  11. Functional redundancy of division specific penicillin-binding proteins in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassine, Jad; Xu, Meizhu; Sidiq, Karzan R; Emmins, Robyn; Errington, Jeff; Daniel, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial cell division involves the dynamic assembly of a diverse set of proteins that coordinate the invagination of the cell membrane and synthesis of cell wall material to create the new cell poles of the separated daughter cells. Penicillin-binding protein PBP 2B is a key cell division protein in Bacillus subtilis proposed to have a specific catalytic role in septal wall synthesis. Unexpectedly, we find that a catalytically inactive mutant of PBP 2B supports cell division, but in this background the normally dispensable PBP 3 becomes essential. Phenotypic analysis of pbpC mutants (encoding PBP 3) shows that PBP 2B has a crucial structural role in assembly of the division complex, independent of catalysis, and that its biochemical activity in septum formation can be provided by PBP 3. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a close sequence relationship between PBP 3 and Staphylococcus aureus PBP 2A, which is responsible for methicillin resistance. These findings suggest that mechanisms for rescuing cell division when the biochemical activity of PBP 2B is perturbed evolved prior to the clinical use of β-lactams. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Simplified immunoassay for rapid Dengue serotype diagnosis, revealing insensitivity to non-specific binding interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C.C.L. Loureiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proof of concept of an immunoassay, which is easy to implement, for rapid Dengue virus (DENV serotype diagnosis, in the early infection stage, is reported. The four-layer assay is immobilized onto a thin gold film and relies on a low cost, disposable polymer biochip for optical surface plasmon resonance sensing and detection. The protocol comprises Neutravidin-Biotin mediated monoclonal antibody (MAB attachment as the functionalized sensing element. Formation of the MAB-DENV complex results in a pronounced thickness change that is optically recorded in real time, employing a microfluidic set-up. Virus presence is confirmed by atomic force microscopy from the same sample. Serum samples were collected from a patient in acute febrile state. Simultaneous serological analysis by means of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, independently, confirmed presence of DENV2 and DENV3. The protocol proved applicable in presence of strong non-specific binding interference that originates from, and is caused by, various blood, serum and other body fluid constituents. False positive indications for both, negative serum and blood control samples were not observed. The achievable limit of detection was estimated to be 2×104 particles/ml. Eventually, the method can be modified towards detection of other viruses by using the same protocol.

  13. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  14. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  15. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  16. Developmental variation of the SUUR protein binding correlates with gene regulation and specific chromatin types in D. melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Daniil A; Koryakov, Dmitry E; Belyakin, Stepan N

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized in large chromatin domains that maintain proper gene activity in the cell. These domains may be permissive or repressive to the transcription of underlying genes. Based on its protein makeup, chromatin in Drosophila cell culture has been recently categorized into five color-coded states. Suppressor of Under-Replication (SUUR) protein was found to be the major component present in all three repressive chromatin states named BLACK, BLUE, and GREEN and to be depleted from the active YELLOW and RED chromatin types. Here, we addressed the question of developmental dynamics of SUUR binding as a marker of repressed chromatin types. We established genomewide SUUR binding profiles in larval salivary gland, brain, and embryos using DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) technique, performed their pairwise comparisons and comparisons with the published data from Drosophila Kc cells. SUUR binding pattern was found to vary between the samples. Increase in SUUR binding predominantly correlated with local gene repression suggesting heterochromatin formation. Reduction in SUUR binding often coincided with activation of tissue-specific genes probably reflecting the transition to permissive chromatin state and increase in accessibility to specific transcription factors. SUUR binding plasticity accompanied by the regulation of the underlying genes was mainly observed in BLACK, BLUE, and RED chromatin types. Our results provide novel insight into the developmental dynamics of repressive chromatin and reveal a link to the chromatin-guided regulation of gene expression.

  17. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováciková, Michaela; Raska, Ivan; Mateásik, Anton; Chase, Bruce A; Farkas, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Highly conserved LAMMER kinases belong to the family of dual-specific proteins phosphorylating enzymes with homologues in yeast, plants, Drosophila and mammals. SR proteins, several members of which are components of the spliceosomal complex and have been implicated in the control of alternative splicing, were identified among first targets of LAMMER kinases. The Drosophila locus Darkener of apricot (Doa) encodes best known representative of the LAMMER family of kinases, which is essential for embryonic and postembryonic development, neurogenesis, differentiation of photoreceptors, and sex determination. DOA kinase was detected on squash preparations of polythene chromosomes using anti-DOA antibodies in combination with indirect immunofluorescence. Here we provide evidence for active chromosomal presence of DOA kinase in Drosophila salivary glands, and increased abundance of DOA at eleven specific loci of polythene chromosomes where it can be involved in on-site control of splicing process. Many genes that may be found at the loci with increased abundance fall into three major groups based on their known functions. First group contains genes that code for transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins or chromatin modifying enzymes. Second group of genes encode proteins which belong to proteasomal components, lipid enzymes, stress-sensitive ER proteins and caspases which are all early/proximal components of apoptotic process. Third group of genes comprises of tRNA coding genes or genes of tRNA synthases (ligases), all involved in protein synthesis. Some of the encoded protein products are confirmed or potential substrates of DOA kinase activity. Data indicate that genes encoding proteins involved in closely related pathways are concentrated at certain loci to achieve more efficient regulation of their expression as exemplified from distribution of DOA protein on Drosophila polythene chromosomes.

  18. Carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity of legume lectins in respect to their proposed biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viana Ramos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lectins, proteins which specifically recognize carbohydrate moieties, have been extensively studied in many biochemical and structural aspects in order to establish the molecular basis of this non-catalytic event. On the other hand, their clinical and agricultural potentials have been growing fast. Although lectins, mainly those from legume plants, had been investigated for biological properties, studies about the physiological functions of lectins are scarce in literature. Therefore, despite the accumulated data on lectins (as proteins, the role played by these signalizing molecules is poorly discussed. In the light of our accumulated results on legume lectins, specially those obtained from plants belonging to the Diocleinae sub-tribe and available data in literature, we discuss here the main hypothesis of their functions according to their carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity.As lectinas, proteinas que especificamente reconhecem estruturas que contém carboidratos, têm sido extensivamente estudadas em muitos aspectos bioquímicos e estruturais, objetivando estabelecer as bases moleculares deste evento não-catalítico. Por outro lado, os potenciais clínicos e agriculturais destas proteínas têm crescido rapidamente. Embora as lectinas, principalmente aquelas de legumes tenham sido bastante investigadas em suas propriedades biológicas, estudos sobre as funcões fisiológicas de lectinas são escassos na literatura. Além disto, a despeito da quantidade de dados acumulados sobre lectinas (como proteínas, o papel desempenhado por estas moléculas de sinalização é pobremente discutido. Valendo-se de nossos estudos sobre lectinas de leguminosas, principalmente da sub-tribo Diocleinae, e outros dados presentes na literatura, discutimos aqui, as principais hipóteses de suas funções com base na especificidade por carboidratos e glicanos complexos.

  19. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  20. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa plasma membrane proteins were identified as viral envelope targets. Competitive binding assay showed these proteins competing with dengue virus binding. MTT assay indicate that viability of vero cells increases in cultures pretreated with 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa proteins ...

  1. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  2. Characterization of the carbohydrate binding specificity and kinetic parameters of lectins by using surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haseley, S.R.; Talaga, P.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    An accurate, rapid, and sensitive method for characterizing the carbohydrate binding properties of lectins using a BIAcore apparatus and the detection method of surface plasmon resonance is described. As a model study, the sialic acid binding lectins from Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis, which

  3. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    . The ability of NAC proteins to dimerize and to bind DNAwas analysed by structure-based mutagenesis. This identified two salt bridge-forming residues essential for NAC protein dimerization. Alteration of basic residues in a loop region containing several highly conserved residues abolished DNA binding. Thus...

  4. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2?) and tungstate (WO4 2?). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  5. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette

    2014-01-01

    representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  6. Role of Lysine-54 in determining cofactor specificity and binding in human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shaoming; Tan, Xuehai; Thompson, P.D.; Freisheim, J.H. (Medical College of Ohio, Todedo (USA)); Appleman, J.R.; Blakley, R.L. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA)); Sheridan, R.P.; Venkataraghavan, R. (Lederle Laboratories, Pearl River, NY (USA))

    1990-09-04

    Lysine-54 of human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) appears to be involved in the interaction with the 2{prime}-phosphate of NADPH and is conserved as a basic residue in other species. Studies have suggested that in Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase Arg-43, the homologous residue at this position, plays an important role in the binding of NADPH and in the differentiation of K{sub m} values for NADPH and NADH. A Lys-54 to Gln-54 mutant (K54Q) of hDHFR has been constructed by oligodeoxynucleotide-directed mutagenesis in order to study the role of Lys-54 in differentiating K{sub m} and k{sub cat} values for NADPH and NADH as well as in other functions of hDHFR. The purpose of this paper is to delineate in quantitative terms the magnitude of the effect of the Lys-54 to Gln-54 replacement on the various kinetic parameters of hDHFR. Such quantitative effects cannot be predicted solely on the basis of X-ray structures. The ratio of K{sub m}(NADH)/K{sub m}(NADPH) decreases from 69 in the wild-type enzyme to 4.7 in the K54Q enzyme, suggesting that Lys-54, among other interactions between protein side-chain residues and the 2{prime}-phosphate, makes a major contribution in terms of binding energy and differentiation of K{sub m} values for NADPH and NADH. Agents at concentrations that show activating effects on the wild-type enzyme such as potassium chloride and urea all inactivate the K54Q enzyme. There appear to be no gross conformational differences between wild-type and K54Q enzyme molecules as judged by competitive ELISA using peptide-specific antibodies against human dihydrofolate reductase and from protease susceptibility studies on both wild-type and K54Q mutant enzymes. The pH-rate profiles using NADPH for K54Q and wild-type enzymes show divergences at certain pH values, suggesting the possibility of alteration(s) in the steps of the catalytic pathway for the K54Q enzyme.

  7. DNA binding specificity of ATAF2, a NAC domain transcription factor targeted for degradation by Tobacco mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of the host transcriptome represents a key battleground in the interaction of plants and pathogens. Specifically, plants have evolved complex defense systems that induce profound transcriptional changes in response to pathogen attack while pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert or disable these defenses. Several NAC transcription factors such as ATAF2 have been linked to plant defense responses, including those targeting viruses. The replication protein of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV has been shown to interact with and target the degradation of ATAF2. These findings suggest that the transcriptional targets of ATAF2 are involved in defense against TMV. Results To detect potential ATAF2 transcriptional targets, a genomic pull-down assay was utilized to identify ATAF2 promoter binding sequences. Subsequent mobility shift and DNA footprinting assays identified a 30-bp ATAF2 binding sequence. An in vivo GUS reporter system confirmed the function of the identified 30-bp binding sequence as an ATAF2 specific transcriptional activator in planta. Gel filtration studies of purified ATAF2 protein and mutagenesis studies of the 30-bp binding sequence indicate ATAF2 functions as a dimer. Computational analysis of interacting promoter sequences identified a corresponding 25-bp A/T-rich consensus sequence with repeating [GC]AAA motifs. Upon ATAF2 induction real-time qRT-PCR studies confirmed the accumulation of select gene transcripts whose promoters contain this consensus sequence. Conclusion We report the identification of a cis-regulatory binding sequence for ATAF2. Different from other known NAC protein binding sequences, the A/T-rich ATAF2 binding motif represents a novel binding sequence for NAC family proteins. Combined this information represents a unique tool for the identification of ATAF2 target genes.

  8. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  9. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  10. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available :359-69. 37 8. Burrer, R., S. Haessig-Einius, A. M. Aubertin, and C. Moog. 2005. 38 Neutralizing as well as non-neutralizing polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)G 39 from infected patients capture HIV-1 via antibodies directed against the 40 principal.... Moore, G. D. Tomaras, C. K. 5 Wibmer, A. Puren, A. DeCamp, P. B. Gilbert, B. Wood, D. C. Montefiori, 6 J. M. Binley, G. M. Shaw, B. F. Haynes, J. R. Mascola, and L. Morris. 7 2009. Antibody specificities associated with neutralization breadth...

  11. Highly specific off-target binding identified and eliminated during the humanization of an antibody against FGF receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Arthur E; Lin, Benjamin C; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Desnoyers, Luc; Shen, Ben-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Off-target binding can significantly affect the pharmacokinetics (PK), tissue distribution, efficacy and toxicity of a therapeutic antibody. Herein we describe the development of a humanized anti-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) antibody as a potential therapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A chimeric anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (chLD1) was previously shown to block ligand binding and to inhibit FGFR4-mediated signaling as well as tumor growth in vivo. A humanized version of chLD1, hLD1.vB, had similar binding affinity and in vitro blocking activity, but it exhibited rapid clearance, poor target tissue biodistribution and limited efficacy when compared to chLD1 in a HUH7 human HCC xenograft mouse model. These problems were traced to instability of the molecule in rodent serum. Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography, immunoprecipitation and mass spectral sequencing identified a specific interaction between hLD1.vB and mouse complement component 3 (C3). A PK study in C3 knock-out mice further confirmed this specific interaction. Subsequently, an affinity-matured variant derived from hLD1.vB (hLD1.v22), specifically selected for its lack of binding to mouse C3 was demonstrated to have a PK profile and in vivo efficacy similar to that of chLD1 in mice. Although reports of non-specific off-target binding have been observed for other antibodies, this represents the first report identifying a specific off-target interaction that affected disposition and biological activity. Screens developed to identify general non-specific interactions are likely to miss the rare and highly specific cross-reactivity identified in this study, thus highlighting the importance of animal models as a proxy for avoiding unexpected clinical outcomes. PMID:21540647

  12. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  13. /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor specific binding to placentas and fetal membranes from varoius pregnancy states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, G.E.; Siddiqi, T.A.; Rao, Ch. V.; Carman, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Specific binding of /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) to homogenates of term human placentas and fetal membranes from normal and appropriate for gestational age (N = 20), intrauterine growth retarded (N = 9), twin (N = 11), White class AB diabetic (N = 12), and large for gestational age (N = 13) pregnancies was measured. In all pregnancy states, placentas bound approximately four times more /sup 125/I-hEGF than did fetal membranes (P<0.0001). There was no significant differnce in /sup 125/I-hEGF binding to fetal membranes from the various pregnancy states (P<0.05). /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding to placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies was significantly greater compared with placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies (P<0.05). The binding to placentas from pregnancies complicated by White class AB diabetes or large for gestational age infants, on the other hand, was not significantly different from that to placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies. /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding did not differ between placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies (P<0.05). Placental and fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding did not vary with fetal sex, maternal race, placental weight, or gestational age between 37 to 42 weeks (P<0.05). Placental but not fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding increased with increasing infant weight when appropriate for gestational age and large for gestational age infants were included (P<0.05, r = 0.38, N = 32) but not for intrauterine growth retarded, appropriate for gestational age, or large for gestational age infants alone.

  14. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    residues, H142, Q150, and T152, were demonstrated to be involved in the distinct pharmacology of the α4-α4 versus α4-β2 binding sites. To obtain insight into the three-dimensional structure of the α4-α4 binding site, a surrogate protein reproducing α4-α4 binding characteristics was constructed...... by introduction of three point mutations, R104H, L112Q, and M114T, into the binding pocket of Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP). Cocrystallization with two agonists possessing distinct pharmacologic profiles, NS3920 [1-(6-bromopyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane] and NS3573 [1-(5-ethoxypyridin-3......-yl)-1,4-diazepane], highlights the roles of the three residues in determining binding affinities and functional properties of ligands at the α4-α4 interface. Confirmed by mutational studies, our structures suggest a unique ligand-specific role of residue H142 on the α4 subunit. In the cocrystal...

  15. ALIX is a Lys63-specific polyubiquitin binding protein that functions in retrovirus budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlatshahi, Dara P; Sandrin, Virginie; Vivona, Sandro; Shaler, Thomas A; Kaiser, Stephen E; Melandri, Francesco; Sundquist, Wesley I; Kopito, Ron R

    2012-12-11

    The diversity of ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent signaling is attributed to the ability of this small protein to form different types of covalently linked polyUb chains and to the existence of Ub binding proteins that interpret this molecular syntax. We used affinity capture/mass spectrometry to identify ALIX, a component of the ESCRT pathway, as a Ub binding protein. We report that the V domain of ALIX binds directly and selectively to K63-linked polyUb chains, exhibiting a strong preference for chains composed of more than three Ub. Sequence analysis identified two potential Ub binding sites on a single α-helical surface within the coiled-coil region of the V domain. Mutation of these putative Ub binding sites inhibited polyUb binding to the isolated V domain in vitro and impaired budding of lentiviruses. These data reveal an important role for K63 polyUb binding by ALIX in retroviral release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Astrocytes cultured from specific brain regions differ in their expression of adrenergic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsberger, P; Iacovitti, L; Reis, D J

    1990-05-28

    We sought to characterize regional heterogeneity of astrocytes using adrenergic receptor sites as cellular markers. Primary cultures made from 6 regions of neonatal rat brain consisted almost exclusively of astrocytes. Membranes from astrocytes cultured 1-3 weeks were prepared for radioligand binding assays of beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic sites using the ligands [3H]dihydroalprenolol and [3H]p-aminoclonidine, respectively. Receptor expression was not affected by time in culture. Astrocytes from different brain regions varied up to 3-fold with respect to number but not affinity for both classes of adrenergic binding site with a rank order of cerebral cortex = superior colliculus greater than hippocampus = ventral midbrain greater than or equal to caudate nucleus greater than or equal to hypothalamus. Binding to beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors was positively correlated across brain regions. Astrocytic receptor binding in each region did not correspond to total receptor levels assessed by quantitative autoradiography. We conclude that: (a) astrocytes are markedly heterogeneous between major brain regions with respect to expression of adrenergic binding sites; (b) regional variations in the density of adrenergic binding sites in brain reflect, in part, local specialization of astrocytes; and (c) a substantial proportion of the adrenergic binding sites in some brain regions may be on astrocytes.

  17. Sporozoite and liver stage antigen Plasmodium falciparum peptides bind specifically to human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Rodríguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Tovar, Diana; Forero, Martha; Bermudez, Adriana; Cortes, Jimena; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-03-12

    Sporozoite and Liver Stage Antigen (SALSA) sequence synthetic peptides were used in HepG2 cell binding assays to identify regions involved in parasite invasion. SALSA 20608 ( 21IWASEKKDEKEASEQGEESHY40) and 20611 ( 64KKDDGTDKVQEKVLEKSPKY83) peptides were determined as having high binding activity in HepG2 cell assays, some of them were located in immunogenic regions. Immune-fluorescence antibody test with 24276 (20608 peptide analogue, CGIWSSMKMDEKMAAMQGEESHCG) showed sporozoite and merozoite reactivity. This data suggests SALSA high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) possible role in hepatic cell invasion and merozoite invasion of erythrocytes.

  18. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  19. Growth arrest-specific 6 regulates thrombin-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 through forkhead box O1 in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, F R; Lemarié, C A; Robins, R S; Blostein, M D

    2015-12-01

    Growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6)-deficient mice are protected against venous thromboembolism (VTE), suggesting a role for Gas6 in this disorder. We previously demonstrated that Gas6 induces forkhead box O1 (FoxO-1) phosphorylation through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt pathway. FoxO-1 regulates the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), a molecule that has been implicated in VTE. To assess the role of FoxO-1 in Gas6-dependent VCAM-1 expression. Thrombin was used to stimulate endothelial cells (ECs). Wild-type (WT) and Gas6(-/-) ECs were transfected with small interfering RNA targeting Axl or FoxO-1, a luciferase-coupled plasmid containing the FoxO-1 consensus sequence, and a phosphorylation-resistant FoxO-1 mutant, or treated with an Akt inhibitor. VCAM-1 mRNA expression was measured by real time-qPCR. VCAM-1 protein expression and FoxO-1 and Akt phosphorylation were assessed by western blot analysis. FoxO-1 localization was assessed by immunofluorescence. Adhesion of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MCs) on ECs was assessed by fluorescence. Thrombin induces both VCAM-1 expression and FoxO-1 phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion in WT ECs only. Silencing of FoxO-1 enhances VCAM-1 expression in both WT and Gas6(-/-) ECs. Inhibition of Akt or FoxO-1 phosphorylation prevents VCAM-1 expression in WT ECs. These data show that Gas6 induces FoxO-1 phosphorylation, leading to derepression of VCAM-1 expression. BM-MC-EC adhesion is increased by thrombin in WT ECs. BM-MC-EC adhesion is further increased when FoxO-1 is silenced, but decreased when FoxO-1 phosphorylation is inhibited. These results demonstrate that the Gas6-FoxO-1 signaling axis plays an important role in VCAM-1 expression in the context of VTE by promoting BM-MC-EC adhesion. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. The conserved PA14 domain of cell wall-associated fungal adhesins governs their glycan-binding specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Klis, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast cell wall-associated, lectin-like adhesins form large families that mediate flocculation and host cell recognition. The glycan specificity of individual adhesins is largely unknown. Zupancic et al. (this issue of Molecular Microbiology) used glycan microarrays to compare the glycan-binding

  1. A plasmonic multi-logic gate platform based on sequence-specific binding of estrogen receptors and gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Roger M; Bosman, Michel; Thanh, Nguyen T K; Su, Xiaodi

    2016-12-08

    A hybrid system made of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is used to build a versatile multi-logic gate platform, capable of performing six different logic operations. The sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the DNA drives the optical response of the design.

