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Sample records for box protein-1 hmgb1

  1. Autoantibodies Against High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) in Patients with SLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; Horst, Gerda; Henegouwen, Daan van Beijeren Bergenen; Bijzet, Johan; de Leeuw, Karina; Stel, Alja; Limburg, Pieter C.; Heeringa, Peter; Westra, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a damage-associated molecular pattern and can be divided in three separate domains: the A Box, B Box and the acidic tail. Box A by itself serves as a competitive antagonist for HMGB1 and inhibits HMGB1 activity. In an earlier study we showed

  2. Overexpression of HMGB1 A-box reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal inflammation via HMGB1/TLR4 signaling in vitro.

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    Wang, Fu-Cai; Pei, Jing-Xuan; Zhu, Jun; Zhou, Nan-Jin; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Xiong, Hui-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Qun; Lin, Dong-Jia; Xie, Yong

    2015-07-07

    To investigate the inhibitory effects and mechanism of high mobility group box (HMGB)1 A-box in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal inflammation. Overexpression of HMGB1 A-box in human intestinal epithelial cell lines (SW480 cells) was achieved using the plasmid pEGFP-N1. HMGB1 A-box-overexpressing SW480 cells were stimulated with LPS and co-culturing with human monocyte-like cell lines (THP-1 cells) using a Transwell system, compared with another HMGB1 inhibitor ethyl pyruvate (EP). The mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1/toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling pathways [including HMGB1, TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor88 (MYD88), Phosphorylated Nuclear Factor κB (pNF-κB) p65] in the stimulated cells were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The levels of the proinflammatory mediators [including HMGB1, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α] in the supernatants of the stimulated cells were determined by ELISA. EP downregulated the mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1, inhibited the TLR4 signaling pathways (TLR4, MYD88 and pNF-κB p65) and reduced the secretion of proinflammatory mediators (HMGB1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in the SW480 and THP-1 cells activated by LPS but not in the unstimulated cells. Activated by LPS, the overexpression of HMGB1 A-box in the SW480 cells also inhibited the HMGB1/TLR4 signaling pathways and reduced the secretion of these proinflammatory mediators in the THP-1 cells but not in the transfected and unstimulated cells. HMGB1 A-box, not only EP, can reduce LPS-induced intestinal inflammation through inhibition of the HMGB1/TLR4 signaling pathways.

  3. Role of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 in SCA17 pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ching Lee

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17 involves the expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ expanded TATA-binding protein (TBP, a general transcription initiation factor. TBP interacts with other protein factors, including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, to regulate gene expression. Previously, our proteomic analysis of soluble proteins prepared from mutant TBP (TBP/Q61 expressing cells revealed a reduced concentration of HMGB1. Here, we show that HMGB1 can be incorporated into mutant TBP aggregates, which leads to reduced soluble HMGB1 levels in TBP/Q(61∼79 expressing cells. HMGB1 overexpression reduced mutant TBP aggregation. HMGB1 cDNA and siRNA co-transfection, as well as an HSPA5 immunoblot and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated the important role of HMGB1 in the regulation of HSPA5 transcription. In starvation-stressed TBP/Q36 and TBP/Q79 cells, increased reactive oxygen species generation accelerated the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1, which accompanied autophagy activation. However, TBP/Q79 cells displayed a decrease in autophagy activation as a result of the reduction in the cytoplasmic HMGB1 level. In neuronal SH-SY5Y cells with induced TBP/Q(61∼79 expression, HMGB1 expression was reduced and accompanied by a significant reduction in the total outgrowth and branches in the TBP/Q(61∼79 expressing cells compared with the non-induced cells. The decreased soluble HMGB1 and impaired starvation-induced autophagy in cells suggest that HMGB1 may be a critical modulator of polyQ disease pathology and may represent a target for drug development.

  4. Emerging Role of High-Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) in Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ruochan; Hou, Wen; Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules are essential for the initiation of innate inflammatory responses to infection and injury. The prototypic DAMP molecule, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is an abundant architectural chromosomal protein that has location-specific biological functions: within the nucleus as a DNA chaperone, within the cytosol to sustain autophagy and outside the cell as a DAMP molecule. Recent research indicates that aberrant activation of HMGB1 signaling ...

  5. High mobility group box1 (HMGB1) in relation to cutaneous inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, D. A.; Westra, J.; Reefman, E.; Zuidersma, E.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P. C.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Bijl, M.

    Photosensitivity is characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Upon ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure, patients develop inflammatory skin lesions in the vicinity of sunburn cells (SBCs). High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is released from apoptotic and activated cells and exerts inflammatory

  6. High mobility group box1 (HMGB1) in relation to cutaneous inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, D.A.; Westra, J.; Reefman, E.; Zuidersma, E.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Kallenberg, C.G.M.; Bijl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Photosensitivity is characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Upon ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure, patients develop inflammatory skin lesions in the vicinity of sunburn cells (SBCs). High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is released from apoptotic and activated cells and exerts inflammatory

  7. Overexpression of HMGB1 A-box reduced IL-1β-induced MMP expression and the production of inflammatory mediators in human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yahui; Lei, Jinlai; Zhuang, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Lu, Daigang

    2016-11-15

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) by stimulating several mediators that contribute to cartilage degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) inhibitors HMGB1 A-box on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and the production of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes after activation by IL-1β. We found that the overexpression of HMGB1 A-box significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated the production of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and also reduced the elevated levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associated with the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) production in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. In addition, overexpression of the HMGB1 A-box significantly inhibited the up-regulation of ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5 and HMGB1 caused by IL-1β in chondrocytes. Moreover, the overexpression of HMGB1 A-box markedly suppressed the IL-1β-mediated activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TRL4)/NF-κB pathway. Our observations indicated that the HMGB1 A-box can play a protective role by suppressing the IL-1β-induced expression of MMPs and that the production of inflammatory mediators in chondrocytes was associated with suppression of the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, HMGB1 A-box relieves the development of OA that may be associated with regulating the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  9. Early release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from neurons in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Wu, Wei; Hu, Yang-Chun; Li, Hua; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Song; Li, Wei; Li, Wei-De; Ma, Biao; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2014-06-12

    Translocation of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from nucleus could trigger inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 up-regulates inflammatory response in sepsis as a late mediator. However, little was known about its role in subarachnoid hemorrhage-inducible inflammation, especially in the early stage. This study aims to identify whether HMGB1 translocation occurred early after SAH and also to clarify the potential role of HMGB1 in brain injury following SAH. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham group and SAH groups at 2 h, 12 h and on day 1, day 2. SAH groups suffered experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage by injection of 0.3 ml autoblood into the pre-chiasmatic cistern. Rats injected by recombinant HMGB1(rHMGB1) solution were divided into four groups according to different time points. Cultured neurons were assigned into control group and four hemoglobin (Hb) incubated groups. Mixed glial cells were cultured and stimulated in medium from neurons incubated by Hb. HMGB1 expression is measured by western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Downstream nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit P65 and inflammatory factor Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured by western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Brain injury was evaluated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. Our results demonstrated HMGB1 translocation occurred as early as 2 h after experimental SAH with mRNA and protein level increased. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence results indicated cytosolic HMGB1 was mainly located in neurons while translocated HMGB1 could also be found in some microglia. After subarachnoid injection of rHMGB1, NF-κB, downstream inflammatory response and cleaved caspase-3 were up-regulated in the cortex compared to the saline control group. In-vitro, after Hb incubation, HMGB1 was also rapidly released from neurons to medium. Incubation with medium from neurons up-regulated IL-1β in mixed glial

  10. Clinical Implications of High-mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) in Cutaneous Malignancy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Detty, Shannon Q; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and the immune system play a role in the development and progression of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting effects of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have been investigated in these cutaneous malignancies. The clinical implication of these molecules is not fully described. The National Library of Medicine database was searched for articles addressing the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and RAGE in melanoma, BCC, and SCC. This systematic review includes nine articles, with six summarizing RAGE in cutaneous malignancies and three involving HMGB1. RAGE has been found to be up-regulated in SCC lesions, as well as melanoma. Levels of RAGE were highest in stage IV melanomas. Lower levels of soluble RAGE have been associated with poor overall survival in melanoma. Sporadic extracellular expression of HMGB1 was evident in BCC and SCC lesions, which could be released by necrotic tumor cells. HMGB1 was found to be a prognostic marker in melanoma, and HMGB1 levels were elevated in patients who were non-responders to ipilimumab treatment. HMGB1 and RAGE could serve as potential prognostic markers or therapeutic targets in treating melanoma, BCC, and SCC, but further research regarding the clinical utility of the HMGB1-RAGE axis in cutaneous malignancies is warranted. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is upregulated by the Epstein-Barr virus infection and promotes the proliferation of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

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    Zhu, Xuewei; Sun, Le; Wang, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    The current study confirmed the significant high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was promoted in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, in association with the malignant status of NPC, and promoted the proliferation NPC cells RAGE-dependently. The present study was to examine the association of HMGB1 over-expression in human NPC with the EBV-positivity and to determine the regulatory role of HMGB1 on the proliferation of NPC cells in vitro. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were utilized to examine the HMGB1 expression. EBV infection in CNE-2 cells was performed to investigate the HMGB1 promotion by EBV infection. RNA interference technology was utilized for the RAGE knockout. It was demonstrated that HMGB1 was significantly higher in both mRNA and protein levels in the EBV-positive NPC tissues, in marked association with the malignant status of NPC, and with the LMP1 DNA level in EBV-positive NPC samples. In addition, the MTT assay, growth curve, and the colony forming assay confirmed the promotion by HMGB1 to the proliferation of CNE-2 cells, depending on RAGE.

  12. Natural Killer (NK)/melanoma cell interaction induces NK-mediated release of chemotactic High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) capable of amplifying NK cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Cantoni, Claudia; Averna, Monica; Patrone, Mauro; Cavaletto, Maria; Spertino, Stefano; Pende, Daniela; Balsamo, Mirna; Pietra, Gabriella; Sivori, Simona; Carlomagno, Simona; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Sparatore, Bianca; Vitale, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    In this study we characterize a new mechanism by which Natural Killer (NK) cells may amplify their recruitment to tumors. We show that NK cells, upon interaction with melanoma cells, can release a chemotactic form of High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) protein capable of attracting additional activated NK cells. We first demonstrate that the engagement of different activating NK cell receptors, including those mainly involved in tumor cell recognition can induce the active release of HMGB1. Then we show that during NK-mediated tumor cell killing two HMGB1 forms are released, each displaying a specific electrophoretic mobility possibly corresponding to a different redox status. By the comparison of normal and perforin-defective NK cells (which are unable to kill target cells) we demonstrate that, in NK/melanoma cell co-cultures, NK cells specifically release an HMGB1 form that acts as chemoattractant, while dying tumor cells passively release a non-chemotactic HMGB1. Finally, we show that Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products is expressed by NK cells and mediates HMGB1-induced NK cell chemotaxis. Proteomic analysis of NK cells exposed to recombinant HMGB1 revealed that this molecule, besides inducing immediate chemotaxis, also promotes changes in the expression of proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeletal network. Importantly, these modifications could be associated with an increased motility of NK cells. Thus, our findings allow the definition of a previously unidentified mechanism used by NK cells to amplify their response to tumors, and provide additional clues for the emerging role of HMGB1 in immunomodulation and tumor immunity.

  13. Inflammation triggers high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) secretion in adipose tissue, a potential link to obesity.

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    Gunasekaran, Manoj Kumar; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Girard, Anne-Claire; Festy, Franck; Cesari, Maya; Roche, Regis; Hoareau, Laurence

    2013-10-01

    Low grade inflammation is one of the major metabolic disorders in case of obesity due to variable secretion of adipose derived cytokines called adipokines. Recently the nuclear protein HMGB1 was identified as an inflammatory alarmin in obesity associated diseases. However HMGB1 role in adipose tissue inflammation is not yet studied. The aim of this study was to prove the expression of HMGB1 in human adipose tissue and to assess the levels of expression between normo-weight and obese individuals. Furthermore we determined which type of cells within adipose tissue is involved in HMGB1 production under inflammatory signal. Western-blot was performed on protein lysates from human normo-weight and obese adipose tissue to study the differential HMGB1 expression. Human normo-weight adipose tissue, adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and adipocytes were cultured and stimulated with LPS to induce inflammation. HMGB1, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion and gene expression were quantified by ELISA and Q-PCR respectively, as well as cell death by LDH assay. HMGB1 translocation during inflammation was tracked down by immunofluorescence in ASCs. HMGB1 was expressed 2-fold more in adipose tissue from obese compared to normo-weight individuals. LPS led to an up-regulation in HMGB1 secretion and gene expression in ASCs, while no change was noticed in adipocytes. Moreover, this HMGB1 release was not attributable to any cell death. In LPS-stimulated ASCs, HMGB1 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm was detectable at 12h and the nuclear HMGB1 was completely drained out after 24h of treatment. The expression level studies between adipose tissue from normo-weight and obese individuals together with in vitro results strongly suggest that adipose tissue secretes HMGB1 in response to inflammatory signals which characterized obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is increased in injured mouse spinal cord and can elicit neurotoxic inflammation.

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    Kigerl, Kristina A; Lai, Wenmin; Wallace, Lindsay M; Yang, Huan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2017-11-22

    Inflammation is a ubiquitous but poorly understood consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI). The mechanisms controlling this response are unclear but culminate in the sequential activation of resident and recruited immune cells. Collectively, these cells can exert divergent effects on cell survival and tissue repair. HMGB1 is a ubiquitously expressed DNA binding protein and also a potent inflammatory stimulus. Necrotic cells release HGMB1, but HMGB1 also is actively secreted by inflammatory macrophages. A goal of this study was to quantify spatio-temporal patterns of cellular HMGB1 expression in a controlled mouse model of experimental SCI then determine the effects of HMGB1 on post-SCI neuroinflammation and recovery of function. We documented SCI-induced changes in nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of HMGB1 in various cell types after SCI. The data reveal a time-dependent increase in HMGB1 mRNA and protein with protein reaching maximal levels 24-72 hours post-injury then declining toward baseline 14-28 days post-SCI. Although most cells expressed nuclear HMGB1, reduced nuclear labeling with increased cytoplasmic expression was found in a subset of CNS macrophages suggesting that those cells begin to secrete HMGB1 at the injury site. In vitro data indicate that extracelluar HMGB1 helps promote the development of macrophages with a neurotoxic phenotype. The ability of HMGB1 to elicit neurotoxic macrophage functions was confirmed in vivo; 72h after injecting 500ng of recombinant HMGB1 into intact spinal cord ventral horn, inflammatory CNS macrophages co-localized with focal areas of neuronal killing. However, attempts to confer neuroprotection after SCI by blocking HMGB1 with a neutralizing antibody were unsuccessful. Collectively, these data implicate HMGB1 as a novel regulator of post-SCI inflammation and suggest that inhibition of HMGB1 could be a novel therapeutic target after SCI. Future studies will need to identify better methods to deliver optimal

  15. The role of nuclear protein high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad Al-Qas Alias, Deena Abib

    2013-01-01

    Systemische Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is een auto-immuunziekte met ontstekingen in allerlei organen, waaronder de nieren. UMCG-promovendus Deena Abdulahad toonde aan dat het eiwit HMGB1 verhoogd aanwezig is in het bloed bij ziekteactiviteit in de nieren. Het aantonen van HMGB1 in de urine kan helpen

  16. Anabolic Properties of High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1 is mainly recognized as a chemoattractant for macrophages in the initial phase of host response to pathogenic stimuli. However, recent findings provide evidence for anabolic properties in terms of enhanced proliferation, migration, and support of wound healing capacity of mesenchymal cells suggesting a dual role of the cytokine in the regulation of immune response and subsequent regenerative processes. Here, we examined potential anabolic effects of HMGB1 on human periodontal ligament (PDL cells in the regulation of periodontal remodelling, for example, during orthodontic tooth movement. Preconfluent human PDL cells (hPDL were exposed to HMGB1 protein and the influence on proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and biomineralization was determined by MTS assay, real time PCR, immunofluorescence cytochemistry, ELISA, and von Kossa staining. HMGB1 protein increased hPDL cell proliferation, migration, osteoblastic marker gene expression, and protein production as well as mineralized nodule formation significantly. The present findings support the dual character of HMGB1 with anabolic therapeutic potential that might support the reestablishment of the structural and functional integrity of the periodontium following periodontal trauma such as orthodontic tooth movement.

  17. Increased plasma levels of the high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) are associated with a higher score of gastrointestinal dysfunction in individuals with autism.

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    Babinská, K; Bucová, M; Ďurmanová, V; Lakatošová, S; Jánošíková, D; Bakoš, J; Hlavatá, A; Ostatníková, D

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a disorder of neural development characterized by impairments in communication, social interaction, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. The etiology of autism is poorly understood, the evidence indicates that inflammation may play a key role. In autism a high prevalence of gastrointestinal disturbances is reported, that are linked to a low-grade chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is an intranuclear protein that can be passively released from necrotic cells or actively secreted under inflammatory conditions as alarmin or late proinflammatory cytokine. The objective of this study was to measure plasma levels of HMGB1 in individuals with autism and to analyze their association with gastrointestinal symptoms. The study involved 31 subjects with low-functioning autistic disorder aged 2-22 years and 16 healthy controls. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher in individuals with autism than in controls (13.8+/-11.7 ng/ml vs. 7.90+/-4.0 ng/ml, pautism and its possible association with GI symptoms.

  18. HMGB1 in ANCA-associated vasculitis: A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva De Souza, A.W.; Westra, J.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Bijl, M.; Stegeman, C.A.; Kallenberg, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction.- Extra-cellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as an alarmin and has been shown to be a biomarker of disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aims to assess anti- HMGB1 antibodies and HMGB1 levels as biomarkers for disease activity and predictors of

  19. HMGB1 Localization during Experimental Periodontitis

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    Andressa Vilas Boas Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study sought to investigate the in vitro expression profile of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 in murine periodontal ligament fibroblasts (mPDL stimulated with LPS or IL-1β and in vivo during ligature- or LPS-induced periodontitis in rats. Material and Methods. For the in vivo study, 36 rats were divided into experimental and control groups, and biopsies were harvested at 7–30 d following disease induction. Bone loss and inflammation were evaluated. HMGB1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, qPCR, and Western blot. Results. Significant increases in mPDL HMGB1 mRNA occurred at 4, 8, and 12 h with protein expression elevated by 24 h. HMGB1 mRNA expression in gingival tissues was significantly increased at 15 d in the LPS-PD model and at 7 and 15 d in the ligature model. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a significant increase in the number of HMGB1-positive cells during the experimental periods. Conclusion. The results show that PDL cells produce HMGB1, which is increased and secreted extracellularly after inflammatory stimuli. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HMGB1 may be associated with the onset and progression of periodontitis, suggesting that further studies should investigate the potential role of HMGB1 on periodontal tissue destruction.

  20. HMGB-1 as a Novel Predictor of Disease Severity and Prognosis in Patients with Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

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    Hong Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the predictive capacity of the high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB-1 for disease severity and prognosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Methods. One hundred and five HFRS patients and 28 controls were studied. The concentrations of HMGB-1 in the blood were measured with a commercially available ELISA. The levels of white blood cells (WBC, platelets (PLT, hematocrit (HCT, albumin (ALB, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine (Scr, and uric acid (UA were routinely tested in the same time frame. Results. The levels of HMGB-1 increased with the severity of the disease (P<0.001. HMGB-1 was positively correlated with WBC and BUN and negatively correlated with PLT, ALB, and UA (P<0.001. HMGB-1 showed statistical significance for predicting prognosis (AUC = 0.800, P<0.001. The sensitivity and specificity of HMGB-1, WBC, PLT, and ALB used in combination for predicting outcome were better than those of single analyses (AUC = 0.892, P<0.001. Conclusions. HMGB-1 can be considered a novel biomarker for severity and outcome in patients with HFRS. The use of HMGB-1, WBC, PLT, and ALB in combination to predict the outcome in patients with HFRS exhibited an acceptable level of diagnostic capability.

  1. Microglial Amyloid-β1-40 Phagocytosis Dysfunction Is Caused by High-Mobility Group Box Protein-1: Implications for the Pathological Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Kazuyuki Takata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer disease (AD patient brains, the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides is associated with activated microglia. Aβ is derived from the amyloid precursor protein; two major forms of Aβ, that is, Aβ1-40 (Aβ40 and Aβ1-42 (Aβ42, exist. We previously reported that rat microglia phagocytose Aβ42, and high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1, a chromosomal protein, inhibits phagocytosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exogenous HMGB1 on rat microglial Aβ40 phagocytosis. In the presence of exogenous HMGB1, Aβ40 markedly increased in microglial cytoplasm, and the reduction of extracellular Aβ40 was inhibited. During this period, HMGB1 was colocalized with Aβ40 in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, exogenous HMGB1 inhibited the degradation of Aβ40 induced by the rat microglial cytosolic fraction. Thus, extracellular HMGB1 may internalize with Aβ40 in the microglial cytoplasm and inhibit Aβ40 degradation by microglia. This may subsequently delay Aβ40 clearance. We further confirmed that in AD brains, the parts of senile plaques surrounded by activated microglia are composed of Aβ40, and extracellular HMGB1 is deposited on these plaques. Taken together, microglial Aβ phagocytosis dysfunction may be caused by HMGB1 that accumulates extracellularly on Aβ plaques, and it may be critically involved in the pathological progression of AD.

  2. Ketamine attenuates sepsis-induced acute lung injury via regulation of HMGB1-RAGE pathways.

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    Li, Kehan; Yang, Jianxue; Han, Xuechang

    2016-05-01

    High mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and receptor for the advanced glycation end product (RAGE) play important roles in the development of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Ketamine is considered to confer protective effects on ALI during sepsis. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on HMGB1-RAGE activation in a rat model of sepsis-induced ALI. ALI was induced in wild type (WT) and RAGE deficient (RAGE(-/-)) rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or HMGB1 to mimic sepsis-induced ALI. Rats were randomly divided to six groups: sham-operation+normal saline (NS, 10 mL/kg), sham-operation+ketamine (10 mg/kg), CLP/HMGB1+NS (10 mL/kg), CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (5 mg/kg), CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (7.5 mg/kg), and CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (10 mg/kg) groups. NS and ketamine were administered at 3 and 12 h after CLP/HMGB1 via intraperitoneal injection. Pathological changes of lung, inflammatory cell counts, expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, and concentrations of various inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and lung tissue were then assessed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways in the lung were also evaluated. CLP/HMGB1 increased the wet to dry weight ratio and myeloperoxidase activity in lung, the number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in the BALF, and inflammatory mediators in the BALF and lung tissues. Moreover, expression of HMGB1 and RAGE in lung tissues was increased after CLP. Ketamine inhibited all the above effects. It also inhibited the activation of IκB-α, NF-κB p65, and MAPK. Ketamine protects rats against HMGB1-RAGE activation in a rat model of sepsis-induced ALI. These effects may partially result from reductions in NF-κB and MAPK. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma C1q/TNF-Related Protein-3 (CTRP-3 and High-Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB-1 Concentrations in Subjects with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To detect the association of C1q/TNF-related protein-3 (CTRP-3 and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 in subjects with prediabetes (pre-DM and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (nT2DM. Methods. 224 eligible participants were included. The 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and several clinical parameters of metabolic disorders and cytokines were measured. All participants were divided into three groups: normal glucose tolerance (NGT, n=62, pre-DM (n=111, and nT2DM group (n=56. Results. Plasma CTRP-3 concentrations were significantly lower in subjects with pre-DM and nT2DM than that of the NGT group, while plasma HMGB-1 levels were higher in pre-DM and nT2DM group compared with the NGT group (P<0.05. A multiple linear regression analysis showed both plasma CTRP-3 and HMGB-1 concentrations were independently associated with homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and interleukin-6 (IL-6 (P<0.05 for all. Further multiple logistical regression analyses revealed that both plasma CTRP-3 and HMGB-1 levels were significantly associated with pre-DM and nT2DM after adjusting for several confounders (P<0.001 for all. Conclusions. Circulating CTRP-3 and HMGB-1 concentrations might be promising biomarkers to predict prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

  4. HMGB1 is negatively correlated with the development of endometrial carcinoma and prevents cancer cell invasion and metastasis by inhibiting the process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan XR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaorong Luan,1,2 Chunjing Ma,2 Ping Wang,2 Fenglan Lou1 1Nursing College, Shandong University, 2Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1, a nuclear protein that plays a significant role in DNA architecture and transcription, was correlated with the progression of some types of cancer. However, the role of HMGB1 in endometrial cancer cell invasion and metastasis remains unexplored. HMGB1 expression was initially assessed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in normal endometrial tissue and endometrial carcinoma tissue. High expressions of HMGB1 protein were detected in normal endometrial tissues; however, in endometrial cancer tissues, the expressions of HMGB1 were found to be very weak. Furthermore, HMGB1 expressions were negatively correlated with advanced stage and lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer. Then by RT-qPCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry, HMGB1 was also detected in primary cultured endometrial cells and four kinds of endometrial cancer cell lines (Ishikawa, HEC-1A, HEC-1B and KLE. We found that the expression of HMGB1 was much higher in normal endometrial cells than in endometrial cancer cells, and reduced expression levels of HMGB1 were observed especially in the highly metastatic cell lines. Using lentivirus transfection, HMGB1 small hairpin RNA was constructed, and this infected the lowly invasive endometrial cancer cell lines, Ishikawa and HEC-1B. HMGB1 knockdown significantly enhanced the proliferation, invasion and metastasis of endometrial cancer cells and induced the process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These results can contribute to the development of a new potential therapeutic target for endometrial cancer. Keywords: HMGB1, endometrial cancer, invasion, metastasis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

  5. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) and serum soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) in children affected by vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, Anna Maria; Zicari, Alessandra; Nebbioso, Marcella; Mari, Emanuela; Celani, Camilla; Lollobrigida, Valeria; Cesoni Marcelli, Azzurra; Occasi, Francesca; Duse, Marzia

    2014-02-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic disease affecting conjunctiva even though the immunopathogenetic mechanisms underlying this inflammation are unclear. The aim of our study is to investigate serum levels of HMGB1 and circulating sRAGE in children affected by VKC before and after treatment with cyclosporine A (CsA) eye drops and in a group of healthy children. Twenty-four children affected by VKC aged between 5 and 12 yrs of life were enrolled at the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, 'Sapienza' University of Rome. Twenty-four healthy children without atopy, ocular, and systemic disease, cross-matched for sex and age to patients affected by VKC, represented the controls. All children affected by VKC were treated with CsA 1% eye drops for 4 wks, and blood samples were collected before and 2 wks after the end of treatment while the controls underwent to a single blood sample at the time of enrollment. Serum basal levels of HMGB1 and sRAGE were higher in children with VKC when compared with controls while, in patients affected by VKC, no difference was detected between atopic and non-atopic, and between ANA-positive and ANA-negative children. A significant reduction in serum HMGB1 and sRAGE levels was detected after the therapy while CsA serum levels were negative. Our study gives a support to the definition of VKC as a systemic inflammation in which HMGB1 and its soluble receptors could play a role. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pivotal advance: inhibition of HMGB1 nuclear translocation as a mechanism for the anti-rheumatic effects of gold sodium thiomalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterström, Cecilia K; Jiang, Weiwen; Wähämaa, Heidi; Ostberg, Therese; Aveberger, Ann-Charlotte; Schierbeck, Hanna; Lotze, Michael T; Andersson, Ulf; Pisetsky, David S; Erlandsson Harris, Helena

    2008-01-01

    Gold compounds such as gold sodium thiomalate (GST) can reduce the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although their mechanism of action is not well defined. As the proinflammatory mediator high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) may play a role in the pathogenesis of RA, we have performed in vitro studies to investigate whether GST inhibits HMGB1 release as the basis of its mode of action. Murine RAW 264.7 or human THP-1 macrophage cells were stimulated in culture with agents causing extracellular HMGB1 release, including LPS, IFN-gamma, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, IFN-beta, or NO in the presence of GST, ranging from 0 microM to 250 microM. Secretion and intracellular location of HMGB1 were assessed by Western blotting, HMGB1-specific ELISPOT assay, and immunofluorescent staining. In parallel, TNF and IFN-beta levels were analyzed by ELISPOT and/or ELISA. Supernatant NO production was analyzed by the Griess method. At pharmacologically relevant doses, GST inhibited the extracellular release of HMGB1 from activated macrophages and caused the nuclear retention of this protein; in contrast, no effects were observed on the secretion or production of TNF. Release of the key endogenous mediators of HMGB1 translocation, IFN-beta and NO, was inhibited by GST. This inhibition required gold, as sodium thiomalate did not affect the responses measured. Furthermore, gold chloride also inhibited release of HMGB1. Together, these results suggest a new mechanism for the anti-rheumatic effects of gold salts in RA and the potential of drugs, which interfere with intracellular HMGB1 transport mechanisms, as novel agents to treat RA.

  7. A highly purified vegetal fraction able to modulate HMGB1 and to attenuate septic shock in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetrei, Natalia Simona; Călugăru, Ana; Kerek, F; Panteli, Minerva; Rasit, I; Cremer, Lidia; Szegli, G; Lupu, Andreea-Roxana

    2011-01-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is an intracellular protein that may be released actively from monocytes and macrophages or passively from necrotic or damaged cells. Its inhibition in animal experiments, even in the late phase of septic shock, significantly enhanced the survival rate of rodents. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of a vegetal fraction isolated and highly purified from Helleborus purpurascens regarding the modulation of HMGB1 release either from tumor cells or human blood mononuclear cells. Our results showed that the vegetal fraction was able to down-regulate the release of HMGB1 from activated human blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and tumor cells. By combining the purified fraction with Cyclophosphamide the release of HMGB1 from tumor cells was strongly decreased. This synergism was not noticed when the ve getal product was associated with Doxorubicin. We also studied the effect of the purified fraction in mice with septic shock induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method. The tested vegetal product increased significantly the survival rate of animals compared to the mice not treated with it. Our data suggest that the purified vegetal fraction may modulate inflammation by down-regulating the HMGB1, which can also explain its efficacy in septic shock in mice.

  8. p53-dependent release of Alarmin HMGB1 is a central mediator of senescent phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Misako; Malhotra, Gautam K.; Schaum, Nicholas; Huang, Jiahao; Ved, Urvi; Beausejour, Christian M.; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Rodier, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests proliferation in response to potentially oncogenic stress. Senescent cells also secrete inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, which promote age-associated inflammation and pathology. HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) modulates gene expression in the nucleus, but certain immune cells secrete HMGB1 as an extracellular Alarmin to signal tissue damage. We show that nuclear HMGB1 relocalized to the extracellular milieu in senescent human and mouse cells in culture and in vivo. In contrast to cytokine secretion, HMGB1 redistribution required the p53 tumor suppressor, but not its activator ATM. Moreover, altered HMGB1 expression induced a p53-dependent senescent growth arrest. Senescent fibroblasts secreted oxidized HMGB1, which stimulated cytokine secretion through TLR-4 signaling. HMGB1 depletion, HMGB1 blocking antibody, or TLR-4 inhibition attenuated senescence-associated IL-6 secretion, and exogenous HMGB1 stimulated NF-κB activity and restored IL-6 secretion to HMGB1-depleted cells. Our findings identify senescence as a novel biological setting in which HMGB1 functions and link HMGB1 redistribution to p53 activity and senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:23649808

  9. Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans protected the cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by inhibiting high-mobility group box protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Choi, Sun Bok; Jung, Won-Seok; Jung, Su-Young; Cho, Jung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2013-03-14

    To evaluate the inhibitory effects of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans (SSM) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in a mouse model. SSM water extract (0.1, 0.5, or 1 g/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally 1 h prior to the first injection of cerulein. Once AP developed, the stable cholecystokinin analogue, cerulein was injected hourly, over a 6 h period. Blood samples were taken 6 h later to determine serum amylase, lipase, and cytokine levels. The pancreas and lungs were rapidly removed for morphological examination, myeloperoxidase assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. To specify the role of SSM in pancreatitis, the pancreatic acinar cells were isolated using collagenase method. Then the cells were pre-treated with SSM, then stimulated with cerulein. The cell viability, cytokine productions and high-mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB-1) were measured. Furthermore, the regulating mechanisms of SSM action were evaluated. The administration of SSM significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis and pancreatitis associated lung injury, as was shown by the reduction in pancreatic edema, neutrophil infiltration, vacuolization and necrosis. SSM treatment also reduced pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, serum amylase, lipase and cytokine levels, and mRNA expression of multiple inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. In addition, treatment with SSM inhibited HMGB-1 expression in the pancreas during AP. In accordance with in vivo data, SSM inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death, cytokine, and HMGB-1 release. SSM also inhibited the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, p38 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. These results suggest that SSM plays a protective role during the development of AP and pancreatitis associated lung injury via deactivating c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, p38 and NF-κB.

  10. Metformin directly binds the alarmin HMGB1 and inhibits its proinflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Takahiro; Sakata, Natsumi; Narumi, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Takashi; Nagano, Keisuke; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Tsukita, Sohei; Yamada, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Hideki; Shirakawa, Ryutaro; Horiuchi, Hisanori

    2017-05-19

    Metformin is the first-line drug in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to its hypoglycemic effect, metformin has an anti-inflammatory function, but the precise mechanism promoting this activity remains unclear. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an alarmin that is released from necrotic cells and induces inflammatory responses by its cytokine-like activity and is, therefore, a target of anti-inflammatory therapies. Here we identified HMGB1 as a novel metformin-binding protein by affinity purification using a biotinylated metformin analogue. Metformin directly bound to the C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Both in vitro and in vivo, metformin inhibited inflammatory responses induced by full-length HMGB1 but not by HMGB1 lacking the acidic tail. In an acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury model in which HMGB1 released from injured cells exacerbates the initial injury, metformin effectively reduced liver injury and had no additional inhibitory effects when the extracellular HMGB1 was blocked by anti-HMGB1-neutralizing antibody. In summary, we report for the first time that metformin suppresses inflammation by inhibiting the extracellular activity of HMGB1. Because HMGB1 plays a major role in inflammation, our results suggest possible new ways to manage HMGB1-induced inflammation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn; Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: vet@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  12. The extracellular release of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 nuclear protein is mediated by acetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho Carneiro, Vitor; Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Caetano de Abreu da Silva, Isabel; Furtado Madeira da Costa, Rodrigo [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Neto Paiva, Claudia; Torres Bozza, Marcelo [Departamento de Imunologia, Instituto de Microbiologia Professor Paulo de Goes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Rosado Fantappie, Marcelo, E-mail: fantappie@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2009-12-25

    Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) was revealed to be a substrate for the parasite histone acetyltransferases SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. We found that full-length SmHMGB1, as well as its HMG-box B (but not HMG-box A) were acetylated in vitro by SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. However, SmCBP1 was able to acetylate both substrates more efficiently than SmGCN5. Interestingly, the removal of the C-terminal acidic tail of SmHMGB1 (SmHMGB1{Delta}C) resulted in increased acetylation of the protein. We showed by mammalian cell transfection assays that SmHMGB1 and SmHMGB1{Delta}C were transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment. Importantly, after NaB treatment, SmHMGB1 was also present outside the cell. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of SmHMGB1 plays a role in cellular trafficking, culminating with its secretion to the extracellular milieu. The possible role of SmHMGB1 acetylation in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is discussed.

  13. The Role of HMGB1 in Cardiovascular Biology: Danger Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingjing; Wen, Juan; Bauer, Eileen; Zhong, Hua; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Alex F

    2015-12-10

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Accumulating evidence shows that dysregulated immune response contributes to several types of CVDs such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Vascular intimal impairment and low-density lipoprotein oxidation trigger a complex network of innate immune responses and sterile inflammation. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear DNA-binding protein, was recently discovered to function as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) that initiates the innate immune responses. These findings lead to the understanding that HMGB1 plays a critical role in the inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of CVD. In this review, we highlight the role of extracellular HMGB1 as a proinflammatory mediator as well as a DAMP in coronary artery disease, cerebral artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and PH. A key focus for future researches on HMGB1 location, structure, modification, and signaling will reveal HMGB1's multiple functions and discover a targeted therapy that can eliminate HMGB1-mediated inflammation without interfering with adaptive immune responses.

  14. A dual-role of Gu-4 in suppressing HMGB1 secretion and blocking HMGB1 pro-inflammatory activity during inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiting Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High mobility group box 1(HMGB1 was first recognized as a nuclear protein that increased the chromatin remodeling and regulates transcription of many genes. In recent years, HMGB1 has been identified as a critical "late" pro-inflammatory mediator due to its unique secretion pattern and lethal effects in sepsis. Therefore, preventing the active release and inhibiting the pro-inflammatory activity of HMGB1 become promising strategies for the treatment of sepsis. Here, we reported the therapeutic effects of Gu-4, a lactosyl derivative, on sepsis and the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an experimental rat model of sepsis caused by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, Gu-4 administration prominently attenuated lung injury and improved the survival of the septic animals, which was positively correlated with the decrease of the serum HMGB1 level. Using RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, we further showed that Gu-4 significantly suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced release and cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1. Moreover, Gu-4 not only dose-dependently attenuated recombinant human (rhHMGB1-induced production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in THP-1 cells, but also greatly inhibited the adhesion of rhHMGB1-challenged THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Analyses of flow cytometry demonstrated that Gu-4 could effectively reduce the activation of CD11b elicited by rhHMGB1. Western blot analyses revealed that Gu-4 treatment could partially block the rhHMGB1-induced activation of ERK and NF-κB signalings. Meanwhile, CD11b knockdown also obviously attenuated the rhHMGB1-induced phosphorylations of ERK and IKKα/β. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results suggest that Gu-4 possesses a therapeutic potential in the treatment of sepsis probably via inhibiting the LPS-induced release of HMGB1 from macrophages and via suppressing the pro-inflammatory activity of HMGB1.

  15. Circulating pathogen-associated molecular pattern - binding proteins and High Mobility Group Box protein 1 in nascent metabolic syndrome: implications for cellular Toll-like receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialal, I; Rajamani, U; Adams-Huet, B; Kaur, H

    2014-09-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome, (MetS) a global epidemic, is a state of low grade chronic inflammation and confers an increased risk for diabetes and CVD. We have previously reported increased activity of the pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), TLR2 and TLR4 in MetS. We hypothesized that increased TLR activity in MetS is due in part to increased levels of circulating PAMP-binding proteins, soluble CD14 (sCD14), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and the damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP), High Mobility Group Box protein 1 (HMGB-1). We measured sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 in fasting plasma from nascent MetS (n = 37) and healthy control subjects (n = 32) by ELISA. We also investigated the effects of sCD14 and LBP on TLR4 activity in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Following adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference, sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 levels remained significantly increased in MetS. Also their levels increased with increasing numbers of MetS risk factors. Only sCD14 correlated significantly with monocyte TLR4 protein and activity. None of these soluble biomarkers correlated with TLR2 protein. Both sCD14 and HMGB-1 correlated significantly with HOMA-IR. In LPS primed HAECs, sCD14 compared to LBP, resulted in a greater increase in both TLR4 abundance and inflammatory biomediators (NF-κB, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α). Thus, we make the novel observation that sCD14 reflects increased monocyte TLR4 protein and activity in nascent MetS and by contributing to increased cellular inflammation could explain, in part, the increased risk for diabetes and CVD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. HMGB1: A new marker for estimation of the postmortem interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIKUCHI, KIYOSHI; KAWAHARA, KO-ICHI; BISWAS, KAMAL KRISHNA; ITO, TAKASHI; TANCHAROEN, SALUNYA; SHIOMI, NAOTO; KODA, YOSHIRO; MATSUDA, FUMIYO; MORIMOTO, YOKO; OYAMA, YOKO; TAKENOUCHI, KAZUNORI; MIURA, NAOKI; ARIMURA, NOBORU; NAWA, YUKO; ARIMURA, SHINICHIRO; JIE, MENG XIAO; SHRESTHA, BINITA; IWATA, MASAHIRO; MERA, KENTARO; SAMESHIMA, HISAYO; OHNO, YOSHIKO; MAENOSONO, RYUICHI; TAJIMA, YUTAKA; UCHIKADO, HISAAKI; KURAMOTO, TERUKAZU; NAKAYAMA, KENJI; SHIGEMORI, MINORU; YOSHIDA, YOSHIHIRO; HASHIGUCHI, TERUTO; MARUYAMA, IKURO

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI) is one of the most important tasks in forensic medicine. Numerous methods have been proposed for the determination of the time since death by chemical means. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein is released by eukaryotic cells upon necrosis. Postmortem serum levels of HMGB1 of 90 male Wistar rats stored at 4, 14 and 24°C since death were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The serum HMGB1 level showed a time-dependent increase up to seven days at 4°C. At 14°C, the HMGB1 level peaked at day 3, decreased at day 4, and then plateaued. At 24°C, the HMGB1 level peaked at day 2, decreased at day 3, and then plateaued. Our findings suggest that HMGB1 is related to the PMI in rats. PMID:23136602

  17. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  18. Critical role of RAGE and HMGB1 in inflammatory heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, Anna; Andrassy, Martin; Müller, Anna-Maria; Bockstahler, Mariella; Fischer, Andrea; Volz, Christian H; Leib, Christoph; Göser, Stefan; Korkmaz-Icöz, Sevil; Zittrich, Stefan; Jungmann, Andreas; Lasitschka, Felix; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Müller, Oliver J; Katus, Hugo A; Kaya, Ziya

    2016-01-12

    Autoimmune response to cardiac troponin I (TnI) induces inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that exerts proinflammatory activity by mainly binding to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The involvement of the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is yet not fully understood. Using the well-established model of TnI-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), we demonstrated that both local and systemic HMGB1 protein expression was elevated in wild-type (wt) mice after TnI immunization. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of HMGB1 using glycyrrhizin or anti-HMGB1 antibody reduced inflammation in hearts of TnI-immunized wt mice. Furthermore, RAGE knockout (RAGE-ko) mice immunized with TnI showed no structural or physiological signs of cardiac impairment. Moreover, cardiac overexpression of HMGB1 using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors induced inflammation in the hearts of both wt and RAGE-ko mice. Finally, patients with myocarditis displayed increased local and systemic HMGB1 and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) expression. Together, our study highlights that HMGB1 and its main receptor, RAGE, appear to be crucial factors in the pathogenesis of TnI-induced EAM, because inhibition of HMGB1 and ablation of RAGE suppressed inflammation in the heart. Moreover, the proinflammatory effect of HMGB1 is not necessarily dependent on RAGE only. Other receptors of HMGB1 such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may also be involved in disease pathogenesis. These findings could be confirmed by the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and sRAGE. Therefore, blockage of one of these molecules might represent a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

  19. Critical role of RAGE and HMGB1 in inflammatory heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, Anna; Andrassy, Martin; Müller, Anna-Maria; Bockstahler, Mariella; Fischer, Andrea; Volz, Christian H.; Leib, Christoph; Göser, Stefan; Korkmaz-Icöz, Sevil; Zittrich, Stefan; Jungmann, Andreas; Lasitschka, Felix; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Müller, Oliver J.; Katus, Hugo A.; Kaya, Ziya

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune response to cardiac troponin I (TnI) induces inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that exerts proinflammatory activity by mainly binding to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The involvement of the HMGB1–RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is yet not fully understood. Using the well-established model of TnI-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), we demonstrated that both local and systemic HMGB1 protein expression was elevated in wild-type (wt) mice after TnI immunization. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of HMGB1 using glycyrrhizin or anti-HMGB1 antibody reduced inflammation in hearts of TnI-immunized wt mice. Furthermore, RAGE knockout (RAGE-ko) mice immunized with TnI showed no structural or physiological signs of cardiac impairment. Moreover, cardiac overexpression of HMGB1 using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors induced inflammation in the hearts of both wt and RAGE-ko mice. Finally, patients with myocarditis displayed increased local and systemic HMGB1 and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) expression. Together, our study highlights that HMGB1 and its main receptor, RAGE, appear to be crucial factors in the pathogenesis of TnI-induced EAM, because inhibition of HMGB1 and ablation of RAGE suppressed inflammation in the heart. Moreover, the proinflammatory effect of HMGB1 is not necessarily dependent on RAGE only. Other receptors of HMGB1 such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may also be involved in disease pathogenesis. These findings could be confirmed by the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and sRAGE. Therefore, blockage of one of these molecules might represent a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy. PMID:26715748

  20. HMGB1/anti-HMGB1 antibodies define a molecular signature of early stages of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    OpenAIRE

    Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Poirier-Beaudouin, Béatrice; Durant, Jacques; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Saïdi, Héla; Seffer, Valérie; Ticchioni, Michel; Chanalet, Stephane; Carsenti, Helene; Harvey-Langton, Alexandra; Laffon, Muriel; Cottalorda, Jacqueline; Pradier, Christian; Dellamonica, Pierre; Vassallo, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Background: HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist in the post-HAART era, characterized by asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) and mild neurocognitive disorders (MND). High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone chromosomal protein widely expressed in the nucleus of all eukaryotic cells, including brain cells, which acts as a potent proinflammatory cytokine when actively secreted from immune cells. Recent reports suggested that HMGB1 acts on microglial cells to...

  1. Targeting HMGB1 inhibits ovarian cancer growth and metastasis by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yueran

    2012-11-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear and extracellular protein, is implicated in the development and progression of some types of cancers. However, no information is available to date regarding the function of HMGB1 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we performed cDNA microarray analysis and identified HMGB1 as a gene dramatically elevated in the highly invasive subclone S1 compared with the low invasive subclone S21 derived from the same cell line SKOV3. Then lentivirus vector with HMGB1 shRNA was constructed and infected the highly invasive cell line S1, A1, and HO8910PM. Real-time RT-PCR, Western blot, and IHC results confirmed the down-regulation of HMGB1 expression by its shRNA was about 80-90% at both the mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HMGB1 significantly suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase, which was accompanied by decreased expressions of cyclin D1 and PCNA. Furthermore, knockdown of HMGB1 induced ovarian cancer cell apoptosis, which was mediated by increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2. Finally, knockdown of HMGB1 significantly inhibited ovarian cancer cell invasion and metastasis, which was regulated by decreased expressions of MMP2 and MMP9. Serum HMGB1 levels in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were significantly higher than that in patients with benign ovarian tumor and healthy controls. These results indicate that HMGB1 is a newly identified gene associated with ovarian cancer growth and metastasis. HMGB1 may serve as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of ovarian cancer in the future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The HMGB1/RAGE Pro-Inflammatory Axis in the Human Placenta: Modulating Effect of Low Molecular Weight Heparin.

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    Zenerino, Cristian; Nuzzo, Anna Maria; Giuffrida, Domenica; Biolcati, Marilisa; Zicari, Alessandra; Todros, Tullia; Rolfo, Alessandro

    2017-11-17

    We evaluated whether physiological and pre-eclamptic (PE) placentae, characterized by exacerbated inflammation, presented alterations in pro-inflammatory High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) and its Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) expression. Moreover, we investigated, in physiological placental tissue, the ability of Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH) to modify HMGB1 structural conformation thus inhibiting RAGE binding and HMGB1/RAGE axis inflammatory activity. HMGB1, RAGE, IL-6 and TNFα (HMGB1/RAGE targets) mRNA expression were assessed by Real Time PCR. HMGB1, RAGE protein levels were assessed by western blot assay. Physiological term placental explants were treated by 0.5 U LMWH for 24 or 48 h. HMGB1 and RAGE expression and association were evaluated in LMWH explants by RAGE immunoprecipitation followed by HMGB1 immunoblot. HMGB1 spatial localization was evaluated by immuofluorescent staining (IF). HMGB1 expression was increased in PE relative to physiological placentae while RAGE was unvaried. 24 h LMWH treatment significantly up-regulated HMGB1 expression but inhibited HMGB1/RAGE complex formation in physiological explants. RAGE expression decreased in treated relative to untreated explants at 48 h. IF showed HMGB1 localization in both cytoplasm and nucleus of mesenchymal and endothelial cells but not in the trophoblast. IL-6 and TNFα gene expression were significantly increased at 24 h relative to controls, while they were significantly down-regulated in 48 h vs. 24 h LMWH explants. Our data depicted a new molecular mechanism through which LMWH exerts its anti-inflammatory effect on PE placentae, underlying the importance of HMGB1/RAGE axis in PE inflammatory response.

  3. The HMGB1/RAGE Pro-Inflammatory Axis in the Human Placenta: Modulating Effect of Low Molecular Weight Heparin

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    Cristian Zenerino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated whether physiological and pre-eclamptic (PE placentae, characterized by exacerbated inflammation, presented alterations in pro-inflammatory High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 and its Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE expression. Moreover, we investigated, in physiological placental tissue, the ability of Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH to modify HMGB1 structural conformation thus inhibiting RAGE binding and HMGB1/RAGE axis inflammatory activity. HMGB1, RAGE, IL-6 and TNFα (HMGB1/RAGE targets mRNA expression were assessed by Real Time PCR. HMGB1, RAGE protein levels were assessed by western blot assay. Physiological term placental explants were treated by 0.5 U LMWH for 24 or 48 h. HMGB1 and RAGE expression and association were evaluated in LMWH explants by RAGE immunoprecipitation followed by HMGB1 immunoblot. HMGB1 spatial localization was evaluated by immuofluorescent staining (IF. HMGB1 expression was increased in PE relative to physiological placentae while RAGE was unvaried. 24 h LMWH treatment significantly up-regulated HMGB1 expression but inhibited HMGB1/RAGE complex formation in physiological explants. RAGE expression decreased in treated relative to untreated explants at 48 h. IF showed HMGB1 localization in both cytoplasm and nucleus of mesenchymal and endothelial cells but not in the trophoblast. IL-6 and TNFα gene expression were significantly increased at 24 h relative to controls, while they were significantly down-regulated in 48 h vs. 24 h LMWH explants. Our data depicted a new molecular mechanism through which LMWH exerts its anti-inflammatory effect on PE placentae, underlying the importance of HMGB1/RAGE axis in PE inflammatory response.

  4. Danger signaling protein HMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death accompanied by formation of giant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdynia, Georg; Keith, Martina; Kopitz, Jürgen; Bergmann, Marion; Fassl, Anne; Weber, Alexander N R; George, Julie; Kees, Tim; Zentgraf, Hans-Walter; Wiestler, Otmar D; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2010-11-01

    Cells dying by necrosis release the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, which has immunostimulatory effects. However, little is known about the direct actions of extracellular HMGB1 protein on cancer cells. Here, we show that recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) exerts strong cytotoxic effects on malignant tumor cells. The rhHMGB1-induced cytotoxicity depends on the presence of mitochondria and leads to fast depletion of mitochondrial DNA, severe damage of the mitochondrial proteome by toxic malondialdehyde adducts, and formation of giant mitochondria. The formation of giant mitochondria is independent of direct nuclear signaling events, because giant mitochondria are also observed in cytoplasts lacking nuclei. Further, the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine as well as c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase blockade inhibited the cytotoxic effect of rhHMGB1. Importantly, glioblastoma cells, but not normal astrocytes, were highly susceptible to rhHMGB1-induced cell death. Systemic treatment with rhHMGB1 results in significant growth inhibition of xenografted tumors in vivo. In summary, rhHMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death in cancer cells, which differs from the known forms of apoptosis, autophagy, and senescence, possibly representing an important novel mechanism of specialized necrosis. Further, our findings suggest that rhHMGB1 may offer therapeutic applications in treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors. ©2010 AACR.

  5. Effects of propofol on lipopolysaccharide-induced expression and release of HMGB1 in macrophages

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    Wang, T.; Wei, X.Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, L.J.; Jiang, L.H. [Department of Anesthesiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2015-02-24

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression and release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in mouse macrophages. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells were randomly divided into 5 treatment groups. Expression levels of HMGB1 mRNA were detected using RT-PCR, and cell culture supernatant HMGB1 protein levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in macrophages was observed by Western blotting and activity of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus was detected using ELISA. HMGB1 mRNA expression levels increased significantly in the cell culture supernatant and in cells after 24 h of stimulating RAW264.7 cells with LPS (500 ng/mL). However, HMGB1 mRNA expression levels in the P2 and P3 groups, which received 500 ng/mL LPS with 25 or 50 μmol/mL propofol, respectively, were significantly lower than those in the group receiving LPS stimulation (P<0.05). After stimulation by LPS, HMGB1 protein levels were reduced significantly in the nucleus but were increased in the cytoplasm (P<0.05). Simultaneously, the activity of NF-κB was enhanced significantly (P<0.05). After propofol intervention, HMGB1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and NF-κB activity were inhibited significantly (each P<0.05). Thus, propofol can inhibit the LPS-induced expression and release of HMGB1 by inhibiting HMGB1 translocation and NF-κB activity in RAW264.7 cells, suggesting propofol may be protective in patients with sepsis.

  6. Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate Inhibits HMGB1-Dependent Inflammation and Ameliorates Colitis in Mice.

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    Roberta Vitali

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 is a DNA-binding protein that is released from injured cells during inflammation. Advances in targeting HMGB1 represent a major challenge to improve the treatment of acute/chronic inflammation.This study is aimed at verifying whether the inhibition of HMGB1 through dipotassium glycyrrhizate (DPG is a good strategy to reduce intestinal inflammation.Human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, HT29, human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma, Caco2, and murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, were cultured to investigate the effect of DPG on the secretion of HMGB1. Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice through administration of 3% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS; a combined treatment with DSS and 3 or 8 mg/kg/day DPG was used to investigate the effects of DPG on intestinal inflammation. Animals were euthanized at seventh day and colonic samples underwent molecular and histological analyses.DPG significantly reduces in vitro the release of HMGB1 in the extracellular matrix as well as expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6, by inhibiting HMGB1. Moreover, DPG significantly decreases the severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice. Murine colonic samples show decreased mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6, as well as HMGB1 receptors, RAGE and TLR4. Finally, HMGB1, abundantly present in the feces of mice with DSS-induced colitis, is strongly reduced by DPG.HMGB1 is an early pro-inflammatory cytokine and an active protagonist of mucosal gut inflammation. DPG exerts inhibitory effects against HMGB1 activity, significantly reducing intestinal inflammation. Thus, we reason that DPG could represent an innovative tool for the management of human intestinal inflammation.

  7. HMGB1 promotes the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats.

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    Yukari Sadamura-Takenaka

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right ventricular failure and death. Recent studies have suggested that chronic inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving inflammation have not been fully elucidated.To elucidate the roles of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a ubiquitous DNA-binding protein with extracellular pro-inflammatory activity, in a rat model of PAH.Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered monocrotaline (MCT. Concentrations of HMGB1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum, and localization of HMGB1 in the lung were examined over time. The protective effects of anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody against MCT-induced PAH were tested.HMGB1 levels in BALF were elevated 1 week after MCT injection, and this elevation preceded increases of other pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, and the development of PAH. In contrast, serum HMGB1 levels were elevated 4 weeks after MCT injection, at which time the rats began to die. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that HMGB1 was translocated to the extranuclear space in periarterial infiltrating cells, alveolar macrophages, and bronchial epithelial cells of MCT-injected rats. Anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody protected rats against MCT-induced lung inflammation, thickening of the pulmonary artery wall, and elevation of right ventricular systolic pressure, and significantly improved the survival of the MCT-induced PAH rats.Our results identify extracellular HMGB1 as a promoting factor for MCT-induced PAH. The blockade of HMGB1 activity improved survival of MCT-induced PAH rats, and thus might be a promising therapy for the treatment of PAH.