  2. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  3. Rationally Designed PI3Kα Mutants to Mimic ATR and Their Use to Understand Binding Specificity of ATR Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yipin; Knapp, Mark; Crawford, Kenneth; Warne, Robert; Elling, Robert; Yan, Kelly; Doyle, Michael; Pardee, Gwynn; Zhang, Li; Ma, Sylvia; Mamo, Mulugeta; Ornelas, Elizabeth; Pan, Yue; Bussiere, Dirksen; Jansen, Johanna; Zaror, Isabel; Lai, Albert; Barsanti, Paul; Sim, Janet

    2017-06-02

    ATR, a protein kinase in the PIKK family, plays a critical role in the cell DNA-damage response and is an attractive anticancer drug target. Several potent and selective inhibitors of ATR have been reported showing significant antitumor efficacy, with most advanced ones entering clinical trials. However, due to the absence of an experimental ATR structure, the determinants contributing to ATR inhibitors' potency and specificity are not well understood. Here we present the mutations in the ATP-binding site of PI3Kα to progressively transform the pocket to mimic that of ATR. The generated PI3Kα mutants exhibit significantly improved affinity for selective ATR inhibitors in multiple chemical classes. Furthermore, we obtained the X-ray structures of the PI3Kα mutants in complex with the ATR inhibitors. The crystal structures together with the analysis on the inhibitor affinity profile elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residues in the binding of ATR inhibitors, offering key insights for the binding mechanism and revealing the structure features important for the specificity of ATR inhibitors. The ability to obtain structural and binding data for these PI3Kα mutants, together with their ATR-like inhibitor binding profiles, makes these chimeric PI3Kα proteins valuable model systems for structure-based inhibitor design. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthetic Ubiquinones Specifically Bind to Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 (VDAC1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Masatoshi; Okuda, Ayaka; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2017-01-31

    The role of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) as a metabolic gate of the mitochondrial outer membrane has been firmly established; however, its involvement in the regulation of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) remains extremely controversial. Although some low-molecular-weight chemicals have been proposed to modulate the regulatory role of VDAC in the induction of PT, direct binding between these chemicals and VDAC has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated whether the ubiquinone molecule directly binds to VDAC in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria through a photoaffinity labeling technique using two photoreactive ubiquinones (PUQ-1 and PUQ-2). The results of the labeling experiments demonstrated that PUQ-1 and PUQ-2 specifically bind to VDAC1 and that the labeled position is located in the C-terminal region Phe221-Lys234, connecting the 15th and 16th β-strand sheets. Mutations introduced in this region (R224A, Y225A, D228A, and Y225A/D228A) hardly affected the binding affinity of PUQ-1. PUQ-1 and PUQ-2 both significantly suppressed the Ca2+-induced mitochondrial PT (monitored by mitochondrial swelling) at the one digit μM level. Thus, the results of the present study provided, for the first time to our knowledge, direct evidence indicating that the ubiquinone molecule specifically binds to VDAC1 through its quinone-head ring.

  5. Anomer-Specific Recognition and Dynamics in a Fucose-Binding Lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonik, Paweł M; Volkov, Alexander N; Broder, Ursula N; Re, Daniele Lo; van Nuland, Nico A J; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-03-01

    Sugar binding by a cell surface ∼29 kDa lectin (RSL) from the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum was characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The complexes formed with four monosaccharides and four fucosides were studied. Complete resonance assignments and backbone dynamics were determined for RSL in the sugar-free form and when bound to l-fucose or d-mannose. RSL was found to interact with both the α- and the β-anomer of l-fucose and the "fucose like" sugars d-arabinose and l-galactose. Peak splitting was observed for some resonances of the binding site residues. The assignment of the split signals to the α- or β-anomer was confirmed by comparison with the spectra of RSL bound to methyl-α-l-fucoside or methyl-β-l-fucoside. The backbone dynamics of RSL were sensitive to the presence of ligand, with the protein adopting a more compact structure upon binding to l-fucose. Taking advantage of tryptophan residues in the binding sites, we show that the indole resonance is an excellent reporter on ligand binding. Each sugar resulted in a distinct signature of chemical shift perturbations, suggesting that tryptophan signals are a sufficient probe of sugar binding.

  6. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  7. Y-box Binding Protein-1 Is Part of a Complex Molecular Network Linking ΔNp63α to the PI3K/akt Pathway in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Annaelena; Lomoriello, Irene Schiano; di Martino, Orsola; Fusco, Sabato; Pollice, Alessandra; Vivo, Maria; La Mantia, Girolama; Calabrò, Viola

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) typically lack somatic oncogene-activating mutations and most of them contain p53 mutations. However, the presence of p53 mutations in skin premalignant lesions suggests that these represent early events during tumor progression and additional alterations may be required for SCC development. SCC cells frequently express high levels of ΔNp63α and Y-box binding 1 (YB-1 or YBX1) oncoproteins. Here, we show that knockdown of YB-1 in spontaneously immortalized HaCaT and non-metastatic SCC011 cells led to a dramatic decrease of ΔNp63α, cell detachment and death. In highly metastatic SCC022 cells, instead, YB-1 silencing induces PI3K/AKT signaling hyperactivation which counteracts the effect of YB-1 depletion and promotes cell survival. In summary, our results unveil a functional cross-talk between YB-1, ΔNp63α and the PI3K/AKT pathway critically governing survival of squamous carcinoma cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Molecular characterization and expression pattern of X box-binding protein-1 (XBP1) in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.): Indications for a role of XBP1 in antibacterial and antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Li, Hua; Peng, Shaoqing; Zhang, Fumiao; An, Liguo; Yang, Guiwen

    2017-08-01

    X box-binding protein-1 (XBP1) is a transcription factor that is essential for the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the differentiation of plasma cells, and some findings have also uncovered its function in innate immunity. XBP1 typically has two different transcripts, un-spliced (XBP1u) and spliced forms (XBP1s), but XBP1s is an active transcription factor in the regulation of target genes. To date, there is no evidence about the identification and function of XBP1 in common carp. Moreover, no data are currently available regarding the role of fish XBP1 in innate immunity. Thus, to determine whether XBP1 is involved in innate immune response in common carp, we cloned CcXBP1s and examined the expression of XBP1s and a XBP1s stimulated gene (IL-6) after Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) challenges. The results imply that CcXBP1s, as an active transcription factor, might play regulation roles in the antibacterial and antiviral innate immune responses of common carp. This allows us to gain new insights into the immunological function of XBP1 in fish innate immunity and the evolution of this important class of genes across vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half

  10. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohideen-Abdul, Kareem; Tazibt, Karima; Bourguet, Maxime; Hazemann, Isabelle; Lebars, Isabelle; Takacs, Maria; Cianférani, Sarah; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Moras, Dino; Billas, Isabelle M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Most nuclear receptors (NRs) bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs) involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR) belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR) family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD) with that of the estrogen receptor (ER). In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3), but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs)], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS), non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3), such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3), where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half-site is

  11. Binding patterns of DTR-specific antibodies reveal a glycosylation-conditioned tumor-specific epitope of the epithelial mucin (MUC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Uwe; Serttas, Nida; Paulsen, Hans; Danielczyk, Antje; Goletz, Steffen

    2004-08-01

    Glycosylation determines essential biological functions of epithelial mucins in health and disease. We report on the influence of glycosylation of the immunodominant DTR motif of MUC1 on its antigenicity. Sets of novel glycopeptides were synthesized that enabled us to examine sole and combined effects of peptide length (number of repeats) and O-glycosylation with GalNAc at the DTR motif on the binding patterns of 22 monoclonal antibodies recognizing this motif. In case of unglycosylated peptides almost all antibodies bound better to multiple MUC1 tandem repeats. Glycosylation at the DTR led to enhanced binding in 11 cases, whereas 10 antibodies were not influenced in binding, and one was inhibited. In nine of the former cases both length and DTR glycosylation were additive in their influence on antibody binding, suggesting that both effects are different. Improved binding to the glycosylated DTR motif was exclusively found with antibodies generated against tumor-derived MUC1. Based on these data a tumor-specific MUC1 epitope is defined comprising the ...PDTRP... sequence in a particular conformation essentially determined by O-glycosylation at its threonine with either GalNAcalpha1 or a related short glycan. The results can find application in the field of MUC1-based immunotherapy.

  12. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini, E-mail: ekaterini.kordeli@inserm.fr

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  13. DNA recognition by F factor TraI36: highly sequence-specific binding of single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J C; Schildbach, J F

    2001-09-25

    The TraI protein has two essential roles in transfer of conjugative plasmid F Factor. As part of a complex of DNA-binding proteins, TraI introduces a site- and strand-specific nick at the plasmid origin of transfer (oriT), cutting the DNA strand that is transferred to the recipient cell. TraI also acts as a helicase, presumably unwinding the plasmid strands prior to transfer. As an essential feature of its nicking activity, TraI is capable of binding and cleaving single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing an oriT sequence. The specificity of TraI DNA recognition was examined by measuring the binding of oriT oligonucleotide variants to TraI36, a 36-kD amino-terminal domain of TraI that retains the sequence-specific nucleolytic activity. TraI36 recognition is highly sequence-specific for an 11-base region of oriT, with single base changes reducing affinity by as much as 8000-fold. The binding data correlate with plasmid mobilization efficiencies: plasmids containing sequences bound with lower affinities by TraI36 are transferred between cells at reduced frequencies. In addition to the requirement for high affinity binding to oriT, efficient in vitro nicking and in vivo plasmid mobilization requires a pyrimidine immediately 5' of the nick site. The high sequence specificity of TraI single-stranded DNA recognition suggests that despite its recognition of single-stranded DNA, TraI is capable of playing a major regulatory role in initiation and/or termination of plasmid transfer.

  14. Identifying determinants of cullin binding specificity among the three functionally different Drosophila melanogaster Roc proteins via domain swapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Reynolds

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cullin-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases (CDL are key regulators of protein destruction that participate in a wide range of cell biological processes. The Roc subunit of CDL contains an evolutionarily conserved RING domain that binds ubiquitin charged E2 and is essential for ubiquitylation. Drosophila melanogaster contains three highly related Roc proteins: Roc1a and Roc2, which are conserved in vertebrates, and Roc1b, which is specific to Drosophila. Our previous genetic data analyzing Roc1a and Roc1b mutants suggested that Roc proteins are functionally distinct, but the molecular basis for this distinction is not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using co-immunoprecipitation studies we show that Drosophila Roc proteins bind specific Cullins: Roc1a binds Cul1-4, Roc1b binds Cul3, and Roc2 binds Cul5. Through domain swapping experiments, we demonstrate that Cullin binding specificity is strongly influenced by the Roc NH(2-terminal domain, which forms an inter-molecular beta sheet with the Cullin. Substitution of the Roc1a RING domain with that of Roc1b results in a protein with similar Cullin binding properties to Roc1a that is active as an E3 ligase but cannot complement Roc1a mutant lethality, indicating that the identity of the RING domain can be an important determinant of CDL function. In contrast, the converse chimeric protein with a substitution of the Roc1b RING domain with that of Roc1a can rescue the male sterility of Roc1b mutants, but only when expressed from the endogenous Roc1b promoter. We also identified mutations of Roc2 and Cul5 and show that they cause no overt developmental phenotype, consistent with our finding that Roc2 and Cul5 proteins are exclusive binding partners, which others have observed in human cells as well. CONCLUSIONS: The Drosophila Roc proteins are highly similar, but have diverged during evolution to bind a distinct set of Cullins and to utilize RING domains that have overlapping, but not

  15. Specific histamine binding activity of a new lipocalin from Hyalomma asiaticum (Ixodidae) and therapeutic effects on allergic asthma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Li, Zhuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Houshuang; Gong, Haiyan; Zhou, Jinlin

    2016-09-17

    Lipocalin proteins are secreted by tick salivary glands as an important strategy to interfere with the immune response of hosts. A large number of lipocalins are secreted, but the functions of most of these proteins are unclear. Here, we report a new lipocalin protein with particular histamine binding capacity, which was isolated from the salivary glands of the tick Hyalomma asiaticum. The full length cDNA of the Ha24 gene was obtained by RACE, and Ha24 gene was expressed in E. coli; after protein purification and mice immunizations, specific Polyclonal antibodies (PcAb) were created in response to the recombinant protein. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), indirect immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) assay and western blot were used to detect the existence of native Ha24 in ticks. To confirm the histamine-binding capacity of rHa24, a histamine-binding assay was completed in vitro (ELISA) and in vivo by inhibition of allergic asthma in mice. Ha24 is coded by 681 bases, contains 227 amino acids, and has a molecular weight of 23.3 kDa. Abundant expression in the salivary glands of feeding ticks was confirmed by the identification of native Ha24 in ticks. The results of a histamine binding assay both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that rHa24 binds specifically with histamine in a dose-dependent manner, and can provide relief from allergic asthma in mice. Ha24 is a new tick lipocalin with specific histamine binding activity that can provide relief from host inflammation response.

  16. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  17. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  18. Humanization of a phosphothreonine peptide-specific chicken antibody by combinatorial library optimization of the phosphoepitope-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Du-San; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-07-31

    Detection of protein phosphorylation at a specific residue has been achieved by using antibodies, which have usually been raised by animal immunization. However, there have been no reports of the humanization of phosphospecific non-human antibodies. Here, we report the humanization of a chicken pT231 antibody specific to a tau protein-derived peptide carrying the phosphorylated threonine at residue 231 (pT231 peptide) as a model for better understanding the phosphoepitope recognition mechanism. In the chicken antibody, the phosphate group of the pT231-peptide antigen is exclusively recognized by complementarity determining region 2 of the heavy chain variable domain (VH-CDR2). Simple grafting of six CDRs of the chicken antibody into a homologous human framework (FR) template resulted in the complete loss of pT231-peptide binding. Using a yeast surface-displayed combinatorial library with permutations of 11 FR residues potentially affecting CDR loop conformations, we identified 5 critical FR residues. The back mutation of these residues to the corresponding chicken residues completely recovered the pT231-peptide binding affinity and specificity of the humanized antibody. Importantly, the back mutation of the FR 76 residue of VH (H76) (Asn to Ser) was critical in preserving the pT231-binding motif conformation via allosteric regulation of ArgH71, which closely interacts with ThrH52 and SerH52a residues on VH-CDR2 to induce the unique phosphate-binding bowl-like conformation. Our humanization approach of CDR grafting plus permutations of FR residues by combinatorial library screening can be applied to other animal antibodies containing unique binding motifs on CDRs specific to posttranslationally modified epitopes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the binding specificity of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) in comparison to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, S E; Thiele, J; Park, Y O; Hanisch, F G; Bara, J; Fischer, R

    1996-08-01

    Using immunochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the binding site of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) was characterized and compared with the related fucose-specific lectin from Ulex europaeus (UEA-I). In solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassays, the two lectins recognized Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta-HSA. AAA additionally cross-reacted with neoglycolipids bearing lacto-N-fucopentaose (LNFP) I [H type 1] and II [Le(a)] and lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) as glycan moieties. UEA-I, on the other hand, bound to a LDFT-derived neoglycolipid but not to the other neoglycolipids tested. Binding of AAA to gastric mucin was competitively neutralized by Le(a)-specific monoclonal antibodies. UEA-I binding, on the other hand, was reduced after co-incubation with H type 2- and Le(y)-specific monoclonal antibodies. According to our results, AAA reacts with fucosylated type 1 chain antigens, whereas UEA-I binds only to the alpha 1-2-fucosylated LDFT-derived neoglycolipid. In immunohistochemical studies, the reactivity of AAA and UEA-I in normal pyloric mucosa from individuals with known Lewis and secretor status was analysed. AAA showed a broad reaction in the superficial pyloric mucosa from secretors and non-secretors, but AAA reactivity was more pronounced in Le(a+b-) individuals. On the other hand, UEA-I stained the superficial pyloric mucosa only from secretor individuals. A staining of deep mucous glands by the lectins was found in all specimens. Both reacted with most human carcinomas of different origin. Slight differences in their binding pattern were observed and may be explained by the different fine-specificities of the lectins.

  20. A novel prenyl-polybasic domain code determines lipid-binding specificity of the K-Ras membrane anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Hancock, John F

    2018-01-15

    Ras proteins must localize to the plasma membrane (PM) for biological function. The membrane anchor of the K-Ras4B isoform comprises a farnesylated and methylated C-terminal cysteine together with an adjacent hexa-lysine polybasic domain (PBD). Traditionally, polybasic sequences have been thought to interact electrostatically with negatively charged membranes showing no specificity for anionic lipid head groups. By contrast we recently showed that the K-Ras membrane anchor actually exhibits a very high degree of specificity for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). The selectivity for PtdSer is determined by a combinatorial code comprising the PBD sequence plus the prenyl anchor. Lipid binding specificity is therefore altered by PBD point mutations that in turn modulate signaling output. For example, mutating Lys177 or Lys178 to glutamine switches K-Ras4B lipid affinity from PtdSer to phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Changing the lipid anchor from farnesyl to geranylgeranyl or the PBD lysines to arginines also changes lipid binding specificity. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the structural basis for these K-Ras anchor lipid-binding preferences. Here we examine the PM interactions of a series of geranylgeranylated PBD mutants and provide further evidence that the precise PBD sequence and prenyl lipid determines lipid sorting specificity of the K-Ras anchor and hence biological function.

  1. Specificity Characterization of SLA Class I Molecules Binding to Swine-Origin Viral Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA class I molecules play a crucial role in generating specific cellular immune responses against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. They mainly bind and present antigens of intracellular origin to circulating MHC I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. Binding of an appropriate epitope to an SLA class I molecule is the single most selective event in antigen presentation and the first step in the killing of infected cells by CD8+ CTLs. Moreover, the antigen epitopes are strictly restricted to specific SLA molecules. In this study, we constructed SLA class I complexes in vitro comprising viral epitope peptides, the extracellular region of the SLA-1 molecules, and β2-microglobulin (β2m using splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR. The protein complexes were induced and expressed in an Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system and subsequently purified and refolded. Specific binding of seven SLA-1 proteins to one classical swine fever virus (CSFV and four porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV epitope peptides was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based method. The SLA-1∗13:01, SLA-1∗11:10, and SLA-1∗11:01:02 proteins were able to bind specifically to different CTL epitopes of CSFV and PRRSV and the MHC restrictions of the five epitopes were identified. The fixed combination of Asn151Val152 residues was identified as the potentially key amino acid residues influencing the binding of viral several CTL epitope peptides to SLA-1∗13:01 and SLA-1∗04:01:01 proteins. The more flexible pocket E in the SLA-1∗13:01 protein might have fewer steric limitations and therefore be able to accommodate more residues of viral CTL epitope peptides, and may thus play a critical biochemical role in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-1∗13:01. Characterization of the binding specificity of peptides to SLA class I molecules provides an

  2. T-box family of transcription factor-TBX5, insights in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ting; Qiao, Longwei; Wang, Qian; Mi, Rui; Chen, Jinnan; Lu, Yaojuan; Gu, Junxia; Zheng, Qiping

    2017-01-01

    The T-box gene family refers to a group of transcription factors that share a highly conserved, sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (T-box) containing around 180-amino acids. According to HUGO gene nomenclature committee (HGNC), there are 18 T-box family members. These T-box genes have been implicated essential roles during embryogenesis and cardiac development, given their specific expression pattern in developing mammalian heart for several T-box genes, including TBX5. TBX5 is consisted of three transcriptional variants which cover 9 exons and encode two distinct isoforms that differ in N-terminus. TBX5 is probably the most frequently studied T-box gene over the past decade due to the typical cardiac defects observed in Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS), which is caused by TBX5 mutation. Most of the mutations are within exons 3-7 where locate sequence coding for the T-box domain. Notably, a variety of cardiac defects, as well as abnormalities in limb and other organs have been seen in HOS syndrome with different kinds of TBX5 mutations, suggesting a heterogeneous disease mechanism. We have performed a meta-analysis of TBX5 and found a significant correlation between its single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3825214 (A to G), and risk of atrial fibrillation and its subtypes, supporting TBX5 as a master transcription factor for cardiac development. In addition, bioinformatics analysis of this SNP identified several TFs that may be affected for their binding affinity with TBX5. Identification and characterization of more TBX5 mutations and SNPs hold promise for therapeutic strategy targeting TBX5 associated developmental abnormalities and diseases.

  3. Molecular determinants for the complex binding specificity of the PDZ domain in PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Beuming, Thijs; Niv, Masha Y

    2005-01-01

    polarization. Our results showed that the PICK1 PDZ domain binds the type II sequence presented by the human dopamine transporter (-WLKV) with an almost 15-fold and >100-fold higher affinity than the type I sequences presented by protein kinase Calpha (-QSAV) and the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (-DSLL......), respectively. Mutational analysis of Lys(83) in the alphaB1 position of the PDZ domain suggested that this residue mimics the function of hydrophobic residues present in this position in regular type II PDZ domains. The PICK1 PDZ domain was moreover found to prefer small hydrophobic residues in the C......-terminal P(0) position of the ligand. Molecular modeling predicted a rank order of (Val > Ile > Leu) that was verified experimentally with up to a approximately 16-fold difference in binding affinity between a valine and a leucine in P(0). The results define the structural basis for the unusual binding...

  4. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    molecular weight urokinase receptor-associated protein. The tryptic peptide mixture derived from a cross-linked complex of pro-urokinase and the latter protein was analyzed by nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. This analysis identified the novel protein as the human homologue of a murine...... membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  5. Generation of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex-specific Fab antibody blocking the binding of the complex to CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Ivo R; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    During intravascular hemolysis hemoglobin (Hb) binds to haptoglobin (Hp) leading to endocytosis of the complex by the macrophage receptor, CD163. In the present study, we used a phage-display Fab antibody strategy to explore if the complex formation between Hp and Hb leads to exposure of antigenic...... was measured for non-complexed Hp or Hb. The Fab antibody completely inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled Hp-Hb complexes to CD163 and blocked their uptake in CD163-transfected cells. In conclusion, we have raised a receptor-blocking antibody specifically recognizing the Hp-Hb complex. In addition to provide...... new insight into the changes occurring when Hp and Hb bind, the present study provides a new potential tool for measuring and removal of Hp-Hb complexes from plasma/serum....

  6. Validating fragment-based drug discovery for biological RNAs: lead fragments bind and remodel the TPP riboswitch specifically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Katherine Deigan; Homan, Philip; Weeks, Kevin M; Smith, Alison G; Abell, Chris; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-05-22

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches regulate essential genes in bacteria by changing conformation upon binding intracellular TPP. Previous studies using fragment-based approaches identified small molecule "fragments" that bind this gene-regulatory mRNA domain. Crystallographic studies now show that, despite having micromolar Kds, four different fragments bind the TPP riboswitch site-specifically, occupying the pocket that recognizes the aminopyrimidine of TPP. Unexpectedly, the unoccupied site that would recognize the pyrophosphate of TPP rearranges into a structure distinct from that of the cognate complex. This idiosyncratic fragment-induced conformation, also characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and chemical probing, represents a possible mechanism for adventitious ligand discrimination by the riboswitch, and suggests that off-pathway conformations of RNAs can be targeted for drug development. Our structures, together with previous screening studies, demonstrate the feasibility of fragment-based drug discovery against RNA targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structure of an archaeal specific DNA-binding protein (Ape10b2) from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Sakamoto, Keiko; Gopinath, Subash C B; Shinkai, Akeo; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-05-15

    DNA binding proteins are essential in all organisms, and they play important roles in both compacting and regulating the genetic material. All thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaea encode one or more copies of Alba or Sso10b, which is a small, abundant, basic protein that binds DNA. Here, we present the crystal structure of Ape10b2 from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.70 A. Although the overall structure resembles the known Alba protein fold, a significant conformational change was observed in the loop regions. Specifically, the L5 loop is slightly longer, as compared to those of other known proteins, and the flexibility of this loop may facilitate the interaction with double stranded DNA. In addition, we showed that Ape10b2 binds to 16 and 39 bp duplex DNAs with high affinity. On the basis of our analyses, we have created a putative protein-DNA complex model. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie J J Bartels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Methylated DNA is specifically bound by Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins (MBPs. Three different types of MBPs have been identified so far: the Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD family proteins, three BTB/POZ-Zn-finger proteins, and UHRF1. Most of the known MBPs have been identified via homology with the MBD and Zn-finger domains as present in MeCP2 and Kaiso, respectively. It is conceivable that other proteins are capable of recognizing methylated DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the purpose of identifying novel 'readers' we set up a methyl-CpG pull-down assay combined with stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. In a methyl-CpG pull-down with U937 nuclear extracts, we recovered several known MBPs and almost all subunits of the MBD2/NuRD complex as methylation specific binders, providing proof-of-principle. Interestingly, RBP-J, the transcription factor downstream of Notch receptors, also bound the DNA in a methylation dependent manner. Follow-up pull-downs and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs showed that RBP-J binds methylated DNA in the context of a mutated RBP-J consensus motif. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The here described SILAC/methyl-CpG pull-down constitutes a new approach to identify potential novel DNAme readers and will advance unraveling of the complete methyl-DNA interactome.

  9. Flexibility of PCNA-protein interface accommodates differential binding partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedley, Anthony M; Lill, Markus A; Davisson, V Jo

    2014-01-01

    The expanding roles of PCNA in functional assembly of DNA replication and repair complexes motivated investigation of the structural and dynamic properties guiding specificity of PCNA-protein interactions. A series of biochemical and computational analyses were combined to evaluate the PIP Box recognition features impacting complex formation. The results indicate subtle differences in topological and molecular descriptors distinguishing both affinity and stoichiometry of binding among PCNA-peptide complexes through cooperative effects. These features were validated using peptide mimics of p85α and Akt, two previously unreported PCNA binding partners. This study characterizes for the first time a reverse PIP Box interaction with PCNA. Small molecule ligand binding at the PIP Box interaction site confirmed the adaptive nature of the protein in dictating overall shape and implicates allosterism in transmitting biological effects.

  10. Flexibility of PCNA-protein interface accommodates differential binding partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M Pedley

    Full Text Available The expanding roles of PCNA in functional assembly of DNA replication and repair complexes motivated investigation of the structural and dynamic properties guiding specificity of PCNA-protein interactions. A series of biochemical and computational analyses were combined to evaluate the PIP Box recognition features impacting complex formation. The results indicate subtle differences in topological and molecular descriptors distinguishing both affinity and stoichiometry of binding among PCNA-peptide complexes through cooperative effects. These features were validated using peptide mimics of p85α and Akt, two previously unreported PCNA binding partners. This study characterizes for the first time a reverse PIP Box interaction with PCNA. Small molecule ligand binding at the PIP Box interaction site confirmed the adaptive nature of the protein in dictating overall shape and implicates allosterism in transmitting biological effects.

  11. 49 CFR 38.33 - Fare box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fare box. 38.33 Section 38.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.33 Fare box. Where provided, the farebox...

  12. Design Principles for SuCESsFul Biosensors: Specific Fluorophore/Analyte Binding and Minimization of Fluorophore/Scaffold Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Picciotto, Seymour; Dickson, Paige M; Traxlmayr, Michael W; Marques, Bryan S; Socher, Elke; Zhao, Sixing; Cheung, Stephanie; Kiefer, Jonathan D; Wand, A Joshua; Griffith, Linda G; Imperiali, Barbara; Wittrup, K Dane

    2016-10-09

    Quantifying protein location and concentration is critical for understanding function in situ. Scaffold conjugated to environment-sensitive fluorophore (SuCESsFul) biosensors, in which a reporting fluorophore is conjugated to a binding scaffold, can, in principle, detect analytes of interest with high temporal and spatial resolution. However, their adoption has been limited due to the extensive empirical screening required for their development. We sought to establish design principles for this class of biosensor by characterizing over 400 biosensors based on various protein analytes, binding proteins, and fluorophores. We found that the brightest readouts are attained when a specific binding pocket for the fluorophore is present on the analyte. Also, interaction of the fluorophore with the binding protein it is conjugated to can raise background fluorescence, considerably limiting sensor dynamic range. Exploiting these two concepts, we designed biosensors that attain a 100-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to analyte, an order of magnitude improvement over the previously best-reported SuCESsFul biosensor. These design principles should facilitate the development of improved SuCESsFul biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins.

  14. Specificity of Odor Recognition: The Three-Dimensional Structure of an Odorant Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    results so far with molecular replacement with Insecto - cyanin did not look hopeful. Hence, we are proceeding with the methods that use heavy-atom...proteins -Retinol binding Protein (RBP), a-lactoglobulin and Insecto - cyanin- have known three-dimensional structures. In tracing the polypeptide chain

  15. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kaustubh; Sangani, Sahil S; Kehr, Andrew D; Rule, Gordon S; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2016-11-08

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein-DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein-DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg 2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu 3+ or two La 3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu 3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1 H- 15 N amide resonances, for 1 H- 13 C Ile-δ-CH 3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH 3 and Val-γ-CH 3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex.

  16. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein–DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein–DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein–DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu3+ or two La3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1H–15N amide resonances, for 1H–13C Ile-δ-CH3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH3 and Val-γ-CH3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex. PMID:27786446

  17. Characterization of glycan binding specificities of influenza B viruses with correlation with hemagglutinin genotypes and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Chi, Chia-Yu; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Su, Ih-Jen

    2012-04-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificities are different among avian and human influenza A viruses and may affect the tissue tropism and transmission of these viruses. The glycan binding biology for influenza B, however, has not been systematically characterized. Glycan binding specificities of influenza B viral isolates were analyzed and correlated to hemagglutinin (HA) genotypes and clinical manifestations. A newly developed solution glycan array was applied to characterize the receptor binding specificities of influenza B virus clinical isolates from 2001 to 2007 in Taiwan. Thirty oligosaccharides which include α-2,3 and α-2,6 linkage glycans were subjected to analysis. The glycan binding patterns of 53 influenza B isolates could be categorized into three groups and were well correlated to their HA genotypes. The Yamagata-like strains predominantly bound to α-2,6-linkage glycan (24:29, 83%) while Victoria-like strains preferentially bound to both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linkage glycans (13:24, 54%). A third group of viruses bound to sulfated glycans and these all belonged to Victoria-like strains. Based on the HA sequences, Asn-163, Glu-198, Ala-202, and Lys-203 were conserved among Victoria-like strains which may influence their carbohydrate recognition. The viruses bound to dual type glycans were more likely to be associated with the development of bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal illness than those bound only to α-2,6 sialyl glycans (P B viruses, and will contribute to virus surveillance and vaccine strain selection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. High expression of Y-box-binding protein 1 correlates with poor prognosis and early recurrence in patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shilei Zhao,1,* Wei Guo,1,* Jinxiu Li,1 Wendan Yu,1 Tao Guo,1 Wuguo Deng,2,3 Chundong Gu1 1The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Cancer Stem Cell, Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, 2Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 3State Key Laboratory of Targeted Drug for Tumors of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou Double Bioproduct Inc., Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Prognosis of small (≤2 cm invasive lung adenocarcinoma remains poor, and identification of high-risk individuals from the patients after complete surgical resection of lung adenocarcinoma has become an urgent problem. YBX1 has been reported to be able to predict prognosis in many cancers (except lung adenocarcinoma that are independent of TNM (tumor, nodes, metastases staging, especially small invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we examined the significance of YBX1 expression on prognosis and recurrence in patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: A total of 75 patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma after complete resection were enrolled from January 2008 to December 2010. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the expression of YBX1, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to precisely assess the overall expression of YBX1. Meanwhile, primary lesions were identified based on the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, the American Thoracic Society, and the European Respiratory Society’s classification of lung adenocarcinoma. The effect of different clinicopathological factors on patients’ survival was examined. Furthermore, Western blot analysis was used to show the expression of YBX1 in vitro. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of YBX1 for detecting small

  19. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  20. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R; Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA-protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R.; Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. PMID:24706949

  2. Sasquatch: predicting the impact of regulatory SNPs on transcription factor binding from cell- and tissue-specific DNase footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwessinger, Ron; Suciu, Maria C; McGowan, Simon J; Telenius, Jelena; Taylor, Stephen; Higgs, Doug R; Hughes, Jim R

    2017-10-01

    In the era of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and personalized medicine, predicting the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulatory elements is an important goal. Current approaches to determine the potential of regulatory SNPs depend on inadequate knowledge of cell-specific DNA binding motifs. Here, we present Sasquatch, a new computational approach that uses DNase footprint data to estimate and visualize the effects of noncoding variants on transcription factor binding. Sasquatch performs a comprehensive k -mer-based analysis of DNase footprints to determine any k -mer's potential for protein binding in a specific cell type and how this may be changed by sequence variants. Therefore, Sasquatch uses an unbiased approach, independent of known transcription factor binding sites and motifs. Sasquatch only requires a single DNase-seq data set per cell type, from any genotype, and produces consistent predictions from data generated by different experimental procedures and at different sequence depths. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Sasquatch using previously validated functional SNPs and benchmark its performance against existing approaches. Sasquatch is available as a versatile webtool incorporating publicly available data, including the human ENCODE collection. Thus, Sasquatch provides a powerful tool and repository for prioritizing likely regulatory SNPs in the noncoding genome. © 2017 Schwessinger et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins: relationships with precomplex features and contributions to specificity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Munazah; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ahmad, Shandar

    2014-05-01

    Both Proteins and DNA undergo conformational changes in order to form functional complexes and also to facilitate interactions with other molecules. These changes have direct implications for the stability and specificity of the complex, as well as the cooperativity of interactions between multiple entities. In this work, we have extensively analyzed conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins by superimposing DNA-bound and unbound pairs of protein structures in a curated database of 90 proteins. We manually examined each of these pairs, unified the authors' annotations, and summarized our observations by classifying conformational changes into six structural categories. We explored a relationship between conformational changes and functional classes, binding motifs, target specificity, biophysical features of unbound proteins, and stability of the complex. In addition, we have also investigated the degree to which the intrinsic flexibility can explain conformational changes in a subset of 52 proteins with high quality coordinate data. Our results indicate that conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins contribute significantly to both the stability of the complex and the specificity of targets recognized by them. We also conclude that most conformational changes occur in proteins interacting with specific DNA targets, even though unbound protein structures may have sufficient information to interact with DNA in a nonspecific manner. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  5. The Rab27a-binding protein, JFC1, regulates androgen-dependent secretion of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic-specific acid phosphatase1

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ellis, Beverly A.; Noack, Deborah; Seabra, Miguel C.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2005-01-01

    Two of the major proteins secreted by the prostate epithelium secretory cells are PSA (prostate-specific antigen) and PSAP (prostatic-specific acid phosphatase). The molecules involved in the secretory machinery of PSA and PSAP, and the regulation of this machinery, remain unknown. In the present paper, we provide evidence that JFC1 [synaptotagmin-like protein (slp1)], a Rab27a- and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding protein, regulates the androgen-dependent secretion of PSAP and PSA in human LNCaP pros...

  6. Site-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation: a selective method to individually analyze neighboring transcription factor binding sites in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuch Ronaldo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites (TFBSs play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. It is therefore vital to know how the allocation pattern of TFBSs affects the functioning of any particular gene in vivo. A widely used method to analyze TFBSs in vivo is the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. However, this method in its present state does not enable the individual investigation of densely arranged TFBSs due to the underlying unspecific DNA fragmentation technique. This study describes a site-specific ChIP which aggregates the benefits of both EMSA and in vivo footprinting in only one assay, thereby allowing the individual detection and analysis of single binding motifs. Findings The standard ChIP protocol was modified by replacing the conventional DNA fragmentation, i. e. via sonication or undirected enzymatic digestion (by MNase, through a sequence specific enzymatic digestion step. This alteration enables the specific immunoprecipitation and individual examination of occupied sites, even in a complex system of adjacent binding motifs in vivo. Immunoprecipitated chromatin was analyzed by PCR using two primer sets - one for the specific detection of precipitated TFBSs and one for the validation of completeness of the enzyme digestion step. The method was established exemplary for Sp1 TFBSs within the egfr promoter region. Using this site-specific ChIP, we were able to confirm four previously described Sp1 binding sites within egfr promoter region to be occupied by Sp1 in vivo. Despite the dense arrangement of the Sp1 TFBSs the improved ChIP method was able to individually examine the allocation of all adjacent Sp1 TFBS at once. The broad applicability of this site-specific ChIP could be demonstrated by analyzing these SP1 motifs in both osteosarcoma cells and kidney carcinoma tissue. Conclusions The ChIP technology is a powerful tool for investigating transcription factors in vivo, especially

  7. The G-Box Transcriptional Regulatory Code in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Samuel J.K.; Brestovitsky, Anna; Dickinson, Patrick; Biswas, Surojit

    2017-01-01

    Plants have significantly more transcription factor (TF) families than animals and fungi, and plant TF families tend to contain more genes; these expansions are linked to adaptation to environmental stressors. Many TF family members bind to similar or identical sequence motifs, such as G-boxes (CACGTG), so it is difficult to predict regulatory relationships. We determined that the flanking sequences near G-boxes help determine in vitro specificity but that this is insufficient to predict the transcription pattern of genes near G-boxes. Therefore, we constructed a gene regulatory network that identifies the set of bZIPs and bHLHs that are most predictive of the expression of genes downstream of perfect G-boxes. This network accurately predicts transcriptional patterns and reconstructs known regulatory subnetworks. Finally, we present Ara-BOX-cis (araboxcis.org), a Web site that provides interactive visualizations of the G-box regulatory network, a useful resource for generating predictions for gene regulatory relations. PMID:28864470

  8. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of five lectins that bind to O-Glycosyl-linked carbohydrate chains. Quantitative analysis by frontal-affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, S; Tsuji, T; Osawa, T

    1988-07-15

    The carbohydrate-binding specificities of lectins purified from Agaricus bisporus (ABA-I), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), Glycine max (SBA), and Vicia villosa (VVA-B4) have been studied by affinity chromatography on columns of the immobilized lectins, and quantitatively analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography. These five lectins could be classified into two groups with respect to their reactivities with typical mucin-type glycopeptides, beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1----3)-Ser/Thr (2) and alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1----3)-Ser/Thr (3). One group, which consists of ABA-I, PNA, and BPA, preferentially binds to 2, and the other, which consists of SBA and VVA-B4, shows higher affinity for 3 than for 2. Among the lectins tested, only ABA-I was found to bind to a sialylated glycopeptide, whic which was prepared from human erythrocyte glycophorin A and contains three three tetrasaccharide chains having the structure of alpha-NeuAc-(2----3)-beta-D-GAlp-(1----3)-NeuAC-(2----6)]-alpha-D-Galp NAc-(1----, with an association constant of 15 microM, whereas the association constants of the other four lectins for this sialylated glycopeptide were less than 3.5 mM. On the other hand, removal of the beta-D-galactopyranosyl group from a glycopeptide containing sequence 2 resulted in decreased association constants for the three lectins of the first group, especially ABA-I and PNA. The two lectins of the second group showed a high affinity for 3, but SBA preferentially interacted with oligosaccharides containing the alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1----3)-beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-D-GlapNAc sequence, prepared from a blood group A-active oligosaccharide.

  9. Serotype-specific Binding Properties and Nanoparticle Characteristics Contribute to the Immunogenicity of rAAV1 Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrand, Maxime; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Corre, Guillaume; Galy, Anne; Boisgerault, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenic properties of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene transfer vectors remain incompletely characterized in spite of their usage as gene therapy vectors or as vaccines. Molecular interactions between rAAV and various types of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), as well as the impact of these interactions on transgene or capsid-specific immunization remain unclear. We herein show that binding motifs recognized by the capsid and which determine the vector tissue tropism are ...

  10. Quantification of the Epitope Diversity of HIV-1-Specific Binding Antibodies by Peptide Microarrays for Global HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6,564 peptides from across...

  11. In vivo imaging of specific drug-target binding at subcellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J. M.; Vinegoni, C.; Mazitschek, R.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Cameron, L. A.; Weissleder, R.