  8. Xuebijing Ameliorates Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury by Downregulating HMGB1 and RAGE Expressions in Mice

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    Qiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xuebijing (XBJ injection, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been reported as a promising approach in the treatment of sepsis in China. However, its actual molecular mechanisms in sepsis-induced lung injury are yet unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of XBJ on inflammation and the underlying mechanisms in a model of caecal ligation and puncture-(CLP- induced lung injury. The mice were divided into CLP group, CLP+XBJ group (XBJ, 4 mL/kg per 12 hours, and sham group. The molecular and histological examinations were performed on the lung, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid samples of mice at the points of 6, 24, and 48 hours after CLP. The results show that XBJ reduces morphological destruction and neutrophil infiltration in the alveolar space and lung wet/dry weight ratio, which improves mortality of CLP-induced lung injury. Meanwhile, XBJ treatment downregulates high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE expression, as well as neutrophil counts, production of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the BAL fluids. In conclusion, these results indicate that XBJ may reduce the mortality through inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines secretion mediated by HMGB1/RAGE axis.

  9. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production.

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    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong; Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Emerging Role of HMGB1 in Neuropathic Pain: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Neuroinflammation

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    Wenbin Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NPP is intolerable, persistent, and specific type of long-term pain. It is considered to be a direct consequence of pathological changes affecting the somatosensory system and can be debilitating for affected patients. Despite recent progress and growing interest in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease, NPP still presents a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 mediates inflammatory and immune reactions in nervous system and emerging evidence reveals that HMGB1 plays an essential role in neuroinflammation through receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLR, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, C-X-X motif chemokines receptor 4 (CXCR4, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. In this review, we present evidence from studies that address the role of HMGB1 in NPP. First, we review studies aimed at determining the role of HMGB1 in NPP and discuss the possible mechanisms underlying HMGB1-mediated NPP progression where receptors for HMGB1 are involved. Then we review studies that address HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target for NPP.

  11. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

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    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Omuta City General Hospital, 2-19-1 Takarazaka, Omuta-City, Fukuoka 836-8567 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Morimoto, Yoko [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Matsuda, Fumiyo [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan); Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Miura, Naoki [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); and others

    2009-07-24

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  12. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Induces Decreased Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Retina

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    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF- mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

  13. The Induction of HMGB1 Release from RAW 264.7 Cells by Transfected DNA

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    Jiang, Weiwen; Pisetsky, David S.

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone nuclear protein that can activate innate immunity when in an extracellular location. As shown in in vitro studies, while polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] and LPS, TLR3 and TLR4 ligands respectively, can induce HMGB1 release from macrophages, CpG DNA, a TLR 9 ligand, does not. Since DNA displays distinct immunostimulatory activity when transfected into cells, we investigated whether transfected DNA can induce HMGB1 release from macrophages. In these experiments, using RAW 264.7 cells as model, we show that DNA, either natural DNA or synthetic oligonucleotides, can induce HMGB1 release when used to stimulate cells with the transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000®; release occurred irrespective of the intrinsic activity of the DNA. The induction of HMGB1 release by transfected DNA was dependent on IFN-β as shown by the inhibitory effects of an antibody. In addition, JNK activation mediated HMGB1 release induced by a transfected phosphorothioate oligonucleotide but not by transfected natural DNA. Together, these findings indicate that transfected DNA can stimulate macrophages to release HMGB1 under conditions in which free DNA is inactive and suggest a role of DNA in inducing inflammation when bound to molecules that influence its entry into cells. PMID:18031817

  14. HMGB1/TLR4 signaling induces an inflammatory response following high-pressure renal pelvic perfusion in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Sha, Minglei; Chen, Lei; Li, Deng; Lu, Jun; Xia, Shujie

    2016-11-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) causes a rapid increase in renal pelvic pressure in the kidney, which induces an inflammatory response. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is known to trigger the recruitment of inflammatory cells and the release of proinflammatory cytokines following ischemia reperfusion injury in the kidney, but the contribution of HMGB1 to the inflammatory response following high-pressure renal pelvic perfusion has not been investigated. In this study, high-pressure renal pelvic perfusion was induced in anesthetized pigs to examine the effect of HMGB1 on the inflammatory response. HMGB1 levels in the kidney increased following high-pressure renal pelvic perfusion, together with elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the plasma and kidney and an accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. Inhibition of HMGB1 alleviated this inflammatory response while perfusion with recombinant HMGB1 had an augmentative effect, confirming the involvement of HMGB1 in the inflammatory response to high-pressure renal pelvic perfusion. HMGB1 regulated the inflammatory response by activating Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that HMGB1/TLR4 signaling contributes to the inflammatory response following high-pressure renal pelvic perfusion in a porcine model and has implications for the management of inflammation after PCNL. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. High-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) is a novel biomarker for human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Xi, Bo; Zhao, Yueran; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chunyu

    2012-07-01

    High mobility group box l (HMGB1), a nuclear and extracellular protein, is implicated in some physiologic and pathologic conditions. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of HMGB1 in ovarian cancer. cDNA microarray analysis was performed to compare gene expression profiles of the highly invasive and the low invasive subclones derived from the SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cell line. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was performed to investigate HMGB1 expression in a total of 100 ovarian tissue specimens. In functional assays, effects of HMGB1 knockdown on the biological behavior of ovarian cancer cells were investigated. HMGB1 was overexpressed in the highly invasive subclone compared with the low invasive subclone. High HMGB1 expression was associated with poor clinicopathologic features. Knockdown of HMGB1 expression significantly suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation accompanied by decreased cyclin D1 and PCNA expression, and inhibited cell migration and invasion accompanied by decreased MMP2 and MMP9 activities. HMGB1 is a newly identified gene overexpressed in ovarian cancer and associated with poor clinicopathologic features. HMGB1 may serve as a new biomarker and a therapeutic target for ovarian cancer in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. RNA-binding specificity of Y-box protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinjiang; Akcakanat, Argun; Stivers, David N; Zhang, Jiexin; Kim, Doyil; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2009-01-01

    Y-box protein 1 (YB-1) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. The specificity of YB-1's RNA binding and its consequences are unknown. Because expression and subcellular localization of YB-1 have been reported to be important in breast cancer, we determined the specificity and functional impact of YB-1 mRNA-binding in MCF7 breast cancer cells. We used YB-1 antibodies to immunoprecipitate YB-1 and microarray profiling to compare YB-1-bound and total poly(A) RNA. We demonstrated that YB-1 mRNA-binding was preferential. Transcript sequences significantly associated with this binding had high GC content. Selected YB-1 mRNA-binding targets were confirmed by QRT-PCR. However, downregulation of YB-1 levels by siRNA did not affect their RNA or protein expression. Thus, YB-1 has RNA-binding specificity; however, YB-1 binding does not necessarily regulate the stability or translation of its mRNA targets. Further study is needed to determine the functional consequences of selective YB-1 mRNA binding.

  17. MicroRNA-126 suppresses inflammation in endothelial cells under hyperglycemic condition by targeting HMGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Song-Tao; Wang, Feng; Shao, Min; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Hua-Qing

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA-126(miR-126) targets involved in inflammation need to be identified. In this study, we aim to investigate whether high-mobility group box 1(HMGB1), an inflammation-related gene, is the target of miR-126 in diabetic vascular endothelium. The diabetic apoE -/- mice model, a classical diabetic atherosclerosis model, was established. The aorta of diabetic apoE -/- mice showed decrease of miR-126 and elevation of HMGB1 and inflammation. Next, we employed several in vitro experiments to address the role of miRNA-126 on the regulation of HMGB1 in endothelial cells under hyperglycemic and inflammatory conditions. Manipulation of miRNA levels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was achieved by transfecting cells with miR-126 mimic and antagomir. Overexpression of miR-126 could decrease the expression of downstream components of HMGB1 including TNF-α, ROS, and NADPH oxidase activity in HUVECs under hyperglycemic condition. Nevertheless, such phenomenon was completely reversed by miR-126 antagomir. The expression of HMGB1 protein rather than HMGB1 mRNA was down-regulated after transfection with miR-126 mimic, which indicated the modulation of HMGB1 mediated by miR-126 was at the posttranslational level. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed the 3'-UTR of HMGB1 gene was a direct target of miR-126. Western blot analysis also indicated that overexpression of miR-126 contributed to the elevation of p-eNOS, eNOS and p-AKT expressions, respectively. In summary, our findings suggest that miR-126 may suppress inflammation and ROS production in endothelial cells treated by high glucose through modulating the expression of HMGB1. Our study provides a novel pathogenic link between dysregulated miRNA expression and inflammation in diabetic vascular endothelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The HMGB1/RAGE inflammatory pathway promotes pancreatic tumor growth by regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, R; Tang, D; Schapiro, NE; Loux, T; Livesey, KM; Billiar, TR; Wang, H; Van Houten, B; Lotze, MT; Zeh, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells require increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to support anabolism and proliferation. The precise mechanisms regulating this process in tumor cells are unknown. Here, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and one of its primary ligands, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), are required for optimal mitochondrial function within tumors. We found that RAGE is present in the mitochondria of cultured tumor cells as well as primary tumors. RAGE and HMGB1 coordinately enhanced tumor cell mitochondrial complex I activity, ATP production, tumor cell proliferation and migration. Lack of RAGE or inhibition of HMGB1 release diminished ATP production and slowed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings link, for the first time, the HMGB1–RAGE pathway with changes in bioenergetics. Moreover, our observations provide a novel mechanism within the tumor microenvironment by which necrosis and inflammation promote tumor progression. PMID:23318458

  19. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-02-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG.

  20. Effects of high-mobility group box 1 on the proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, S C; Cui, C; Yan, Y H; Sun, G H; Zhu, S R

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the expression of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in human dental pulp tissues and the effects of HMGB1 on proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Immunohistochemical assay, immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometric analysis were used to detect the expression of HMGB1 in the human dental pulp and hDPCs, respectively. The proliferation of hDPCs was examined by CCK-8 after culturing human primary hDPCs in the presence of HMGB1 with different doses. Odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs was determined using alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity assay and mineralized nodule formation. Important mineralization-related genes such as ALP, dental sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dental matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the difference in expressions of DMP-1 and DSP with or without the presence of exogenous HMGB1. Simultaneously, messenger RNA and protein levels of HMGB1 and RAGE were also detected. The protein level of HMGB1 in the supernatants was quantified using ELISA analysis. HMGB1 was found in human dental pulp tissue and in the nuclei of hDPCs. During hDPC odontoblastic differentiation, HMGB1 translocated from the nuclei to the cytoplasm and then secreted out from hDPCs. Exogenous HMGB1 promoted hDPC proliferation and mineralized nodule formation. It up-regulated the activity of ALPase and the mRNA and protein levels of dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and receptor for advance glycation end (RAGE) of hDPCs. HMGB1 promoted the proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. HMGB1 Is a Potential Biomarker for Severe Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers.

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    Katarina Resman Rus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF are common representatives of viral hemorrhagic fevers still often neglected in some parts of the world. Infection with Dobrava or Puumala virus (HFRS and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV can result in a mild, nonspecific febrile illness or as a severe disease with hemorrhaging and high fatality rate. An important factor in optimizing survival rate in patients with VHF is instant recognition of the severe form of the disease for which significant biomarkers need to be elucidated. To determine the prognostic value of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 as a biomarker for disease severity, we tested acute serum samples of patients with HFRS or CCHF. Our results showed that HMGB1 levels are increased in patients with CCHFV, DOBV or PUUV infection. Above that, concentration of HMGB1 is higher in patients with severe disease progression when compared to the mild clinical course of the disease. Our results indicate that HMGB1 could be a useful prognostic biomarker for disease severity in PUUV and CCHFV infection, where the difference between the mild and severe patients group was highly significant. Even in patients with severe DOBV infection concentrations of HMGB1 were 2.8-times higher than in the mild group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Our results indicated HMGB1 as a potential biomarker for severe hemorrhagic fevers.

  2. The alarmin HMGB-1 influences healing outcomes in fetal skin wounds.

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    Dardenne, Adrienne D; Wulff, Brian C; Wilgus, Traci A

    2013-01-01

    In mice, cutaneous wounds generated early in development (embryonic day 15, E15) heal scarlessly, while wounds generated late in gestation (embryonic day 18, E18) heal with scar formation. Even though both types of wounds are generated in the same sterile uterine environment, scarless fetal wounds heal without inflammation, but a strong inflammatory response is observed in scar-forming fetal wounds. We hypothesized that altered release of alarmins, endogenous molecules that trigger inflammation in response to damage, may be responsible for the age-related changes in inflammation and healing outcomes in fetal skin. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the alarmin high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) is involved in fetal wound repair. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that in unwounded skin, E18 keratinocytes expressed higher levels of HMGB-1 compared with E15 keratinocytes. After injury, HMGB-1 was released to a greater extent from keratinocytes at the margin of scar-forming E18 wounds, compared with scarless E15 wounds. Furthermore, instead of healing scarlessly, E15 wounds healed with scars when treated with HMGB-1. HMGB-1-injected wounds also had more fibroblasts, blood vessels, and macrophages compared with control wounds. Together, these data suggest that extracellular HMGB-1 levels influence the quality of healing in cutaneous wounds. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. Inhibition of HMGB1 Translocation by Green Tea Extract in Rats Exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke

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    Sirintip Chaichalotornkul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS exposure is linked to carcinogenic, oxidative and inflammatory cellular reactions. Green tea polyphenol reportedly plays a role in the prevention of inflammation-related diseases. To evaluate the effects of green tea extract (GTE on cellular location of High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1 protein, we studied the lung tissue in rats exposed to cigarette smoke (CS. Rats were divided into three groups; CS, CSG, and C, which were groups of CS-treated only, CS-treated with GTE dietary supplement, and the control, respectively. Our findings by immunocytochemistry showed that abundant HMGB1 translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the lung tissues of rats that were exposed to CS, whereas HMGB1 was localized to the nuclei of CSG and C group. For in vitro studies, cotinine stimulated the secretion of HMGB1 in a dose and time dependent manner and the HMGB1 level was suppressed by GTE in murine macrophage cell lines. Our results could suggest that GTE supplementation which could suppress HMGB1 may offer a beneficial effect against diseases.

  4. Glycyrrhizin suppresses the expressions of HMGB1 and relieves the severity of traumatic pancreatitis in rats.

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    Ke Xiang

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 plays important roles in a large variety of diseases; glycyrrhizin (GL is recognized as an HMGB1 inhibitor. However, few studies have focused on whether glycyrrhizin can potentially improve the outcome of traumatic pancreatitis (TP by inhibiting HMGB1.A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20 in each: Control group, TP group and TP-GL group. Pancreatic trauma was established with a custom-made biological impact machine-III, and GL was administered at 15 minutes after the accomplishment of operation. To determine survival rates during the first 7 days after injury, another 60 rats (n = 20 in each were grouped and treated as mentioned above. At 24 hours of induction of TP, the histopathological changes in pancreas were evaluated and serum amylase levels were tested. Serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and HMGB1 were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. HMGB1 expressions in pancreas were measured using immunohistochemical staining, Western blot and Real-Time PCR analysis.Serum levels of HMGB1, TNF-α and IL-6 were increased dramatically in TP group at 24 hours after induction of TP. However, these indicators were reduced significantly by GL administration in TP-GL group comparing with TP group (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, survival analysis showed that the seven-day survival rate in TP-GL group was significantly higher than that in TP group (85% versus 65%, P < 0.05. GL treatment significantly decreased the pancreatic protein and mRNA expressions of HMGB1 and ameliorated the pancreatic injury in rats with TP.Glycyrrhizin might play an important role in improving survival rates and ameliorating pancreatic injury of TP by suppression of the expressions of HMGB1 and other proinflammatory cytokine.

  5. CK2 phosphorylation of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 protein regulates its cellular traffic and secretion but not its DNA transactions.

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    Isabel Caetano de Abreu da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The helminth Schistosoma mansoni parasite resides in mesenteric veins where fecundated female worms lay hundred of eggs daily. Some of the egg antigens are trapped in the liver and induce a vigorous granulomatous response. High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1, a nuclear factor, can also be secreted and act as a cytokine. Schistosome HMGB1 (SmHMGB1 is secreted by the eggs and stimulate the production of key cytokines involved in the pathology of schistosomiasis. Thus, understanding the mechanism of SmHMGB1 release becomes mandatory. Here, we addressed the question of how the nuclear SmHMGB1 can reach the extracellular space. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed in vitro and in vivo that CK2 phosphorylation was involved in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SmHMGB1. By site-directed mutagenesis we mapped the two serine residues of SmHMGB1 that were phosphorylated by CK2. By DNA bending and supercoiling assays we showed that CK2 phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 had no effect in the DNA binding activities of the protein. We showed by electron microscopy, as well as by cell transfection and fluorescence microscopy that SmHMGB1 was present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of adult schistosomes and mammalian cells. In addition, we showed that treatments of the cells with either a phosphatase or a CK2 inhibitor were able to enhance or block, respectively, the cellular traffic of SmHMGB1. Importantly, we showed by confocal microscopy and biochemically that SmHMGB1 is significantly secreted by S. mansoni eggs of infected animals and that SmHMGB1 that were localized in the periovular schistosomotic granuloma were phosphorylated. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that secretion of SmHMGB1 is regulated by phosphorylation. Moreover, our results suggest that egg-secreted SmHMGB1 may represent a new egg antigen. Therefore, the identification of drugs that specifically target phosphorylation of SmHMGB1 might block its secretion and interfere with the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Activates HMGB1 Expression and Recruits RAGE into Lipid Rafts to Promote Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

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    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Chen, Wei-Wei; Lee, Che-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Chih-Jung; Huang, Mei-Zi; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastrointestinal disorders in the human population worldwide. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, mediates various inflammation functions. The interaction between HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) triggers nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression, which in turn stimulates the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-8, and enhances the inflammatory response. However, how H. pylori activates HMGB1 expression and mobilizes RAGE into cholesterol-rich microdomains in gastric epithelial cells to promote inflammation has not been explored. In this study, we found that HMGB1 and RAGE expression increased significantly in H. pylori-infected cells compared with -uninfected cells. Blocking HMGB1 by neutralizing antibody abrogated H. pylori-elicited RAGE, suggesting that RAGE expression follows HMGB1 production, and silenced RAGE-attenuated H. pylori-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 production. Furthermore, significantly more RAGE was present in detergent-resistant membranes extracted from H. pylori-infected cells than in those from -uninfected cells, indicating that H. pylori exploited cholesterol to induce the HMGB1 signaling pathway. These results indicate that HMGB1 plays a crucial role in H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric epithelial cells, which may be valuable in developing treatments for H. pylori-associated diseases.

  7. The potential role of HMGB1 release in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

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    Shirong Cao

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a DNA-binding nuclear protein, has been implicated as an endogenous danger signal in the pathogenesis of infection diseases. However, the potential role and source of HMGB1 in the peritoneal dialysis (PD effluence of patients with peritonitis are unknown. First, to evaluate HMDB1 levels in peritoneal dialysis effluence (PDE, a total of 61 PD patients were enrolled in this study, including 42 patients with peritonitis and 19 without peritonitis. Demographic characteristics, symptoms, physical examination findings and laboratory parameters were recorded. HMGB1 levels in PDE were determined by Western blot and ELISA. The concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in PDE were quantified by ELISA. By animal model, inhibition of HMGB1 with glycyrrhizin was performed to determine the effects of HMGB1 in LPS-induced mice peritonitis. In vitro, a human peritoneal mesothelial cell line (HMrSV5 was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, HMGB1 extracellular content in the culture media and intracellular distribution in various cellular fractions were analyzed by Western blot or immunofluorescence. The results showed that the levels of HMGB1 in PDE were higher in patients with peritonitis than those in controls, and gradually declined during the period of effective antibiotic treatments. Furthermore, the levels of HMGB1 in PDE were positively correlated with white blood cells (WBCs count, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. However, pretreatment with glycyrrhizin attenuated LPS-induced acute peritoneal inflammation and dysfunction in mice. In cultured HMrSV5 cells, LPS actively induced HMGB1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation and release in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, cytosolic HMGB1 was located in lysosomes and secreted via a lysosome-mediated secretory pathway following LPS stimulation. Our study demonstrates that elevated HMGB1 levels in PDE during PD-related peritonitis, at least partially, from peritoneal mesothelial cells

  8. Autoantibodies to high mobility group box 1 in patients with Incomplete and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, F.; De Leeuw, K.; Horst, G.; Maas, F.; Beijeren, D.V.; Bijzet, J.; Heeringa, P.; Limburg, P.C.; Westra, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) is involved in the pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). However, the role of autoantibodies to HMGB1 is unclear. Therefore levels of anti-HMGB1 and their reactivity to HMGB1 BoxA and BoxB were examined in association with disease

  9. Role of the acidic tail of high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) in protein stability and DNA bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrano, Fabricio S; de Abreu da Silva, Isabel C; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Fantappié, Marcelo R; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group box (HMGB) proteins are abundant nonhistone proteins found in all eukaryotic nuclei and are capable of binding/bending DNA. The human HMGB1 is composed of two binding motifs, known as Boxes A and B, are L-shaped alpha-helix structures, followed by a random-coil acidic tail that consists of 30 Asp and Glu residues. This work aimed at evaluating the role of the acidic tail of human HMGB1 in protein stability and DNA interactions. For this purpose, we cloned, expressed and purified HMGB1 and its tailless form, HMGB1ΔC, in E. coli strain. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) experiments clearly showed an increase in protein stability promoted by the acidic tail under different conditions, such as the presence of the chemical denaturant guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn.HCl), high temperature and low pH. Folding intermediates found at low pH for both proteins were denatured only in the presence of chemical denaturant, thus showing a relatively high stability. The acidic tail did not alter the DNA-binding properties of the protein, although it enhanced the DNA bending capability from 76° (HMGB1ΔC) to 91° (HMGB1), as measured using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique. A model of DNA bending in vivo was proposed, which might help to explain the interaction of HMGB1 with DNA and other proteins, i.e., histones, and the role of that protein in chromatin remodeling.

  10. HMGB1/anti-HMGB1 antibodies define a molecular signature of early stages of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Isorders (HAND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Poirier-Beaudouin, Béatrice; Durant, Jacques; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Saïdi, Héla; Seffer, Valérie; Ticchioni, Michel; Chanalet, Stephane; Carsenti, Helene; Harvey-Langton, Alexandra; Laffon, Muriel; Cottalorda, Jacqueline; Pradier, Christian; Dellamonica, Pierre; Vassallo, Matteo

    2017-02-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist in the post-HAART era, characterized by asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) and mild neurocognitive disorders (MND). High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone chromosomal protein widely expressed in the nucleus of all eukaryotic cells, including brain cells, which acts as a potent proinflammatory cytokine when actively secreted from immune cells. Recent reports suggested that HMGB1 acts on microglial cells to promote neuroinflammation. In this study, our aim was to determine whether HMGB1 is involved in HAND, but also to identify early new markers of neurological impairment in HIV-infected patients. CSF and serum were collected from 103 HIV-1-infected patients enrolled in Neuradapt, a prospective study of the prevalence of HAND in HIV-1 infected patients at Nice University Hospital. Stored fluids were assessed for immunological, virological, and brain metabolite parameters. In addition to HIV RNA and DNA measurements, expression of T-cell surface markers of activation (CD38 and HLA-DR) was analyzed on whole blood. Concentration of 27 cytokines and chemokines was measured using multiplex bead assays on serum and CSF. Concentration of HMGB1 and anti-HMGB1 IgG autoantibodies were also measured on the same samples. Changes in cerebral metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), Choline (Cho) and creatinine (Cr) were assessed by magnetic resonance microscopy (MRS). Clinical, virological and immunological characteristics were comparable between HAND (n = 30) and no HAND (n = 73) patients, except the absolute numbers of CD8(+) T cells, which were higher in patients with HAND. Among the 29 molecules tested, only 4 of them were significantly upregulated in the CSF from HAND patients as compared to healthy donors i.e. HMGB1, anti-HMGB1 IgG antibodies, IP-10 and MCP1. CSF HMGB1 levels were positively correlated with HIV-1 DNA in aviremic HAND patients, suggesting a positive impact of HMGB1 on HIV reservoirs

  11. Oxidation of HMGB1 causes attenuation of its pro-inflammatory activity and occurs during liver ischemia and reperfusion.

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    Anding Liu

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a nuclear transcription factor. Once HMGB1 is released by damaged cells or activated immune cells, it acts as danger molecule and triggers the inflammatory signaling cascade. Currently, evidence is accumulating that posttranslational modifications such as oxidation may modulate the pro-inflammatory potential of danger signals. We hypothesized that oxidation of HMGB1 may reduce its pro-inflammatory potential and could take place during prolonged ischemia and upon reperfusion.Liver grafts were cold preserved for 24 h and flushed with saline in hourly intervals to collect the effluent. Liver grafts, cold-preserved for 6 h, were transplanted into syngeneic recipients to obtain serum and liver samples 24 h after initiation of reperfusion. Addition of the effluent to a macrophage culture induced the synthesis of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6. The stimulatory activity of graft effluent was reduced after depletion of HMGB1 via immunoprecipitation. Oxidation of the effluent HMGB1 using H(2O(2 attenuated its stimulatory activity as well. Liver transplantation of cold preserved grafts caused HMGB1 translocation and release as determined by immunohistochemistry and ELISA-assay, respectively. Using Western blot with non-reducing conditions revealed the presence of oxidized HMGB1 in liver samples obtained after 12 h and in effluent samples after 16 h of cold preservation as well as in liver and serum samples obtained 24 h after reperfusion.These observations confirm that post-translational oxidation of HMGB1 attenuates its pro-inflammatory activity. Oxidation of HMGB1 as induced during prolonged ischemia and by reoxygenation during reperfusion in vivo might also attenuate its pro-inflammatory activity. Our findings also call for future studies to investigate the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of oxidized HMGB1 on the pro-inflammatory potential.

  12. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) IV mediates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and release of HMGB1 during lipopolysaccharide stimulation of macrophages.

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    Zhang, Xianghong; Wheeler, David; Tang, Ying; Guo, Lanping; Shapiro, Richard A; Ribar, Thomas J; Means, Anthony R; Billiar, Timothy R; Angus, Derek C; Rosengart, Matthew R

    2008-10-01

    The chromatin-binding factor high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) functions as a proinflammatory cytokine and late mediator of mortality in murine endotoxemia. Although serine phosphorylation of HMGB1 is necessary for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling before its cellular release, the protein kinases involved have not been identified. To investigate if calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) IV serine phosphorylates and mediates the release of HMGB1 from macrophages (Mphi) stimulated with LPS, RAW 264.7 cells or murine primary peritoneal Mphi were incubated with either STO609 (a CaMKIV kinase inhibitor), KN93 (a CaMKIV inhibitor), or we utilized cells from which CaMKIV was depleted by RNA interference (RNAi) before stimulation with LPS. We also compared the LPS response of primary Mphi isolated from CaMKIV(+/+) and CaMKIV(-/-) mice. In both cell types LPS induced activation and nuclear translocation of CaMKIV, which preceded HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. However, Mphi treated with KN93, STO609, or CaMKIV RNAi before LPS showed reduced nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HMGB1 and release of HMGB1 into the supernatant. Additionally, LPS induced serine phosphorylation of HMGB1, which correlated with an interaction between CaMKIV and HMGB1 and with CaMKIV phosphorylation of HMGB1 in vitro. In cells, both HMGB1 phosphorylation and interaction with CaMKIV were inhibited by STO609 or CaMKIV RNAi. Similarly, whereas CaMKIV(+/+) Mphi showed serine phosphorylation of HMGB1 in response to LPS, this phosphorylation was attenuated in CaMKIV(-/-) Mphi. Collectively, our results demonstrate that CaMKIV promotes the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HMGB1 and suggest that the process may be mediated through CaMKIV-dependent serine phosphorylation of HMGB1.

  13. Proinflammatory Effect of High Glucose Concentrations on HMrSV5 Cells via the Autocrine Effect of HMGB1.

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    Chu, Yuening; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Zhihuang; Lin, Yuli; He, Rui; Liu, Jun; Yang, Xuguang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Peritoneal fibrosis, in which inflammation and apoptosis play crucial pathogenic roles, is a severe complication associated with the treatment of kidney failure with peritoneal dialysis (PD) using a glucose-based dialysate. Mesothelial cells (MCs) take part in the inflammatory processes by producing various cytokines and chemokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). The apoptosis of MCs induced by high glucose levels also contributes to complications of PD. High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory factor that has repeatedly been proven to be related to the occurrence of peritoneal dysfunction. Aim: In this study, we aimed to explore the effect and underlying mechanism of endogenous HMGB1 in high-glucose-induced MC injury. Methods: The human peritoneal MC line, HMrSV5 was cultured in high-glucose medium and incubated with recombinant HMGB1. Cellular expression of HMGB1 was blocked using HMGB1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Apoptosis and production of inflammatory factors as well as the potential intermediary signaling pathways were examined. Results: The major findings of these analyses were: (1) MCs secreted HMGB1 from the nucleus during exposure to high glucose levels; HMGB1 acted in an autocrine fashion on the MCs to promote the production of MCP-1 and IL-8; (2) HMGB1 had little effect on high-glucose-induced apoptosis of the MCs; and (3) HMGB1-mediated MCP-1 and IL-8 production depended on the activation of MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, endogenous HMGB1 plays an important role in the inflammatory reaction induced by high glucose on MCs via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, but it seems to have little effect on high-glucose-induced apoptosis.

  14. Proinflammatory Effect of High Glucose Concentrations on HMrSV5 Cells via the Autocrine Effect of HMGB1

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    Yuening Chu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peritoneal fibrosis, in which inflammation and apoptosis play crucial pathogenic roles, is a severe complication associated with the treatment of kidney failure with peritoneal dialysis (PD using a glucose-based dialysate. Mesothelial cells (MCs take part in the inflammatory processes by producing various cytokines and chemokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 and interleukin 8 (IL-8. The apoptosis of MCs induced by high glucose levels also contributes to complications of PD. High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1 is an inflammatory factor that has repeatedly been proven to be related to the occurrence of peritoneal dysfunction.Aim: In this study, we aimed to explore the effect and underlying mechanism of endogenous HMGB1 in high-glucose-induced MC injury.Methods: The human peritoneal MC line, HMrSV5 was cultured in high-glucose medium and incubated with recombinant HMGB1. Cellular expression of HMGB1 was blocked using HMGB1 small interfering RNA (siRNA. Apoptosis and production of inflammatory factors as well as the potential intermediary signaling pathways were examined.Results: The major findings of these analyses were: (1 MCs secreted HMGB1 from the nucleus during exposure to high glucose levels; HMGB1 acted in an autocrine fashion on the MCs to promote the production of MCP-1 and IL-8; (2 HMGB1 had little effect on high-glucose-induced apoptosis of the MCs; and (3 HMGB1-mediated MCP-1 and IL-8 production depended on the activation of MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, endogenous HMGB1 plays an important role in the inflammatory reaction induced by high glucose on MCs via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways, but it seems to have little effect on high-glucose-induced apoptosis.

  15. Genetic predisposition to ischaemic stroke byRAGEandHMGB1gene variants in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Linfa; Hu, Weidong; Wang, Mengxu; Li, Shengnan; Gu, Xuefeng; Tao, Hua; Zhao, Bin; Ma, Guoda; Li, Keshen

    2017-11-21

    Emerging evidence suggests that the multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) contribute to the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke (IS). The present study aimed to investigate the association of RAGE and HMGB1 variants with the risk of IS. A total of 1,034 patients and 1,015 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were genotyped to detect five genetic variants of the RAGE gene and four genetic variants of the HMGB1 gene using the Multiplex SNaPshot assay. We found that the rs2070600 variant of RAGE was associated with an increased risk of IS (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38, P = 0.043), whereas the rs2249825 variant of HMGB1 was associated with a decreased risk of IS (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98, P = 0.041). Further stratification by IS subtypes revealed that the presence of the TT genotype of the RAGE rs2070600 variant confers a higher risk of the large artery atherosclerosis subtype of IS (P = 0.036). Moreover, patients with the variant T allele of the RAGE rs2070600 variant presented with reduced serum soluble RAGE production. Patients carrying the variant G allele of the HMGB1 rs2249825 variant exhibited significantly lower infarct volumes than those with the major CC genotype. These clues may help in the development of optimal personalized therapeutic approaches for IS patients.

  16. Barrier protective effects of withaferin A in HMGB1-induced inflammatory responses in both cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonhwa [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hoon [Department of Herbal Medicinal Pharmacology, Daegu Haany University (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Sae-Kwang [Department of Anatomy and Histology, College of Oriental Medicine, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyoung-jin [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Shik [School of Life Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Taeg Kyu [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong-Sup, E-mail: baejs@knu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Withaferin A (WFA), an active compound from Withania somnifera, is widely researched for its anti-inflammatory, cardioactive and central nervous system effects. In this study, we first investigated the possible barrier protective effects of WFA against pro-inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in mice induced by high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the associated signaling pathways. The barrier protective activities of WFA were determined by measuring permeability, leukocytes adhesion and migration, and activation of pro-inflammatory proteins in HMGB1-activated HUVECs. We found that WFA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-mediated barrier disruption, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and adhesion/transendothelial migration of leukocytes to human endothelial cells. WFA also suppressed acetic acid-induced hyperpermeability and carboxymethylcellulose-induced leukocytes migration in vivo. Further studies revealed that WFA suppressed the production of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by HMGB1. Collectively, these results suggest that WFA protects vascular barrier integrity by inhibiting hyperpermeability, expression of CAMs, adhesion and migration of leukocytes, thereby endorsing its usefulness as a therapy for vascular inflammatory diseases. -- Highlights: ► Withaferin A inhibited LPS induced HMGB1 release. ► Withaferin A reduced HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated adhesion and migration of leukocytes. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated activation of NF-κB, IL-6 and TNF-α.

  17. Expression of RAGE and HMGB1 in thymic epithelial tumors, thymic hyperplasia and regular thymic morphology.

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    Bernhard Moser

    Full Text Available Recently, a role of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE in myasthenia gravis was described. RAGE and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 play key roles in autoimmunity and cancer. To test whether these molecules are involved in patients with thymic abnormalities we applied immunohistochemical analysis in 33 cases of thymic epithelial tumors, comprising 27 thymomas and 6 thymic carcinomas, and 21 nonneoplastic thymuses. Both molecules were detected in neoplastic epithelial cells: RAGE staining was most intense in WHO type B2 thymomas and thymic carcinomas (pB3>thymic carcinoma (p<0.001. Conversely, HMGB1 cytoplasmic staining intensities were as follows: A and AB (none, B1 (strong, B2 (moderate, B3 and thymic carcinoma (weak; (p<0.001. Fetal thymic tissue showed a distinct expression of RAGE and HMGB1 in subcapsular cortical epithelial cells which was found in 50% of myasthenic patients. Furthermore RAGE and HMGB1 were expressed in thymocytes, macrophages, Hassall's corpuscles, thymic medulla, and germinal center cells in myasthenic patients. Immunohistochemistry results were complemented by systemic measurements (immunosorbent assay: serum levels of soluble RAGE were significantly reduced in patients with epithelial tumors (p = 0.008; and in invasive tumors (p = 0.008. Whereas RAGE was equally reduced in thymic hyperplasia and epithelial tumors (p = 0.003, HMGB1 was only elevated in malignancies (p = 0.036. Results were most pronounced in thymic carcinomas. Thus, RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the (patho-physiology of thymus, as evidenced by differentiated thymic and systemic expression patterns that may act as diagnostic or therapeutic targets in autoimmune disease and cancer.

  18. Frontline Science: HMGB1 induces neutrophil dysfunction in experimental sepsis and in patients who survive septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Murielle; Tadié, Jean-Marc; Uhel, Fabrice; Gacouin, Arnaud; Piau, Caroline; Bone, Nathaniel; Le Tulzo, Yves; Abraham, Edward; Tarte, Karin; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is accompanied by the initial activation of proinflammatory pathways and long-lasting immunosuppression that appears to contribute to late-occurring mortality. Although high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is involved in many aspects of inflammation, its role in sepsis-induced immune suppression remains unclear. In this study, we examined HMGB1's contribution to neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity dysfunction and associated neutrophil-dependent bacterial clearance in mice subjected to sepsis and in patients who survive septic shock. Using a murine model of polymicrobial septic peritonitis, we demonstrated that treatment with anti-HMGB1 Ab significantly diminished sepsis-induced dysfunction of neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity. In a subsequent set of experiments, we found that blocking HMGB1 preserved the ability of neutrophils from patients recovering from septic shock to activate NADPH oxidase. Taken together, our data suggest that HMGB1 accumulation in the late phase of sepsis plays a specific role in the development of postsepsis immunosuppression and specifically affects neutrophil-dependent antibacterial defense mechanisms. Thus, blocking HMGB1 may be a promising therapeutic intervention to diminish the adverse effects of sepsis-induced immunosuppression. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. HMGB1 Contributes to the Expression of P-Glycoprotein in Mouse Epileptic Brain through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Xian-Jing; Yu, Nian; Xie, Yuan; Zhang, Kang; Wen, Fang; Liu, Hao; Di, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the seizure-induced P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression and the underlying mechanism. Kainic acid (KA)-induced mouse seizure model was used for in vivo experiments. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: normal saline control (NS) group, KA-induced epileptic seizure (EP) group, and EP group pretreated with HMGB1 (EP+HMGB1 group) or BoxA (HMGB1 antagonist, EP+BoxA group). Compared to the NS group, increased levels of HMGB1 and P-gp in the brain were observed in the EP group. Injection of HMGB1 before the induction of KA further increased the expression of P-gp while pre-treatment with BoxA abolished this up-regulation. Next, the regulatory role of HMGB1 and its potential involved signal pathways were investigated in mouse microvascular endothelial bEnd.3 cells in vitro. Cells were treated with HMGB1, HMGB1 plus lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS) [toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist], HMGB1 plus FPS-ZM1 [receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) inhibitor], HMGB1 plus SN50 [nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor], or vehicle. Treatment with HMGB1 increased the expression levels of P-gp, TLR4, RAGE and the activation of NF-κB in bEnd.3 cells. These effects were inhibited by the pre-treatment with either LPS-RS or FPS-ZM1, and were abolished by the pre-treatment of SN50 or a combination treatment of both LPS-RS and FPS-ZM1. Luciferase reporter assays showed that exogenous expression of NF-κB p65 increased the promoter activity of multidrug resistance 1a (P-gp-encoding gene) in endothelial cells. These data indicate that HMGB1 contributes to the overexpression of P-gp in mouse epileptic brain tissues via activation of TLR4/RAGE receptors and the downstream transcription factor NF-κB in brain microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:26485677

  20. HMGB1 Contributes to the Expression of P-Glycoprotein in Mouse Epileptic Brain through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products.

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    Yan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in the seizure-induced P-glycoprotein (P-gp overexpression and the underlying mechanism. Kainic acid (KA-induced mouse seizure model was used for in vivo experiments. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: normal saline control (NS group, KA-induced epileptic seizure (EP group, and EP group pretreated with HMGB1 (EP+HMGB1 group or BoxA (HMGB1 antagonist, EP+BoxA group. Compared to the NS group, increased levels of HMGB1 and P-gp in the brain were observed in the EP group. Injection of HMGB1 before the induction of KA further increased the expression of P-gp while pre-treatment with BoxA abolished this up-regulation. Next, the regulatory role of HMGB1 and its potential involved signal pathways were investigated in mouse microvascular endothelial bEnd.3 cells in vitro. Cells were treated with HMGB1, HMGB1 plus lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS [toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 antagonist], HMGB1 plus FPS-ZM1 [receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE inhibitor], HMGB1 plus SN50 [nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB inhibitor], or vehicle. Treatment with HMGB1 increased the expression levels of P-gp, TLR4, RAGE and the activation of NF-κB in bEnd.3 cells. These effects were inhibited by the pre-treatment with either LPS-RS or FPS-ZM1, and were abolished by the pre-treatment of SN50 or a combination treatment of both LPS-RS and FPS-ZM1. Luciferase reporter assays showed that exogenous expression of NF-κB p65 increased the promoter activity of multidrug resistance 1a (P-gp-encoding gene in endothelial cells. These data indicate that HMGB1 contributes to the overexpression of P-gp in mouse epileptic brain tissues via activation of TLR4/RAGE receptors and the downstream transcription factor NF-κB in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

  1. HMGB1 in ischemic and non-ischemic liver after selective warm ischemia/reperfusion in rat.

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    Liu, Anding; Dirsch, Olaf; Fang, Haoshu; Sun, Jian; Jin, Hao; Dong, Wei; Dahmen, Uta

    2011-05-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as an early mediator in inflammation and organ injury. Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury induces HMGB1 translocation and expression in ischemic areas. However, it is unknown whether selective warm liver I/R injury also induces the expression of HMGB1 in non-ischemic lobes. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that selective liver I/R injury also causes HMGB1 translocation and up-regulates its expression in non-ischemic liver areas. In the present study, selective I/R injury was induced by clamping the median and left lateral liver lobes for 90 min followed by 0.5, 6 and 24 h reperfusion. We used male inbred Lewis rats; six animals for each point in time and six animals for the normal control group. Selective hepatic I/R injury induced morphological changes not only in ischemic lobes but also in non-ischemic lobes. HMGB1 translocation and expression was increased in a time-dependent manner in the ischemic lobes, and increased in with delayed onset in the non-ischemic lobes. Serum HMGB1 levels were increased after reperfusion. Furthermore, liver I/R injury up-regulated the expression of HMGB1 receptors (Toll-like receptor 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products and pro-inflammatory cytokines (Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) in both ischemic lobes, however, the up-regulation of these cytokines was more prominent in the ischemic lobes. In conclusion, selective warm I/R induces a substantial "sympathetic/bystander" effect on the non-ischemic lobes in terms of HMGB1 translocation and local cytokine production.

  2. Generation of the Fluorescent HMGB1-GFP Fusion Protein in Insect Cells and Evaluation of its Immunogenicity in Two Mice Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvar, Ali; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Salahshourifar, Iman; Bolhassani, Azam

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a highly conserved protein present in the nuclei and cytoplasm of cells which has an important role as a mediator of inflammation in the extracellular environment. HMGB1 was identified as an innate adjuvant that induces immune responses against soluble antigens in vivo. Our goal is the generation of recombinant HMGB1-GFP fusion protein in insect cells for evaluation of immune responses in mouse model. In the current study, we used a baculovirus expression system for insect cells that was based on expression of HMGB1 with target gene (GFP), and purified the recombinant HMGB1- GFP fusion protein. We then demonstrated whether immunogenicity of GFP changes in the presence or absence of recombinant HMGB1 acting as an adjuvant in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Our data showed that HMGB1 had a major influence on antibody immune responses induced by GFP in both animal models. The groups receiving HMGB1-GFP fusion protein showed total IgG and IgG2a responses significantly higher than IgG1 in BALB/c mice. Indeed, a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response was observed with high intensity toward IgG2a. In contrast, C57BL/6 mice immunized by HMGB1-GFP protein elicited the same levels of IgG1 and IgG2a. However, the levels of IgG2a and total IgG against the recombinant GFP (rGFP) in C57BL/6 mice were lower than those in BALB/c mice. We concluded that fusion of HMGB1 with GFP was immunologically more effective than GFP alone. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Inhibition of HMGB1 reduces rat spinal cord astrocytic swelling and AQP4 expression after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation via TLR4 and NF-κB signaling in an IL-6-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Li, Man; Ma, Xun; Feng, Haoyu; Song, Junlai; Lv, Cong; He, Yajun

    2017-11-25

    Spinal cord astrocyte swelling is an important component to spinal cord edema and is associated with poor functional recovery as well as therapeutic resistance after spinal cord injury (SCI). High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a mediator of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system and plays a critical role after SCI. Given this, we sought to identify both the role and underlying mechanisms of HMGB1 in cellular swelling and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in cultured rat spinal cord astrocytes after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R). The post-natal day 1-2 Sprague-Dawley rat spinal cord astrocytes were cultured in vitro, and the OGD/R model was induced. We first investigated the effects of OGD/R on spinal cord astrocytic swelling and HMGB1 and AQP4 expression, as well as HMGB1 release. We then studied the effects of HMGB1 inhibition on cellular swelling, HMGB1 and AQP4 expression, and HMGB1 release. The roles of both toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in reducing cellular swelling resulting from HMGB1 inhibition in spinal cord astrocytes after OGD/R were studied. Intergroup data were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnett's test. The OGD/R increased spinal cord astrocytic swelling and HMGB1 and AQP4 expression, as well as HMGB1 release. Inhibition of HMGB1 using either HMGB1 shRNA or ethyl pyruvate resulted in reduced cellular volume, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling, and lysosome number and decreased upregulation of both HMGB1 and AQP4 in spinal cord astrocytes, as well as HMGB1 release. The HMGB1 effects on spinal cord astrocytic swelling and AQP4 upregulation after OGD/R were mediated-at least in part-via activation of TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), and NF-κB. These activation effects can be repressed by TLR4 inhibition using CLI-095 or C34, or by NF-κB inhibition using BAY 11

  4. Dengue virus infection mediates HMGB1 release from monocytes involving PCAF acetylase complex and induces vascular leakage in endothelial cells.

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    Siew Pei Ong

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein is released from cells as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in response to an injury or infection. During dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS, a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines are released, contributing to disease pathogenesis. In this study, the release of HMGB1 from human myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 and primary peripheral blood monocytes (PBM cells was examined during dengue virus (DV-infection. HMGB1 was shown to translocate from cell nuclei to the cytoplasm in both K562- and PBM-infected cells. The translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was shown to be mediated by the host cell p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF acetylase complex in K562 cells. In addition, DV capsid protein was observed to be the putative viral protein in actuating HMGB1 migration from the nucleus to cytoplasm through the involvement of PCAF acetylase. HMGB1 was released from DV-infected K562 cells into the extracellular milieu in a multiplicity of infection (M.O.I.-independent manner and its release can be inhibited by the addition of 1-5 mM of ethyl pyruvate (EP in a dose-dependent manner. Application of DV-infected K562 cell culture supernatants to primary endothelial cells induced vascular permeability. In contrast, supernatants from DV-infected K562 cells treated with EP or HMGB1 neutralizing antibody were observed to maintain the structural integrity of the vascular barrier.

  5. Stress sounds the alarmin: The role of the danger-associated molecular pattern HMGB1 in stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthew G; Weber, Michael D; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2015-08-01

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is an endogenous danger signal or alarmin that mediates activation of the innate immune response including chemotaxis and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. HMGB1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neuroinflammatory conditions including ischemia, traumatic brain injury, seizure and chronic ethanol use. In the present review, the unique structural and functional properties of HMGB1 will be explored including its affinity for multiple pattern recognition receptors (TLR2/TLR4), redox sensitivity and adjuvant-like properties. In light of recent evidence suggesting that HMGB1 may also mediate stress-induced sensitization of neuroinflammatory responses, mechanisms of HMGB1 action in neuroinflammatory priming are explored. A model of neuroinflammatory priming is developed wherein glucocorticoids induce synthesis and release of HMGB1 from microglia, which signals through TLR2/TLR4, thereby priming the NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose that if GCs reach a critical threshold as during a fight/flight response, they may thus function as an alarmin by inducing HMGB1, thereby preparing an organism's innate immune system (NLRP3 inflammasome priming) for subsequent immune challenges such as injury, trauma or infection, which are more likely to occur during a fight/flight response. In doing so, GCs may confer a significant survival advantage by enhancing the central innate immune and sickness response to immune challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Macrophage-derived HMGB1 as a Pain Mediator in the Early Stage of Acute Pancreatitis in Mice: Targeting RAGE and CXCL12/CXCR4 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Yuhei; Tsubota, Maho; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Terada, Yuka; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2017-07-28

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) activates the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and forms a heterocomplex with CXCL12 that strongly activates CXCR4, promoting inflammatory and pain signals. In the present study, we investigated the role of HMGB1 in pancreatic pain accompanying cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Abdominal referred hyperalgesia accompanying acute pancreatitis occurred within 1 h after 6 hourly injections of cerulein. The anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody or recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM), known to inactivate HMGB1, abolished the cerulein-induced referred hyperalgesia, but not pancreatitis itself. Plasma or pancreatic HMGB1 levels did not change, but macrophage infiltration into the pancreas occurred 1 h after cerulein treatment. Minocycline, a macrophage/microglia inhibitor, ethyl pyruvate that inhibits HMGB1 release from macrophages, or liposomal clodronate that depletes macrophages prevented the referred hyperalgesia, but not pancreatitis. Antagonists of RAGE or CXCR4, but not TLR4, strongly suppressed the cerulein-induced referred hyperalgesia, but not pancreatitis. Upregulation of RAGE, CXCR4 and CXCL12, but not TLR4, were detected in the pancreas 1 h after cerulein treatment. Our data suggest that HMGB1 regionally secreted by macrophages mediates pancreatic pain by targeting RAGE and CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the early stage of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Diagnostic value of HMGB1 immunostaining on cell blocks from residual liquid-based gynecologic cytology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Duan, Chao; He, Mian; Yang, Zheng; Chen, Guidong; Shi, Huijuan; Yang, Shicong; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2014-09-01

    Aberrant expression of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is associated with tumor development and progression. The current study was conducted to evaluate the significance of HMGB1 immunostaining on cell block (CB) preparations in the diagnosis of neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions of the cervix. The CBs were prepared from 157 residual liquid-based gynecologic cytology specimens which were collected from women whose cervical lesions had been confirmed by histopathology. The expression of HMGB1 and p16INK4A (p16) was visualized by immunocytochemistry on the CB preparations, and the association of their expression patterns was correlated with the severity of cervical lesions. HeLa cells were used as positive control. HMGB1 expression was observed in dysplastic and neoplastic cells and increased along with the progression of cervical neoplasia. The rates of positive staining for HMGB1 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (CIN-1), CIN-2, CIN-3, and invasive squamous cell carcinomas (ISCCs) were 69.4, 96.9, 100.0, and 100.0%, respectively. The differences between positive rates of patients with chronic cervicitis and various CINs as well as ISCCs were significant (P gynecologic cytology specimens is potentially valuable for the screening of cervical lesions in cases with questionable cytology. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. HMGB1 exacerbates experimental mouse colitis by enhancing innate lymphoid cells 3 inflammatory responses via promoted IL-23 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Li, Lingyun; Khan, Muhammad Noman; Shi, Lifeng; Wang, Zhongyan; Zheng, Fang; Gong, Feili; Fang, Min

    2016-11-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), as an endogenous inflammatory molecule, can promote inflammatory cytokines secretion by acting on TLR2/4 resulting in tissue damage. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report a novel role of HMGB1 in controlling the maintenance and function of intestine-resident group-3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) that are important innate effector cells implicated in mucosal homeostasis and IBD pathogenesis. We showed that mice treated with anti-HMGB1 Ab, or genetically deficient for TLR2 -/- or TLR4 -/- mice, displayed reduced intestinal inflammation. In these mice, the numbers of colonic ILC3s were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-17 and IL-22 that can be secreted by ILC3s were also decreased in the colon tissues. Furthermore, HMGB1 promoted DCs via TLR2/4 signaling to produce IL-23, activating ILC3s to produce IL-17 and IL-22. Our data thus indicated that the HMGB1-TLR2/4-DCs-IL-23 cascade pathway enhances the functions of ILC3s to produce IL-17 and IL-22, and this signal way might play a vital role in the development of IBD.

  9. p53/HMGB1 Complexes Regulate Autophagy and Apoptosis

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    Livesey, Kristen M.; Kang, Rui; Vernon, Philip; Buchser, William; Loughran, Patricia; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Lin; Manfredi, James J.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Li, Luyuan; Lotze, Michael T.; Tang, Daolin

    2012-01-01

    The balance between apoptosis (“programmed cell death”) and autophagy (“programmed cell survival”) is important in tumor development and response to therapy. Here we show that HMGB1 and p53 form a complex which regulates the balance between tumor cell death and survival. We demonstrate that knockout of p53 inHCT116 cells increases expression of cytosolic HMGB1 and induces autophagy. Conversely, knockout of HMGB1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts increases p53 cytosolic localization and decreases...

  10. HMGB1 mediates endogenous TLR2 activation and brain tumor regression.

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    James F Curtin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor that carries a 5-y survival rate of 5%. Attempts at eliciting a clinically relevant anti-GBM immune response in brain tumor patients have met with limited success, which is due to brain immune privilege, tumor immune evasion, and a paucity of dendritic cells (DCs within the central nervous system. Herein we uncovered a novel pathway for the activation of an effective anti-GBM immune response mediated by high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1, an alarmin protein released from dying tumor cells, which acts as an endogenous ligand for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 signaling on bone marrow-derived GBM-infiltrating DCs.Using a combined immunotherapy/conditional cytotoxic approach that utilizes adenoviral vectors (Ad expressing Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L and thymidine kinase (TK delivered into the tumor mass, we demonstrated that CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells were required for tumor regression and immunological memory. Increased numbers of bone marrow-derived, tumor-infiltrating myeloid DCs (mDCs were observed in response to the therapy. Infiltration of mDCs into the GBM, clonal expansion of antitumor T cells, and induction of an effective anti-GBM immune response were TLR2 dependent. We then proceeded to identify the endogenous ligand responsible for TLR2 signaling on tumor-infiltrating mDCs. We demonstrated that HMGB1 was released from dying tumor cells, in response to Ad-TK (+ gancyclovir [GCV] treatment. Increased levels of HMGB1 were also detected in the serum of tumor-bearing Ad-Flt3L/Ad-TK (+GCV-treated mice. Specific activation of TLR2 signaling was induced by supernatants from Ad-TK (+GCV-treated GBM cells; this activation was blocked by glycyrrhizin (a specific HMGB1 inhibitor or with antibodies to HMGB1. HMGB1 was also released from melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and glioma cells treated with radiation or temozolomide. Administration of either glycyrrhizin or anti-HMGB

  11. Interleukin-1 stimulates beta-cell necrosis and release of the immunological adjuvant HMGB1.

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    Sarah A Steer

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available There are at least two phases of beta-cell death during the development of autoimmune diabetes: an initiation event that results in the release of beta-cell-specific antigens, and a second, antigen-driven event in which beta-cell death is mediated by the actions of T lymphocytes. In this report, the mechanisms by which the macrophage-derived cytokine interleukin (IL-1 induces beta-cell death are examined. IL-1, known to inhibit glucose-induced insulin secretion by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and increased production of nitric oxide by beta-cells, also induces beta-cell death.To ascertain the mechanisms of cell death, the effects of IL-1 and known activators of apoptosis on beta-cell viability were examined. While IL-1 stimulates beta-cell DNA damage, this cytokine fails to activate caspase-3 or to induce phosphatidylserine (PS externalization; however, apoptosis inducers activate caspase-3 and the externalization of PS on beta-cells. In contrast, IL-1 stimulates the release of the immunological adjuvant high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1; a biochemical maker of necrosis in a nitric oxide-dependent manner, while apoptosis inducers fail to stimulate HMGB1 release. The release of HMGB1 by beta-cells treated with IL-1 is not sensitive to caspase-3 inhibition, while inhibition of this caspase attenuates beta-cell death in response to known inducers of apoptosis.These findings indicate that IL-1 induces beta-cell necrosis and support the hypothesis that macrophage-derived cytokines may participate in the initial stages of diabetes development by inducing beta-cell death by a mechanism that promotes antigen release (necrosis and islet inflammation (HMGB1 release.

  12. Interleukin-1 Stimulates beta-Cell Necrosis and Release of the Immunological Adjuvant HMGB1.

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    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are at least two phases of beta-cell death during the development of autoimmune diabetes: an initiation event that results in the release of beta-cell-specific antigens, and a second, antigen-driven event in which beta-cell death is mediated by the actions of T lymphocytes. In this report, the mechanisms by which the macrophage-derived cytokine interleukin (IL-1 induces beta-cell death are examined. IL-1, known to inhibit glucose-induced insulin secretion by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and increased production of nitric oxide by beta-cells, also induces beta-cell death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To ascertain the mechanisms of cell death, the effects of IL-1 and known activators of apoptosis on beta-cell viability were examined. While IL-1 stimulates beta-cell DNA damage, this cytokine fails to activate caspase-3 or to induce phosphatidylserine (PS externalization; however, apoptosis inducers activate caspase-3 and the externalization of PS on beta-cells. In contrast, IL-1 stimulates the release of the immunological adjuvant high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1; a biochemical maker of necrosis in a nitric oxide-dependent manner, while apoptosis inducers fail to stimulate HMGB1 release. The release of HMGB1 by beta-cells treated with IL-1 is not sensitive to caspase-3 inhibition, while inhibition of this caspase attenuates beta-cell death in response to known inducers of apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that IL-1 induces beta-cell necrosis and support the hypothesis that macrophage-derived cytokines may participate in the initial stages of diabetes development by inducing beta-cell death by a mechanism that promotes antigen release (necrosis and islet inflammation (HMGB1 release.

  13. Protocatechuic aldehyde ameliorates experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway

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    Zhang, Liang, E-mail: countryspring@sina.com; Ji, Yunxia, E-mail: 413499057@qq.com; Kang, Zechun, E-mail: davidjiangwl@163.com; Lv, Changjun, E-mail: Lucky_lcj@sina.com; Jiang, Wanglin, E-mail: jwl518@163.com

    2015-02-15

    An abnormal high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) activation and a decrease in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) play a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Protocatechuic aldehyde (PA) is a naturally occurring compound, which is extracted from the degradation of phenolic acids. However, whether PA has anti-fibrotic functions is unknown. In this study, the effects of PA on the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the apoptosis of human type I alveolar epithelial cells (AT I), on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PA treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells with a decrease in vimentin and HMGB, an increase of E-cadherin and RAGE, a reduction of HLF-1 proliferation with a decrease of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Apoptosis of AT I was attenuated with an increase of RAGE. PA ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats with a reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a lower FGF-2, PDGF, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression, whereas higher RAGE was found in BLM-instilled lungs. Through the decrease of HGMB1 and the regulation of RAGE, PA reversed the EMT, inhibited HLF-1 proliferation as well as reduced apoptosis in AT I, and prevented pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway. - Highlights: • PA prevents EMT, reduces the apoptosis of AT1 in vitro. • PA decreases proliferation of HLF-1, reduces PDGF and FGF expression in vitro. • PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  14. HMGB1-RAGE pathway drives peroxynitrite signaling-induced IBD-like inflammation in murine nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Varun Chandrashekaran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical studies found a strong association of colonic inflammation and Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD-like phenotype with NonAlcoholic Fatty liver Disease (NAFLD yet the mechanisms remain unknown. The present study identifies high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 as a key mediator of intestinal inflammation in NAFLD and outlines a detailed redox signaling mechanism for such a pathway. NAFLD mice showed liver damage and release of elevated HMGB1 in systemic circulation and increased intestinal tyrosine nitration that was dependent on NADPH oxidase. Intestines from NAFLD mice showed higher Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 activation and proinflammatory cytokine release, an outcome strongly dependent on the existence of NAFLD pathology and NADPH oxidase. Mechanistically intestinal epithelial cells showed the HMGB1 activation of TLR-4 was both NADPH oxidase and peroxynitrite dependent with the latter being formed by the activation of NADPH oxidase. Proinflammatory cytokine production was significantly blocked by the specific peroxynitrite scavenger phenyl boronic acid (FBA, AKT inhibition and NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin suggesting NADPH oxidase-dependent peroxynitrite is a key mediator in TLR-4 activation and cytokine release via an AKT dependent pathway. Studies to ascertain the mechanism of HMGB1-mediated NADPH oxidase activation showed a distinct role of Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE as the use of inhibitors targeted against RAGE or use of deformed HMGB1 protein prevented NADPH oxidase activation, peroxynitrite formation, TLR4 activation and finally cytokine release. Thus, in conclusion the present study identifies a novel role of HMGB1 mediated inflammatory pathway that is RAGE and redox signaling dependent and helps promote ectopic intestinal inflammation in NAFLD.

  15. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

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    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Pasheva, Evdokia, E-mail: eva@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  16. HMGB1 is associated with atherosclerotic plaque composition and burden in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

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    Martin Andrassy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The role of inflammation in atherosclerosis is widely appreciated. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, an injury-associated molecular pattern molecule acting as a mediator of inflammation, has recently been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we sought to investigate the association of plasma HMGB1 with coronary plaque composition in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD. DESIGN: HMGB1, high sensitive troponin T (hsTnT and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP were determined in 152 consecutive patients with suspected or known stable CAD who underwent clinically indicated 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA. Using CCTA, we assessed 1 coronary calcification, 2 non-calcified plaque burden and 3 the presence of vascular remodeling in areas of non-calcified plaques. RESULTS: Using univariate analysis, hsCRP, hsTnT and HMGB1 as well as age, and atherogenic risk factors were associated with non-calcified plaque burden (r = 0.21, p = 0.009; r = 0.48, p<0.001 and r = 0.34, p<0.001, respectively. By multivariate analysis, hsTnT and HMGB1 remained independent predictors of the non-calcified plaque burden (r = 0.48, p<0.01 and r = 0.34, p<0.001, respectively, whereas a non-significant trend was noticed for hs-CRP (r = 0.21, p = 0.07. By combining hsTnT and HMGB1, a high positive predictive value for the presence of non-calcified and remodeled plaque (96% and 77%, respectively was noted in patients within the upper tertiles for both biomarkers, which surpassed the positive predictive value of each marker separately. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to hs-TnT, a well-established cardiovascular risk marker, HMGB1 is independently associated with non-calcified plaque burden in patients with stable CAD, while the predictive value of hs-CRP is lower. Complementary value was observed for hs-TnT and HMGB1 for the prediction of complex coronary plaque.

  17. HMGB1 mediates IFN-γ-induced cell proliferation in MMC cells through regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4/p16 pathway.

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    Feng, Xiaojuan; Hao, Jun; Liu, Qingjuan; Yang, Lin; Lv, Xin; Zhang, Yujun; Xing, Lingling; Xu, Ning; Liu, Shuxia

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have revealed the elevated serum levels of High-mobility group box-1(HMGB1) and the interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced proliferation of renal mesangial cells in patients or experimental animals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, it is still not elucidated whether HMGB1 involves in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN) and mediates IFN-γ-induced mesangial cell proliferation. Therefore, in the present study we demonstrated HMGB1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the glomeruli of LN patients and BXSB mice. HMGB1 increased the proliferation index of mouse mesangial cells (MMC) that was accompanied with the up-regulation of cyclin D1, CDK4 and the down-regulation of p16, subsequently promoting the transition from the G0/G1 to S stage. Inhibition of HMGB1 by a specific short hairpin RNA vector prevented cyclin D1/CDK4/p16 up-regulation and attenuated IFN-γ-induced MMC cell proliferation and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA) expression. These findings indicate that HMGB1 mediates IFN-γ-induced cell proliferation in MMC cells through regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4/p16 pathway and promoting the cell cycle transition from G1 to S stage. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Reduced HMGB 1-Mediated Pathway and Oxidative Stress in Resveratrol-Treated Diabetic Mice: A Possible Mechanism of Cardioprotection of Resveratrol in Diabetes Mellitus

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    Han Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis and inflammation are intricately linked in diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM, and resveratrol has been shown to attenuate oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in several cell types or animal models. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB 1, a proinflammatory cytokine, has been reported to regulate fibrosis and inflammation in various organs. Then the present study aimed to reveal the expression of HMGB 1-mediated signaling pathway and oxidative stress in resveratrol-treated diabetic mice. The significant increase in serum HMGB 1 concentration in diabetic mice was attenuated by treatment with resveratrol. Similarly, western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of HMGB 1 protein in monocytes and heart tissues of diabetic mice, and resveratrol partly normalized the changes. In addition, resveratrol abrogated the increased expression of HMGB 1-mediated signaling pathway, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and inflammation in diabetic hearts. In conclusion, inhibition of HMGB 1-mediated signaling pathway and oxidative stress may contribute to resveratrol-induced anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in DCM.

  19. Reduced HMGB 1-Mediated Pathway and Oxidative Stress in Resveratrol-Treated Diabetic Mice: A Possible Mechanism of Cardioprotection of Resveratrol in Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Wu, Han; Sheng, Zhen-Qiang; Xie, Jun; Li, Ran; Chen, Liang; Li, Guan-Nan; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis and inflammation are intricately linked in diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), and resveratrol has been shown to attenuate oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in several cell types or animal models. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB 1), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been reported to regulate fibrosis and inflammation in various organs. Then the present study aimed to reveal the expression of HMGB 1-mediated signaling pathway and oxidative stress in resveratrol-treated diabetic mice. The significant increase in serum HMGB 1 concentration in diabetic mice was attenuated by treatment with resveratrol. Similarly, western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of HMGB 1 protein in monocytes and heart tissues of diabetic mice, and resveratrol partly normalized the changes. In addition, resveratrol abrogated the increased expression of HMGB 1-mediated signaling pathway, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and inflammation in diabetic hearts. In conclusion, inhibition of HMGB 1-mediated signaling pathway and oxidative stress may contribute to resveratrol-induced anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in DCM.

  20. Association between HMGB1 and COPD: A Systematic Review

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    Sebastiano Gangemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HMGB1 is an alarmin, a protein that warns and activates inflammation. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterised by a progressive airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. Current anti-inflammatory therapies are poorly effective in maintaining lung function and symptoms of COPD. This underlines the need for finding new molecular targets involved in disease pathogenesis in order to block pathology progression. This review aims to analyse latest advances on HMGB1 role, utilisation, and potential application in COPD. To this purpose we reviewed experimental studies that investigated this alarmin as marker as well as a potential treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This systematic review was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. In almost all the studies, it emerged that HMGB1 levels are augmented in smokers and in patients affected by COPD. It emerged that cigarette smoking, the most well-known causative factor of COPD, induces neutrophils death and necrosis. The necrosis of neutrophil cells leads to HMGB1 release, which recruits other neutrophils in a self-maintaining process. According to the results reported in the paper both inhibiting HMGB1 and its receptor (RAGE and blocking neutrophils necrosis (inducted by cigarette smoking could be the aim for further studies.

  1. Hemin Reduces HMGB1 Release by UVB in an AMPK/HO-1-dependent Pathway in Human Keratinocytes HaCaT Cells.

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    Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Young Min; Chang, Ki Churl

    2017-07-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays an important role as a pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates inflammation in various diseases. We hypothesized that hemin might reduce HMGB1 release through the induction of HO-1 in UVB-induced HaCaTs. The effects of hemin on the release of HMGB1 in UVB exposure were evaluated. The mechanisms were investigated using various signal inhibitors and small interfering RNA techniques. Treatment with hemin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in UVB-induced HaCaTs in a dose-dependent manner. HMGB1 release by UVB was significantly reduced by hemin, N-acetyl-cysteine and DPI (NADPH oxidase inhibitor). Hemin increased HO-1 induction followed by phosphorylation of AMPK in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Additionally, hemin significantly increased the NAD+/NADH ratio in HaCaTs. The inhibitory effects of UVB-induced HMGB1 release by hemin were significantly reversed not only with pharmacological inhibitors of AMPK (compound c) or HO-1 (ZnPPIX) but also through transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for AMPK or HO-1. Interestingly, hemin decreased phosphor-AMPK expression by HO-1 siRNA transfection, but it failed to induce HO-1 in AMPK siRNA-transfected cells, which suggested that HO-1 was involved in AMPK activation by hemin in HaCaT. Moreover, recombinant HMGB1 induced Snail and inhibited E-Cadherin in HaCaTs, whereas hemin reversed those effects through rHMGB1. It is concluded that the increased activity of HO-1/AMPK and scavenging ROS are, at least in part, responsible for the inhibition of UVB-induced HMGB1 release in keratinocyte HaCaTs. Therefore, hemin may be a useful agent for preventing UVB-induced skin cancer. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HMGB1-Induced Cross Talk between PTEN and miRs 221/222 in Thyroid Cancer

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    S. Mardente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is an ubiquitous protein that plays different roles in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and extracellular space. It is an important DAMP molecule that allows communication between damaged or tumor cells and the immune system. Tumor cells exploit HMGB1’s ability to activate intracellular pathways that lead to cell growth and migration. Papillary thyroid cancer is a well-differentiated tumor and is often used to study relationships between cells and the inflammatory microenvironment as the latter is characterized by high levels of inflammatory cells and cytokines. Anaplastic thyroid cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers in which many microRNAs and tumor suppressor genes are deregulated. Upregulation of microRNAs 221 and 222 has been shown to induce the malignant phenotype in many human cancers via inhibition of PTEN expression. In this study we suggest that extracellular HMGB1 interaction with RAGE enhances expression of oncogenic cluster miR221/222 that in turn inhibits tumor suppressor gene PTEN in two cell lines derived from human thyroid anaplastic and papillary cancers. The newly identified pathway HMGB1/RAGE/miR221/222 may represent an effective way of tumor escape from immune surveillance that could be used to develop new therapeutic strategies against anaplastic tumors.

  3. Probenecid protects against transient focal cerebral ischemic injury by inhibiting HMGB1 release and attenuating AQP4 expression in mice.

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    Xiong, Xiao-Xing; Gu, Li-Juan; Shen, Jian; Kang, Xian-Hui; Zheng, Yue-Ying; Yue, Si-Biao; Zhu, Sheng-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Stroke results in inflammation, brain edema, and neuronal death. However, effective neuroprotectants are not available. Recent studies have shown that high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a proinflammatory cytokine, contributes to ischemic brain injury. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, is considered to play a pivotal role in ischemia-induced brain edema. More recently, studies have shown that pannexin 1 channels are involved in cerebral ischemic injury and the cellular inflammatory response. Here, we examined whether the pannexin 1 channel inhibitor probenecid could reduce focal ischemic brain injury by inhibiting cerebral inflammation and edema. Transient focal ischemia was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1 h. Infarct volume, neurological score and cerebral water content were evaluated 48 h after MCAO. Immunostaining, western blot analysis and ELISA were used to assess the effects of probenecid on the cellular inflammatory response, HMGB1 release and AQP4 expression. Administration of probenecid reduced infarct size, decreased cerebral water content, inhibited neuronal death, and reduced inflammation in the brain 48 h after stroke. In addition, HMGB1 release from neurons was significantly diminished and serum HMGB1 levels were substantially reduced following probenecid treatment. Moreover, AQP4 protein expression was downregulated in the cortical penumbra following post-stroke treatment with probenecid. These results suggest that probenecid, a powerful pannexin 1 channel inhibitor, protects against ischemic brain injury by inhibiting cerebral inflammation and edema.

  4. Histone H1 Differentially Inhibits DNA Bending by Reduced and Oxidized HMGB1 Protein.

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    Michal Štros

    Full Text Available HMGB1 protein and linker histone H1 have overlapping binding sites in the nucleosome. HMGB1 has been implicated in many DNA-dependent processes in chromatin involving binding of specific proteins, including transcription factors, to DNA sites pre-bent by HMGB1. HMGB1 can also act as an extracellular signaling molecule by promoting inflammation, tumor growth a metastasis. Many of the intra- and extracellular functions of HMGB1 depend on redox-sensitive cysteine residues of the protein. Here we report that mild oxidization of HMGB1 (and much less mutation of cysteines involved in disulphide bond formation can severely compromise the functioning of the protein as a DNA chaperone by inhibiting its ability to unwind or bend DNA. Histone H1 (via the highly basic C-terminal domain significantly inhibits DNA bending by the full-length HMGB1, and the inhibition is further enhanced upon oxidization of HMGB1. Interestingly, DNA bending by HMGB1 lacking the acidic C-tail (HMGB1ΔC is much less affected by histone H1, but oxidization rendered DNA bending by HMGB1ΔC and HMGB1 equally prone for inhibition by histone H1. Possible consequences of histone H1-mediated inhibition of DNA bending by HMGB1 of different redox state for the functioning of chromatin are discussed.

  5. Resveratrol attenuates HMGB1 signaling and inflammation in house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis in mice.

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    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol abundantly found in red grape skin and is effective against antiaging and anti-inflammation associated with immune responses. In this study, we have investigated the effect of resveratrol on skin lesion, high mobility group box (HMGB)1 and inflammation pathway in an atopic dermatitis (AD) mouse model. AD-like lesion was induced by the application of house dust mite extract to the dorsal skin of NC/Nga mouse. After AD induction, resveratrol (20 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered daily for 2 weeks. We evaluated dermatitis severity, histopathological changes, serum levels of T helper (Th) cytokines (interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-4) and changes in protein expression by Western blotting for HMGB1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), toll like receptor (TLR)4, nuclear factor (NF)κB, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, IL-1β, IL-2Rα and other inflammatory markers in the skin of AD mice. Treatment of resveratrol inhibited the development of the AD-like skin lesions. Histological analysis showed that resveratrol inhibited hypertrophy, intracellular edema, mast cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment down-regulated HMGB1, RAGE, p-NFκB, p-PI3K, p-ERK1/2, COX2, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-2Rα, IFNγ and IL-4. Considering all these findings together, the HMGB1 pathway might be a potential therapeutic target in skin inflammation, and resveratrol treatment could have beneficial effects on AD by modulating the HMGB1 protein expression.

  6. Curcumin longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion improves the survival of endotoxemic mice by inhibiting nitric oxide-dependent HMGB1 release.

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    Ahn, Min Young; Hwang, Jung Seok; Lee, Su Bi; Ham, Sun Ah; Hur, Jinwoo; Kim, Jun Tae; Seo, Han Geuk

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a well-known damage-related alarmin that participates in cellular inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms leading to HMGB1 release in inflammatory conditions and the therapeutic agents that could prevent it remain poorly understood. This study attempted to examine whether the Curcumin longa herb, which is known to have anti-inflammatory property, can modulate cellular inflammatory responses by regulating HMGB1 release. The murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or a C. longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion (CLEN). The levels of released HMGB1, nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were analyzed in RAW264.7 macrophages. The effects of CLEN on survival of endotoxemic model mice, circulating HMGB1 levels, and tissue iNOS expression were also evaluated. We have shown that a nanoemulsion loaded with an extract from the C. longa rhizome regulates cellular inflammatory responses and LPS-induced systemic inflammation by suppressing the release of HMGB1 by macrophages. First, treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with the nanoemulsion significantly attenuated their LPS-induced release of HMGB1: this effect was mediated by inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, which in turn suppressed the NO production and iNOS expression of the cells. The nanoemulsion did not affect LPS-induced p38 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Second, intraperitoneal administration of the nanoemulsion improved the survival rate of LPS-injected endotoxemic mice. This associated with marked reductions in circulating HMGB1 levels and tissue iNOS expression. The present study shows for the first time the mechanism by which C. longa ameliorates sepsis, namely, by suppressing NO signaling and thereby inhibiting the release of the proinflammatory cytokine HMGB1. These observations suggest that identification of

  7. Curcumin longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion improves the survival of endotoxemic mice by inhibiting nitric oxide-dependent HMGB1 release

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    Min Young Ahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a well-known damage-related alarmin that participates in cellular inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms leading to HMGB1 release in inflammatory conditions and the therapeutic agents that could prevent it remain poorly understood. This study attempted to examine whether the Curcumin longa herb, which is known to have anti-inflammatory property, can modulate cellular inflammatory responses by regulating HMGB1 release. Methods The murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and/or a C. longa extract-loaded nanoemulsion (CLEN. The levels of released HMGB1, nitric oxide (NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS expression, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were analyzed in RAW264.7 macrophages. The effects of CLEN on survival of endotoxemic model mice, circulating HMGB1 levels, and tissue iNOS expression were also evaluated. Results We have shown that a nanoemulsion loaded with an extract from the C. longa rhizome regulates cellular inflammatory responses and LPS-induced systemic inflammation by suppressing the release of HMGB1 by macrophages. First, treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with the nanoemulsion significantly attenuated their LPS-induced release of HMGB1: this effect was mediated by inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, which in turn suppressed the NO production and iNOS expression of the cells. The nanoemulsion did not affect LPS-induced p38 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Second, intraperitoneal administration of the nanoemulsion improved the survival rate of LPS-injected endotoxemic mice. This associated with marked reductions in circulating HMGB1 levels and tissue iNOS expression. Discussion The present study shows for the first time the mechanism by which C. longa ameliorates sepsis, namely, by suppressing NO signaling and thereby inhibiting the release of the proinflammatory cytokine HMGB1

  8. High HMGB1 level is associated with poor outcome of septicemic melioidosis

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    Jaruek Charoensup

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: The level of HMGB1 in septic melioidosis patients can be used as a marker of late severe sepsis. Neutralizing antibody to HMGB1 may be used as an adjunct therapy to improve the outcome of melioidosis.

  9. Essential Role of X-Box Binding Protein-1 during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Podocytes.

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    Hassan, Hossam; Tian, Xuefei; Inoue, Kazunori; Chai, Nathan; Liu, Chang; Soda, Keita; Moeckel, Gilbert; Tufro, Alda; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Somlo, Stefan; Fedeles, Sorin; Ishibe, Shuta

    2016-04-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated epithelial cells that reside along the glomerular filtration barrier. Evidence suggests that after podocyte injury, endoplasmic reticulum stress response is activated, but the molecular mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. In a mouse model, we confirmed that podocyte injury induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and upregulated unfolded protein response pathways, which have been shown to mitigate damage by preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, simultaneous podocyte-specific genetic inactivation of X-box binding protein-1 (Xbp1), a transcription factor activated during endoplasmic reticulum stress and critically involved in the untranslated protein response, and Sec63, a heat shock protein-40 chaperone required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulted in progressive albuminuria, foot process effacement, and histology consistent with ESRD. Finally, loss of both Sec63 and Xbp1 induced apoptosis in podocytes, which associated with activation of the JNK pathway. Collectively, our results indicate that an intact Xbp1 pathway operating to mitigate stress in the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for the maintenance of a normal glomerular filtration barrier. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. The Y-Box Binding Protein 1 Suppresses Alzheimer's Disease Progression in Two Animal Models.

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    N V Bobkova

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is a member of the family of DNA- and RNA binding proteins. It is involved in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent events including cell proliferation and differentiation, stress response, and malignant cell transformation. Previously, YB-1 was detected in neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus, but its precise role in the brain remains undefined. Here we show that subchronic intranasal injections of recombinant YB-1, as well as its fragment YB-11-219, suppress impairment of spatial memory in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX mice with Alzheimer's type degeneration and improve learning in transgenic 5XFAD mice used as a model of cerebral amyloidosis. YB-1-treated OBX and 5XFAD mice showed a decreased level of brain β-amyloid. In OBX animals, an improved morphological state of neurons was revealed in the neocortex and hippocampus; in 5XFAD mice, a delay in amyloid plaque progression was observed. Intranasally administered YB-1 penetrated into the brain and could enter neurons. In vitro co-incubation of YB-1 with monomeric β-amyloid (1-42 inhibited formation of β-amyloid fibrils, as confirmed by electron microscopy. This suggests that YB-1 interaction with β-amyloid prevents formation of filaments that are responsible for neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Our data are the first evidence for a potential therapeutic benefit of YB-1 for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Significant association of TREM-1 with HMGB1, TLRs and RAGE in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in obese diabetic populations.

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    Subramanian, Saravanan; Pallati, Pradeep K; Sharma, Poonam; Agrawal, Devendra K; Nandipati, Kalyana C

    2017-01-01

    Activated cell surface and intracellular receptors lead to insulin resistance in obesity. Among these receptors, triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1, toll like receptors (TLRs), and receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) play a significant role in the induction of inflammatory response in innate immunity. TREM-1 potentially amplifies TLRs and RAGE synergistically with DNA-binding high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1). The objective of the study was to analyze the association between TREM-1/DAP12 and HMGB-1, RAGE and TLRs in obesity-induced insulin resistance. We examined the mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blotting and immunofluorescence for TREM-1, TREM-2, DAP-12, HMGB-1, RAGE, TLR-4 and TLR-2 in omentum, subcutaneous and liver biopsy tissues of obese diabetic (n=22) and non-diabetic subjects (n=24) and compared with the non-obese non-diabetic controls (n=5). There was a significantly increased expression of TREM-1, DAP-12, HMGB-1, RAGE, TLR-4 and TLR-2 and decreased expression of TREM-2 in the omentum, subcutaneous and liver biopsy of obese diabetic subjects compared to obese non-diabetics and the non-obese population. Overall, obese diabetic subjects had high expression of TREM-1 in association with HMGB1 (100% vs 58.3%, P=0.003), RAGE (77.3% vs 41.7%, P=0.045), TLR4 (100% vs 58.3%, P=0.003), and TLR2 (100% vs 50%, P=0.003) in liver biopsy samples in comparison to obese non-diabetic subjects. Obese diabetics have significantly increased TREM-1, HMGB1, RAGE, and TLRs compared to obese non-diabetics. Our findings suggest a potential pathophysiological role of TREM-1 in conjunction with HMGB1 and inflammatory cell receptors (RAGE, TLR-4 and TLR-2) in obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  12. Potential of the Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) Telmisartan, Irbesartan, and Candesartan for Inhibiting the HMGB1/RAGE Axis in Prevention and Acute Treatment of Stroke

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    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Ito, Takashi; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Miura, Naoki; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. The main cause of stroke is atherosclerosis, and the most common risk factor for atherosclerosis is hypertension. Therefore, antihypertensive treatments are recommended for the prevention of stroke. Three angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), telmisartan, irbesartan and candesartan, inhibit the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which is one of the pleiotropic effects of these drugs. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is the ligand of RAGE, and has been recently identified as a lethal mediator of severe sepsis. HMGB1 is an intracellular protein, which acts as an inflammatory cytokine when released into the extracellular milieu. Extracellular HMGB1 causes multiple organ failure and contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. This is the first review of the literature evaluating the potential of three ARBs for the HMGB1-RAGE axis on stroke therapy, including prevention and acute treatment. This review covers clinical and experimental studies conducted between 1976 and 2013. We propose that ARBs, which inhibit the HMGB1/RAGE axis, may offer a novel option for prevention and acute treatment of stroke. However, additional clinical studies are necessary to verify the efficacy of ARBs. PMID:24065095

  13. HMGB1-induced autophagy: a new pathway to maintain Treg function during chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

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    Cheng, Li-Sha; Li, Jing; Liu, Yun; Wang, Fu-Ping; Wang, Si-Qi; She, Wei-Min; Wu, Sheng-di; Qi, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Yong-Ping; Jiang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, as one of the well-known damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), is enriched in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and has a context-dependent role in autophagy, a highly conserved self-digestive process in response to environmental stress. Recent mouse studies indicate that autophagy is highly active in regulatory T (Treg)-cells. In the present study, we evaluated spontaneous and induced autophagy of peripheral Treg cells from 98 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), by measuring levels of lipidated form of microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3-II, marker for closed autophagosomes) and observing autophagic vacuoles (AV) with transmission electron microscope. No significant difference was found in spontaneous autophagy of either Treg or CD4(+) naive cells when comparing CHB patients with healthy subjects, apart from CHB-Treg showed significantly higher autophagic activity after activation by anti-CD3-CD28 beads. Besides, incubation of CHB-Treg cells with CHB-serum greatly maintained their autophagic behaviour, which could be significantly diminished by blocking HMGB1 with the neutralizing antibody. Further, we characterized time- and dose-dependent effects by recombinant HMGB1 protein on autophagy of CHB-Treg cells. We also documented a significant up-regulation of HMGB1 and its receptors [toll-like receptor (TLR4), receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE)] in both peripheral and intra-hepatic microenvironments of CHB patients. Moreover, the RAGE-extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) axis and rapamycin-sensitive components of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways were demonstrated in vitro to be involved in HMGB1-induced autophagy of Treg cells. Additionally, HMGB1-induced autophagy could maintain cell survival and functional stability of CHB-Treg cells. Our findings could open new perspectives in developing therapeutic strategies to activate specific anti

  14. Identification and Characterization of the Lamprey High-Mobility Group Box 1 Gene

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    Pang, Yue; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2012-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. We identified a homolog of HMGB1 in the Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica). The Lampetra japonica HMGB1 gene (Lj-HMGB1) has over 70% sequence identity with its homologs in jawed vertebrates. Despite the reasonably high sequence identity with other HMGB1 proteins, Lj-HMGB1 did not group together with these proteins in a phylogenetic analysis. We examined Lj-HMGB1 expression in lymphocyte-like cells, and the kidneys, heart, gills, and intestines of lampreys before and after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and concanavalin A (ConA). Lj-HMGB1 was initially expressed at a higher level in the heart, but after treatment with LPS and ConA only the gills demonstrated a significant up-regulation of expression. The recombinant Lj-HMGB1 (rLj-HMGB1) protein bound double-stranded DNA and induced the proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells to a similar extent as human HMGB1. We further revealed that Lj-HMGB1 was able to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pro-inflammatory mediator, in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. These results suggest that lampreys use HMGB1 to activate their innate immunity for the purpose of pathogen defense. PMID:22563397

  15. Identification and characterization of the lamprey high-mobility group box 1 gene.

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    Yue Pang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. We identified a homolog of HMGB1 in the Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica. The Lampetra japonica HMGB1 gene (Lj-HMGB1 has over 70% sequence identity with its homologs in jawed vertebrates. Despite the reasonably high sequence identity with other HMGB1 proteins, Lj-HMGB1 did not group together with these proteins in a phylogenetic analysis. We examined Lj-HMGB1 expression in lymphocyte-like cells, and the kidneys, heart, gills, and intestines of lampreys before and after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and concanavalin A (ConA. Lj-HMGB1 was initially expressed at a higher level in the heart, but after treatment with LPS and ConA only the gills demonstrated a significant up-regulation of expression. The recombinant Lj-HMGB1 (rLj-HMGB1 protein bound double-stranded DNA and induced the proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells to a similar extent as human HMGB1. We further revealed that Lj-HMGB1 was able to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory mediator, in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. These results suggest that lampreys use HMGB1 to activate their innate immunity for the purpose of pathogen defense.

  16. Association of anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibodies with higher disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

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    C S Syahidatulamali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by numerous autoantibodies. In this study, we investigated the presence of anti-chloride intracellular channel 2 (anti-CLIC2 and anti-high mobility group box 1 (anti-HMGB1 autoantibodies in SLE patients (n = 43 versus healthy controls ([HCs] n = 43, and their association with serological parameters (antinuclear antibody [ANA], anti-double-stranded DNA [anti-dsDNA], and C-reactive protein [CRP] and disease activity using Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI score (active or inactive. Settings and Design: Case–control study at Rheumatology Clinic of Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. Subjects and Methods: The sera of SLE patients and HCs were tested for the presence of anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibodies using human recombinant proteins and ELISA methodologies. Other serological parameters were evaluated according to routine procedures, and patients' demographic and clinical data were obtained. Statistical Analysis: Mann–Whitney U-test, Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Anti-CLIC2 autoantibody levels were significantly higher in SLE patients compared to HCs (P = 0.0035, whereas anti-HMGB1 autoantibody levels were not significantly elevated (P = 0.7702. Anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibody levels were not associated with ANA pattern, anti-dsDNA, and CRP. Interestingly, SLEDAI score (≥6 was associated with anti-CLIC2 (P = 0.0046 and with anti-HMGB1 (P = 0.0091 autoantibody levels. Conclusion: Our findings support the potential of using anti-CLIC2 autoantibodies as a novel biomarker for SLE patients. Both anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibody levels demonstrated potential in monitoring SLE disease activity.

  17. Association of anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibodies with higher disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahidatulamali, C S; Wan Syamimee, W G; Azwany, Y Nor; Wong, K K; Che Maraina, C H

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by numerous autoantibodies. In this study, we investigated the presence of anti-chloride intracellular channel 2 (anti-CLIC2) and anti-high mobility group box 1 (anti-HMGB1) autoantibodies in SLE patients (n = 43) versus healthy controls ([HCs] n = 43), and their association with serological parameters (antinuclear antibody [ANA], anti-double-stranded DNA [anti-dsDNA], and C-reactive protein [CRP]) and disease activity using Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score (active or inactive). Case-control study at Rheumatology Clinic of Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. The sera of SLE patients and HCs were tested for the presence of anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibodies using human recombinant proteins and ELISA methodologies. Other serological parameters were evaluated according to routine procedures, and patients' demographic and clinical data were obtained. Mann-Whitney U-test, Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Anti-CLIC2 autoantibody levels were significantly higher in SLE patients compared to HCs (P = 0.0035), whereas anti-HMGB1 autoantibody levels were not significantly elevated (P = 0.7702). Anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibody levels were not associated with ANA pattern, anti-dsDNA, and CRP. Interestingly, SLEDAI score (≥6) was associated with anti-CLIC2 (P = 0.0046) and with anti-HMGB1 (P = 0.0091) autoantibody levels. Our findings support the potential of using anti-CLIC2 autoantibodies as a novel biomarker for SLE patients. Both anti-CLIC2 and anti-HMGB1 autoantibody levels demonstrated potential in monitoring SLE disease activity.

  18. HMGB1 regulates P-glycoprotein expression in status epilepticus rat brains via the RAGE/NF-κB signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuan; Yu, Nian; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Kang; Ma, Hai-Yan; Di, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the brain is an important mechanism involved in drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an inflammatory cytokine, significantly increases following seizures and may be involved in upregulation of P-gp. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its downstream signaling components, receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), on P-gp expression in rat brains during status epilepticus (SE). Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was administered to rats prior to induction of SE by pilocarpine, to block transcription of the genes encoding HMGB1 and RAGE, respectively. An inhibitor of NF-κB, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid (PDTC), was utilized to inhibit activation of NF-κB. The expression levels of HMGB1, RAGE, phosphorylated-NF-κB p65 (p-p65) and P-gp were detected by western blotting. The relative mRNA expression levels of the genes encoding these proteins were measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the cellular localization of the proteins was determined by immunofluorescence. Pre-treatment with HMGB1 siRNA reduced the expression levels of RAGE, p-p65 and P-gp. PDTC reduced the expression levels of P-gp. These findings suggested that overexpression of P-gp during seizures may be regulated by HMGB1 via the RAGE/NF-κB signaling pathway, and may be a novel target for treating DRE. PMID:28627626

  19. HMGB1 – its role in tumor progression and anticancer therapy 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a wide spectrum of action. Its main receptors are RAGE and TLR found on the surface of immune system cells as well as endothelial cells. Although signaling pathways for both receptor groups are different, ultimately they both activate NFκB transcription factor which, in turn, activates genes encoding adhesion proteins, proinflammatory cytokines and proangiogenic factors. Inside cells, HMGB1 is found mainly in the cell nucleus, where it participates in replication, recombination, transcription and DNA repair processes. Following release into the extracellular space, HMGB1 becomes a proinflammatory cytokine which stimulates formation of new blood microvessels, enhances cell migration, activates the inflammatory condition and affects cell proliferation. HMGB1 protein also takes part in regeneration of damaged tissues and stimulates autophagy.HMGB1 plays a potential role in anticancer therapy. Increased amounts of HMGB1 in cancer cells and elevated levels in the bloodstream are noted among patients afflicted with various cancers. HMGB1 protects cells from apoptosis, as it affects telomere stability. HMGB1 also stimulates a number of proteins involved in proliferation of cancer cells and inhibits signals that control cell growth. Ability to arrest HMGB1 release from cells or to inhibit its activity appears to be a promising therapeutic approach. At present, several inhibitors of HMGB1 are known and can be used in anticancer therapy. 

  20. HMGB1 Promotes Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Enhancing Macrophage Inflammatory Response

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    Mudan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose. HMGB1, which may act as a proinflammatory mediator, has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; however, the precise mechanism of HMGB1 in the pathogenic process of SLE remains obscure. Method. The expression of HMGB1 was measured by ELISA and western blot. The ELISA was also applied to detect proinflammatory cytokines levels. Furthermore, nephritic pathology was evaluated by H&E staining of renal tissues. Results. In this study, we found that HMGB1 levels were significantly increased and correlated with SLE disease activity in both clinical patients and murine model. Furthermore, gain- and loss-of-function analysis showed that HMGB1 exacerbated the severity of SLE. Of note, the HMGB1 levels were found to be associated with the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in SLE patients. Further study demonstrated that increased HMGB1 expression deteriorated the severity of SLE via enhancing macrophage inflammatory response. Moreover, we found that receptor of advanced glycation end products played a critical role in HMGB1-mediated macrophage inflammatory response. Conclusion. These findings suggested that HMGB1 might be a risk factor for SLE, and manipulation of HMGB1 signaling might provide a therapeutic strategy for SLE.

  1. Cardiac nuclear high mobility group box 1 prevents the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Akira; Shishido, Tetsuro; Netsu, Shunsuke; Narumi, Taro; Kadowaki, Shinpei; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Abe, Jun-ichi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakao, Kazuwa; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2013-09-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an abundant and ubiquitous nuclear DNA-binding protein that has multiple functions dependent on its cellular location. HMGB1 binds to DNA, facilitating numerous nuclear functions including maintenance of genome stability, transcription, and repair. However, little is known about the effects of nuclear HMGB1 on cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The aim of this study was to examine whether nuclear HMGB1 plays a role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload. Analysis of human biopsy samples by immunohistochemistry showed decreased nuclear HMGB1 expression in failing hearts compared with normal hearts. Nuclear HMGB1 decreased in response to both endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulation in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, where nuclear HMGB1 was acetylated and translocated to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of nuclear HMGB1 attenuated ET-1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thoracic transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was performed in transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of HMGB1 (HMGB1-Tg) and wild-type (WT) mice. Cardiac hypertrophy after TAC was attenuated in HMGB1-Tg mice and the survival rate after TAC was higher in HMGB1-Tg mice than in WT mice. Induction of foetal cardiac genes was decreased in HMGB1-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Nuclear HMGB1 expression was preserved in HMGB1-Tg mice compared with WT mice and significantly attenuated DNA damage after TAC was attenuated in HMGB1-TG mice. These results suggest that the maintenance of stable nuclear HMGB1 levels prevents hypertrophy and heart failure by inhibiting DNA damage.

  2. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation attenuates microglial-induced inflammation by inhibiting the HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangrong; Wu, Shukai; Chen, Chunnuan; Xie, Baoyuan; Fang, Zhongning; Hu, Weipeng; Chen, Junyan; Fu, Huangde; He, Hefan

    2017-07-24

    Microglial activation and the subsequent inflammatory response in the central nervous system play important roles in secondary damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, an important mediator in late inflammatory responses, interacts with transmembrane receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate downstream signaling pathways, such as the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway, leading to a cascade amplification of inflammatory responses, which are related to neuronal damage after TBI. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA) is a commonly used clinical immunonutrient, which has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of ω-3 PUFA on HMGB1 expression and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway are not clear. The Feeney DM TBI model was adopted to induce brain injury in rats. Modified neurological severity scores, brain water content, and Nissl staining were employed to determine the neuroprotective effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Assessment of microglial activation in lesioned sites and protein markers for proinflammatory, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, and HMGB1 were used to evaluate neuroinflammatory responses and anti-inflammation effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis were used to detect HMGB1 nuclear translocation, secretion, and HMGB1-mediated activation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway to evaluate the effects of ω-3 PUFA supplementation and gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the development of the neuroinflammatory response after TBI. It was found that ω-3 PUFA supplementation inhibited TBI-induced microglial activation and expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ), reduced brain edema, decreased neuronal apoptosis, and improved neurological

  3. Association of HMGB1 polymorphisms with outcome in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Madsen, Hans O

    2008-01-01

    report of clinical implications of variation in the human HMGB1 gene. Two polymorphisms were determined as significant risk factors associated with early and late mortality, which may provide insight into the molecular background of SIRS and sepsis, suggesting a possible role for HMGB1 genetics in future...... decreased mortality, even when administration was delayed for 24 hours, providing a window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention if transferred into a clinical setting. Whether genetic variation in the human HMGB1 gene is associated with disease susceptibility is unknown. METHODS: We sequenced...... the HMGB1 gene in 239 prospectively monitored patients with SIRS admitted to an intensive care unit and we measured the corresponding HMGB1 serum concentrations. Blood donors served as control individuals. Outcome parameters according to different HMGB1 genotypes were compared. RESULTS: Homozygosity...

  4. HMGB1/anti-HMGB1 antibodies define a molecular signature of early stages of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Isorders (HAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Lise Gougeon

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: We report that brain injury in chronically HIV-infected patients on stable HAART is strongly associated with persistent CNS inflammation, which is correlated with increased levels of HMGB1 and anti-HMGB1 IgG in the CSF. Moreover, we identified circulating anti-HMGB1 IgG as a very early biomarker of neurological impairment in patients without HAND. These results might have important implication for the identification of patients who are at high risk of developing neurological disorders.

  5. MicroRNA-142-3p Inhibits Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Inflammation in Osteoarthritis by Targeting HMGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuqin; Guo, Yanqing; Wang, Chunyan; Yu, Hong; Yu, Xiuxiang; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by articular cartilage degradation and joint inflammation in which microRNAs are significantly involved. Previous studies have reported that miR-142-3p is a novel mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways, but whether miR-142-3p regulates OA remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of miR-142-3p in OA and the underlying molecular mechanism. We showed that miR-142-3p was significantly reduced in the articular cartilage tissues from experimental OA mice. The expression of miR-142-3p was also decreased in chondrocytes treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-142-3p significantly inhibited cell apoptosis, nuclear factor (NF)-kB, and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by LPS. Interestingly, bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an important inflammatory mediator of OA, was predicted as a target of miR-142-3p, which was validated by dual-luciferase reporter assay. The high expression of HMGB1 in chondrocytes induced by LPS was significantly inhibited by miR-142-3p overexpression. Furthermore, the restoration of HMGB1 markedly abrogated the effect of miR-142-3p. In OA mice, the overexpression of miR-142-3p by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer significantly inhibited HMGB1 expression, NF-kB signaling, and proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-142-3p significantly alleviated OA progression in OA mice in vivo. Taken together, our study suggests that miR-142-3p inhibits chondrocyte apoptosis and inflammation in OA by inhibiting the HMGB1-mediated NF-kB signaling pathway. The overexpression of miR-142-3p impedes the OA progression in mice in vivo indicating that miR-142-3p is a potential molecular target for OA treatment.

  6. Effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on the serum and liver HMGB1 expression in rats with acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sheng; Yang, Juan; Tang, Yingmei; Yang, Jinhui; Shao, Qinghua; Guo, Ling; Liu, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation on the expression of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in the serum and liver of rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into control group, ALF group and BMSCs group. ALF was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 900 mg/kg D-GalN and 10 μg/kg LPS. In BMSCs group, rats received BMSCs (1.0×10(7)) transplantation via the tail vein at 2 h after ALF induction. Intraperitoneal injection of 900 mg/kg D-GalN and 10 μg/kg LPS was able to induce ALF in rats. In ALF group, serum ALT and AST increased gradually over time. At 72 h, the serum ALT and AST in BMSCs group were significantly different from those in ALF group. HMGB1 expression in the serum and liver remained at a low level at any time point in control group, but increased significantly in ALF group and BMSCs group. The serum and liver HMGB1 expression increased progressively in ALF group, but reduced gradually in BMSCs group. Significant difference in serum and liver HMGB1 expression was observed between ALF group and BMSCs group at 24 h and 72 h. In addition, there was marked difference in the survival rate among three groups at 24 h (χ (2) =21.098, Pliver function and liver pathology in ALF rats and decrease the serum and liver HMGB1.

  7. Cutting edge: extracellular high mobility group box-1 protein is a proangiogenic cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitola, Stefania; Belleri, Mirella; Urbinati, Chiara; Coltrini, Daniela; Sparatore, Bianca; Pedrazzi, Marco; Melloni, Edon; Presta, Marco

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomal high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein acts as a proinflammatory cytokine when released in the extracellular environment by necrotic and inflammatory cells. In the present study, we show that HMGB1 exerts proangiogenic effects by inducing MAPK ERK1/2 activation, cell proliferation, and chemotaxis in endothelial cells of different origin. Accordingly, HMGB1 stimulates membrane ruffling and repair of a mechanically wounded endothelial cell monolayer and causes endothelial cell sprouting in a three-dimensional fibrin gel. In keeping with its in vitro properties, HMGB1 stimulates neovascularization when applied in vivo on the top of the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane whose blood vessels express the HMGB1 receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Accordingly, RAGE blockade by neutralizing Abs inhibits HMGB1-induced neovascularization in vivo and endothelial cell proliferation and membrane ruffling in vitro. Taken together, the data identify HMGB1/RAGE interaction as a potent proangiogenic stimulus.

  8. Microglial-derived miRNA let-7 and HMGB1 contribute to ethanol-induced neurotoxicity via TLR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Leon G; Zou, Jian; Crews, Fulton T

    2017-01-25

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is emerging as an important component of neurodegeneration. TLR7 senses viral RNA and certain endogenous miRNAs to initiate innate immune responses leading to neurodegeneration. Alcoholism is associated with hippocampal degeneration, with preclinical studies linking ethanol-induced neurodegeneration with central innate immune induction and TLR activation. The endogenous miRNA let-7b binds TLR7 to cause neurodegeneration. TLR7 and other immune markers were assessed in postmortem human hippocampal tissue that was obtained from the New South Wales Tissue Bank. Rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex (HEC) slice culture was used to assess specific effects of ethanol on TLR7, let-7b, and microvesicles. We report here that hippocampal tissue from postmortem human alcoholic brains shows increased expression of TLR7 and increased microglial activation. Using HEC slice culture, we found that ethanol induces TLR7 and let-7b expression. Ethanol caused TLR7-associated neuroimmune gene induction and initiated the release let-7b in microvesicles (MVs), enhancing TLR7-mediated neurotoxicity. Further, ethanol increased let-7b binding to the danger signaling molecule high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in MVs, while reducing let-7 binding to classical chaperone protein argonaute (Ago2). Flow cytometric analysis of MVs from HEC media and analysis of MVs from brain cell culture lines found that microglia were the primary source of let-7b and HMGB1-containing MVs. Our results identify that ethanol induces neuroimmune pathology involving the release of let-7b/HMGB1 complexes in microglia-derived microvesicles. This contributes to hippocampal neurodegeneration and may play a role in the pathology of alcoholism.

  9. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xufang, E-mail: xufang.zhang@student.qut.edu.au [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Jiang, Hongwei, E-mail: jianghw@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Gong, Qimei, E-mail: gongqmei@gmail.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Fan, Chen, E-mail: c3.fan@student.qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Huang, Yihua, E-mail: enu0701@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Ling, Junqi, E-mail: lingjq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  10. Elevated Serum Level of HMGB1 in Patients with the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Manganelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy problems are common in patients with rheumatic disease; indeed, autoimmune disorders and autoantibodies can affect pregnancy progress and lead to maternal complications. Recent studies have highlighted a close association between HMGB1, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. Thus, in this investigation, we analyzed serum levels of HMGB1, an alarmin which plays a pivotal role in inducing and enhancing immune cell function. Sera from 30 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (11 primary and 19 secondary APS, 35 subjects with pregnancy morbidity, and 30 healthy women were analysed for HMGB1 and its putative receptor RAGE (sRAGE by Western blot and for TNF-α by ELISA. Results revealed that APS patients showed significantly increased serum levels of HMGB1, sRAGE, and the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, as compared to healthy women. However, also, the pregnancy morbidity subjects showed significantly increased levels of HMGB1 and sRAGE as well as TNF-α compared to healthy women. Our findings suggest that in subjects with pregnancy morbidity, including obstetric APS, elevated levels of HMGB1/sRAGE may represent an alarm signal, indicating an increase of proinflammatory triggers. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of HMGB1/sRAGE as a possible tool to evaluate the risk stratification of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Binding of histone H1 to DNA is differentially modulated by redox state of HMGB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Polanská

    Full Text Available HMGB1 is an architectural protein in chromatin, acting also as a signaling molecule outside the cell. Recent reports from several laboratories provided evidence that a number of both the intracellular and extracellular functions of HMGB1 may depend on redox-sensitive cysteine residues of the protein. In this study we demonstrate that redox state of HMGB1 can significantly modulate the ability of the protein to bind and bend DNA, as well as to promote DNA end-joining. We also report a high affinity binding of histone H1 to hemicatenated DNA loops and DNA minicircles. Finally, we show that reduced HMGB1 can readily displace histone H1 from DNA, while oxidized HMGB1 has limited capacity for H1 displacement. Our results suggested a novel mechanism for the HMGB1-mediated modulation of histone H1 binding to DNA. Possible biological consequences of linker histones H1 replacement by HMGB1 for the functioning of chromatin are discussed.

  12. Expression and Effects of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoao Pang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the significance of high- mobility group box1 (HMGB1 and T-cell-mediated immunity and prognostic value in cervical cancer. HMGB1, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3, IL-2, and IL-10 protein expression was analyzed in 100 cervical tissue samples including cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and healthy control samples using immunohistochemistry. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag was immunoradiometrically measured in 32 serum samples from 37 cases of squamous cervical cancer. HMGB1 and SCC-Ag were then correlated to clinicopathological characteristics. HMGB1 expression tends to increase as cervical cancer progresses and it was found to be significantly correlated to FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis. These findings suggest that HMGB1 may be a useful prognostic indicator of cervical carcinoma. In addition, there were significant positive relationships between HMGB1 and FOXP3 or IL-10 expression (both p < 0.05. In contrast, HMGB1 and IL-2 expression was negatively correlated (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression may activate Tregs or facilitate Th2 polarization to promote immune evasion of cervical cancer. Elevated HMGB1 protein in cervical carcinoma samples was associated with a high recurrence of HPV infection in univariate analysis (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression and levels of SCC-Ag were directly correlated in SCC (p < 0.05. Thus, HMGB1 may be a useful biomarker for patient prognosis and cervical cancer prediction and treatment.

  13. Anti-HMGB1 Antibodies and Alpha-7 Agonists as Experimental Therapeutics as BW Countermeasures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tracey, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    .... We originally identified a cytokine role for HMGB1, a protein known previously as a transcription factor, and have since focused our efforts on studying the role of this mediator in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis...

  14. Effect of microRNA-129-5p targeting HMGB1-RAGE signaling pathway on revascularization in a collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin-Long; Li, Shu-Ya; Shang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed at exploring the effect of microRNA-129-5p (miR-129-5p) targeting high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1)-receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) signaling pathway on the revascularization in a collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) rat model. OX26-pGFAP-IL, an immunoliposome expressing miR-129-5p was constructed. The collagenase-induced ICH rat models were successfully established by 96 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, which were categorized into the sham group, ICH group, miR-129-5p group, negative control (NC) group, ethyl pyruvate (EP, an inhibitor of HMGB1) group and N-benzyl-4-chloro-N-cyclohe-xylbenzamide (FPS-ZM1, a RAGE receptor antagonist) group. The miR-129-5p expression in the brain tissue homogenate was detected using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and the protein expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used for the detection of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Microvessel density (MVD) was also detected. Compared to the sham group, the ICH, NC, EP and FPS-ZM1 groups had a decrease in miR-129-5p expressions, and an increase in the protein expressions of HMGB1, RAGE and VEGF and MVD. In comparison to the ICH, NC, EP and FPS-ZM1 groups the miR-129-5p group had an elevation in the miRNA-129-5p expressions. The miR-129-5p and EP groups had decreased HMGB1 protein expression and the miR-129-5p, EP and FPS-ZM1 groups had a reduced RAGE protein expression as compared to the ICH group. In comparison to the ICH group, the miR-129-5p, EP, FPS-ZM1 groups had a decline in the VEGF protein expression and MVD. Our study proved that up-regulation of miR-129-5p might suppress the HMGB1-RAGE signaling pathway to restrain the revascularization of rats with ICH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis plasmid-encoded protein pORF5 protects mitochondrial function by inducing mitophagy and increasing HMGB1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenbo; Li, Qun; Su, Shengmei; Bu, Jichang; Huang, Qiulin; Li, Zhongyu

    2017-12-29

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular pathogen, has various effective strategies to regulate host cell death signalling pathways that ensure completion of their growth cycle. Mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) is responsible for elimination of dysfunctional and impaired mitochondria, and this process plays a critical role in cell survival via restriction of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. However, the specific molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood. In the present study, we observed that pORF5 plasmid protein of C. trachomatis plays a crucial role in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Knockdown high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) by lentivirus suppressed pORF5-induced mitophagy and increased apoptosis, implying that pORF5 may participate in cell death signalling pathways via up-regulation of HMGB1. Thus, we concluded that up-regulation of HMGB1 is a pivotal event for C. trachomatis that manipulates mitophagy and apoptosis in order to establish a favourable environment supportive of Chlamydial growth, which should further promote our understanding of Chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The Y-Box Binding Protein 1 Suppresses Alzheimer’s Disease Progression in Two Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, N. V.; Lyabin, D. N.; Medvinskaya, N. I.; Samokhin, A. N.; Nekrasov, P. V.; Nesterova, I. V.; Aleksandrova, I. Y.; Tatarnikova, O. G.; Bobylev, A. G.; Vikhlyantsev, I. M.; Kukharsky, M. S.; Ustyugov, A. A.; Polyakov, D. N.; Eliseeva, I. A.; Kretov, D. A.; Guryanov, S. G.; Ovchinnikov, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a member of the family of DNA- and RNA binding proteins. It is involved in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent events including cell proliferation and differentiation, stress response, and malignant cell transformation. Previously, YB-1 was detected in neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus, but its precise role in the brain remains undefined. Here we show that subchronic intranasal injections of recombinant YB-1, as well as its fragment YB-11−219, suppress impairment of spatial memory in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice with Alzheimer’s type degeneration and improve learning in transgenic 5XFAD mice used as a model of cerebral amyloidosis. YB-1-treated OBX and 5XFAD mice showed a decreased level of brain β-amyloid. In OBX animals, an improved morphological state of neurons was revealed in the neocortex and hippocampus; in 5XFAD mice, a delay in amyloid plaque progression was observed. Intranasally administered YB-1 penetrated into the brain and could enter neurons. In vitro co-incubation of YB-1 with monomeric β-amyloid (1–42) inhibited formation of β-amyloid fibrils, as confirmed by electron microscopy. This suggests that YB-1 interaction with β-amyloid prevents formation of filaments that are responsible for neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Our data are the first evidence for a potential therapeutic benefit of YB-1 for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26394155

  17. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

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    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  18. Carbon monoxide from CORM-2 reduces HMGB1 release through regulation of IFN-β/JAK2/STAT-1/INOS/NO signaling but not COX-2 in TLR-activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoyi, Konstantin; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jang, Hwa Jin; Mun, Lidiya; Kim, Hye Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2010-12-01

    Reduction of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and NO levels may be important therapeutic strategy for treatment of sepsis. Recently, we found that carbon monoxide (CO) can reduce HMGB1 levels in septic animal models. Here, we tried to elucidate the molecular machinery of how CO inhibits HMGB1 release in toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated macrophages. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) specifically inhibited the expression of iNOS (NO), but not of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) (PGE₂) in RAW 264.7 cells activated either by peptidoglycan (TLR-2 agonist), polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (TLR-3 agonist), or LPS (TLR-4 agonist); this inhibition seemed to be mediated via the JAK2/STAT1 pathway. Treatment with neutralizing antibody to IFN-β, a JAK2 inhibitor (AG490), or a STAT1 inhibitor (fludarabine) selectively inhibited iNOS, but not COX-2 in this system. Moreover, deletion of STAT1 by siRNA also showed preferential inhibition of iNOS but not COX-2 in LPS-treated cells. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 reduced IFN-β production and phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT1 in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 failed to inhibit iNOS and HMGB1 levels in the presence of recombinant IFN-β and NO donor (NOC-18), respectively. Finally, plasma levels of HMGB1 and iNOS protein expression in lung tissues of cecal ligation and puncture-induced septic mice were decreased in the presence of CORM-2. Taken together, it is concluded that CO selectively inhibits iNOS over COX-2, at least through IFNβ/JAK2/STAT1 signals, and this regulation plays an important role in the CORM-2-mediated inhibitory effect on HMGB1 release in macrophages.