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of measuring binding of small-molecule drugs to desired targets in live cells could provide a better understanding of drug action. However, current approaches mostly yield static data, require lysis or rely on indirect assays and thus often provide an incomplete understanding of drug action. Here, we present a multiphoton fluorescence anisotropy microscopy live cell imaging technique to measure and map drug-target interaction in real time at subcellular resolution. This approach is generally applicable using any fluorescently labelled drug and enables high-resolution spatial and temporal mapping of bound and unbound drug distribution. To illustrate our approach we measure intracellular target engagement of the chemotherapeutic Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in live cells and within a tumour in vivo. These results are the first generalizable approach to directly measure drug-target binding in vivo and present a promising tool to enhance understanding of drug activity.

  12. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E

    2016-01-01

    -exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues......Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface...... within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides...

  13. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info .

  14. Structural Basis for Binding Specificity between Subclasses of Modular Polyketide Synthase Docking Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Bartley, III, Frank E.; Reynolds, Kevin A.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.; (Michigan); (Portland SU)

    2009-04-02

    Bacterial type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) assemble structurally diverse natural products of significant clinical value from simple metabolic building blocks. The synthesis of these compounds occurs in a processive fashion along a large multiprotein complex. Transfer of the acyl intermediate across interpolypeptide junctions is mediated, at least in large part, by N- and C-terminal docking domains. We report here a comprehensive analysis of the binding affinity and selectivity for the complete set of discrete docking domain pairs in the pikromycin and erythromycin PKS systems. Despite disconnection from their parent module, each cognate pair of docking domains retained exquisite binding selectivity. Further insights were obtained by X-ray crystallographic analysis of the PikAIII/PikAIV docking domain interface. This new information revealed a series of key interacting residues that enabled development of a structural model for the recently proposed H2-T2 class of polypeptides involved in PKS intermodular molecular recognition.

  15. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, A. M.; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 21 (2016), s. 2903-2913 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alanine scanning mutagenesis * high-affinity binding * type 1 IGF receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.biochem.6b00140

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the desferrioxamine gene cluster of Streptomyces coelicolor is mediated by binding of DmdR1 to an iron box in the promoter of the desA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Sedef; Barreiro, Carlos; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Coque, Juan José R; Martín, Juan F

    2007-02-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces pilosus produce desferrioxamine siderophores which are encoded by the desABCD gene cluster. S. pilosus is used for the production of desferrioxamine B which is utilized in human medicine. We report the deletion of the desA gene encoding a lysine decarboxylase in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The DeltadesA mutant was able to grow on lysine as the only carbon and nitrogen source but its desferrioxamine production was blocked, confirming that the L-lysine decarboxylase encoded by desA is a dedicated enzyme committing L-lysine to desferrioxamine biosynthesis. Production of desferrioxamine was restored by complementation with the whole wild-type desABCD cluster, but not by desA alone, because of a polar effect of the desA gene replacement on expression of the downstream des genes. The transcription pattern of the desABCD cluster in S. coelicolor showed that all four genes were coordinately induced under conditions of iron deprivation. The transcription start point of the desA gene was identified by primer extension analysis at a thymine located 62 nucleotides upstream of the translation start codon. The -10 region of the desA promoter overlaps the 19-nucleotide palindromic iron box sequence known to be involved in iron regulation in Streptomyces. Binding of DmdR1 divalent metal-dependent regulatory protein to the desA promoter region of both S. coelicolor and S. pilosus was shown using electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, validating the conclusion that iron regulation of the desABCD cluster is mediated by the regulatory protein DmdR1. We conclude that the genes involved in desferrioxamine production are under transcriptional control exerted by the DmdR1 regulator in the presence of iron and are expressed under conditions of iron limitation.

  17. Physical organization of DNA by multiple non-specific DNA-binding modes of integration host factor (IHF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lin

    Full Text Available The integration host factor (IHF is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein and an essential co-factor for phage λ site-specific recombination and gene regulation in E. coli. Introduction of a sharp DNA kink at specific cognate sites is critical for these functions. Interestingly, the intracellular concentration of IHF is much higher than the concentration needed for site-specific interactions, suggesting that non-specific binding of IHF to DNA plays a role in the physical organization of bacterial chromatin. However, it is unclear how non-specific DNA association contributes to DNA organization. By using a combination of single DNA manipulation and atomic force microscopy imaging methods, we show here that distinct modes of non-specific DNA binding of IHF result in complex global DNA conformations. Changes in KCl and IHF concentrations, as well as tension applied to DNA, dramatically influence the degree of DNA-bending. In addition, IHF can crosslink DNA into a highly compact DNA meshwork that is observed in the presence of magnesium at low concentration of monovalent ions and high IHF-DNA stoichiometries. Our findings provide important insights into how IHF contributes to bacterial chromatin organization, gene regulation, and biofilm formation.

  18. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  19. Structure elucidation and DNA binding specificity of natural compounds from Cassia siamea leaves: A biophysical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Mehtab; Ahmad, Faheem; Malla, Ali Mohammed; Khan, Mohd Sohrab; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Tabish, Mohammad; Silva, Manuela Ramos; Silva, P S Pereira

    2016-06-01

    A novel isoflavone, 5,6,7-trimethoxy-3-(3',4',5'-trimethoxyphenyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (1) along with a known pyranocoumarin, Seselin (2) have been isolated from the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Cassia siamea (Family: Fabaceae). Compound 1 has been reported for the first time from any natural source and has not been synthesized so far. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physical evidences viz. elemental analysis, UV, FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and mass spectral analysis. Structure of compound (1) was further authenticated by single-crystal X-ray analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A multi-technique approach employing UV-Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence, KI quenching studies, competitive displacement assay, circular dichroism and viscosity studies have been utilized to probe the extent of interaction and possible binding modes of isolated compounds (1-2) with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA). Both the compounds were found to interact with DNA via non-intercalative binding mode with moderate proficiencies. Groove binding was the major interaction mode in the case of compound 2 while compound 1 probably interacts with DNA through electrostatic interactions. These studies provide deeper insight in understanding of DNA-drug (natural products) interaction which could be helpful to improve their bioavailability for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure and DNA-binding of meiosis-specific protein Hop2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghua; Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Here we report structure elucidation of the DNA binding domain of homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2), which is important to gene diversity when sperms and eggs are produced. Together with another protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. However, the structural and biochemical bases for the function of Hop2 and Mnd1 have not been well understood. As a first step toward such understanding, we recently solved the structure for the N-terminus of Hop2 (1-84) using solution NMR. This fragment shows a typical winged-head conformation with recognized DNA binding activity. DNA interacting sites were then investigated by chemical shift perturbations in a titration experiment. Information of these sites was used to guide protein-DNA docking with MD simulation, revealing that helix 3 is stably lodged in the DNA major groove and that wing 1 (connecting strands 2 and 3) transiently comes in contact with the minor groove in nanosecond time scale. Mutagenesis analysis further confirmed the DNA binding sites in this fragment of the protein.

  1. MHC2SKpan: a novel kernel based approach for pan-specific MHC class II peptide binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Linyuan; Luo, Cheng; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2013-01-01

    Computational methods for the prediction of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II binding peptides play an important role in facilitating the understanding of immune recognition and the process of epitope discovery. To develop an effective computational method, we need to consider two important characteristics of the problem: (1) the length of binding peptides is highly flexible; and (2) MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and for the vast majority of them there are no sufficient training data. We develop a novel string kernel MHC2SK (MHC-II String Kernel) method to measure the similarities among peptides with variable lengths. By considering the distinct features of MHC-II peptide binding prediction problem, MHC2SK differs significantly from the recently developed kernel based method, GS (Generic String) kernel, in the way of computing similarities. Furthermore, we extend MHC2SK to MHC2SKpan for pan-specific MHC-II peptide binding prediction by leveraging the binding data of various MHC molecules. MHC2SK outperformed GS in allele specific prediction using a benchmark dataset, which demonstrates the effectiveness of MHC2SK. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of MHC2SKpan using various benckmark data sets from several different perspectives: Leave-one-allele-out (LOO), 5-fold cross validation as well as independent data testing. MHC2SKpan has achieved comparable performance with NetMHCIIpan-2.0 and outperformed NetMHCIIpan-1.0, TEPITOPEpan and MultiRTA, being statistically significant. MHC2SKpan can be freely accessed at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/MHC2SKpan/index.html.

  2. Contribution of Specific Amino Acid Changes in Penicillin Binding Protein 1 to Amoxicillin Resistance in Clinical Helicobacter pylori isolates ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadia N.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Schiller, Neal L.

    2011-01-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used to treat Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of peptic ulcers, stomach cancer, and B-cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori is increasing steadily, especially in developing countries, leading to treatment failures. In this study, we characterize the mechanism of amoxicillin resistance in the U.S. clinical isolate B258. Transformation of amoxicillin-susceptible strain 26695 with the penicillin binding protein 1 gene (pbp1) from B258 increased the amoxicillin resistance of 26695 to equal that of B258, while studies using biotinylated amoxicillin showed a decrease in the binding of amoxicillin to the PBP1 of B258. Transformation with 4 pbp1 fragments, each encompassing several amino acid substitutions, combined with site-directed mutagenesis studies, identified 3 amino acid substitutions in PBP1 of B258 which affected amoxicillin susceptibility (Val 469 Met, Phe 473 Leu, and Ser 543 Arg). Homology modeling showed the spatial orientation of these specific amino acid changes in PBP1 from 26695 and B258. The results of these studies demonstrate that amoxicillin resistance in the clinical U.S. isolate B258 is due solely to an altered PBP1 protein with a lower binding affinity for amoxicillin. Homology modeling analyses using previously identified amino acid substitutions of amoxicillin-resistant PBP1s demonstrate the importance of specific amino acid substitutions in PBP1 that affect the binding of amoxicillin in the putative binding cleft, defining those substitutions deemed most important in amoxicillin resistance. PMID:20956585

  3. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  4. Binding specificity of R-10G and TRA-1-60/81, and substrate specificity of keratanase II studied with chemically synthesized oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hiromi; Nagai, Yuko; Kojima, Aya; Toyoda, Hidenao; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2017-03-14

    Recently, we established a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to hiPS/ hES cells, R-10G, which recognizes a type of keratan sulfate. Keratan sulfates (KS) comprise a family of glycosaminoglycans consisting of the repeating unit of [Gal-GlcNAc(6S)]. However, there is a diversity in the degree of sulfation at Gal and GlcNAc residues, and also in the mode of linkage, Galβ1 - 3GlcNAc (type 1) or Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc (type 2). To gain more insight into the binding specificity of R-10G, we carried out an ELISA test on avidin-coated plates using polyethylene glycol (PEG)3-biotinylated derivatives of a series of N-acetyllactosamine tetrasaccharides (keratan sulfates (KSs)). The results suggested that the minimum epitope structure is Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc(6S)β1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc(6S)β1 (type 2- type 2 keratan sulfate). Removal of sulfate from GlcNAc(6S) or addition of sulfate to Gal abolished the binding activity almost completely. We also examined the binding specificity of TRA-1-60/81 in the same assay system. The minimum epitope structure was shown to be Galβ1 - 3GlcNAcβ1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAcβ1 in agreement with the previous study involving glycan arrays (Natunen et al., Glycobiology, 21, 1125-1130 (2011)). Interestingly, however, TRA-1-60/81 was shown to bind to Galβ1 - 3GlcNAc(6S)β1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc(6S)β1 (type 1- type 2 keratan sulfate) dose-dependently, being more than one-third the binding activity toward Galβ1 - 3GlcNAcβ1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAcβ1 than in the case of TRA-1-60. In addition, a substrate specificity study on keratanase II revealed that keratanase II degraded not only "type 2-type 2 keratan sulfate" but also "type 1-type 2 keratan sulfate", significantly.

  5. Comparative integromics on FZD7 orthologs: conserved binding sites for PU.1, SP1, CCAAT-box and TCF/LEF/SOX transcription factors within 5'-promoter region of mammalian FZD7 orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    that the binding sites for PU.1, SP1/Krüppel-like, CCAAT-box, and TCF/LEF/SOX transcription factors were conserved among 5'-promoter regions of mammalian FZD7 orthologs.

  6. Luteolin is a novel p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) inhibitor that suppresses Notch4 signaling by blocking the activation of Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reipas, Kristen M.; Law, Jennifer H.; Couto, Nicole; Islam, Sumaiya; Li, Yvonne; Li, Huifang; Cherkasov, Artem; Jung, Karen; Cheema, Amarpal S.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Hassell, John A.; Dunn, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are notoriously difficult to treat because they lack hormone receptors and have limited targeted therapies. Recently, we demonstrated that p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) is essential for TNBC growth and survival indicating it as a target for therapeutic development. RSK phosphorylates Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an oncogenic transcription/translation factor, highly expressed in TNBC (~70% of cases) and associated with poor prognosis, drug resistance and tumor initiation. YB-1 regulates the tumor-initiating cell markers, CD44 and CD49f however its role in Notch signaling has not been explored. We sought to identify novel chemical entities with RSK inhibitory activity. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1120 off-patent drugs was screened for RSK inhibitors using both in vitro kinase assays and molecular docking. The lead candidate, luteolin, inhibited RSK1 and RSK2 kinase activity and suppressed growth in TNBC, including TIC-enriched populations. Combining luteolin with paclitaxel increased cell death and unlike chemotherapy alone, did not enrich for CD44+ cells. Luteolin’s efficacy against drug-resistant cells was further indicated in the primary x43 cell line, where it suppressed monolayer growth and mammosphere formation. We next endeavored to understand how the inhibition of RSK/YB-1 signaling by luteolin elicited an effect on TIC-enriched populations. ChIP-on-ChIP experiments in SUM149 cells revealed a 12-fold enrichment of YB-1 binding to the Notch4 promoter. We chose to pursue this because there are several reports indicating that Notch4 maintains cells in an undifferentiated, TIC state. Herein we report that silencing YB-1 with siRNA decreased Notch4 mRNA. Conversely, transient expression of Flag:YB-1WT or the constitutively active mutant Flag:YB-1D102 increased Notch4 mRNA. The levels of Notch4 transcript and the abundance of the Notch4 intracellular domain (N4ICD) correlated with activation of P-RSKS221/7 and P-YB-1

  7. Characterization of new Spt3 and TATA-binding protein mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Spt3 TBP allele-specific interactions and bypass of Spt8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Lisa; Rose, David; Winston, Fred

    2007-12-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a multifunctional coactivator complex that has been shown to regulate transcription by distinct mechanisms. Previous results have shown that the Spt3 and Spt8 components of SAGA regulate initiation of transcription of particular genes by controlling the level of TATA-binding protein (TBP/Spt15) associated with the TATA box. While biochemical evidence exists for direct Spt8-TBP interactions, similar evidence for Spt3-TBP interactions has been lacking. To learn more about Spt3-TBP interactions in vivo, we have isolated a new class of spt3 mutations that cause a dominant-negative phenotype when overexpressed. These mutations all cluster within a conserved region of Spt3. The isolation of extragenic suppressors of one of these spt3 mutations has identified two new spt15 mutations that show allele-specific interactions with spt3 mutations with respect to transcription and the recruitment of TBP to particular promoters. In addition, these new spt15 mutations partially bypass an spt8 null mutation. Finally, we have examined the level of SAGA-TBP physical interaction in these mutants. While most spt3, spt8, and spt15 mutations do not alter SAGA-TBP interactions, one spt3 mutation, spt3-401, causes a greatly increased level of SAGA-TBP physical association. These results, taken together, suggest that a direct Spt3-TBP interaction is required for normal TBP levels at Spt3-dependent promoters in vivo.

  8. The antenna-specific odorant-binding protein AlinOBP13 of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus is expressed specifically in basiconic sensilla and has high binding affinity to terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Xiao, H-J; Gu, S-H; Zhou, J-J; Guo, Y-Y; Liu, Z-W; Zhang, Y-J

    2014-08-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are crucial in the olfactory pathway of insects. In the present study, the antenna-enriched OBP AlinOBP13 was investigated because of its potential contribution to the peripheral olfactory perception in the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus. The results of quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that the transcript level of AlinOBP13 was higher in the adult stage than in the nymph stages. The transcript levels of AlinOBP13 in the male and female antennae significantly increased after 4 and 8 h of starvation, respectively. Fine ultrastructures of different types of chemosensilla in both female and male antennae were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemical labelling. The results revealed that the anti-AlinOBP13 antiserum strongly and specifically labelled short basiconic sensilla; this antiserum was restricted to the inner lumen and the cavities below the sensillum base of the sensilla. By contrast, multiporous sensilla trichodea, medium long sensilla basiconica, and aporous sensilla chaetica were not labelled. The present study is the first to report an OBP showing specific expression in the short basiconic sensilla of a member of the Hemipteran species. The results of a fluorescence displacement binding assay indicated that recombinant AlinOBP13 showed a more specific binding preference to terpenoids than to sex pheromones and other classes of chemicals. This binding ability was dramatically affected by pH; higher binding affinities were displayed at pH 10.0 than at pH 7.4 and 5.0. In addition, the results of dose-dependent electroantennogram recordings from the antennae showed that both female and male adult bugs responded to the terpenoids tested, suggesting an apparent physiological relevance of AlinOBP13 in A. lineolatus chemoreception. The results of this study suggest that AlinOBP13 functions as a specific carrier of terpenoids and provide insights into the mechanism of A

  9. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Panel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or “PB/LIE” free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo. The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  10. RNA Targets and Specificity of Staufen, a Double-stranded RNA-binding Protein in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGendre, Jacqueline Baca; Campbell, Zachary T.; Kroll-Conner, Peggy; Anderson, Phil; Kimble, Judith; Wickens, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    The Staufen family consists of proteins that possess double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Staufen proteins of Drosophila and mammals regulate mRNA localization, translation, and decay. We report analysis of Staufen in Caenorhabditis elegans, which we have designated STAU-1. We focus on its biochemical properties, mRNA targets, and possible role in RNAi. We show that STAU-1 is expressed as mRNA and protein at all stages of C. elegans development. The wild-type, full-length protein, purified from bacteria, binds duplex RNA with high affinity in vitro. Purified, mutant proteins lacking single dsRBDs still bind RNA efficiently, demonstrating that no single domain is required for binding to duplex RNA (although dsRBD2 could not be tested). STAU-1 mRNA targets were identified via immunoprecipitation with specific anti-STAU-1 antibodies, followed by microarray analysis (RIP-Chip). These studies define a set of 418 likely STAU-1 mRNA targets. Finally, we demonstrate that stau-1 mutants enhance exogenous RNAi and that stau-1;eri-1 double mutants exhibit sterility and synthetic germ line defects. PMID:23195953

  11. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panel, Nicolas; Sun, Young Joo; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Simonson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or "PB/LIE" free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo. The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  12. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data......F) docking experiment against an existing technique, which requires the user to perform the rotation and scaling of the box explicitly. The precision of the users' box construction is evaluated by a novel error metric measuring the difference between two boxes. The results of the experiment strongly indicate...... that for precision docking of 9 DoF boxes, some of the proposed techniques are significantly better than ones with explicit rotation and scaling. Another interesting result is that the number of DoF simultaneously controlled by the user significantly influences the precision of the docking....

  13. Role of site-specific binding to plasma albumin in drug availability to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Haritha; Parepally, Jagan Mohan R; Feng, Rose; Smith, Quentin R

    2006-05-01

    Many studies have reported greater drug uptake into brain than that predicted based upon existing models using the free fraction (f(u)) of drug in arterial serum. To explain this difference, circulating plasma proteins have been suggested to interact with capillary membrane in vivo to produce a conformational change that favors net drug dissociation and elevation of f(u). Albumin, the principal binding protein in plasma, has two main drug binding sites, Sudlow I and II. We tested this hypothesis using drugs that bind selectively to either site I (warfarin) or site II (ibuprofen), as well as mixed ligands that have affinity for both sites (tolbutamide and valproate). Brain uptake was determined in the presence and absence of albumin using the in situ rat brain perfusion technique. Unidirectional brain uptake transfer constants (K(in)) were measured and compared with those predicted using the modified Kety-Crone-Renkin model: K(in) = F(1-e(-f(u) x PS(u)/F)), where F is perfusion flow and PS(u) is the permeability-surface area product to free drug of brain capillaries. The results demonstrated good agreement between measured and predicted K(in) over a 100-fold range in perfusion fluid albumin concentration using albumin from three different species (i.e., human, bovine, and rat), as well as whole-rat serum. K(in) decreased in the presence of albumin in direct proportion to perfusion fluid f(u) with constant PS(u). The results show that brain uptake of selected Sudlow site I and II ligands matches that predicted by the modified Kety-Crone-Renkin model with no evidence for enhanced dissociation.