  19. The effect of physicochemical factors on the self-association of HMGB1: A surface plasmon resonance study.

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    Anggayasti, Wresti L; Mancera, Ricardo L; Bottomley, Steven; Helmerhorst, Erik

    2016-11-01

    HMGB1 triggers proinflammatory reactions by interacting extracellularly with various receptors. HMGB1 also acts in the nucleus by interacting with DNA and controlling DNA transcription, a process which involves its self-association. The self-association of HMGB1 was characterized using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). A dimer/tetramer binding model was developed that provided a good fit to the SPR sensorgrams and enabled the kinetics of self-association of different HMGB1 oligomers to be evaluated under a variety of physicochemical conditions. The formation of HMGB1 tetramers, and not dimers, was strongly influenced by ionic strength. HMGB1 self-association increased as the pH was decreased from 7.4 to 4.8 but was abolished at pH4.0, suggesting the involvement of acidic amino acids of HMGB1 in its self-association. HMGB1 dimers were found to predominate in the absence of zinc, but addition of zinc promoted the formation of HMGB1 tetramers. More reducing conditions favored dimerization but diminished tetramer formation. In contrast, oxidizing conditions favored tetramer formation. Physicochemical factors modulate the extent of self-association of HMGB1. We speculate that HMGB1 dimers may preferentially bind DNA, whereas HMGB1 tetramers may promote inflammatory responses by binding to RAGE and TLRs. The self-association of HMGB1, regulated by variations of physicochemical factors, may influence its roles in DNA rearrangement and regulation of pathophysiological diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional characterization of the ER stress induced X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp-1 in the porcine system

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    Jin Dong-Il

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR is an evolutionary conserved adaptive reaction for increasing cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress conditions. X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp1 is a key transcription factor of UPR that activates genes involved in protein folding, secretion, and degradation to restore ER function. The UPR induced by ER stress was extensively studied in diseases linked to protein misfolding and aggregations. However, in the porcine system, genes in the UPR pathway were not investigated. In this study, we isolated and characterized the porcine Xbp1 (pXbp1 gene in ER stress using porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF cells and porcine organs. ER stress was induced by the treatment of tunicamycin and cell viability was investigated by the MTT assay. For cloning and analyzing the expression pattern of pXbp1, RT-PCR analysis and Western blot were used. Knock-down of pXbp1 was performed by the siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Results We found that the pXbp1 mRNA was the subject of the IRE1α-mediated unconventional splicing by ER stress. Knock-down of pXbp1 enhanced ER stress-mediated cell death in PEF cells. In adult organs, pXbp1 mRNA and protein were expressed and the spliced forms were detected. Conclusions It was first found that the UPR mechanisms and the function of pXbp1 in the porcine system. These results indicate that pXbp1 plays an important role during the ER stress response like other animal systems and open a new opportunity for examining the UPR pathway in the porcine model system.

  1. Recent Developments in the Role of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; Westra, Johanna; Bijl, Marc

    2014-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an important molecule for several nuclear processes. Recently, HMGB1 has gained much attention as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several (auto)immune diseases, in particular, systemic lupus

  2. Mir-22-3p Inhibits Arterial Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration and Neointimal Hyperplasia by Targeting HMGB1 in Arteriosclerosis Obliterans

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    Shui-chuan Huang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aberrant vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation and migration contribute to the development of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis and post-angioplasty restenosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether miR-22-3p plays a role in regulating human artery vascular smooth muscle cell (HASMC function and neointima formation. Methods: Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH were used to detect miR-22-3p expression in human arteries. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 and EdU assays were performed to assess cell proliferation, and transwell and wound closure assays were performed to assess cell migration. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays were performed to identify the target genes of miR-22-3p. Finally, a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model was used to determine the role of miR-22-3p in neointima formation. Results: MiR-22-3p expression was downregulated in arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO arteries compared with normal arteries, as well as in platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB-stimulated HASMCs compared with control cells. MiR-22-3p overexpression had anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects and dual-luciferase assay showed that high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 is a direct target of miR-22-3p in HASMCs. Furthermore, miR-22-3p expression was negatively correlated with HMGB1 expression in ASO tissue specimens. Finally, LV-miR-22-3p-mediated miR-22-3p upregulation significantly suppressed neointimal hyperplasia specifically by reducing HMGB1 expression in vivo. Conclusions: Our results indicate that miR-22-3p is a key molecule in regulating HASMC proliferation and migration by targeting HMGB1 and that miR-22-3p and HMGB1 may be therapeutic targets in the treatment of human ASO.

  3. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

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    Salunya Tancharoen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide (LPS on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1. RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection.

  4. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

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    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection. PMID:25114379

  5. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP. PMID:25663762

  6. Levels of high-mobility group box-1 in gingival crevicular fluid in nonsmokers and smokers with chronic periodontitis

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    Yi-Chun Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a role in inflammatory disorders. Smoking is a well-established risk factor for periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of HMGB1 in the gingival crevicular fluid from periodontally healthy nonsmokers, chronic periodontitis nonsmokers, and chronic periodontitis smokers. Furthermore, the relationship between levels of HMGB1 and periodontal parameters was examined. Methods: Periodontal parameters of 17 nonsmokers with chronic periodontitis, nine smokers with chronic periodontitis, and nine periodontally healthy nonsmokers were examined. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected, and the levels of HMGB1 were analyzed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The median level of HMGB1 was statistically significantly higher in chronic periodontitis nonsmokers (37.5 ng/mL than in chronic periodontitis smokers (9.5 ng/mL and periodontally healthy nonsmokers (3.7 ng/mL. There was no significant difference in the levels of HMGB1 between chronic periodontitis smokers and periodontally healthy nonsmokers. Levels of HMGB1 were positively correlated with plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level of nonsmokers. However, no significant correlations were found between levels of HMGB1 and all periodontal parameters examined in chronic periodontitis smokers. Conclusion: Chronic periodontitis nonsmokers had elevated levels of HMGB1 in gingival crevicular fluid. Moreover, the levels of HMGB1 were correlated with severity of periodontitis. Chronic periodontitis smokers exhibited lower levels of HMGB1 than chronic periodontitis nonsmokers. Further research is needed for understanding the role of HMGB1 in smoking and pathogenesis of periodontitis. Keywords: gingival crevicular fluid, high-mobility group box-1, periodontitis, smoking

  7. HMGB1 protein does not mediate the inflammatory response in spontaneous spinal cord regeneration: a hint for CNS regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yingying; Gu, Yun; Huan, Youjuan; Wang, Yingjie; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2013-06-21

    Uncontrolled, excessive inflammation contributes to the secondary tissue damage of traumatic spinal cord, and HMGB1 is highlighted for initiation of a vicious self-propagating inflammatory circle by release from necrotic cells or immune cells. Several regenerative-competent vertebrates have evolved to circumvent the second damages during the spontaneous spinal cord regeneration with an unknown HMGB1 regulatory mechanism. By genomic surveys, we have revealed that two paralogs of HMGB1 are broadly retained from fish in the phylogeny. However, their spatial-temporal expression and effects, as shown in lowest amniote gecko, were tightly controlled in order that limited inflammation was produced in spontaneous regeneration. Two paralogs from gecko HMGB1 (gHMGB1) yielded distinct injury and infectious responses, with gHMGB1b significantly up-regulated in the injured cord. The intracellular gHMGB1b induced less release of inflammatory cytokines than gHMGB1a in macrophages, and the effects could be shifted by exchanging one amino acid in the inflammatory domain. Both intracellular proteins were able to mediate neuronal programmed apoptosis, which has been indicated to produce negligible inflammatory responses. In vivo studies demonstrated that the extracellular proteins could not trigger a cascade of the inflammatory cytokines in the injured spinal cord. Signal transduction analysis found that gHMGB1 proteins could not bind with cell surface receptors TLR2 and TLR4 to activate inflammatory signaling pathway. However, they were able to interact with the receptor for advanced glycation end products to potentiate oligodendrocyte migration by activation of both NFκB and Rac1/Cdc42 signaling. Our results reveal that HMGB1 does not mediate the inflammatory response in spontaneous spinal cord regeneration, but it promotes CNS regeneration.

  8. HMGB1 induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells via the RAGE-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

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    Luo, Ying [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Shu-Jun [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Yang, Jian [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Qiu, Yuan-Zhen [Department of Otolaryngology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Chen, Fang-Ping, E-mail: xychenfp@163.com [Department of Hematology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Mechanisms of inflammatory response induced by HMGB1 are incompletely understood. •We found that endoplasmic reticulum stress mediate the inflammatory response induced by HMGB1. •RAGE-mediated ERS pathways are involved in those processes. •We reported a new mechanism for HMGB1 induced inflammatory response. -- Abstract: The high mobility group 1B protein (HMGB1) mediates chronic inflammatory responses in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. The goal of our study was to identify the effects of HMGB1 on the RAGE-induced inflammatory response in endothelial cells and test the possible involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Our results showed that incubation of endothelial cells with HMGB1 (0.01–1 μg/ml) for 24 h induced a dose-dependent activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducers, as assessed by PERK and IRE1 protein expression. Moreover, HMGB1 also promoted nuclear translocation of ATF6. HMGB1-mediated ICAM-1 and P-selectin production was dramatically suppressed by PERK siRNA or IRE1 siRNA. However, non-targeting siRNA had no such effects. HMGB1-induced increases in ICAM-1 and P-selectin expression were also inhibited by a specific eIF2α inhibitor (salubrinal) and a specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Importantly, a blocking antibody specifically targeted against RAGE (anti-RAGE antibody) decreased ICAM-1, P-selectin and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecule (PERK, eIF2α, IRE1 and JNK) protein expression levels. Collectively, these novel findings suggest that HMGB1 promotes an inflammatory response by inducing the expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin via RAGE-mediated stimulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  9. Autoantibodies to box A of high mobility group box 1 in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Schaper, F; de Leeuw, K; Horst, G; Maas, F; Bootsma, H; Heeringa, P; Limburg, P C; Westra, J

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to nuclear structures are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), including autoantibodies to nuclear protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). HMGB1 consists of three separate domains: box A, box B and an acidic tail. Recombinant box A acts as a competitive antagonist for HMGB1 and might be an interesting treatment option in SLE. However, antibodies to box A might interfere. Therefore, levels of anti-box A were examined in SLE patients in association with disease activity and clinical parameters. Serum anti-box A was measured in 86 SLE patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Serum samples of 28 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were included as disease controls. Anti-HMGB1 and anti-box B levels were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay during quiescent disease [SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) ≤ 4, n = 47] and active disease (SLEDAI ≥ 5, n = 39). Anti-box A levels in active SLE patients were higher compared to quiescent patients, and were increased significantly compared to HC and disease controls. Anti-box A levels correlated positively with SLEDAI and anti-dsDNA levels and negatively with complement C3 levels. Increased levels of anti-box A antibodies were present in the majority of patients with nephritic (73%) and non-nephritic exacerbations (71%). Antibodies to the box A domain of HMGB1 might be an interesting new biomarker, as these had a high specificity for SLE and were associated with disease activity. Longitudinal studies should be performed to evaluate whether these antibodies perform better in predicting an exacerbation, especially non-nephritic exacerbations. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Escape of HIV-1-infected dendritic cells from TRAIL-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity during NK-DC cross-talk--a pivotal role of HMGB1.

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    Marie-Thérèse Melki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Early stages of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 infection are associated with local recruitment and activation of important effectors of innate immunity, i.e. natural killer (NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs capture HIV-1 through specific receptors and can disseminate the infection to lymphoid tissues following their migration, which is associated to a maturation process. This process is dependent on NK cells, whose role is to keep in check the quality and the quantity of DCs undergoing maturation. If DC maturation is inappropriate, NK cells will kill them ("editing process" at sites of tissue inflammation, thus optimizing the adaptive immunity. In the context of a viral infection, NK-dependent killing of infected-DCs is a crucial event required for early elimination of infected target cells. Here, we report that NK-mediated editing of iDCs is impaired if DCs are infected with HIV-1. We first addressed the question of the mechanisms involved in iDC editing, and we show that cognate NK-iDC interaction triggers apoptosis via the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 (DR4 pathway and not via the perforin pathway. Nevertheless, once infected with HIV-1, DC(HIV become resistant to NK-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. This resistance occurs despite normal amounts of TRAIL released by NK cells and comparable DR4 expression on DC(HIV. The escape of DC(HIV from NK killing is due to the upregulation of two anti-apoptotic molecules, the cellular-Flice like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (c-IAP2, induced by NK-DC(HIV cognate interaction. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, an alarmin and a key mediator of NK-DC cross-talk, was found to play a pivotal role in NK-dependent upregulation of c-FLIP and c-IAP2 in DC(HIV. Finally, we demonstrate that restoration of DC(HIV susceptibility to NK-induced TRAIL killing can be obtained either by silencing c-FLIP and c-IAP2 by specific

  11. Contribution of high-mobility group box-1 to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Koh, Hidefumi; Ueno, Hiroshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Ebina, Masahito; Yamada, Shingo; Funakoshi, Yosuke; Soejima, Junko; Moriyama, Kiyoshi; Kotani, Toru; Hashimoto, Satoru; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Abraham, Edward; Takeda, Junzo

    2006-08-15

    Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a macrophage-derived proinflammatory cytokine that can cause lung injury. This study tested the hypothesis that HMGB1 is released in intact lungs ventilated with large Vt. A second objective was to identify the source of HMGB1. A third objective was to examine the effects of blocking HMGB1 on the subsequent development of VILI. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained from rabbits mechanically ventilated for 4 h with a small (8 ml/kg) versus a large (30 ml/kg) Vt. BALF was also obtained from rabbits with intratracheal instillation of anti-HMGB1 antibody before the initiation of large Vt ventilation. The concentrations of HMGB1 in BALF were fivefold higher in the large than in the small Vt group. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence studies revealed expression of HMGB1 in the cytoplasm of macrophages and neutrophils in lungs ventilated with large Vt. Blocking HMGB1 improved oxygenation, limited microvascular permeability and neutrophil influx into the alveolar lumen, and decreased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in BALF. These observations suggest that HMGB1 could be one of the deteriorating factors in the development of VILI.

  12. High mobility group box 1 levels are not associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis but are reduced by glucocorticoids and statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Souza, Alexandre; De Leeuw, Karina; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Van Der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Nienhuis, Hans L.A.; Bijzet, Johan; Limburg, Pieter C.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone DNA binding protein that is passively released by dying cells or actively secreted by immunocompetent cells and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is one of its receptors. Higher levels of HMGB1 have been

  13. Potential role of high mobility group box 1 in viral infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haichao; Ward, Mary F; Fan, Xue-Gong; Sama, Andrew E; Li, Wei

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear protein, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is released passively by necrotic cells and actively by macrophages/monocytes in response to exogenous and endogenous inflammatory stimuli. After binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), HMGB1 activates macrophages/monocytes to express proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Pharmacological suppression of its activities or release is protective against lethal endotoxemia and sepsis, establishing HMGB1 as a critical mediator of lethal systemic inflammation. In light of observations that many viruses (e.g., West Nile virus, Salmon anemia virus) can induce passive HMGB1 release, we propose a potential pathogenic role of HMGB1 in viral infectious diseases.

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates acute lung injury induced by high mobility group box-1.

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    Yuxiao Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lung injury (ALI is considered to be the major cause of respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Clinical studies have found that in patients with sepsis and after hemorrhage, the elevated level of high mobility group box-1(HMGB-1 in their circulation is highly associated with ALI, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Extracellular HMGB-1 has cytokine-like properties and can bind to Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4, which was reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALI. The aim of this study was to determine whether HMGB-1 directly contributes to ALI and whether TLR4 signaling pathway is involved in this process. METHODS: Recombinant human HMGB-1 (rhHMGB-1 was used to induce ALI in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lung specimens were collected 2 h after HMGB-1 treatment. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, TLR4 protein, and TLR4 mRNA in lungs as well as pathological changes of lung tissue were assessed. In cell studies, the alveolar macrophage cell line, NR8383, was collected 24 h after rhHMGB-1 treatment and the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in cultured medium as well as TLR4 protein and mRNA levels in the cell were examined. TLR4-shRNA-lentivirus was used to inhibit TLR4 expression, and a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody was used to neutralize rhHMGB-1 both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: Features of lung injury and significant elevation of IL-1β and TNF-α levels were found in lungs of rhHMGB-1-treated animals. Cultured NR8383 cells were activated by rhHMGB-1 treatment and resulted in the release of IL-1β and TNF-α. TLR4 expression was greatly up-regulated by rhHMGB-1. Inhibition of TLR4 or neutralization of HMGB1 with a specific antibody also attenuated the inflammatory response induced by HMGB-1 both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSION: HMGB-1 can activate alveolar macrophages to produce proinflammatory cytokines and induce ALI through a mechanism that relies on TLR-4.

  15. Expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 in gingival tissues, GCF and PICF of periodontitis patients and peri-implantitis

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    Ping Xie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group chromosomal protein B1 (HMGB1 and N2 (HMGN2, two members of High mobility group (HMG family, play important role in inflammation. The purposes of this study were to investigate the expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 in periodontistis. The expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 mRNA in gingival tissues and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF in chronic periodontitis (CP, generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP patients and healthy subjects was detected by real-time PCR. The protein level of HMGB1 and HMGN2 in peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF, peri-implant crevicular fluid of peri-implantitis (PI-PICF and normal patients was determined by Western blotting. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and HMGB1 levels in GCF, PI-PICF and healthy-PICF samples from different groups were determined by ELISA. HMGN2 expression was increased in inflamed gingival tissues and GCF from CP and G-ApG groups compared to control group. HMGB1 expression was the highest in the gingival tissues and GCF from CP patients and was accompanied by increased concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 proinflammaory cytokines. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting that the expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 was increased in the gingival tissues and GCF in CP and G-AgP and the PICF in PICF. Our data suggest that HMGB1 may be a potential target for the therapy of periodontitis and PI.

  16. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein promotes osteoclast differentiation from CD68 positive mononuclear cells by regulating HMGB1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chunfeng; Luan, Luan; Ren, Chunfeng

    2018-01-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality. The circulating ox-LDL/LDL ratio is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. In this study, we found that the ox-LDL/LDL ratio was increased in AS patients. The levels of serum RANKL and HMGB1 were also elevated in AS patients, and the number of CD68+/RANK+ cells was increased in peripheral blood from AS patients. 0.03% ox-LDL in LDL, similar to the ox-LDL/LDL ratio in peripheral blood from AS patients, promoted cytoplasmic translocation and release of HMGB1 as well as RANK expression. Further investigation evidenced that ox-LDL-induced EGR1 expression contributed to the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 and CD68 assisted the secretion of HMGB1 from cytoplasm to extracellular matrix. Extracellular HMGB1 induced RANK expression in CD68+ mononuclear cells, forming osteoclast precursors that were differentiated to osteoclasts in response to RANKL. Taken together, these results suggested that the changes, including ox-LDL/LDL ratio, CD68+/RANK+ cells number, and the levels of RANKL and HMGB1 in AS patients, favored osteoclastogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The effect of HMGB1 on sub-toxic chlorpyrifos exposure-induced neuroinflammation in amygdala of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Dai, Hongmei; Deng, Yuanying; Zhang, Jie; Li, Ying; Zhou, Jun; Zhao, Mingyi; Zhao, Mengwen; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Yuxi; Wang, Peipei; Bing, Guoying; Zhao, Lingling

    2015-12-02

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF), one of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), is associated with developmental neurotoxicity. Inflammatory response is closely related with CPF-induced neurotoxicity. The present study aimed at exploring whether sub-toxic CPF exposure on neonatal rats results in neuroinflammation that mediated by HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in the amygdala. The neonatal rats were subcutaneously injected with 5mg/kg CPF for 4 consecutive days (postnatal day 11-14) with or without HMGB1 inhibitor, glycyrrhizin. We assessed the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines at 12, 24, and 72 h after CPF exposure. The role of HMGB1 on neuroinflammation in sub-toxic exposure during brain development was studied. CPF-treated neonatal rats exhibited a significant increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1, and a significant increase in the activation of NF-κB in the amygdala after CPF exposure. Inhibited HMGB1 reduced the release of IL-6 and TNF-α, and inhibited activation of NF-κB. Our findings indicate that CPF exposure on developmental brain might induce the activation of neuroinflammation mediated by HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB pathway in the amygdala. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1 and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

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    Oscar Rodríguez-Lima

    Full Text Available TATA-box binding protein (TBP is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1. Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5 and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene.

  19. The heme oxygenase-1 inducer THI-56 negatively regulates iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells and CLP-induced septic mice.

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    Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Hwa Jin; Tsoyi, Konstantin; Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1.

  20. MiR-34a Promotes Apoptosis and Inhibits Autophagy by Targeting HMGB1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Liru Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: MiR-34a is identified as a tumor suppressor gene and involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML development. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-34a in AML is unclear. Methods: The expression of miR-34a and HMGB1 in HL-60, THP-1 and HS-5 cells were detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. Lipofectamine 2000 was used to transfect with miR-34a mimics, miR-34a inhibitor, si-HMGB1, pcDNA 3.1-HMGB1, and corresponding controls. The apoptosis and autophagy of transfected AML cells were assessed by flow cytometry and western blot, respectively. Bioinformatics software and dual luciferase reporter assay were applied to predict and verify the target of miR-34a. The effects of miR-34a mimics or si-HMGB1 on chemotherapy-induced autophagy were further explored in HL-60 cells treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA along with lysosomal protease inhibitors E64d and pepstatin A. Results: MiR-34a was lower expressed and HMGB1 mRNA and proteins were both higher expressed in HL-60 and THP-1 cells compared with that in HS-5 cells. Higher expression levels of MiR-34 and lower expression levels of HMGB1 both significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited autophagy in HL-60 and THP-1 cells. Dual luciferase reporter system confirmed that HMGB1 was a potential target of miR-34a. Moreover, overexpression of HMGB1 dramatically reversed the promotion of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy mediated by higher expression level of miR-34a. Higher expression level of miR-34a and lower expression level of HMGB1 both inhibited chemotherapy-induced autophagy by stimulating the LC3 conversion. Conclusion: MiR-34a promoted cell apoptosis and inhibited autophagy by targeting HMGB1. Therefore, miR-34a may be a potential promising molecular target for AML therapy.

  1. High-mobility group box 1 inhibits gastric ulcer healing through Toll-like receptor 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1's ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1's effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses.

  2. High-mobility group box 1 inhibits gastric ulcer healing through Toll-like receptor 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

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    Yuji Nadatani

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1's ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1's effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses.

  3. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Inhibits Gastric Ulcer Healing through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1’s ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1’s effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses. PMID:24244627

  4. Structure and expression of MdFBCP1, encoding an F-box-containing protein 1, during Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) fruit ripening.

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    Han, Sang Eun; Seo, Young Sam; Heo, Seong; Kim, Daeil; Sung, Soon-Kee; Kim, Woo Taek

    2008-08-01

    From database comparisons of 1,117 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generated from ripened Fuji apple fruits, we identified ten ubiquitin (Ub)-related genes. RNA gel-blot analysis suggests that these Ub-related genes are induced by at least four distinct signaling pathways in fruits. In this study, we analyzed structure and expression of MdFBCP1, encoding an F-box-containing protein 1, in Fuji apples. MdFBCP1 transcript was predominantly expressed in the fully ripened climacteric fruits, in which serge of ethylene production occurred. The MdFBCP1 gene was also activated effectively in response to exogenous ethylene treatment, with the induction pattern being comparable to those of ACC oxidase and beta-cyanoalanine synthase. Thus, it seems likely that the expression of MdFBCP1 is closely associated with a climacteric ethylene production and ACC oxidase activity and, hence, MdFBCP1 may play a role in the ripening process of Fuji apple fruits. Yeast two hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays revealed that MdFBCP1 physically interacted with MdSkp1 and N-terminal F-box motif was essential for this interaction. These results suggest that MdFBCP1 indeed functions as an F-box-containing protein and participates in the formation of SCF complex, which acts as E3 Ub ligase. Genomic Southern blot analysis showed that MdFBCP1 exhibited different pattern of restriction enzyme digestion in three cultivars (Tsugaru, Golden Delicious and Fuji) that produce different amount of ethylene, suggesting that the MdFBCP1 gene is organized in a cultivar specific manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Ub degradation pathway may play an important role in the ripening of Fuji apple fruits.

  5. Functions of MutLα, Replication Protein A (RPA), and HMGB1 in 5′-Directed Mismatch Repair*

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    Genschel, Jochen; Modrich, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A purified system comprised of MutSα, MutLα, exonuclease 1 (Exo1), and replication protein A (RPA) (in the absence or presence of HMGB1) supports 5′-directed mismatch-provoked excision that terminates after mismatch removal. MutLα is not essential for this reaction but enhances excision termination, although the basis of this effect has been uncertain. One model attributes the primary termination function in this system to RPA, with MutLα functioning in a secondary capacity by suppressing Exo1 hydrolysis of mismatch-free DNA (Genschel, J., and Modrich, P. (2003) Mol. Cell 12, 1077–1086). A second invokes MutLα as the primary effector of excision termination (Zhang, Y., Yuan, F., Presnell, S. R., Tian, K., Gao, Y., Tomkinson, A. E., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2005) Cell 122, 693–705). In the latter model, RPA provides a secondary termination function, but together with HMGB1, also participates in earlier steps of the reaction. To distinguish between these models, we have reanalyzed the functions of MutLα, RPA, and HMGB1 in 5′-directed mismatch-provoked excision using purified components as well as mammalian cell extracts. Analysis of extracts derived from A2780/AD cells, which are devoid of MutLα but nevertheless support 5′-directed mismatch repair, has demonstrated that 5′-directed excision terminates normally in the absence of MutLα. Experiments using purified components confirm a primary role for RPA in terminating excision by MutSα-activated Exo1 but are inconsistent with direct participation of MutLα in this process. While HMGB1 attenuates excision by activated Exo1, this effect is distinct from that mediated by RPA. Assay of extracts derived from HMGB1+/+ and HMGB1−/− mouse embryo fibroblast cells indicates that HMGB1 is not essential for mismatch repair. PMID:19515846

  6. Urinary levels of high mobility group box-1 are associated with disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis.

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    Tian-Tian Ma

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, a kind of pro-inflammatory mediator, is associated with inflammatory conditions and tissue damage. Our previous study demonstrated that the circulating levels of HMGB1 correlated with disease activity of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. In the current study, we aimed to measure urinary levels of HMGB1 in AAV patients, correlated them to clinical activity index and analysed the immunohistochemical HMGB1 staining in kidney specimens.50 patients with AAV in active stage and 56 patients with AAV in remission were recruited. The urinary levels of HMGB1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, renal biopsy specimens from 27 patients with active AAV were randomly collected to evaluate the deposition of HMGB1.Urinary HMGB1 levels in AAV patients in active stage were significantly higher than those in AAV patients in remission and healthy controls (1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.38 [0.10-1.35] mg/μmolCr, P=0.001; 1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.48 [0.40-0.60] mg/μmolCr, P=0.000, respectively. Further analysis found that urinary levels of HMGB1 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.354, p=0.012, C-reactive protein (r=0.289, p=0.042, and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (r=0.350, p=0.013. Renal tissue of active AAV patients showed HMGB1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The percentage of HMGB1-negative nuclei in renal tissue of patients with active AAV was significantly higher than that in normal controls (60.6±20.2 % versus 2.7±0.6 %, p<0.01.Urinary levels of HMGB1 may be associated with the disease activity in AAV patients.

  7. Mitochondrial Translocation of High Mobility Group Box 1 Facilitates LIM Kinase 2-Mediated Programmed Necrotic Neuronal Death

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    Hyun, Hye-Won; Ko, Ah-Reum; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts a signaling molecule regulating a wide range of inflammatory responses in extracellular space. HMGB1 also stabilizes nucleosomal structure and facilitates gene transcription. Under pathophysiological conditions, nuclear HMGB1 is immediately transported to the cytoplasm through chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1). Recently, we have reported that up-regulation of LIM kinase 2 (LIMK2) expression induces HMGB1 export from neuronal nuclei during status epilepticus (SE)-induced programmed neuronal necrosis in the rat hippocampus. Thus, we investigated whether HMGB1 involves LIMK2-mediated programmed neuronal necrosis, but such role is not reported. In the present study, SE was induced by pilocarpine in rats that were intracerebroventricularly infused with saline, control siRNA, LIMK2 siRNA or leptomycin B (LMB, a CRM1 inhibitor) prior to SE induction. Thereafter, we performed Fluoro-Jade B staining, western blots and immunohistochemical studies. LIMK2 knockdown effectively attenuated SE-induced neuronal death and HMGB1 import into mitochondria accompanied by inhibiting nuclear HMGB1 release and abnormal mitochondrial elongation. LMB alleviated SE-induced neuronal death and nuclear HMGB1 release. However, LMB did not prevent mitochondrial elongation induced by SE, but inhibited the HMGB1 import into mitochondria. The efficacy of LMB was less effective to attenuate SE-induced neuronal death than that of LIMK2 siRNA. These findings indicate that nuclear HMGB1 release and the subsequent mitochondrial import may facilitate and deteriorate programmed necrotic neuronal deaths. The present data suggest that the nuclear HMGB1 release via CRM1 may be a potential therapeutic target for the programmed necrotic neuronal death induced by SE. PMID:27147971

  8. High mobility group box-1 and its clinical value in breast cancer

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    Sun S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shanping Sun,1,2 Wei Zhang,2 Zhaoqing Cui,2 Qi Chen,2 Panpan Xie,2 Changxin Zhou,2 Baoguo Liu,2 Xiangeng Peng,2 Yang Zhang21Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 is a factor regulating malignant tumorigenesis, proliferation, and metastasis, and is associated with poor clinical pathology in various human cancers. We investigated the differential concentrations of HMGB1 in tissues and sera, and their clinical value for diagnosis in patients with breast cancer, benign breast disease, and healthy individuals.Methods: HMGB1 levels in tumor tissues, adjacent normal tissues, and benign breast disease tissues was detected via immunohistochemistry. Serum HMGB1 was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 56 patients with breast cancer, 25 patients with benign breast disease, and 30 healthy control subjects. The clinicopathological features of the patients were compared. Tissues were evaluated histopathologically by pathologists.Results: HMGB1 levels in the tissues and sera of patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with benign breast disease or normal individuals. The 56 cancer patients were classified as having high tissue HMGB1 levels (n=41 or low tissue HMGB1 levels (n=15, but the corresponsive serum HMGB1 in these two groups was not significantly different. HMGB1 levels in breast cancer tissues significantly correlated with differentiation grade, lymphatic metastasis, and tumor-node-metastasis stage, but not patient age, tumor size, or HER-2/neu expression; no association between serum HMGB1 levels and these clinicopathological parameters was found. The sensitivity and specificity of tissue HMGB1 levels for the diagnosis of breast cancer were 73.21% and 84

  9. Escin Increases the Survival Rate of LPS-Induced Septic Mice Through Inhibition of HMGB1 Release from Macrophages

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    Yajun Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have described the effects of Escin on improving the survival rate of endotoxemic animals. The purpose of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms of this potentially beneficial treatment. Methods: First, the survival rate of endotoxemic mice was monitored for up to 2 weeks after Escin pretreatment, Escin post-treatment, or Escin post-treatment + rHMGB1. The effects of Escin on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 and HMGB1 in the serum of endotoxemic mice and LPS-induced macrophages were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1 in LPS-induced macrophages were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 was evaluated by ELISA in rHMGB1-induced macrophages. Finally, the protein levels and the activity of NF-κB in macrophages were checked by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Results: Both pretreatment and post-treatment with Escin could improve the survival rate of endotoxemic mice, while exogenous rHMGB1 reversed this effect. In addition, Escin decreased the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 and HMGB1 in endotoxemic mice and in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could also inhibit the mRNA levels and activity of HMGB1. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 could be suppressed in rHMGB1-induced macrophages by Escin. Finally, Escin could suppress the activation of NF-κB in LPS-induced macrophages. Conclusion: Escin could improve the survival of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. This effect maybe meditated by reducing the release of HMGB1, resulting in the suppression of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

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    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Ying; Yu, Peng; Tong, Rui; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Shuning; Yao, Kang; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, but the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which is increased in myocardium under pressure overload, may be involved in pressure overload-induced cardiac injury. The objectives of this study are to determine the role of HMGB1 in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction under pressure overload. Pressure overload was imposed on the heart of male wild-type mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC), while recombinant HMGB1, HMGB1 box A (a competitive antagonist of HMGB1) or PBS was injected into the LV wall. Moreover, cardiac myocytes were cultured and given sustained mechanical stress. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed after the operation and sections for histological analyses were generated from paraffin-embedded hearts. Relevant proteins and genes were detected. Cardiac HMGB1 expression was increased after TAC, which was accompanied by its translocation from nucleus to both cytoplasm and intercellular space. Exogenous HMGB1 aggravated TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction, as demonstrated by echocardiographic analyses, histological analyses and foetal cardiac genes detection. Nevertheless, the aforementioned pathological change induced by TAC could partially be reversed by HMGB1 inhibition. Consistent with the in vivo observations, mechanical stress evoked the release and synthesis of HMGB1 in cultured cardiac myocytes. This study indicates that the activated and up-regulated HMGB1 in myocardium, which might partially be derived from cardiac myocytes under pressure overload, may be of crucial importance in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Disrupts Metabolic Function with Cigarette Smoke Exposure in a Ceramide-Dependent Manner

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    Oliver J. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously found that cigarette smoke disrupts metabolic function, in part, by increasing muscle ceramide accrual. To further our understanding of this, we sought to determine the role of the cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, which is increased with smoke exposure, in smoke-induced muscle metabolic perturbations. To test this theory, we determined HMGB1 from lungs of human smokers, as well as from lung cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke. We also treated cells and mice directly with HMGB1, in the presence or absence of myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in ceramide biosynthesis. Outcomes included assessments of insulin resistance and muscle mitochondrial function. HMGB1 was significantly increased in both human lungs and rodent alveolar macrophages. Further testing revealed that HMGB1 treatment elicited a widespread increase in ceramide species and reduction in myotube mitochondrial respiration, an increase in reactive oxygen species, and reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis with myriocin was protective. In mice, by comparing treatments of HMGB1 injections with or without myriocin, we found that HMGB1 injections resulted in increased muscle ceramides, especially C16 and C24, which were necessary for reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration and compromised insulin and glucose tolerance. In conclusion, HMGB1 may be a necessary intermediate in the ceramide-dependent metabolic consequences of cigarette smoke exposure.

  12. Production and application of HMGB1 derived recombinant RAGE-antagonist peptide for anti-inflammatory therapy in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonyeong; Piao, Chunxian; Kim, Gyeungyun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Minhyung

    2018-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory lung disease caused by sepsis, infection, or ischemia-reperfusion. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) signaling pathway plays an important role in ALI. In this study, a novel RAGE-antagonist peptide (RAP) was produced as an inhibitor of the RAGE signaling pathway based on the RAGE-binding domain of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1). Recombinant RAP was over-expressed and purified using nickel-affinity chromatography. In lipopolysaccharide- or HMGB1-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, RAP reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). RAP decreased the levels of cell surface RAGE and inhibited the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). These results imply that RAP decreases RAGE-mediated NF-κB activation and subsequent inflammatory reaction. For in vivo evaluation, RAP was delivered to the lungs of ALI-model animals via intratracheal administration. As a result, RAGE was down-regulated in the lung tissues by pulmonary delivery of RAP. Consequently, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were also reduced in broncoalveolar lavage fluid and the lung tissues of RAP-treated animals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining indicated that inflammation was decreased in RAP-treated animals. Collectively, these results suggest that RAP may be a useful treatment for ALI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Higher plasma high-mobility group box 1 levels are associated with incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nin, J W M; Ferreira, I; Schalkwijk, C G

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the associations of plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes.......This study aimed to investigate the associations of plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes....

  14. Forkhead Box Protein 1 (FoxO1) Inhibits Accelerated β Cell Aging in Pancreas-specific SMAD7 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Chen, Congde; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Ting; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Shiota, Chiyo; Prasadan, Krishna; Dong, Henry; Gittes, George K

    2017-02-24

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of exocrine dysfunction on the development of diabetes remain largely unknown. Here we show that pancreatic depletion of SMAD7 resulted in age-dependent increases in β cell dysfunction with accelerated glucose intolerance, followed by overt diabetes. The accelerated β cell dysfunction and loss of proliferation capacity, two features of β cell aging, appeared to be non-cell-autonomous, secondary to the adjacent exocrine failure as a "bystander effect." Increased Forkhead box protein 1 (FoxO1) acetylation and nuclear retention was followed by progressive FoxO1 loss in β cells that marked the onset of diabetes. Moreover, forced FoxO1 expression in β cells prevented β cell dysfunction and loss in this model. Thus, we present a model of accelerated β cell aging that may be useful for studying the mechanisms underlying β cell failure in diabetes. Moreover, we provide evidence highlighting a critical role of FoxO1 in maintaining β cell identity in the context of SMAD7 failure. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Forkhead Box Protein 1 (FoxO1) Inhibits Accelerated β Cell Aging in Pancreas-specific SMAD7 Mutant Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Chen, Congde; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Ting; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Shiota, Chiyo; Prasadan, Krishna; Dong, Henry; Gittes, George K.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of exocrine dysfunction on the development of diabetes remain largely unknown. Here we show that pancreatic depletion of SMAD7 resulted in age-dependent increases in β cell dysfunction with accelerated glucose intolerance, followed by overt diabetes. The accelerated β cell dysfunction and loss of proliferation capacity, two features of β cell aging, appeared to be non-cell-autonomous, secondary to the adjacent exocrine failure as a “bystander effect.” Increased Forkhead box protein 1 (FoxO1) acetylation and nuclear retention was followed by progressive FoxO1 loss in β cells that marked the onset of diabetes. Moreover, forced FoxO1 expression in β cells prevented β cell dysfunction and loss in this model. Thus, we present a model of accelerated β cell aging that may be useful for studying the mechanisms underlying β cell failure in diabetes. Moreover, we provide evidence highlighting a critical role of FoxO1 in maintaining β cell identity in the context of SMAD7 failure. PMID:28057752

  16. Y-box Protein-1 Regulates the Expression of Collagen I in Hepatic Progenitor Cells via PDGFR-β/ERK/p90RSK Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Y-box protein-1 (YB-1 is a highly conserved transcription factor that is involved in multiple biological processes via transcriptional regulation of several genes, including p53, cyclin D1, and EGFR. YB-1 has been reported to be overexpressed in injured livers. This study aims to explore the functions of YB-1 in hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs. Herein, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-sequencing and RNA-sequencing assays identified that YB-1 participated in the biological adhesion process and ECM-receptor interactions in HPCs. Further study demonstrated that YB-1 modulated the expression of extracellular matrix components in HPCs. ChIP-sequencing assays established that PDGFR-β was a target gene of YB-1, and luciferase reporter assays confirmed that YB-1 negatively regulated PDGFR-β promoter activity in HPCs. In addition, PDGFR-β can regulate the expression of collagen I through ERK/p90RSK signalling, and disruption of the signalling pathway with a PDGFR-β inhibitor or ERK1/2 inhibitor abolished the regulatory effect of PDGFR-β on collagen I expression in HPCs. Conclusively, YB-1 can modulate the expression of collagen I in HPCs via direct binding to the PDGFR-β promoter, negatively regulating its expression. In addition, the ERK/p90RSK axis serves as the downstream signalling pathway of PDGFR-β.

  17. Brief Report: Endothelial-Specific X-Box Binding Protein 1 Deficiency Limits Tumor Necrosis Factor-Induced Leukocyte Recruitment and Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziogas, Athanasios; Muders, Michael H; Economopoulou, Matina; Sprott, David; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Siegert, Gabriele; Baretton, Gustavo B; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell activation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and associated leukocyte infiltration are hallmarks of vasculitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of the cellular stress-associated endothelial X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) transcription factor in TNF-induced endothelial cell inflammation and vasculitis. Mice with an endothelial cell-specific XBP-1 deficiency were used in a modified local Shwartzman reaction (LSR) model of TNF-induced small vessel vasculitis. To address the contribution of XBP-1 to the TNF-mediated inflammatory response in endothelial cells, we examined the activation of XBP-1 expression by TNF as well as the effect of XBP-1 knockdown in endothelial cells on TNF-induced signaling, proinflammatory gene expression, and leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. The active spliced form of XBP-1 in endothelial cells was triggered by TNF. In addition, endothelial XBP-1 contributed to the sustained TNF-triggered NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activation of proinflammatory molecules, which was associated with leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. In the LSR model, endothelial cell-specific XBP-1-deficient mice displayed significantly less vascular damage, accompanied by reduced perivascular neutrophil infiltration, as compared with wild-type mice. Endothelial XBP-1 is activated by TNF and regulates leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion in vitro as well as neutrophil infiltration and vascular damage in murine vasculitis. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Identification of Y-box binding protein 1 as a core regulator of MEK/ERK pathway-dependent gene signatures in colorectal cancer cells.

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    Karsten Jürchott

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional signatures are an indispensible source of correlative information on disease-related molecular alterations on a genome-wide level. Numerous candidate genes involved in disease and in factors of predictive, as well as of prognostic, value have been deduced from such molecular portraits, e.g. in cancer. However, mechanistic insights into the regulatory principles governing global transcriptional changes are lagging behind extensive compilations of deregulated genes. To identify regulators of transcriptome alterations, we used an integrated approach combining transcriptional profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines treated with inhibitors targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, computational prediction of regulatory elements in promoters of co-regulated genes, chromatin-based and functional cellular assays. We identified commonly co-regulated, proliferation-associated target genes that respond to the MAPK pathway. We recognized E2F and NFY transcription factor binding sites as prevalent motifs in those pathway-responsive genes and confirmed the predicted regulatory role of Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1 by reporter gene, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We also validated the MAPK-dependent gene signature in colorectal cancers and provided evidence for the association of YBX1 with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. This suggests that MEK/ERK-dependent, YBX1-regulated target genes are involved in executing malignant properties.

  19. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Protein Mediates the Regulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 in the Diabetic Retina and in Human Retinal Müller Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Jomar, Deema; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Alam, Kaiser; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M

    2017-01-01

    The expression of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) is upregulated in the diabetic retina. We hypothesized that the activation of STAT-3 is under the control of HMGB1. Retinas from 1-month-old diabetic rats and from normal rats intravitreally injected with HMGB1 and human retinal Müller glial cells (MIO-M1) stimulated with HMGB1 or high glucose were studied by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. We also studied the effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin (GA) on high-glucose-induced pSTAT-3 nuclear translocation and upregulation in Müller cells and on pSTAT-3 expression in the retinas of diabetic rats (n = 7-10 in each group). In addition, we studied the effect of STAT-3 inhibitor on the HMGB1-induced induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by Müller cells and human retinal microvascular endothelial cell (HRMEC) migration. Treatment of retinal Müller cells with recombinant HMGB1 induced nuclear translocation of pSTAT-3 but did not alter pSTAT-3 expression. High glucose induced a significant upregulation of HMGB1 and pSTAT-3 upregulation and nuclear translocation in retinal Müller cells. GA co-treatment normalized the high-glucose-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and pSTAT-3 upregulation and nuclear translocation in Müller cells. Intravitreal administration of HMGB1 in normal and diabetic rats upregulated pSTAT-3 expression in the retina. GA attenuated the diabetes-induced upregulation of pSTAT-3 in the retina. The STAT-3 inhibitor attenuated HMGB1-induced VEGF upregulation by Müller cells and HRMEC migration. The results suggest a role for HMGB1 in the modulation of STAT-3 expression in the diabetic retina. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ by Rosiglitazone Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Release of High Mobility Group Box 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Seok Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are shown to modulate the pathological status of sepsis by regulating the release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a well-known late proinflammatory mediator of sepsis. Ligand-activated PPARs markedly inhibited lipopolysaccharide- (LPS induced release of HMGB1 in RAW 264.7 cells. Among the ligands of PPAR, the effect of rosiglitazone, a specific ligand for PPARγ, was superior in the inhibition of HMGB1 release induced by LPS. This effect was observed in cells that received rosiglitazone before LPS or after LPS treatment, indicating that rosiglitazone is effective in both treatment and prevention. Ablation of PPARγ with small interfering RNA or GW9662-mediated inhibition of PPARγ abolished the effect of rosiglitazone on HMGB1 release. Furthermore, the overexpression of PPARγ markedly potentiated the inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on HMGB1 release. In addition, rosiglitazone inhibited LPS-induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 signal molecules, suggesting a possible mechanism by which rosiglitazone modulates HMGB1 release. Notably, the administration of rosiglitazone to mice improved survival rates in an LPS-induced animal model of endotoxemia, where reduced levels of circulating HMGB1 were demonstrated. Taken together, these results suggest that PPARs play an important role in the cellular response to inflammation by inhibiting HMGB1 release.

  1. Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Inhibition of the RAGE-HMGB1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangming Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of RAGE-HMGB1 signal pathway on remote ischemic postconditioning in mice with myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Methods. Mice model of MIRI was established and randomly divided into three groups: control group, ischemia reperfusion group, and remote ischemic postconditioning group. Infarction size was detected by Evans blue and TTC staining. Cardiac function was detected by echocardiography measurement. The protein levels of RAGE, HMGB1, P-AKT, and ERK1/2 were detected by Western blot 120 min following reperfusion. Results. RIPostC could decrease the infarct size and increase LVEF and FS compared with I/R group. Two hours after myocardial ischemia reperfusion, the levels of RAGE and HMGB1 were significantly decreased in RIPostC group compared with those in I/R group. The level of p-AKT was significantly higher in the RIPostC group than in the I/R group. LY294002 significantly attenuated RIPostC-increased levels of Akt phosphorylation. Conclusion. RIPostC may inhibit the expression of RAGE and HMGB1 and activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to extenuate ischemic reperfusion injury in mice. It could further suppress the oxidative stress, have antiapoptosis effect, and reduce inflammatory reaction, but this effect has certain timeliness.

  2. HMGB1 and Extracellular Histones Significantly Contribute to Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Failure in Acute Liver Failure

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    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure (ALF is the culmination of severe liver cell injury from a variety of causes. ALF occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death exceeds the hepatic regenerative capacity. ALF has a high mortality that is associated with multiple organ failure (MOF and sepsis; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Emerging evidence shows that ALF patients/animals have high concentrations of circulating HMGB1, which can contribute to multiple organ injuries and mediate gut bacterial translocation (BT. BT triggers/induces systemic inflammatory responses syndrome (SIRS, which can lead to MOF in ALF. Blockade of HMGB1 significantly decreases BT and improves hepatocyte regeneration in experimental acute fatal liver injury. Therefore, HMGB1 seems to be an important factor that links BT and systemic inflammation in ALF. ALF patients/animals also have high levels of circulating histones, which might be the major mediators of systemic inflammation in patients with ALF. Extracellular histones kill endothelial cells and elicit immunostimulatory effect to induce multiple organ injuries. Neutralization of histones can attenuate acute liver, lung, and brain injuries. In conclusion, HMGB1 and histones play a significant role in inducing systemic inflammation and MOF in ALF.

  3. Contrast Media-Induced Renal Inflammation Is Mediated Through HMGB1 and Its Receptors in Human Tubular Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Qing-Jie; Zuo, Xiao-Cong; Guo, Ren; Peng, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Jiang-Lin; Yin, Wen-Jun; Li, Dai-Yang

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of imaging diagnosis and interventional therapy, contrast media (CM) are widely used in clinics. However, contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is the third leading cause of hospital-acquired acute renal failure accounting for 10-12% of all causes of hospital-acquired renal failure. Recent study found that inflammation may participate in the pathogenesis of CIN, but the role of it remains unclear. HK-2 cells were treated with Iohexol, Urografin, and mannitol. Two types of CM increased the release of HMGB1 in cell supernatant accompanied by increased expression of TLR2 and CXCR4. Iohexol and Urografin also caused a significant increase in NF-κB followed by the release of IL-6 and MCP-1. To clarify the role of HMGB1, TLR2, and CXCR4, glycyrrhizin, anti-TLR2-IgG, and AMD3100 were used to inhibit HMGB1, TLR2, and CXCR4, respectively. Significant decrease in the expression of TLR2, CXCR4, nuclear NF-κB, and the release of IL-6 and MCP-1 were observed. These results indicate that TLR2 and CXCR4 signaling are involved in CM-induced HK-2 cell injury model in an HMGB1-dependent pathway, which may provide a new target for the prevention and the treatment of CIN.

  4. Urinary high-mobility group box-1 associates specifically with lupus nephritis class V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, N R; Blanco, I; Lee, I; Putterman, C; Caricchio, R

    2016-12-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). There is increased HMGB-1 expression in the kidneys and increased levels are observed in serum and urine of patients with LN. This study was performed to determine whether the increased urinary HMGB-1 was specific for active lupus or secondary to renal damage. Urine from 61 lupus patients (32 had active LN and 29 had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with no evidence of LN) and 14 control proteinuric patients (all with hypertension and eight also with diabetes) were included in this study. HMGB-1 was detected by Western blot. Urine protein was normalized to urine creatinine to account for volume of the specimen. Median normalized urine HMGB-1 levels were significantly elevated in LN patients compared to lupus patients without kidney disease (53.81 vs 9.46, p classes, with a significant difference between proliferative and membranous disease (33.4 vs 138.8, p = 0.003). Urine protein to urine creatinine ratio (P/C) correlated with urinary HMGB-1 (r = 0.52, p classes this was true only for membranous disease (r = 0.71, p = 0.022, proliferative, p = 0.63; mixed, p = 0.34). HMGB-1 is elevated in the urine of patients with active LN. Levels are associated with LN class, and higher levels of urinary HMGB-1 are seen in patients with class V when compared to both proliferative and mixed classes. Therefore, urinary HMGB-1 may be suggestive of membranous LN and warrants further evaluation in a large lupus cohort. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. High mobility group box 1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Statt, Sarah; Wu, Reen; Chang, Hao-Teng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Wang, Chien-Neng; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lee, Chen-Chen

    2016-01-07

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is implicated in bronchial remodeling and loss of lung function in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Previous studies showed the involvement of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in the pathology of chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, the role of HMGB1 in EMT of human airway epithelial cells is still unclear. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to show that HMGB1 treatment regulated EMT-related gene expression in human primary-airway epithelial cells. The top five upregulated genes were SNAI2, FGFBP1, VIM, SPARC (osteonectin), and SERPINE1, while the downregulated genes included OCLN, TJP1 (ZO-1), FZD7, CDH1 (E-cadherin), and LAMA5. We found that HMGB1 induced downregulation of E-cadherin and ZO-1, and upregulation of vimentin mRNA transcription and protein translation in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we observed that HMGB1 induced AKT phosphorylation, resulting in GSK3β inactivation, cytoplasmic accumulation, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin to induce EMT in human airway epithelial cells. Treatment with PI3K inhibitor (LY294006) and β-catenin shRNA reversed HMGB1-induced EMT. Moreover, HMGB1 induced expression of receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE), but not that of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or TLR4, and RAGE shRNA inhibited HMGB1-induced EMT in human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, we found that HMGB1 induced EMT through RAGE and the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  6. Porphyromonas Gingivalis Elevated High-Mobility Group Box 1 Levels After Myocardial Infarction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisuwantha, Rungtiwa; Shiheido, Yuka; Aoyama, Norio; Sato, Hiroki; Kure, Keitetsu; Laosrisin, Narongsak; Izumi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2017-10-21

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein released from necrotic cells, inducing inflammatory responses. Epidemiological studies suggested a possible association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Due to tissue damage and necrosis of cardiac cells following myocardial infarction (MI), HMGB1 is released, activating an inflammatory reaction. However, it remains unclear whether periodontitis is also involved in myocardial damage. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) after MI in mice.C57BL/6J wild type mice in post-MI were inoculated with P.g. in the infected group (P.g.-inoculated MI group) and with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) in the control group (PBS-injected MI group). Plasma samples and twelve tissue samples from mice hearts after MI were obtained. We determined the expression of HMGB1 by ELISA and immunohistochemistry.The level of HMGB1 protein in the P.g.-inoculated MI group was significantly higher than in the PBS-injected MI group on day 5, but not on day 14. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that HMGB1 was mainly expressed in cardiomyocytes, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells in the PBS-injected MI group, while HMGB1 was seen broadly in degenerated cardiomyocytes, extracellular fields, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells in the P.g.-inoculated MI group. A significant increase in the number of HMGB1 positive cells was observed in the P.g.-inoculated MI group compared to the PBS-injected MI group.Infection with P.g. after MI enhanced myocardial HMGB1 expression. There is a possible relationship between periodontitis and post-infarction myocardial inflammation through HMGB-1.