  14. Antibodies against arylcyclohexylamines and their similarities in binding specificity with the phencyclidine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, S.M.; Zorbas, M.; Lattin, D.L.; Gunnell, M.; Polk, M.

    1988-08-01

    Rabbit antibodies were generated against five unique epitopes of phencyclidine (PCP)-like molecules to determine the molecular requirements for arylcyclohexylamine binding to the PCP receptor. Three of the haptens contained the three ring structures of PCP. A fourth hapten was synthesized from a derivative of the highly potent PCP analog, 1-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine. The fifth hapten, 5-(N-(1'-phenylcyclohexyl)amino)pentanoic acid, was used as a haptenic model for N-ethyl-1-phenylcyclohexylamine, one of the most potent arylcyclohexylamines. These haptens were bound covalently to bovine serum albumin and were then used as antigens to immunize rabbits. The affinities and cross-reactivity patterns of the resulting five antibodies were studied in a (3H)PCP radioimmunoassay using standard curves of various arylcyclohexylamines. The dissociation constants ranged from 1.9 to 51.6 nM. From the average IC50 values of the radioimmunoassay dose-response curves, the relative potency of each ligand to PCP was determined. Least-squares linear regression was used to correlate these data with relative potency data from two (3H)PCP receptor binding assays and a PCP drug discrimination assay in the rat. Only relative potency data from the anti-5(N-(1'-phenylcyclohexyl)amino)pentanoic acid antibody showed a significant correlation with data from the three pharmacological studies (r2 = 0.80, 0.57 and 0.78, respectively; p less than .05 in all cases). These data indicated the 5-(N-(1'-phenylcyclohexyl)amino)pentanoic acid hapten contained the pharmacologically active features needed for arylcyclohexylamine binding to the PCP receptor.

  15. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from t...

  16. Cheap but accurate calculation of chemical reaction rate constants from ab initio data, via system-specific, black-box force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julien; Hartke, Bernd

    2017-10-28

    Building on the recently published quantum-mechanically derived force field (QMDFF) and its empirical valence bond extension, EVB-QMDFF, it is now possible to generate a reliable potential energy surface for any given elementary reaction step in an essentially black box manner. This requires a limited and pre-defined set of reference data near the reaction path and generates an accurate approximation of the reference potential energy surface, on and off the reaction path. This intermediate representation can be used to generate reaction rate data, with far better accuracy and reliability than with traditional approaches based on transition state theory (TST) or variational extensions thereof (VTST), even if those include sophisticated tunneling corrections. However, the additional expense at the reference level remains very modest. We demonstrate all this for three arbitrarily chosen example reactions.

  17. Cheap but accurate calculation of chemical reaction rate constants from ab initio data, via system-specific, black-box force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julien; Hartke, Bernd

    2017-10-01

    Building on the recently published quantum-mechanically derived force field (QMDFF) and its empirical valence bond extension, EVB-QMDFF, it is now possible to generate a reliable potential energy surface for any given elementary reaction step in an essentially black box manner. This requires a limited and pre-defined set of reference data near the reaction path and generates an accurate approximation of the reference potential energy surface, on and off the reaction path. This intermediate representation can be used to generate reaction rate data, with far better accuracy and reliability than with traditional approaches based on transition state theory (TST) or variational extensions thereof (VTST), even if those include sophisticated tunneling corrections. However, the additional expense at the reference level remains very modest. We demonstrate all this for three arbitrarily chosen example reactions.

  18. SEARCHPATTOOL: a new method for mining the most specific frequent patterns for binding sites with application to prokaryotic DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nason Martha

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational methods to predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS based on exhaustive algorithms are guaranteed to find the best patterns but are often limited to short ones or impose some constraints on the pattern type. Many patterns for binding sites in prokaryotic species are not well characterized but are known to be large, between 16–30 base pairs (bp and contain at least 2 conserved bases. The length of prokaryotic species promoters (about 400 bp and our interest in studying a small set of genes that could be a cluster of co-regulated genes from microarray experiments led to the development of a new exhaustive algorithm targeting these large patterns. Results We present Searchpattool, a new method to search for and select the most specific (conservative frequent patterns. This method does not impose restrictions on the density or the structure of the pattern. The best patterns (motifs are selected using several statistics, including a new application of a z-score based on the number of matching sequences. We compared Searchpattool against other well known algorithms on a Bacillus subtilis group of 14 input sequences and found that in our experiments Searchpattool always performed the best based on performance scores. Conclusion Searchpattool is a new method for pattern discovery relative to transcription factor binding sites for species or genes with short promoters. It outputs the most specific significant patterns and helps the biologist to choose the best candidates.

  19. Molecular dynamics, thermodynamic, and mutational binding studies for tumor-specific LyP-1 in complex with p32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Selin Seda; Yalçın, Gözde; Çevik, Özge; Andaç, Cenk; Gürsoy, R Neslihan

    2017-04-21

    Recent studies in tumor homing peptides have shown the specificity of LyP-1 (CGNKRTRGC) to tumor lymphatics. In this present work, we evaluated the possible interactions between cyclic LyP-1 and its receptor, p32, with molecular dynamics and docking studies in order to lead the design of novel LyP-1 derivatives, which could bind to p32 more effectively and perform enhanced antitumor effect. The total binding enthalpy energies have been obtained by MM-PBSA thermodynamic computations and the favorability of p32.LyP-1 complex in water has been shown by explicit water MD computations. The last 30 ns of molecular dynamics trajectory have shown the strong interaction of LyP-1 with the inner surface chains of p32, especially with chains B and C. ALA-SCAN mutagenesis studies have indicated the considerable influence of Asn3, Lys4, Arg5, and Arg7 amino acid residues on the specific binding of LyP-1. Within the knowledge of the critical role of p32 receptor in cancer cell metabolism, this study can lead to further developments in anticancer therapy by targeting p32 with LyP-1 derivatives as active targeting moiety. This data can also be applied for the development of new drug delivery systems in which LyP-1 can be used for its targeting and anticancer properties.

  20. [Specific variability of teicoplanin protein binding in patients receiving continuous hemodiafiltration-comparison with hypoalbuminemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimoto, Hiromi; Teramatsu, Tsuyoshi; Goto, Junko; Yanagisawa, Masahiko; Harii, Norikazu; Suzuki, Masahiko; Hanawa, Takehisa; Matsuda, Kenichi; Oguchi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Variation in protein binding ratio (PBR) of teicoplanin (TEIC) was investigated in continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) patients. TEIC is classified as a high PBR drug (≧90%), and it was reported that the PBR of TEIC decreased with an decrease in the serum albumin level in hypoalbuminemia patients. However, few reports can be found about the variation of PBR of TEIC for CHDF patient. An antibiotic activity is directly determined by the level of unbound antibiotics species (Cfree) in the target site, namely, an increase in the Cfree enhances the risks of TEIC as well as the therapeutic effect against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this study, both the total concentration (Ctotal) and Cfree of TEIC were determined and the PBRs were compared between a patient with normal albumin level, hypoalbuminemia patients and CHDF patients. Similarly to the previous report, the lowering of PBR of TEIC was demonstrated in the hypoalbuminemia patients. On the other hand, the CHDF patients showed lower value of PBR suggesting some change in the protein binding ability, although showed higher values of serum albumin level in comparison with the hypoalbuminemia patients. It was not necessary to measure the Cfree value for the hypoalbuminemia patient routinely, but the monitoring of Cfree as well as Ctotal for the CHDF patients can be important for the proper TEIC use because of the potential specialty of PBR.

  1. AUH, a gene encoding an AU-specific RNA binding protein with intrinsic enoyl-CoA hydratase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, J; Waldner, H; Meyer-Monard, S; Hofsteenge, J; Jenö, P; Moroni, C

    1995-01-01

    AU-rich elements within the 3' untranslated region of transcripts of lymphokines and some protooncogenes serve as signal for rapid mRNA degradation. By using an AUUUA matrix, we have affinity-purified a 32-kDa protein, microsequenced it, and cloned the corresponding cDNA. In vitro, the recombinant protein bound specifically to AU-rich transcripts, including those for interleukin 3, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, c-fos, and c-myc. Sequence analysis revealed an unexpected homology to enoyl-CoA hydratase (EC 4.2.1.17), and the recombinant protein showed a low degree of the enzymatic activity. Thus, this gene, designated AUH, encodes an RNA binding protein with intrinsic enzymatic activity. Protein immobilized on an AUUUA matrix was enzymatically active, suggesting that hydratase and AU-binding functions are located on distinct domains within a single polypeptide. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7892223

  2. Elucidation of binding specificity of Jacalin toward O-glycosylated peptides: quantitative analysis by frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Nakamura, Sachiko; Wang, Han; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Tachibana, Kahori; Maebara, Kanako; Cheng, Lamei; Hirabayashi, J; Narimatsu, H

    2006-01-01

    Jacalin, a lectin from the jackfruit Artocarpus integrifolia, has been known as a valuable tool for specific capturing of O-glycoproteins such as mucins and IgA1. Though its sugar-binding preference for T/Tn-antigens is well established, its detailed specificity has not been elucidated. In this study, we prepared a series of mucin-type glycopeptides using human glycosyltransferases, that is, ST6GalNAc1, Core1Gal-T1 and -T2, beta3Gn-T6, and Core2GnT1, and investigated their binding to immobilized Jacalin by frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). As a result, consistent with the previous observation, Jacalin showed high affinity for T-antigen (Core1) and Tn-antigen (alpha N-acetylgalactosamine)-attached peptides. Furthermore, we here show as novel findings that (1) Jacalin also showed significant affinity for Core3 and sialyl-T (ST)-attached peptides, but (2) Jacalin could not bind to Core2, Core6, and sialyl-Tn (STn)-attached peptides. The results were also confirmed by FAC using p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-derivatized saccharides. In conclusion, Jacalin binds to a GalNAcalpha1-peptide, in which C6-OH of alphaGalNAc is free (i.e., Core1, Tn, Core3, and ST), whereas it cannot recognize a GalNAcalpha1-peptide with a substitution at the C6 position (i.e., Core2, Core6, and STn). These findings provide useful information when applying jacalin for functional analysis of mucin-type glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

  3. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  4. Sex-specific metabolic profiles of androgens and its main binding protein SHBG in a middle aged population without diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piontek, Uwe; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2017-01-01

    The role of androgens in metabolism with respect to sex-specific disease associations is poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to provide molecular signatures in plasma and urine of androgen action in a sex-specific manner using state-of-the-art metabolomics techniques. Our study population...... consisted of 430 men and 343 women, aged 20-80 years, who were recruited for the cross-sectional population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND), Germany. We used linear regression models to identify associations between testosterone, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS......) as well as sex hormone-binding globulin and plasma or urine metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. The analyses revealed major sex-specific differences in androgen-associated metabolites, particularly for levels of urate, lipids and metabolic surrogates of lifestyle factors, like cotinine or piperine...

  5. Math in the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make an origami paper box and explores the algebra, geometry, and other mathematics that unfolds. A set of origami steps that transforms the paper into an open box can hold mathematical surprises for both students and teachers. An origami lesson can engage students in an open-ended exploration of the relationship…

  6. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  7. A Specific Peptide with Calcium-Binding Capacity from Defatted Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and the Molecular Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms have been proposed as a new kind of protein source. Efforts are needed in order to transform the protein-rich biological wastes left after lipid extraction into value-added bio-products. Thus, the utilization of protein recovered from defatted Schizochytrium sp. by-products presents an opportunity. A specific peptide Tyr-Leu (YL with calcium-binding capacity was purified from defatted Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. The calcium-binding activity of YL reached 126.34 ± 3.40 μg/mg. The calcium-binding mechanism was investigated through ultraviolet, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that calcium ions could form dative bonds with carboxyl oxygen atoms and amino nitrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of amide bonds. YL-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which was beneficial for its absorption and transport in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the cellular uptake of calcium in Caco-2 cells showed that YL-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency and protect calcium ions against precipitation caused by dietary inhibitors such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate and metal ions. The findings indicate that the by-product of Schizochytrium sp. is a promising source for making peptide-calcium bio-products as algae-based functional supplements for human beings.

  8. A Specific Peptide with Calcium-Binding Capacity from Defatted Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and the Molecular Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xixi; Yang, Qian; Lin, Jiaping; Fu, Nanyan; Wang, Shaoyun

    2017-03-29

    Marine microorganisms have been proposed as a new kind of protein source. Efforts are needed in order to transform the protein-rich biological wastes left after lipid extraction into value-added bio-products. Thus, the utilization of protein recovered from defatted Schizochytrium sp. by-products presents an opportunity. A specific peptide Tyr-Leu (YL) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from defatted Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. The calcium-binding activity of YL reached 126.34 ± 3.40 μg/mg. The calcium-binding mechanism was investigated through ultraviolet, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that calcium ions could form dative bonds with carboxyl oxygen atoms and amino nitrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of amide bonds. YL-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which was beneficial for its absorption and transport in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the cellular uptake of calcium in Caco-2 cells showed that YL-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency and protect calcium ions against precipitation caused by dietary inhibitors such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate and metal ions. The findings indicate that the by-product of Schizochytrium sp. is a promising source for making peptide-calcium bio-products as algae-based functional supplements for human beings.

  9. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-inactive dCas9 proteins as they bind along engineered DNA substrates. High-resolution imaging allows us to determine their relative propensities to bind with different guide RNA variants to targeted or off-target sequences. Mapping the structural properties of Cas9 and dCas9 to their respective binding sites reveals a progressive conformational transformation at DNA sites with increasing sequence similarity to its target. With kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, these results provide evidence of a ‘conformational gating’ mechanism driven by the interactions between the guide RNA and the 14th–17th nucleotide region of the targeted DNA, the stabilities of which we find correlate significantly with reported off-target cleavage rates. KMC simulations also reveal potential methodologies to engineer guide RNA sequences with improved specificity by considering the invasion of guide RNAs into targeted DNA duplex. PMID:26384421

  10. A sequence-specific core promoter-binding transcription factor recruits TRF2 to coordinately transcribe ribosomal protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Douglas G; Gilmour, David S

    2017-10-13

    Ribosomal protein (RP) genes must be coordinately expressed for proper assembly of the ribosome yet the mechanisms that control expression of RP genes in metazoans are poorly understood. Recently, TATA-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2) rather than the TATA-binding protein (TBP) was found to function in transcription of RP genes in Drosophila. Unlike TBP, TRF2 lacks sequence-specific DNA binding activity, so the mechanism by which TRF2 is recruited to promoters is unclear. We show that the transcription factor M1BP, which associates with the core promoter region, activates transcription of RP genes. Moreover, M1BP directly interacts with TRF2 to recruit it to the RP gene promoter. High resolution ChIP-exo was used to analyze in vivo the association of M1BP, TRF2 and TFIID subunit, TAF1. Despite recent work suggesting that TFIID does not associate with RP genes in Drosophila, we find that TAF1 is present at RP gene promoters and that its interaction might also be directed by M1BP. Although M1BP associates with thousands of genes, its colocalization with TRF2 is largely restricted to RP genes, suggesting that this combination is key to coordinately regulating transcription of the majority of RP genes in Drosophila. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Forkhead Box Protein 1 (FoxO1) Inhibits Accelerated β Cell Aging in Pancreas-specific SMAD7 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Chen, Congde; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Ting; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Shiota, Chiyo; Prasadan, Krishna; Dong, Henry; Gittes, George K

    2017-02-24

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of exocrine dysfunction on the development of diabetes remain largely unknown. Here we show that pancreatic depletion of SMAD7 resulted in age-dependent increases in β cell dysfunction with accelerated glucose intolerance, followed by overt diabetes. The accelerated β cell dysfunction and loss of proliferation capacity, two features of β cell aging, appeared to be non-cell-autonomous, secondary to the adjacent exocrine failure as a "bystander effect." Increased Forkhead box protein 1 (FoxO1) acetylation and nuclear retention was followed by progressive FoxO1 loss in β cells that marked the onset of diabetes. Moreover, forced FoxO1 expression in β cells prevented β cell dysfunction and loss in this model. Thus, we present a model of accelerated β cell aging that may be useful for studying the mechanisms underlying β cell failure in diabetes. Moreover, we provide evidence highlighting a critical role of FoxO1 in maintaining β cell identity in the context of SMAD7 failure. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Forkhead Box Protein 1 (FoxO1) Inhibits Accelerated β Cell Aging in Pancreas-specific SMAD7 Mutant Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Chen, Congde; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Ting; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Shiota, Chiyo; Prasadan, Krishna; Dong, Henry; Gittes, George K.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of exocrine dysfunction on the development of diabetes remain largely unknown. Here we show that pancreatic depletion of SMAD7 resulted in age-dependent increases in β cell dysfunction with accelerated glucose intolerance, followed by overt diabetes. The accelerated β cell dysfunction and loss of proliferation capacity, two features of β cell aging, appeared to be non-cell-autonomous, secondary to the adjacent exocrine failure as a “bystander effect.” Increased Forkhead box protein 1 (FoxO1) acetylation and nuclear retention was followed by progressive FoxO1 loss in β cells that marked the onset of diabetes. Moreover, forced FoxO1 expression in β cells prevented β cell dysfunction and loss in this model. Thus, we present a model of accelerated β cell aging that may be useful for studying the mechanisms underlying β cell failure in diabetes. Moreover, we provide evidence highlighting a critical role of FoxO1 in maintaining β cell identity in the context of SMAD7 failure. PMID:28057752

  13. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  14. Costunolide specifically binds and inhibits thioredoxin reductase 1 to induce apoptosis in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Weishan; Chen, Ruijie; Vladimir, Katanaev; Dong, Xidan; Zia, Khan; Sun, Xiangwei; Dai, Xuanxuan; Bao, Miao; Shen, Xian; Liang, Guang

    2018-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. A natural sesquiterpene lactone, costunolide (CTD), showed inhibition of cancer development. However, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Here, we have examined the therapeutic activity and novel mechanisms of the anti-cancer activities of CTD in colon cancer cells. Using SPR analysis and enzyme activity assay on recombinant TrxR1 protein, our results show that CTD directly binds and inhibits the activity of TrxR1, which caused enhanced generation of ROS and led to ROS-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Overexpression of TrxR1 in HCT116 cells reversed CTD-induced cell apoptosis and ROS increase. CTD treatment of mice implanted with colon cancer cells showed tumor growth inhibition and reduced TrxR1 activity and ROS level. In addition, it was observed that TrxR1 was significantly up-regulated in existing colon cancer gene database and clinically obtained colon cancer tissues. Our studies have uncovered the mechanism underlying the biological activity of CTD in colon cancer and suggest that targeting TrxR1 may prove to be beneficial as a treatment option. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  16. Reactivity and models for anion distribution: specific iodide binding to sulfobetaine micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, M Akhyar; Beber, Rosane C; Priebe, Jacks P; Lal Satnami, Manmohan; Micke, Gustavo A; Costa, Ana C O; Fiedler, Haidi D; Bunton, Clifford A; Nome, Faruk

    2008-11-18

    The reaction of I (-) with methyl naphthalene-2-sulfonate (MeONs) is accelerated by the micellized sulfobetaine surfactants N-decyl, N-dodecyl, N-tetradecyl, and N-hexadecyl- N, N-dimethylammonio-1-propanesulfonate. Concentrations of micellar-bound I (-) were determined by using ion-selective electrodes (ISE), and capillary electrophoresis. At low concentrations, I (-) incorporation fits Langmuir isotherms and is related to changes in micellar surface potentials. Rate effects of dilute KI are fitted quantitatively by a pseudophase model that describes I (-) binding in terms of a sorption isotherm, but at higher [KI], where the simple model predicts saturation, rates increase due to electrolyte invasion. This model considers transfer equilibria of both reactants between water and micelles and second-order rate constants in each pseudophase. Estimated second-order rate constants for reaction of MeONs with I (-) in the micellar pseudophase are 3.2- to 3.5-fold higher than the second-order rate constant, k 2w, in water, depending on surfactant structure and assumptions in the treatment.