  7. FOXO3a Expression Regulated by ERK Signaling is Inversely Correlated With Y-Box Binding Protein-1 Expression in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Kenjiro; Shiota, Masaki; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Masaaki; Abe, Tatsuro; Kohashi, Kenichi; Yokomizo, Akira; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-02-01

    FOXO3a is a member of the forkhead O transcription factors. FOXO3a induces the factors that contribute to cell cycle arrest and is considered a tumor suppressor in several malignant tumors. Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is a multifunctional protein whose high expression is correlated with poor prognoses in various malignant tumors. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between FOXO3a and YB-1 to validate their functional roles in prostate cancer. Western blotting and cytotoxicity assays were conducted in prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, and 22Rv1 cells. We also evaluated the protein expressions of FOXO3a and YB-1 in human prostate cancer tissues, using radical prostatectomy specimens. Then, we investigated the correlations between protein expressions and clinicopathologic parameters. We found that both FOXO3a and YB-1 proteins were phosphorylated by ERK signaling, resulting in FOXO3a inactivation and YB-1 activation in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells. Inversely, inhibition of MEK or treatment with metformin activated FOXO3a through inactivation of ERK signaling and suppressed the viability of LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In immunohistochemical analysis, FOXO3a nuclear expression was inversely correlated with YB-1 nuclear expression (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, high FOXO3a nuclear expression was inversely correlated with a higher Gleason grade (P < 0.0001) and higher preoperative PSA (P = 0.0437). These results showed that in prostate cancer, FOXO3a, and YB-1 play inverse reciprocal roles as a tumor-suppressor gene and oncogene, respectively, through their master regulator ERK. Prostate 77:145-153, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Decreased cytoplasmic X-box binding protein-1 expression is associated with poor prognosis and overall survival in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Ting; Hsing, Ming-Tai; Yeh, Chung-Min; Chen, Chih-Jung; Yang, Jia-Sin; Yeh, Kun-Tu

    2018-01-02

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cancer of the oral cavity. In spite of advancements in surgical, chemoradiological and targeted therapies, these therapeutic strategies still have had little impact on survival rates. X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) is a potent transcription factor that is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, which itself is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress as a method to restore cellular homeostasis. The role XBP-1 plays in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has yet to be determined. In this study, we used molecular and immunohistochemical analyses to investigate the role of XBP-1 protein playing in the OSCC carcinogenesis. We used immunohistochemical analyses to investigate XBP-1 expression in 255 OSCC tissue specimens, as well as migration and invasion assays with XBP-1 siRNA transfection of oral cancer cell lines to confirm its role in OSCC. The XBP-1 immunostaining was dichotomized as low-level expression and high-level expression. We found that low-level cytoplasmic XBP-1expression was significantly correlated with larger tumor size (p=0.047), more advanced clinical stage (pCox regression analysis revealed that cytoplasmic XBP-1 expression was a prognostic factor for overall survival of patients with OSCC. We also found that inhibition of XBP-1 promoted OSCC cell migration and invasion. Our results suggest that XBP-1 expression may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of OSCC and that targeting XBP-1 may be a sound therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular decoy to the Y-box binding protein-1 suppresses the growth of breast and prostate cancer cells whilst sparing normal cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Law

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1 is an oncogenic transcription/translation factor that is activated by phosphorylation at S102 whereby it induces the expression of growth promoting genes such as EGFR and HER-2. We recently illustrated by an in vitro kinase assay that a novel peptide to YB-1 was highly phosphorylated by the serine/threonine p90 S6 kinases RSK-1 and RSK-2, and to a lesser degree PKCα and AKT. Herein, we sought to develop this decoy cell permeable peptide (CPP as a cancer therapeutic. This 9-mer was designed as an interference peptide that would prevent endogenous YB-1(S102 phosphorylation based on molecular docking. In cancer cells, the CPP blocked P-YB-1(S102 and down-regulated both HER-2 and EGFR transcript level and protein expression. Further, the CPP prevented YB-1 from binding to the EGFR promoter in a gel shift assay. Notably, the growth of breast (SUM149, MDA-MB-453, AU565 and prostate (PC3, LNCap cancer cells was inhibited by ∼90% with the CPP. Further, treatment with this peptide enhanced sensitivity and overcame resistance to trastuzumab in cells expressing amplified HER-2. By contrast, the CPP had no inhibitory effect on the growth of normal immortalized breast epithelial (184htert cells, primary breast epithelial cells, nor did it inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. These data collectively suggest that the CPP is a novel approach to suppressing the growth of cancer cells while sparing normal cells and thereby establishes a proof-of-concept that blocking YB-1 activation is a new course of cancer therapeutics.

  10. Identification of novel putative-binding proteins for cellular prion protein and a specific interaction with the STIP1 homology and U-Box-containing protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Ana Paula Lappas; Richter, Larissa Morato Luciani; Atherino, Mariana Campos; Beirão, Breno Castello Branco; Fávaro, Celso; Costa, Michele Dietrich Moura; Zanata, Silvio Marques; Malnic, Bettina; Mercadante, Adriana Frohlich

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases involve the conversion of the endogenous cellular prion protein, PrP(C), into a misfolded infectious isoform, PrP(Sc). Several functions have been attributed to PrP(C), and its role has also been investigated in the olfactory system. PrP(C) is expressed in both the olfactory bulb (OB) and olfactory epithelium (OE) and the nasal cavity is an important route of transmission of diseases caused by prions. Moreover, Prnp(-/-) mice showed impaired behavior in olfactory tests. Given the high PrP(C) expression in OE and its putative role in olfaction, we screened a mouse OE cDNA library to identify novel PrP(C)-binding partners. Ten different putative PrP(C) ligands were identified, which were involved in functions such as cellular proliferation and apoptosis, cytoskeleton and vesicle transport, ubiquitination of proteins, stress response, and other physiological processes. In vitro binding assays confirmed the interaction of PrP(C) with STIP1 homology and U-Box containing protein 1 (Stub1) and are reported here for the first time. Stub1 is a co-chaperone with ubiquitin E3-ligase activity, which is associated with neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Physiological and pathological implications of PrP(C)-Stub1 interaction are under investigation. The PrP(C)-binding proteins identified here are not exclusive to the OE, suggesting that these interactions may occur in other tissues and play general biological roles. These data corroborate the proposal that PrP(C) is part of a multiprotein complex that modulates several cellular functions and provide a platform for further studies on the physiological and pathological roles of prion protein.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis attenuates ATP-mediated inflammasome activation and HMGB1 release through expression of a nucleoside-diphosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Larry; Atanasova, Kalina R; Bui, Phuong Q; Lee, Jungnam; Hung, Shu-Chen; Yilmaz, Özlem; Ojcius, David M

    2015-05-01

    Many intracellular pathogens evade the innate immune response in order to survive and proliferate within infected cells. We show that Porphyromonas gingivalis, an intracellular opportunistic pathogen, uses a nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDK) homolog to inhibit innate immune responses due to stimulation by extracellular ATP, which acts as a danger signal that binds to P2X7 receptors and induces activation of an inflammasome and caspase-1. Thus, infection of gingival epithelial cells (GECs) with wild-type P. gingivalis results in inhibition of ATP-induced caspase-1 activation. However, ndk-deficient P. gingivalis is less effective than wild-type P. gingivalis in reducing ATP-mediated caspase-1 activation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, from infected GECs. Furthermore, P. gingivalis NDK modulates release of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a pro-inflammatory danger signal, which remains associated with chromatin in healthy cells. Unexpectedly, infection with either wild-type or ndk-deficient P. gingivalis causes release of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytosol. But HMGB1 is released to the extracellular space when uninfected GECs are further stimulated with ATP, and there is more HMGB1 released from the cells when ATP-treated cells are infected with ndk-deficient mutant than wild-type P. gingivalis. Our results reveal that NDK plays a significant role in inhibiting P2X7-dependent inflammasome activation and HMGB1 release from infected GECs. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Y-box binding protein 1 overexpression on the prognosis of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma undergoing postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Heng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the association between Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 overexpression and the prognosis of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC undergoing postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. MethodsThe paraffin-embedded specimens were collected from 58 patients with ICC who underwent surgical treatment and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University from January 2010 to January 2015. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of YB-1 in ICC tissue; after ICC cells were transfected with YB-1 plasmid, the thiazolyl blue method was used to observe the change in gemcitabine sensitivity, and qPCR was used to observe the changes in the expression of multidrug resistance genes. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups and a one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups; the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates and the log-rank test was used for survival difference analysis. ResultsAmong the 58 patients, 44 (75.9% had high expression of YB-1 in the cytoplasm of ICC cells (cytoplasm YB-1 positive group and 14 (24.1% had no expression of YB-1 in the cytoplasm of ICC cells (cytoplasm YB-1 negative group. Of all patients in the cytoplasm YB-1 positive group, 18 (40.9% also had positive nuclear expression of YB-1 (nuclear YB-1 positive group; the other 40 patients had no nuclear expression of YB-1 (nuclear YB-1 negative group. The nuclear YB-1 negative group had a significantly longer survival time than the nuclear YB-1 positive group (63 months vs 28 months, χ2=17.99, P<0.05. In the control plasmid group, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of gemcitabine in HCCC-9810 cells was 0.054 μmol, and in the pSG5-YB-1 plasma transfection group, IC50 increased to 0

  13. Regulation of Autophagy-Related Protein and Cell Differentiation by High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in Adipocytes

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    Huanhuan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a molecule related to the development of inflammation. Autophagy is vital to maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against inflammation of adipocyte injury. Our recent work focused on the relationship of HMGB1 and autophagy in 3T3-L1 cells. In vivo experimental results showed that, compared with the normal-diet group, the high-fat diet mice displayed an increase in adipocyte size in the epididymal adipose tissues. The expression levels of HMGB1 and LC3II also increased in epididymal adipose tissues in high-fat diet group compared to the normal-diet mice. The in vitro results indicated that HMGB1 protein treatment increased LC3II formation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in contrast to that in the control group. Furthermore, LC3II formation was inhibited through HMGB1 knockdown by siRNA. Treatment with the HMGB1 protein enhanced LC3II expression after 2 and 4 days but decreased the expression after 8 and 10 days among various differentiation stages of adipocytes. By contrast, FABP4 expression decreased on the fourth day and increased on the eighth day. Hence, the HMGB1 protein modulated autophagy-related proteins and lipid-metabolism-related genes in adipocytes and could be a new target for treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  14. Up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in high mobility group Box1-stimulated macrophages in pulpitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Javad; Sabermarouf, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Sadat-Hatamnezhad, Leila; Shotorbani, Siamak Sandoghchian

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone, DNA-binding protein that serves a crucial role in regulating gene transcription and is involved in a variety of proinflammatory, extracellular activities. The aim of this study was to explore whether HMGB1 stimulation can up-regulate the expression of Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) on macrophages from pulpitis and to clarify the subsequent events involving Th17 cells and Th17 cell-associated cytokine changes. Materials and Methods: Having prepared dental pulp tissues of pulpitis and healthy controls, macrophage were isolated and cultured. Macrophages were thereafter stimulated by HMGB1 time course. RT-QPCR, flowcytometer, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and ELISA techniques were used in the present research. Results: Our results showed that the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages stimulated with HMGB1 increased in pulpitis compared with controls (macrophages without HMGB1 stimulation) with a statistical significance (Ppulpitis increased, and NF-kB, the downstream target of TLR2 and TLR4, also showed a marked elevation after macrophages’ stimulation by HMGB1. Conclusion: The evidence from the present study suggests that the enhanced TLR2 and TLR4 pathways and Th17 cell polarization may be due to HMGB1 stimulation in pulpitis. PMID:28293399

  15. A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, Shahin; Koldkjaer, Ole G; Møller, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: High-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) has been known as a chromosomal protein for many years. HMGB1 has recently been shown to be a proinflammatory cytokine with a role in the immunopathogenesis of sepsis. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has a central role in the innate...... cell count and neutrophils) were measured with commercially available laboratory techniques. RESULTS: A total of 185 adult patients were included in the study; 154 patients fulfilled our definition of infection. Levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT were higher in infected patients compared with a healthy...

  16. The role of intracellular high-mobility group box 1 in the early activation of Kupffer cells and the development of Con A-induced acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao; Liu, Yanning; Shi, Yu; Zheng, Min; He, Jiliang; Chen, Zhi

    2013-10-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a highly complex syndrome characterized by devastating activation of early activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ALF. However, the factors regulating KC early activation are virtually unexplored. The aim of present study was to determine the role of the intracellular high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in modulating the early activation of KCs during ALF. The intravenous injection of Concanavalin A (Con A) was used to establish a mouse model of ALF. The dynamic pro-inflammatory properties and MHC II expression of KCs were measured by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. HMGB1 expression in KCs was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. The immunofluorescence was implemented to determine the relocation of HMGB1 in KCs, and the siRNA against HMGB1 was utilized to assess the impact of HMGB1 on KC pro-inflammatory properties. The peak of pro-inflammatory cytokines production and MHC II expression in KCs appeared at the early stage of ALF. The up-regulation of HMGB1 expression and the translocation of HMGB1 in KCs were in parallel with the early activation of KCs. The blockade of intracellular HMGB1 expression caused by siRNA significantly inhibited the production of KC-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines, and led to a down-regulation of MAP kinase activation in KCs. The self-derived HMGB1 is an "early alarmin" of KC activation during Con A-induced ALF. HMGB1 might be a potential target for cell-specific strategy in ALF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Interplay between human high mobility group protein 1 and replication protein A on psoralen-cross-linked DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Madhava C; Christensen, Jesper; Vasquez, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    Human high mobility group box (HMGB) 1 and -2 proteins are highly conserved and abundant chromosomal proteins that regulate chromatin structure and DNA metabolism. HMGB proteins bind preferentially to DNA that is bent or underwound and to DNA damaged by agents such as cisplatin, UVC radiation...

  18. Application of hyperthermia in addition to ionizing irradiation fosters necrotic cell death and HMGB1 release of colorectal tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schildkopf, Petra, E-mail: petra.schildkopf@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Frey, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.frey@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Mantel, Frederick, E-mail: frederick.mantel@web.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Ott, Oliver J., E-mail: oliver.ott@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Weiss, Eva-Maria, E-mail: eva-maria.weiss@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Sieber, Renate, E-mail: renate.sieber@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Janko, Christina, E-mail: christina.janko@uk-erlangen.de [Department for Internal Medicine 3, Institute for Clinical Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Sauer, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.sauer@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.fietkau@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Gaipl, Udo S., E-mail: udo.gaipl@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death in developed countries. Tumor therapies should on the one hand aim to stop the proliferation of tumor cells and to kill them, and on the other hand stimulate a specific immune response against residual cancer cells. Dying cells are modulators of the immune system contributing to anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory responses, depending on the respective cell death form. The positive therapeutic effects of temperature-controlled hyperthermia (HT), when combined with ionizing irradiation (X-ray), were the origin to examine whether combinations of X-ray with HT can induce immune activating tumor cell death forms, also characterized by the release of the danger signal HMGB1. Human colorectal tumor cells with differing radiosensitivities were treated with combinations of HT (41.5 {sup o}C for 1 h) and X-ray (5 or 10 Gy). Necrotic cell death was prominent after X-ray and could be further increased by HT. Apoptosis remained quite low in HCT 15 and SW480 cells. X-ray and combinations with HT arrested the tumor cells in the radiosensitive G2 cell cycle phase. The amount of released HMGB1 protein was significantly enhanced after combinatorial treatments in comparison to single ones. We conclude that combining X-ray with HT may induce anti-tumor immunity as a result of the predominant induction of inflammatory necrotic tumor cells and the release of HMGB1.

  19. Serum high mobility group box 1 protein levels are not associated with either histological severity or treatment response in children and adults with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, Katherine P.; Ross Deppe; Megan Comerford; Howard Masuoka; Cummings, Oscar W.; James Tonascia; Naga Chalasani; Raj Vuppalanchi

    2017-01-01

    Aim Serum high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a proinflammatory molecule that could potentially serve as a biomarker for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) due to its correlation with degree of liver fibrosis. The aim of the current study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between serum HMGB1 levels and liver histology in adults and children with NAFLD participating in two large randomized controlled trial...

  20. Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Satoru; Amaya, Fumimasa; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yamada, Shingo; Hasegawa, Naoki; Soejima, Junko; Koh, Hidefumi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2004-12-15

    This study was performed to examine the putative role of high mobility group box (HMGB) protein in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Observations were made (1) in 21 patients who were septic with ALI and 15 patients with normal lung function and (2) in a mouse model 24 hours after intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The concentrations of HMGB1 were increased in plasma and lung epithelial lining fluid of patients with ALI and mice instilled with LPS. LPS-induced ALI was mitigated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Although this protein was not detected in the plasma of control humans or mice, the concentrations of HMGB1 in lung epithelial lining fluid or in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were unexpectedly high. The nuclear expression of HMGB1 was apparent in epithelial cells surrounding terminal bronchioles in normal mice, whereas its nuclear and cytoplasmic expression was observed in alveolar macrophages in LPS-instilled mice. Lung instillation of HMGB2 did not cause as much inflammation as HMGB1. Extracellular HMGB1 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of clinical and experimental ALI. However, its expression in normal airways is noteworthy and suggests that it also plays a physiologic role in the lung.

  1. Association of high mobility group BOX-1 and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts with clinicopathological features of haematological malignancies: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin H. Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a versatile protein with nuclear and extracellular functions. In the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE. The expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE have been described in a variety of cancers. However, the clinical values of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies have yet to be evaluated. A systematic search through PubMed and the Web of Science for articles discussing the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies produced 15 articles. Overexpression of HMGB1 was reported to be associated with malignancy and, in certain studies, poor prognosis and tumour aggressiveness. Only one included study investigated the clinical value of RAGE, in which no significant difference was found between expression of RAGE in CLL neoplastic cells and nonmalignant controls. The discussed associations of HMGB1 and RAGE with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with haematological malignancies warrants further investigation into the prognostic and diagnostic value of both of these molecules.

  2. High-mobility group box 1 accelerates early acute allograft rejection via enhancing IL-17+ γδ T-cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Quansong; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Lifeng; Zheng, Fang; Gong, Feili; Fang, Min

    2014-04-01

    Th17 and γδ T cells are the dominant IL-17-producing cell. We previously reported that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is critical in inducing IL-17-producing alloreactive T cells during early stage of acute allograft rejection. However, the role of γδ T cells during this process and its implication in HMGB1-mediated allograft rejection are not fully understood. Here, we use a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation to further study the role of HMGB1 and IL-17-producing γδ T cells in acute allograft rejection. It was found that the expression of HMGB1 was increased in allograft, while blockade of HMGB1 suppressed IL-17(+) γδ T-cell response and inhibited the gene transcription of IL-23 and IL-1β. Furthermore, in vitro HMGB1 indirectly promoted the development of IL-17(+) γδ T cells by stimulating dendritic cells to produce IL-23 and IL-1β, meanwhile depletion of γδ T cells in vivo prolonged allograft survival and reduced the level of IL-17 in serum. In conclusion, our findings inferred that increased HMGB1 expression could enhance IL-17(+) γδ T-cell response by promoting the secretion of IL-23 and IL-1β, while IL-17(+) γδ T cells contribute to the early stage of acute allograft rejection. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  3. The Protective Effect of Lidocaine on Septic Rats via the Inhibition of High Mobility Group Box 1 Expression and NF-κB Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan-Liang; Xing, Yan-Qiu; Xu, Ying-Xue; Rong, Fei; Lei, Wei-Fu; Zhang, Wen-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Lidocaine, a common local anesthetic drug, has anti-inflammatory effects. It has demonstrated a protective effect in mice from septic peritonitis. However, it is unknown whether lidocaine has effects on high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a key mediator of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lidocaine treatment on serum HMGB1 level and HMGB1 expression in liver, lungs, kidneys, and ileum in septic rats induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). We found that acute organ injury induced by CLP was mitigated by lidocaine treatment and organ function was significantly improved. The data also demonstrated that lidocaine treatment raised the survival of septic rats. Furthermore, lidocaine suppressed the level of serum HMGB1, the expression of HMGB1, and the activation of NF-κB p65 in liver, kidneys, lungs, and ileum. Taken together, these results suggest that lidocaine treatment exerts its protective effection on CLP-induced septic rats. The mechanism was relative to the inhibitory effect of lidocaine on the mRNA expression level of HMGB1 in multiple organs, release of HMGB1 to plasma, and activation of NF-κB. PMID:24371375

  4. Serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein and its association with quality of life and psychological and functional status in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktayoglu, Pelin; Tahtasiz, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Em, Serda; Ucar, Demet; Yazmalar, Levent; Mete, Nuriye; Nas, Kemal; Gezer, Orhan

    2013-08-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a proinflammatory cytokine. Previous studies have suggested that HMGB1 can play an important role in the pathogenesis of many rheumatic diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and its association with quality of life and psychological and functional status in these patients. Twenty-nine patients who met the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the classification of FM and 29 healthy controls (HC) were included in the present study. Serum samples were collected from both the patients and the HC, and HMGB1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to assess the disease severity and functional status in patients with FM. Furthermore, the Nottingham Health Profile was used to assess quality of life in all subjects, as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to assess depression and anxiety. The serum levels of HMGB1 protein were positively correlated with the FIQ scores in patients with FM (P = 0.002). Mean serum levels of HMGB1 were higher in patients with FM than in HC but this difference was not statistically significant. HMGB1 protein might be a good laboratory-sourced candidate for the assessment of functional status and disease severity in patients with FM. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Neuropathic pain in rats with a partial sciatic nerve ligation is alleviated by intravenous injection of monoclonal antibody to high mobility group box-1.

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    Yoki Nakamura

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 is associated with the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. A previous study reported that intravenous injection of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody significantly attenuated brain edema in a rat model of stroke, possibly by attenuating glial activation. Peripheral nerve injury leads to increased activity of glia in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, it is possible that the anti-HMGB1 antibody could also be efficacious in attenuating peripheral nerve injury-induced pain. Following partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL, rats were treated with either anti-HMGB1 or control IgG. Intravenous treatment with anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (2 mg/kg significantly ameliorated PSNL-induced hind paw tactile hypersensitivity at 7, 14 and 21 days, but not 3 days, after ligation, whereas control IgG had no effect on tactile hypersensitivity. The expression of HMGB1 protein in the spinal dorsal horn was significantly increased 7, 14 and 21 days after PSNL; the efficacy of the anti-HMGB1 antibody is likely related to the presence of HMGB1 protein. Also, the injury-induced translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytosol occurred mainly in dorsal horn neurons and not in astrocytes and microglia, indicating a neuronal source of HMGB1. Markers of astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1 and spinal neuron (cFos activity were greatly increased in the ipsilateral dorsal horn side compared to the sham-operated side 21 days after PSNL. Anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody treatment significantly decreased the injury-induced expression of cFos and Iba1, but not GFAP. The results demonstrate that nerve injury evokes the synthesis and release of HMGB1 from spinal neurons, facilitating the activity of both microglia and neurons, which in turn leads to symptoms of neuropathic pain. Thus, the targeting of HMGB1 could be a useful therapeutic strategy in the treatment of chronic

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of high-mobility group box 1 correlates with resistance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for lower rectal cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Kumiko; Kazama, Shinsuke; Tsuno, Nelson H; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-27

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nucleoprotein that is related to inflammation. It has been implicated in a variety of biologically important processes, including transcription, DNA repair, differentiation, development, and extracellular signaling. Recently, its important role in the process of tumor invasion, metastasis, and resistance to anti-cancer therapies has been demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation of HMGB1 expression and resistance of rectal cancer patients to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) prior to curative operation. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 75 lower rectal cancer patients without complete pathological response who had received preoperative CRT and had undergone curative resection at the University of Tokyo Hospital between May 2003 and June 2010. HMGB1 expression in surgically resected specimens was evaluated using immunohistochemical detection and specimens were classified into high or low HMGB1 expression groups. Clinicopathologic features, degree of tumor reduction, regression of tumor grade, and patient survival were compared between the groups using non-paired Student's t-tests and Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 52 (69.3%) patients had high HMGB1 expression, and 23 (30.7%) had low expression. HMGB1 expression was significantly correlated with histologic type (P=0.02), lymphatic invasion (P=0.02), and venous invasion (P=0.05). Compared to patients with low HMGB1 expression, those with high expression had a poorer response to CRT, in terms of tumor reduction ratio (42.2 versus 28.9%, respectively; P<0.01) and post-CRT histological tumor regression grade (56.5 versus 30.8% grade 2; respectively; P=0.03). However, no significant correlation was found between HMGB1 expression and recurrence-free and overall survival rates. HMGB1 expression may be one of the key factors regulating the response of rectal cancer to preoperative CRT in terms of tumor invasiveness and resistance to therapy.

  7. Serum high mobility group box 1 protein levels are not associated with either histological severity or treatment response in children and adults with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P Yates

    Full Text Available Serum high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a proinflammatory molecule that could potentially serve as a biomarker for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH due to its correlation with degree of liver fibrosis. The aim of the current study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between serum HMGB1 levels and liver histology in adults and children with NAFLD participating in two large randomized controlled trials.Serum HMGB1 levels were measured at various time points in adults and children with NAFLD, who participated in PIVENS and TONIC clinical trials respectively. PIVENS trial compared vitamin E or pioglitazone to placebo in adults whereas TONIC trial compared vitamin E or metformin to placebo in children. Participants had liver biopsies at baseline and the end of treatment (96 weeks, and liver histology was reviewed by a central committee of study pathologists.In the cross-sectional analyses (n = 205 for PIVENS and 109 for TONIC, there was no significant relationship between serum HMGB1 levels and histological features such as steatosis, ballooning, inflammation, fibrosis, or presence of steatohepatitis in either adults or children. Serum HMGB1 levels did not change significantly during treatment either with placebo, vitamin E therapy (P = 0.81 or pioglitazone (P = 0.09 in the PIVENS trial. Similarly, serum HMGB1 levels did not change significantly during treatment either with placebo, metformin (P = 0.15 or vitamin E (P = 0.23 in the TONIC trial. In the longitudinal analyses (n = 105 for PIVENS and 109 for TONIC, changes in serum HMGB1 levels did not correlate with histologic improvement or resolution of NASH in either adults or children. There was no relationship between serum HMGB1 and ALT levels in either adults or children with NAFLD.Serum HMGB1 levels were not associated with histological severity or treatment response in either children or adults with NAFLD.

  8. Research on influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum

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    Han-Chun Yan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum. Methods: A total of 240 cases of patients with condyloma acuminatum were randomly divided into two groups, control group and observation group, each group of 120 cases. The CO2 laser was used for the removal of warts in all patients, while patients in the observation group were combined with interferon. Then the differences of curative effect and the recurrence of patients between the two groups were compared, and the change of T-lymphocyte subsets and serum inflammatory cytokines, HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in the two groups were compared before and after treatment. Results: The cure rate of observation group was 88.33%, significantly higher than that of control group by 65%. The recurrence rate of the observation group was 10.83% which was significantly lower than that of the control group by 30.83%. Three, six months after treatment, the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ of patients in observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, and CD8+ was significantly lower than that in the control group; the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were notably higher than those of control group, while the IL-4, IL-10 levels of patients were lower than those in control group; the serum levels of HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF were lower than control group too. The difference between groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: Interferon can regulate T-lymphocyte subsets, inhibit inflammatory reaction and change the immune stress state, thereby profitably improving the cure rate and reduce the recurrence rate of CA patients.

  9. Correlation between Serum Levels of High Mobility Group Box-1 Protein and Pancreatitis: A Meta-Analysis

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    Yan Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aberrant expression of high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1 contributes to the progression of various inflammatory diseases. This meta-analysis focused on the clinical significance of serum HMGB1 levels in pancreatitis patients, with the goal of building a novel diagnostic score model. Method. We conducted a meta-analysis by searching in the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CISCOM, CINAHL, Google Scholar, China BioMedicine (CBM, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases without any language restrictions. Studies were pooled and standard mean difference (SMD and its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated. Version 12.0 STATA software was used for statistical analysis. Results. We performed a final analysis of 841 subjects from 12 clinical case-control studies. The meta-analysis results showed a positive association between serum HMGB1 levels and the progression of pancreatitis. In the subgroup analysis by country, high serum level of HMGB1 may be related to pancreatitis progression in China, Korea, Hungary, and Japan populations (all P<0.05. Conclusion. The present meta-analysis indicated that serum HMGB1 level was statistically elevated in patients with pancreatitis, and thus serum levels of HMGB1 could be determined to be a useful biomarker for pancreatitis patients.

  10. The N-terminal domain of y-box binding protein-1 induces cell cycle arrest in g2/m phase by binding to cyclin d1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Payal; Padala, Mythili K; Cox, John; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2009-01-01

    Y-box binding protein YB-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in cell proliferation, regulation of transcription and translation. Our previous study indicated that disruption of one allele of Chk-YB-1b gene in DT-40 cells resulted in major defects in the cell cycle. The abnormalities seen in heterozygous mutants could be attributed to a dominant negative effect exerted by the disrupted YB-1 allele product. To test this hypothesis the N-terminal sequence of the YB-1 was fused with the third helix of antennapedia and the green fluorescent protein. These purified fusion proteins were introduced into rat hepatoma cells and their effect on cell proliferation was studied. Results indicate that the N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of the YB-1 protein induced the cells to arrest in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and undergo apoptosis. Additional deletion analysis indicated that as few as 26 amino acids of the N-terminus of YB-1 can cause these phenotypic changes. We further demonstrated that this N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of YB-1 sequesters cyclin D1 in the cytoplasm of cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of YB-1 plays a major role in cell cycle progression through G2/M phase of cell cycle.

  11. The N-Terminal Domain of Y-Box Binding Protein-1 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G2/M Phase by Binding to Cyclin D1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Khandelwal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Y-box binding protein YB-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in cell proliferation, regulation of transcription and translation. Our previous study indicated that disruption of one allele of Chk-YB-1b gene in DT-40 cells resulted in major defects in the cell cycle. The abnormalities seen in heterozygous mutants could be attributed to a dominant negative effect exerted by the disrupted YB-1 allele product. To test this hypothesis the N-terminal sequence of the YB-1 was fused with the third helix of antennapedia and the green fluorescent protein. These purified fusion proteins were introduced into rat hepatoma cells and their effect on cell proliferation was studied. Results indicate that the N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of the YB-1 protein induced the cells to arrest in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and undergo apoptosis. Additional deletion analysis indicated that as few as 26 amino acids of the N-terminus of YB-1 can cause these phenotypic changes. We further demonstrated that this N-terminal 77 amino acid domain of YB-1 sequesters cyclin D1 in the cytoplasm of cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of YB-1 plays a major role in cell cycle progression through G2/M phase of cell cycle.

  12. Endotoxin tolerance alleviates experimental acute liver failure via inhibition of high mobility group box 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sai-Nan; Hu, Dan-Ping; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been widely reported to mediate damage caused by inflammatory responses. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of HMGB1 in endotoxin tolerance (ET) alleviating inflammation of acute liver failure (ALF) rats and its possible signaling mechanism. To mimic ET, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.1 mg/kg once a day intraperitoneally for consecutive five days) before subsequent ALF induction. ALF was induced by intraperitoneal administration of D-GalN/LPS. ET induced by LPS pretreatment significantly improved the survival rate of ALF rats. Moreover, after ALF induction, ET+ALF rats exhibited lower serum enzyme (ALT, AST and TBiL) levels, lower production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-a and HMGB1) and more minor liver histopathological damage than ALF rats. ET+ALF rats showed enhanced expression levels of HMGB1, decreased levels of STAT1 and p-STAT1, augmented expression of SOCS1 in liver tissues than ALF rats. These results indicated that ET induced by low-dose LPS pretreatment may alleviate inflammation and liver injury in experimental acute liver failure rats mainly through inhibition of hepatic HMGB1 translocation and release.

  13. Increased serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein in patients with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele, Enzo; Boso, Marianna; Brondino, Natascia; Pietra, Stefania; Barale, Francesco; Ucelli di Nemi, Stefania; Politi, Pierluigi

    2010-05-30

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein that functions as an activator for inducing the immune response and can be released from neurons after glutamate excitotoxicity. The objective of the present study was to measure serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with autistic disorder and to study their relationship with clinical characteristics. We enrolled 22 adult patients with autistic disorder (mean age: 28.1+/-7.7 years) and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 28.7+/-8.1 years). Serum levels of HMGB1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with healthy subjects, serum levels of HMGB1 were significantly higher in patients with autistic disorder (10.8+/-2.6 ng/mL versus 5.6+/-2.5 ng/mL, respectively, Pautistic disorder. Increased HMGB1 may be a biological correlate of the impaired reciprocal social interactions in this neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tanshinone IIA Attenuates Chronic Pancreatitis-Induced Pain in Rats via Downregulation of HMGB1 and TRL4 Expression in the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye-song; Li, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Li-hua; Kang, Ying; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Zi-quan; Wang, Kun; Kaye, Alan David; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a long-standing inflammation of the exocrine pancreas, which typically results in severe and constant abdominal pain. Previous studies on the mechanisms underlying CP-induced pain have primarily focused on the peripheral nociceptive system. A role for a central mechanism in the mediation or modulation of abdominal pain is largely unknown. Tanshinone IIA (TSN IIA), an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Danshen, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties via downregulation of the expression of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a late proinflammatory cytokine. HMGB1 binds and activates toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to induce spinal astrocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine release in neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of TSN IIA on pain responses in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced CP. The roles of central mechanisms in the mediation or modulation of CP were also investigated. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled animal trial. CP was induced in rats by intrapancreatic infusion of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Pancreatic histopathological changes were characterized with semi-quantitative scores. The abdomen nociceptive behaviors were assessed with von Frey filaments. The effects of intraperitoneally administered TSN IIA on CP-induced mechanical allodynia were tested. The spinal protein expression of HMGB1 was determined by western blot. The spinal mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were determined by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. The spinal expression of the HMGB1 receptor TRL4 and the astrocyte activation marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined by western blot or immunohistological staining after intraperitoneal injection of TSN IIA or intrathecal administration of a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody. TNBS infusion resulted in pancreatic histopathological changes of chronic

  15. Diabetes-Induced Oxidative Stress in Endothelial Progenitor Cells May Be Sustained by a Positive Feedback Loop Involving High Mobility Group Box-1

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    Han Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a critical factor in diabetes-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC dysfunction, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 in diabetes-induced oxidative stress. HMGB-1 was upregulated in both serum and bone marrow-derived monocytes from diabetic mice compared with control mice. In vitro, advanced glycation end productions (AGEs induced, expression of HMGB-1 in EPCs and in cell culture supernatants in a dose-dependent manner. However, inhibition of oxidative stress with N-acetylcysteine (NAC partially inhibited the induction of HMGB-1 induced by AGEs. Furthermore, p66shc expression in EPCs induced by AGEs was abrogated by incubation with glycyrrhizin (Gly, while increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in cell culture supernatants was observed in the Gly treated group. Thus, HMGB-1 may play an important role in diabetes-induced oxidative stress in EPCs via a positive feedback loop involving the AGE/reactive oxygen species/HMGB-1 pathway.

  16. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Protein Serum Levels Do Not Reflect Monocytic Function in Patients with Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression

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    Nadine Unterwalder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 protein is released during “late sepsis” by activated monocytes. We investigated whether systemic HMGB-1 levels are associated with indices of monocytic activation/function in patients with sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Methodology. 36 patients (31 male, 64±14 years with severe sepsis/septic shock and monocytic deactivation (reduced mHLA-DR expression and TNF-α release were assessed in a subanalysis of a placebo-controlled immunostimulatory trial using GM-CSF. HMGB-1 levels were assessed over a 9-day treatment interval. Data were compared to standardized biomarkers of monocytic immunity (mHLA-DR expression, TNF-α release. Principle findings. HMGB-1 levels were enhanced in sepsis but did not differ between treatment and placebo groups at baseline (14.6 ± 13.5 versus 12.5 ± 11.5 ng/ml, P=.62. When compared to controls, HMGB-1 level increased transiently in treated patients at day 5 (27.8±21.7 versus 11.0±14.9, P=.01. Between group differences were not noted at any other point of assessment. HMGB-1 levels were not associated with markers of monocytic function or clinical disease severity. Conclusions. GM-CSF treatment for sepsis-induced immunosuppression induces a moderate but only transient increase in systemic HMGB-1 levels. HMGB-1 levels should not be used for monitoring of monocytic function in immunostimulatory trials as they do not adequately portray contemporary changes in monocytic immunity.

  17. Salidroside ameliorates sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality via downregulating NF-κB and HMGB1 pathways through the upregulation of SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chao, Sung-Chuan; Wu, Hsiao-Yi; Chiang, Chia-Lien; Wang, Ching-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Weng, Te-I

    2017-09-20

    Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition. Salidroside, a substance isolated from Rhodiola rosea, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The effect and mechanism of salidroside on sepsis-induced acute lung injury still remains to be well clarified. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of salidroside on septic mouse models and explored the role of salidroside-upregulated SIRT1. Salidroside inhibited the inflammatory responses and HMGB1 productions in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages and mice. Salidroside could also reverse the decreased SIRT1 protein expression in LPS-treated macrophages and mice. Salidroside also alleviated the sepsis-induced lung edema, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes and the mortality, and improved the lung PaO2/FiO2 ratio in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced septic mice. Salidroside significantly decreased the serum TNF-α, IL-6, NO, and HMGB1 productions, pulmonary inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and phosphorylated NF-κB-p65 protein expressions, and pulmonary HMGB1 nuclear translocation in CLP septic mice. Moreover, sepsis decreased the SIRT1 protein expression in the lungs of CLP septic mice. Salidroside significantly upregulated the SIRT1 expression and inhibited the inflammatory responses in CLP septic mouse lungs. These results suggest that salidroside protects against sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality, which might be through the SIRT1-mediated repression of NF-κB activation and HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation.

  18. Inhibition of high-mobility group box 1 as therapeutic option in autoimmune disease : lessons from animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; Heeringa, Peter; Bijl, Marc; Westra, Johanna

    Purpose of review High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a molecule that has gained much attention in the last couple of years as an important player in innate immune responses and modulating factor in several (auto) immune diseases. Furthermore, advancements have been made in identifying the diverse

  19. Association between maternal serum high mobility group box 1 levels and pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbe, A; Granese, R; Grasso, R; Salpietro, V; Corrado, F; Giorgianni, G; Foti, G; Amadore, D; Triolo, O; Giunta, L; Di Benedetto, A

    2016-05-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), is characterized by chronic, low-grade subclinical inflammation with altered production of cytokines and mediators. Recently, a new protein acting as a "danger signal", high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), that migrates quickly during electrophoresis, has been identified. The aim of our study was to analyze serum levels of HMGB1 in pregnant women, with or without GDM, in the third trimester of pregnancy to evaluate correlation with insulin resistance and other risk factors for GDM. Seventy five pregnant women positive to the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were included in the study group and 48 pregnant women who were negative to the screening test, were randomly selected using a computer-generated randomisation table. A significant positive univariate correlation was observed between serum HMGB1 levels, HOMA-IR index, glycaemia values at OGTT and pre-pregnancy BMI. Moreover, logistic regression analysis showed that serum HMGB1 was independent linked to GDM. Our study demonstrated that HMGB1, a marker of chronic inflammation, is associated to GDM and insulin resistance level, in the third trimester of pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of High-Mobility Group Box-1 and Its Crosstalk with Microbiome in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flex, Andrea; Alivernini, Stefano; Tolusso, Barbara; Gremese, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, definitely disabling, and potentially severe autoimmune disease. Although an increasing number of patients are affected, a key treatment for all patients has not been discovered. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein passively and actively released by almost all cell types after several stimuli. HMGB1 is involved in RA pathogenesis, but a convincing explanation about its role and possible modulation in RA is still lacking. Microbiome and its homeostasis are altered in patients with RA, and the microbiota restoration has been proposed to patients with RA. The purpose of the present review is to analyze the available evidences regarding HMGB1 and microbiome roles in RA and the possible implications of the crosstalk between the nuclear protein and microbiome in understanding and possibly treating patients affected by this harmful condition. PMID:29200665

  1. Receptor for advanced glycation end products - membrane type1 matrix metalloproteinase axis regulates tissue factor expression via RhoA and Rac1 activation in high-mobility group box-1 stimulated endothelial cells.

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    Koichi Sugimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is understood to be a blood vessel inflammation. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 plays a key role in the systemic inflammation. Tissue factor (TF is known to lead to inflammation which promotes thrombus formation. Membrane type1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP associates with advanced glycation endproducts (AGE triggered-TF protein expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB. However, it is still unclear about the correlation of MT1-MMP and HMBG-1-mediated TF expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TF expression in response to HMGB-1 stimulation and the involvement of MT1-MMP in endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Pull-down assays and Western blotting revealed that HMGB-1 induced RhoA/Rac1 activation and NF-kB phosphorylation in cultured human aortic endothelial cells. HMGB-1 increased the activity of MT1-MMP, and inhibition of RAGE or MT1-MMP by siRNA suppressed HMGB-1-induced TF upregulation as well as HMGB-1-triggered RhoA/Rac1 activation and NF-kB phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that RAGE/MT1-MMP axis modified HMBG-1-mediated TF expression through RhoA and Rac1 activation and NF-κB phosphorylation in endothelial cells. These results suggested that MT1-MMP was involved in vascular inflammation and might be a good target for treating atherosclerosis.

  2. Molecular characterization and expression pattern of X box-binding protein-1 (XBP1) in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.): Indications for a role of XBP1 in antibacterial and antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Li, Hua; Peng, Shaoqing; Zhang, Fumiao; An, Liguo; Yang, Guiwen

    2017-08-01

    X box-binding protein-1 (XBP1) is a transcription factor that is essential for the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the differentiation of plasma cells, and some findings have also uncovered its function in innate immunity. XBP1 typically has two different transcripts, un-spliced (XBP1u) and spliced forms (XBP1s), but XBP1s is an active transcription factor in the regulation of target genes. To date, there is no evidence about the identification and function of XBP1 in common carp. Moreover, no data are currently available regarding the role of fish XBP1 in innate immunity. Thus, to determine whether XBP1 is involved in innate immune response in common carp, we cloned CcXBP1s and examined the expression of XBP1s and a XBP1s stimulated gene (IL-6) after Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) challenges. The results imply that CcXBP1s, as an active transcription factor, might play regulation roles in the antibacterial and antiviral innate immune responses of common carp. This allows us to gain new insights into the immunological function of XBP1 in fish innate immunity and the evolution of this important class of genes across vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression and clinical implication of Beclin1, HMGB1, p62, survivin, BRCA1 and ERCC1 in epithelial ovarian tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, L-L; Zhao, C Y; Ye, K-F; Yang, H; Zhang, J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the differential expression of Beclin1, HMGB1, p62, survivin, ERCC1 and BRCA1 protein in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to evaluate the relationship between autophagy and platinum resistance of EOC patients during platinum-based chemotherapy with the protein expression. Expression of Beclin1, HMGB1, p62, survivin, ERCC1 and BRCA1 were detected with immunohistochemistry in 60 patients, including 39 with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), 13 benign epithelial ovarian tumor tissue (BET) and 8 borderline ovarian tumor tissue. Beclin, p62 and ERCC1 expression was significantly higher in the EOC than the BET (p0.05). BRCA1 expression was lower in EOC than BET (pepithelial ovarian cancer.

  4. The inflammatory molecules IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly enhance focal seizure generation in a brain slice model of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Angela eChiavegato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by a hyperexcitable brain tissue and unpredictable seizures, i.e., aberrant firing discharges in large neuronal populations. It is well established that proinflammatory cytokines, in addition to their canonical involvement in the immune response, have a crucial role in the mechanism of seizure generation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and high mobility group B1 (HMGB1 in the generation of seizure-like discharges using two models of focal epilepsy in a rat entorhinal cortex slice preparation. Seizure like-discharges were evoked by either slice perfusion with low Mg2+ and picrotoxin or with a double NMDA local stimulation in the presence of the proconvulsant 4-amino-pyridine. The effects of IL-1β or HMGB1 were evaluated by monitoring seizure discharge generation through laser scanning microscope imaging of Ca2+ signals from neurons and astrocytes. In the picrotoxin model, we revealed that both cytokines increased the mean frequency of spontaneous ictal-like discharges, whereas only IL-1β reduced the latency and prolonged the duration of the first ictal-like event. In the second model, a single NMDA pulse, per se ineffective, became successful when it was performed after IL-β or HMGB1 local applications. These findings demonstrate that both IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly lower focal ictal event threshold and strengthen the possibility that targeting these inflammatory pathways may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent seizures.

  5. Interactions of Histone Acetyltransferase p300 with the Nuclear Proteins Histone and HMGB1, As Revealed by Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

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    Banerjee, S; Rakshit, T; Sett, S; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2015-10-22

    One of the important properties of the transcriptional coactivator p300 is histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity that enables p300 to influence chromatin action via histone modulation. p300 can exert its HAT action upon the other nuclear proteins too--one notable example being the transcription-factor-like protein HMGB1, which functions also as a cytokine, and whose accumulation in the cytoplasm, as a response to tissue damage, is triggered by its acetylation. Hitherto, no information on the structure and stability of the complexes between full-length p300 (p300FL) (300 kDa) and the histone/HMGB1 proteins are available, probably due to the presence of unstructured regions within p300FL that makes it difficult to be crystallized. Herein, we have adopted the high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach, which allows molecularly resolved three-dimensional contour mapping of a protein molecule of any size and structure. From the off-rate and activation barrier values, obtained using single molecule dynamic force spectroscopy, the biochemical proposition of preferential binding of p300FL to histone H3, compared to the octameric histone, can be validated. Importantly, from the energy landscape of the dissociation events, a model for the p300-histone and the p300-HMGB1 dynamic complexes that HAT forms, can be proposed. The lower unbinding forces of the complexes observed in acetylating conditions, compared to those observed in non-acetylating conditions, indicate that upon acetylation, p300 tends to weakly associate, probably as an outcome of charge alterations on the histone/HMGB1 surface and/or acetylation-induced conformational changes. To our knowledge, for the first time, a single molecule level treatment of the interactions of HAT, where the full-length protein is considered, is being reported.

  6. Salidroside ameliorates sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality via downregulating NF-κB and HMGB1 pathways through the upregulation of SIRT1

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    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chao, Sung-Chuan; Wu, Hsiao-Yi; Chiang, Chia-Lien; Wang, Ching-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Weng, Te-I

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition. Salidroside, a substance isolated from Rhodiola rosea, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The effect and mechanism of salidroside on sepsis-induced acute lung injury still remains to be well clarified. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of salidroside on septic mouse models and explored the role of salidroside-upregulated SIRT1. Salidroside inhibited the inflammatory responses and HMGB1 productions in bacterial l...

  7. HMGB1/Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) does not aggravate inflammation but promote endogenous neural stem cells differentiation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Mei, Xifan; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Ziming; Guo, Zhanpeng; Bi, Yunlong; Shen, Zhaoliang; Yuan, Yajiang; Guo, Yue; Song, Cangwei; Bai, Liangjie; Wang, Yansong; Yu, Deshui

    2017-09-04

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signaling is involved in a series of cell functions after spinal cord injury (SCI). Our study aimed to elucidate the effects of RAGE signaling on the neuronal recovery after SCI. In vivo, rats were subjected to SCI with or without anti-RAGE antibodies micro-injected into the lesion epicenter. We detected Nestin/RAGE, SOX-2/RAGE and Nestin/MAP-2 after SCI by Western blot or immunofluorescence (IF). We found that neural stem cells (NSCs) co-expressed with RAGE were significantly activated after SCI, while stem cell markers Nestin and SOX-2 were reduced by RAGE blockade. We found that RAGE inhibition reduced nestin-positive NSCs expressing MAP-2, a mature neuron marker. RAGE blockade does not improve neurobehavior Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scores; however, it damaged survival of ventral neurons via Nissl staining. Through in vitro study, we found that recombinant HMGB1 administration does not lead to increased cytokines of TNF-α and IL-1β, while anti-RAGE treatment reduced cytokines of TNF-α and IL-1β induced by LPS via ELISA. Meanwhile, HMGB1 increased MAP-2 expression, which was blocked after anti-RAGE treatment. Hence, HMGB1/RAGE does not exacerbate neuronal inflammation but plays a role in promoting NSCs differentiating into mature neurons in the pathological process of SCI.

  8. Correlation between high mobility group box-1 protein and chronic hepatitis B infection with severe hepatitis B and acute-on-chronic liver failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Bing; Hu, Dan-Ping; Fu, Rong-Quan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression in the serum with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) related liver fibrosis, severe hepatitis B and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). We made a literature search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Medline, Google Scholar, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang with no language restriction. Pooled data were analyzed and mean difference with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A total of 16 relevant studies were identified. HMGB1 serum levels were higher in severe hepatitis B or ACLF patients than those in CHB patients. Pooled mean differences of HMGB1 in severe hepatitis B and ACLF patients compared with CHB patients were 4.32 (95% CI: 0.34-8.29, Z=2.13, I2=59%, P=0.03) and 15.96 (95% CI: -0.37-32.28, Z=1.92, P=0.06). Four studies showed there was a different HMGB1 expression in mild, moderate and severe CHB patients (P values were <0.05, <0.05, <0.05 and <0.01, respectively). Pooled mean difference of HMGB1 in low liver fibrosis patients compared with high liver fibrosis was -125.38 (95% CI: -539.44-288.68, Z=0.59, I2=98%, P=0.55). The results suggested that HMGB1 levels in the serum were statistically higher in severe hepatitis B and ACLF patients. Therefore, HMGB1 may be a useful therapeutic target for severe hepatitis B and ACLF diagnosis.

  9. High-mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end products contribute to lung injury during Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achouiti, Ahmed; van der Meer, Anne Jan; Florquin, Sandrine; Yang, Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus has emerged as an important cause of necrotizing pneumonia. Lung injury during S. aureus pneumonia may be enhanced by local release of damage associated molecular patterns such as high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In the current study we sought to determine the functional

  10. Paradoxical role of high mobility group box 1 in glioma: a suppressor or a promoter?

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    Richard A. Seidu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas represent 60% of primary intracranial brain tumors and 80% of all malignant types, with highest morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although glioma has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathology remain poorly understood. Clarification of the molecular mechanisms involved in their development and/or treatment resistance is highly required. High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a nuclear protein that can also act as an extracellular trigger of inflammation, proliferation and migration, through receptor for advanced glycation end products and toll like receptors in a number of cancers including gliomas. It is known that excessive release of HMGB1 in cancer leads to unlimited replicative potential, ability to develop blood vessels (angiogenesis, evasion of programmed cell death (apoptosis, self-sufficiency in growth signals, insensitivity to inhibitors of growth, inflammation, tissue invasion and metastasis. In this review we explore the mechanisms by which HMGB1 regulates apoptosis and autophagy in glioma. We also looked at how HMGB1 mediates glioma regression and promotes angiogenesis as well as possible signaling pathways with an attempt to provide potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of glioma.

  11. Epochal neuroinflammatory role of high mobility group box 1 in central nervous system diseases

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    Seidu A. Richard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS is enriched with a developed reaction reserve dubbed “neuroinflammation”, which facilitates it to cope with pathogens, toxins, traumata and degeneration. Inflammation is a significant biological activity in reaction to injury, infection, and trauma agonized by cells or tissues. A positive inflammatory reaction mechanism removes attacking pathogens, initiating wound healing and angiogenesis. The High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 protein is abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind to DNA, nucleosome and other multi-protein complexes in a dynamic and reversible fashion to regulate DNA processing in the context of chromatin. Complex genetic and physiological variations as well as environmental factors that drive emergence of chromosomal instability, development of unscheduled cell death, skewed differentiation, and altered metabolism are central to the pathogenesis of human diseases and disorders. HMGB1 protein, senses and coordinates the cellular stress response and plays a critical role not only inside of the cell as a DNA chaperone, chromosome guardian, autophagy sustainer, and protector from apoptotic cell death, but also outside the cell as the prototypic damage associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP. This DAMP, in conjunction with other factors such as cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor activity, orchestrating the inflammatory and immune response. All of these characteristics make HMGB1 a critical molecular target in multiple human diseases including infectious diseases, ischemia, immune disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer. With regards to these various disease condition above, our review focus on the role of HMGB1 and CNS Diseases.

  12. Association of High-Mobility Group Box-1 With Th Cell-Related Cytokines in the Vitreous of Ocular Sarcoidosis Patients.

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    Takeuchi, Masaru; Taguchi, Manzo; Sato, Tomohito; Karasawa, Kyoko; Sakurai, Yutaka; Harimoto, Kohzou; Ito, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone DNA-binding nuclear protein released from necrotic cells, which is also secreted by activated leukocytes and acts as a primary proinflammatory cytokine. In this study, we compared vitreous HMGB1 levels in ocular sarcoidosis with those in noninflammatory vitreoretinal diseases and evaluated its association with Th cell-related and proinflammatory cytokines. The study group consisted of 24 patients with ocular sarcoidosis. The control group consisted of 27 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and 24 with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM). Vitreous fluid samples were obtained at the beginning of vitrectomy. Vitreous levels of HMGB1 and IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, IL-25, IL-31, IL-33, IFN-γ, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), and TNFα were measured. High-mobility group box-1 was detected in the vitreous of 23 of 24 patients (95.8%) with ocular sarcoidosis. Mean vitreous level of HMGB1 was the highest in the sarcoidosis group, followed by the PDR and ERM groups, with significant differences between the three groups. In the sarcoidosis group, vitreous levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-31, IFN-γ, sCD40L, and TNFα were significantly higher than those in the idiopathic ERM group, and IFN-γ and sCD40L were significantly higher than those in the PDR group. Vitreous HMGB-1 level correlated significantly with IL-10, IFN-γ, and sCD40L levels but not with IL-6, IL-17, IL-31, or TNFα levels. The vitreous level of HMGB1 is elevated in ocular sarcoidosis and is associated with vitreous levels of Th1- and regulatory T-related cytokines, but not with proinflammatory or Th17-related cytokines.