  17. Carbohydrate structure and differential binding of prostate specific antigen to Maackia amurensis lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Chikara; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yoshikawa, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Arai, Yoichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    2004-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay is widely used for detection of prostate cancer. Because PSA is also synthesized from normal prostate, false positive diagnosis cannot be avoided by the conventional serum PSA test. To apply the cancer-associated carbohydrate alteration to the improvement of PSA assay, we first elucidated the structures of PSA purified from human seminal fluid. The predominant core structure of N-glycans of seminal fluid PSA was a complex type biantennary oligosaccharide and was consistent with the structure reported previously. However, we found the sialic acid alpha2-3 galactose linkage as an additional terminal carbohydrate structure on seminal fluid PSA. We then analyzed the carbohydrate moiety of serum PSA from the patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy using lectin affinity chromatography. Lectin binding was assessed by lectin affinity column chromatography followed by determining the amount of total and free PSA. Concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Aleuria aurantia, Sambucus nigra, and Maackia amurensis lectins were tested for their binding to the carbohydrates on PSA. Among the lectins examined, the M. amurensis agglutinin-bound fraction of free serum PSA is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to benign prostate hypertrophy patients. The binding of PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, was also confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These results suggest that the differential binding of free serum PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy could be a potential measure for diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  18. The peripheral binding of 14-3-3γ to membranes involves isoform-specific histidine residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene J Bustad

    Full Text Available Mammalian 14-3-3 protein scaffolds include seven conserved isoforms that bind numerous phosphorylated protein partners and regulate many cellular processes. Some 14-3-3-isoforms, notably γ, have elevated affinity for membranes, which might contribute to modulate the subcellular localization of the partners and substantiate the importance of investigating molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction. By applying surface plasmon resonance we here show that the binding to phospholipid bilayers is stimulated when 14-3-3γ is complexed with its partner, a peptide corresponding to the Ser19-phosphorylated N-terminal region of tyrosine hydroxylase. Moreover, membrane interaction is dependent on salts of kosmotropic ions, which also stabilize 14-3-3γ. Electrostatic analysis of available crystal structures of γ and of the non-membrane-binding ζ-isoform, complemented with molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the electrostatic potential distribution of phosphopeptide-bound 14-3-3γ is optimal for interaction with the membrane through amphipathic helices at the N-terminal dimerization region. In addition, His158, and especially His195, both specific to 14-3-3γ and located at the convex lateral side, appeared to be pivotal for the ligand induced membrane interaction, as corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis. The participation of these histidine residues might be associated to their increased protonation upon membrane binding. Overall, these results reveal membrane-targeting motifs and give insights on mechanisms that furnish the 14-3-3γ scaffold with the capacity for tuned shuffling from soluble to membrane-bound states.

  19. The influence of specific binding of collagen-silk chimeras to silk biomaterials on hMSC behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; DesRochers, Teresa M; Qin, Guokui; Xia, Xiaoxia; Thiagarajan, Geetha; Brodsky, Barbara; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-like proteins in the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes adopt a triple-helix structure with a thermal stability similar to that of animal collagens, can be expressed in high yield in Escherichia coli and can be easily modified through molecular biology techniques. However, potential applications for such recombinant collagens are limited by their lack of higher order structure to achieve the physical properties needed for most biomaterials. To overcome this problem, the S. pyogenes collagen domain was fused to a repetitive Bombyx mori silk consensus sequence, as a strategy to direct specific non-covalent binding onto solid silk materials whose superior stability, mechanical and material properties have been previously established. This approach resulted in the successful binding of these new collagen-silk chimeric proteins to silk films and porous scaffolds, and the binding affinity could be controlled by varying the number of repeats in the silk sequence. To explore the potential of collagen-silk chimera for regulating biological activity, integrin (Int) and fibronectin (Fn) binding sequences from mammalian collagens were introduced into the bacterial collagen domain. The attachment of bioactive collagen-silk chimeras to solid silk biomaterials promoted hMSC spreading and proliferation substantially in comparison to the controls. The ability to combine the biomaterial features of silk with the biological activities of collagen allowed more rapid cell interactions with silk-based biomaterials, improved regulation of stem cell growth and differentiation, as well as the formation of artificial extracellular matrices useful for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Mutsuo [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. {yields} HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. {yields} Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. {yields} Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  1. [Spectroscopy study of binding mechanisms and molecular recognition of methamidophos-specific moleculary imprinted polymer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhong-Lan; Yang, Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Lan; Gao, Yun; Su, Qing-De

    2009-01-01

    A new methamidophos-specific molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized based on non-covalent interaction. The complexes formed between MAP and MAA were evaluated by 1H NMR, FTIR and UV spectrometry. The MAP-MAA complexes of 1 : 2 mole ratio were obtained by cooperative hydrogen bonding and the complexes possessed better stabilization (K = 2.894 x 10(6) L2 x mol(-2). The Infrared spectrometry differences of the MIPs before and after saturated with MAP further indicated that there were carboxyl functional groups in the MIP, which could interact with the template by cooperative hydrogen bonding specifically.

  2. Prevalence and specificity of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A non-complement-binding anti-HLA alloantibodies in retransplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, M-L; Dechant, M; Doxiadis, I I N; Spriewald, B M

    2008-07-01

    The role of complement-binding donor-directed anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in graft rejection is well established, whereas the prevalence and relevance of non-complement-binding (NCB) anti-HLA antibodies are less well defined. The aim of our study was to establish a sensitive and reliable test system for the detection and the specification of these NCB anti-HLA antibodies. Sera from 60 patients awaiting retransplantation were analysed for the presence of anti-HLA class I alloantibodies with complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) tests. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G(all) anti-HLA class I and class II alloantibodies were differentiated on generic level by plate-based solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Subsequently, a modified bead-based (Luminex) assay was applied, allowing the investigation of IgG(2/4) NCB isotypes as well as IgA(1/2). The anti-HLA specificities of the NCB alloantibodies were determined and compared with known mismatches from previous transplants. Seventeen of the 60 sera (28%) were positive in the CDC increasing to 26 of 60 (43%) in the class I and 33 of 60 (55%) in the class II plate-based assay. Using the modified bead-based system 24 of 60 sera (40%) contained NCB IgG(2/4), which were mostly donor specific. In addition, a high prevalence of NCB IgA antibodies was detected (26 of 60 sera), which occurred independently of IgG(2/4) NCB, and half of which were donor specific. NCB anti-HLA alloantibodies, including the IgA isotype, can reliably be detected using the modified bead-based test system. These NCB alloantibodies had a high prevalence in retransplant candidates and were mostly donor specific.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Noncovalent Interactions That Drive Binding and Specificity in DD-Peptidases and β-Lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Vankayala, Sai Lakshmana; White, Justin K; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-02-11

    Bacterial resistance to standard (i.e., β-lactam-based) antibiotics has become a global pandemic. Simultaneously, research into the underlying causes of resistance has slowed substantially, although its importance is universally recognized. Key to unraveling critical details is characterization of the noncovalent interactions that govern binding and specificity (DD-peptidases, antibiotic targets, versus β-lactamases, the evolutionarily derived enzymes that play a major role in resistance) and ultimately resistance as a whole. Herein, we describe a detailed investigation that elicits new chemical insights into these underlying intermolecular interactions. Benzylpenicillin and a novel β-lactam peptidomimetic complexed to the Stremptomyces R61 peptidase are examined using an arsenal of computational techniques: MD simulations, QM/MM calculations, charge perturbation analysis, QM/MM orbital analysis, bioinformatics, flexible receptor/flexible ligand docking, and computational ADME predictions. Several key molecular level interactions are identified that not only shed light onto fundamental resistance mechanisms, but also offer explanations for observed specificity. Specifically, an extended π-π network is elucidated that suggests antibacterial resistance has evolved, in part, due to stabilizing aromatic interactions. Additionally, interactions between the protein and peptidomimetic substrate are identified and characterized. Of particular interest is a water-mediated salt bridge between Asp217 and the positively charged N-terminus of the peptidomimetic, revealing an interaction that may significantly contribute to β-lactam specificity. Finally, interaction information is used to suggest modifications to current β-lactam compounds that should both improve binding and specificity in DD-peptidases and their physiochemical properties.

  4. p53 Specifically Binds Triplex DNA In Vitro and in Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brázdová, Marie; Tichý, Vlastimil; Helma, Robert; Bažantová, Pavla; Polášková, Alena; Krejčí, Aneta; Petr, Marek; Navrátilová, Lucie; Tichá, Olga; Nejedlý, Karel; Bennink, Martin L; Subramaniam, Vinod; Bábková, Zuzana; Martínek, Tomáš; Lexa, Matej; Adámik, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Triplex DNA is implicated in a wide range of biological activities, including regulation of gene expression and genomic instability leading to cancer. The tumor suppressor p53 is a central regulator of cell fate in response to different type of insults. Sequence and structure specific modes of DNA

  5. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    . Using this strategy, we characterized eight BoLA-I molecules, and found the peptide specificity to resemble that of human MHC-I molecules with primary anchors most often at P2 and P9, and occasional auxiliary P1/P3/P5/P6 anchors. We analyzed nine reported CTL epitopes from Theileria parva, and in eight...

  6. Electrostatic contributions to residue-specific protonation equilibria and proton binding capacitance for a small protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindman, Stina; Linse, Sara; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Andre, Ingemar

    2006-01-01

    Charge-charge interactions in proteins are important in a host of biological processes. Here we use C-13 NMR chemical shift data for individual aspartate and glutamate side chain carboxylate groups to accurately detect site-specific protonation equilibria in a variant of the B1 domain of protein G

  7. A Quantitative Description of the Binding States and In Vitro Function of Antitermination Protein N of Bacteriophage λ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conant, Clarke R.; Van Gilst, Marc R.; Weitzel, Stephen E.; Rees, William A.; von Hippel, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The N protein of bacteriophage λ activates transcription of genes that lie downstream of termination sequences by suppressing transcription termination. N binds to specific (boxB) and non-specific sites on the transcript RNA and contacts RNA polymerase via cis-RNA looping, resulting in “antitermination” of transcription. To find the effect of N–boxB binding on antitermination, we quantitatively relate binding measurements made in isolation to in vitro antitermination activity. We measure binding of N to boxB RNA, non-specific single-stranded RNA, and non-specific double-stranded DNA fluorimetrically, and use an equilibrium model to describe quantitatively the binding of N to nucleic acids of Escherichia coli transcription elongation complexes. We then test the model by comparison with in vitro N antitermination activity measured in reactions containing these same elongation complexes. We find that binding of N protein to the nucleic acid components of transcription elongation complexes can quantitatively predict antitermination activity, suggesting that antitermination in vitro is determined by a nucleic acid binding equilibrium with one molecule of N protein per RNA transcript being sufficient for antitermination. Elongation complexes contain numerous overlapping non-specific RNA and DNA-binding sites for N; the large number of sites compensates for the low N binding affinity, so multiple N proteins are expected to bind to elongation complexes. The occupancy/activity of these proteins is described by a binomial distribution of proteins on transcripts containing multiple non-specific sites. The contribution of specific (boxB) binding to activity also depends on this distribution. Specificity is not measured accurately by measurements made in the presence and in the absence of boxB. We find that antitermination is inhibited by non-productive binding of N to non-specific sites on template DNA, and that NusA protein covers RNA sites on the transcript, limiting

  8. Site-specific binding of a water molecule to the sulfa drugs sulfamethoxazole and sulfisoxazole: a laser-desorption isomer-specific UV and IR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Thomas; Seidel, Sebastian; Müller, Christian W

    2018-02-20

    To determine the preferred water molecule binding sites of the polybasic sulfa drugs sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfisoxazole (SIX), we have studied their monomers and monohydrated complexes through laser-desorption conformer-specific UV and IR spectroscopy. Both the SMX and SIX monomer adopt a single conformer in the molecular beam. On the basis of their conformer-specific IR spectra in the NH stretch region, these conformers were assigned to the SMX and SIX global minimum structures, both exhibiting a staggered sulfonamide group and an intramolecular C-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]S hydrogen bond. The SMX-H 2 O and SIX-H 2 O complexes each adopt a single isomer in the molecular beam. Their isomeric structures were determined based on their isomer-specific IR spectra in the NH/OH stretch region. Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis of the calculated electron densities revealed that in the SMX-H 2 O complex the water molecule donates an O-HN hydrogen bond to the heterocycle nitrogen atom and accepts an N-HO hydrogen bond from the sulfonamide NH group. In the SIX-H 2 O complex, however, the water molecule does not bind to the heterocycle but instead donates an O-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]S hydrogen bond to the sulfonamide group and accepts an N-HO hydrogen bond from the sulfonamide NH group. Both water complexes are additionally stabilized by a C ph -HOH 2 hydrogen bond. Interacting Quantum Atoms analysis suggests that all intermolecular hydrogen bonds are dominated by the short-range exchange-correlation contribution.

  9. Regulation of the bioavailability of thioredoxin in the lens by a specific thioredoxin-binding protein (TBP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Namal P M; Fernando, M Rohan; Lou, Marjorie F

    2007-08-01

    Thioredoxin (TRx) is known to control redox homeostasis in cells. In recent years, a specific TRx binding protein called thioredoxin binding protein-2 (TBP-2) was found in other cell types and it appeared to negatively regulate TRx bioavailability and thereby control TRx biological function. In view of the sensitivity of lens transparency to redox status, proper regulation of TRx bioavailability is of the utmost importance. This study was conducted to examine the presence and function of TBP-2 in human lens epithelial cells (HLE B3). We cloned human lens TBP-2 from a human cDNA library (GenBank accession number AY 594328) and showed that it is fully homologous to the human brain TBP-2 gene. The recombinant TBP-2 protein was partially purified and mass spectrometric analysis confirmed its sequence homology to that of brain TBP-2. Immunoprecipitates obtained from HLE B3 cells using anti-TRx and anti-TBP-2 antibodies showed the presence of TRx and TBP-2 in immunoprecipitates indicating the formation of a TRx-TBP-2 complex in vivo. Furthermore, under H(2)O(2)-stress conditions, TRx gene expression was transiently up-regulated while TBP-2 gene expression was inversely down-regulated as seen in both HLE B3 cells and in the epithelial cell layers from cultured pig lenses. Cells with overexpressed TBP-2 showed lower TRx activity, grew slower and were more susceptible to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. This is the first report of the presence of a TRx-specific binding protein in the lens. Our data suggest that TBP-2 is likely a negative regulator for the bioavailability, and therefore, the overall function of TRx in the lens.

  10. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-05-19

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Rapid characterization of binding specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies using recombinant human protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Gregor; Ipcho, Simon; Baars, Sabine; Chen, Hong; Hadley, Katie; Beveridge, Allan; Gould, Edith; Murphy, Derek

    2009-01-30

    Antibodies are routinely used as research tools, in diagnostic assays and increasingly as therapeutics. Ideally, these applications require antibodies with high sensitivity and specificity; however, many commercially available antibodies are limited in their use as they cross-react with non-related proteins. Here we describe a novel method to characterize antibody specificity. Six commercially available monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were screened on high-density protein arrays comprising of ~10,000 recombinant human proteins (Imagenes). Two of the six antibodies examined; anti-pICln and anti-GAPDH, bound exclusively to their target antigen and showed no cross-reactivity with non-related proteins. However, four of the antibodies, anti-HSP90, anti-HSA, anti-bFGF and anti-Ro52, showed strong cross-reactivity with other proteins on the array. Antibody-antigen interactions were readily confirmed using Western immunoblotting. In addition, the redundant nature of the protein array used, enabled us to define the epitopic region within HSP90 of the anti-HSP90 antibody, and identify possible shared epitopes in cross-reacting proteins. In conclusion, high-density protein array technology is a fast and effective means for determining the specificity of antibodies and can be used to further improve the accuracy of antibody applications.

  12. Autoantibodies to box A of high mobility group box 1 in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, F; de Leeuw, K; Horst, G; Maas, F; Bootsma, H; Heeringa, P; Limburg, P C; Westra, J

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to nuclear structures are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), including autoantibodies to nuclear protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). HMGB1 consists of three separate domains: box A, box B and an acidic tail. Recombinant box A acts as a competitive antagonist for HMGB1 and might be an interesting treatment option in SLE. However, antibodies to box A might interfere. Therefore, levels of anti-box A were examined in SLE patients in association with disease activity and clinical parameters. Serum anti-box A was measured in 86 SLE patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Serum samples of 28 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were included as disease controls. Anti-HMGB1 and anti-box B levels were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay during quiescent disease [SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) ≤ 4, n = 47] and active disease (SLEDAI ≥ 5, n = 39). Anti-box A levels in active SLE patients were higher compared to quiescent patients, and were increased significantly compared to HC and disease controls. Anti-box A levels correlated positively with SLEDAI and anti-dsDNA levels and negatively with complement C3 levels. Increased levels of anti-box A antibodies were present in the majority of patients with nephritic (73%) and non-nephritic exacerbations (71%). Antibodies to the box A domain of HMGB1 might be an interesting new biomarker, as these had a high specificity for SLE and were associated with disease activity. Longitudinal studies should be performed to evaluate whether these antibodies perform better in predicting an exacerbation, especially non-nephritic exacerbations. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  13. A Network of HMG-box Transcription Factors Regulates Sexual Cycle in the Fungus Podospora anserina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Benkhali, Jinane; Coppin, Evelyne; Brun, Sylvain; Peraza-Reyes, Leonardo; Martin, Tom; Dixelius, Christina; Lazar, Noureddine; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Debuchy, Robert

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group (HMG) B proteins are eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins characterized by the HMG-box functional motif. These transcription factors play a pivotal role in global genomic functions and in the control of genes involved in specific developmental or metabolic pathways. The filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina contains 12 HMG-box genes. Of these, four have been previously characterized; three are mating-type genes that control fertilization and development of the fruit-body, whereas the last one encodes a factor involved in mitochondrial DNA stability. Systematic deletion analysis of the eight remaining uncharacterized HMG-box genes indicated that none were essential for viability, but that seven were involved in the sexual cycle. Two HMG-box genes display striking features. PaHMG5, an ortholog of SpSte11 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is a pivotal activator of mating-type genes in P. anserina, whereas PaHMG9 is a repressor of several phenomena specific to the stationary phase, most notably hyphal anastomoses. Transcriptional analyses of HMG-box genes in HMG-box deletion strains indicated that PaHMG5 is at the hub of a network of several HMG-box factors that regulate mating-type genes and mating-type target genes. Genetic analyses revealed that this network also controls fertility genes that are not regulated by mating-type transcription factors. This study points to the critical role of HMG-box members in sexual reproduction in fungi, as 11 out of 12 members were involved in the sexual cycle in P. anserina. PaHMG5 and SpSte11 are conserved transcriptional regulators of mating-type genes, although P. anserina and S. pombe diverged 550 million years ago. Two HMG-box genes, SOX9 and its upstream regulator SRY, also play an important role in sex determination in mammals. The P. anserina and S. pombe mating-type genes and their upstream regulatory factor form a module of HMG-box genes analogous to the SRY/SOX9 module, revealing a commonality of sex

  14. A novel core 1 O-linked glycan-specific binding lectin from the fruiting body of Hericium erinaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghun

    2018-02-01

    Mucin-type O-glycans are involved in biological functions on the cell surface as well as the glycoproteins and can also be used as specific carbohydrate biomarkers of many diseases. In this study, I purified a novel core 1 O-linked glycan specific lectin, Hericium erinaceus lecin (HeL), from the fruiting body of the mushroom Hericium erinaceus, which is known as the natural source for a sialic acid-binding lectin. Upon optimization of the purification conditions, a sequence of ion exchange, affinity, ion exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography resulted in the highest yield and best quality of lectin without protease activity. The resulting purified HeL is an apparent hexameric protein with a subunit molecular weight of 15kDa, and a pI of 4.3. In hemagglutination inhibition assay, the purified lectin was only inhibited by glycoproteins containing mucin-type O-glycans and reacted weakly with Galβ(1,3)GalNAc. Glycan array analyses showed that HeL specifically interacts with core 1 O-linked glycans as well as extended O-glycan structures containing sialylation or fucosylation. The glycan binding specificity of HeL is comparable to that of peanut agglutinin for detection of a broader range of extended core 1 O-glycan structures. Taken together, these results provide an efficient and optimized procedure for the purification of HeL from the fruiting body of the mushroom Hericium erinaceus. Moreover, HeL represents a powerful tool for analyzing core 1 and extended core 1 O- glycan structures in diagnosis assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth hormone binding to specific receptors stimulates growth and function of cloned insulin-producing rat insulinoma RIN-5AH cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Martin, J M

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human GH (hGH) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line RIN-5AH in monolayer culture was studied along with some physiological effects of the hormone on these cells. Binding was time and temperature dependent, and steady state binding was observed in 60 min at 37 C...... of the insulinotropic effect showed that half-maximal and maximal stimulation were observed in cells cultured in the presence of 10 and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Insulin release to the medium during the 4-day culture period was not affected by hGH. These data suggest that GH, through binding to specific receptors...

  16. Anaphylaxis caused by the new ant, Pachycondyla chinensis: demonstration of specific IgE and IgE-binding components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S S; Park, H S; Kim, H Y; Lee, S K; Nahm, D H

    2001-06-01

    There have been no reports dealing with the pathogenic mechanism and IgE-binding components in patients with anaphylaxis caused by a sting from Pachycondyla chinensis. This study was conducted to observe the clinical features of patients with P chinensis -induced anaphylaxis. The roles of specific (s) IgE and sIgG4 antibodies were evaluated, and IgE-binding components were identified. Seven patients with P chinensis -induced anaphylaxis and 15 unexposed control subjects were enrolled. P chinensis ants were collected at the patients' homes, and venom was prepared as P chinensis extract. Five patients complained of bee venom-induced anaphylaxis and had positive sIgE levels to yellow jacket venom, wasp venom, or both as well. Serum sIgE and sIgG4 were detected by means of ELISA. To identify IgE-binding components within P chinensis extracts, 12% SDS-PAGE with immunoblot analysis was applied. All patients had positive skin prick test responses to P chinensis antigen and positive sIgE levels. Five (71%) patients had positive sIgG4 levels. Eight IgE-binding components (58, 46, 3l, 29, 27, 25, 22, and 12 kd) were noted, and the component at 12 kd was the most frequently found allergen (85%). IgE ELISA inhibition tests were performed on 2 groups of sera: one from patients with anaphylaxis induced by both P chinensis and bee venom (group A) and the other from patients with anaphylaxis induced by P chinensis venom alone without bee venom allergy (group B). ELISA inhibition tests with serum from group A showed significant inhibitions with addition of P chinensis extract, partial inhibitions with yellow jacket antigen, and minimal inhibitions with wasp or imported fire ant antigens. However, ELISA inhibition tests with serum from group B showed significant inhibitions with P chinensis antigen but no inhibition with wasp, yellow jacket, or imported fire ant antigens. IgE-mediated reactions contributed to the development of P chinensis -induced anaphylaxis. Eight IgE-binding

  17. Microscale characterization of the binding specificity and affinity of a monoclonal antisulfotyrosyl IgG antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, K.S.; Bradbury, A.R.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfation is a potentially important post-translational modification of proteins and has been demonstrated in a number of polypeptides, notably in gastrointestinal hormones. In contrast to phosphorylation, however, the investigation of sulfation patterns in tissues and on purified proteins has been...... peptides and proteins. The data show that the anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody is completely specific for compounds containing sulfated tyrosyls. Affinity electrophoresis experiments allowed us to estimate dissociation constants for sulfated hirudin fragment (56-65), gastrin-17, and cholecystokinin octapeptide...

  18. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  19. [Phage display peptide library for screening the peptides that specifically bind to osteoblasts cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingyue; Zhou, Yuqin; Du, Mingliang; Qian, Haiyan; Li, Quanli

    2015-07-01

    To explore the experimental methods that the phage peptide library technology screening human osteoblast specificity polypeptide, which will provide the basis of the experiment of the Ti surface biolization modification. Human calvarial osteoblasts were used as the target cells for whole-cell biopanning from a 12-mer peptide phage-display library. Cell eluent and cell lysis buffer were cultivate and count respectively after washing. Then the target cells were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence detection to authenticate the positive phage clones by human gingival fibroblast as the absorber cells. The positive phage clones were deduced by DNA sequencing. After four rounds of screening, twenty-two positive phage clones were found out from randomly selected phage monoclonals, whose single-strand DNA were extracted and sequenced. Amino acid sequence of the highest frequency peptide was MGWSWWPETWPM. The specific peptide against human osteoblasts can be obtained from a phage-display peptide library for use as a new research approach and experimental basis of the biolization modification of the titanium surface.

  20. Ligand size is a major determinant of specificity in periplasmic oxyanion-binding proteins: the 1.2 A resolution crystal structure of Azotobacter vinelandii ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D M; Williams, C E; Mitchenall, L A; Pau, R N

    1998-12-15

    . Periplasmic receptors constitute a diverse class of binding proteins that differ widely in size, sequence and ligand specificity. Nevertheless, almost all of them display a common beta/alpha folding motif and have similar tertiary structures consisting of two globular domains. The ligand is bound at the bottom of a deep cleft, which lies at the interface between these two domains. The oxyanion-binding proteins are notable in that they can discriminate between very similar ligands. . Azotobacter vinelandii is unusual in that it possesses two periplasmic molybdate-binding proteins. The crystal structure of one of these with bound ligand has been determined at 1.2 A resolution. It superficially resembles the structure of sulphate-binding protein (SBP) from Salmonella typhimurium and uses a similar constellation of hydrogen-bonding interactions to bind its ligand. However, the detailed interactions are distinct from those of SBP and the more closely related molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli. . Despite differences in the residues involved in binding, the volumes of the binding pockets in the A. vinelandii and E. coli molybdate-binding proteins are similar and are significantly larger than that of SBP. We conclude that the discrimination between molybdate and sulphate shown by these binding proteins is largely dependent upon small differences in the sizes of these two oxyanions.

  1. Genomic identification, characterization and differential expression analysis of SBP-box gene family in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongtao; Hao, Mengyu; Wang, Wenxiang; Mei, Desheng; Tong, Chaobo; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jia; Fu, Li; Hu, Qiong

    2016-09-08

    SBP-box genes belong to one of the largest families of transcription factors. Though members of this family have been characterized to be important regulators of diverse biological processes, information of SBP-box genes in the third most important oilseed crop Brassica napus is largely undefined. In the present study, by whole genome bioinformatics analysis and transcriptional profiling, 58 putative members of SBP-box gene family in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) were identified and their expression pattern in different tissues as well as possible interaction with miRNAs were analyzed. In addition, B. napus lines with contrasting branch angle were used for investigating the involvement of SBP-box genes in plant architecture regulation. Detailed gene information, including genomic organization, structural feature, conserved domain and phylogenetic relationship of the genes were systematically characterized. By phylogenetic analysis, BnaSBP proteins were classified into eight distinct groups representing the clear orthologous relationships to their family members in Arabidopsis and rice. Expression analysis in twelve tissues including vegetative and reproductive organs showed different expression patterns among the SBP-box genes and a number of the genes exhibit tissue specific expression, indicating their diverse functions involved in the developmental process. Forty-four SBP-box genes were ascertained to contain the putative miR156 binding site, with 30 and 14 of the genes targeted by miR156 at the coding and 3'UTR region, respectively. Relative expression level of miR156 is varied across tissues. Different expression pattern of some BnaSBP genes and the negative correlation of transcription levels between miR156 and its target BnaSBP gene were observed in lines with different branch angle. Taken together, this study represents the first systematic analysis of the SBP-box gene family in Brassica napus. The data presented here provides base foundation for

  2. Phenylacetic acids and the structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac bind to specific gamma-hydroxybutyric acid sites in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe; Skonberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a proposed neurotransmitter or neuromodulator with a yet unresolved mechanism of action. GHB binds to both specific high-affinity GHB binding sites and to gamma-aminobutyric acid subtype B (GABA(B)) receptors in the brain. To separate specific GHB effects from...... GABA(B) receptor effects, it is imperative to develop GHB selective and potent compounds. We generated the compound, 4-(biphen-4-yl)-4-hydroxybutyric acid, which is the 4-hydroxyl analogue of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) fenbufen (referred to as gamma-hydroxyfenbufen). When measured...... in a rat brain homogenate [(3)H]NCS-382 binding assay, gamma-hydroxyfenbufen inhibited [(3)H]NCS-382 binding with a 10-fold higher affinity than GHB (K(i) 0.44 microM), thus establishing it as a novel lead structure. The active metabolite of fenbufen, 4-biphenylacetic acid inhibited [(3)H]NCS-382 binding...

  3. Tumor-specific binding of radiolabeled G-22 monoclonal antibody in glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Jun; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Mizuno, Masaaki; Sugita, Kenichiro; Oshima, Motoo; Tadokoro, Masanori; Sakuma, Sadayuki (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Seo, Hisao

    1992-03-01

    Iodine-131-labeled G-22 monoclonal antibody F(ab'){sub 2} fragment reacting specifically with a glioma-associated surface glycoprotein was administered to 12 glioma patients to investigate its use in radioimaging of intracranial gliomas. No immediate or delayed side effects were attributable to antibody injection. Nine patients received the radiolabeled complex intravenously. The images of low-grade gliomas were generally poor and disappeared within 4 days. High-contrast images were obtained beyond the 7th day in high-grade gliomas except one case in the pineal region. Three patients received intraventricular or intratumoral administration. Clear images of all tumors were demonstrated from the 2nd until later than the 7th day. One patient with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dissemination of brainstem glioma demonstrated negative CSF cytology after intraventricular administration. (author).

  4. The binding of NCAM to FGFR1 induces a specific cellular response mediated by receptor trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Cattaneo, Paola; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    different from that elicited by FGF-2. In contrast to FGF-induced degradation of endocytic FGFR1, NCAM promotes the stabilization of the receptor, which is recycled to the cell surface in a Rab11- and Src-dependent manner. In turn, FGFR1 recycling is required for NCAM-induced sustained activation of various...... effectors. Furthermore, NCAM, but not FGF-2, promotes cell migration, and this response depends on FGFR1 recycling and sustained Src activation. Our results implicate NCAM as a nonconventional ligand for FGFR1 that exerts a peculiar control on the intracellular trafficking of the receptor, resulting...... in a specific cellular response. Besides introducing a further level of complexity in the regulation of FGFR1 function, our findings highlight the link of FGFR recycling with sustained signaling and cell migration and the critical role of these events in dictating the cellular response evoked by receptor...

  5. BoxPlot++

    OpenAIRE

    Azmeh, Zeina; Hamoui, Fady; Huchard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    We propose the BoxPlot++ as an extension of Tukey's boxplot. We improve the resulting data values distribution by removing the repeated values and by calculating distances between the points and the nearest median.

  6. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins bind integrin αIIbβ3 and inhibit the platelet-fibrinogen interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Shanley

    Full Text Available Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs are immunoglobulin superfamily members encoded by multigene families in rodents and primates. In human pregnancy, PSGs are secreted by the syncytiotrophoblast, a fetal tissue, and reach a concentration of up to 400 ug/ml in the maternal bloodstream at term. Human and mouse PSGs induce release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGFβ1 from monocytes, macrophages, and other cell types, suggesting an immunoregulatory function. RGD tri-peptide motifs in the majority of human PSGs suggest that they may function like snake venom disintegrins, which bind integrins and inhibit interactions with ligands. We noted that human PSG1 has a KGD, rather than an RGD motif. The presence of a KGD in barbourin, a platelet integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist found in snake venom, suggested that PSG1 may be a selective αIIbβ3 ligand. Here we show that human PSG1 binds αIIbβ3 and inhibits the platelet - fibrinogen interaction. Unexpectedly, however, the KGD is not critical as multiple PSG1 domains independently bind and inhibit αIIbβ3 function. Human PSG9 and mouse Psg23 are also inhibitory suggesting conservation of this function across primate and rodent PSG families. Our results suggest that in species with haemochorial placentation, in which maternal blood is in direct contact with fetal trophoblast, the high expression level of PSGs reflects a requirement to antagonise abundant (3 mg/ml fibrinogen in the maternal circulation, which may be necessary to prevent platelet aggregation and thrombosis in the prothrombotic maternal environment of pregnancy.

  7. Boxes and Shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Dean

    2008-01-01

    The Boxes and Shelves series from 2008 are are all made from the backing card from discarded writing pads. Boxes and Shelves extended my investigation of quotidian materials and their relationship to the origins of creative toil. Since 1996 my research has sought to identify and locate instances where the 'unmeasurable' meets the measurable. I have consistently employed a range of utilitarian materials such as bus seats, bus tickets, puddles, A4 writing paper, to present a series of 'problem ...

  8. Freedom to box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, N

    1998-02-01

    The british Medical Association wants to criminalise all boxing. This article examines the logic of the arguments it uses and finds them wanting. The move from medical evidence about the risk of brain damage to the conclusion that boxing should be banned is not warranted. The BMA's arguments are a combination of inconsistent paternalism and legal moralism. Consistent application of the principles implicit in the BMA's arguments would lead to absurd consequences and to severe limitations being put on individual freedom.

  9. Improved pan-specific prediction of MHC class I peptide binding using a novel receptor clustering data partitioning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, A H; Kringelum, J V; Garde, C; Nielsen, M

    2016-12-01

    Pan-specific prediction of receptor-ligand interaction is conventionally done using machine-learning methods that integrates information about both receptor and ligand primary sequences. To achieve optimal performance using machine learning, dealing with overfitting and data redundancy is critical. Most often so-called ligand clustering methods have been used to deal with these issues in the context of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions, and the MHC system the approach has proven highly effective for extrapolating information from a limited set of receptors with well characterized binding motifs, to others with no or very limited experimental characterization. The success of this approach has however proven to depend strongly on the similarity of the query molecule to the molecules with characterized specificity using in the machine-learning process. Here, we outline an alternative strategy with the aim of altering this and construct data sets optimal for training of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions focusing on receptor similarity rather than ligand similarity. We show that this receptor clustering method consistently in benchmarks covering affinity predictions, MHC ligand and MHC epitope identification perform better than the conventional ligand clustering method on the alleles with remote similarity to the training set. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Diverse monoclonal antibodies against the CA 19-9 antigen show variation in binding specificity with consequences for clinical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Katie; Maupin, Kevin A; Brand, Randall E; Haab, Brian B

    2012-07-01

    The CA 19-9 antigen is currently the best individual marker for the detection of pancreatic cancer. In order to optimize the CA 19-9 assay and to develop approaches to further improve cancer detection, it is important to understand the specificity differences between CA 19-9 antibodies and the consequential affect on biomarker performance. Antibody arrays enabled multiplexed comparisons between five different CA 19-9 antibodies used in the analysis of plasma samples from pancreatic cancer patients and controls. Major differences were observed between antibodies in their detection of particular patient samples. Glycan array analysis revealed that certain antibodies were highly specific for the canonical CA 19-9 epitope, sialyl-Lewis A, while others bound sialyl-Lewis A in addition to a related structure called sialyl-Lewis C and modification with Nue5Gc. In a much larger patient cohort, we confirmed the binding of sialyl-Lewis C glycan by one of the antibodies and showed that the broader specificity led to the detection of an increased number of cancer patients without increasing detection of pancreatitis patient samples. This work demonstrates that variation between antibody specificity for cancer-associated glycans can have significant implications for biomarker performance and highlights the value of characterizing and detecting the range of glycan structures that are elevated in cancer. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    , and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and structural analyses...... definition of the MHC-binding environment including information from non-human species....

  13. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives.

  15. TBP-like protein (TLP) interferes with Taspase1-mediated processing of TFIIA and represses TATA box gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Isogai, Momoko; Maeda, Ryo; Ura, Kiyoe; Tamura, Taka-Aki

    2015-07-27

    TBP-TFIIA interaction is involved in the potentiation of TATA box-driven promoters. TFIIA activates transcription through stabilization of TATA box-bound TBP. The precursor of TFIIA is subjected to Taspase1-directed processing to generate α and β subunits. Although this processing has been assumed to be required for the promoter activation function of TFIIA, little is known about how the processing is regulated. In this study, we found that TBP-like protein (TLP), which has the highest affinity to TFIIA among known proteins, affects Taspase1-driven processing of TFIIA. TLP interfered with TFIIA processing in vivo and in vitro, and direct binding of TLP to TFIIA was essential for inhibition of the processing. We also showed that TATA box promoters are specifically potentiated by processed TFIIA. Processed TFIIA, but not unprocessed TFIIA, associated with the TATA box. In a TLP-knocked-down condition, not only the amounts of TATA box-bound TFIIA but also those of chromatin-bound TBP were significantly increased, resulting in the stimulation of TATA box-mediated gene expression. Consequently, we suggest that TLP works as a negative regulator of the TFIIA processing and represses TFIIA-governed and TATA-dependent gene expression through preventing TFIIA maturation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene binds specifically to functional recognition sites on a monomeric and a dimeric ubiquitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to the understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene on monomeric Ub and on a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub's NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. The specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in a monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of a dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, the protein-NP association prevented the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide an experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways.The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which

  17. Screening and Characterization of a Novel RNA Aptamer That Specifically Binds to Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase and Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) expression increases proportionally with prostate cancer progression, making it useful in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers. A novel ligand that can specifically bind to PAP would be very helpful for guiding prostate cancer therapy. RNA aptamers bind to target molecules with high specificity and have key advantages such as low immunogenicity and easy synthesis. Here, human PAP-specific aptamers were screened from a 2′-fluoropyrimidine (FY)-modified RNA library by SELEX. The candidate aptamer families were identified within six rounds followed by analysis of their sequences and PAP-specific binding. A gel shift assay was used to identify PAP binding aptamers and the 6N aptamer specifically bound to PAP with a Kd value of 118 nM. RT-PCR and fluorescence labeling analyses revealed that the 6N aptamer bound to PAP-positive mammalian cells, such as PC-3 and LNCaP. IMR-90 negative control cells did not bind the 6N aptamer. Systematic minimization analyses revealed that 50 nucleotide sequences and their two hairpin structures in the 6N 2′-FY RNA aptamer were equally important for PAP binding. Renewed interest in PAP combined with the versatility of RNA aptamers, including conjugation of anti-cancer drugs and nano-imaging probes, could open up a new route for early theragnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25591398

  18. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cominelli Eleonora

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications.

  19. Structure and biochemical function of a prototypical Arabidopsis U-box domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille; Kragelund, Birthe B; Olsen, Addie N

    2004-01-01

    19p U-box and RING finger domains. In these proteins, conserved hydrophobic residues form a putative E2-binding cleft. By contrast, they contain no common polar E2 binding site motif. Two hydrophobic cores stabilize the AtPUB14 U-box fold, and hydrogen bonds and salt bridges interconnect the residues...

  20. Isolation and Characterization of a Monobody with a Fibronectin Domain III Scaffold That Specifically Binds EphA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwan Park

    Full Text Available Monobodies are binding scaffold proteins originating from a human fibronectin domain III (Fn3 scaffold that can be easily engineered with specificity and affinity. Human EphA2 (hEphA2 is an early detection marker protein for various tumors including lung, breast, and colon cancer. In this study, we isolated two hEphA2-specific monobodies (E1 and E10 by screening a yeast surface display library. They showed the same amino acid sequence except in the DE loop and had high affinity (~2 nM Kd against hEphA2. E1 bound only hEphA2 and mEphA2, although it bound hEphA2 with an affinity 2-fold higher than that of mEphA2. However, E10 also bound the mEphA6 and mEphA8 homologs as well as hEphA2 and mEphA2. Thus, E1 but not E10 was highly specific for hEphA2. E1 specifically bound human cells and xenograft tumor tissues expressing hEphA on the cell surface. In vivo optical imaging showed strong targeting of Cy5.5-labeled E1 to mouse tumor tissue induced by PC3 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line that expresses a high level of hEphA2. In conclusion, the highly specific monobody E1 is useful as a hEphA2 probe candidate for in vivo diagnosis and therapy.

  1. A lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-specific monoclonal antibody, 88B8, that abolishes the binding of LPL to GPIHBP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, Christopher M; Larsson, Mikael; Hu, Xuchen

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) contains two principal domains: an amino-terminal catalytic domain (residues 1-297) and a carboxyl-terminal domain (residues 298-448) that is important for binding lipids and binding GPIHBP1 (an endothelial cell protein that shuttles LPL to the capillary lumen). The LPL......-binding domain. The binding of both antibody 88B8 and GPIHBP1 to LPL depends on large segments of LPL's carboxyl-terminal domain....

  2. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  3. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    to identify the amino acid residues important for binding of PEPHC1 to EGFRvIII. The results indicate that the amino acid residues at the N-terminus of PEPHC1 are essential for the binding to the mutated receptor. One analog, [Ala(12)]PEPHC1, showed higher selective binding to EGFRvIII than PEPHC1...

  4. Interactions of the G quartet forming semaphorin 3F RNA with the RGG box domain of the fragile X protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Lakshmi; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2007-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene due to an unstable expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat and its subsequent hypermethylation in its 5' UTR. This gene encodes for the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein that has been shown to use its RGG box domain to bind to G quartet-forming RNA. In this study, we performed a detailed analysis of the interactions between the FMRP RGG box domain and one of its proposed RNA targets, human semaphorin 3F (S3F) RNA by using biophysical methods such as fluorescence, UV and circular dichroism spectroscopy. We show that this RNA forms a G quartet-containing structure, which is recognized with high affinity and specificity by the FMRP RGG box. In addition, we analyzed the interactions of human S3F RNA with the RGG box and RG cluster of the two FMRP autosomal paralogs, the FXR1P and FXR2P. We found that this RNA is bound with high affinity and specificity only by the FXR1P RGG box, but not by the FXR2P RG cluster. Both FMRP and FXR1P RGG box are able to unwind the G quartet structure of S3F RNA, however, the peptide concentrations required in this process are very different: a ratio of 1:6 RNA:FMRP RGG box versus 1:2 RNA:FXR1P RGG box.

  5. Characterization of specific /sup 125/I-bolton hunter (BH)-CCK-8 binding in guinea pig stomach muscle membranes - similar to pancreas but different from gastric glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, R.S.L.; Lotti, V.J.; Chen, T.B.; Kunkel, K.K.

    1986-03-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone which regulates gastric motility. The authors have characterized specific /sup 125/I-BH-CCK-8 binding in guinea pig stomach muscle membranes. The relative potencies of various CCK related peptides to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in stomach muscle membranes resembled their rank order determined for pancreatic CCK receptor binding (CCK-8>> CCK-8-desulfate = gastrin CCK-4). The specific peripheral CCK antagonist, asperlicin and other non- selective CCK antagonists including proglumide, CBZ-CCK (26-32) amide, dibutyrylcyclic GMP and benzotript effectively inhibited /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in gastric muscle membranes with IC/sub 50/'s comparable to those for pancreatic CCK receptors. In contrast, specific /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in guinea pig gastric glands was inhibited equally well by gastrin and CCK-8. Moreover, asperlicin did not inhibit /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in guinea gastric glands. These results indicate CCK receptors in the stomach muscle membranes are similar to pancreatic CCK receptors but different from brain CCK or gastrin receptors.

  6. The BOXES Methodology Black Box Dynamic Control

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, David W

    2012-01-01

    Robust control mechanisms customarily require knowledge of the system’s describing equations which may be of the high order differential type.  In order to produce these equations, mathematical models can often be derived and correlated with measured dynamic behavior.  There are two flaws in this approach one is the level of inexactness introduced by linearizations and the other when no model is apparent.  Several years ago a new genre of control systems came to light that are much less dependent on differential models such as fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms. Both of these soft computing solutions require quite considerable a priori system knowledge to create a control scheme and sometimes complicated training program before they can be implemented in a real world dynamic system. Michie and Chambers’ BOXES methodology created a black box system that was designed to control a mechanically unstable system with very little a priori system knowledge, linearization or approximation.  All the method need...

  7. Replicative senescence is associated with nuclear reorganization and with DNA methylation at specific transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänzelmann, Sonja; Beier, Fabian; Gusmao, Eduardo G; Koch, Carmen M; Hummel, Sebastian; Charapitsa, Iryna; Joussen, Sylvia; Benes, Vladimir; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Reid, George; Costa, Ivan G; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Primary cells enter replicative senescence after a limited number of cell divisions. This process needs to be considered in cell culture experiments, and it is particularly important for regenerative medicine. Replicative senescence is associated with reproducible changes in DNA methylation (DNAm) at specific sites in the genome. The mechanism that drives senescence-associated DNAm changes remains unknown - it may involve stochastic DNAm drift due to imperfect maintenance of epigenetic marks or it is directly regulated at specific sites in the genome. In this study, we analyzed the reorganization of nuclear architecture and DNAm changes during long-term culture of human fibroblasts and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We demonstrate that telomeres shorten and shift towards the nuclear center at later passages. In addition, DNAm profiles, either analyzed by MethylCap-seq or by 450k IlluminaBeadChip technology, revealed consistent senescence-associated hypermethylation in regions associated with H3K27me3, H3K4me3, and H3K4me1 histone marks, whereas hypomethylation was associated with chromatin containing H3K9me3 and lamina-associated domains (LADs). DNA hypermethylation was significantly enriched in the vicinity of genes that are either up- or downregulated at later passages. Furthermore, specific transcription factor binding motifs (e.g. EGR1, TFAP2A, and ETS1) were significantly enriched in differentially methylated regions and in the promoters of differentially expressed genes. Senescence-associated DNA hypermethylation occurs at specific sites in the genome and reflects functional changes in the course of replicative senescence. These results indicate that tightly regulated epigenetic modifications during long-term culture contribute to changes in nuclear organization and gene expression.

  8. Cell Type-Specific Expression of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Binding Protein in GABAergic Interneurons in the Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D. Ketchesin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone-binding protein (CRH-BP is a secreted glycoprotein that binds CRH with very high affinity to modulate CRH receptor activity. CRH-BP is widely expressed throughout the brain, with particularly high expression in regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral tegmental area and prefrontal cortex (PFC. Recent studies suggest a role for CRH-BP in stress-related psychiatric disorders and addiction, with the PFC being a potential site of interest. However, the molecular phenotype of CRH-BP-expressing cells in this region has not been well-characterized. In the current study, we sought to determine the cell type-specific expression of CRH-BP in the PFC to begin to define the neural circuits in which this key regulator is acting. To characterize the expression of CRH-BP in excitatory and/or inhibitory neurons, we utilized dual in situ hybridization to examine the cellular colocalization of CRH-BP mRNA with vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD mRNA in different subregions of the PFC. We show that CRH-BP is expressed predominantly in GABAergic interneurons of the PFC, as revealed by the high degree of colocalization (>85% between CRH-BP and GAD. To further characterize the expression of CRH-BP in this heterogenous group of inhibitory neurons, we examined the colocalization of CRH-BP with various molecular markers of GABAergic interneurons, including parvalbumin (PV, somatostatin (SST, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and cholecystokinin (CCK. We demonstrate that CRH-BP is colocalized predominantly with SST in the PFC, with lower levels of colocalization in PV- and CCK-expressing neurons. Our results provide a more comprehensive characterization of the cell type-specific expression of CRH-BP and begin to define its potential role within circuits of the PFC. These results will serve as the basis for future in vivo studies to manipulate CRH-BP in a cell type-specific manner to better

  9. Biomolecular mirror-image recognition: reciprocal chiral-specific DNA binding of synthetic enantiomers of zinc finger domain from GAGA factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Shigeru; Dhanasekaran, Muthu; Hirata, Tsuyoshi; Urata, Hidehito; Sugiura, Yukio

    2006-05-05

    To experimentally demonstrate the mirror-image recognition in protein and DNA interaction, we have designed a small DNA-binding peptide based on the zinc-finger domain of GAGA transcription factor. Circular dichroism data suggest that the conformations of peptide enantiomers as well as the DNA enantiomers have a mirror-image relationship. The gel mobility shift assay showed that the synthetic enantiomers of the peptide showed reciprocal chiral-specific interactions with the DNA; the natural L-peptide binds specifically with the natural D-DNA substrate, and the unnatural D-peptide binds specifically with the unnatural L-DNA substrate. The present data imply that the folding of the L- and D-enantiomers of the peptide as well as the DNA substrates are exact mirror images of each other in 3-D structure and biological activity, and generalize the chiral-specific nature of biomolecular interaction. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. ss-TEA: Entropy based identification of receptor specific ligand binding residues from a multiple sequence alignment of class A GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Marijn P A; Fleuren, Wilco W M; Verhoeven, Stefan; van den Beld, Sven; Alkema, Wynand; de Vlieg, Jacob; Klomp, Jan P G

    2011-08-10

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in many different physiological processes and their function can be modulated by small molecules which bind in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Because of their structural and sequence conservation, the TM domains are often used in bioinformatics approaches to first create a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and subsequently identify ligand binding positions. So far methods have been developed to predict the common ligand binding residue positions for class A GPCRs. Here we present 1) ss-TEA, a method to identify specific ligand binding residue positions for any receptor, predicated on high quality sequence information. 2) The largest MSA of class A non olfactory GPCRs in the public domain consisting of 13324 sequences covering most of the species homologues of the human set of GPCRs. A set of ligand binding residue positions extracted from literature of 10 different receptors shows that our method has the best ligand binding residue prediction for 9 of these 10 receptors compared to another state-of-the-art method. The combination of the large multi species alignment and the newly introduced residue selection method ss-TEA can be used to rapidly identify subfamily specific ligand binding residues. This approach can aid the design of site directed mutagenesis experiments, explain receptor function and improve modelling. The method is also available online via GPCRDB at http://www.gpcr.org/7tm/.

  11. ss-TEA: Entropy based identification of receptor specific ligand binding residues from a multiple sequence alignment of class A GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkema Wynand

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in many different physiological processes and their function can be modulated by small molecules which bind in the transmembrane (TM domain. Because of their structural and sequence conservation, the TM domains are often used in bioinformatics approaches to first create a multiple sequence alignment (MSA and subsequently identify ligand binding positions. So far methods have been developed to predict the common ligand binding residue positions for class A GPCRs. Results Here we present 1 ss-TEA, a method to identify specific ligand binding residue positions for any receptor, predicated on high quality sequence information. 2 The largest MSA of class A non olfactory GPCRs in the public domain consisting of 13324 sequences covering most of the species homologues of the human set of GPCRs. A set of ligand binding residue positions extracted from literature of 10 different receptors shows that our method has the best ligand binding residue prediction for 9 of these 10 receptors compared to another state-of-the-art method. Conclusions The combination of the large multi species alignment and the newly introduced residue selection method ss-TEA can be used to rapidly identify subfamily specific ligand binding residues. This approach can aid the design of site directed mutagenesis experiments, explain receptor function and improve modelling. The method is also available online via GPCRDB at http://www.gpcr.org/7tm/.

  12. Sequence Discrimination by DNA-binding Domain of ETS Family Transcription Factor PU.1 Is Linked to Specific Hydration of Protein-DNA Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2012-01-01

    PU.1 is an essential transcription factor in normal hematopoietic lineage development. It recognizes a large number of promoter sites differing only in bases flanking a core consensus of 5′-GGAA-3′. DNA binding is mediated by its ETS domain, whose sequence selectivity directly corresponds to the transactivational activity and frequency of binding sites for full-length PU.1 in vivo. To better understand the basis of sequence discrimination, we characterized its binding properties to a high affinity and low affinity site. Despite sharing a homologous structural framework as confirmed by DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting, the two complexes exhibit striking heterogeneity in terms of hydration properties. High affinity binding is destabilized by osmotic stress, whereas low affinity binding is insensitive. Dimethyl sulfate footprinting showed that the major groove at the core consensus is protected in the high affinity complex but accessible in the low affinity one. Finally, destabilization of low affinity binding by salt is in quantitative agreement with the number of phosphate contacts but is substantially attenuated in high affinity binding. These observations support a mechanism of sequence discrimination wherein specifically bound water molecules couple flanking backbone contacts with base-specific interactions in a sequestered cavity at the core consensus. The implications of this model with respect to other ETS paralogs are discussed. PMID:22474303

  13. Bifidobacterial α-galactosidase with unique carbohydrate-binding module specifically acts on blood group B antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakinaka, Takura; Kiyohara, Masashi; Kurihara, Shin; Hirata, Akiko; Chaiwangsri, Thida; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Fukamizo, Tamo; Katayama, Takane; Ashida, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is one of the most frequently found bifidobacteria in the intestines of newborn infants. We previously reported that B. bifidum possesses unique metabolic pathways for O-linked glycans on gastrointestinal mucin (Yoshida E, Sakurama H, Kiyohara M, Nakajima M, Kitaoka M, Ashida H, Hirose J, Katayama T, Yamamoto K, Kumagai H. 2012. Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis uses two different β-galactosidases for selectively degrading type-1 and type-2 human milk oligosaccharides. Glycobiology. 22:361-368). The nonreducing termini of O-linked glycans on mucin are frequently covered with histo-blood group antigens. Here, we identified a gene agabb from B. bifidum JCM 1254, which encodes glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 110 α-galactosidase. AgaBb is a 1289-amino acid polypeptide containing an N-terminal signal sequence, a GH110 domain, a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) 51 domain, a bacterial Ig-like (Big) 2 domain and a C-terminal transmembrane region, in this order. The recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli hydrolyzed α1,3-linked Gal in branched blood group B antigen [Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Galβ1-R], but not in a linear xenotransplantation antigen (Galα1-3Galβ1-R). The enzyme also acted on group B human salivary mucin and erythrocytes. We also revealed that CBM51 specifically bound blood group B antigen using both isothermal titration calorimetry and a solid-phase binding assay, and it enhanced the affinity of the enzyme toward substrates with multivalent B antigens. We suggest that this enzyme plays an important role in degrading B antigens to acquire nutrients from mucin oligosaccharides in the gastrointestinal tracts.

  14. Stream specificity and asymmetries in feature binding and content-addressable access in visual encoding and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Duong L; Tripathy, Srimant P; Bedell, Harold E; Ögmen, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Human memory is content addressable-i.e., contents of the memory can be accessed using partial information about the bound features of a stored item. In this study, we used a cross-feature cuing technique to examine how the human visual system encodes, binds, and retains information about multiple stimulus features within a set of moving objects. We sought to characterize the roles of three different features (position, color, and direction of motion, the latter two of which are processed preferentially within the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively) in the construction and maintenance of object representations. We investigated the extent to which these features are bound together across the following processing stages: during stimulus encoding, sensory (iconic) memory, and visual short-term memory. Whereas all features examined here can serve as cues for addressing content, their effectiveness shows asymmetries and varies according to cue-report pairings and the stage of information processing and storage. Position-based indexing theories predict that position should be more effective as a cue compared to other features. While we found a privileged role for position as a cue at the stimulus-encoding stage, position was not the privileged cue at the sensory and visual short-term memory stages. Instead, the pattern that emerged from our findings is one that mirrors the parallel processing streams in the visual system. This stream-specific binding and cuing effectiveness manifests itself in all three stages of information processing examined here. Finally, we find that the Leaky Flask model proposed in our previous study is applicable to all three features.

  15. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 4 (AAV4) and AAV5 Both Require Sialic Acid Binding for Hemagglutination and Efficient Transduction but Differ in Sialic Acid Linkage Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaludov, Nikola; Brown, Kevin E.; Walters, Robert W.; Zabner, Joseph; Chiorini, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 4 (AAV4) and AAV5 have different tropisms compared to AAV2 and to each other. We recently reported that α2-3 sialic acid is required for AAV5 binding and transduction. In this study, we characterized AAV4 binding and transduction and found it also binds sialic acid, but the specificity is significantly different from AAV5. AAV4 can hemagglutinate red blood cells from several species, whereas AAV5 hemagglutinates only rhesus monkey red blood cells. Treatment of ...

  16. High-throughput binding analysis determines the binding specificity of ASF/SF2 on alternatively spliced human pre-mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Brian; Levin, J; Thompson, William A; Fairbrother, William G

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput immunoprecipitation studies of transcription factors and splicing factors have revolutionized the fields of transcription and splicing. Recent location studies on Nova1/2 and Fox2 have identified a set of cellular targets of these splicing factors. One problem with identifying binding sites for splicing factors arises from the transient role of RNA in gene expression. The primary role of most splicing factors is to bind pre-mRNA co-transcriptionally and participate in the extremely rapid process of splice site selection and catalysis. Pre-mRNA is a labile species with a steady state level that is three orders of magnitude less abundant than mRNA. As many splicing factors also bind mRNA to some degree, these substrates tend to dominate the output of location studies. Here we present an in-vitro method for screening RNA protein interactions that circumvents these problems. We screen approximately 4000 alternatively spliced exons and the entire Hepatitis C genome for binding of ASF/SF2, the only splicing factor demonstrated to function as an oncogene. From the pre-mRNA sequences returned in this screen we discovered physiologically relevant ASF recognition element motifs. ASF binds two motifs: a C-rich and a purine rich motif. Comparisons with similar data derived from the hnRNP protein PTB reveals little overlap between strong PTB and ASF/SF2 sites. We illustrate how this method could be employed to screen disease alleles with the set of small molecules that have been shown to alter splicing in search for therapies for splicing diseases.

  17. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 protein regions that specifically bind to HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier Eduardo; Puentes, Alvaro; Súarez, Jorge; López, Ramses; Vera, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Luis Eduardo; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Guzman, Fanny; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-02-01

    Identify hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences in E1 and E2 protein binding to HepG2. Synthetic 20-mer long, ten-residue overlapped peptides, from E1 and E2 proteins, were tested in HepG2 or Raji cell-binding assays. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay for high activity binding peptides (HABPs). Receptors for HepG2 cell were determined by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. Twelve HABPs were found in HCV genotype 1a, allowing six hepatocyte-binding sequences (HBSs) to be defined: two peptide-binding regions in E1 HABPs 4913 (YQVRNSTGLYHVTNDCPNSS) and 4918 (MTPTVATRDGKLPATQLRRHY). Four hepatocyte-binding regions were defined in E2: region-I, peptide 4931 (ETHVTGGSAGHTVSGFVSLLY); region-II, 4937-4939 (HHKFNSSGCPERLASCRPLTDFDQGWGPISYANGSGPDQR); region-III, 4943-4945 (PVYCFTPSPVVVGTTDRSGAPTYSWGENDTDVFVLNNTR) and region-IV, 4949-4952 (CGAPPCVIGGAGNNTLHCPTDCFRKHPDATYSRCGSGPWITPRCLVDYPY). The underlined sequences are most relevant in the binding process. HABPs 4913 and 4938 also bind to CD81 positive Raji cells. Region-II 4938 HABPs bind to 50 and 60kDa HepG2 cell membrane surface proteins. Six HVRs to the HepG2 were identified. Some HABPs have been previously found to be antigenic and immunogenic. HABPs, 4918 (from E1), 4938, 4949, 4950, 4951 and 4952 (from E2) have not been previously recognised. These HABPs could be relevant to HCV invasion of hepatocytes.

  18. Crystallography of a Lewis-binding norovirus, elucidation of strain-specificity to the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses, an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans, recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs as host susceptible factors in a strain-specific manner. The crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of two A/B/H-binding noroviruses, the prototype Norwalk virus (GI.1 and a predominant GII.4 strain (VA387, have been elucidated. In this study we determined the crystal structures of the P domain protein of the first Lewis-binding norovirus (VA207, GII.9 that has a distinct binding property from those of Norwalk virus and VA387. Co-crystallization of the VA207 P dimer with Le(y or sialyl Le(x tetrasaccharides showed that VA207 interacts with these antigens through a common site found on the VA387 P protein which is highly conserved among most GII noroviruses. However, the HBGA-binding site of VA207 targeted at the Lewis antigens through the α-1, 3 fucose (the Lewis epitope as major and the β-N-acetyl glucosamine of the precursor as minor interacting sites. This completely differs from the binding mode of VA387 and Norwalk virus that target at the secretor epitopes. Binding pocket of VA207 is formed by seven amino acids, of which five residues build up the core structure that is essential for the basic binding function, while the other two are involved in strain-specificity. Our results elucidate for the first time the genetic and structural basis of strain-specificity by a direct comparison of two genetically related noroviruses in their interaction with different HBGAs. The results provide insight into the complex interaction between the diverse noroviruses and the polymorphic HBGAs and highlight the role of human HBGA as a critical factor in norovirus evolution.

  19. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...... to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has...... not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (Gal...

  20. Insight into the role of substrate-binding residues in conferring substrate specificity for the multifunctional polysaccharide lyase Smlt1473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Logan C; Berger, Bryan W

    2014-06-27

    Anionic polysaccharides are of growing interest in the biotechnology industry due to their potential pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery and wound treatment. Chemical composition and polymer length strongly influence the physical and biological properties of the polysaccharide and thus its potential industrial and medical applications. One promising approach to determining monomer composition and controlling the degree of polymerization involves the use of polysaccharide lyases, which catalyze the depolymerization of anionic polysaccharides via a β-elimination mechanism. Utilization of these enzymes for the production of custom-made oligosaccharides requires a high degree of control over substrate specificity. Previously, we characterized a polysaccharide lyase (Smlt1473) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia k279a, which exhibited significant activity against hyaluronan (HA), poly-β-d-glucuronic acid (poly-GlcUA), and poly-β-d-mannuronic acid (poly-ManA) in a pH-regulated manner. Here, we utilize a sequence structure guided approach based on a homology model of Smlt1473 to identify nine putative substrate-binding residues and examine their effect on substrate specificity via site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, single point mutations H221F and R312L resulted in increased activity and specificity toward poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA, respectively. Furthermore, a W171A mutant nearly eliminated HA activity, while increasing poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA activity by at least 35%. The effect of these mutations was analyzed by comparison with the high resolution structure of Sphingomonas sp. A1-III alginate lyase in complex with poly-ManA tetrasaccharide and by taking into account the structural differences between HA, poly-GlcUA, and poly-ManA. Overall, our results demonstrate that even minor changes in active site architecture have a significant effect on the substrate specificity of Smlt1473, whose structural plasticity could be applied to the design of highly