  13. Luteolin is a novel p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) inhibitor that suppresses Notch4 signaling by blocking the activation of Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reipas, Kristen M.; Law, Jennifer H.; Couto, Nicole; Islam, Sumaiya; Li, Yvonne; Li, Huifang; Cherkasov, Artem; Jung, Karen; Cheema, Amarpal S.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Hassell, John A.; Dunn, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are notoriously difficult to treat because they lack hormone receptors and have limited targeted therapies. Recently, we demonstrated that p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) is essential for TNBC growth and survival indicating it as a target for therapeutic development. RSK phosphorylates Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an oncogenic transcription/translation factor, highly expressed in TNBC (~70% of cases) and associated with poor prognosis, drug resistance and tumor initiation. YB-1 regulates the tumor-initiating cell markers, CD44 and CD49f however its role in Notch signaling has not been explored. We sought to identify novel chemical entities with RSK inhibitory activity. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1120 off-patent drugs was screened for RSK inhibitors using both in vitro kinase assays and molecular docking. The lead candidate, luteolin, inhibited RSK1 and RSK2 kinase activity and suppressed growth in TNBC, including TIC-enriched populations. Combining luteolin with paclitaxel increased cell death and unlike chemotherapy alone, did not enrich for CD44+ cells. Luteolin’s efficacy against drug-resistant cells was further indicated in the primary x43 cell line, where it suppressed monolayer growth and mammosphere formation. We next endeavored to understand how the inhibition of RSK/YB-1 signaling by luteolin elicited an effect on TIC-enriched populations. ChIP-on-ChIP experiments in SUM149 cells revealed a 12-fold enrichment of YB-1 binding to the Notch4 promoter. We chose to pursue this because there are several reports indicating that Notch4 maintains cells in an undifferentiated, TIC state. Herein we report that silencing YB-1 with siRNA decreased Notch4 mRNA. Conversely, transient expression of Flag:YB-1WT or the constitutively active mutant Flag:YB-1D102 increased Notch4 mRNA. The levels of Notch4 transcript and the abundance of the Notch4 intracellular domain (N4ICD) correlated with activation of P-RSKS221/7 and P-YB-1

  14. Relevance of pre-analytical blood management on the emerging cardiovascular protein biomarkers TWEAK and HMGB1 and on miRNA serum and plasma profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Daniela; Padoan, Andrea; Laufer, Thomas; Aneloni, Vittorio; Moz, Stefania; Schroers, Hannah; Pelloso, Michela; Saiz, Anna; Krapp, Medea; Fogar, Paola; Cornoldi, Paola; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Rossi, Elisa; La Malfa, Marco; Marotti, Alberto; Brefort, Thomas; Weis, Tanja M; Katus, Hugo A; Plebani, Mario

    2017-03-01

    Disease-independent sources of biomarker variability include pre-analytical, analytical and biological variance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the pre-analytical phase has any impact on the emerging heart disease TWEAK and HMGB1 protein markers and miRNA biomarkers, and whether peptidome profiling allows the identification of pre-analytical quality markers. An assessment was made of sample type (serum, EDTA-Plasma, Citrate-Plasma, ACD-plasma, Heparin-plasma), temperature of sample storage (room temperature or refrigerated), time of sample storage (0.5, 3, 6 and 9h) and centrifugation (one or two-step). Aliquots of all processed samples were immediately frozen (-80°C) before analysis. Proteins were assayed by ELISAs, miRNA expression profile by microarray and peptidome profiling by MALDI-TOF/MS. Temperature, time and centrifugation had no impact on TWEAK and HMGB1 results, which were significantly influenced by matrix type, TWEAK levels being significantly higher (F=194.7, p<0.0001), and HMGB1 levels significantly lower (F=36.32, p<0.0001) in serum than in any other plasma type. Unsuitable miRNA results were obtained using Heparin-plasma. Serum miRNA expression profiles depended mainly on temperature, while EDTA-plasma miRNA expression profiles were strongly affected by the centrifugation method used. MALDI-TOF/MS allowed the identification of seven features as indices of pre-analytical serum (m/z at 1206, 1350, 1865 and 2021) or EDTA-plasma (m/z 1897, 2740 and 2917) degradation. Serum and EDTA-plasma allow the analysis of both proteins and miRNA emerging biomarkers of heart diseases. Refrigerated storage prevents an altered miRNA expression profile also in cases of a prolonged time-interval between blood drawing and processing. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Time-courses of plasma IL-6 and HMGB-1 reflect initial severity of clinical presentation but do not predict poor neurologic outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Heikki Kiiski

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: High initial IL-6 values seem to reflect the intensity of the inflammatory response but not the brain damage per se. An early inflammatory response might even be beneficial since although elevated IL-6 levels were observed in patients with a more severe initial clinical presentation, they were not associated with neurological outcome. The lack of correlation between IL-6 and HMGB1 questions the role of macrophages in the process of the secretion of these inflammatory markers after aSAH, instead pointing to the activation of alternative pro-inflammatory pathways.

  16. A Newly Recognized 13q12.3 Microdeletion Syndrome Characterized by Intellectual Disability, Microcephaly, and Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis Encompassing the HMGB1 and KATNAL1 Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdi, D.; Stray-Pedersen, A.; Azzarello-Burri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Proximal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 have been reported only rarely. Here we present three unrelated patients with heterozygous, apparently de novo deletions encompassing 13q12.3. The patients present with moderate demonstrated or apparent intellectual disability, postnatal...... that microdeletion 13q12.3 represents a novel clinically recognizable condition and that the microtubule severing gene KATNAL1 and the chromatin-associated gene HMGB1 are candidate genes for intellectual disability inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  17. Biphasic Modulation of NOS Expression, Protein and Nitrite Products by Hydroxocobalamin Underlies Its Protective Effect in Endotoxemic Shock: Downstream Regulation of COX-2, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, André L. F.; Dalli, Jesmond; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Perretti, Mauro; Wheatley, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background. NOS/•NO inhibitors are potential therapeutics for sepsis, yet they increase clinical mortality. However, there has been no in vivo investigation of the (in vitro) •NO scavenger, cobalamin's (Cbl) endogenous effects on NOS/•NO/inflammatory mediators during the immune response to sepsis. Methods. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), ELISA, Western blot, and NOS Griess assays, in a C57BL/6 mouse, acute endotoxaemia model. Results. During the immune response, pro-inflammatory phase, parenteral hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl) treatment partially inhibits hepatic, but not lung, iNOS mRNA and promotes lung eNOS mRNA, but attenuates the LPS hepatic rise in eNOS mRNA, whilst paradoxically promoting high iNOS/eNOS protein translation, but relatively moderate •NO production. HOCbl/NOS/•NO regulation is reciprocally associated with lower 4 h expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and lower circulating TNF-α, but not IL-6. In resolution, 24 h after LPS, HOCbl completely abrogates a major late mediator of sepsis mortality, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) mRNA, inhibits iNOS mRNA, and attenuates LPS-induced hepatic inhibition of eNOS mRNA, whilst showing increased, but still moderate, NOS activity, relative to LPS only. experiments (LPS+D-Galactosamine) HOCbl afforded significant, dose-dependent protection in mice Conclusions. HOCbl produces a complex, time- and organ-dependent, selective regulation of NOS/•NO during endotoxaemia, corollary regulation of downstream inflammatory mediators, and increased survival. This merits clinical evaluation. PMID:23781123

  18. Edaravone attenuates hippocampal damage in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis by reducing HMGB1 and iNOS expression via the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Qian-qian; Yan, Yan; Xu, Feng-dan; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Wei-qin; Feng, Zhi-chun

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) is a free radical scavenger that has shown potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in variety of disease models. In this study, we investigated whether edaravone produced neuroprotective actions in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were infected on postnatal d 11 by intracisternal injection of a certain inoculum of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The mice received intracisternal injection of 10 μL of saline containing edaravone (3 mg/kg) once a day for 7 d. The severity of pneumococcal meningitis was assessed with a clinical score. In mice with severe meningitis, the survival rate from the time of infection to d 8 after infection was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. In mice with mild meningitis, the CSF inflammation and cytokine levels in the hippocampus were analyzed d 7 after infection, and the clinical neurological deficit score was evaluated using a neurological scoring system d 14 after infection. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice and heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1 KO) mice were used to confirm the involvement of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in the neuroprotective actions of edaravone. Results: In mice with severe meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly increased the survival rate (76.4%) compared with the meningitis model group (32.2%). In mice with mild meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly decreased the number of leukocytes and TNF- levels in CSF, as well as the neuronal apoptosis and protein levels of HMGB1 and iNOS in the hippocampus, but did not affect the high levels of IL-10 and IL-6 in the hippocampus. Moreover, edaravone treatment significantly improved the neurological function of mice with mild meningitis. In Nrf2 KO or HO-1 KO mice with the meningitis, edaravone treatment was no longer effective in improving the survival rate of the mice with severe meningitis (20.2% and 53.6%, respectively

  19. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.F. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wu, M. [Department of Surgery, Jinshan Pavilion Forest Hospital, Shanghai (China); Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-12

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP.

  20. Synergistic requirement of orphan nonamer-like elements and DNA bending enhanced by HMGB1 for RAG-mediated nicking at cryptic 12-RSS but not authentic 12-RSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Masashi; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2011-08-01

    V(D)J recombination is initiated by the specific binding of the recombination activating gene (RAG) complex to the heptamer and nonamer elements within recombination signal sequence (RSS). The break points associated with some chromosomal translocations contain cryptic RSSs, and mistargeting of RAG proteins to these less conserved elements could contribute to an aberrant V(D)J recombination. Recently, we found RAG-dependent recombination in the hotspots of TEL-AML1 t(12;21)(p13;q22) chromosomal translocation by an extrachromosomal recombination assay. Here, we describe using in vitro cleavage assays that RAG proteins directly bind to and introduce nicks into TEL and AML1 translocation regions, which contain several heptamer-like sequences. The cryptic nicking site within the TEL fragment was cleaved by RAG proteins essentially depending on a 12-RSS framework, and the nicking activity was enhanced synergistically by both HMGB1 and orphan nonamer-like (NL) sequences, which do not possess counterpart heptamers. In addition, we found that DNA bending stimulated by HMGB1 is indispensable for the HMGB1- and orphan NL element-dependent enhancement of RAG-mediated nicking at the cryptic 12-RSS. Collectively, we would propose the mechanism of HMGB1-dependent enhancement of RAG-mediated nicking at a cryptic RSS through enhanced DNA bending. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. High-mobility group box 1 regulates cytoprotective autophagy in a mouse spermatocyte cell line (GC-2spd) exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Z; Chen, Y; Niu, X; He, W; Song, B; Fan, D; Sun, X

    2017-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental and industrial pollutant that induces a broad spectrum of toxicological effects, influences a variety of human organs, and is associated with poor semen quality and male infertility. Increasing evidence demonstrates that Cd induces testicular germ cell apoptosis in rodent animals. However, the specific effect of Cd exposure on autophagy in germ cells is poorly understood. We investigate the role of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a ubiquitous nuclear protein, on Cd-evoked autophagy in a mouse spermatocyte cell line (GC-2spd). Our data have shown that autophagy was significantly elevated in GC-2spd cells exposed to Cd. Furthermore, there was a reduction in rapamycin (RAP)-mediated apoptosis. In addition, Cd exposure reduced cell viability, which is an effect that could be significantly inhibited by RAP treatment. These results indicate that autophagy appears to serve a positive function in reducing Cd-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, HMGB1 increased coincident with the processing of LC3-I to LC3-II. Thus, the upregulation of HMGB1 increases LC3-II levels. Our data suggest that HMGB1-induced autophagy appears to act as a defense/survival mechanism against Cd cytotoxicity in GC-2spd cells.

  2. Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase is Involved in the Release of High Mobility Group Box 1 Via the Interferon-β Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijuan; Kim, Seon-Ju

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a proinflammatory mediator in sepsis, is released via the IFN-β-mediated JAK/STAT pathway. However, detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we dissected upstream signaling pathways of HMGB1 release using various molecular biology methods. Here, we found that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase, CaMK) is involved in HMGB1 release by regulating IFN-β production. CaMK inhibitor, STO609, treatment inhibits LPS-induced IFN-β production, which is correlated with the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Additionally, we show that CaMK-I plays a major role in IFN-β production although other CaMK members also seem to contribute to this event. Furthermore, the CaMK inhibitor treatment reduced IFN-β production in a murine endotoxemia. Our results suggest CaMKs contribute to HMGB1 release by enhancing IFN-β production in sepsis. PMID:23091438

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist protects against hyperglycemia-induced cardiocytes injury by inhibiting high mobility group box 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yi, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Wen, Zhongyuan

    2012-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a gut incretin hormone secreted from L cells, and a GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex-4) has been shown to be cardioprotective and could exert beneficial effects through its anti-inflammatory property. However, the mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Ex-4 could ameliorate myocardial cell injury by inhibiting high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression under high glucose condition. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were prepared and then cultured with high glucose and different concentration of Ex-4. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. HMGB1 expression was assessed by western blotting. Ex-4 significantly inhibited the increase in LDH, CK, TNF-α, IL-1β and MDA levels induced by high glucose, especially at the 1 and 10 nM concentrations as well as suppressed the decrease in SOD level. Meanwhile, HMGB1 expression was markedly increased after 12 h of hyperglycaemia (P < 0.05), which was significantly inhibited by Ex-4, especially at the 1 and 10 nM concentrations (P < 0.05). The present study suggested that Ex-4 could reduce high glucose-induced cardiocytes injury, which may be associated with the inhibition of HMGB1 expression.

  4. A Unique HMG-Box Domain of Mouse Maelstrom Binds Structured RNA but Not Double Stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzor, Pavol; Bortvin, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Piwi-interacting piRNAs are a major and essential class of small RNAs in the animal germ cells with a prominent role in transposon control. Efficient piRNA biogenesis and function require a cohort of proteins conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Here we studied Maelstrom (MAEL), which is essential for piRNA biogenesis and germ cell differentiation in flies and mice. MAEL contains a high mobility group (HMG)-box domain and a Maelstrom-specific domain with a presumptive RNase H-fold. We employed a combination of sequence analyses, structural and biochemical approaches to evaluate and compare nucleic acid binding of mouse MAEL HMG-box to that of canonical HMG-box domain proteins (SRY and HMGB1a). MAEL HMG-box failed to bind double-stranded (ds)DNA but bound to structured RNA. We also identified important roles of a novel cluster of arginine residues in MAEL HMG-box in these interactions. Cumulatively, our results suggest that the MAEL HMG-box domain may contribute to MAEL function in selective processing of retrotransposon RNA into piRNAs. In this regard, a cellular role of MAEL HMG-box domain is reminiscent of that of HMGB1 as a sentinel of immunogenic nucleic acids in the innate immune response. PMID:25807393

  5. A unique HMG-box domain of mouse Maelstrom binds structured RNA but not double stranded DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Genzor

    Full Text Available Piwi-interacting piRNAs are a major and essential class of small RNAs in the animal germ cells with a prominent role in transposon control. Efficient piRNA biogenesis and function require a cohort of proteins conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Here we studied Maelstrom (MAEL, which is essential for piRNA biogenesis and germ cell differentiation in flies and mice. MAEL contains a high mobility group (HMG-box domain and a Maelstrom-specific domain with a presumptive RNase H-fold. We employed a combination of sequence analyses, structural and biochemical approaches to evaluate and compare nucleic acid binding of mouse MAEL HMG-box to that of canonical HMG-box domain proteins (SRY and HMGB1a. MAEL HMG-box failed to bind double-stranded (dsDNA but bound to structured RNA. We also identified important roles of a novel cluster of arginine residues in MAEL HMG-box in these interactions. Cumulatively, our results suggest that the MAEL HMG-box domain may contribute to MAEL function in selective processing of retrotransposon RNA into piRNAs. In this regard, a cellular role of MAEL HMG-box domain is reminiscent of that of HMGB1 as a sentinel of immunogenic nucleic acids in the innate immune response.

  6. Y-box Binding Protein-1 Is Part of a Complex Molecular Network Linking ΔNp63α to the PI3K/akt Pathway in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Annaelena; Lomoriello, Irene Schiano; di Martino, Orsola; Fusco, Sabato; Pollice, Alessandra; Vivo, Maria; La Mantia, Girolama; Calabrò, Viola

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) typically lack somatic oncogene-activating mutations and most of them contain p53 mutations. However, the presence of p53 mutations in skin premalignant lesions suggests that these represent early events during tumor progression and additional alterations may be required for SCC development. SCC cells frequently express high levels of ΔNp63α and Y-box binding 1 (YB-1 or YBX1) oncoproteins. Here, we show that knockdown of YB-1 in spontaneously immortalized HaCaT and non-metastatic SCC011 cells led to a dramatic decrease of ΔNp63α, cell detachment and death. In highly metastatic SCC022 cells, instead, YB-1 silencing induces PI3K/AKT signaling hyperactivation which counteracts the effect of YB-1 depletion and promotes cell survival. In summary, our results unveil a functional cross-talk between YB-1, ΔNp63α and the PI3K/AKT pathway critically governing survival of squamous carcinoma cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of spectator ligands on the specific recognition of intrastrand platinum-DNA cross-links by high mobility group box and TATA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M; Cohen, S M; Silverman, A P; Lippard, S J

    2001-10-19

    The results presented describe the effects of various spectator ligands, attached to a platinum 1,2-intrastand d(GpG) cross-link in duplex DNA, on the binding of high mobility group box (HMGB) domains and the TATA-binding protein (TBP). In addition to cisplatin-modified DNA, 15-base pair DNA probes modified by [Pt(1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)](2+), cis-[Pt(NH(3))(cyclohexylamine)](2+), [Pt(ethylenediamine)](2+), cis-[Pt(NH(3))(cyclobutylamine)](2+), and cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2-picoline)](2+) were examined. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that both the A and B domains of HMGB1 as well as TBP discriminate between different platinum-DNA adducts. HMGB1 domain A is the most sensitive to the nature of the spectator ligands on platinum. The effect of the spectator ligands on protein binding also depends highly on the base pairs flanking the platinated d(GpG) site. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the AG*G*C sequence, where the asterisks denote the sites of platination, with different spectator ligands are only moderately discriminated by the HMGB proteins and TBP, but the recognition of dsTG*G*A is highly dependent on the ligands. The effects of HMGB1 overexpression in a BG-1 ovarian cancer cell line, induced by steroid hormones, on the sensitivity of cells treated with [Pt(1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)Cl(2)] and cis-[Pt(NH(3))(cyclohexylamine)Cl(2)] were also examined. The results suggest that HMGB1 protein levels influence the cellular processing of cis-[Pt(NH(3))- (cyclohexylamine)](2+), but not [Pt((1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane)](2+), DNA lesions. This result is consistent with the observed binding of HMGB1a to platinum-modified dsTG*G*A probes but not with the binding affinity of HMGB1a and HMGB1 to platinum-damaged dsAG*G*C oligonucleotides. These experiments reinforce the importance of sequence context in platinum-DNA lesion recognition by cellular proteins.

  8. Carbon-ion beams induce production of an immune mediator protein, high mobility group box 1, at levels comparable with X-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Yuya; Oike, Takahiro; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ando, Ken; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Isono, Mayu; Mimura, Kousaku; Kono, Koji; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    X-ray radiotherapy activates tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses, and increases in the serum levels of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) induced by X-ray irradiation play a pivotal role in activating anti-tumor immunity. Here, we examined whether carbon-ion beams, as well as X-rays, can induce HMGB1 release from human cancer cell lines. The study examined five human cancer cell lines: TE2, KYSE70, A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr. The proportion of cells surviving X- or carbon-ion beam irradiation was assessed in a clonogenic assay. The D10, the dose at which 10% of cells survive, was calculated using a linear-quadratic model. HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants were assessed by an ELISA. The D10 dose for X-rays in TE2, KYSE70, A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr cells was 2.1, 6.7, 8.0, 4.8 and 7.1 Gy, respectively, whereas that for carbon-ion beams was 0.9, 2.5, 2.7, 1.8 and 3.5 Gy, respectively. X-rays and carbon-ion beams significantly increased HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants of A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr cells at 72 h post-irradiation with a D10 dose. Furthermore, irradiation with X-rays or carbon-ion beams significantly increased HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants of all five cell lines at 96 h post-irradiation. There was no significant difference in the amount of HMGB1 induced by X-rays and carbon-ion beams at any time-point (except at 96 h for NCI-H460 cells); thus we conclude that comparable levels of HMGB1 were detected after irradiation with iso-survival doses of X-rays and carbon-ion beams. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-22

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. [Expression of high mobility group box-1 in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-min; Yang, Hua

    2013-07-01

    To explore the expression of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and to explore its relationship with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin(IL)-1β. Sixty samples of lung tissues were obtained from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had underwent pneumonectomy in Department of Chest Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from June 2010 to December 2011. At the same period, 40 normal lung samples were also obtained from patients with pulmonary contusion and lung cancer by surgical resections as the control group. The mRNA expressions of HMGB1 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein level of HMGB1 was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays in lung tissue. Blood samples were taken from 89 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary tuberculosis group), including hematogenous disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (type II) in 35 cases and secondary pulmonary tuberculosis (type III) in 54 cases, and 50 healthy volunteers (control group). Furthermore, the 54 patients with secondary pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into different subgroups according to cavity formation and the lung fields involved: patients without lung cavity (35 cases) vs those with lung cavity (19 cases), patients with involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis (69 ± 29) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (22 ± 12) (t = 2.389, P pulmonary tuberculosis (786 ± 86) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (202 ± 60) (t = 3.872, P pulmonary tuberculosis group were (5.0 ± 3.2) µg/L, (118 ± 77) ng/L and (33 ± 20) ng/L, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group [(1.7 ± 1.0) µg/L, (40 ± 11) ng/L and (18 ± 12) ng/L, respectively], the respective t values being -0.928, 4.268 and 11.064, all P pulmonary tuberculosis, the serum concentration of HMGB

  11. Virtual box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard, Malthe Kirkhoff

    2007-01-01

    . This paper reports on the design, implementation and initial evaluation of Virtual Box. Virtual Box attempts to create a physical and engaging context in order to support reciprocal interactions with expressive content. An implemented version of Virtual Box is evaluated in a location-aware environment...

  12. High-mobility group box-1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in children with community acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalnins Imants

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Even though sepsis is one of the common causes of children morbidity and mortality, specific inflammatory markers for identifying sepsis are less studied in children. The main aim of this study was to compare the levels of high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1, Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP, Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP between infected children without systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and children with severe and less severe sepsis. The second aim was to examine HMGB1, LBP, IL6 and CRP as markers for of bacteraemia. Methods Totally, 140 children with suspected or proven infections admitted to the Children's Clinical University Hospital of Latvia during 2008 and 2009 were included. Clinical and demographical information as well as infection focus were assessed in all patients. HMGB1, LBP, IL-6 and CRP blood samples were determined. Children with suspected or diagnosed infections were categorized into three groups of severity of infection: (i infected without SIRS (n = 36, (ii sepsis (n = 91 and, (iii severe sepsis (n = 13. They were furthermore classified according bacteraemia into (i bacteremia (n = 30 and (ii no bacteraemia (n = 74. Results There was no statistically significant difference in HMGB1 levels between children with different levels of sepsis or with and without bacteraemia. The levels of LBP, IL-6 and CRP were statistically significantly higher among patients with sepsis compared to those infected but without SIRS (p p Conclusion Elevated levels of LBP, IL-6 and CRP were associated with a more severe level of infection in children. Whereas LBP, IL-6 and CRP seem to be good markers to detect patients with bacteraemia, HMGB1 seem to be of minor importance. LBP, IL-6 and CRP levels may serve as good biomarkers for identifying children with severe sepsis and bacteraemia and, thus, may be routinely used in clinical practice.

  13. Short-Term Hesperidin Pretreatment Attenuates Rat Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein Expression via the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hesperidin pretreatment has been shown to protect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the cardioprotective effects of a 3-day hesperidin pretreatment on I/R injury and to further explore whether its mechanism of action was associated with the inhibition of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 expression via the PI3K/Akt pathway. Methods: In a fixed-dose study, hematoxylin and eosin staining and myocardial enzyme measurements were used to determine the optimal dose of hesperidin that elicited the best cardioprotective effects against I/R injury. Furthermore, rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg hesperidin, and infarct size and the levels of myocardial enzymes, apoptosis, inflammatory and oxidative indices, and HMGB1 and p-Akt expression were measured. Results: Our results indicated that while different 3-day hesperidin pretreatment doses promoted histopathological changes and reduced myocardial enzymes induced by I/R the optimal dose was 200 mg/kg. Moreover, the 200 mg/kg hesperidin pretreatment not only significantly decreased the infarct size as well as myocardial enzyme levels but also inhibited myocardial apoptosis, the inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Additionally, hesperidin downregulated HMGB1 expression and upregulated p-Akt expression in the myocardium. LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, partially reversed the decreased HMGB1 expression, increased p-Akt expression induced by hesperidin and abolished the anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of hesperidin. Conclusion: These findings suggest that short-term pretreatment with hesperidin protects against myocardial I/R injury by suppressing myocardial apoptosis, the inflammatory response and oxidative stress via PI3K/Akt pathway activation and HMGB1 inhibition.

  14. Short-Term Hesperidin Pretreatment Attenuates Rat Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein Expression via the PI3K/Akt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefei; Hu, Xiaorong; Wang, Jichun; Xu, Weipan; Yi, Chunfeng; Ma, Ruisong; Jiang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hesperidin pretreatment has been shown to protect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the cardioprotective effects of a 3-day hesperidin pretreatment on I/R injury and to further explore whether its mechanism of action was associated with the inhibition of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) expression via the PI3K/Akt pathway. In a fixed-dose study, hematoxylin and eosin staining and myocardial enzyme measurements were used to determine the optimal dose of hesperidin that elicited the best cardioprotective effects against I/R injury. Furthermore, rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg hesperidin, and infarct size and the levels of myocardial enzymes, apoptosis, inflammatory and oxidative indices, and HMGB1 and p-Akt expression were measured. Our results indicated that while different 3-day hesperidin pretreatment doses promoted histopathological changes and reduced myocardial enzymes induced by I/R the optimal dose was 200 mg/kg. Moreover, the 200 mg/kg hesperidin pretreatment not only significantly decreased the infarct size as well as myocardial enzyme levels but also inhibited myocardial apoptosis, the inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Additionally, hesperidin downregulated HMGB1 expression and upregulated p-Akt expression in the myocardium. LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, partially reversed the decreased HMGB1 expression, increased p-Akt expression induced by hesperidin and abolished the anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of hesperidin. These findings suggest that short-term pretreatment with hesperidin protects against myocardial I/R injury by suppressing myocardial apoptosis, the inflammatory response and oxidative stress via PI3K/Akt pathway activation and HMGB1 inhibition. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The efficacy of gastrodin in combination with folate and vitamin B12 on patients with epilepsy after stroke and its effect on HMGB-1, IL-2 and IL-6 serum levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Xu, Lei; Huang, Hongli; Yu, Chunyu

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of gastrodin in combination with folate (FOL) and vitamin-B12 (V-B12) on patients with epilepsy after stroke (EAS) and its effect on high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB-1), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 serum levels. The clinical data of 92 EAS patients admitted for treatment between April, 2014 and March, 2016 were collected. These patients were randomly divided into control and observation groups (n=46 each) using computer software. Patients in the control group were administered only regular antiepileptic drugs, whereas observation group patients also received a combination of gastrodin, FOL and V-B12. After treatment, we compared efficacy, frequency of epileptic seizure, and Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) scores. Serum homocysteine (HCY), FOL and V-B12 levels were detected 3 months later. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect changes in serum HMGB-1, IL-2 and IL-6 levels at one day before treatment and on the 7th, 21st, 30th and 90th days after treatment. Pearson's correlation coefficient was utilized to analyze the correlations of HMGB-1 with IL-2 and IL-6. The total treatment effectiveness rate was 95.65% in the observation group, which was significantly higher than the control group (73.91%, pB12 serum levels were significantly higher, at 3 months post-treatment start in the observation group relative to control group (pB12 for EAS can significantly improve inflammatory response symptoms, decrease HCY levels, and increase FOL and V-B12 levels in serum while effectively controlling epileptic seizures, thus exhibiting relatively better clinical efficacy. Therefore, this combination treatment is worthy of being promoted in clinical practice.

  16. [shRNAs targeting high mobility group box-1 lead to inhibition of E-selectin expression via homeobox A9 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Jiao, Lili; Luan, Zhenggang; Ma, Xiaochun

    2015-08-01

    To approach the regulatory mechanism of high mobility group box-1 ( HMGB1 ) on the expression of E-selectin in human umbilical vein endothelial cell ( HUVEC ). Homeobox A9 ( HOXA9 ) siRNA was transfected to HUVEC at logarithmic phase, real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction ( real-time qPCR ) and Western Blot were used to determine the HOXA9 mRNA expression and protein expressions; a blank control group and a nonsilence negative control group were set. HUVEC stable transfected with pRNA-u6.1/Neo-HMGB1 shRNA plasmids ( HUVEC with low-expression HMGB1 ) was obtained, and HOXA9 and E-selectin mRNA expressions were determined with real-time qPCR; a nonsilence transfection group served as the negative control. The HOXA9 siRNA was transfected to HUVEC with low-expression HMGB1 as co-transfection group, and the E-selectin expressions was determined with real-time qPCR; a HMGB1 shRNA group and a HOXA9 nonsilence group served as control. (1) HOXA9 mRNA ( 2(-Δ ΔCT) ) and protein expression ( integral A value ) in blank control group were 1.094±0.115 and 1.031±0.060. Compared with nonsilence transfection group, HOXA9 siRNA transfection group could significantly reduced mRNA and protein expression of HOXA9 [ HOXA9 mRNA ( 2(-Δ ΔCT) ): 0.257±0.030 vs. 1.035±0.091, t = 14.010, P = 0.002; HOXA9 protein ( integral A value ): 0.278±0.042 vs. 0.975±0.014, t = 27.310, P = 0.002 ]. (2) Compared with nonsilence transfection group, HMGB1 shRNA transfection could up-regulate HOXA9 mRNA expression in HUVEC ( 2(-Δ ΔCT) : 2.519±0.278 vs. 0.856±0.063, t = 10.100, P = 0.001 ), also could down-regulate E-selectin mRNA expression ( 0.311±0.046 vs. 1.080±0.201, t = 7.415, P = 0.000 ). (3) Compared with HOXA9 nonsilence group and HMGB1 shRNA group, HMGB1 shRNA and HOXA9 siRNA co-transfected HUVEC cells could significantly elevate E-selectin mRNA expression ( 2(-Δ ΔCT) : 3.445±0.428 vs. 1.085±0.212, 1.004±0.104, t(1) = 8.507, t(2) = 9.603, both P < 0

  17. Placental growth factor, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products, extracellular newly identified receptor for receptor for advanced glycation end products binding protein and high mobility group box 1 levels in patients with acute kidney injury: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakiyanov, Oskar; Kriha, Vitezslav; Vachek, Jan; Zima, Tomas; Tesar, Vladimir; Kalousova, Marta

    2013-11-04

    Placental growth factor (PlGF), pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), extracellular newly identified receptor for RAGE binding protein (EN-RAGE) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1) are novel biomarkers in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, their clinical significance in acute kidney injury (AKI) is unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether selected biomarkers are changed in AKI patients. Serum PlGF, PAPP-A, sRAGE, EN-RAGE and HMGB-1 levels were assessed in 40 patients with AKI, 42 CKD 5 patients, 31 haemodialysis patients (HD) and 39 age-matched healthy controls. PAPP-A was elevated in AKI (20.6 ± 16.9 mIU/L) compared with controls (9.1 ± 2.3 mIU/L, p PAPP-A levels were associated with transferrin (p PAPP-A, EN-RAGE and HMGB1 are elevated, but sRAGE and PlGF are not increased. Whereas PAPP-A correlates with markers of nutrition; PlGF, EN-RAGE and HMGB-1 are related to inflammatory parameters.

  18. Bento Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Bento boxes are common objects in Japanese culture, designed to hold enough lunch for one person. They have individual compartments and sometimes multiple tiers for rice, vegetables, and other side dishes. They are made of materials ranging from wood, cloth, aluminum, or plastic. In general, the greater the number of foods, the better the box is…

  19. Cisplatin prevents high mobility group box 1 release and is protective in a murine model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Jon; Pan, Pinhua; Dhupar, Rajeev; Ross, Mark; Nakao, Atsunori; Lotze, Michael; Billiar, Timothy; Geller, David; Tsung, Allan

    2009-08-01

    The nuclear protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an important inflammatory mediator involved in the pathogenesis of liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Strategies aimed at preventing its release from stressed or damaged cells may be beneficial in preventing inflammation after I/R. Cisplatin is a member of the platinating chemotherapeutic agents and can induce DNA lesions that are capable of retaining high mobility group proteins inside the nucleus of cells. In vitro studies in primary cultured rat hepatocytes show that nontoxic concentrations of cisplatin can sequester HMGB1 inside the nucleus of hypoxic cells. Similarly, the in vivo administration of nontoxic doses of cisplatin prevents liver damage associated with a well-established murine model of hepatic I/R as measured by lower circulating serum aminotransferase levels, lower hepatic inflammatory cytokine levels including tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6, lower inducible NO synthase expression, and fewer I/R-associated histopathologic changes. The mechanism of action in vivo appears to involve the capacity of cisplatin to prevent the I/R-induced release of HMGB1 as well as to alter cell survival and stress signaling in the form of autophagy and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, respectively. Low, nontoxic doses of cisplatin can sequester HMGB1 inside the nucleus of redox-stressed hepatocytes in vitro and prevent its release in vivo in a murine model of hepatic I/R. Furthermore, cell survival and stress signaling pathways are altered by low-dose cisplatin. Therefore, platinating agents may provide a novel approach to mitigating the deleterious effects of I/R-mediated disease processes.

  20. Properties of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Differentiated Derivatives Depend on Nonhistone DNA-Binding HMGB1 and HMGB2 Proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bagherpoor, Alireza Jian; Doležalová, Dáša; Bárta, T.; Kučírek, Martin; Sani, Soodabeh Abbasi; Esner, M.; Bosakova, M.K.; Vinařský, V.; Peškova, L.; Hampl, A.; Štros, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2017), s. 328-340 ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01354S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA15-23033S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : group box 1 * chromatin protein * expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2016

  1. Pruni cortex ameliorates skin inflammation possibly through HMGB1-NFκB pathway in house dust mite induced atopic dermatitis NC/Nga transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Takashi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Fukumoto, Kyoko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    Pruni cortex, the bark of Prunus jamasakura Siebold ex Koidzumi, has been used in the Japanese systems of medicine for many years for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitussive properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of pruni cortex on atopic dermatitis NC/Nga mouse model. Atopic dermatitis-like lesion was induced by the application of house dust mite extract to the dorsal skin. After induction of atopic dermatitis, pruni cortex aqueous extract (1 g/kg, p.o.) was administered daily for 2 weeks. We evaluated dermatitis severity, histopathological changes and cellular protein expression by Western blotting for nuclear and cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear factor κB, apoptosis and inflammatory markers in the skin of atopic dermatitis mice. The clinical observation confirmed that the dermatitis score was significantly lower when treated with pruni cortex than in the atopic dermatitis group. Similarly pruni cortex inhibited hypertrophy and infiltration of inflammatory cells as identified by histopathology. In addition, pruni cortex significantly inhibited the protein expression of cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear p-nuclear factor kappa B, apoptosis and inflammatory markers. These results indicate that pruni cortex may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of atopic dermatitis by attenuating high mobility group box 1 and inflammation possibly through the nuclear factor κB pathway.

  2. A Genome-wide Association Study Provides Evidence of Sex-specific Involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46 With Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Meng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system and it affects around 1 in 4 diabetic patients in the UK. The purpose of this genome-wide association study (GWAS was to identify genetic contributors to this disorder. Cases of neuropathic pain were defined as diabetic patients with a multiple prescription history of at least one of five drugs specifically indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Controls were diabetic individuals who were not prescribed any of these drugs, nor amitriptyline, carbamazepine, or nortriptyline. Overall, 961 diabetic neuropathic pain cases and 3260 diabetic controls in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside (GoDARTS cohort were identified. We found a cluster in the Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P with a lowest P value of 2.74 × 10−7 at rs71647933 in females and a cluster in the Chr8p23.1, next to HMGB1P46 with a lowest P value of 8.02 × 10−7 at rs6986153 in males. Sex-specific narrow sense heritability was higher in males (30.0% than in females (14.7%. This GWAS on diabetic neuropathic pain provides evidence for the sex-specific involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46 with the disorder, indicating the need for further research.

  3. Naringin Decreases TNF-α and HMGB1 Release from LPS-Stimulated Macrophages and Improves Survival in a CLP-Induced Sepsis Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minchan Gil

    Full Text Available Naringin, a flavanone glycoside extracted from various plants, has a wide range of pharmacological effects. In the present study, we investigated naringin's mechanism of action and its inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and high-mobility group box 1 expression in macrophages, and on death in a cecal ligation and puncture induced mouse model of sepsis. Naringin increased heme oxygenase 1 expression in peritoneal macrophage cells through the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, p38, and NF-E2-related factor 2. Inhibition of heme oxygenase 1 abrogated the naringin's inhibitory effect on high-mobility group box 1 expression and NF-kB activation in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, mice pretreated with naringin (200 mg/kg exhibited decreased sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury, and alleviated lung pathological changes. However, the naringin's protective effects on sepsis-induced lung injury were eliminated by zinc protoporphyrin, a heme oxygenase 1 competitive inhibitor. These results revealed the mechanism underlying naringin's protective effect in inflammation and may be beneficial for the treatment of sepsis.

  4. Paraformaldehyde Fixation May Lead to Misinterpretation of the Subcellular Localization of Plant High Mobility Group Box Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Wah; Zhou, Liang; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis High Mobility Group Box (HMBG) proteins were previously found associated with the interphase chromatin but not the metaphase chromosome. However, these studies are usually based on immunolocalization analysis involving paraformaldehyde fixation. Paraformaldehyde fixation has been widely adapted to preserved cell morphology before immunofluorescence staining. On one hand, the processed cells are no longer living. On the other hand, the processing may lead to misinterpretation of localization. HMGBs from Arabidopsis were fused with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and transformed into tobacco BY-2 cells. Basically, the localization of these HMGB proteins detected with EGFP fluorescence in interphase agreed with previous publications. Upon 4% paraformaldehyde fixation, AtHMGB1 was found associated with interphase but not the metaphase chromosomes as previously reported. However, when EGFP fluorescence signal was directly observed under confocal microscope without fixation, association of AtHMGB1 with metaphase chromosomes can be detected. Paraformaldehyde fixation led to dissociation of EGFP tagged AtHMBG1 protein from metaphase chromosomes. This kind of pre-processing of live specimen may lead to dissociation of protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interaction. Therefore, using of EGFP fusion proteins in live specimen is a better way to determine the correct localization and interaction of proteins.

  5. Glycyrrhizin inhibits porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection and attenuates the proinflammatory responses by inhibition of high mobility group box-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Chang-Chao; Wang, Hua-Xia; Sheng, Xiang-Xiang; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xin; Mao, Xiang

    2017-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED), caused by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection, leads to significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. In our studies, we found that glycyrrhizin, the major component of licorice root extracts, could moderately inhibit PEDV infection in Vero cells, when analyzed by western blot, qRT-PCR and a plaque formation assay. We also revealed that glycyrrhizin inhibited the entry and replication of PEDV. In addition, we demonstrated that glycyrrhizin decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Since glycyrrhizin is a competitive inhibitor of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), we confirmed that TLR4 and RAGE (£ associated with PEDV pathogenesis during the infection in Vero cells. In summary, our studies provide a molecular basis for developing novel therapeutic methods to control PEDV infection, based on glycyrrhizin and its derivatives.

  6. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data......F) docking experiment against an existing technique, which requires the user to perform the rotation and scaling of the box explicitly. The precision of the users' box construction is evaluated by a novel error metric measuring the difference between two boxes. The results of the experiment strongly indicate...... that for precision docking of 9 DoF boxes, some of the proposed techniques are significantly better than ones with explicit rotation and scaling. Another interesting result is that the number of DoF simultaneously controlled by the user significantly influences the precision of the docking....

  7. Math in the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make an origami paper box and explores the algebra, geometry, and other mathematics that unfolds. A set of origami steps that transforms the paper into an open box can hold mathematical surprises for both students and teachers. An origami lesson can engage students in an open-ended exploration of the relationship…

  8. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  9. Overexpression of oligouridylate binding protein 1b results in ABA hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Kanno, Yuri; Seo, Mitsunori; Seki, Motoaki

    2017-02-01

    Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b), a marker protein of plant stress granules (SGs), plays a role in heat stress tolerance in plants. A previous microarray analysis revealed that the expression of several ABA signaling-related genes is higher in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox) subjected to both non-stressed and heat stress conditions. Root elongation and seed germination assays demonstrated that UBP1b-ox exhibited hypersensitivity to ABA. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade genes, such as MPK3, MKK4, and MKK9 were upregulated in UBP1b-ox plants. ABA receptor genes, including PYL5 and PYL6, were also upregulated in UBP1b-ox plants. mRNA of WRKY33 - a downstream gene of MPK3 and an upstream gene of ethylene biosynthesis, exhibited high levels of accumulation, although the level of endogenous ABA was not significantly different between UBP1b-ox and control plants. In addition, RNA decay analysis revealed that WRKY33 was more stable in UBP1b-ox plants, indicating that the mRNA of WRKY33 was protected within UBP1b SGs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an important role in plant response to ABA.

  10. BoxPlot++

    OpenAIRE

    Azmeh, Zeina; Hamoui, Fady; Huchard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    We propose the BoxPlot++ as an extension of Tukey's boxplot. We improve the resulting data values distribution by removing the repeated values and by calculating distances between the points and the nearest median.

  11. Methylation-mediated repression of microRNA-129-2 suppresses cell aggressiveness by inhibiting high mobility group box 1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhikui; Dou, Changwei; Yao, Bowen; Xu, Meng; Ding, Linglong; Wang, Yufeng; Jia, Yuli; Li, Qing; Zhang, Hongyong; Tu, Kangsheng; Song, Tao; Liu, Qingguang

    2016-06-14

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and its dysfunction have been revealed as crucial modulators of cancer initiation and progression. MiR-129-2 has been reported to play a tumor suppressive role in different human malignancies. Here, we demonstrated that miR-129-2 was significantly decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, miR-129-2 was expressed at significant lower levels in aggressive and recurrent tumor tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that miR-129-2 expression was inversely correlated with venous infiltration, high Edmondson-Steiner grading and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage in HCC. Notably, miR-129-2 was an independent prognostic factor for indicating overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of HCC patients. Ectopic expression of miR-129-2 inhibited cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we confirmed that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was a direct target of miR-129-2, and it abrogated the function of miR-129-2 in HCC. Mechanistic investigations showed that miR-129-2 overexpression inhibited AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase2/9 (MMP2/9). Upregulation of p-AKT abolished the decreased cell migration and invasion induced by miR-129-2 in HCC. Whereas inhibition of Akt phosphorylation significantly decreased HMGB1-enhanced HCC cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that miR-129-2 was downregulated by DNA methylation, and demethylation of miR-129-2 increased miR-129-2 expression in HCC cells and resulted in significant inhibitory effects on cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, miR-129-2 may serve as a prognostic indicator for HCC patients and exerts tumor suppressive role, at least in part, by inhibiting HMGB1.

  12. Boxes and Shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Dean

    2008-01-01

    The Boxes and Shelves series from 2008 are are all made from the backing card from discarded writing pads. Boxes and Shelves extended my investigation of quotidian materials and their relationship to the origins of creative toil. Since 1996 my research has sought to identify and locate instances where the 'unmeasurable' meets the measurable. I have consistently employed a range of utilitarian materials such as bus seats, bus tickets, puddles, A4 writing paper, to present a series of 'problem ...

  13. Freedom to box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, N

    1998-02-01

    The british Medical Association wants to criminalise all boxing. This article examines the logic of the arguments it uses and finds them wanting. The move from medical evidence about the risk of brain damage to the conclusion that boxing should be banned is not warranted. The BMA's arguments are a combination of inconsistent paternalism and legal moralism. Consistent application of the principles implicit in the BMA's arguments would lead to absurd consequences and to severe limitations being put on individual freedom.

  14. Cable Tester Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Cables are very important electrical devices that carry power and signals across multiple instruments. Any fault in a cable can easily result in a catastrophic outcome. Therefore, verifying that all cables are built to spec is a very important part of Electrical Integration Procedures. Currently, there are two methods used in lab for verifying cable connectivity. (1) Using a Break-Out Box and an ohmmeter this method is time-consuming but effective for custom cables and (2) Commercial Automated Cable Tester Boxes this method is fast, but to test custom cables often requires pre-programmed configuration files, and cables used on spacecraft are often uniquely designed for specific purposes. The idea is to develop a semi-automatic continuity tester that reduces human effort in cable testing, speeds up the electrical integration process, and ensures system safety. The JPL-Cable Tester Box is developed to check every single possible electrical connection in a cable in parallel. This system indicates connectivity through LED (light emitting diode) circuits. Users can choose to test any pin/shell (test node) with a single push of a button, and any other nodes that are shorted to the test node, even if they are in the same connector, will light up with the test node. The JPL-Cable Tester Boxes offers the following advantages: 1. Easy to use: The architecture is simple enough that it only takes 5 minutes for anyone to learn how operate the Cable Tester Box. No pre-programming and calibration are required, since this box only checks continuity. 2. Fast: The cable tester box checks all the possible electrical connections in parallel at a push of a button. If a cable normally takes half an hour to test, using the Cable Tester Box will improve the speed to as little as 60 seconds to complete. 3. Versatile: Multiple cable tester boxes can be used together. As long as all the boxes share the same electrical potential, any number of connectors can be tested together.

  15. High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein Induction by Mycobacterium Bovis BCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Hofner

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Our pilot experiments draw attention to the HMGB1 inducing ability of Mycobacterium bovis. Assesment of the pathophysiological role of this late cytokine in mycobacterial infections demands further in vitro and in vivo examinations.

  16. Inhibition of sphingosine kinase 1 ameliorates acute liver failure by reducing high-mobility group box 1 cytoplasmic translocation in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Li, Wen; Luo, Pan; Zheng, Pei-Fen

    2015-12-14

    To determine the therapeutic potential of sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) inhibition and its underlying mechanism in a well-characterized mouse model of D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver failure (ALF). Balb/c mice were randomly assigned to different groups, with ALF induced by intraperitoneal injection of D-GaIN (600 mg/kg) and LPS (10 μg/kg). The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels at different time points within one week were determined using a multi-parametric analyzer. Serum high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and sphingosine-1-phosphate were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatic morphological changes at 36 h after acute liver injury induction were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. HMGB1 expression in hepatocytes and cytoplasmic translocation were detected by immunohistochemistry. Expression of Sphk1 in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by Western blot. The expression of Sphk1 in liver tissue and PBMCs was upregulated in GalN/LPS-induced ALF. Upregulated Sphk1 expression in liver tissue was mainly caused by Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages of the liver. The survival rates of mice in the N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS, a specific inhibitor of SphK1) treatment group were significantly higher than that of the control group (P liver cells were significantly decreased in the DMS treatment group compared to the control group (43.72% ± 5.51% vs 3.57% ± 0.83%, χ(2) = 12.81, P liver cells, and so might be a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  17. The BOXES Methodology Black Box Dynamic Control

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, David W

    2012-01-01

    Robust control mechanisms customarily require knowledge of the system’s describing equations which may be of the high order differential type.  In order to produce these equations, mathematical models can often be derived and correlated with measured dynamic behavior.  There are two flaws in this approach one is the level of inexactness introduced by linearizations and the other when no model is apparent.  Several years ago a new genre of control systems came to light that are much less dependent on differential models such as fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms. Both of these soft computing solutions require quite considerable a priori system knowledge to create a control scheme and sometimes complicated training program before they can be implemented in a real world dynamic system. Michie and Chambers’ BOXES methodology created a black box system that was designed to control a mechanically unstable system with very little a priori system knowledge, linearization or approximation.  All the method need...

  18. Opto-Box

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Welch, Steven; Smith, Dale Shane; Che, Siinn; Gan, K.K.; Boyd, George Russell Jr

    2015-01-01

    The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules, which process and transfer optoelectronic data. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35x10x8 cm^3. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain.

  19. Teaching with Box Tops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiser, Lynne; D'Zamko, Mary Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    Using environmental materials (such as the phone book and placemats from fast food restaurants) can be a motivating way to teach learning disabled students skills and concepts, as shown in an approach to reading, math, science and nutrition, and social studies instruction using a JELL-O brand gelatin box. (CL)

  20. Many-box locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuqian; Cai, Yu; Bancal, Jean-Daniel; Gao, Fei; Scarani, Valerio

    2017-11-01

    There is an ongoing search for a physical or operational definition for quantum mechanics. Several informational principles have been proposed which are satisfied by a theory less restrictive than quantum mechanics. Here, we introduce the principle of "many-box locality," which is a refined version of the previously proposed "macroscopic locality." These principles are based on coarse graining the statistics of several copies of a given box. The set of behaviors satisfying many-box locality for N boxes is denoted LNM B. We study these sets in the bipartite scenario with two binary measurements, in relation with the sets Q and Q1 +A B of quantum and "almost quantum" correlations, respectively. We find that the LNM B sets are, in general, not convex. For unbiased marginals, by working in the Fourier space we can prove analytically that LNM B⊈Q for any finite N , while L∞M B=Q . Then, with suitably developed numerical tools, we find an example of a point that belongs to L16M B but not to Q1 +A B. Among the problems that remain open is whether Q ⊂L∞M B .

  1. IN-A-BOX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 2. Claude Elwood Shannon. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 7 Issue 2 February 2002 pp 2-3. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/02/0002-0003. Author Affiliations.

  2. Mystery Box Marvels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Joel; Centurio, Tina

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the first week of school could very well set the stage for the rest of the school year. Setting high standards for science activities based in inquiry can start on the first day of science class and develop as the year unfolds. With the use of simple, readily available, inexpensive materials, an efficient mystery box lesson can be…

  3. Operant-Box Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Stuart J.

    1971-01-01

    Sketches a model which considers society a teacher which instructs like an operant box..." The author contends that the family, the school, the play group, the adolescent gang, the office, the prison, the mental hospital, each reward, instruct and control the individual who learns by operant means what the institution teaches." (Author/AL)

  4. Hermit Points on a Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  5. Opto-Box

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00377159; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules, which process and transfer optoelectronic data. Many novel solutions were developed for the custom design and manufacturing. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35x10x8 cm$^{3}$. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain.

  6. Fragile X mental retardation protein interactions with the microtubule associated protein 1B RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Lakshmi; Mader, Samantha Ann; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2008-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to use its arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) box to bind to a subset of RNA targets that form a G quadruplex structure. We performed a detailed analysis of the interactions between the FMRP RGG box and the microtubule associated protein 1B (MAP1B) mRNA, a relevant in vivo FMRP target. We show that MAP1B RNA forms an intramolecular G quadruplex structure, which is bound with high affinity and specificity by the FMRP RGG box. We determined that hydrophobic interactions are important in the FMRP RGG box-MAP1B RNA association, with minor contributions from electrostatic interactions. Our findings that at low protein:RNA ratios the RNA G quadruplex structure is slightly stabilized, whereas at high ratios is unfolded, suggest a mechanism by which the FMRP concentration variation in response to a neurotransmitter stimulation event could act as a regulatory switch for the protein function, from translation repressor to translation activator.

  7. Boxed Permutation Pattern Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amit, Mika; Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2016-01-01

    the goal is to only find the boxed subsequences of T that are order-isomorphic to P. This problem was introduced by Bruner and Lackner who showed that it can be solved in O(n3) time. Cho et al. [CPM 2015] gave an O(n2m) time algorithm and improved it to O(n2 logm). In this paper we present a solution...

  8. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1: The Outsider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is one of the first characterized proteins that bind auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses. Early studies characterized its auxin binding properties and focused on rapid electrophysiological and cell expansion responses, while subsequent work indicated a role in cell cycle and cell division control. Very recently, ABP1 has been ascribed a role in modulating endocytic events at the plasma membrane and RHO OF PLANTS-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements during asymmetric cell expansion. The exact molecular function of ABP1 is still unresolved, but its main activity apparently lies in influencing events at the plasma membrane. This review aims to connect the novel findings with the more classical literature on ABP1 and to point out the many open questions that still separate us from a comprehensive model of ABP1 action, almost 40 years after the first reports of its existence. PMID:21719690

  9. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  10. High mobility group box-1 protein in patients with suspected community-acquired infections and sepsis: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, Shahin; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Koldkjaer, Ole Graesbøll

    2008-01-01

    -infected patients and all infected patients, the area under the curve for HMGB1 was 0.59 (P white blood cell count, neutrophils, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (P

  11. Spirit Boxes: Expressions of Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuro, Ted

    1984-01-01

    After studying the culture and art of the ancient civilizations of South America, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Egypt, secondary level art students made spirit boxes as expressions of the various cultures. How to make the boxes and how to prepare the face molds are described. (RM)

  12. Being Creative "Inside the Box"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomascoff, Rocky

    2011-01-01

    Artist Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) created wonderful environments inside boxes using mostly found objects. They were often Surrealistic in nature. Some boxes were designed with glass fronts, and others were meant to be interactive with the viewer, wherein the objects could be handled. With Joseph Cornell in mind, the author introduces an art…

  13. Box-and-Whisker Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Russell D.

    1985-01-01

    Box-and-whisker plots (which give rapid visualization of batches of data) can be effectively used to present diverse collections of data used in traditional first-year chemistry courses. Construction of box-and-whisker plots and their use with bond energy data and data on heats of formation and solution are discussed. (JN)

  14. Microclimate boxes for panel paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The use of microclimate boxes to protect vulnerable panel paintings is, therefore, not a new phenomenon of the past two or three decades. Rather, it has been a concern for conservators and curators to protect these objects of art at home and in transit since the end of the nineteenth century....... The increased number of travelling exhibitions in recent years has heightened the need to protect paintings during circulation (Thomson 1961; Mecklenburg 1991). The use and design of microclimate boxes have been evolving since 1892. These boxes may be divided into three broad groups: those using an active...

  15. Two-dimensional box plot

    OpenAIRE

    Phattrawan Tongkumchum

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a two-dimensional box plot, a simple bivariate extension of the box plot and the scatter plot. This plot comprises a pair of trapeziums oriented in the direction of a fitted straight line, with symbols denoting extreme values. The choice for the fitted straight resistant line showing the relationship between the two variables is Tukey’s resistance line. The main components of the plot are an inner box containing 50% of the projection points of the observations on the ...

  16. DIRECT KICKS IN BOXING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izet Kahrović

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hit directly, giving any impact maximum muscle strength is skill, and it is neces- sary to the exercise and learning to make it perfect. Training begins with oral statement, so that students get to know with the techni- que that works. After oral exposure, it is necessary to create a good notion on technology that is adopted. The best way for the creation of good notion is a good demonstration. In direct training kicks in the box, you need patience and gradualness and there- fore uses a large number of additional exercises. In their work with beginners, in the first class, individual elements of technology, and also direct blow, it is necessary to separate the parts and run them on multiple commands, to later come to the confluence in one command. Direct wounds, with left and right hand, can be run from the towns, on the head and body, from the movement, to step forward, step back and step aside, the remedy to the left and right side. Left direct is taking out from a running protrusion hands, but kick, which is a pro- duct of the system, ankle-knee-pelvis and shoulder forward horizontaly. Set at the time of stripes, body weight over the left leg. Right direct from the place, starting ekscentrical reflecsive impuls of a extensor muscle in ankle, knee and joint of a hip.This kind of a sud- den movement is running simultaneously with the rotation of the body around vertical (longitudinal axis, with the transfer body weight on the left leg. Further movement to the hand which serves as a lever, which is transmitted through the power stroke

  17. Box Plots: Basic and Advanced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenex, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a five-number summary which is a display of the minimum value, lower quartile, median, upper quartile, and maximum value. Indicates how to draw box plots as graphical representations of a five-number summary. (YP)

  18. Implementace hry Dots and Boxes

    OpenAIRE

    Balko, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Title: Dots and Boxes implementation Author: Martin Balko Department: Department of Applied Mathematics Supervisor: RNDr. Ondřej Pangrác, Ph.D. Supervisor's email address: Abstract: The presented thesis deals with the analysis of a popular logical game Dots and Boxes and its generalized versions. It focuses on the different methods and algorithms of opponent's artificial intelligence. The result of the work is implementation of the generalized version of this game in w...

  19. Thinking Outside the Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Lorne [World Nuclear Transport Institute, Remo House, 310-312 Regent Street, London, W1B 3AX (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The World Nuclear Transport Institute was formed to fill a need to provide a dedicated vehicle for the radioactive transport and packaging industry sectors worldwide, to exchange information and ideas, all with a view to working toward consolidated industry positions on the key issues affecting safe, efficient and reliable transport. WNTI was also intended to be a strong voice for industry in those international and national bodies where deliberations on such transport safety issues take place. The very fact that companies, sometimes in competition with each other, were prepared to come together in this way, reflects two important points: firstly, it represents an acknowledgement on industry's part that safe, effective and reliable transport is the sine qua non, the absolute essential. And second, it is a recognition that it is enhanced to the extent that industry is able to collaborate to this end. This is thinking outside the box. Another important attribute of safety is 'stability'. Everyone likes to know where he or she stands. The radioactive materials packaging and transport industry thrives within a stable regulatory framework for safety. For a stable regulatory regime allows operators to be properly trained; it allows operators to become familiar with safety requirements, and to be at ease with them. Stability is conducive to safety and efficiency. Stability is good for business too - for stability in package and transport requirements allows sufficient time for a fair return on investment in expensive package design, manufacture, licensing and use over time. Stability should not, however, be opposed to creativity. From experience we can develop new thinking to improve efficiency as illustrated in examples of work related to the packaging and transport of Uranium Concentrates for instance.. Another example is work within WNTI on the thermal test requirements for the packaging of uranium hexafluoride. The robustness of packages is based on the

  20. Comparison of black-box, glass-box and open-box software for aiding conceptual understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Hosein, Anesa; Aczel, James; Clow, Doug; Richardson, John T E

    2008-01-01

    Three mathematical software types: black-box (no steps shown), glass-box (steps shown) and open-box (interactive steps) were used by 32 students to solve conceptual and procedural tasks on the computer via remote observation. Comparison of the three software types suggests that there is no difference in the scores that students receive for conceptual understanding tasks. Students using the black-box are more likely to explore answers than students using the glass and open-box software.

  1. 30 CFR 56.12006 - Distribution boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distribution boxes. 56.12006 Section 56.12006... Distribution boxes. Distribution boxes shall be provided with a disconnecting device for each branch circuit... visual observation when such a device is open and that the circuit is deenergized, the distribution box...

  2. 30 CFR 57.12006 - Distribution boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distribution boxes. 57.12006 Section 57.12006... and Underground § 57.12006 Distribution boxes. Distribution boxes shall be provided with a... deenergized, and the distribution box shall be labeled to show which circuit each device controls. ...

  3. Regulation of high mobility group box protein 1 expression following mechanical loading by orthodontic forces in vitro and in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Michael; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Küpper, Katharina; Jäger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    ...) cells challenged by mechanical loading similar to force levels being applied in orthodontic treatment in vitro and to transfer these findings to an in vivo microenvironment in an animal model of tooth movement in rats...

  4. First-aid boxes - Reminder

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    With a view to ensuring optimum use of the first-aid boxes on the CERN site, we should like to remind you of various changes introduced in March 2009: The TSO of the buildings concerned is responsible for the first-aid boxes, including checking their contents.   First-aid boxes may be restocked ONLY at the CERN stores (SCEM No. 54.99.80). This is no longer possible at the Infirmary. The associated cost is charged to the Departments.   First-aid boxes should be used only for mild injuries. All other cases should be referred to the Medical Service Infirmary (Bldg. 57 – ground-floor, tel. 73802) between 8.00 a.m. and 5.30 p.m. or to the Fire and Rescue Service (tel. 74444). N.B.: This information does not apply to the red emergency first-aid boxes in the underground areas or to the emergency kits for use in the event of being splashed with hydrofluoric acid.

  5. Identifying competencies of boxing coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tasiopoulos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the management skills required by boxing coaches to administrate their clubs. For the purposes of this study a scale was constructed which was answered by 98 boxing coaches. Explanatory factor analysis revealed seven factors: Communication-public relations (5 items, event management (4 items, management techniques (4 items, new technologies (4 items, prevention-safety (2 items, sport (5 items and sports facilities (2 items. The Cronbach of the scale was 0.85. The five competencies that rated by the coaches were: Supervisors of the area of training, maintaining excellent communication with athletes, using new technologies (e-mail, internet, handling disciplinary matters, accidents, complaints and reports on some sporting games and promoted harmony among athletes. We concluded that boxing coaches understand that the competencies required for meeting their obligations, were related to sports, prevention, safety and communications-public relations.

  6. Expo-Box Contact Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-Expo-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  7. On the Dirichlet's Box Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kin-Keung; Shiu, Wai-Chee

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we will focus on several applications on the Dirichlet's box principle in Discrete Mathematics lesson and number theory lesson. In addition, the main result is an innovative game on a triangular board developed by the authors. The game has been used in teaching and learning mathematics in Discrete Mathematics and some high schools in…

  8. The Bird Box Survey Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    When high school students are asked what's the best part of science class, many will say it's the field trips. Students enjoy engaging in authentic, community-based science outside the classroom. To capitalize on this, Patrick Willis created the Bird Box Survey Project for his introductory field biology class. The project takes students…

  9. Light Therapy Boxes for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal affective disorder treatment: Choosing a light therapy box Light therapy boxes can offer an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder. Features such as light intensity, safety, cost and ...

  10. Main: BOX2PSGS2 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BOX2PSGS2 S000204 17-May-1998 (last modified) kehi Box 2 in glutamine synthetase (G...S2) gene in pea (P.s.); Repeated in tandem with a partial palindrome located between the repeats; Located at ca. -300 of pea GS2; Box

  11. The Heuristic Interpretation of Box Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Box plots are frequently used, but are often misinterpreted by students. Especially the area of the box in box plots is often misinterpreted as representing number or proportion of observations, while it actually represents their density. In a first study, reaction time evidence was used to test whether heuristic reasoning underlies this…

  12. Epstein Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 in Hodgkin's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1), CD15 and CD30 immunohistochemistry was also performed. The clinical characteristics of each patient were documented. Objectives: To document the frequency of involvement of Epstein-Barr virus in cases of HL seen in a university hospital in Nigeria. Results: Out of ...

  13. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target...

  14. RAGE deficiency alleviates aortic valve calcification in ApoE-/-mice via the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Cai, Zhejun; Liu, Baoqing; Liu, Zongtao; Zhou, Xianming; Dong, Nianguo; Li, Fei

    2017-03-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been shown to be involved in calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, the association between RAGE and ER stress remains unknown in the pathogenesis of CAVD. The current study aims to test the hypothesis that RAGE deficiency alleviates aortic valve calcification via the inhibition of ER stress. Up-regulation of RAGE and ER stress markers in calcified human aortic valves were confirmed by immunoblotting. Aortic valve calcification was evaluated in atherosclerotic prone ApoE -/- mice or in mice with dual deficiencies of ApoE and RAGE (ApoE -/- RAGE -/- ) fed with high cholesterol diet for 24weeks. Echocardiography and histological examination show that genetic deficiency of RAGE attenuates aortic valve calcification in ApoE -/- mice. Meanwhile, RAGE deficiency inhibited the osteogenic signaling and ER stress activation as well as suppressed macrophage infiltration in vivo. Cultured human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) were treated with high molecular group box 1 protein (HMGB1) as in vitro model. We found that HMGB1 induced osteoblastic differentiation and calcification through RAGE/ER stress. Furthermore, Sox9 up-regulation and intranuclear translocation mediated the pro-osteogenic effect of HMGB1 on AVICs. RAGE or ER stress knockdown reduced the up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in human AVICs exposed to HMGB1.These novel findings demonstrate that RAGE deficiency protects against aortic valve calcification in high cholesterol diet-fed ApoE -/- mice via inhibition of ER stress. HMGB1 induces AVIC osteoblastic differentiation and calcification through RAGE/ER stress/Sox9 pathway. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Lessons from the light-cone box

    CERN Document Server

    Leibbrandt, G

    2000-01-01

    Working in the noncovariant light-cone gauge, we discuss the explicit computation of the 1PI four-point function ("box diagram") in Yang- Mills theory. The complete box diagram which consists of 16 box subdiagrams, 8 lynx subdiagrams and 4 fish subdiagrams, yields both local and nonlocal UV divergent terms. The nonlocal terms are consistent with gauge symmetry and correspond to a nonlocal renormalization of the wave function. (14 refs).

  16. IMPROVED, FAVORABLE FOR ENVIRONMENT POLYURETHANE COLD-BOX-PROCESS (COLD BOX «HUTTENES-ALBERTUS» .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sergini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the laboratory and industrial investigations, the purpose of which is improvement of the classical Cold-box-process, i.e. the process of the slugs hardening in cold boxes, are presented.

  17. TAK1-binding protein 1 is a pseudophosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, Sarah H; Kular, Gursant; Peggie, Mark; Shepherd, Sharon; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W; Cohen, Philip; van Aalten, Daan M.F.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract TAB1 (TAK1-binding protein 1) is one of the regulatory subunits of TGF{beta}-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), a protein kinase that lies at the head of three pro-inflammatory kinase cascades. Here we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of TAB1. Surprisingly, TAB1 possesses a fold closely related to that of the PPM phosphatase family as demonstrated by the close structural similarity with protein phosphatase 2C{alpha}. However, we were unable to detect any phosp...

  18. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1: a key mediator in inflammatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Esther; Medina, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Urdiales, José Luis

    2009-05-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemoattractant for monocytes and macrophages to areas of inflammation. MCP-1 is a prototypical chemokine subject to coordinated regulation by immunomodulatory agents. Since MCP-1 is implicated in multiple inflammatory diseases, it is a potential target for the treatment of these disorders. In this review, we will provide background information and summarize the MCP-1 structure and signaling pathways. Its involvement in multiple diseases, such as tumour development, atherogenesis and rare autoimmune diseases is also revised.

  19. Vascular barrier protective effects of baicalin, baicalein and wogonin in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Soyoung [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Sae-Kwang [Department of Anatomy and Histology, College of Korean Medicine, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min-Su [Laboratory for Arthritis and Bone Biology, Fatima Research Institute, Fatima Hospital, Daegu 701-600 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong-Sup, E-mail: baejs@knu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Inhibition of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and restoration of endothelial integrity is emerging as an attractive therapeutic strategy in the management of sepsis. Here, three structurally related polyphenols found in the Chinese herb Huang Qui, baicalin (BCL), baicalein (BCN), and wogonin (WGN), were examined for their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated release of HMGB1 and on modulation of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses. According to our data, BCL, BCN, and WGN inhibited the release of HMGB1 and down-regulated HMGB1-dependent inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells. BCL, BCN, and WGN also inhibited HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability and leukocyte migration in mice. In addition, treatment with BCL, BCN, and WGN reduced CLP-induced release of HMGB1 and sepsis-related mortality and pulmonary injury in mice. These results indicate that BCL, BCN, and WGN could be candidate therapeutic agents for various severe vascular inflammatory diseases owing to their inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • HMGB1 is an inflammatory mediator for vascular inflammation. • Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin inhibited HMGB1-induced hyperpermeability in vitro and in vivo. • Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin inhibited HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses. • Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin suppressed the activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and production of TNF-α and IL-6. • Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin prevent CLP-induced septic mortality.

  20. 36 CFR 1192.33 - Fare box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fare box. 1192.33 Section 1192.33 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD... Systems § 1192.33 Fare box. Where provided, the farebox shall be located as far forward as practicable and...

  1. Magnetorotational dynamo action in the shearing box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Justin; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic dynamo action caused by the magnetorotational instability is studied in the shearing-box approximation with no imposed net magnetic flux. Consistent with recent studies, the dynamo action is found to be sensitive to the aspect ratio of the box: it is much easier to obtain in tall boxes (stretched in the direction normal to the disc plane) than in long boxes (stretched in the radial direction). Our direct numerical simulations indicate that the dynamo is possible in both cases, given a large enough magnetic Reynolds number. To explain the relatively larger effort required to obtain the dynamo action in a long box, we propose that the turbulent eddies caused by the instability most efficiently fold and mix the magnetic field lines in the radial direction. As a result, in the long box the scale of the generated strong azimuthal (stream-wise directed) magnetic field is always comparable to the scale of the turbulent eddies. In contrast, in the tall box the azimuthal magnetic flux spreads in the vertical direction over a distance exceeding the scale of the turbulent eddies. As a result, different vertical sections of the tall box are permeated by large-scale non-zero azimuthal magnetic fluxes, facilitating the instability. In agreement with this picture, the cases when the dynamo is efficient are characterized by a strong intermittency of the local azimuthal magnetic fluxes.

  2. Unification of box shapes in molecular simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, H.

    1997-01-01

    In molecular simulations with periodic boundary conditions the computational box may have five different shapes: triclinic; the hexagonal prism; two types of dodecahedrons; and the truncated octahedron. In this article, we show that every molecular simulation, formulated in one of these boxes, can

  3. An effective box trap for capturing lynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay A. Kolbe; John R. Squires; Thomas W. Parker

    2003-01-01

    We designed a box trap for capturing lynx (Lynx lynx) that is lightweight, safe, effective, and less expensive than many commercial models. It can be constructed in approximately 3-4 hours from readily available materials. We used this trap to capture 40 lynx 89 times (96% of lynx entering traps) and observed no trapping related injuries. We compare our box...

  4. Modern biotechnology Panacea or new Pandora's box?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tramper, J.; Yang Zhu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    According to Greek mythology Pandora was sent down to earth upon the orders of Zeus. She was given a mysterious box which she was not allowed to open. However, Pandora was very curious and when she arrived on earth she couldn?t help taking a peek inside the box. She saw that it was filled with gifts

  5. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? A A A | Print | Share Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and ankle ... extreme and imprudent as it may sound, the cosmetic surgery craze is not just for faces anymore— ...

  6. Box Plots in the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jane M.

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the definition of "box plot" as used in the "Australian Curriculum: Mathematics" with other definitions used in the education community; describes the difficulties students experience when dealing with box plots; and discusses the elaboration that is necessary to enable teachers to develop the knowledge…

  7. 49 CFR 38.33 - Fare box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fare box. 38.33 Section 38.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.33 Fare box. Where provided, the farebox...

  8. North American box turtles: A natural history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Once a familiar backyard visitor in many parts of the United States and Mexico, the box turtle is losing the battle against extinction. In North American Box Turtles, C. Kenneth Dodd, Jr., has written the first book-length natural history of the twelve species and subspecies of this endangered animal. This volume includes comprehensive information on the species’ evolution, behavior, courtship and reproduction, habitat use, diet, population structure, systematics, and disease. Special features include color photos of all species, subspecies, and their habitats; a simple identification guide to both living and fossil species; and a summary of information on fossil Terrapene and Native uses of box turtles. End-of-chapter sections highlight future research directions, including the need for long-term monitoring and observation of box turtles within their natural habitat and conservation applications. A glossary and a bibliography of literature on box turtles accompany the text.

  9. Exercise training reduces high mobility group box-1 protein levels in women with breast cancer: findings from the DIANA-5 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallauria, Francesco; Gentile, Marco; Chiodini, Paolo; Berrino, Franco; Mattiello, Amalia; Maresca, Luigi; Vitelli, Alessandra; Mancini, Maria; Grieco, Alessandra; Lucci, Rosa; Torella, Giorgio; Panico, Salvatore; Vigorito, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether exercise training might exert anti-inflammatory effect by reducing HMGB1 levels in women with breast cancer (BC). We analyzed monocentric data from the DIANA (DIET AND ANDROGENS)-5 PROJECT. Study population consisted of 94 patients randomized into two groups: 61 patients (53 +/- 8 yrs, training group) were assigned to a structured exercise training intervention (3 times/week for the first 3 months, and once /week for the following 9 months); whereas 33 patients (52 +/- 7 yrs, control group) followed only the general indications to adhere to the life-style intervention suggestions of the DIANA protocol. At study entry and after 12 months, all patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, biochemical as- sessment [HMGB1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6)]; and lipid and glycemic profile. There were no significant differences between groups in baseline clinical and inflammatory profile. Among the training group, only 19/61 patients had high adherence to the exercise intervention. After stratifying the study population according to the level of adhesion to the exer- cise intervention, 1-year HMGB1 levels were lower among patients more adherent to exercise (p for trend = 0.001). Further adjusting for age, body mass index and baseline values, 1-year HMGB1 levels remained significantly and inversely associated to the level of adhesion to the exercise intervention (B = -0.97, SE = 0.43, p = 0.01). Moderate intensity exercise training in BC survivors is associated with reduced HMGB1 levels that are proportional to the level of adhesion to the exercise intervention, independently from other classical inflammatory molecules, suggesting an exercise-induced anti-inflammatory effect mediated by HMGB1.

  10. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1(Mipu1:zinc finger protein 667 - a multifunctional KRAB/C2H2 zinc finger protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1 (Mipu1 is a newly discovered upregulated gene produced in rats during the myocardial ischemic preconditioning process. Mipu1 cDNA contains a 1824-base pair open reading frame and encodes a 608 amino acid protein with an N-terminal Krüppel-associated box (KRAB domain and classical zinc finger C2H2 motifs in the C-terminus. Mipu1 protein is located in the cell nucleus. Recent studies found that Mipu1 has a protective effect on the ischemia-reperfusion injury of heart, brain, and other organs. As a nuclear factor, Mipu1 may perform its protective function through directly transcribing and repressing the expression of proapoptotic genes to repress cell apoptosis. In addition, Mipu1 also plays an important role in regulating the gene expression of downstream inflammatory mediators by inhibiting the activation of activator protein-1 and serum response element.

  11. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  12. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  13. F-BOX proteins in cancer cachexia and muscle wasting: Emerging regulators and therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukari, Ammar; Muqbil, Irfana; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Philip, Philip A; Azmi, Asfar S

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating metabolic syndrome accounting for fatigue, an impairment of normal activities, loss of muscle mass associated with body weight loss eventually leading to death in majority of patients with advanced disease. Cachexia patients undergoing skeletal muscle atrophy show consistent activation of the SCF ubiquitin ligase (F-BOX) family member Atrogin-1 (also known as MAFBx/FBXO32) alongside the activation of the muscle ring finger protein1 (MuRF1). Other lesser known F-BOX family members are also emerging as key players supporting muscle wasting pathways. Recent work highlights a spectrum of different cancer signaling mechanisms impacting F-BOX family members that feed forward muscle atrophy related genes during cachexia. These novel players provide unique opportunities to block cachexia induced skeletal muscle atrophy by therapeutically targeting the SCF protein ligases. Conversely, strategies that induce the production of proteins may be helpful to counter the effects of these F-BOX proteins. Through this review, we bring forward some novel targets that promote atrogin-1 signaling in cachexia and muscle wasting and highlight newer therapeutic opportunities that can help in the better management of patients with this devastating and fatal disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Present views on boxing--Henner's legacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, J

    1997-05-29

    Fifty years ago academician Henner formulated clearly the negative view of neurologists on boxing as practised in his time. It was his merit that a protective helmet was introduced, many of his demands concerning the regime after a KO and the importance of medical examinations were no yet adequately appreciated. At the opportunity of the 100th anniversary of Henner's birth and the fiftieth anniversary of the Clinic he founded in the premises of saint Catherine the author discusses contemporary views on boxing, the risk of repeated injuries for the development of encephalopathia pugilistica and their relationship to Alzheimer's disease. Contemporary boxing is a spectacle which is a continuation of historical fights of gladiators. If the main objective is to hurt the adversary, this activity does not deserve the name of "sport" Sport should promote and maintain physical and mental health which is not the case in professional boxing.

  15. Grey Box Modelling of Hydrological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thordarson, Fannar Ørn

    The main topic of the thesis is grey box modelling of hydrologic systems, as well as formulation and assessment of their embedded uncertainties. Grey box model is a combination of a white box model, a physically-based model that is traditionally formulated using deterministic ordinary differential...... represent a stochastic state space model. In the grey box model the total noise is divided into a measurement noise and a process noise. The process noise is due to model approximations, undiscovered input and uncertainties in the input series. Estimates of the process noise can be used to highlight...... in the model, or formulation of process noise can be considered so that it meets the physical limits of the hydrological system and give an adequate description of the embedded uncertainty in model structure. The thesis consists of two parts: a summary report and a part which contains six scientific papers...

  16. Black-Box Search by Unbiased Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The complexity theory for black-box algorithms, introduced by Droste, Jansen, and Wegener (Theory Comput. Syst. 39:525–544, 2006), describes common limits on the efficiency of a broad class of randomised search heuristics. There is an obvious trade-off between the generality of the black-box model...... and the strength of the bounds that can be proven in such a model. In particular, the original black-box model provides for well-known benchmark problems relatively small lower bounds, which seem unrealistic in certain cases and are typically not met by popular search heuristics.In this paper, we introduce a more...... restricted black-box model for optimisation of pseudo-Boolean functions which we claim captures the working principles of many randomised search heuristics including simulated annealing, evolutionary algorithms, randomised local search, and others. The key concept worked out is an unbiased variation operator...

  17. EPA EcoBox Tools by Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  18. Packing a cake into a box

    KAUST Repository

    Skopenkov, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    Given a triangular cake and a box in the shape of its mirror image, how can the cake be cut into a minimal number of pieces so that it can be put into the box? The cake has icing, so we are not allowed to put it into the box upside down. V. G. Boltyansky asked this question in 1977 and showed that three pieces always suffice. In this paper we provide examples of cakes that cannot be cut into two pieces to be put into the box. This shows that three is the answer to Boltyansky\\'s question. We also give examples of cakes which can be cut into two pieces. © THE MATHEMATICAL ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA.

  19. ENERGY STAR Certified Set Top Boxes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 5.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes that are effective as of January...

  20. A Lithium Vapor Box Divertor Similarity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Emdee, Eric D.; Goldston, Robert J.; Jaworski, Michael A.; Schwartz, Jacob A.

    2017-10-01

    A lithium vapor box divertor offers an alternate means of managing the extreme power density of divertor plasmas by leveraging gaseous lithium to volumetrically extract power. The vapor box divertor is a baffled slot with liquid lithium coated walls held at temperatures which increase toward the divertor floor. The resulting vapor pressure differential drives gaseous lithium from hotter chambers into cooler ones, where the lithium condenses and returns. A similarity experiment was devised to investigate the advantages offered by a vapor box divertor design. We discuss the design, construction, and early findings of the vapor box divertor experiment including vapor can construction, power transfer calculations, joint integrity tests, and thermocouple data logging. Heat redistribution of an incident plasma-based heat flux from a typical linear plasma device is also presented. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and The Princeton Environmental Institute.

  1. Random Young diagrams in a Rectangular Box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Dan; Boutillier, Cédric; Enriquez, Nathanaël

    We exhibit the limit shape of random Young diagrams having a distribution proportional to the exponential of their area, and confined in a rectangular box. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bridge arises from the fluctuations around the limit shape.......We exhibit the limit shape of random Young diagrams having a distribution proportional to the exponential of their area, and confined in a rectangular box. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bridge arises from the fluctuations around the limit shape....

  2. Tracking the Motion of Box Jellyfish

    OpenAIRE

    Kjellberg, Tobias; Palmér, Tobias; Oskarsson, Magnus; Åström, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a system for tracking the motion of box jellyfish tripedalia cystophora in a special test setup. The goal is to measure the motor response of the animal given certain visual stimuli. The approach is based on tracking the special sensory structures – the rhopalia – of the box jellyfish from high-speed video sequences. We have focused on a realtime system with simple building blocks in our system. However, using a combination of simple intensity...

  3. Box Lesion with Single Radiofrequency Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhrezai, Kasra; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Hunter, Steven

    2017-04-12

    We introduce a maneuver to perform the box lesion as a part of Cox maze IV procedure with single radiofrequency clamp. The maneuver entails engaging the right pulmonary veins with the clamp, then advancing the clamp jaws underneath the superior vena cava through the transverse sinus to include the roof and the left pulmonary veins in the clamp. We regularly use this technique for box lesion with desirable transmurality. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. TAK1-binding protein 1 is a pseudophosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Sarah H.; Kular, Gursant; Peggie, Mark; Shepherd, Sharon; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W.; Cohen, Philip; Van Aalten, Daan M. F.

    2006-01-01

    TAB1 [TAK1 (transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1)-binding protein 1] is one of the regulatory subunits of TAK1, a protein kinase that lies at the head of three pro-inflammatory kinase cascades. In the current study we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of TAB1. Surprisingly, TAB1 possesses a fold closely related to that of the PPM (Mg2+- or Mn2+-dependent protein phosphatase) family as demonstrated by the close structural similarity with protein phosphatase 2Cα. However, we were unable to detect any phosphatase activity for TAB1 using a phosphopeptide or p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate. Although the overall protein phosphatase 2Cα fold is conserved in TAB1, detailed structural analyses and mutagenesis studies show that several key residues required for dual metal-binding and catalysis are not present in TAB1, although binding of a single metal is supported by soaking experiments with manganese and isothermal titration calorimetry. Thus, it appears that TAB1 is a ‘pseudophosphatase’, possibly binding to and regulating accessibility of phosphorylated residues on substrates downstream of TAK1 or on the TAK1 complex itself. PMID:16879102

  5. Secretion of Streptomyces tendae antifungal protein 1 by Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Freitas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis, the model lactic acid bacterium, is a good candidate for heterologous protein production in both foodstuffs and the digestive tract. We attempted to produce Streptomyces tendae antifungal protein 1 (Afp1 in L. lactis with the objective of constructing a strain able to limit fungal growth. Since Afp1 activity requires disulfide bond (DSB formation and since intracellular redox conditions are reportedly unfavorable for DSB formation in prokaryotes, Afp1 was produced as a secreted form. An inducible expression-secretion system was used to drive Afp1 secretion by L. lactis; Afp1 was fused or not with LEISSTCDA, a synthetic propeptide (LEISS that has been described to be a secretion enhancer. Production of Afp1 alone was not achieved, but production of LEISS-Afp1 was confirmed by Western blot and immunodetection with anti-Afp1 antibodies. This protein (molecular mass: 9.8 kDa is the smallest non-bacteriocin heterologous protein ever reported to be secreted in L. lactis via the Sec-dependent pathway. However, no anti-fungal activity was detected, even in concentrated samples of induced supernatant. This could be due to a too low secretion yield of Afp1 in L. lactis, to the absence of DSB formation, or to an improper DSB formation involving the additional cysteine residue included in LEISS propeptide. This raises questions about size limits, conformation problems, and protein secretion yields in L. lactis.

  6. Differential regulation of dentin matrix protein 1 expression during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; Pi, Yuli; Feng, Jian Q

    2005-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in mineralized tooth and bone. Both in vitro and in vivo data show that DMP1 is critical for mineralization and tooth morphogenesis (growth and development). In this study, we studied Dmp1 gene regulation. The in vitro transient transfection assay identified two important DNA fragments, the 2.4- and 9.6-kb promoter regions. We next generated and analyzed transgenic mice bearing the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter gene driven by the 2.4- or 9.6-kb promoter with the complete 4-kb intron 1. The 9.6-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice conferred a DMP1 expression pattern in odontoblasts identical to that in the endogenous Dmp1 gene. This is reflected by lacZ expression in Dmp1-lacZ knock-in mice during all stages of odontogenesis. In contrast, the 2.4-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice display activity in odontoblast cells only at the early stage of odontogenesis. Thus, we propose that different transcription factors regulate early or later cis-regulatory domains of the Dmp1 promoter, which gives rise to the unique spatial and temporal expression pattern of Dmp1 gene at different stages of tooth development. 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Structural plasticity in human heterochromatin protein 1β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Munari

    Full Text Available As essential components of the molecular machine assembling heterochromatin in eukaryotes, HP1 (Heterochromatin Protein 1 proteins are key regulators of genome function. While several high-resolution structures of the two globular regions of HP1, chromo and chromoshadow domains, in their free form or in complex with recognition-motif peptides are available, less is known about the conformational behavior of the full-length protein. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy in combination with small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering to characterize the dynamic and structural properties of full-length human HP1β (hHP1β in solution. We show that the hinge region is highly flexible and enables a largely unrestricted spatial search by the two globular domains for their binding partners. In addition, the binding pockets within the chromo and chromoshadow domains experience internal dynamics that can be useful for the versatile recognition of different binding partners. In particular, we provide evidence for the presence of a distinct structural propensity in free hHP1β that prepares a binding-competent interface for the formation of the intermolecular β-sheet with methylated histone H3. The structural plasticity of hHP1β supports its ability to bind and connect a wide variety of binding partners in epigenetic processes.

  8. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1/Tolloid-like Metalloproteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Delana R.; Keles, Sunduz; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    A decade ago, bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) was shown to provide the activity necessary for proteolytic removal of the C-propeptides of procollagens I–III: precursors of the major fibrillar collagens. Subsequent studies have shown BMP1 to be the prototype of a small group of extracellular metalloproteinases that play manifold roles in regulating formation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Soon after initial cloning of BMP1, genetic studies showed the related Drosophila proteinase Tolloid (TLD) to be necessary for formation of the dorsal-ventral axis in early embryogenesis. It is now clear that the BMP1/TLD-like proteinases, conserved in species ranging from Drosophila to humans, act in dorsal-ventral patterning via activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-like proteins BMP2, BMP4 (vertebrates) and decapentaplegic (arthropods). More recently, it has become apparent that the BMP1/TLD-like proteinases are key activators of a broader subset of the TGFβ superfamily of proteins, with implications that these proteinases may be key in orchestrating formation of ECM with growth factor activation and BMP signaling in morphogenetic processes. PMID:17560775

  9. Serum Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Sullivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA has etiological association with chronic inflammation. Elevated circulating levels of inflammatory mediators, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, are found in obese individuals. We hypothesized that serum MCP-1 levels are elevated in obese PDA patients. Methods. ELISA was used to analyze MCP-1 serum levels in PDA (n=62 and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN (n=27. Recursive partitioning statistical analysis investigated the relationship between log MCP-1 and clinicopathological parameters. Results. Log MCP-1 values were significantly (P<0.05 elevated in patients with BMI ≥ 37.5. In patients with BMI < 37.5, average log MCP-1 values were significantly elevated in PDA patients when compared to IPMN patients. Within the IPMN group, higher log MCP-1 levels correlated with increased age. Recursive partitioning analysis of IPMN versus PDA revealed a strategy of predicting characteristics of patients who are more likely to have cancer. This strategy utilizes log MCP-1 as the primary factor and also utilizes smoking status, gender, and age. Conclusion. MCP-1 is a promising biomarker in pancreatic cancer. The potential of using MCP-1 to distinguish PDA from IPMN patients must be studied in larger populations to validate and demonstrate its eventual clinical utility.

  10. HYDROGEN AND VOC RETENTION IN WASTE BOXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PACE ME; MARUSICH RM

    2008-11-21

    The Hanford Waste Management Project Master Documented Safety Analysis (MDSA) (HNF-14741, 2003) identifies derived safety controls to prevent or mitigate the risks of a single-container deflagration during operations requiring moving, venting or opening transuranic (TRU)-waste containers. The issue is whether these safety controls are necessary for operations involving TRU-waste boxes that are being retrieved from burial at the Hanford Site. This paper investigates the potential for a deflagration hazard within these boxes and whether safety controls identified for drum deflagration hazards should be applied to operations involving these boxes. The study evaluates the accumulation of hydrogen and VOCs within the waste box and the transport of these gases and vapors out of the waste box. To perform the analysis, there were numerous and major assumptions made regarding the generation rate and the transport pathway dimensions and their number. Since there is little actual data with regards to these assumptions, analyses of three potential configurations were performed to obtain some indication of the bounds of the issue (the concentration of hydrogen or flammable VOCs within a waste box). A brief description of each of the three cases along with the results of the analysis is summarized.

  11. Box-Cox transformation for QTL mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runqing; Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    The maximum likelihood method of QTL mapping assumes that the phenotypic values of a quantitative trait follow a normal distribution. If the assumption is violated, some forms of transformation should be taken to make the assumption approximately true. The Box-Cox transformation is a general transformation method which can be applied to many different types of data. The flexibility of the Box-Cox transformation is due to a variable, called transformation factor, appearing in the Box-Cox formula. We developed a maximum likelihood method that treats the transformation factor as an unknown parameter, which is estimated from the data simultaneously along with the QTL parameters. The method makes an objective choice of data transformation and thus can be applied to QTL analysis for many different types of data. Simulation studies show that (1) Box-Cox transformation can substantially increase the power of QTL detection; (2) Box-Cox transformation can replace some specialized transformation methods that are commonly used in QTL mapping; and (3) applying the Box-Cox transformation to data already normally distributed does not harm the result.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Complementarity in the Einstein-Bohr photon box

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieks, D.G.B.J.; Lam, S

    2008-01-01

    The Bohr-Einstein photon box thought experiment is a forerunner of the EPR experiment: a packet of radiation escapes from a box, and the box-plus-radiation state remains entangled. Hence, a measurement on the box makes a difference for the state of the far-away radiation long after its escape. This

  14. Changes in position and quality of preferred nest box: effects on nest box use by laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch; Nielsen, Birte L.

    2013-01-01

    hens were housed in pens, each with five identical nest boxes in different positions: Two single (in a corner or not) and a triplet of nest boxes (one of which in a corner). The use of nest boxes was determined by the number of eggs laid daily in each box. Three experiments, each lasting 10 days, were...

  15. Advances in the theory of box integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, J.M.; Crandall, R.E.

    2009-06-25

    Box integrals - expectations <|{rvec r}|{sup s}> or <|{rvec r}-{rvec q}|{sup s}> over the unit n-cube (or n-box) - have over three decades been occasionally given closed forms for isolated n,s. By employing experimental mathematics together with a new, global analytic strategy, we prove that for n {le} 4 dimensions the box integrals are for any integer s hypergeometrically closed in a sense we clarify herein. For n = 5 dimensions, we show that a single unresolved integral we call K{sub 5} stands in the way of such hyperclosure proofs. We supply a compendium of exemplary closed forms that naturally arise algorithmically from this theory.

  16. Reassessment of the nonlocality of correlation boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.P.; Parisio, Fernando, E-mail: parisio@df.ufpe.br

    2017-01-15

    Correlation boxes are hypothetical systems usually designed to produce the maximal algebraic violation of a Bell inequality, beyond the quantum bound and without superluminal signalling. The fact that these systems show stronger correlations than those presented by maximally entangled quantum states, as the spin singlet, has been regarded as a demonstration that the former are more nonlocal than the latter. By applying an alternative, consistent measure of nonlocality to a family of correlation boxes, we show that this conclusion is not necessarily true. Complementarily, we define a class of systems displaying subquantum correlations which, nevertheless, are more nonlocal than the singlet state, showing that the extent of the numeric violation of an inequality may have little to do with the degree of nonlocality, especially in the case of correlation boxes.

  17. A white box perspective on behavioural adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Roberto; Corradini, Andrea; Gadducci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We present a white-box conceptual framework for adaptation developed in the context of the EU Project ASCENS coordinated by Martin Wirsing. We called it CoDA, for Control Data Adaptation, since it is based on the notion of control data. CoDA promotes a neat separation between application and adap......We present a white-box conceptual framework for adaptation developed in the context of the EU Project ASCENS coordinated by Martin Wirsing. We called it CoDA, for Control Data Adaptation, since it is based on the notion of control data. CoDA promotes a neat separation between application...

  18. Virtualisointi VirtualBox-ohjelman avulla

    OpenAIRE

    Pakka, Markku

    2011-01-01

    Tutkielmassani käsittelen aluksi palvelimia ja niiden tietoturvaa yleisesti, koska palvelinten tietoturva on tärkeää virtualisoitujen käyttöjärjestelmien turvallisuuden ja toimivuuden kannalta. Sen jälkeen siirryn käsittelemään virtualisointia ja sen tulevaisuutta. Seuraavaksi tutkin VirtualBox-ohjelmaa. Aluksi asennan VirtualBox-ohjelman Windows Vista-koneelle. Sen jälkeen käsittelen VirtualBoxin käyttöliittymää ja asennan Ubuntun virtuaalikäyttöjärjestelmäksi VirtualBoxin avulla. ...

  19. CASAS: A Smart Home in a Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Crandall, Aaron S; Thomas, Brian L; Krishnan, Narayanan C

    2013-07-01

    While the potential benefits of smart home technology are widely recognized, a lightweight design is needed for the benefits to be realized at a large scale. We introduce the CASAS "smart home in a box", a lightweight smart home design that is easy to install and provides smart home capabilities out of the box with no customization or training. We discuss types of data analysis that have been performed by the CASAS group and can be pursued in the future by using this approach to designing and implementing smart home technologies.

  20. Study of WATCH GRB error boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the first WATCH GRB Catalogue ofγ-ray Bursts in order to find correlations between WATCH GRB error boxes and a great variety of celestial objects present in 33 different catalogues. No particular class of objects has been found to be significantly correlated with the WATCH GRBs....

  1. Expo-Box: Submit Tool Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-Expo-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  2. Nest Boxes Artificial Homes for Woodland Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Daniel J.; Kelley, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Provides instructions for constructing artificial "homes" for squirrels, raccoons, and rabbits. These include squirrel dens constructed from discarded automobile tires and squirrel nest boxes, raccoon dens, and rabbit burrows constructed from wood. Includes a chart giving dimensions of materials needed and suggestions on where to place the…

  3. Cereal Box Design: An Interdisciplinary Graphics Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Tsosie, Teri

    2012-01-01

    The cereal box design activity is intriguing both for its simplicity and the resourcefulness that it can generate in young people. Also, it lends itself to a variety of curriculums. It covers both consumerism and Design for the Environment (DfE) concepts broadly and in depth. The activity introduces a wide range of topics. They include graphic…

  4. Comparing Box Plot Distributions: A Teacher's Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuch, Maxine

    2006-01-01

    Drawing conclusions from the comparison of datasets using informal statistical inference is a challenging task since the nature and type of reasoning expected is not fully understood. In this paper a secondary teacher's reasoning from the comparison of box plot distributions during the teaching of a Year 11 (15-year-old) class is analyzed. From…

  5. Activities: Exploring Data with Box Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Elizabeth H.

    1988-01-01

    This set of activity sheets requires students to organize and display data with a box-and-whiskers graph. Students use the plot as a summary display to detect patterns and to highlight the important features of the data for purposes of comparison. (PK)

  6. Choreographies with Secure Boxes and Compromised Principals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Guttman, Joshua

    2009-01-01

      We equip choreography-level session descriptions with a simple abstraction of a security infrastruc- ture. Message components may be enclosed within (possibly nested) ”boxes” annotated with the intended source and destination of those components. The boxes are to be implemented with cryp...

  7. One-dimensional oscillator in a box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (UNLP, CCT La Plata-CONICET), Division Quimica Teorica, Blvd 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: paolo@ucol.mx, E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar

    2010-01-15

    We discuss a quantum-mechanical model of two particles that interact by means of a harmonic potential and are confined to a one-dimensional box with impenetrable walls. We apply perturbation theory to the cases of different and equal masses and analyse the symmetry of the states in the latter case. We compare the approximate perturbation results with accurate numerical ones.

  8. The black box of a mysterious disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, F.; Schouten, A.; De Vlugt, E.; Van der Sanden, M.

    2005-01-01

    Red and swollen limbs that feel hot or cold, a numb feeling, lack of mobility, and worst of all, pain. These are symptoms of post-traumatic dystrophy (PD). Researchers from various disciplines are working together in the TREND research consortium to open the black box of this mysterious disorder.

  9. Minimal Solutions to the Box Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jer-Chin

    2009-01-01

    The "box problem" from introductory calculus seeks to maximize the volume of a tray formed by folding a strictly rectangular sheet from which identical squares have been cut from each corner. In posing such questions, one would like to choose integral side-lengths for the sheet so that the excised squares have rational or integral side-length.…

  10. Reflective Cracking between Precast Prestressed Box Girders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The adjacent precast prestressed concrete box-beam bridge is the bridge of choice for short and short-to-medium span bridges. This choice is because of the ease of construction, favorable span-to-depth ratios, aesthetic appeal, and high torsional sti...

  11. The clinicopathological significance of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Yang, Zhulin; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Ziru; Miao, Xiongying; Li, Daiqiang; Zou, Qiong; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis, and the biomarkers for the early diagnosis, targeting therapy, and prognosis are still not clinically available. This study investigated the expression of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a proteins in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor tissues and pancreatic tissues with and without benign lesions using immunohistochemical staining. Results showed that the positive rates of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a protein expression were significantly lower in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumors compared to peritumoral tissues, benign pancreatic tissues, and normal pancreatic tissues (p box P1 and forkhead box O3a protein expression exhibited dysplasia or intraepithelial neoplasia. The positive rates of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression were significantly lower in cases with tumor mass >5 cm, lymph node metastasis, invasion to surrounding tissues and organs, and tumor-node-metastasis III + IV stage disease compared to cases with tumor mass ⩽5 cm (p box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression survived significantly shorter than patients with positive forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression (p = 0.000). Cox multivariate analysis revealed that negative forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a expression was an independent poor prognosis factor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. The area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.642 for forkhead box P1 (95% confidence interval: 0.553-0.730) and 0.655 for forkhead box O3a (95% confidence interval: 0.6568-0.742). Loss of forkhead box P1 and forkhead box O3a protein expression is associated with carcinogenesis, progression, and poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas.

  12. Mechanisms of neuroimmune gene induction in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Fulton T; Vetreno, Ryan P

    2016-05-01

    Alcoholism is a primary, chronic relapsing disease of brain reward, motivation, memory, and related circuitry. It is characterized by an individual's continued drinking despite negative consequences related to alcohol use, which is exemplified by alcohol use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the expression of innate immune signaling molecules (ISMs) in the brain that alter cognitive processes and promote alcohol drinking. Unraveling the mechanisms of alcohol-induced neuroimmune gene induction is complicated by positive loops of multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules that converge on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and activator protein-1 leading to induction of additional neuroimmune signaling molecules that amplify and expand the expression of ISMs. Studies from our laboratory employing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to assess mRNA, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis to assess protein expression, and others suggest that ethanol increases brain neuroimmune gene and protein expression through two distinct mechanisms involving (1) systemic induction of innate immune molecules that are transported from blood to the brain and (2) the direct release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from neurons in the brain. Released HMGB1 signals through multiple receptors, particularly Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, that potentiate cytokine receptor responses leading to a hyperexcitable state that disrupts neuronal networks and increases excitotoxic neuronal death. Innate immune gene activation in brain is persistent, consistent with the chronic relapsing disease that is alcoholism. Expression of HMGB1, TLRs, and other ISMs is increased several-fold in the human orbital frontal cortex, and expression of these molecules is highly correlated with each other as well as lifetime alcohol consumption and age of drinking onset. The persistent and

  13. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is Essential in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Han Lai

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR family plays a key role in innate immunity and various inflammatory responses. TLR4, one of the well-characterized pattern-recognition receptors, can be activated by endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern molecules such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 to sustain sterile inflammation. Evidence suggested that blockade of TLR4 signaling may confer protection against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Herein we aimed to obtain further insight into the mechanism by which TLR4 might promote aneurysm formation. Characterization of the CaCl2-induced AAA model in mice revealed that upregulation of TLR4 expression, localized predominantly to vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, was followed by a late decline during a 28-day period of AAA development. In vitro, TLR4 expression was increased in VSMCs treated with HMGB1. Knockdown of TLR4 by siRNA attenuated HMGB1-enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, specifically interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 from VSMCs. In vivo, two different strains of TLR4-deficient (C57BL/10ScNJ and C3H/HeJ mice were resistant to CaCl2-induced AAA formation compared to their respective controls (C57BL/10ScSnJ and C3H/HeN. Knockout of TLR4 reduced interleukin-6 and MCP-1 levels and HMGB1 expression, attenuated macrophage accumulation, and eventually suppressed MMP production, elastin destruction and VSMC loss. Finally, human AAA exhibited higher TLR4 expression that was localized to VSMCs. These data suggest that TLR4 signaling contributes to AAA formation by promoting a proinflammatory status of VSMCs and by inducing proteinase release from VSMCs during aneurysm initiation and development.

  14. Can the design of glove dispensing boxes influence glove contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, O; Leaper, D J; Kramer, A; Ousey, K J

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have explored the microbial contamination of glove boxes in clinical settings. The objective of this observational study was to investigate whether a new glove packaging system in which single gloves are dispensed vertically, cuff end first, has lower levels of contamination on the gloves and on the surface around the box aperture compared with conventional glove boxes. Seven participating sites were provided with vertical glove dispensing systems (modified boxes) and conventional boxes. Before opening glove boxes, the surface around the aperture was sampled microbiologically to establish baseline levels of superficial contamination. Once the glove boxes were opened, the first pair of gloves in each box was sampled for viable bacteria. Thereafter, testing sites were visited on a weekly basis over a period of six weeks and the same microbiological assessments were made. The surface near the aperture of the modified boxes became significantly less contaminated over time compared with the conventional boxes (Pcontamination around the aperture. Overall, gloves from modified boxes showed significantly less colony-forming unit contamination than gloves from conventional boxes (Pcontamination. This simple improvement to glove box design reduces contamination of unused gloves. Such modifications could decrease the risk of microbial cross-transmission in settings that use gloves. However, such advantages do not substitute for strict hand hygiene compliance and appropriate use of non-sterile, single-use gloves. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. All rights reserved.

  15. HMG-box sequences from microbats homologous to the human SOX30 HMG-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Barragán, M J; Sánchez, A

    2000-01-01

    SOX genes are a family of genes that encode for proteins which are characterised by the presence of a HMG-domain related to that of the mammalian sex-determining gene (SRY). By definition, the DNA binding domain of SOX genes is at least 50% identical to the 79 amino acid HMG domain of the SRY gene. We report here two HMG-box sequences from two microbat species (R. ferrumequinum and P. Pipistrellus) which were PCR amplified using a primer pair specific to the mouse Sry HMG-box. The high percentage of identity of this sequences with the human and mouse SOX30 HMG-box suggests that they are the SOX30 HMG-box for these two bat species.

  16. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wang, Yuchan; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong; Xu, Xiaohong; He, Song

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1(S102) were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1(S102) nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of NF-Kappa B Signaling in X-Box Binding Protein 1 (XBP1)-Mediated Antiestrogen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    will be administered to the mice through drinking water to induce XBP1 expression. Over the past year, I was successfully added to my mentor Dr...M. and Leclercq, G., About GATA3, HNF3A, and XBP1, three genes co- expressed with the oestrogen receptor-alpha gene (ESR1) in breast cancer. Mol Cell

  18. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yuchan [Department of Pathogen, Medical College, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Yunhua [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxiaohongnantong@126.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Song, E-mail: hesongnt@126.com [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1{sup S102} nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. - Highlights: • The expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} are reversely correlated with outcomes of DLBCL patients. • YB-1 promotes cell proliferation by accelerating G1/S transition in DLBCL. • YB-1 confers drug resistance to mitoxantrone in DLBCL.

  19. High expression of Y-box-binding protein 1 correlates with poor prognosis and early recurrence in patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shilei Zhao,1,* Wei Guo,1,* Jinxiu Li,1 Wendan Yu,1 Tao Guo,1 Wuguo Deng,2,3 Chundong Gu1 1The First Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Cancer Stem Cell, Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, 2Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 3State Key Laboratory of Targeted Drug for Tumors of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou Double Bioproduct Inc., Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Prognosis of small (≤2 cm invasive lung adenocarcinoma remains poor, and identification of high-risk individuals from the patients after complete surgical resection of lung adenocarcinoma has become an urgent problem. YBX1 has been reported to be able to predict prognosis in many cancers (except lung adenocarcinoma that are independent of TNM (tumor, nodes, metastases staging, especially small invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we examined the significance of YBX1 expression on prognosis and recurrence in patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: A total of 75 patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma after complete resection were enrolled from January 2008 to December 2010. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the expression of YBX1, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to precisely assess the overall expression of YBX1. Meanwhile, primary lesions were identified based on the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, the American Thoracic Society, and the European Respiratory Society’s classification of lung adenocarcinoma. The effect of different clinicopathological factors on patients’ survival was examined. Furthermore, Western blot analysis was used to show the expression of YBX1 in vitro. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of YBX1 for detecting small invasive lung adenocarcinoma from normal surrounding tissue were 66.7% and 74.7% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve =0.731; P<0.001, respectively. High YBX1 expression was detected in 31 (41.3% patients, and in A549, H322, Hcc827, and H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cells but not in HLF cells. In addition to sex, age, tumor size, TNM staging, pleural invasion, and lymph node metastasis, the expression of YBX1 was associated with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, the American Thoracic Society, and the European Respiratory Society pathological grade risk (P=0.026 and differentiation (P=0.009. The patients with low YBX1 expression lived longer than those with high expression (5-year overall survival: 52.3% vs 79.0%; P=0.039 and showed fewer recurrences (P=0.024. In multivariate analyses, high YBX1 expression (odds ratio =2.737; 95% confidence interval: 1.058–7.082; P=0.038 was shown as an independent risk factor of overall survival but not of disease-free survival (odds ratio =1.696; 95% confidence interval: 0.616–4.673; P=0.307. Conclusion: YBX1 is an important predictor for the prognosis in patients with small invasive lung adenocarcinoma after complete resection. Keywords: YBX1, lung adenocarcinoma, prognosis

  20. Localization and Differential Expression of the Krüppel-Associated Box Zinc Finger Proteins 1 and 54 in Early Mouse Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Maria; Teperek, Marta; Elholm, Grethe

    2010-01-01

    Upon fertilization, the zygotic genome is activated. To ensure the transcription of specific genes and avoid promiscuous gene expression, a chromatin-mediated repressive state is established. To characterize potential heterochromatin factors present during the first cleavage, two putative...

  1. Reconciling White-Box and Black-Box Perspectives on Behavioral Self-adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Bruni, Roberto; Corradini, Andrea; Gadducci, Fabio; Hölzl, Matthias; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto; Vandin, Andrea; Wirsing, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes to reconcile two perspectives on behavioral adaptation commonly taken at different stages of the engineering of autonomic computing systems. Requirements engineering activities often take a black-box perspective: A system is considered to be adaptive with respect to an environment whenever the system is able to satisfy its goals irrespectively of the environment perturbations. Modeling and programming engineering activities often take a white-box perspective: A system is e...

  2. Experts’ Misinterpretation of Box Plots – a Dual Processing Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephanie Lem; Patrick Onghena; Lieven Verschaffel; Wim Van Dooren

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that students often misinterpret the area of the box in box plots as representing the frequency or proportion of observations in that interval, while it actually represents density...

  3. Conceptual design and optimization methodology for box wing aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Jemitola, Paul Olugbeji

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual design optimization methodology was developed for a medium range box wing aircraft. A baseline conventional cantilever wing aircraft designed for the same mis- sion and payload was also optimized alongside a baseline box wing aircraft. An empirical formula for the mass estimation of the fore and aft wings of the box wing aircraft was derived by relating conventional cantilever wings to box wing aircraft wings. The results indicate that the fore and aft wings would ...

  4. Box-Cox symmetric distributions and applications to nutritional data

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Silvia L. P.; Fumes, Giovana

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Box-Cox symmetric class of distributions, which is useful for modeling positively skewed, possibly heavy-tailed, data. The new class of distributions includes the Box-Cox t, Box-Cox Cole-Gree, Box-Cox power exponential distributions, and the class of the log-symmetric distributions as special cases. It provides easy parameter interpretation, which makes it convenient for regression modeling purposes. Additionally, it provides enough flexibility to handle outliers. The usefuln...

  5. Transformative Environmental Education: Stepping Outside the Curriculum Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental education has become trapped in the curriculum box. At a time when our students' generation is becoming trapped in a global warming box, their education needs to be rapidly adaptable to the changing state of their planet. Venturing outside the curriculum box takes courage, creativity, and a willingness to let nature serve as the…

  6. 76 FR 41411 - Group E Post Office Box Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... 111 Group E Post Office Box Service AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The... administration for Group E (free) Post Office\\TM\\ (PO) box service. DATES: Effective Date: September 6, 2011. FOR... facilitate uniform administration for Group E (free) PO Box\\TM\\ service. The Postal Service received several...

  7. 75 FR 71642 - Group E Post Office Box Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... 111 Group E Post Office Box Service AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The... administration for Group E (free) Post Office\\TM\\ (PO) Box service. DATES: We must receive your comments on or..., Washington, DC between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. E-mail comments concerning the proposed box...

  8. 21 CFR 864.9185 - Blood grouping view box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood grouping view box. 864.9185 Section 864.9185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9185 Blood grouping view box. (a) Identification. A blood grouping view box...

  9. 31 CFR 515.326 - Custody of safe deposit boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Custody of safe deposit boxes. 515... Definitions § 515.326 Custody of safe deposit boxes. Safe deposit boxes shall be deemed to be in the custody... upon the meaning of the term custody. ...

  10. 31 CFR 500.326 - Custody of safe deposit boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Custody of safe deposit boxes. 500... Definitions § 500.326 Custody of safe deposit boxes. Safe deposit boxes shall be deemed to be in the custody... upon the meaning of the term custody. ...

  11. 30 CFR 18.49 - Connection boxes on machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connection boxes on machines. 18.49 Section 18..., AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.49 Connection boxes on machines. Connection boxes used to facilitate replacement...

  12. Using Origami Boxes to Explore Concepts of Geometry and Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this classroom note is to provide an example of how a simple origami box can be used to explore important concepts of geometry and calculus. This article describes how an origami box can be folded, then it goes on to describe how its volume and surface area can be calculated. Finally, it describes how the box could be folded to…

  13. 49 CFR 230.102 - Tender plain bearing journal boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tender plain bearing journal boxes. 230.102... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.102 Tender plain bearing journal boxes. Plain bearing journal boxes... expected to damage the bearing; or have a detrimental effect on the lubrication of the journal and bearing...

  14. 49 CFR 230.103 - Tender roller bearing journal boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tender roller bearing journal boxes. 230.103... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.103 Tender roller bearing journal boxes. Tender roller bearing journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition. ...

  15. The Central Nervous System of Box Jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Ekström, Peter

    2008-01-01

    of behaviors in the box jellyfish such as obstacle avoidance and navigation. The need to process the visual information and turn it into the appropriate behavior puts strong demands on the nervous system of box jellyfish, which appears more elaborate than in other cnidarians. Here, the central part...... of this nervous system is described. Each rhopalium holds a separate part of the CNS with 1,000 nerve cells and a large amount of neuropil. The rhopalial nervous system has several subsystems defined by the anatomy, location, and immunocytochemistry of the cells. Most of the subsystems connect to one or more...... of the eye types, and it is likely that the rhopalial nervous system accounts for most of the visual processing. The major part of the CNS is made up of a ring nerve encircling the bell shaped body. The ring nerve holds around 10,000 cells and is directly connected to all four rhopalial nervous systems...

  16. Fatal exit the automotive black box debate

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalick, Tom

    2005-01-01

    "Fatal Exit: The Automotive Black Box Debate cuts through thirty years of political wrangling and institutional biases to provide an argument for the Motor Vehicle Event Data Recorder (MVEDR). This automotive equivalent of an airplane's flight recorder or black box is intended to solve the mysteries of car crashes and improve the safety of our roads. The reader is taken inside the automotive industry and the government highway safety establishment to foster an understanding of the politics and the positions on all sides of this safety debate. The author takes an unbiased approach, chronologically presenting each argument and uncovering the agendas and mandates of each of the stakeholders." "This publication is essential reading for all consumers who need to have their voices heard on this critical issue, as well as for attorneys, public safety advocates, public policy administrators, engineers, automotive professionals, journalists, and insurance executives."--Jacket.

  17. Design and Optimize an Automatic Medicine Box

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Lin; Wu, Shengmin

    2010-01-01

    Our work is to design an automatic and intelligent medicine box to help most people to take the medicine easily, especially for the arthritis, the elderly, the forgetful people and the kids. First, five different structures have been designed by CAD Inventor software. One of them, which can be carried out the most easily in reality, has been chosen to complete with a dynamic system. Considering the characteristic of medicine, there are two schemes in the structure designs are ideal. Several c...

  18. Can the box plot be improved?

    OpenAIRE

    Chamnein Choonpradub; Don McNeil

    2005-01-01

    Invented by Spear in 1952 and popularized by Tukey in 1977, the box plot is widely used for displaying and comparing samples of continuous observations. Despite its popularity, it is less effective for showing shape behaviour of distributions, particularly bimodality. Using robust estimators of data skewness and kurtosis to classify the distribution into categories, we suggest a simple enhancement for indicating bimodality, central peakedness, and skewness. We also suggest a new graphical met...

  19. The Spectra of Des S-Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Properties of Cayley Graphs Associated with S-Box 8 BFs. . . . . 132 Table 6.51 The DES Functions with Ramanujan Cayley Graphs. . . . . . . . 136 Table...interesting case occurs when this inequality is not satisfied. Alexander Lubotzky et al. [89] coined the term Ramanujan graph for an r-regular graph in which...the largest eigenvalue other than λn = r is less than or equal to the Alon-Boppana bound. Ramanujan graphs are named after Indian mathematician

  20. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  1. Interferometric investigation of convection in plexiglas boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, J. N.

    1983-09-01

    Real-time holographic interferometry is used to study free convection in cavities heated from below and bounded by Plexiglas windows. Advantages and shortcomings of this visualization technique applied to such Plexiglas boxes are discussed. As Plexiglas has a high temperature-dependent refractive index, temperature fields in the windows and the fluid layer are visualized. These visualizations furnished proof of a pronounced thermal influence of the walls on the flow pattern based on what we call “thermal memory” of Plexiglas.

  2. Monitoring Instrument for X-Ray Box

    CERN Document Server

    Cifuentes Ospina, Alberto; Kuehn, Susanne; Schaepe, Steffen; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    A humidity and temperature readout instrument has been designed and implemented in order to monitor the X-Ray Box used for testing the silicon detectors prototypes of the ITk. The sensors are connected to an Arduino Mega board equipped with 16 analog inputs and a serial port to a computer. A user-friendly software has been also designed in order to give an easy access to all measurements.

  3. PCB-Based Break-Out Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Break-out boxes (BOBs) are necessary for all electrical integration/cable checkouts and troubleshooting. Because the price of a BOB is high, and no work can be done without one, often the procedure stops, simply waiting for a BOB. A less expensive BOB would take less time in the integration, testing, and troubleshooting process. The PCB-based BOB works and looks the same as a standard JPL BOB, called Gold Boxes. The only differences between the old BOB and the new PCB-based BOB is that the new one has 80 percent of its circuitry in a printed circuit board. This process reduces the time for fabrication, thus making the BOBs less expensive. Moreover, because of its unique design, the new BOBs can be easily assembled and fixed. About 80 percent of the new PCB-based BOB is in a $22 (at the time of this reporting) custom-designed, yet commercially available PCB. This device has been used successfully to verify that BOB cables were properly made. Also, upon completion, the BOB was beeped out via a multimeter to ensure that all sockets on the connectors were properly connected to the respective banana jack. When compared to the Gold Box BOBs, the new BOB has many advantages. It is much more cost efficient, it delivers equal usability at substantially lower cost of the BOB, and the Gold Box is much heavier when compared to the new BOB. The new BOB is also a bit longer and much more versatile in that connectors are easily changeable and if a banana jack is broken, it can be replaced instead of throwing away an entire BOB.

  4. Box fractal dimension in speckle images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabal, Héctor; Grumel, Eduardo; Cap, Nelly; Buffarini, Leandro; Trivi, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a generalization of the box fractal dimension in images by considering the curve obtained from its value as a function of the binarization threshold. This curve can be used to describe speckle patterns. We show some examples of both objective simulated and experimental and subjective speckle in some cases of interest. The concept can be extended for all types of images.

  5. Prohibiting Headgear for Safety in Amateur Boxing? Opinion of the Canadian Boxing Community: an Online Poll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Philip; Rempel, Philip

    In 2013, the Amateur International Boxing Association (AIBA) introduced a rule banning headgear for male-senior open class boxers during competition. The AIBA has defended the rule change as motivated by safety and supported by internal unpublished studies. As a result, in 2018, the AIBA plans to universally prohibit headgear in competition: for all competitors (male and female), all ages and all levels. Within Canada, this ruling has generated controversy in the boxing community, yet there has been no overall measure of opinion. To address this, we instituted a voluntary, anonymous, online open-access poll to allow members of the boxing community to express their stance on headgear use in competition. In total, 636 responses were received. A total of 71.5 % of Canadian respondents believed headgear should be mandatory at all levels. Only 5.8 % agreed that headgear should be prohibited, as planned for 2018. Estimating results on a representative breakdown of boxing membership in Canada, a similar pattern emerged, whereby 68.2 % concurred with mandatory headgear while only 4.95 % supported its prohibition. Parents of boxers were almost unanimously against banning headgear, stating they would change sports as a result. Similarly, only 1.7 % of women believed headgear should be prohibited. The consensus of the Canadian boxing community largely opposes the rule changes that the AIBA has implemented. The results highlight risks posed to the long-term viability of the sport, if significant grassroots safety concerns are disregarded.

  6. 49 CFR 178.512 - Standards for steel or aluminum boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for steel or aluminum boxes. 178.512... aluminum boxes. (a) The following are identification codes for steel or aluminum boxes: (1) 4A for a steel box; and (2) 4B for an aluminum box. (b) Construction requirements for steel or aluminum boxes are as...

  7. Reconciling White-Box and Black-Box Perspectives on Behavioral Self-adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Roberto; Corradini, Andrea; Gadducci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes to reconcile two perspectives on behavioral adaptation commonly taken at different stages of the engineering of autonomic computing systems. Requirements engineering activities often take a black-box perspective: A system is considered to be adaptive with respect...... to an environment whenever the system is able to satisfy its goals irrespectively of the environment perturbations. Modeling and programming engineering activities often take a white-box perspective: A system is equipped with suitable adaptation mechanisms and its behavior is classified as adaptive depending...... and possibly modify the adaptation requirements, models and programs of an autonomic system....

  8. Box codes of lengths 48 and 72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, G.; Jin, Y.

    1993-01-01

    A self-dual code length 48, dimension 24, with Hamming distance essentially equal to 12 is constructed here. There are only six code words of weight eight. All the other code words have weights that are multiples of four and have a minimum weight equal to 12. This code may be encoded systematically and arises from a strict binary representation of the (8,4;5) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF (64). The code may be considered as six interrelated (8,7;2) codes. The Mattson-Solomon representation of the cyclic decomposition of these codes and their parity sums are used to detect an odd number of errors in any of the six codes. These may then be used in a correction algorithm for hard or soft decision decoding. A (72,36;15) box code was constructed from a (63,35;8) cyclic code. The theoretical justification is presented herein. A second (72,36;15) code is constructed from an inner (63,27;16) Bose Chaudhuri Hocquenghem (BCH) code and expanded to length 72 using box code algorithms for extension. This code was simulated and verified to have a minimum distance of 15 with even weight words congruent to zero modulo four. The decoding for hard and soft decision is still more complex than the first code constructed above. Finally, an (8,4;5) RS code over GF (512) in the binary representation of the (72,36;15) box code gives rise to a (72,36;16*) code with nine words of weight eight, and all the rest have weights greater than or equal to 16.

  9. Can the box plot be improved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamnein Choonpradub

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Invented by Spear in 1952 and popularized by Tukey in 1977, the box plot is widely used for displaying and comparing samples of continuous observations. Despite its popularity, it is less effective for showing shape behaviour of distributions, particularly bimodality. Using robust estimators of data skewness and kurtosis to classify the distribution into categories, we suggest a simple enhancement for indicating bimodality, central peakedness, and skewness. We also suggest a new graphical method for displaying confidence intervals when comparing several samples of continuous data.

  10. Smart Distribution Boxes, Complete Energy Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platise, Uros

    2010-09-15

    Present households demand side management implementations are turning conventional appliances into smart ones to support auto demand (AutoDR) response function. Present concept features a direct link between the power meters and appliances. In this paper new concept and example of implementation of a so-called Smart Distribution Box (SmartDB) is represented for complete energy and power management. SmartDBs, as an intermediate layer, are extending smart grid power meter functionality to support AutoDR with fast and guaranteed response times, distributed power sources, and besides provide full control over energy management and extra safety functions to the consumers.

  11. Keller-box method and its application

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Kerehalli V

    2014-01-01

    Most of the problems arising in science and engineering are nonlinear. They are inherently difficult to solve. Traditional analytical approximations are valid only for weakly nonlinear problems, and often break down for problems with strong nonlinearity. This book presents the current theoretical developments and applications of Keller-Box method to nonlinear problems. The first half of the bookaddresses basic concepts to understand the theoretical framework for the method. In the second half of the book, the authorsgive a number of examples of coupled nonlinear problems that have been solved

  12. Do Biomimetic Students Think Outside the Box?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetics is a recognized method in ideation for getting access to new and – for the designer – novel knowledge, which hopefully will result in more novel and useful products. But do designers actually find new knowledge, i.e. think outside the box or do they stick to well-known biological...... phenomena? If they concentrate on animals and plants, which they beforehand have knowledge about, it could be expected that solutions will remind of what they would have found without using biomimetics. To investigate this question, the empirical results from a university course in biomimetics have been...

  13. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  14. A (72, 36; 15) box code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, G.

    1993-01-01

    A (72,36;15) box code is constructed as a 9 x 8 matrix whose columns add to form an extended BCH-Hamming (8,4;4) code and whose rows sum to odd or even parity. The newly constructed code, due to its matrix form, is easily decodable for all seven-error and many eight-error patterns. The code comes from a slight modification in the parity (eighth) dimension of the Reed-Solomon (8,4;5) code over GF(512). Error correction uses the row sum parity information to detect errors, which then become erasures in a Reed-Solomon correction algorithm.

  15. Is serum HMGB1 a biomarker in ANCA-associated vasculitis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza, Alexandre W.S.; Westra, Johanna; Bijzet, Johan; Limburg, Pieter C.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are systemic inflammatory disorders that include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg-Strauss syndrome and renal limited vasculitis (RLV). Extracellular high-mobility group

  16. PKCa and HMGB1 antagonistically control hydrogen peroxide-induced poly-ADP-ribose formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson Anneli; Bluwstein Andrej; Kumar Nitin; Teloni Federico; Traenkle Jens; Baudis Michael; Altmeyer Matthias; Hottiger Michael O

    2016-01-01

    Harmful oxidation of proteins lipids and nucleic acids is observed when reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced excessively and/or the antioxidant capacity is reduced causing 'oxidative stress'. Nuclear poly ADP ribose (PAR) formation is thought to be induced in response to oxidative DNA damage and to promote cell death under sustained oxidative stress conditions. However what exactly triggers PAR induction in response to oxidative stress is incompletely understood. Using reverse phase pro...

  17. Teaching Outside the Box: ARL Librarians' Integration of the "One- Box" into Student Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Christina; McCain, Cheryl; Scrivener, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey that targeted reference and instruction librarians who work at libraries that are members of the Asso- ciation of Research Libraries (ARL). Respondents were asked to indicate whether or not they teach students to use the one-box tool, and why or why not. Based on the responses of the 352 librarians who…

  18. The Design of the Orthogonal Box Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Alfred; /Fermilab

    2010-09-15

    The muon collider and/or the neutrino factory require large accelerating electric field gradients immersed in large (3 to 6 T) solenoidal magnetic fields for ionization cooling of muon beams. Our original vacuum breakdown study demonstrated a loss of achievable peak accelerating gradient in solenoidal magnetic fields by a factor 2 or greater. The Muon Collaboration has developed a theory of a method to suppress high electric field breakdown in vacuum cavities needed for a Muon collider or neutrino factory. It has been shown in our studies and by others that high gradient electric field emitted electrons (dark current) are the primary cause of breakdown. A DC magnetic field orthogonal to the RF electric accelerating field prevents dark current high field emitted electrons from traveling across the accelerating gap and then will prevent breakdown. We have decided to test this theory by building a special cavity in the shape of vacuum box. Figure 1 is a simplified view of the cavity design. The design is based on an 805 MHz WR975 waveguide cavity resonating in the TE{sub 101} mode. For the TE{sub 101} mode the resonant frequency f{sub 0} is given by the relationship f{sub 0} = c[(I/a){sup 2} + (m/b){sup 2} + (n/d){sup 2}]{sup 0.5}/2 where a and d are the lengths of the base sides and b is the height of the box in MKS units and c is the velocity of light.

  19. Research of intelligent bus coin box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Shihao

    2017-03-01

    In the energy-saving emission reduction of the social context, in response to low-carbon travel, buses become the majority of people choose. We have designed this sorting machine for the present situation that the bus company has received a large amount of mixed zero coins and employed a large amount of manpower to sort out and lower the efficiency. Its function is to separate the coins and notes mixed, and the coins sort storage, the display shows the value of the received coins, so that the whole mechanized inventory classification, reduce the cost of clearing up and improve the efficiency of zero cash recycling, use Simple mechanical principles for classification, to be efficient, accurate and practical. Really meet the current city bus companies, commerce and banking and other industries in order to zero notes, zero coins in the actual demand. The size and specification of this machine are designed according to the size of the bus coin box. It is suitable for almost all buses. It can be installed in the coin box directly, real-time sorting and real-time counting. The difficulty of clearing change.

  20. Hairy black holes in a box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Pallab [International Center for Theoretical Sciences,IISc Campus, Bangalore 560012 (India); Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P.N. Bala [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-11-08

    We do a systematic study of the phases of gravity coupled to an electromagnetic field and charged scalar in flat space, with box boundary conditions. The scalar-less box has previously been investigated by Braden, Brown, Whiting and York (and others) before AdS/CFT and we elaborate and extend their results in a language more familiar from holography. The phase diagram of the system is analogous to that of AdS black holes, but we emphasize the differences and explain their origin. Once the scalar is added, we show that the system admits both boson stars as well as hairy black holes as solutions, providing yet another way to evade flat space no-hair theorems. Furthermore both these solutions can exist as stable phases in regions of the phase diagram. The final picture of the phases that emerges is strikingly similar to that found recently for holographic superconductors in global AdS, http://arxiv.org/abs/1602.07211. Our construction lays bare certain previously unnoticed subtleties associated to the definition quasi-local charges for gravitating scalar fields in finite regions.

  1. Flexible bulb large storage box hydrogen maser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1973-01-01

    The principal limitation on the accuracy of the hydrogen maser as a primary frequency standard has been the irreproducibility of the frequency shift caused by collisions of the radiating atoms with the walls of the vessel containing them. The flexible bulb-large storage box hydrogen maser allows correction for this wall shift within a single device, sidestepping the reproducibility problem, and reducing the frequency error from the wall shift to the level imposed by the device's stability. The principles of the device are discussed including the flexible bulb technique and the complications caused by a multiple region storage bulb. The stability of the device is discussed including a comparison with an ordinary hydrogen maser. Data is presented from a working flexible bulb-large storage box hydrogen maser demonstrating the feasibility of the device and showing some of its operating characteristics. The flexibility of the device is demonstrated by showing how the device's added degrees of freedom allow measurement of parameters unmeasurable in an ordinary hydrogen maser.

  2. A Group Action Method for Construction of Strong Substitution Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Sajjad Shaukat; Shah, Tariq; Attaullah, Atta

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the method to develop cryptographically strong substitution box is presented which can be used in multimedia security and data hiding techniques. The algorithm of construction depends on the action of a projective general linear group over the set of units of the finite commutative ring. The strength of substitution box and ability to create confusion is assessed with different available analyses. Moreover, the ability of resistance against malicious attacks is also evaluated. The substitution box is examined by bit independent criterion, strict avalanche criterion, nonlinearity test, linear approximation probability test and differential approximation probability test. This substitution box is equated with well-recognized substitution boxes such as AES, Gray, APA, S8, prime of residue, Xyi and Skipjack. The comparison shows encouraging results about the strength of the proposed box. The majority logic criterion is also calculated to analyze the strength and its practical implementation.

  3. Visual pigments of the box jellyfish species Chiropsella bronzie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O*Connor, Megan; Garm, Anders Lydik; Marshall, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Box jellyfish (Cubomedusae) possess a unique visual system comprising 24 eyes of four morphological types. Moreover, box jellyfish display several visually guided behaviours, including obstacle avoidance and light-shaft attractance. It is largely unknown what kind of visual information box...... jellyfish use for carrying out these behaviours. Brightness contrast is almost certainly involved, but it is also possible that box jellyfish extract colour information from their surroundings. The possible presence of colour vision in box jellyfish has previously been investigated using behavioural......, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. However, the results from these studies are to some degree conflicting and inconclusive. Here, we present results from an investigation into the visual system of the box jellyfish Chiropsella bronzie, using microspectrophotometry and immunohistochemistry. Our...

  4. Deep Cropping via Attention Box Prediction and Aesthetics Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenguan; Shen, Jianbing

    2017-01-01

    We model the photo cropping problem as a cascade of attention box regression and aesthetic quality classification, based on deep learning. A neural network is designed that has two branches for predicting attention bounding box and analyzing aesthetics, respectively. The predicted attention box is treated as an initial crop window where a set of cropping candidates are generated around it, without missing important information. Then, aesthetics assessment is employed to select the final crop ...

  5. Prospective Assessment of Inpatient Boxed Warning Prescriber Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, Megan A; Lohr, Brian R; Smithburger, Pamela L; Seybert, Amy L; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate medication boxed warning nonadherence in the inpatient setting. This was a prospective cohort quality improvement project approved by our institution's Total Quality Council. General medicine and ICU patients 18 years and older were included if they were cared for by a prescriber-led multidisciplinary team that included a pharmacist. Patients were evaluated for medication orders with an actionable boxed warning; if boxed warning nonadherence occurred, the physician's reason was determined. Patients with boxed warning nonadherence were monitored for adverse drug reactions until discharge. A total of 393 patients (224 general medicine and 169 ICU) were evaluated for nonadherence to 149 actionable boxed warnings. There were 293 drugs (175 general medicine and 118 ICU) with boxed warnings prescribed, and more than 50% of these were medications restarted from home. A total of 23 boxed warning nonadherences occurred in general medicine patients, and NSAIDs accounted for 81% of these events. ICU patients experienced 11 boxed warning nonadherences, with nearly 54% from anti-infectives and immunosuppressants. Antipsychotics were the most commonly ordered boxed warning medication class in ICU patients. Reasons for nonadherence included knowledge deficit and an acceptable risk-to-benefit ratio. Two adverse drug reactions occurred from boxed warning nonadherences, both because of a drug-drug interaction. Boxed warning nonadherence is a concern in the inpatient setting, specifically with NSAID use in general medicine patients and antipsychotic use in ICU patients. More than half of boxed warning nonadherence occurred in medications restarted from home, which emphasizes the need for medication evaluation during transitions of care.

  6. Grey-box modelling of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling con...... in order to describe the complicated in vivo system of insulin and glucose following an IVGTT....

  7. An Improved Method of Manufacturing Corrugated Boxes: Lateral Corrugator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank C. Murray Ph.D.; , Roman Popil Ph.D.; Michael Shaepe (formerly with IPST, now at Cargill. Inc)

    2008-12-18

    Paper physicists have known that a corrugated box constructed from outer liner sheets having a predominant fiber orientation aligned with the corrugating flute direction would have higher stiffness and crush resistance (per unit of fiber weight) than the conventional box construction. Such increased performance per unit of fiber weight could result in fiber reduction and energy savings for boxes having equivalent performance specifications. The goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a commercially viable lateral corrugating process. This included designing and building a pilot lateral corrugator, testing and evaluating pilot machine made boxes, and developing a strategy for commercialization.

  8. Design Research: Six Views in a Box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    This book is a report from a class on design research at the Danish Design School. Ten students had ten weeks to conduct design research based on approaches, methods and techniques from co-design focusing on the Alzheimer’s disease as experienced by people with Alzheimer’s, their relatives...... and close relations, and professional caretakers. Alzheimer's destroys brain cells, causing memory loss and problems with thinking and behavior severe enough to affect work, lifelong hobbies and social life. As Alzheimer’s is a fatal disease that affects many people, there is a strong interest in finding...... professional organizations in a user-driven approach to explore and learn what it means to identify and admit that a person has Alzheimer’s. Apart from making contributions to the common box, the students have written reports in which they reflect on their work both in relation to the design research process...

  9. Box ladders in a noninteger dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, I.; Kondrashuk, I. N.

    2013-11-01

    We construct a family of triangle-ladder diagrams that can be calculated using the Belokurov-Usyukina loop reduction technique in d= 4-2ɛ dimensions. The main idea of the approach we propose is to generalize this loop reduction technique existing in d= 4 dimensions. We derive a recurrence relation between the result for an L-loop triangle-ladder diagram of this family and the result for an (L- 1)-loop triangleladder diagram of the same family. Because the proposed method combines analytic and dimensional regularizations, we must remove the analytic regularization at the end of the calculation by taking the double uniform limit in which the parameters of the analytic regularization vanish. In the position space, we obtain a diagram in the left-hand side of the recurrence relations in which the rung indices are 1 and all other indices are 1 - ɛ in this limit. Fourier transforms of diagrams of this type give momentum space diagrams with rung indices 1 - ɛ and all other indices 1. By a conformal transformation of the dual space image of this momentum space representation, we relate such a family of triangle-ladder momentum diagrams to a family of box-ladder momentum diagrams with rung indices 1 - ɛ and all other indices 1. Because any diagram from this family is reducible to a one-loop diagram, the proposed generalization of the Belokurov-Usyukina loop reduction technique to a noninteger number of dimensions allows calculating this family of box-ladder diagrams in the momentum space explicitly in terms of Appell's hypergeometric function F 4 without expanding in powers of the parameter ɛ in an arbitrary kinematic region in the momentum space.

  10. Chironex fleckeri (Box Jellyfish) Venom Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane L.; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; McInerney, Bernie V.; Mulvenna, Jason; Seymour, Jamie E.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Hodgson, Wayne C.

    2014-01-01

    The box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri produces extremely potent and rapid-acting venom that is harmful to humans and lethal to prey. Here, we describe the characterization of two C. fleckeri venom proteins, CfTX-A (∼40 kDa) and CfTX-B (∼42 kDa), which were isolated from C. fleckeri venom using size exclusion chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. Full-length cDNA sequences encoding CfTX-A and -B and a third putative toxin, CfTX-Bt, were subsequently retrieved from a C. fleckeri tentacle cDNA library. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the new toxins belong to a small family of potent cnidarian pore-forming toxins that includes two other C. fleckeri toxins, CfTX-1 and CfTX-2. Phylogenetic inferences from amino acid sequences of the toxin family grouped CfTX-A, -B, and -Bt in a separate clade from CfTX-1 and -2, suggesting that the C. fleckeri toxins have diversified structurally and functionally during evolution. Comparative bioactivity assays revealed that CfTX-1/2 (25 μg kg−1) caused profound effects on the cardiovascular system of anesthetized rats, whereas CfTX-A/B elicited only minor effects at the same dose. Conversely, the hemolytic activity of CfTX-A/B (HU50 = 5 ng ml−1) was at least 30 times greater than that of CfTX-1/2. Structural homology between the cubozoan toxins and insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins (δ-endotoxins) suggests that the toxins have a similar pore-forming mechanism of action involving α-helices of the N-terminal domain, whereas structural diversification among toxin members may modulate target specificity. Expansion of the cnidarian toxin family therefore provides new insights into the evolutionary diversification of box jellyfish toxins from a structural and functional perspective. PMID:24403082

  11. Sound radiation characteristics of a box-type structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran Lin, Tian; Pan, Jie

    2009-09-01

    The finite element and boundary element methods are employed in this study to investigate the sound radiation characteristics of a box-type structure. It has been shown [T.R. Lin, J. Pan, Vibration characteristics of a box-type structure, Journal of Vibration and Acoustics, Transactions of ASME 131 (2009) 031004-1-031004-9] that modes of natural vibration of a box-type structure can be classified into six groups according to the symmetry properties of the three panel pairs forming the box. In this paper, we demonstrate that such properties also reveal information about sound radiation effectiveness of each group of modes. The changes of radiation efficiencies and directivity patterns with the wavenumber ratio (the ratio between the acoustic and the plate bending wavenumbers) are examined for typical modes from each group. Similar characteristics of modal radiation efficiencies between a box structure and a corresponding simply supported panel are observed. The change of sound radiation patterns as a function of the wavenumber ratio is also illustrated. It is found that the sound radiation directivity of each box mode can be correlated to that of elementary sound sources (monopole, dipole, etc.) at frequencies well below the critical frequency of the plates of the box. The sound radiation pattern on the box surface also closely related to the vibration amplitude distribution of the box structure at frequencies above the critical frequency. In the medium frequency range, the radiated sound field is dominated by the edge vibration pattern of the box. The radiation efficiency of all box modes reaches a peak at frequencies above the critical frequency, and gradually approaches unity at higher frequencies.

  12. A Comparison of Energy Expenditure During "Wii Boxing" Versus Heavy Bag Boxing in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusek, Kristen; Sparks, Kenneth; Little, Kathleen; Motley, Mary; Patterson, Sheila; Wieand, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    Traditional computer videogames are sedentary, whereas new computer videogames, such as the Nintendo(®) (Redmond, WA) "Wii™ Sports" games, allow users to physically interact while playing the sport. Energy expenditure (EE), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during heavy bag boxing versus the Nintendo "Wii Boxing" game were compared. Fifteen males and 14 females (mean age, 25.6 years; height, 171.3 cm; weight, 71.8 kg) randomly selected (by a coin toss) heavy bag boxing or "Wii Boxing" for their first test session and completed the other protocol at their second session at least 2 days later. Each session lasted for a total duration of 30 minutes and consisted of 10 3-minute exercise bouts with measurements of HR, RPE, and EE obtained from indirect calorimetry. A paired-samples t test was used to analyze the results. Significant differences were found for HR (bag, 156 beats per minute; Wii, 138 beats per minute; P=0.001) and RPE (bag, 13.8; Wii, 11.4; P=0.0001) but not for EE (bag, 8.0 kcal/minute; Wii, 7.1 kcal/minute; bag, 241 total kcal; Wii, 213 total kcal; P=0.078). The results suggest that computer active videogames, such as the Nintendo Wii, have the potential to provide similar EE as their traditional forms of exercise and may be a sufficient replacement for traditional target HR zone activities, especially in less fit individuals. Further research is needed to compare EE for different "Wii Sports" games with those for their traditional forms of exercise.

  13. Dream Box Learning. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "DreamBox Learning" is a supplemental online mathematics program that provides adaptive instruction for students in grades K-5 and focuses on number and operations, place value, and number sense. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) identified one study of "DreamBox Learning" that both falls within the scope of the Elementary…

  14. 49 CFR 230.101 - Steam locomotive driving journal boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. 230.101... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.101 Steam locomotive driving journal boxes. (a) Driving journal...

  15. Creative Underachievers: Children Who Are Too out of the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Educators in the field of gifted education attempt to not only accelerate curriculum for their students, but also to encourage and expand their critical and creative thinking. They often explain this creative approach to students as "out-of-the-box" thinking. "The box" is an effective analogy to help children understand how to…

  16. A System for Cooling inside a Glove Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Martial

    2010-01-01

    An easy, efficient, reliable, and low-cost method of constructing a cooling system using a simple circulating pump is described. The system is employed in conjunction with an inert atmosphere glove box to achieve the synthesis of air- and moisture-sensitive compounds inside the glove box at controlled, low temperatures without contaminating the…

  17. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  18. Faster Black-Box Algorithms Through Higher Arity Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Johannsen, Daniel; Kötzing, Timo

    2011-01-01

    We extend the work of Lehre and Witt (GECCO 2010) on the unbiased black-box model by considering higher arity variation operators. In particular, we show that already for binary operators the black-box complexity of LeadingOnes drops from (n2) for unary operators to O(n log n). For OneMax, the (n...

  19. Getting started with Oracle VM VirtualBox

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Pradyumna

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step guide that will show you how to install, configure, and manage VirtualBox.This book is for system administrators, technical architects, and virtualization enthusiasts who want to learn how to set up a virtual machine. Knowledge of the Linux environment is expected. Prior experience with VirtualBox or knowledge of virtualization is not required.

  20. Modelling of Box Type Solar Cooker Performance in a Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal performance model of box type solar cooker with loaded water is presented. The model was developed using the method of Funk to estimate cooking power in terms of climatic and design parameters for box type solar cooker in a tropical environment. Coefficients for each term used in the model were determined ...

  1. Current implementation of advance encryption standard (AES) S-Box

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the attack on cryptosystem is still not severe, the development of the scheme is still ongoing especially for the design of S-Box. Two main approach has beenused, which are heuristic method and algebraic method. Algebraic method as in current AES implementation has been proven to be the most secure S-Box ...

  2. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and...

  3. 30 CFR 18.42 - Explosion-proof distribution boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion-proof distribution boxes. 18.42 Section 18.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.42 Explosion-proof distribution boxes. (a) A cable passing through an...

  4. Analysis of the petunia MADS-box transcription factor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Busscher-Lange, J.; Kooiker, M.; Busscher, M.; Angenent, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of plant development. One of the major groups of transcription factors is the MADS-box family, of which at least 80 members are encoded in the Arabidopsis genome. In this study, 23 members of the petunia MADS-box transcription factor family were investigated

  5. Lightweight S-Box Architecture for Secure Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prathiba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight cryptographic solutions are required to guarantee the security of Internet of Things (IoT pervasiveness. Cryptographic primitives mandate a non-linear operation. The design of a lightweight, secure, non-linear 4 × 4 substitution box (S-box suited to Internet of Things (IoT applications is proposed in this work. The structure of the 4 × 4 S-box is devised in the finite fields GF (24 and GF ((222. The finite field S-box is realized by multiplicative inversion followed by an affine transformation. The multiplicative inverse architecture employs Euclidean algorithm for inversion in the composite field GF ((222. The affine transformation is carried out in the field GF (24. The isomorphic mapping between the fields GF (24 and GF ((222 is based on the primitive element in the higher order field GF (24. The recommended finite field S-box architecture is combinational and enables sub-pipelining. The linear and differential cryptanalysis validates that the proposed S-box is within the maximal security bound. It is observed that there is 86.5% lesser gate count for the realization of sub field operations in the composite field GF ((222 compared to the GF (24 field. In the PRESENT lightweight cipher structure with the basic loop architecture, the proposed S-box demonstrates 5% reduction in the gate equivalent area over the look-up-table-based S-box with TSMC 180 nm technology.

  6. Heart Rate and Liking During "Kinect Boxing" Versus "Wii Boxing": The Potential for Enjoyable Vigorous Physical Activity Videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gabriel J; Peacock, Corey A; Barkley, Jacob E; Gish, Brian; Brock, Scott; Volpenhein, Josh

    2015-08-01

    Nintendo(®) (Kyoto, Japan) "Wii™ Sports Boxing" ("Wii Boxing") and Xbox(®) (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) "Kinect(®) Sports Boxing" ("Kinect Boxing") are both boxing simulation videogames that are available for two different active videogame (AVG) systems. Although these AVGs are similar, the style of gameplay required is different (i.e., upper body only versus total body movements) and may alter physical activity intensity and one's preference for playing one game over the other. AVGs that elicit the greatest physiologic challenge and are preferred by users should be identified in an effort to enhance the efficacy of physical activity interventions and programs that include AVGs. The mean heart rate (HRmean) and peak heart rate (HRpeak) for 27 adults (22.7±4.2 years old) were recorded during four 10-minute conditions: seated rest, treadmill walking at 3 miles/hour, "Wii Boxing," and "Kinect Boxing." Upon completion of all four conditions, participants indicated which condition they preferred, and HRmean and HRpeak were calculated as a percentage of age-predicted maximum heart rate to classify physical activity intensity for the three activity conditions (treadmill, "Wii Boxing," and "Kinect Boxing"). "Kinect Boxing" significantly (P<0.001) increased percentage HRmean (64.1±1.6 percent of age-predicted maximum) and percentage HRpeak (76.5±1.9 percent) above all other conditions: Wii HRmean, 53.0±1.2 percent; Wii HRpeak, 61.8±1.5 percent; treadmill HRmean, 52.4±1.2 percent; treadmill HRpeak, 55.2±2.2 percent. Percentage HRpeak for "Kinect Boxing" was great enough to be considered a vigorous-intensity physical activity. There was no difference (P=0.55) in percentage HRmean between "Wii Boxing" and treadmill walking. Participants also preferred "Kinect Boxing" (P<0.001; n=26) to all other conditions ("Wii Boxing," n=1; treadmill n=0). "Kinect Boxing" was the most preferred and the only condition that was physiologically challenging enough to be classified as a

  7. Getting started with Citrix VDI-in-a-Box

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Stuart Arthur

    2013-01-01

    A practical and fast-paced guide that gives you all the information you need to simplify and streamline virtual desktops so you get a production-quality solution while instantly lowering your costs and improving security.Getting Started with Citrix VDI-in-a-Box is great for IT professionals who are new to VDI-in-a-Box and who are looking for a good grounding in the product. You may be planning to research VDI-in-a-Box in more detail, or you may be tasked with researching how VDI-in-a-Box could improve the productivity of your organization. No prior knowledge of VDI-in-a-Box is required, just a

  8. Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) Preliminary Design Study

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, S; Chard-Mj, P; Estop, J R; Martancik, D; Sheila-Melton; Young, B

    2003-01-01

    Canberra Industries has won the tendered solicitation, INEEL/EST-99-00121 for boxed waste Nondestructive Assay Development and Demonstration. Canberra will provide the Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) which is a suite of assay instrumentation and a data reduction system that addresses the measurement needs for Boxed Wastes identified in the solicitation and facilitates the associated experimental program and demonstration of system capability. The IBIS system will consist of the next generation CWAM system, i.e. CWAM II, which is a Scanning Passive/Active Neutron interrogation system which we will call a Box Segmented Neutron Scanner (BSNS), combined with a physically separate Box Segmented Gamma-ray Scanning (BSGS) system. These systems are based on existing hardware designs but will be tailored to the large sample size and enhanced to allow the program to evaluate the following measurement criteria:Characterization and correction for matrix heterogeneity Characterization of non-uniform radio-nucli...

  9. The Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 in Skin Carcinogenesis and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marcel Oliver; Garman, Khalid Ammar; Lee, Yong Gu

    2018-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-binding protein 1 (FGFBP1, FGF-BP) is a secreted chaperone that mobilizes paracrine-acting FGFs, stored in the extracellular matrix, and presents them to their cognate receptors. FGFBP1 enhances FGF signaling including angiogenesis during cancer progression, and is upregu...

  10. Structure of Human Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 Reveals a Binuclear Zinc Active Site Important for Melanogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Xuelei; Wichers, Harry J.; Soler-Lopez, Montserrat; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1) is one of three tyrosinase-like glycoenzymes in human melanocytes that are key to the production of melanin, the compound responsible for the pigmentation of skin, eye, and hair. Difficulties with producing these enzymes in pure form have hampered the

  11. Tolvaptan suppresses monocyte chemotactic protein-1 excretion in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grantham, Jared J.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Blais, Jaime; Czerwiec, Frank S.; Devuyst, Olivier; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Higashihara, Eiji; Krasa, Holly; Zhou, Wen; Ouyang, John; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by multitudes of expanding renal cysts associated with mononuclear interstitial infiltrates. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 is produced in the kidneys and excreted in the urine (uMCP1) of these patients in increased

  12. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanley, T P; Schmal, H; Friedl, H P

    1995-01-01

    The role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in rats after intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes or intratracheal administration of LPS has been assessed. Critical to these studies was the cloning and functional expression ...

  13. Surveillance of artemether-lumefantrine associated Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 gene polymorphisms in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A; Paulo, Petro; Kaaya, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    ) is the recommended first-line drug in treatment of uncomplicated malaria. This study surveyed the distribution of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased parasite tolerance to ALu, in Tanzania. METHODS: A total of 687 Plasmodium...

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Diversity in Seven Genomes – Divide and Conquer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Thomas Salhøj; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Theander, Thor G.

    2010-01-01

    The var gene encoded hyper-variable Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family mediates cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to human endothelium. Antibodies blocking cytoadhesion are important mediators of malaria immunity acquired by endemic populations. The development...

  15. Sequential, ordered acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Lusingu, John

    2009-01-01

    The binding of erythrocytes infected with mature blood stage parasites to the vascular bed is key to the pathogenesis of malignant malaria. The binding is mediated by members of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. PfEMP1s can be divided into groups, and it has...

  16. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in experimentally infected humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Magistrado, Pamela; Hermsen, Cornelus C

    2005-01-01

    -encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family, which is expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes where it mediates binding to endothelial receptors. Thus, severe malaria may be caused by parasites expressing PfEMP1 variants that afford parasites optimal sequestration...

  17. IEA Common Exercise 4: ARX, ARMAX and grey-box models for thermal performance characterization of the test box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacher, Peder; Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff

    In this report results of applying time series models for assessing the thermal performance of the IEA Annex 58 test box based on data given in the Common Exercise 4 (CE4), which was measured in Almeria, Spain. Both ARX, ARMAX and grey-box models are applied. Finally, the same models are fitted...

  18. Rethinking sanitation: panacea or Pandora's box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrey, S A

    2000-01-01

    In the 19th century, sanitation solutions were designed and built on the premises that human excreta was a waste suitable only for disposal and that the environment was capable of assimilating the waste. The prevailing view last century was that vapors from smells caused disease, and the best way to deal with excreta was to convey it to rivers and streams where it could be diluted and cleansed. Times have changed, the premises are outdated, and current solutions contribute, either directly or indirectly, to many of the problems faced by society today: water pollution, scarcity of fresh water, food insecurity, destruction and loss of soil fertility, loss of biodiversity, depletion of the ozone layer, and global warming. A common denominator of all these problems is how society deals with its wastes, specifically how it deals with human excrement. We have to rethink past premises, design and build new systems, and contribute to the solving of society's most pressing problems. The panacea of the 19th century is turning out to be the pandora's box of the 21st century.

  19. Box Cello Middle School Science Clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegrift, Guy

    1998-10-01

    The Box Cello is a middle school science club which is attempting to (1) understand the cello and (2) design a low-cost starter instrument. We can support and justify this research by adding a third goal: (3) to help supply local science classes with equipment. My policy of spending one entire day each week away from the university, out in a local school is essential to this project. This schedule also permits me to conduct lessons on optics and music in the schools. And, it permits circulation of tools and equipment. A simple calculation demonstrates the great economy achieved by combining science clubs with academic year school visits. Consider the cost of letting 10,000 students in 10 middle schools each learn about and play with a pair of "upside-down" glasses for one hour. A visit to each school for three consecutive weeks would easily permit such a circulation if only 30 pairs were constructed. Assume rhetorically, that the construction of 30 pairs of glasses were to consume the entire estimated annual budget of $100,000. The cost per student would be only ten dollars! The visits, guest lectures, and equipment loans permit informal networking (including lunch) with math, science and music teachers in 10 schools. For more information, visit the http://www.utep.edu/boxcello/

  20. Opening up a Colourful Cosmic Jewel Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The combination of images taken by three exceptional telescopes, the ESO Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal , the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla observatory and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, has allowed the stunning Jewel Box star cluster to be seen in a whole new light. Star clusters are among the most visually alluring and astrophysically fascinating objects in the sky. One of the most spectacular nestles deep in the southern skies near the Southern Cross in the constellation of Crux. The Kappa Crucis Cluster, also known as NGC 4755 or simply the "Jewel Box" is just bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye. It was given its nickname by the English astronomer John Herschel in the 1830s because the striking colour contrasts of its pale blue and orange stars seen through a telescope reminded Herschel of a piece of exotic jewellery. Open clusters [1] such as NGC 4755 typically contain anything from a few to thousands of stars that are loosely bound together by gravity. Because the stars all formed together from the same cloud of gas and dust their ages and chemical makeup are similar, which makes them ideal laboratories for studying how stars evolve. The position of the cluster amongst the rich star fields and dust clouds of the southern Milky Way is shown in the very wide field view generated from the Digitized Sky Survey 2 data. This image also includes one of the stars of the Southern Cross as well as part of the huge dark cloud of the Coal Sack [2]. A new image taken with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile shows the cluster and its rich surroundings in all their multicoloured glory. The large field of view of the WFI shows a vast number of stars. Many are located behind the dusty clouds of the Milky Way and therefore appear red [3]. The FORS1 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) allows a much closer look at the cluster itself. The telescope's huge mirror

  1. A Grey-Box Dynamic Model of Plate Heat Exchangers Used in an Urban Heating System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qingwei Miao; Shijun You; Wandong Zheng; Xuejing Zheng; Huan Zhang; Yaran Wang

    2017-01-01

    .... In the grey-box method, a newly developed parameter identification method was established. The simulation results of two outlet temperatures by the grey-box and white-box method, respectively, are compared with the test data...

  2. SUPERSTITIOUS BEHAVIOR AMONG JUDO, TAEKWONDO AND BOXING PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dureja Gaurav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study was designed to measure superstitious behavior among Judo, Taekwondo and Boxing players. Material: Thirty (N=30 male inter-college level players with the age group of 19-25 years were selected through purposive sampling technique to act as subjects from affiliated colleges of Panjab University, Chandigarh. They were further divided into three groups: Group-A [Judo (n=10], Group-B [Taekwondo (n=10] and Group-C [Boxing (n=10]. One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was applied to find out the differences among judo, taekwondo and boxing players. Where F values found significant, Least Significant Differences (LSD Post-hoc test was applied to find out the direction and degree of difference. Results: The level of significance was set at 0.05. The result revealed significant differences among judo, taekwondo and boxing players on the sub parameters: clothing and appearance, preparation, team ritual and coach. However, no significant differences have been observed on the sub-parameters fetish, game/competition, prayer and parameter superstitious (Total. Conclusions: The obtained results showed significant differences on the sub-parameter Coach among Judo, Taekwondo and Boxing players. While calculating the mean values of entire groups, it has been observed that Boxing players demonstrate significantly better on the sub-parameter Coach. Therefore, it can be ascertained that Boxing players are more confident that coach bring a lucky charm to our game.

  3. SUPERSTITIOUS BEHAVIOR AMONG JUDO, TAEKWONDO AND BOXING PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Dureja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study was designed to measure superstitious behavior among Judo, Taekwondo and Boxing players. Material: Thirty (N=30 male inter-college level players with the age group of 19-25 years were selected through purposive sampling technique to act as subjects from affiliated colleges of Panjab University, Chandigarh. They were further divided into three groups: Group-A [Judo (n=10], Group-B [Taekwondo (n=10] and Group-C [Boxing (n=10]. One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was applied to find out the differences among judo, taekwondo and boxing players. Where ‘F’ values found significant, Least Significant Differences (LSD Post-hoc test was applied to find out the direction and degree of difference. Results: The level of significance was set at 0.05. The result revealed significant differences among judo, taekwondo and boxing players on the sub parameters: clothing and appearance, preparation, team ritual and coach. However, no significant differences have been observed on the sub-parameters fetish, game/competition, prayer and parameter superstitious (Total. Conclusions: The obtained results showed significant differences on the sub-parameter Coach among Judo, Taekwondo and Boxing players. While calculating the mean values of entire groups, it has been observed that Boxing players demonstrate significantly better on the sub-parameter Coach. Therefore, it can be ascertained that Boxing players are more confident that coach bring a lucky charm to our game.

  4. Baculovirus F-Box Protein LEF-7 Modifies the Host DNA Damage Response To Enhance Virus Multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan K.; Byers, Nathaniel M.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) of a host organism represents an effective antiviral defense that is frequently manipulated and exploited by viruses to promote multiplication. We report here that the large DNA baculoviruses, which require host DDR activation for optimal replication, encode a conserved replication factor, LEF-7, that manipulates the DDR via a novel mechanism. LEF-7 suppresses DDR-induced accumulation of phosphorylated host histone variant H2AX (γ-H2AX), a critical regulator of the DDR. LEF-7 was necessary and sufficient to block γ-H2AX accumulation caused by baculovirus infection or DNA damage induced by means of pharmacological agents. Deletion of LEF-7 from the baculovirus genome allowed γ-H2AX accumulation during virus DNA synthesis and impaired both very late viral gene expression and production of infectious progeny. Thus, LEF-7 is essential for efficient baculovirus replication. We determined that LEF-7 is a nuclear F-box protein that interacts with host S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1), suggesting that LEF-7 acts as a substrate recognition component of SKP1/Cullin/F-box (SCF) complexes for targeted protein polyubiquitination. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that LEF-7's N-terminal F-box is necessary for γ-H2AX repression and Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) replication events. We concluded that LEF-7 expedites virus replication most likely by selective manipulation of one or more host factors regulating the DDR, including γ-H2AX. Thus, our findings indicate that baculoviruses utilize a unique strategy among viruses for hijacking the host DDR by using a newly recognized F-box protein. PMID:24027328

  5. Increased cerebrospinal fluid levels of cytokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, H R; Escamilla-Ocañas, C E; Camara-Lemarroy, C R; González-Garza, M T; Moreno-Cuevas, J; García Sarreón, M A

    2017-10-10

    Neuroinflammation has recently been described in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the precise role of such proinflammatory cytokines as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) in ALS has not yet been determined. In this study, we determined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MCP-1 and MIP-1β levels and assessed their association with the duration and severity of ALS. Concentrations of MCP-1 and MIP-1β were determined in the CSF of 77 patients diagnosed with ALS and 13 controls. Cytokine levels were analysed in relation to ALS duration (12months) and severity (30points on the ALS Functional Rating Scale administered at hospital admission). Higher CSF MIP-1β (10.68pg/mL vs. 4.69pg/mL, P<.0001) and MCP-1 (234.89pg/mL vs. 160.95pg/mL, P=.011) levels were found in the 77 patients with ALS compared to controls. There were no differences in levels of either cytokine in relation to disease duration or severity. However, we did observe a significant positive correlation between MIP-1β and MCP-1 in patients with ALS. The increase in MIP-1β and MCP-1 levels suggests that these cytokines may have a synergistic effect on ALS pathogenesis. However, in our cohort, no association was found with either the duration or the clinical severity of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Security of the AES with a Secret S-Box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiessen, Tyge; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Kölbl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    How does the security of the AES change when the S-box is replaced by a secret S-box, about which the adversary has no knowledge? Would it be safe to reduce the number of encryption rounds? In this paper, we demonstrate attacks based on integral cryptanalysis which allow to recover both the secret...... key and the secret S-box for respectively four, five, and six rounds of the AES. Despite the significantly larger amount of secret information which an adversary needs to recover, the attacks are very efficient with time/data complexities of 217/216, 238/240 and 290/264, respectively. Another...

  7. Utilization of Boxes for Pesticide Storage in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieris, Ravi; Weerasinghe, Manjula; Abeywickrama, Tharaka

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide self-poisoning is now considered one of the two most common methods of suicide worldwide. Encouraging safe storage of pesticides is one particular approach aimed at reducing pesticide self-poisoning. CropLife Sri Lanka (the local association of pesticide manufacturers), with the aid...... of the Department of Agriculture, distributed lockable in-house pesticide storage boxes free of charge to a farming community in a rural district of Sri Lanka. Padlocks were not provided with the boxes. These storage boxes were distributed to the farmers without prior education. The authors carried out a cross...

  8. Quartic Box-Spline Reconstruction on the BCC Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minho

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents an alternative box-spline filter for the body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice, the seven-direction quartic box-spline M7 that has the same approximation order as the eight-direction quintic box-spline M8 but a lower polynomial degree, smaller support, and is computationally more efficient. When applied to reconstruction with quasi-interpolation prefilters, M7 shows less aliasing, which is verified quantitatively by integral filter metrics and frequency error kernels. To visualize and analyze distributional aliasing characteristics, each spectrum is evaluated on the planes and lines with various orientations.

  9. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromat...

  10. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  11. Inhibition of Activator Protein 1 Activity and Neoplastic Transformation by Aspirin*

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zigang; Huang, Chuanshu; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Ma, Wei-Ya

    1997-01-01

    Aspirin, along with its analgesic-antipyretic uses, is now also being considered for prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although many of aspirin's pharmacological actions are related to its ability to inhibit prostaglandin biosynthesis, some of its beneficial therapeutic effects are not completely understood. Transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) is critical for the induction of neoplastic transformation and inducti...

  12. Trial manufacture of portable type `WISH BOX`; Kahangata WISH BOX no shisaku kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushiyama, I.; Sakuma, H.; Qin, W. [Ashikaga Institute of Technology, Tochigi (Japan); Onai, Y.

    1996-10-27

    This paper proposes the small portable type power source `WISH BOX` (wind and solar hybrid) composed of a small wind power generator and solar cell panels. Since solar radiation and wind power are complementary to each other in seasons, day and night, and fine and cloudy weather, WISH BOX is useful for standalone power source in non-power areas of developing countries, life spot in disasters, and outdoor leisure. The most small light-weight high-performance AIR303 produced by Southwest Windpower Co., USA is used as wind power generator, and two 50W solar cell panels HSC-5010-S produced by Daido Hokusan Co. is used. Sealed lead storage batteries (12V, 20Ah each) are also connected to cope with load fluctuation. In comparison with conventional portable gasoline engine generators, this environment-friendly generator is featured by fuel-free, no emission of gases, no noises and no fire occurrence, and can also supply stable power with small batteries even in the nighttime and cloudy weather by combining wind power. The generator of 400,000 yen is now in field experiment. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  13. 47 CFR 90.241 - Radio call box operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter can be only manually reactivated. (9) Frequency selection must be made with regard to reception of... effective radiated power (ERP). (3) The height of a call box antenna may not exceed 6.1 meters (20 feet...

  14. FDA boxed warnings: how to prescribe drugs safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nina R

    2010-02-01

    Boxed warnings, commonly referred to as "black box" warnings, are issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and featured in the labeling of drugs associated with serious adverse reactions. These safety concerns are typically identified through the Adverse Event Reporting System and the Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology, which evaluates postmarket safety findings. The most common type of warning is issued when there is a potentially serious adverse effect that must be carefully weighed against the potential benefit of the drug. Warnings are also issued to draw attention to dosing, monitoring requirements, and potential drug interactions. Boxed warnings have been issued recently for oral sodium phosphate bowel preparations, fluoroquinolone antibiotics, and salmeterol. Despite these highly publicized warnings, all of these medications remain viable treatment options with appropriate patient selection. Ultimately, physicians must decide whether to prescribe drugs with boxed warnings. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  15. T-Box Genes in Human Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Brook, J D; Wilsdon, A

    2017-01-01

    T-box genes are important development regulators in vertebrates with specific patterns of expression and precise roles during embryogenesis. They encode transcription factors that regulate gene transcription, often in the early stages of development. The hallmark of this family of proteins is the presence of a conserved DNA binding motif, the "T-domain." Mutations in T-box genes can cause developmental disorders in humans, mostly due to functional deficiency of the relevant proteins. Recent studies have also highlighted the role of some T-box genes in cancer and in cardiomyopathy, extending their role in human disease. In this review, we focus on ten T-box genes with a special emphasis on their roles in human disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cryogenic distribution box for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, M. R.; Bonnema, E. C.; Cunningham, E. K.

    2017-12-01

    Meyer Tool & Mfg., Inc (Meyer Tool) of Oak Lawn, Illinois is manufacturing a cryogenic distribution box for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The distribution box will be used for the Muon-to-electron conversion (Mu2e) experiment. The box includes twenty-seven cryogenic valves, two heat exchangers, a thermal shield, and an internal nitrogen separator vessel, all contained within a six-foot diameter ASME coded vacuum vessel. This paper discusses the design and manufacturing processes that were implemented to meet the unique fabrication requirements of this distribution box. Design and manufacturing features discussed include: 1) Thermal strap design and fabrication, 2) Evolution of piping connections to heat exchangers, 3) Nitrogen phase separator design, 4) ASME code design of vacuum vessel, and 5) Cryogenic valve installation.

  17. Generalized box-plot for root growth ensembles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vad, Viktor; Cedrim, Douglas; Busch, Wolfgang; Filzmoser, Peter; Viola, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    .... We use the generalized box plot concept with a new formulation of data depth. In addition to spatial distributions, we created a visual representation to encode temporal distributions associated with the development of root individuals...

  18. Injury and injury rates in Muay Thai kick boxing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gartland, S; Malik, M H; Lovell, M E

    2001-01-01

    To determine the type and number of injuries that occur during the training and practice of Muay Thai kick boxing and to compare the data obtained with those from previous studies of karate and taekwondo...

  19. Box photosynthesis modeling results for WRF/CMAQ LSM

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Box Photosynthesis model simulations for latent heat and ozone at 6 different FLUXNET sites. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Ran, L., J....

  20. EPA EcoBox Tools by Stressors - Physical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  1. EPA EcoBox Tools by Stressors - Stressors in ERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  2. EPA EcoBox Tools by Stressors - Chemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  3. EPA EcoBox Tools by Stressors - Biological

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases