WorldWideScience

Sample records for bowel mri enteroclysis

  1. Radiological assessment of small bowel obstructions: value of conventional enteroclysis and dynamic MR-enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare small bowel lesions, especially stenoses, with conventional enteroclysis, static MRI and dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with Crohn's disease or other suspected small bowel lesions were examined. MRI was performed in a static and a dynamic way either within one hour after conventional enteroclysis (n = 30) or a few days afterwards (n = 12). In order to monitor bowel filling and to characterize stenoses in a dynamic fashion, 4 series of coronal T2w HASTE breath hold sequences were used, first without additional bowel opacification and then during administration of 1,5 l methyl cellulose via a naso-intestinal tube in the MR unit. Intravenously applied Buscopan was used to reduce bowel movement. Results: In 4 out of 42 Patients, application of methylcellulose was limited to 1000 ml because of gastrointestinal complaints or visible gastral reflux. All patients could be evaluated. Static MRI performed within one hour after conventional enteroclysis and no additional bowel opacification showed insufficient bowel distension. Distension was still better than in MRI without prior application of contrast medium. On the contrary, dynamic MR - enteroclysis lead to controlled and complete bowel distension which allowed for significantly better evaluation of normal bowel anatomy and pathological alterations of the gut. Because of a better bowel distension and dynamic evaluation, MR-enteroclysis revealed significantly more stenoses (n = 42) than MRI obtained with less distension (n = 27, p < 0.001), and characterization of lesions was comparable to conventional enteroclysis (p < 0.001). Fixed and non-fixed stenoses could be differentiated by dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Furthermore, extraluminal complication of Crohn's disease such as abscesses and fistulae or large bowel manifestation of disease were shown in 13 patients. (orig.)

  2. CT enteroclysis in small bowel Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease has changed dramatically over the last decade. The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon endoscopy and the introduction of newer therapeutic agents have changed the role of imaging in the small bowel. Additionally, advances in multidetector CT technology have further changed how radiologic investigations are utilized in the diagnosis and management of small bowel Crohn's disease. This article describes how we perform CT enteroclysis in the investigation of small bowel Crohn's disease and discusses the role of CT enteroclysis in the current management of small bowel Crohn's disease.

  3. A prospective randomized comparison between two MRI studies of the small bowel in Crohn's disease, the oral contrast method and MR enteroclysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negaard, Anne; Paulsen, Vemund; Sandvik, Leiv; Berstad, Audun Elnaes; Borthne, Arne; Try, Kirsti; Lygren, Idar; Storaas, Tryggve; Klow, Nils-Einar

    2007-09-01

    The aim was to compare bowel distension and diagnostic properties of magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel with oral contrast (MRI per OS) with magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE). Forty patients with suspected Crohn's disease (CD) were examined with both MRI methods. MRI per OS was performed with a 6% mannitol solution and MRE with nasojejunal intubation and a polyethylenglycol solution. MRI protocol consisted of balanced fast field echo (B-FFE), T2 and T1 sequences with and without gadolinium. Two experienced radiologists individually evaluated bowel distension and pathological findings including wall thickness (BWT), contrast enhancement (BWE), ulcer (BWU), stenosis (BWS) and edema (EDM). The diameter of the small bowel was smaller with MRI per OS than with MRE (difference jejunum: 0.55 cm, p < 0.001; ileum: 0.35 cm, p < 0.001, terminal ileum: 0.09 cm, p = 0.08). However, CD was diagnosed with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values: MRI per OS 88%, 89%, 89%, 89%; MRE 88%, 84%, 82%, 89%) and inter-observer agreement (MRI per OS k = 0.95; MRE k = 1). In conclusion, bowel distension was inferior in MRI per OS compared to MRE. However, both methods diagnosed CD with a high diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:17483955

  4. Indications and selection of MR enterography vs. MR enteroclysis with emphasis on patients who need small bowel MRI and general anaesthesia: results of a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Torkzad, Michael R.; Masselli, Gabriele; Halligan, Steve; Oto, Aytek; Neubauer, Henning; Taylor, Stuart; Gupta, Arun; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Lawrance, Ian C; Welman, Christopher J.; Negård, Anne; Ekberg, Olle; Patak, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aims To survey the perceived indications for magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel (MRE) by experts, when MR enteroclysis (MREc) or MR enterography (MREg) may be chosen, and to determine how the approach to MRE is modified when general anaesthesia (GA) is required. Materials and methods Selected opinion leaders in MRE completed a questionnaire that included clinical indications (MREg or MREc), specifics regarding administration of enteral contrast, and how the technique is altered to ...

  5. CT enteroclysis in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The role of CT enteroclysis is gaining on importance in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. The aim of the study was to present own experiences in CT enteroclysis application, with the use of a 64-detector CT unit. Material/Methods: CT enteroclyses were performed in 60 patients: 53 with the suspicion of the Crohns disease, 2 suspected for carcinoid, 1 with suspicion of the fistula between the small bowel and the bladder, 2 suspected for the tumor of the ileo-caecal region, and in 1 case, the aim of examination was to carry out an evaluation of the postsurgical state of the bowel-bowel anastomosis. We used own endoscopic technique of catheter insertion into the bowel, which shortens the examination time and improves patients comfort. Results: The catheter was correctly introduced into the small bowel in 58 patients (endoscopy had to be repeated in 4 cases). Only 2 examinations failed, because patients refused repeated endoscopy. Radiological signs of the Crohns disease were found in 50 out of 53 patients. In the 3 remaining patients, the appearance of the small bowel was normal. In 5 non-Crohns disease patients, CT enteroclysis enabled a good visualization of the pathology (tumors, fistula). Conclusions: CT enteroclysis with the use of the 64-detector CT unit is a valuable method in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. It could supplement or precede capsule endoscopy. (authors)

  6. A combination of small bowel imaging methods: conventional enteroclysis with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akman, C. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Korman, U. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ugurk9@istanbul.edu.tr; Oguet, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Kurugoglu, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Urger, E. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Ulus, S. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Esen, G. [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Tasci, I. [Department of Surgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    AIM: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the overall findings of conventional enteroclysis (CE) with complementary magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in small bowel disease. METHODS: The study included 32 patients referred from various clinical departments, with known or suspected small bowel disease and abnormalities on CE. Immediately after CE, true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), and unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with fat saturation were obtained. Mucosal, mural and luminal changes of the small bowel were evaluated by each technique. In addition, bowel wall thickening, bowel wall enhancement and perienteric changes were assessed by MRE. The radiological findings obtained were evaluated together as a combination, and the role of MRE in the determination of the activity and complications of the small bowel disease was assessed. Radiological findings were correlated with clinical evaluation and follow-up in all cases, including endoscopy in 14 cases and surgery in 5 cases. RESULTS: MRE provided important supplementary mural and extramural information, including degree of pathological wall thickness, mural enhancement pattern associated with disease activity, perivisceral collection, abscess formation, mesenteric fibrofatty proliferation, lymphadenopathy and increase in perienteric vascularity. Short strictures were not revealed on MRE; however, for patients with a history of abdominal malignancy, MRE helped characterize the level of any obstruction and the extent of the disease. CONCLUSION: We recommend MRE for patients who have findings of advanced inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasm on CE examination. The combination of these two techniques can provide important information on the degree and extent of the disorder.

  7. Multislice CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of multislice computed tomography combined with colon distension by water enteroclysis (MSCTe) in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. Ninety-eight women with symptoms suggestive of colorectal endometriosis underwent MSCTe; locations, number of nodule/s, size of the nodule/s and depth of bowel wall infiltration were determined. Independently from the findings of MSCTe, all women underwent laparoscopy. MSCTe findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Abnormal findings suggestive of bowel endometriotic nodules were detected by MSCTe in 75 of the 76 patients with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe identified 110 (94.8%) of the 116 bowel endometriotic nodules removed at surgery; 6 nodules missed at MSCTe were located on the rectum. MSCTe correctly determined the degree of infiltration of the bowel wall in all of the 34 serosal bowel nodules identified at MSCTe. In six nodules reaching the submucosa, the depth of infiltration was underestimated by MSCTe. MSCTe had a sensitivity of 98.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 95.7% in identifying women with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe is effective in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. (orig.)

  8. Multislice CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscaldi, Ennio; Rollandi, Gian A. [' ' Duchesse of Galliera' ' -Hospital, Genoa (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Ferrero, Simone; Ragni, Nicola; Remorgida, Valentino [San Martino Hospital and Genoa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Obstretics and Gynaecology; Fulcheri, Ezio [San Martino Hospital and Genoa Univ. (Italy). Unit of Anatomy and Histopathology

    2007-01-15

    This prospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of multislice computed tomography combined with colon distension by water enteroclysis (MSCTe) in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. Ninety-eight women with symptoms suggestive of colorectal endometriosis underwent MSCTe; locations, number of nodule/s, size of the nodule/s and depth of bowel wall infiltration were determined. Independently from the findings of MSCTe, all women underwent laparoscopy. MSCTe findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Abnormal findings suggestive of bowel endometriotic nodules were detected by MSCTe in 75 of the 76 patients with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe identified 110 (94.8%) of the 116 bowel endometriotic nodules removed at surgery; 6 nodules missed at MSCTe were located on the rectum. MSCTe correctly determined the degree of infiltration of the bowel wall in all of the 34 serosal bowel nodules identified at MSCTe. In six nodules reaching the submucosa, the depth of infiltration was underestimated by MSCTe. MSCTe had a sensitivity of 98.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 95.7% in identifying women with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe is effective in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. (orig.)

  9. MRI of the small-bowel: how to differentiate primary neoplasms and mimickers

    OpenAIRE

    Masselli, G; Colaiacomo, M C; Marcelli, G; Bertini, L.; Casciani, E; Laghi, F; D'Amico, P.; Caprasecca, S; Polettini, E; Gualdi, G

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the gastrointestinal tract is gaining clinical acceptance and is increasingly used to evaluate patients with suspected small-bowel diseases. MRI may be performed with enterography or enteroclysis, both of which combine the advantages of cross-sectional imaging with those of conventional enteroclysis. In this paper, MRI features of primary small-bowel neoplasms, the most important signs for differential diagnosis and the diseases that can be considered as mimickers of small-bowel neopla...

  10. Accuracy of enteroclysis in Crohn's disease of the small bowel: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of enteroclysis in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small bowel in a group of consecutive patients. From January 1992 to December 1995, 165 patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel presented to our institution for enteroclysis. In 14 patients up to three enteroclysis exams were performed. Most patients (78 %) underwent colonoscopy and retrograde ileoscopy. In the remaining patients clinical follow-up was used as gold standard. In 79 patients no radiographic abnormalities were found. Sixty-one patients (40 men and 21 women; mean age 34.2 years) had a radiological diagnosis of Crohn's disease. This involved the terminal ileum in 39 patients (64 %) either alone (n = 25) or in association with the pelvic ileum (n = 14). In 12 of these patients retrograde ileoscopy was not feasible. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery. In 4 patients pathology revealed diseases other than Crohn's. These patients had all ileocecal diseases (tuberculosis = 2; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma = 1; adenocarcinoma = 1). One false-negative result was observed. Overall, enteroclysis showed a sensitivity of 98.2 % and a positive predictive value of 93.4 %. Enteroclysis is a sensitive technique in evaluating both the extent and the severity of small bowel involvement in Crohn's disease, although the overlap of radiographic findings may hamper its accuracy when the disease is confined to the ileocecal area. (orig.)

  11. Small bowel MRI in adult patients: not just Crohn’s disease—a tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Kavaliauskiene, Giedre; Ziech, Manon L. W.; Nio, C Yung; Stoker, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of less well-known small bowel and mesenteric diseases found at small bowel magnetic resonance (MR) enterography/enteroclysis and to review the imaging findings. MR enterography and enteroclysis are important techniques for evaluation of small bowel diseases. In most centres these techniques are primarily used in Crohn’s disease, and most radiologists are familiar with these MRI findings. However, the knowledge of findings in other diseases is often sparse, i...

  12. Carcinoid tumors of the small-bowel: Evaluation with 64-section CT-enteroclysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.soyer@lrb.aphp.fr [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière - AP-HP, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne-Paris Cité, 10 rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Dohan, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.dohan@lrb.aphp.fr [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière - AP-HP, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne-Paris Cité, 10 rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Eveno, Clarisse, E-mail: larisse.eveno@lrb.aphp.fr [Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne-Paris Cité, 10 rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Department of Digestive Diseases, Hôpital Lariboisière - AP-HP, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); and others

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the imaging presentation of carcinoid tumors of the small-bowel at 64-section CT-enteroclysis and determine the sensitivity of this technique for tumor detection. Patients and methods: The 64-section CT-enteroclysis examinations of 22 patients with histopathologically proven small-bowel carcinoid tumors and those of 6 patients with suspected recurrence after small-bowel resection for carcinoid tumor were reviewed. Images were analyzed with respect to imaging presentation. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, of 64-section CT-enteroclysis for the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the small-bowel were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Twenty-five carcinoid tumors were confirmed in 22 patients (prevalence, 22/28; 79%). Overall sensitivity for carcinoid tumor detection was 76% (19/25; 95%CI: 55–91%) on a per-lesion basis. On a per-patient basis, 64-section CT-enteroclysis had a sensitivity of 86% (19/22; 95%CI: 65–97%), a specificity of 100% (6/6; 95%CI: 54–100%) and an accuracy of 89% (25/28; 95%CI: 72–98%) for the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor. Focal small-bowel wall thickening, mesenteric stranding, and mesenteric mass were found in 20/22 (91%), 18/22 (82%) and 15/22 (68%) patients with pathologically confirmed tumors. Conclusion: 64-Section CT-enteroclysis shows highly suggestive features for the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the small-bowel and achieves high degrees of sensitivity for tumor detection.

  13. Crohn's disease at the small bowel imaging by the ultrasound-enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: Crohn's disease is more likely a systemic disease governed by a shift in the immune response, thus affecting the whole MALT system. Its treatment should be as conservative as possible and surgery is usually taking place after complications like indolent fistulations, stenoses, bleeding, or bowel perforation started. Standard radiological methods to check the extent of the disease are loaded either with certain radiation exposure (enteroclysis, CT) or lack standardization (ultrasound). The aim of this small study was to evaluate the worth of ultrasound-enteroclysis in detecting the extent and complications of the Crohn's disease in surgically treated patients. Material and methods: Since 1997, when we started with the ultrasound-enteroclysis, 246 surgical performances were involved into our study. Out of them, 181 had conventional abdominal intestinal ultrasound as well as conventional enteroclysis within 1 week. Remaining 65 cases were diagnosed by the ultrasound-enteroclysis. Intestinal ultrasound was performed on the Ultramark 3000 HDI device with autofocussable convex 5 MHz and linear 7.5 MHz probes or nowadays ATL 5000 HDI, 7-12 MHz linear probe. No contrast enhancement was used. Enteroclysis was done with the Micropaque suspension diluted 1:1 with HP-7000 300 ml with its application rate up to 75 ml/min followed by HP-7000 solution 2000 ml, application rate of 120 ml/min. The patients with ultrasound-enteroclysis were applied HP 7000 solution only (2000 ml, rate 100 ml/s) via an enteroclysis catheter. All investigations were video-recorded. Results: Consent with the per-operative finding was reached in 162 from 181 enteroclyses and in 169 of 181 ultrasounds. Ultrasound-enteroclysis was precise in 61 cases from 65. Among these, 60 patients had the recurrence during the treatment proved by clinical and laboratory results. This re-activation was clearly revealed in 38 from 43 cases by enteroclysis, 41 from 43 by US and in 16 from 17 by ultrasound-enteroclysis

  14. Modern MRI of the small bowell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  15. MRI enterography: the future of small bowel diagnostics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbach, S

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays an increasing role in small bowel imaging of Crohn's disease. MR enterography (MRE) without nasojejunal intubation and radiation exposure offers similar results compared to MR enteroclysis (with intubation) and should be therefore the preferred method. Sensitivity and specificity is comparable to that of CT enterography. Capsule endoscopy is obviously superior to MRE in detecting superficial lesions, but this is limited to the mucosa and stenosis has to be excluded before examination using imaging, like MRE. There are no convincing studies in the literature regarding assessment of disease activity with imaging. Moreover, there is no consensus in the literature about a suitable reference standard. PMID:20926869

  16. The most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: air enteroclysis, MDCT, endoscopy, and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbo, Alberto I; Reddy, Threta; Gates, Thomas; Vesa, Telciane; Thomas, Jaiyeola; Gonzalez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    This pictorial essay describes the most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, abnormal mucosal folds, villous pattern, aphthous ulcerations, linear ulcerations, cobblestone pattern, string sign, target sign, comb sign, creeping fat, sinus tracts, fistulas, and abscesses. Each description includes the definition, a correlation with the pathologic findings, an explanation of the possible physiopathologic mechanism, sample radiologic images with air enteroclysis or MDCT, the correspondence with the endoscopic findings when possible, and a list of differential diagnoses. PMID:24173609

  17. Small bowel enteroclysis with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in patients with failed and uncertain passage of a patency capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Video capsule enteroscopy (VCE) has revolutionized small bowel imaging, enabling visual examination of the mucosa of the entire small bowel, while MR enteroclysis (MRE) and CT enteroclysis (CTE) have largely replaced conventional barium enteroclysis. A new indication for MRE and CTE is the clinical suspicion of small bowel strictures, as indicated by delayed or non-delivery of a test capsule given before a VCE examination, to exclude stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical value of subsequent MRE and CTE in patients in whom a test capsule did not present itself in due time. Seventy-five consecutive patients were identified with a delayed or unnoticed delivery of the test capsule. Seventy patients consented to participate and underwent MRE (44) or CTE (26). The medical records and imaging studies were retrospectively reviewed and symptoms, laboratory results and imaging findings recorded. Lesions compatible with Crohns disease were shown by MRE in 5 patients, by CTE in one and by VCE in four, one of whom had lesions on MRE. In patients without alarm symptoms and findings (weight loss, haematochezia, anaemia, nocturnal diarrheoa, ileus, fistula, abscess and abnormal blood tests) imaging studies did not unveil any such lesion. VCE's were performed in only 20 patients, mainly younger than 50 years of age, although no stenotic lesion was shown by MRE and CTE. In the remaining 50 patients no VCE or other endoscopic intervention was performed indicating that the referring physician was content with the diagnostic information from MRE or CTE. The diagnostic value of MRE and CTE is sufficient for clinical management of most patients with suspected small bowel disease, and thus VCE may be omitted or at least postponed for later usage

  18. MR enteroclysis versus conventional enteroclysis in Crohn disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Conventional enteroclysis is well established as a modality of choice for imaging evaluation of the small intestine. Its main limitation is the inability to demonstrate exoenteric pathology associated with small intestinal diseases. Cross sectional imaging has been complementary utilized to evaluate mural and extra mural abnormalities and complications of Crohn's disease. The main advantages of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the small bowel include excellent soft-tissue contrast and absence of radiation exposure. Different approaches have been adopted for studying the small bowel with MRI. The most promising is termed MR Enteroclysis (MRE), and includes duodenal intubation and administration of a maximum amount of 21 of contrast agent with the patient lying on prone position inside the magnet. An iso-osmotic water solution with polyethylene glycol and electrolytes (PEG) may be used as intestinal contrast. In our experience, the ideal examination protocol of the small bowel with MRI should comprise two kinds of sequences: (a) T2 weighted sequences for detecting bowel wall thickening and evaluating the exoenteric complications or the extent of the disease and (b) post Gadolinium T1 weighted sequences for characterizing the lesions. In the first group the most suitable sequences are the true FISP and HASTE which offer excellent anatomical depiction of the small bowel (HASTE) and the mesenteries (true FISP). In the second group, a 3d FLASH sequence can provide high resolution images of the bowel wall (512 matrix and 2 mm thin slices), where after Gadolinium injection and fat suppression techniques it is possible to characterize the disease (i.e. activity in Crohn's disease). The most important clinical application of MRE is Crohn disease. The characteristic ulcerations of Crohn's disease can be demonstrated on MRE and are better seen using the true FISP sequence, but they can also be appreciated on HASTE images. Longitudinal or transverse deep linear

  19. Breathhold MRI of the small bowel in Crohn's disease after enteroklysis with oral magnetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of breathhold MRI following enteroclysis with addition of oral magnetic particles to study the extension, detection of stenoses and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn's disease. Results: Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with strong contrast enhancement. 95.8% of affected small bowel segments and 94.7% of stenoses were correctly detected by MRI. All four fistulas were detected and important extraluminal findings were seen in 6/18 patients. Additionally, one ileoileal and two ileosigmoidal adhesions, two extraluminal abscesses and affection of the right ureter were delineated. Conclusion: MRI in Crohn's disease offers the potential to avoid radiation exposure in this relatively young patient group. Important additional findings relevant to indication of surgery are seen in approximately one third of cases. The replacement of transduodenal intubation by oral contrast application remains to be further studied. (orig./AJ)

  20. Combination of dynamic MR enteroclysis (sellink) and MR colonography to diagnose crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to investigate whether a combined examination with MRI enteroclysis and MRI colonography is practicable and would provide additional findings in the regions seen with ileo-colonoscopy in the work-up of patients with Crohn's disease. Material and methods: twenty-five consecutive patients with Crohn's disease (CD) (age range 19 to 42 years, mean age 29.2 years, gender ratio male:female 8:17) were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent conventional ileo-colonoscopy as a standard of reference followed by a combined examination of MRI enteroclysis and MRI colonography at 1.5T within 15 days. Two blinded radiologists evaluated the MRI examinations and compared them with the colonoscopic results. Results: the MRI examination detected 31 inflamed bowel segments in 25 patients. In comparison to colonoscopy, 5 additional, endoscopically inaccessible lesions were found by MRI and only 2 lesions were missed by MRI. Compared to colonoscopy, MRI found 7 of 10 fistulas detected by colonoscopy, and 3 otherwise indiscernible abscesses. The detection of inflamed bowel segments by means of MRI (endoscopy) revealed a sensitivity of 88.8% (100%), specificity of 80% (100%) and an overall accuracy of 96% (100%). Conclusion: this study provides strong evidence that the combination of MRI enteroclysis and MRI colonography is practicable and supplies additional results regarding the regions which are not seen with ileo-colonoscopy in the work-up of patients with Crohn's disease. (orig.)

  1. Gradient-enhanced volume rendering: an image processing strategy to facilitate whole small bowel imaging with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyss, Michael [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Patak, Michael A.; Juli, Christoph F.; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Scheidegger, Markus B. [ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wentz, Klaus U. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); University of Witten Herdecke, Herdecke (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    MRI of the small bowel with positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent is a promising non-invasive imaging method. The aim of our study was to introduce small bowel MRI in a display format that clinicians are accustomed to and that maximizes the amount of information visualized on a single image. Twelve healthy volunteers, median age 32 years (range 18-49 years) participated in the study. A mixture of 20 ml Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), 0.8 g/kg body weight psyllium fibre (Metamucil) and 1.2 l water were sequentially administered over a period of 4 h. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T unit (Philips Gyroscan, Intera). Fat-saturated, 3D, gradient echo imaging was performed while the patient was in apnea (30 s). Bowel motion was reduced with 40 mg intravenously administered scopolamine (Buscopan). A 3D, gradient-enhanced, volume rendering technique was applied to the 3D data sets. Standard projections [left anterior oblique (LAO), right anterior oblique (RAO), supine and prone] resembling conventional enteroclysis were successfully generated within fewer than 10 min processing time. Reconstructions were reproducible and provided an entire overview of the small bowel. In addition thin-slab volume rendering allowed an overlap-free display of individual structures. Positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent, combined with a gradient enhanced volume rendering method, allows the reconstruction of the small bowel in a pattern resembling conventional double-contrast enteroclysis. Segmental display without overlay is possible. (orig.)

  2. Modern MRI of the small bowell; Moderne MRT des Duenndarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharitzer, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  3. Combination of dynamic MR enteroclysis (sellink) and MR colonography to diagnose crohn's disease; Kombination von dynamischem MR-Sellink und MR-Kolonographie zur Diagnostik des Morbus Crohn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, R.; Herzog, H.; Lopez-Haenninen, E.; Cho, C.H.; Felix, R.; Schroeder, R.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: to investigate whether a combined examination with MRI enteroclysis and MRI colonography is practicable and would provide additional findings in the regions seen with ileo-colonoscopy in the work-up of patients with Crohn's disease. Material and methods: twenty-five consecutive patients with Crohn's disease (CD) (age range 19 to 42 years, mean age 29.2 years, gender ratio male:female 8:17) were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent conventional ileo-colonoscopy as a standard of reference followed by a combined examination of MRI enteroclysis and MRI colonography at 1.5T within 15 days. Two blinded radiologists evaluated the MRI examinations and compared them with the colonoscopic results. Results: the MRI examination detected 31 inflamed bowel segments in 25 patients. In comparison to colonoscopy, 5 additional, endoscopically inaccessible lesions were found by MRI and only 2 lesions were missed by MRI. Compared to colonoscopy, MRI found 7 of 10 fistulas detected by colonoscopy, and 3 otherwise indiscernible abscesses. The detection of inflamed bowel segments by means of MRI (endoscopy) revealed a sensitivity of 88.8% (100%), specificity of 80% (100%) and an overall accuracy of 96% (100%). Conclusion: this study provides strong evidence that the combination of MRI enteroclysis and MRI colonography is practicable and supplies additional results regarding the regions which are not seen with ileo-colonoscopy in the work-up of patients with Crohn's disease. (orig.)

  4. Transabdominal ultrasonography of the small bowel after oral administration of a non-absorbable anechoic solution: Comparison with barium enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine if oral administration of a non-absorbable anechoic solution conveys any benefit during abdominal ultrasound (US), with special reference to its accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-three adult out-patients scheduled for small bowel barium enema (SBE) were included. The day before SBE all patients underwent abdominal US before and after oral administration of an isotonic non-absorbable electrolyte solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG-ELS). Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using SBE as a gold standard. RESULTS: After ingestion of PEG-ELS satisfactory distension of the intestinal lumen was obtained (11-25 mm) with sequential visualization of jejunoileal loops in 30.9 ± 17.3 min. In 15 out of 53 cases both US and SBE showed bowel changes characteristic of Crohn's disease. In three out of 53 cases both US and SBE showed neoplasms. In one out of 53 cases US was negative, SBE positive for local nodularity and ulcerations typical of Crohn's disease. In one out of 53 cases US was negative, SBE positive for macronodularity consistent with coeliac disease. In five out of 53 cases US was negative, while SBE was positive for mininodularity expressive of lymphoid hyperplasia. In 28 out of 53 cases both examinations were negative. CONCLUSION: PEG-ELS administration allows a thorough US investigation of the small bowel, with fair sensitivity (72%) and excellent specificity (100%). False negative findings are mainly due to lymphoid hyperplasia, a feature of uncertain significance in adults. Cittadini G. et al.(2001)

  5. MRI in Crohns disease after transduodenal contrast administration using negative oral MRI constrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the efficacy and quality of conventional and MR enteroclysis with different filling methods regarding the assessment of extension and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn's disease.Material and Methods 190 patients with known Crohn's disease were studied following small bowel enteroclysis, after oral administration or direct transduodenal filling in the MRI-department.T1- and T2-weighted breathhold MRI-scans w/o spectral fat suppression w/o i.v.Gd-DTPA were applied using negative oral superparamagnetic contrast media. Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with laminated wall contrast enhancement.In 135 patients 98,2% of affected bowel segments, 97,5% of stenoses and all 16 fistulas were detected,when conventional enteroclysis was employed as standard of reference.Additional important extraluminal findings such as ileoileal (n = 18), ileosigmoidal adhesions (n = 12), extraluminal abscesses (n = 35) and pseudotumors (n = 8) were visualized in 73/135 patients. Concerning the distension of jejunum and ileum, oral filling was rated significantly inferior to transduodenal filling in all small bowel segments,whereas filling in the MRI-unit was rated superior to fluoroscopic, mostly due to a mean transport time of 20 min to the MRI-unit. No clinically important findings of enteroclysis were missed when using MRI. Therefore, in patients with Crohn's disease, conventional enteroclysis can be replaced by MRI.For optimal bowel distension oral contrast administration is inferior to transduodenal filling, if a larger time delay between filling and the MRI-scan can be avoided. (orig.)

  6. Doppler ultrasound and MR enteroclysis imaging of Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present our experience in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease evaluated with US Doppler (USD) and MRI enteroclysis (MRIE). Materials and methods: Twelve patients were studied with USD and MRIE with barium and methylcellulose negative contrast and i.v. gadolinium. We evaluated the presence of flow in USD and enhancement in MRIE, as well as wall thickness and complications of the effected bowel (by both diagnostic imaging procedures). All cases were studied by additional endoscopy and biopsy confirming bowel Crohn's disease. Results: all patients showed wall contrast enhancement in MRIE, and in eleven cases USD showed blood flow. MRIE showed stenoses in ten patients whereas USD in only five patients. Both methods showed wall thickening in all patients. Conclusions: USD and MRIE can identify and quantify changes in affected small bowel loops in patients with Crohn's disease. Both methods could be used in the evaluation and control of these patients. However MRIE showed a higher sensitivity for stenoses. MRIE and USD showed fistulae in 3/4 of the cases (75%) and abscesses in 2/3 of the cases (66%). (author)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Perineum in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Douglas H.; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis a...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the perineum in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Douglas H.; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis a...

  9. Magnetic resonance enteroclysis: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possess several virtues including superb soft-tissue contrast, absence of radiation exposure, cross-sectional and projectional imaging capabilities in all three dimensions and multiple contrast sources, that may favour a comprehensive morphologic and functional evaluation of the small bowel (SB). Ultrafast pulse sequences should be utilized to reduce motion related artifacts arising from physiological motion (respiration and peristalsis). the spatial resolution of these sequences should be high enough to permit demonstration of small lesions i.e. ulcers, that are usually present in small bowel diseases. MRI examination protocols of the small bowel usually comprise T1- and T2- weighted sequences on axial and coronal planes. Both T1- and T2- weighted sequences should be fast enough to allow comfortable breath-hold acquisition times and reduce the motion related artifacts. For T1- weighted images, most authors are using gradient echo sequences in 2D and 3D acquisition modes with or without fat saturation prepulses, while for T2-weighted images, TCE and HASTE sequences are commonly employed. True FISP sequence has been successfully applied in SB imaging, providing high resolution images of the bowel wall and additional information from the mesenteries. Fat suppressed TSE or STIR sequences have been also applied to access Crohn disease activity. True FISP sequence was introduced for MR examination of the small bowel after duodenal intubation. the contrast in true FISP images is somewhat more complex and invoke both T1 and T2 contributions in the form of the T2/T1 ratio. True FISP sequence is excellent in demonstrating the mesenteries, due to high contrast resolution between the bright peritoneal fat and the dark vessels and lymph nodes. Motion related artifacts are minimal on true FISP images due to short acquisition time. As opposed to HASTE sequences, true FISP is insensitive to intraluminal flow voids, due to its balanced

  10. Magnetic Resonance enteroclysis imaging of Crohn's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim.The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MR Enteroclysis (MRE) to assess the extension and complications of Crohn's Disease (CD) in comparison with conventional enteroclysis (CE). Materials and methods. The study comprised 30 consecutive patients affected by Crohn's disease (18 women and 12 men; age range 16-76, mean age 40.6 years), who underwent conventional and MR enteroclysis. The MR enteroclysis protocol includes three sequences: coronal and axial FIESTA and ssFSE sequences and T1-3D-FSPGR sequences before and after intravenous injection of gadolinium, acquired after administration of 1.6-21 of iso-osmolar polyethylene glycol solution via a naso jejunal catheter. Two radiologists blindly scored each sequence for opacification of the lumen, small bowel distension and image quality and evaluated the following parameters: presence of wall ulcers, pseudo polyps, stenoses and fistulae. Results. The accuracy of the FIESTA sequence was significantly higher (p<0.01) than the ssFSE and 3D FSPGR sequences in the evaluation of lumen opacification and bowel distension, and for the overall quality of the images (p<0.01). The sensitivity and specificity of MRE were 82% and 100% for the visualisation of parietal ulcers, 87% and 100% for pseudo polyps, 100% and 88% for stenoses, 75% and 100% for parietal fistulae. High-grade stenoses with pre stenotic dilation (n=6) and low-grade stenoses (n=9) were visualised both by MRE and CE. MRE also showed abscesses in two patients, not seen at CE. The FlESTA and ssFSE sequences had higher accuracy in the detection of wall ulcers and fistulae, whereas the 3D FSPGR sequences showed higher accuracy in the evaluation of wall thickening. Conclusions. MRE is able to demonstrate the spectrum of superficial, intramural and exo enteric alterations in Crohn's disease and closely correlates with CE in demonstrating alterations of the bowel lumen and wall

  11. MR enteroclysis: technical considerations and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) is an emerging technique for the evaluation of small bowel abnormalities. Adequate luminal distention, achieved by the administration of iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter, in combination with ultrafast sequences, such as single-shot turbo spin echo, true fast imaging with steady precession, half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin echo, and 3D fast low-angle shot, results in excellent anatomic demonstration of the small bowel. Magnetic resonance fluoroscopy can be performed during MRE examination and might be useful in studying low-grade stenosis or motility-related disorders. Magnetic resonance enteroclysis is very promising in detecting the number and extent of involved small bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease, and in disclosing lumen narrowing and extramural manifestations and complications of the disease. Initial experience shows that MRE is very efficient in the diagnosis of small bowel tumors and can be used in the evaluation of small bowel obstruction. (orig.)

  12. MR enteroclysis: technical considerations and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Grammatikakis, John; Prassopoulos, Panos [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1352, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2002-11-01

    Magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) is an emerging technique for the evaluation of small bowel abnormalities. Adequate luminal distention, achieved by the administration of iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter, in combination with ultrafast sequences, such as single-shot turbo spin echo, true fast imaging with steady precession, half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin echo, and 3D fast low-angle shot, results in excellent anatomic demonstration of the small bowel. Magnetic resonance fluoroscopy can be performed during MRE examination and might be useful in studying low-grade stenosis or motility-related disorders. Magnetic resonance enteroclysis is very promising in detecting the number and extent of involved small bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease, and in disclosing lumen narrowing and extramural manifestations and complications of the disease. Initial experience shows that MRE is very efficient in the diagnosis of small bowel tumors and can be used in the evaluation of small bowel obstruction. (orig.)

  13. Efficacy of enteroclysis through Miller-Abbott tube for decompression in patients with postoperative intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of enteroclysis through the previously inserted Miller-Abbott (M-A) tube for decompression in the postoperative intestinal obstruction. This study includes twenty patients who has intestinal obstruction symptoms after operation for benign(12) or malignant(8) abdominal lesions. Small amount of barium was introduced to M-A tube for enteroclysis. We evaluated the presence, level, degree, and causes of obstruction on enteroclysis, compared with surgical(11) and clinical(9) findings. Obstruction was seen in 18 cases including the two cases in which the level of obstruction was not clear. There was no obstruction in two cases. Obstruction on enteroclysis was demonstrated in all 11 operated cases(100% accuracy, 11/11). The level of obstruction on enteroclysis were jejunum in three cases, ileum in seven, and colon in one case. The levels of obstruction on enteroclysis were matched with those in operation field in 10 cases. There were two cases of nonobstruction on enteroclysis were jejunum in three cases, ileum in seven, and colon in one case. The levels of obstruction on enteroclysis were matched with those in operation field in 10 cases. There were two cases of nonobstruction, nine cases of low-grade partial obstruction, and nine cases of high-grade partial obstruction. We analyzed the findings on enteroclysis regarding causes of obstruction in 16 patients with the findings of adhesive bands of extrinsic cause(9), cancer recurrence of intrinsic cause(6), and bezoar of intraluminal cause(1). Misinterpreted cases were two cases(87.7% accuracy, 14/16). The cause, for nonvisualization of obstruction site on enteroclysis in four patients included technical failure such as inadequate location of tube(1) and bowel overlapping(1), minimal obstruction(1), and nonexistent obstruction(1), in spite of diffuse edematous mucosa. Enteroclysis through the M-A tube for decompression in patients with postoperative intestinal obstruction

  14. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease; MRT chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen

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    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Elsing, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. IV - Gastroenterologie

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung: Die Standardverfahren in der Diagnostik und der Verlaufskontrolle chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen, speziell des Morbus Crohn und der Colitis ulcerosa, sind die Koloskopie und das Enteroklysma. Die MRT hat sich dazu ihren festen Platz in der Diagnostik perirektaler Fisteln erobert. Mit schnellen, T{sub 1}-gewichteten Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen und T{sub 2}-gewichteten Turbo-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen koennen auch Duenn

  15. MRT of the abdomen in combination with enteroclysis in Crohn disease with oral and intravenous Gd-DTPA; MRT des Abdomens in Kombination mit der Enteroklyse bei Morbus Crohn unter Verwendung von oralem und intravenoesem Gd-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, A.; Wruk, D.; Nuessle, K.; Aschoff, A.J.; Brambs, H.J.; Tomczak, R. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Radiologische Klinik der Univ. Ulm (Germany); Reinshagen, M.; Adler, G. [Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 1 (Gastrenterologie) der Univ. Ulm (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    60 patients between 17 and 72 years of age were investigated. First, an enteroclysis was performed in typical manner. The applicated methylcellulosis was blended with positive oral MR contrast media (Magnevist oral, Schering). After enteroclysis, MRI of the abdomen was performed using T1- and T2-weighted breathhold sequences (Flash 2D pre- and postcontrast and TSE) in axial and coronal planes. The length of the affected bowel and the stenosis seen with enteroclysis correlated well with the visible thickening of the small bowel wall and the stenosis seen in MRI. Using MRI, additional findings could be obtained in 28 patients, such as fistulas, abscesses or a hydronephrosis, or a better assessment of the stenosis was possible with MRI, because of the avoidance of overshadowing of the affected bowel loop with MRI. A brilliant MR-tomographic imaging of the small bowel is possible under the condition, that the small bowel contrast is optimal. The main prerequisite is a large filling volume of the small bowel to reach a homogeneous contrast and a good distension of the small bowel lumen. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] 60 Patienten im Alter von 17-72 Jahren wurden untersucht. Zunaechst wurde eine Enteroklyse in konventioneller Technik durchgefuehrt, wobei der Methylzellulose in einer Mischung von 1:10 positives orales MR-Kontrastmittel (Magnevist enteral) zugesetzt wurde. Nach Abschluss der Enteroklyse erfolgte die MRT unter Verwendung T1- und T2-gewichteter Sequenzen (Flash 2D vor und nach i.v. Gd-DTPA bzw. TSE) in Atemanhaltetechnik in koronarer und axialer Schnittffuehrung. Die in der Enteroklyse nachweisbaren Schleimhautveraenderungen und Stenosenlaenge entsprachen einer nachweisbaren Darmwandverdickung bzw. Stenose in der MRT. Mit der MRT konnten bei 28 Patienten Zusatzbefunde wie Fisteln, Abszesse oder Hydronephrosen diagnostiziert werden, oder die Stenose war wegen der ueberlagerungsfreien Darstellung in der MRT besser beurteilbar als mittels Enteroklyse. Mit der MRT kann

  16. Comparison of MR enteroclysis with MR enterography and conventional enteroclysis in patients with Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of MR enteroclysis with duodenal intubation with MRI after drinking oral contrast agent only (MR enterography) with conventional enteroclysis (conv-E) as reference standard in patients with Crohn's disease. Forty consecutive patients (22 males and 18 females; mean age 36; range 16-74 years) with proven Crohn's disease underwent conv-E and MR imaging. Twenty-two patients underwent MR enteroclysis with intubation (MRE) and 18 underwent MR-enterography (MR per OS). Two radiologists reached a consensus about the following imaging findings: luminal distension and visualization of superficial mucosal, mural and mesenteric abnormalities. Standard descriptive statistics and a Wilcoxon rank sum test were used. Statistical significance was inferred at P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in the adequacy of luminal distention between the MRE and conv-E (P 0.08), and both were statistically superior in comparison to MR per OS in the distension of the jejunum (P < 0.01) and less significant at the ileum and terminal ileum levels (P < 0.05). MRE and conv-E were comparable for the accuracy of superficial mucosal abnormalities; meanwhile conv-E compared with MR per OS was statistically superior (P < 0.01). MRE compared with MR per OS was statistically better when visualizing superficial abnormalities (P < 0.01). No statistically significant differences were found in assessing the diagnostic efficacy between MR examinations for the depiction of mural stenosis (P = 0.105) and fistulae (P = 0.67). The number of detected mesenteric findings was significantly higher with both MRE and MR per OS compared to conv-E (P < 0.01). MRE can serve as the diagnostic procedure for initially evaluating patients suspected of having Crohn's disease. MR per OS may have a role in patients that refuse or have failed intubation and also for follow-up. (orig.)

  17. MRI of the small bowel: can sufficient bowel distension be achieved with small volumes of oral contrast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufficient luminal distension is mandatory for small bowel imaging. However, patients often are unable to ingest volumes of currently applied oral contrast compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate if administration of low doses of an oral contrast agent with high-osmolarity leads to sufficient and diagnostic bowel distension. Six healthy volunteers ingested at different occasions 150, 300 and 450 ml of a commercially available oral contrast agent (Banana Smoothie Readi-Cat, E-Z-EM; 194 mOsmol/l). Two-dimensional TrueFISP data sets were acquired in 5-min intervals up to 45 min after contrast ingestion. Small bowel distension was quantified using a visual five-grade ranking (5 very good distension, 1 = collapsed bowel). Results were statistically compared using a Wilcoxon-Rank test. Ingestion of 450 ml and 300 ml resulted in a significantly better distension than 150 ml. The all-over average distension value for 450 ml amounted to 3.4 (300 ml: 3.0, 150 ml: 2.3) and diagnostic bowel distension could be found throughout the small intestine. Even 45 min after ingestion of 450 ml the jejunum and ileum could be reliably analyzed. Small bowel imaging with low doses of contrast leads to diagnostic distension values in healthy subjects when a high-osmolarity substance is applied. These findings may help to further refine small bowel MRI techniques, but need to be confirmed in patients with small bowel disorders. (orig.)

  18. Hydro-MRI in inflammatory bowel diseases: a comparison with colonoscopy and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare hydro-MRI with colonoscopy and biopsy specimen regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity and the differentiation of inflammatory bowel diseases. Material and methods: After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution and a rectal bowel opacification using 250-500 ml of a 0.9% saline solution, axial and coronal breath-hold sequences ±Gd-DTPA (HASTE-['half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo'] and dynamic FLASH-['fast low angle shot']) were acquired in 27 patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The enhancement of the bowel wall as well as morphological MRI findings were correlated with colonoscopy and biopsy specimens. By means of the MRI findings, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) should be differentiated. Results: In CD, a significant correlation between the contrast enhancement of the inflamed bowel wall (Δ SI) and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be established (r=0.52; p=0.02 and r=0.72; p=0.001). In UC, no correlations between Δ SI and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be found. The correct diagnosis of CD and UC by MRI findings was possible in 22/27 patients (81%). Conclusion: Hydro-MRI with dynamic studies is suitable for the assessment of disease activity in CD, but unreliable in UC. Hydro-MRI provides useful information for the differentiation of CD and UC. (orig.)

  19. Oral contrast agents for small bowel distension in MRI: influence of the osmolarity for small bowel distention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Kuehle, Christiane; Nuefer, Michael; Goehde, Susanne C.; Lauenstein, Thomas C. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Goyen, Mathias [Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Schneemann, Hubert [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Essen (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    To assess the effect of the osmolarity for small bowel distension in MRI, ten volunteers ingested at two separate occasions negative oral contrast agents with different quantity and osmolarity: (1) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 0.2% locus bean gum (LBG) with a quantity of 1500 ml and an osmolarity of 148 mOsmol/l, (2) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 2.0% barium sulphate with a quantity of 1000 ml and an osmolarity of 194 mOsmol/l. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D-TrueFISP images by measuring the small bowel diameters. There were no statistically significant differences in mean small bowel diameter between both contrast agents. The mean small bowel distension was 19.2 mm after ingestion of 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution and 19.0 mm after ingestion of 1000-ml sorbitol-barium sulphate solution. Furthermore, all volunteers found the ingestion of 1000-ml solution more pleasant than the 1500-ml solution. The ingestion of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution led to a sufficient small bowel distension compared to 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution. The side effect rate of both solutions was low. Based on these data, we recommend a quantity of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution as an alternative for 1500-ml sorbitol-LBG solution for optimal bowel distension. (orig.)

  20. Oral contrast agents for small bowel distension in MRI: influence of the osmolarity for small bowel distention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of the osmolarity for small bowel distension in MRI, ten volunteers ingested at two separate occasions negative oral contrast agents with different quantity and osmolarity: (1) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 0.2% locus bean gum (LBG) with a quantity of 1500 ml and an osmolarity of 148 mOsmol/l, (2) a water solution combined with 2.0% sorbitol and 2.0% barium sulphate with a quantity of 1000 ml and an osmolarity of 194 mOsmol/l. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D-TrueFISP images by measuring the small bowel diameters. There were no statistically significant differences in mean small bowel diameter between both contrast agents. The mean small bowel distension was 19.2 mm after ingestion of 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution and 19.0 mm after ingestion of 1000-ml sorbitol-barium sulphate solution. Furthermore, all volunteers found the ingestion of 1000-ml solution more pleasant than the 1500-ml solution. The ingestion of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution led to a sufficient small bowel distension compared to 1500 ml of sorbitol-LBG solution. The side effect rate of both solutions was low. Based on these data, we recommend a quantity of 1000 ml of sorbitol-barium sulphate solution as an alternative for 1500-ml sorbitol-LBG solution for optimal bowel distension. (orig.)

  1. Spectrum of imaging findings on MDCT enterography in patients with small bowel tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is the sixth most common extrapulmonary site of involvement. The sites of involvement in abdominal tuberculosis, in descending order of frequency, are lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity, and gastrointestinal tract. The radiological armamentarium for evaluating tuberculosis of the small bowel (SBTB) includes barium studies (small bowel follow-through, SBFT), CT (multidetector CT, CT enterography, and CT enteroclysis), ultrasound (sonoenteroclysis), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; enterography and enteroclysis). In this review, we illustrate the abnormalities at MDCT enterography in 20 consecutive patients with SB TB and also describe extraluminal findings in these patients. MDCT enterography allows non-invasive good-quality assessment of well-distended bowel loops and the adjacent soft tissues. It displays the thickness and enhancement of the entire bowel wall in all three planes and allows examination of all bowel loops, especially the ileal loops, which are mostly superimposed. The terminal ileum and ileocaecal junction are the most common sites of small bowel involvement in intestinal TB. The most common abnormality is short-segment strictures with symmetrical concentric mural thickening and homogeneous mural enhancement. Other findings include lymphadenopathy, ascites, enteroliths, peritoneal thickening, and enhancement. In conclusion, MDCT enterography is a comprehensive technique for the evaluation of SB TB

  2. CT enteroclysis in the developing world: How we do it, and the pathology we see

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Imaging and diagnosis of small bowel disease is challenging, especially in developing countries where access to supplementary imaging equipment is not readily available. Imaging of the small bowel has evolved from small bowel follow-through to the first enteroclysis by Pesquera in 1929. This technique evolved over time with advances in enteral intubation catheters, enteral contrast media and techniques for infusing enteral contrast. Objective: (1) Describe our modification of performing CTE and (2) to show pathology and discuss its relevance in our clinical practice. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study that included 73 patients since the introduction of our modified technique of performing CT enteroclysis (CTE) using saline vaculitres, intravenous line connection sets and a drip stand. We recorded patient data in Microsoft Corporation Excel 2007 to include indications for the CTE, patient demographics and imaging findings related to small bowel pathology with associated extra luminal findings and incidental extra-intestinal non small bowel findings that was statistically analyzed. Results: Of the 73 patients included in the study 42 where females and 31 males. 15 (20.5%) had small bowel pathology and 12 (16.4%) had non-small bowel pathology that could explain the clinical symptoms. Malabsorption/chronic diarrhea group was the largest indication for referral (26% of referrals). Most prevalent small bowel findings were in the inflammatory bowel subgroups where 30% had imaging features of active inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusion: Decades of experience have shown that only small bowel examinations that uniformly distend the small bowel lumen can confidently confirm or rule out small bowel pathology. With our modified technique performed, with readily available and affordable infusion equipment and enteral contrast we achieve diagnostic quality small bowel distention to demonstrate and diagnose with confidence small bowel pathology

  3. CT enteroclysis in the developing world: How we do it, and the pathology we see

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merwe, B.S. van der, E-mail: attiemalan@mweb.co.za; Ackermann, C.; Els, H.

    2013-08-15

    Introduction: Imaging and diagnosis of small bowel disease is challenging, especially in developing countries where access to supplementary imaging equipment is not readily available. Imaging of the small bowel has evolved from small bowel follow-through to the first enteroclysis by Pesquera in 1929. This technique evolved over time with advances in enteral intubation catheters, enteral contrast media and techniques for infusing enteral contrast. Objective: (1) Describe our modification of performing CTE and (2) to show pathology and discuss its relevance in our clinical practice. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study that included 73 patients since the introduction of our modified technique of performing CT enteroclysis (CTE) using saline vaculitres, intravenous line connection sets and a drip stand. We recorded patient data in Microsoft Corporation Excel 2007 to include indications for the CTE, patient demographics and imaging findings related to small bowel pathology with associated extra luminal findings and incidental extra-intestinal non small bowel findings that was statistically analyzed. Results: Of the 73 patients included in the study 42 where females and 31 males. 15 (20.5%) had small bowel pathology and 12 (16.4%) had non-small bowel pathology that could explain the clinical symptoms. Malabsorption/chronic diarrhea group was the largest indication for referral (26% of referrals). Most prevalent small bowel findings were in the inflammatory bowel subgroups where 30% had imaging features of active inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusion: Decades of experience have shown that only small bowel examinations that uniformly distend the small bowel lumen can confidently confirm or rule out small bowel pathology. With our modified technique performed, with readily available and affordable infusion equipment and enteral contrast we achieve diagnostic quality small bowel distention to demonstrate and diagnose with confidence small bowel pathology

  4. Imaging of inflammatory bowel disease. How?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally the small bowel (barium) follow through (SBFT) has been the investigation of choice for that otherwise inaccessible length of gut between the duodenum and the ileocaecal valve. Whilst it is still a widely practised examination by radiologists it is being largely overtaken by other imaging modalities with CT, MRI and capsule endoscopy (CE) all competing for the territory. At the end of the last century, proponents of enteroclysis were predicting the eventual decline of the SBFT (in adults) although at that stage, in a 'state of the art' article, they were still brave enough to say that 'only in the small bowel does barium radiography remain unchallenged'. The same authors now write of how radiological investigations complement other techniques but are no longer the mainstay. (orig.)

  5. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  6. Addition of diffusion-weighted imaging can improve diagnostic confidence in bowel MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate whether the addition of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in bowel abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can improve diagnostic confidence. Materials and methods: One hundred and eleven consecutive patients with suspected or known inflammatory bowel disease (n = 59), tumour disease (n = 31), unspecific abdominal pain (n = 16), and suspected graft-versus-host disease (n = 5) underwent bowel MRI using a 1.5 T MRI machine. In addition to T2-weighted (T2W) and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE-T1W) data, axial and coronal DWI sequences were collected (b = 50, 500, 1000). Diagnostic confidence for lesion detection with and without DWI was evaluated using a four-point Likert scale [1 = certainly no lesion(s), 2 = probably no lesion(s), 3 = probably lesion(s), 4 = certainly lesion(s)]. Results: In 11 of 111 patients (10%), the diagnostic confidence was improved by DWI. In seven patients, readers changed their diagnosis from “probable” to “certain presence of lesions”. In another four patients, lesions were diagnosed based on DWI, which were not delineated on CE-T1W and T2W imaging. Conclusion: DWI of the bowel can provide additional information to the reader and, therefore, improve diagnostic confidence. Hence, additional DWI should be integrated into a standard bowel MRI protocol

  7. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  8. MRI diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease. Methods: The MRI findings in 13 cases of small intestinal Crohn's disease proved by surgery and pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The patients included 12 men and 1 woman, and their age ranged from 17 to 64 years. The MR images were reviewed for the number, location, and mural thickness of diseased bowel segments, for the ratio of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall after the IV administration of Gd-DTPA or enhanced ratio of diseased bowel wall, and for the complications (phlegmon, inflammatory mass, abscess, and fistula). Six patients received air-infused MR enteroclysis-enhanced scan was performed directly in the fat saturated coronal and axial plane after about 1000 ml of air was infused into small bowel through a nasoenteric catheter. Another 7 patients received small intestinal hydro-MRI--MR images were obtained in fat saturated enhanced coronal and axial plane as well as in unenhanced coronal plane.Twenty mg of IV anisodamine was given to reduce peristalsis in all patients, and fat saturation was used in all sequences. Results: The diseased bowel segment of every case was demonstrated in MRI. The sensitivity was 100%. Thirty-six inflammatory segments were revealed in all (mean 2.8 segments per patient). The MRI findings of small intestinal Crohn's disease were that the enhancement of diseased bowel wall increased significantly. The ratios of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall were 1.9-2.5 (mean, 2.1) in the group of air-infused enteroclysis. The ratios of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall were 1.3-2.9 (mean, 1.9) and the enhanced ratios of diseased bowel wall were 96%-223% (mean, 133%), but the enhanced ratios of normal bowel wall were 31%-78% (mean, 59%). Thirty-three segments (92%) of diseased bowel wall thickened (thickness between 5-27 mm), and the

  9. Breathhold MRI of the small bowel in Crohn`s disease after enteroklysis with oral magnetic particles; Duenndarm-MRT mit schnellen MR-Sequenzen bei Morbus Crohn nach Enteroklysma mit oralen Eisenpartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzknecht, N.; Helmberger, T.; Gauger, J.; Faber, S.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Ritter, C. von [Medizinische Klinik 2, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of breathhold MRI following enteroclysis with addition of oral magnetic particles to study the extension, detection of stenoses and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn`s disease. Results: Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with strong contrast enhancement. 95.8% of affected small bowel segments and 94.7% of stenoses were correctly detected by MRI. All four fistulas were detected and important extraluminal findings were seen in 6/18 patients. Additionally, one ileoileal and two ileosigmoidal adhesions, two extraluminal abscesses and affection of the right ureter were delineated. Conclusion: MRI in Crohn`s disease offers the potential to avoid radiation exposure in this relatively young patient group. Important additional findings relevant to indication of surgery are seen in approximately one third of cases. The replacement of transduodenal intubation by oral contrast application remains to be further studied. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Das Ziel dieser Arbeit war der Vergleich der diagnostischen Effizienz des konventionellen Duenndarmenteroklysmas mit anschliessender MRT mit negativem oralem Kontrastmittel bezueglich der Ausdehnung, Stenoseerkennung und relevanter Zusatzinformation bei Morbus Crohn. Im Vergleich mit dem Enteroklysma konnte die MRT-Untersuchung 95,8% der befallenden Segmente und 94,7% der Stenosen identifizieren. Alle 4 Fisteln wurden detektiert und zusaetzlich relevante Befunde in 6 von 18 Patienten gesehen (eine ileoileale und 2 ileosigmoidale Adhaesionen, 2 extraluminale Abzesse und ein entzuendlicher Pseudotumor mit Einbeziehung des rechten Ureters). Das Stenosegrading zeigte keine signifikanten Unterschiede (p=0,11). Zusaetzlich wurden extraluminal eine mesenteriale Lymphadenopathie (15/18) und mesenteriale Fettgewebsproliferation (12/18) mittels MRT nachgewiesen. (orig./AJ)

  10. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 ± 3 years (mean ± standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition. (orig.)

  11. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Henning; Evangelista, Laura; Wirth, Clemens; Beer, Meinrad [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Pabst, Thomas; Machann, Wolfram; Koestler, Herbert; Hahn, Dietbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dick, Anke [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 {+-} 3 years (mean {+-} standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition. (orig.)

  12. Recurrent or residual pelvic bowel cancer: Accuracy of MRI local extent before salvage surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Philip; Carrington, Bernadette M.; Swindell, Ric; Shanks, Johnathan H.; O' Dwyer, Sarah T

    2002-06-01

    PURPOSE: To determine pre-operative MRI accuracy in assessing local disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer by comparing MRI assessment and staging examination under anaesthesia (EUA), with laparotomy/histopathological findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with recurrent (n = 21) or residual (n = 6) pelvic bowel cancer (13 of the rectum, eleven of the anus and three of the colon) underwent EUA and pelvic MRI (1T) using a phased array pelvic coil. Retrospective analysis of eight specific anatomical regions for tumour involvement on MRI was performed. Findings at EUA and biopsy were recorded. The MRI and EUA findings were correlated with findings at surgery and histopathology. Statistical comparison between MRI and EUA results was performed using the chi-squared test . RESULTS: Overall MRI accuracy in determining tumour invasion for all sites assessed was 452/499 (91%), sensitivity was 95/109 (87%), specificity was 357/390 (92%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 95/128 (74%) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 357/371 (96%). PPV and NPV for specific areas were 21/38 (55%) and 134/136 (99%) for genitourinary tract, 4/6 (67%) and 61/65 (94%) for pelvic side wall, 21/26 (81%) and 40/41 (98%) for pelvic floor, 1/6 (17%) and 40/43 (93%) for the posterior pelvis pre-sacrum/sacrum. For those anatomical sites evaluated by both EUA and MRI, MRI was superior to EUA, with an accuracy of 89% vs 73%(P < 0.05) . CONCLUSION: MRI is an accurate technique for assessing disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer. Robinson, P. et al. (2002)

  13. Comparison of MR enteroclysis with MR enterography and conventional enteroclysis in patients with Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco [Academic Hospital ' ' Umberto I' ' . La Sapienza University Rome, Radiology DEA Department, Rome (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of MR enteroclysis with duodenal intubation with MRI after drinking oral contrast agent only (MR enterography) with conventional enteroclysis (conv-E) as reference standard in patients with Crohn's disease. Forty consecutive patients (22 males and 18 females; mean age 36; range 16-74 years) with proven Crohn's disease underwent conv-E and MR imaging. Twenty-two patients underwent MR enteroclysis with intubation (MRE) and 18 underwent MR-enterography (MR per OS). Two radiologists reached a consensus about the following imaging findings: luminal distension and visualization of superficial mucosal, mural and mesenteric abnormalities. Standard descriptive statistics and a Wilcoxon rank sum test were used. Statistical significance was inferred at P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in the adequacy of luminal distention between the MRE and conv-E (P = 0.08), and both were statistically superior in comparison to MR per OS in the distension of the jejunum (P < 0.01) and less significant at the ileum and terminal ileum levels (P < 0.05). MRE and conv-E were comparable for the accuracy of superficial mucosal abnormalities; meanwhile conv-E compared with MR per OS was statistically superior (P < 0.01). MRE compared with MR per OS was statistically better when visualizing superficial abnormalities (P < 0.01). No statistically significant differences were found in assessing the diagnostic efficacy between MR examinations for the depiction of mural stenosis (P = 0.105) and fistulae (P = 0.67). The number of detected mesenteric findings was significantly higher with both MRE and MR per OS compared to conv-E (P < 0.01). MRE can serve as the diagnostic procedure for initially evaluating patients suspected of having Crohn's disease. MR per OS may have a role in patients that refuse or have failed intubation and also for follow-up. (orig.)

  14. Self-administered, inhaled methoxyflurane improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation for computed tomography enteroclysis for suspected small bowel disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, A., E-mail: dralanmoss@hotmail.co [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Monash University, Box Hill Campus, Melbourne (Australia); Parrish, F.J.; Naidoo, P.; Upton, A. [Department of Radiology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Prime, H.; Leaney, B. [Department of Radiology, Epworth Eastern Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gibson, P.R. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Monash University, Box Hill Campus, Melbourne (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of self-administered, inhaled analgesic, methoxyflurane, used to improve patient comfort during computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE). Materials and methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed at two Australian hospitals (one tertiary referral public hospital and one private hospital). Patients were randomized to 3 ml methoxyflurane or saline (scented to maintain blindness) via hand-held inhaler. The main outcome measures were patient comfort during each stage of CTE and an overall rating as recorded by patients 1 h post-procedure on a 10 cm visual analogue scale. Patient willingness to undergo repeat CTE, radiologist-rated ease of nasoduodenal intubation, and patient-rated ease of use of the inhaler were also assessed. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 45 years; 41 women) were enrolled; 30 received methoxyflurane and were well matched to 30 receiving placebo. Procedural success was 98%. The mean dose of methoxyflurane consumed was 0.9 ml (SD 0.5). Patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation was better with methoxyflurane {l_brace}5.0 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 4.0-6.0]{r_brace} than with placebo [2.7 (95% CI 1.8-3.7); p = 0.002, t-test), but there were no significant differences for comfort levels at other times or overall. The inhaler was easy to use, was well tolerated, and there were no episodes of oxygen desaturation, aspiration, or anaphylaxis. Conclusions: Inhalational methoxyflurane safely improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation, but does not improve overall procedure comfort.

  15. MR enteroclysis protocol optimization: comparison between 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous gadolinium injection and true FISP sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to introduce the true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence for MR enteroclysis and compare it with the already used T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. Twenty-one patients underwent both MR and conventional enteroclysis. The MR enteroclysis examination was performed after administration of an iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter and the following sequences were included: (a) true FISP; and (b) 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous injection of 20 mg Buscopan or 1 mg glucagon and 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium chelates. The true FISP sequence provided images with significantly fewer motion artifacts, whereas 3D FLASH was less sensitive to susceptibility and chemical shift artifacts. The homogeneity of endoluminal opacification, wall conspicuity, and distention of the small bowel were very good to excellent and the two sequences presented no statistically significant differences here. True FISP provided significantly better overall image quality than did 3D FLASH. The true FISP sequence can provide good anatomic demonstration of the small bowel on T2-like images and could be combined with T1-weighted FLASH images for an integrated protocol of MR enteroclysis. (orig.)

  16. MR enteroclysis protocol optimization: comparison between 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous gadolinium injection and true FISP sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourtsoyiannis, N.; Papanikolaou, N.; Grammatikakis, J.; Maris, T.; Prassopoulos, P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce the true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence for MR enteroclysis and compare it with the already used T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. Twenty-one patients underwent both MR and conventional enteroclysis. The MR enteroclysis examination was performed after administration of an iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter and the following sequences were included: (a) true FISP; and (b) 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous injection of 20 mg Buscopan or 1 mg glucagon and 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium chelates. The true FISP sequence provided images with significantly fewer motion artifacts, whereas 3D FLASH was less sensitive to susceptibility and chemical shift artifacts. The homogeneity of endoluminal opacification, wall conspicuity, and distention of the small bowel were very good to excellent and the two sequences presented no statistically significant differences here. True FISP provided significantly better overall image quality than did 3D FLASH. The true FISP sequence can provide good anatomic demonstration of the small bowel on T2-like images and could be combined with T1-weighted FLASH images for an integrated protocol of MR enteroclysis. (orig.)

  17. Small Bowel Crohn's disease MRI pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this article includes revision of normal small bowel anatomy on sequences performed at our institution, with advantages and disadvantages; brief summary of the disease; appearance of acute active disease; usefulness of ancillary findings of active disease; appearance of chronic disease both active and inactive; complications of Crohn's disease; pitfalls and limitations of interpretation; and clinically relevant reporting through clinician feedback.

  18. Abdominal MRI without Enteral Contrast Accurately Detects Intestinal Fibrostenosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy G; Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego; Dhere, Tanvi; Perez, Sebastian D; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K

    2015-11-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting for surgical evaluation require thorough small bowel surveillance as it improves accuracy of diagnosis (ulcerative colitis versus Crohn's) and differentiates those who may respond to nonoperative therapy, preserving bowel length. MRI has not been validated conclusively against histopathology in IBD. Most protocols require enteral contrast. This study aimed to 1) evaluate the accuracy of MRI for inflammation, fibrosis, and extraluminal complications and 2) compare MRI without enteral contrast to standard magnetic resonance enterography. Adults with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis who underwent abdominal MRI and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Of 65 patients evaluated, 55 met inclusion criteria. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for disease involvement localized by segment were 93 per cent (95% confidence interval = 89.4-95.0) and 95 per cent (95% confidence interval = 92.3-97.0), respectively (positive predictive value was 86%, negative predictive value was 98%). Sensitivity and specificity between MRI with and without oral and rectal contrast were similar (96% vs 91% and 99% vs 94%, P > 0.10). As were positive predictive value and negative predictive value (85% vs 96%, P = 0.16; 97% vs 99%, P = 0.42). Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive and specific for localized disease involvement and extraluminal abdominal sequelae of IBD. It accurately differentiates patients who have chronic transmural (fibrotic) disease and thus may require an operation from those with acute inflammation, whose symptoms may improve with aggressive medical therapy alone. MRI without contrast had comparable diagnostic yield to standard magnetic resonance enterography. PMID:26672581

  19. Comparison of neutral and positive enteral contrast media for MDCT enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare neutral and positive enteral contrast media for MDCT enteroclysis (MDCTE) in various small bowel diseases. Materials and methods: 40 patients with suspicion of small bowel diseases were divided randomly into two equal groups. In one group, water was used as neutral enteral contrast and in other group, 2% water soluble iodinated contrast was used as positive enteral contrast. All MDCTE were done on a 16-slice multidetector row CT unit. The findings of MDCTE were compared with the standards of reference. Results: There were 12 cases of abdominal tuberculosis (30%), 5 cases of bowel masses (12%), 4 cases of Crohn's disease (10%), 3 cases of small bowel adhesions (7%), 2 cases of midgut volvulus (5%), 2 cases of segmental enteritis (5%) and 12 of all cases (30%) were normal. There was no statistically significant difference between neutral and positive enteral contrast with regards to bowel distention, contrast reflux and evaluation of duodenum. Abnormal bowel wall enhancement was appreciated only with use of neutral enteral contrast (n = 12). Evaluation of ileocaecal junction was possible in all 20 patients (100%) with positive enteral contrast but in only 17 patients (85%) with neutral enteral contrast. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MDCTE with use of neutral contrast medium (100 and 88% respectively) was greater for evaluation of small bowel diseases, when compared to MDCTE using positive enteral contrast medium (92.8 and 83.3% respectively). Conclusions: Water is a good enteral contrast medium for MDCT enteroclysis examination and allows better evaluation of abnormal bowel wall enhancement. Ileocaecal junction evaluation is better with positive enteral contrast medium.

  20. Correlation of MRI-determined small bowel Crohn's disease categories with medical response and surgical pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian Craig Lawrance; Christopher J Welman; Peter Shipman; Kevin Murray

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to categorize small bowel Crohn's disease (SB CD) into groups that correlate with response to medical therapy and surgical pathology. METHODS: Data was collected from all patients with MRI evidence of SB CD without significant colonic disease over a 32-mo period. Two radiologists,blinded to clinical findings, evaluated each MRI and grouped them based on bowel wall thickness and wall enhancement. These categories were: (1) "fibrosis",(2) "mild segmental hyper-enhancement and mild wall thickening", (3) "mild segmental hyper-enhancement and marked wall thickening", (4) "marked segmental transmural hyper-enhancement". Patient response to additional medical therapy post-MRI was prospectively determined at 8-wk. Non-responders underwent endoscopy and were offered therapeutic endoscopy or surgery. Surgical pathology was assessed against the MRI category.RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were included. Females and category "2" patients were more likely, and patients with luminal narrowing and hold-up less likely,to respond to medical therapy ( P < 0.05). Seventeen patients underwent surgery. The surgical pathological findings of fibrosis and the severity of inflammation correlated with the MRI category in all cases. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that SB CD can be grouped by the MRI findings and that these groups are associated with patients more likely to respond to continued medical therapy. The MRI categories also correlated with the presence and level of intestinal inflammation and fibrosis on surgical pathology, and may be of prognostic use in the management of CD patients.

  1. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  2. Polyethylene glycol and contrast-enhanced MRI of Crohn's disease in children: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the ability of MRI to detect bowel abnormalities in children affected by Crohn's disease (CD). We studied 22 children (age range 8-18 years) referred to us with a known history of CD. MRI was carried out using a 1.5-T unit with a maximum gradient field strength of 16 mT and a phased-array body coil. The sequences performed were breath-hold coronal and axial T2-weighted, express fat saturation, followed by T1-weighted, spoiled gradient, fast fat saturation after IV injection of gadolinium chelate (0.3 mmol/kg) for contrast enhancement of the bowel wall. Bowel distension was achieved using oral administration of isosmotic polyethylene glycol solution. Ileo-colonoscopy was considered the gold standard for evaluation of superficial abnormalities and stenoses of the colon and terminal ileum. MRI findings of bowel-wall thickening, increased vascularisation and extramural involvement were compared with the findings using B-mode and Doppler US. Concordance between MRI and endoscopy, B-mode US and Doppler US findings was determined by the Kappa statistical method. Superficial lesions were not shown by MRI. MR enteroclysis easily detected stenoses, thickening and hyperaemia of bowel wall. Concordance of findings between MRI and endoscopy was 90% (K=0.79, substantial concordance). Concordance of findings between MRI and US concerning bowel-wall thickening and increased vascularisation was 95% (K=0.875, excellent concordance) and 80% (K=0.6, fairly good concordance), respectively. Our initial results show that MRI can detect intra- and extra-mural lesions of CD. The high concordance observed between MRI, endoscopy, US and Doppler US findings suggests that MRI is at least comparable for diagnostic capability with these techniques offering, thanks to multiplanar projections, an improved visualisation of the bowel without ionising radiation. (orig.)

  3. Bowel imaging: a reassessment. Pt. 2. CT and MRI; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Darms - eine Neubewertung. T. 2. CT und MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohl, C.; Muehlenbruch, G.; Schmidt, T.; Guenther, R.W. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Haage, P. [Universitaetsklinik Witten/Herdecke (Germany). HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2007-07-15

    This is the second part of a review of bowel imaging. While the first part addressed conventional X-ray techniques and ultrasonography, the second part discusses the diagnostic features of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including virtual colonography and PET-CT in the diagnosis of bowel disorders. Indications, performance and the diagnostic impact of the different methods are presented and discussed in the context of competitive methods such as (capsule-)endoscopy. (orig.)

  4. MRI enterography with divided dose oral preparation: Effect on bowel distension and diagnostic quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Sinha

    2013-01-01

    divided dose resulted in the majority of patients being scanned in a single visit to the MRI suite. Dividing the oral contrast into aliquots can promote uniform distension of the entire small bowel and provide better bowel distension and improve the diagnostic quality.

  5. Triphasic Computed Tomography Enterography with Polyethylene Glycol to Detect Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastases to the Small Bowel

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Chian-Sem; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Wu, Chin-Chu; Lin, Yu-Min; Chong, Lee-Won; Hsu, Yi-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Enteroclysis was first used to diagnose small bowel obstruction in 1996. However, nasojejunal intubation required during enteroclysis causes discomfort to the patient. Triphasic computed tomography (CT) enterography, a noninvasive procedure that does not require intubation, was found to be an efficient method to diagnose small bowel lesions. We describe our experience of using triphasic CT enterography with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for diagnosing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the ...

  6. Small bowel intubation using guide wire: use in decompression of small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small bowel intubation is a useful method in the non-operative decompression of small bowel obstruction and enteral hyperalimentation in malnourished patients. We have tried small bowel intubation with Ventrol tube guided by small bowel enteroclysis guide wire (Bilbao-Dotter wire) in 12 patients. Ten cases were successfully intubated. In 11 cases of bowel obstruction, 9 cases were intubated and 8 cases were effectively drained. One malnourished patient was improved in nutritional state after enteral hyperalimentation through the intubated tube. We believe this method is an easy and time-saving method in the small bowel decompression

  7. MRI in Crohns disease after transduodenal contrast administration using negative oral MRI constrast media; MRT-Diagnostik des Morbus Crohn nach transduodenaler Fuellung mit negativem oralem MR-Kontrastmittel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzknecht, N.; Helmberger, T.; Herrmann, K.; Reiser, M. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Ochsenkuehn, T.; Goeke, B. [Medizinische Klinik II, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and quality of conventional and MR enteroclysis with different filling methods regarding the assessment of extension and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn's disease.Material and Methods 190 patients with known Crohn's disease were studied following small bowel enteroclysis, after oral administration or direct transduodenal filling in the MRI-department.T1- and T2-weighted breathhold MRI-scans w/o spectral fat suppression w/o i.v.Gd-DTPA were applied using negative oral superparamagnetic contrast media. Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with laminated wall contrast enhancement.In 135 patients 98,2% of affected bowel segments, 97,5% of stenoses and all 16 fistulas were detected,when conventional enteroclysis was employed as standard of reference.Additional important extraluminal findings such as ileoileal (n = 18), ileosigmoidal adhesions (n = 12), extraluminal abscesses (n = 35) and pseudotumors (n = 8) were visualized in 73/135 patients. Concerning the distension of jejunum and ileum, oral filling was rated significantly inferior to transduodenal filling in all small bowel segments,whereas filling in the MRI-unit was rated superior to fluoroscopic, mostly due to a mean transport time of 20 min to the MRI-unit. No clinically important findings of enteroclysis were missed when using MRI. Therefore, in patients with Crohn's disease, conventional enteroclysis can be replaced by MRI.For optimal bowel distension oral contrast administration is inferior to transduodenal filling, if a larger time delay between filling and the MRI-scan can be avoided. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Vergleich der diagnostischen Effizienz und Qualitaet von konventionellem und MRT-Enteroklysma mit unterschiedlichen Fuellungsmethoden und negativem oralem KM bzgl.Ausdehnung und relevanter Zusatzinformationen bei Morbus Crohn.Material und Methoden 190 Patienten mit bekanntem Morbus Crohn wurden teils nach Enteroklysma, oraler KM-Gabe, oder

  8. Functional brain imaging in irritable bowel syndrome with rectal balloon-distention by using fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Yao-Zong; Tao, Ran-Jun; Xu, Bin; Sun, Jing; Chen, Ke-Min; Miao, Fei; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Xu, Jia-Yu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and changes in stool habits. Visceral hypersensitivity is a key factor in the pathophysiology of IBS. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of rectal balloon-distention stimulus by blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) in visceral pain center and to compare the distribution, extent, and intensity of activated areas between IBS patients and normal controls.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of three different MRI protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Munkholm, Pia;

    2015-01-01

    MRE within seven days. For the evaluation, the bowel was divided into nine segments. One radiologist, blinded to clinical findings, evaluated bowel wall thickness, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), mural hyperenhancement, and other inflammatory changes in each bowel segment. RESULTS: Twenty patients...

  10. Quantitative in vivo analysis of small bowel motility using MRI examinations in mice--proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, S; Wurnig, M C; Lesurtel, M; Patak, M A; Boss, A

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel motility analyses using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could reduce current invasive techniques in animal studies and comply with the 'three Rs' rule for human animal experimentation. Thus we investigated the feasibility of in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice using dynamic MRI acquisitions. All experimental procedures were approved by the institutional animal care committee. Six C57BL/6 mice underwent MRI without additional preparation after isoflurane anaesthetization in the prone position on a 4.7 T small animal imager equipped with a linear polarized hydrogen birdcage whole-body mouse coil. Motility was assessed using a true fast imaging in a steady precession sequence in the coronal orientation (acquisition time per slice 512 ms, in-plane resolution 234 × 234 µm, matrix size 128 × 128, slice thickness 1 mm) over 30 s corresponding to 60 acquisitions. Motility was manually assessed measuring the small bowel diameter change over time. The resulting motility curves were analysed for the following parameters: contraction frequency per minute (cpm), maximal contraction amplitude (maximum to minimum [mm]), luminal diameter (mm) and luminal occlusion rate. Small bowel motility quantification was found to be possible in all animals with a mean small bowel contraction frequency of 10.67 cpm (SD ± 3.84), a mean amplitude of the contractions of 1.33 mm (SD ± 0.43) and a mean luminal diameter of 1.37 mm (SD ± 0.42). The mean luminal occlusion rate was 1.044 (SD ± 0.45%/100). The mean duration needed for a single motility assessment was 185 s (SD ± 54.02). Thus our study demonstrated the feasibility of an easy and time-sparing functional assessment for in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice. This could improve the development of small animal models of intestinal diseases and provide a method similar to clinical MR examinations that is in concordance with the 'three Rs' for humane animal

  11. Grading luminal Crohn's disease: Which MRI features are considered as important?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for disease activity grading in small bowel Crohn's disease. It is not known which imaging features are essential for grading. For further insight, we solicited the opinion of expert radiologists. Methods: A questionnaire about the grading of Crohn's disease was sent to 36 radiologists who had published on MRI grading of Crohn's disease between January 2006 and January 2010. Radiologists were asked which MRI protocol they used, how they graded luminal Crohn's disease, which features they used, how important they considered those features for grading, and which reference standards they used. Results: Twenty-four radiologists responded (66%). They used different protocols and features; most frequently T2-weighted sequences (79%) and contrast enhanced fat saturated T1-weighted sequences (83%). MR-enterography was more often used than MR-enteroclysis (88% versus 33%). Features most frequently considered important for grading were bowel wall thickness (79% of radiologists), the presence of an abscess (75%), T1 enhancement (75%), and T1 stratification (46%). Reference standards differed; most commonly (ileo-) colonoscopy (88%) or surgery (75%) were used. Conclusions: Bowel wall thickness, abscess, T1 enhancement and T1 stratification are most often used for grading. Because of difference in grading, there is need for an international consensus on MRI grading of Crohn's disease.

  12. Evaluating bowel wall vascularity in Crohn's disease: a comparison of dynamic MRI and wideband harmonic imaging contrast-enhanced low MI ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This was a prospective comparison of dynamic MRI (1.5 T) and echo-signal enhanced ultrasound in evaluating vascularization in thickened bowel walls cases of Crohn's disease. Twenty-one patients with histologically confirmed Crohn's disease and bowel wall diameters >5 mm were examined by MRI and ultrasound (US). MR sequences: T1w fl2D, T2w, FLASH T1w post-contrast media (CM) applications with fat saturation were used. Dynamic Turbo-FLASH T1w sequences were acquired in the area of maximal thickening of the ileal wall every 1.5 s post-CM application for a total duration of 1 min. US was performed after the application of 1.2 ml of echo-signal enhancer. Contrast uptake was measured by the semiquantitative score and brightness analysis in regions of interest (ROI). Clinical and laboratory findings including Crohn's disease activity indices were documented; MRI and US parameters were correlated. The length of sonographically documented lesions (122±75 mm) correlated significantly with the length of thickened bowel segments in MRI (128±76 mm; r=0.466; P=0.033). The maximum percent signal enhancement in the terminal ileum at ultrasound (217.5±100.1%) showed a high correlation with the findings of MRI (262±108%; r=0.623; P=0.003). With both methods, a plateau phase was observed. US and MRI are capable of evaluating local vascularization in the bowel wall objectively. (orig.)

  13. Computed Tomography Enterography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography: The Future of Small Bowel Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Mark E.; Einstein, David M.; Veniero, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 5 years, computed tomography enterography (CTE) and to a lesser extent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) have supplanted the routine small bowel series and enteroclysis in the evaluation of many small bowel diseases, especially Crohn's disease. Both CTE and MRE use similar methods of bowel lumen opacification and distension and both have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Both have been most extensively studied in patients with Crohn's disease. What is certain is that thes...

  14. Differentiation between active and chronic Crohn's disease using MRI small-bowel motility examinations — Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of locally active Crohn's disease on systemic small-bowel motility in patients with chronic Crohn's disease compared to healthy individuals. Material and methods: Fifteen healthy individuals (11 men, four women; mean age 37 years) and 20 patients with histopathologically proven active (n = 15; 10 women, 5 men; mean age 45 years) or chronic (n = 5; four women, one man; mean age 48 years) Crohn's disease were included in this institutional review board-approved, retrospective study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 1.5 T) was performed after standardized preparation. Two-dimensional (2D) cine sequences for motility acquisition were performed in apnoea (27 s). Motility assessment was performed using dedicated software in three randomly chosen areas of the small-bowel outside known Crohn's disease-affected hotspots. The main quantitative characteristics (frequency, amplitude, occlusion rate) were compared using Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Three randomly chosen segments were analysed in each participant. Patients with active Crohn's disease had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced contraction frequencies (active Crohn's disease: 2.86/min; chronic: 4.14/min; healthy: 4.53/min) and luminal occlusion rates (active: 0.43; chronic: 0.70; healthy: 0.73) compared to healthy individuals and patients with chronic Crohn's disease. Contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced during active Crohn's disease (6.71 mm) compared to healthy participants (10.14 mm), but this only reached borderline significance in comparison to chronic Crohn's disease (8.87 mm). Mean bowel lumen diameter was significantly (p = 0.04) higher in patients with active Crohn's disease (16.91 mm) compared to healthy participants (14.79 mm) but not in comparison to patients with chronic Crohn's disease (13.68). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that local inflammatory activity of small-bowel segments in patients with

  15. MRI enterography with divided dose oral preparation: Effect on bowel distension and diagnostic quality

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Sinha; Sudarshan Rawat

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the impact of an extended oral preparation magnetic resonance (MR) enterography protocol on bowel distension, timing of imaging, and the quality of diagnostic images. Materials and Methods: An analysis of 52 patients who underwent divided oral preparation and 39 patients who underwent standard preparation for MR enterography examination was done. Distension was assessed by measuring the transverse diameters of the jejunum, ileum, and the ileocecal region. Diagnostic quality of ...

  16. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with bleeding, mucosal disruption, irregular surface, discolored area, and white villi are suggested as the VCE findings of small bowel tumor. Device assisted enteroscopy (DAE), computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography and magnetic resonance enteroclysis/enterography also have clinical value in small bowel examination and tumor detection, and they can be used with VCE, sequentially or complementarily. Familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, melanoma, lymphoma, and neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastasis are the high risk groups for small bowel tumors, and surveillance programs for small bowel tumors are needed. VCE and radiological imaging have value in screening, and in selected cases, DAE can provide more accurate diagnosis and endoscopic treatment. This review describes the usefulness and clinical impact of VCE on small bowel tumors. PMID:26855919

  17. Whipple's disease demonstrated by double contrast small bowel enema with barium and methylcellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiologic findings on small bowel enema examination using barium and methylcellulose (SBE+Ba+MC) in a patient with Whipple's disease before and after treatment are described. The changes on SBE+Ba+MC corresponded well to the clinical and morphologic picture. The advantages of this double contrast technique compared to the enteroclysis with barium alone are demonstrated. The SBE+Ba+MC is a good method to demonstrate the manifestations of Whipple's disease involving the small bowel and the mesentery. (orig.)

  18. MRI with oral filling in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases; MRT mit oraler Duenndarmdistension bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, C.; Nagel, B.; Leinsinger, G.; Reiser, M. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Aim Evaluation of mannitol-MRI in patients with suspected or established Crohn's disease (CD). 75 patients with suspected or established Crohn's disease were included. 1.5 l of mannitol-solution were administered orally within 1 h before imaging.A rectal filling was also employed.Butylscopolamin was applied i.v. Native-sequences were acquired. T1w sequences (axial, coronal) were acquired before and after (fs-T1-w-BH) i.v.Gd-DTPA.Additionally a dynamic CM-study was performed. In 45% of the examinations good image quality was achieved. In 28% opacification of the terminal ileum was insufficient. However, diagnostic assessment was possible. Motion artifacts due to breathing were rare, artifacts due to peristalsis were noted in 16% of the examinations. Alterations indicative to CD were found in 69% of the patients.The SI-increase of the thickened bowel-wall was significantly higher than the increase of not thickened wall (117 vs.75%; p = 0,001 in t-test).We detected stenoses in 56%, fistulas in 23% and an abscess in one patient. Mannitol-MRI is a valuable method in the diagnostic work-up of inflammatory bowel disease. Improvement of distal distension should be attempted, because of the good acceptance of the patients and high diagnostical value. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung Evaluation eines MRT-Untersuchungsprotokolls mit oraler Gabe von Mannitolloesung bei Patienten mit Verdacht auf oder gesichertem Morbus Crohn (MC).Patienten und Methode 75 Patienten wurden mittels Mannitol-MRT untersucht. Die Patienten wurden gebeten,1 h vor Untersuchungsbeginn 1,5 l Mannitol kontinuierlich zu trinken.Zur Unterdrueckung der Peristaltik wurde Butylscopolamin injiziert. HASTE- und T1w-Sequenzen wurden nativ in Atemanhaltetechnik akquiriert. Nach i.v.-Gd-DTPA folgten eine dynamische Kontrastmittelstudie in koronarer Schnittfuehrung und transversale fs-T1w-Sequenzen.Ergebnisse Bei 45% der Untersuchungen wurde eine gute Bildqualitaet erreicht.Bei 28% war die Distension

  19. Hydro-MRI in inflammatory bowel diseases: a comparison with colonoscopy and histopathology; Hydro-MRT bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen - Eine koloskopisch-histologische Vergleichsstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, K.; Reiter, S.; Kern, A. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Orth, T.; Wanitschke, R. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2001-08-01

    Purpose: To compare hydro-MRI with colonoscopy and biopsy specimen regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity and the differentiation of inflammatory bowel diseases. Material and methods: After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution and a rectal bowel opacification using 250-500 ml of a 0.9% saline solution, axial and coronal breath-hold sequences {+-}Gd-DTPA (HASTE-['half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo'] and dynamic FLASH-['fast low angle shot']) were acquired in 27 patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The enhancement of the bowel wall as well as morphological MRI findings were correlated with colonoscopy and biopsy specimens. By means of the MRI findings, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) should be differentiated. Results: In CD, a significant correlation between the contrast enhancement of the inflamed bowel wall ({delta} SI) and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be established (r=0.52; p=0.02 and r=0.72; p=0.001). In UC, no correlations between {delta} SI and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be found. The correct diagnosis of CD and UC by MRI findings was possible in 22/27 patients (81%). Conclusion: Hydro-MRI with dynamic studies is suitable for the assessment of disease activity in CD, but unreliable in UC. Hydro-MRI provides useful information for the differentiation of CD and UC. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Vergleich der Hydro-MRT mi Koloskopie und Histopathologie bezueglich der Beurteilung der entzuendlichen Aktivitaet und der Differenzierung entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen. Patienten und Methodik: Bei 27 Patienten mit einer entzuendlichen Darmerkrankung wurden nach einer oralen Darmkontrastierung mit 1000 ml einer 2,5%igen Mannitolloesung und einer rektalen Darmkontrastierung mit 250-500 ml einer 0,9%igen NaCl-Loesung atemangehaltene transversale und koronare Sequenzen {+-} intravenoese Gd-DTPA-Applikation (HASTE

  20. PET-CT enteroclysis: a new technique for evaluation of inflammatory diseases of the intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jyoti Das, Chandan; Sharma, Raju [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India); Makharia, Govind; Goswami, Pooja [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Rakesh; Chawla, Madhavi; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    While CT/MR enteroclysis provides excellent anatomical details, it fails to provide information on metabolic activity of the inflammatory lesions of the intestine. We conceptualized a fusion of metabolic imaging techniques such as PET and an anatomical imaging modality such as CT enteroclysis to derive information both on morphological details and functional activity of lesions at the same time. In a prospective study, we included 17 adult patients with newly diagnosed inflammatory diseases of the intestine. Low dose whole body PET-CT scan was obtained first, which began at approximately 60 min after injection of 10 mCi of {sup 18}fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG). Subsequently, PET-CT enteroclysis of the abdomen was performed after infusion of 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose through a naso-jejunal catheter. Fourteen patients had abnormal and three had normal PET-CT enteroclysis studies. Twenty-three segments of small intestine and 27 segments of large intestine showed increased FDG uptake. The detection rate of PET-CT enteroclysis was significantly higher (total =50 segments, 23 segments of small intestine and 27 segments of large intestine) as compared with barium studies (16 segments of small intestine) and colonoscopy (17 segments of large intestine) combined together (total =33 segments). In addition PET-CT enteroclysis showed extra-luminal FDG uptake (lymph nodes in two, sacroilitis in two, and mesenteric fat proliferation in five). As a single investigation, PET-CT enteroclysis detects a significantly higher number of lesions both in the small and large intestine in comparison to that detected by conventional barium and colonoscopy combined together. This technique is non-invasive, feasible and very promising. (orig.)

  1. Does MRI with oral contrast medium allow single-study depiction of inflammatory bowel disease enteritis and colitis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility and utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the bowel in concurrent small- and large-bowel evaluation for the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Over a 5-year period, 62 MR examinations performed on 53 patients demonstrated evidence of IBD. Sixteen of these 53 (30.1%) patients had imaging findings of colonic disease and underwent 19 formal MR small bowel examinations. These were further evaluated for bowel distention and image quality. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique compared with colonoscopy as the 'gold standard' was evaluated. Simultaneous imaging of the colon is feasible at MR small bowel follow-through with moderate-to-excellent colonic visibility and colon distention obtained when the contrast medium is present in the colon at the time of image acquisition. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 80% (0.56-0.93), specificity of 100% (0.77-1.00), positive predictive value (PPV) of 1 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.8 for the identification of colitis (based on available concurrent correlation of 38/62 examinations with colonoscopy). Small and large bowel MR imaging with orally consumed contrast medium represents a promising, feasible, non-invasive, non-radiating single mode of assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract, performed at a single sitting. (orig.)

  2. Does MRI with oral contrast medium allow single-study depiction of inflammatory bowel disease enteritis and colitis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, Carmel G.; Lohan, Derek G.; Browne, Ann Michelle; Roche, Clare; Murphy, Joseph M. [University College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Galway (Ireland)

    2010-07-15

    To assess the feasibility and utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the bowel in concurrent small- and large-bowel evaluation for the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Over a 5-year period, 62 MR examinations performed on 53 patients demonstrated evidence of IBD. Sixteen of these 53 (30.1%) patients had imaging findings of colonic disease and underwent 19 formal MR small bowel examinations. These were further evaluated for bowel distention and image quality. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique compared with colonoscopy as the 'gold standard' was evaluated. Simultaneous imaging of the colon is feasible at MR small bowel follow-through with moderate-to-excellent colonic visibility and colon distention obtained when the contrast medium is present in the colon at the time of image acquisition. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 80% (0.56-0.93), specificity of 100% (0.77-1.00), positive predictive value (PPV) of 1 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.8 for the identification of colitis (based on available concurrent correlation of 38/62 examinations with colonoscopy). Small and large bowel MR imaging with orally consumed contrast medium represents a promising, feasible, non-invasive, non-radiating single mode of assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract, performed at a single sitting. (orig.)

  3. Modern imaging methods for diagnostic evaluation of Crohn's disease: The value of MRI as compared to conventional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only recently was the magnetic resonance imaging method (MRI) optimized to an extent advocating its application as a tool in clinical routine examinations for diagnostic evaluation of Crohn's disease. The paper gives a comparative outline analysis of currently applied diagnostic methods, such as ultrasonography, enteroclysis, and CT, and the progress achieved in clinical research into the applicability of MRI. (orig./CB)

  4. Non-perforating small bowel Crohn's disease assessed by MRI enterography: Derivation and histopathological validation of an MR-based activity index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, Michael J., E-mail: mikejsteward@gmail.com [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Punwani, Shonit, E-mail: shonit.punwani@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Imaging, Division of Medicine, University College London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Proctor, Ian, E-mail: ian.proctor@nhs.net [Department of Histopathology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Adjei-Gyamfi, Yvette, E-mail: yvette.adjei-gyamfi@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Chatterjee, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.chaterjee@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Bloom, Stuart, E-mail: stuart.bloom@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Gastroenterology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Novelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.novealli@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Histopathology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve, E-mail: S.halligan@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Imaging, Division of Medicine, University College London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.rodriguez-justo@uclh.nhs.uk [Department of Histopathology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-09-15

    Objectives: To develop and validate a qualitative scoring system for enteric Crohn's disease activity using MR enterography (MRE). Methods: MRE was performed in 16 patients (mean age 33, 8 male) undergoing small bowel resection. Mural thickness, T2 signal, contrast enhancement, and perimural oedema were scored qualitatively (0–3) at 44 locations. Transmural histopathological scoring of acute inflammation (AIS) was performed at all locations (score 0–13). MRI parameters best predicting AIS were derived using multivariate analysis. The MRI activity index was applied to 26 Crohn's patients (mean age 32, range 13–69 years, 15 male) and correlated to terminal ileal biopsy scores of acute inflammation (“eAIS” score 1–6). Receiver operator characteristic curves were calculated. Results: Mural thickness (coefficient 1.34 (95% CI 0.36, 2.32)], p = 0.007) and T2 signal (coefficient 0.90 (95% CI −0.24, 2.04) p = 0.06) best predicted AIS (AIS = 1.79 + 1.34*mural thickness + 0.94*mural T2 score [R-squared 0.52]). There was a significant correlation between the MRI index and eAIS (Kendall's tau = 0.40, 95% CI 0.11–0.64, p = 0.02). The model achieved a sensitivity of 0.81 (95% CI 0.54–0.96), specificity of 0.70 (0.35–0.93) and AUC 0.77 for predicting acute inflammation (eAIS ≥2). Conclusions: A simple qualitative MRI Crohn's disease activity score appears predictive against a histopathological standard of reference.

  5. Non-perforating small bowel Crohn's disease assessed by MRI enterography: Derivation and histopathological validation of an MR-based activity index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To develop and validate a qualitative scoring system for enteric Crohn's disease activity using MR enterography (MRE). Methods: MRE was performed in 16 patients (mean age 33, 8 male) undergoing small bowel resection. Mural thickness, T2 signal, contrast enhancement, and perimural oedema were scored qualitatively (0–3) at 44 locations. Transmural histopathological scoring of acute inflammation (AIS) was performed at all locations (score 0–13). MRI parameters best predicting AIS were derived using multivariate analysis. The MRI activity index was applied to 26 Crohn's patients (mean age 32, range 13–69 years, 15 male) and correlated to terminal ileal biopsy scores of acute inflammation (“eAIS” score 1–6). Receiver operator characteristic curves were calculated. Results: Mural thickness (coefficient 1.34 (95% CI 0.36, 2.32)], p = 0.007) and T2 signal (coefficient 0.90 (95% CI −0.24, 2.04) p = 0.06) best predicted AIS (AIS = 1.79 + 1.34*mural thickness + 0.94*mural T2 score [R-squared 0.52]). There was a significant correlation between the MRI index and eAIS (Kendall's tau = 0.40, 95% CI 0.11–0.64, p = 0.02). The model achieved a sensitivity of 0.81 (95% CI 0.54–0.96), specificity of 0.70 (0.35–0.93) and AUC 0.77 for predicting acute inflammation (eAIS ≥2). Conclusions: A simple qualitative MRI Crohn's disease activity score appears predictive against a histopathological standard of reference

  6. Fetal bowel anomalies - US and MR assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubesova, Erika [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The technical quality of prenatal US and fetal MRI has significantly improved during the last decade and allows an accurate diagnosis of bowel pathology prenatally. Accurate diagnosis of bowel pathology in utero is important for parental counseling and postnatal management. It is essential to recognize the US presentation of bowel pathology in the fetus in order to refer the patient for further evaluation or follow-up. Fetal MRI has been shown to offer some advantages over US for specific bowel abnormalities. In this paper, we review the normal appearance of the fetal bowel on US and MRI as well as the typical presentations of bowel pathologies. We discuss more specifically the importance of recognizing on fetal MRI the abnormalities of size and T1-weighted signal of the meconium-filled distal bowel. (orig.)

  7. Ultrasound in Crohn's disease of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of this work is to prospectively evaluate high resolution ultrasonography with graded compression in the ability to detect Crohn's disease of the small bowel (CDSB) together with its complications and activity signs, compared with enteroclysis, CT and immunoscintigraphy in the mirror of the final diagnosis. Methods and material: In a series of 73 consecutive patients, who were referred for enteroclysis with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc labeled monoclonal antigranulocyte antibody (AGAb) examinations were performed within 10 days from each other. For the final evaluation the diagnosis of CDSB was based on combination of clinical and enteroclysis findings (73 cases) and in 17 cases additional surgical and pathological data were available. The results of other modalities were blinded to the radiologists performing and reading out the exams. The diagnostic values of each modality was assessed also in those 18 patients, who had early Crohn's disease. In the group of 43 patients with proven CDSB who had all the four imaging modalities, the modalities were compared in their ability to demonstrate various pathological conditions related to CD. Increased (>500 ml/min) flow measured by Doppler US in the superior mesenteric artery and increased color signs in the gut wall seen by power Doppler sonography were compared to CDAI. Results: Of the 73 patients the combination of enteroclysis and clinical tests demonstrated CDSB in 47. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasound were 88.4, 93.3 and 90.4%, respectively. Enteroclysis was the most accurate method. CT was more sensitive than US, but less specific. The accuracy of US, CT and scintigraphy were similar. In the group of 18 patients, who had early CDSB, the sensitivity of US decreased to only 67%, CT and scintigraphy had higher values. Intra- and perimural abscesses, and sinus tracts were also more

  8. Computed tomography of the whole bowel in patients suspected of Crohn's disease. Preliminary report - assessment of examination technique and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the usefulness of new technique - computed tomography (CT) of the whole bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and correlation of obtained images with other modalities (MR of the bowel, enteroclysis, barium enema, colonoscopy) and operation results. CT examination was performed in 20 patients suspected of having Crohn's disease, which was confirmed in 16 cases. CT was performed after filling small bowel with fluid administered by catheter placed in duodenum (in 10 patients) or orally (in 10 patients), distension of large bowel with air and intravenous injection of contrast material. Distension of small bowel was assessed in both groups by two radiologists. In 7 patients immediately after CT examination MR of the bowel was performed with contrast enhanced T1-weighted images. Distension of small bowel was better in patients examined after administration of fluid directly to duodenum, although the difference was not statistically significant. In 16 CT studies performed in patients with confirmed Crohn's disease all narrowed bowel segments (n = 25) were diagnosed and extraintestinal abnormalities were visualized (thickening of the mesenteries, enlarged lymph nodes, perirectal changes, abscess, fistula). In 7 patients examined by MR 2 of 10 narrowing (20%) were not diagnosed. CT of the whole bowel is promising method in diagnosis of patients with Crohn's disease. The best views of the small bowel were obtained with the use of CT enteroclysis. (author)

  9. Crohn's Disease Evaluated with Magnetic Resonance Enteroclysis: Diagnostic Performance of Experienced and Inexperienced Readers before and after Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) is suggested to become the preferred radiological method in small-bowel Crohn's disease (CD). However, the performance of inexperienced readers may influence the diagnostic value of the method and has not been previously investigated. Purpose: To compare readings of MRE in small-bowel CD performed by experienced and inexperienced readers before and after training.Material and Methods: One experienced radiologist (observer 1) and two trainees (observers 2 and 3) reviewed 60 MRE examinations. A second reading was performed after training. Bowel wall thickness (BWT), ulcers (BWU), stenosis (BWS), fistulas (FIS), and abscesses (ABS) were evaluated. A reference standard based on clinical records was established. Results: BWT in the terminal ileum was evaluated with high diagnostic performance (sensitivity: observer 1, 83%; observer 2, 72%; observer 3, 78%). Only BWU was diagnosed with a higher sensitivity by observer 1 (78% vs. 33% and 39%, respectively; P=0.02). False-positive findings for BWT in the jejunum (observer 2: 7; observer 3: 4) and fistulas and abscesses (observer 2: 11/5; observer 3: 5/4) were made by the trainees. Interobserver agreement in the jejunum was poor (observer 1/observer 2: κ=0.23; observer 1/observer 3: κ=-0.03) and in the ileum good (observer 1/observer 2: κ=0.78; observer 1/observer 3: κ=0.73). After training, evaluation of BWU (observer 2: 56%, P=0.22; observer 3: 44%, P=0.03), BWT (observer 2: 2; observer 3: 2), and interobserver agreement in the jejunum improved (observer 1/observer 2: κ=0.66; observer 1/observer 3: κ=0.66). However, the number of diagnosed fistulas and abscesses remained high. Conclusion: Before training, most findings of Crohn's disease in the terminal ileum were evaluated with high diagnostic performance by all readers. However, the inexperienced readers evaluated BWU with a low sensitivity and overestimated the number of FIS, number of ABS, and increased BWT in

  10. Diagnostic evaluation of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases in children and adolescents: MRI with true-FISP as new gold standard?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to evaluate the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with use of True-FISP sequences in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel-wall changes in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, the diagnostic procedure in children and adolescents with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) will be discussed in light of the relevant literature. Material and methods: twenty-four children and adolescents aged between 7 and 21 years with suspected or known IBD underwent MRI on a 1.5T-scanner (Philips ACS-NT, Best, Netherlands). One hour after 11 of a 2.5% mannitol solution was given orally, MR imaging was performed using coronal HASTE-M2D, coronal fat-suppressed T2-TSE, axial dynamic T1-weighted GE-sequences before and after i.v.-contrast material injection (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA) and using a 2D-balanced-FFE-sequence (True-FISP) before and after i.v.-contrast material injection in coronal and axial planes. The MR-images were correlated with endoscopy and the clinical findings. In 14 patients, a recently performed conventional radiographic enteroclysis was available. Each performed MRI sequence was evaluated by three experienced radiologists regarding the sensitivity and specificity of each sequence in the detection of inflammatory bowel wall changes. In addition, the image quality was assessed regarding the different tissue contrasts and the susceptibility to artifacts. The distension of the bowel wall and the patients' acceptance of the MRI examination were recorded. Results: with a sensitivity in detecting inflammatory small bowel changes of 93.3% (axial pre-contrast, coronal post-contrast) and 100% (axial post-contrast, coronal pre-contrast), the True-FISP outnumbers the other performed sequences (T1 = 80%, HASTE = 13.3% and T2-TSE = 53.3%). The difference between True-FISP and contrast-enhanced T1 was not statistically significant, whereas the difference between True-FISP and HASTE and T2-TSE, respectively. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of primary small intestinal tumours by enteroclysis and CT with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative diagnosis of primary small intestinal neoplasms can be a challenge for both clinicians and radiologists. As a result of their infrequent occurrence, they invariably present difficult problems in diagnosis and management. These problems are reflected mainly in the delayed treatment and a very poor prognosis for such malignant tumours. Their morphological changes, however, shown in enteroclysis and CT, correlate almost perfectly with the lesions identified in the gross pathological specimens. This ability to accurately image a small intestinal neoplasm, independently of its size, anatomical localization and growing tendency, represents a major improvement in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. This paper, based on a large series of patients with primary small intestinal neoplasms, focuses on the recognition of their detailed radiological appearances when evaluated by enteroclysis and CT. (orig.). With 33 figs

  12. Utility of Computed Tomographic Enteroclysis/Enterography for the Assessment of Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shinichi Hashimoto; Kensaku Shimizu; Hiroaki Shibata; Satoko Kanayama; Ryo Tanabe; Hideko Onoda; Naohumi Matsunaga; Isao Sakaida

    2013-01-01

    Aim. When determining therapeutic strategy, it is important to diagnose small intestinal lesions in Crohn's disease (CD) precisely and to evaluate mucosal healing as well as clinical remission in CD. The purpose of this study was to compare findings from computed tomographic enteroclysis/enterography (CTE) with those from the mucosal surface and to determine whether the state of mucosal healing can be determined by CTE. Materials and Methods. Of the patients who underwent CTE for CD, 39 patie...

  13. Small bowel imaging-- a rapidly changing field and a challenge to radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinte, Dean D T

    2006-05-01

    There was a time when the small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was the primary method of diagnosing diseases of the small intestine. Enteroclysis was reinvented in the 70's and with the SBFT remained the dominant methods of investigating the mesenteric small intestine to the late 90's. Since the introduction of the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, the ability of monoslice CT to diagnose different causes of intestinal obstruction and inflammatory bowel diseases emerged. The introduction of helical CT technology in 1989 and subsequently multichannel CT further changed small bowel imaging. Faster acquisition of a large volume of data with thinner collimation allowed multiplanar reformatting a distinct advantage in evaluating an organ which is longer than wide. The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with its increased soft tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to acquire ultrafast sequences has made MR imaging an important tool in small bowel imaging (1). PMID:16395533

  14. Small bowel imaging- a rapidly changing field and a challenge to radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There was a time when the small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was the primary method of diagnosing diseases of the small intestine. Enteroclysis was reinvented in the 70's and with the SBFT remained the dominant methods of investigating the mesenteric small intestine to the late 90's. Since the introduction of the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, the ability of monoslice CT to diagnose different causes of intestinal obstruction and inflammatory bowel diseases emerged. The introduction of helical CT technology in 1989 and subsequently multichannel CT further changed small bowel imaging. Faster aquisition of a large volume of data with thinner collimation allowed multiplanar reformatting a distinct advantage in evaluating an organ which is longer than wide. The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with its increased soft tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to acquire ultrafast sequences has made MR imaging an important tool in small bowel imaging (1). (orig.)

  15. The stepchild of intestinal diagnostics. Evaluation of radiological methods to diagnose leiomyomas of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Various radiological methods to diagnose small bowel neoplasmas and problems of differential diagnosis specially considerating leiomyomas are discussed. Patients and methods: Two patients with leiomyoma of the ileum underwent enteroclysis, computed tomography of the abdomen, intra-arterial DSA and colour Doppler sonography. Another patient with leiomyosarcoma just underwent CT of the abdomen with CT-guided biopsy. Results: Due to the homogenous density and the smooth surface of the tumors in computed tomography and respectively enteroclysis and the presentation of the tumor vascularisation in the angiography and Colour Doppler sonography in both patients a leiomyoma of the small bowel was diagnosed. Postoperatively this diagnosis was histologically confirmed. The CT-findings of the patient with leiomyosarcoma were not suspicious of a malignant tumor. Conclusion: Radiologically it is not possible to determine the dignity of smooth muscle cell tumors safely. That is the reason why the diagnosis has to be achieved operatively. But the histopathological diagnosis based on the mitotic rate may be difficult. Therefore the after care has to be carried out thoroughly. (orig.)

  16. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  17. Delayed gastric emptying and reduced postprandial small bowel water content of equicaloric whole meal bread versus rice meals in healthy subjects: novel MRI insights

    OpenAIRE

    Marciani, Luca; Pritchard, S E; Hellier-Woods, C.; Costigan, C; Hoad, C L; Gowland, P. A.; Spiller, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Postprandial bloating is a common symptom in patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Whole meal bread (WMB) often aggravates such symptoms though the mechanisms are unclear. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor the intragastric fate of a WMB meal (11% bran) compared with a rice pudding (RP) meal. Subjects/Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers completed this randomised crossover study. They fasted overnight and after an initial MRI scan consu...

  18. Utility of Computed Tomographic Enteroclysis/Enterography for the Assessment of Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Hashimoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. When determining therapeutic strategy, it is important to diagnose small intestinal lesions in Crohn's disease (CD precisely and to evaluate mucosal healing as well as clinical remission in CD. The purpose of this study was to compare findings from computed tomographic enteroclysis/enterography (CTE with those from the mucosal surface and to determine whether the state of mucosal healing can be determined by CTE. Materials and Methods. Of the patients who underwent CTE for CD, 39 patients were examined whose mucosal findings could be confirmed by colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, balloon endoscopy, or with the resected surgical specimens. Results. According to the CTE findings, patients were determined to be in the active CD group (n=31 or inactive CD group (n=8. The proportion of previous surgery, clinical remission, stenosis, and CDAI score all showed significant difference between groups. Mucosal findings showed an association with ulcer in 93.6% of active group patients but in only 12.5% of inactive group patients (P<0.0001, whereas mucosal healing was found in 62.5% of inactive group patients but in only 3.2% of active group patients (P<0.0001. Conclusion. CTE appeared to be a useful diagnostic method for assessment of mucosal healing in Crohn's disease.

  19. The role of enteroclysis and roentgen anatomy of jejunum and ileumin Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krivokuća Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aims of this research were: I to establish the value ofen-teroclysis in detection of morphological changes of jejunum and ileum in cases with suspected Crohn's disease and 2 to establish types of morphological changes of jejunum and ileum in patients with Crohn's disease. Material and methods The study compared two groups of people who voluntarily accepted to be examined: a control group and a study group. The control group included 11 healthy people, without gastrointestinal symptom. The study group included 16 patients with Crohn's disease. Single and double-contrast enteroclysis were performed in both groups. Afterwards, we defined parameters which were compared in these groups. Conclusions We concluded that according to statistics there are significantly lower values of the width of the jejunal and Heal lumen and the number of mucosa/folds (per I cm of the jejunal and Heal wall in the examined group in contrast to the control group. Also, according to statistics there are significantly higher values of the width of the jejunal and ileal wall and the thickness of mucosal folds of the jejunum and ileum in the study group in contrast to the control group.

  20. Bariumexaminations of the small intestine and the colon in inflammatory bowel disease; Konventionelle Duenn- und Dickdarmdiagnostik bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antes, G. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Klinikum Kempten-Oberallgaeu g, GmbH, Kempten (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the possibilities of conventional radiography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease of the small intestine and colon.Material and methods For more than 25 years we examine the small bowel employing enteroclysis with barium and methylcellulose and the colon with the usual double-contrast method. In the last 152 months 1560 small bowel enemas were performed. In the last 40 months 410 examinations of the colon were performed. There is a thirty percent decrease in enteroclysis examinations within the past 5 years,however, the rate of examinations with positive results increased from 46 to 57%.The proportion of the inflammatory small intestinal diseases (not only Crohn's disease) remained constant with 18%.Concerning the examinations of the colon for inflammatory disease we confirmed the diagnosis in seven cases.The radiation exposure for the enteroclysis in inflammatory diseases was 7mSv, for colon examinations 14 mSv. Barium examinations, especially of the stomach and colon are decreasing in frequency.Therefore the art of performance and interpretation might get lost.Enteroclysis, however, is still the method of reference for the other imaging methods.The advantages compared to the other imaging methods are the excellent presentation of the details of the mucosal surface and the observation of functional disorders. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll die Moeglichkeiten der konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik an Duenndarm und Kolon bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen aufzeigen.Material und Methoden Seit mehr als 25 Jahren untersuchen wir den Duenndarm mit dem Enteroklysma mit Barium und Methylzellulose und das Kolon mit der ueblichen Doppelkontrastmethode. In den letzten 152 Monaten wurden 1560 Duenndarmuntersuchungen durchgefuehrt. In den letzten 40 Monaten erfolgten 410 Kolonuntersuchungen.Ergebnisse Bei den Duenndarmuntersuchungen wurde in den letzten 5 Jahren ein Rueckgang um 30% beobachtet

  1. Beneficial Effects of Combining Computed Tomography Enteroclysis/Enterography with Capsule Endoscopy for Screening Tumor Lesions in the Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroaki Shibata; Shinichi Hashimoto; Kensaku Shimizu; Ryo Kawasato; Tomohiro Shirasawa; Takayuki Yokota; Hideko Onoda; Takeshi Okamoto; Jun Nishikawa; Naofumi Matsunaga; Isao Sakaida

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare the efficacy of using computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography (CTE), capsule endoscopy (CE), and CTE with CE for diagnosing tumor lesions in the small intestine. Materials and Methods. We included 98 patients who underwent CE during the observation period and were subjected to CTE at our hospital from April 2008 to May 2014. Results. CTE had a significantly higher sensitivity than CE (84.6% versus 46.2%, P = 0.039), but there were no significant differences in specificit...

  2. Bowel incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... move well enough to safely get to the bathroom on their own. These people need special care. They may become used to not getting to the toilet when it's time to have a bowel movement. To ... the bathroom is safe and comfortable. Using special pads or ...

  3. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Kralik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism, is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in small bowel examination.

  4. Conscious sedation for patients undergoing enteroclysis: Comparing the safety and patient-reported effectiveness of two protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglinte, Dean D.T. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, 550 N, University Boulevard, University Hospital Room 0279, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States)], E-mail: dmaglint@iupui.edu; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Rajesh, Arumugam; Jennings, S. Gregory; Ford, Jason M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, 550 N, University Boulevard, University Hospital Room 0279, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States); Savabi, Mojgan Sarah [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 550 N, University Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States); Lappas, John C. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, 550 N, University Boulevard, University Hospital Room 0279, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Objective: To compare the safety and patient-reported effectiveness of two regimens for conscious sedation during enteroclysis. Materials and methods: We surveyed two groups of outpatients and retrospectively reviewed procedure records for conscious sedation and complications. Patients were divided into Group One (received sedative/amnesic diazepam), and Group Two, (received amnesic/sedative, midazolam and analgesic fentanyl). Results: All enteroclyses were successfully completed; there were no hospital admissions due to complications. In Group One (n = 106), mean dose of diazepam was 12.7 mg. 25% had oxygen desaturation (n = 25), and post-procedure vomiting without aspiration (n = 1). 56% of outpatients completed phone surveys, and 68% recalled procedural discomfort. In Group Two (n = 45), mean doses were 3.9 mg midazolam and 108 mcg fentanyl. 31% had desaturation (n = 13), and post-procedure vomiting without aspiration (n = 1). 87% had only a vague recall of the procedure or of any discomfort. Conclusion: A combination of amnesic and fentanyl prevented the recall of discomfort of nasoenteric intubation and infusion in most patients who had enteroclysis compared to diazepam. Most of the patients would undergo the procedure again, if needed.

  5. Conscious sedation for patients undergoing enteroclysis: Comparing the safety and patient-reported effectiveness of two protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the safety and patient-reported effectiveness of two regimens for conscious sedation during enteroclysis. Materials and methods: We surveyed two groups of outpatients and retrospectively reviewed procedure records for conscious sedation and complications. Patients were divided into Group One (received sedative/amnesic diazepam), and Group Two, (received amnesic/sedative, midazolam and analgesic fentanyl). Results: All enteroclyses were successfully completed; there were no hospital admissions due to complications. In Group One (n = 106), mean dose of diazepam was 12.7 mg. 25% had oxygen desaturation (n = 25), and post-procedure vomiting without aspiration (n = 1). 56% of outpatients completed phone surveys, and 68% recalled procedural discomfort. In Group Two (n = 45), mean doses were 3.9 mg midazolam and 108 mcg fentanyl. 31% had desaturation (n = 13), and post-procedure vomiting without aspiration (n = 1). 87% had only a vague recall of the procedure or of any discomfort. Conclusion: A combination of amnesic and fentanyl prevented the recall of discomfort of nasoenteric intubation and infusion in most patients who had enteroclysis compared to diazepam. Most of the patients would undergo the procedure again, if needed.

  6. Diseases of the small bowel in chronic diarrhea: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simadibrata

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic diarrhea in Asia is between 0.8-1.0%. The diseases and abnormalities according to the location, which can cause chronic diarrhea, are divided into three locations: the small bowel, the large bowel and extraintestinal. The small bowel diseases include infectious and non-infectious diseases. The infectious diseases are bacterial infections, parasitic infections etc. The non-infectious diseases include of Crohn’s disease, Celiac sprue, NSAID enteropathy, lactose intolerance, benign tumor, carcinoid tumor, carcinoma, post surgery complications, laxative etc. The approaches to diagnosis include good anamnesis, careful physical examination, supporting laboratory tests, more specialized supporting examinations including X-ray of the colon, esophagogastroduodenum follow-through, enteroclysis, ileo-colonoscopy and endoscopy on the upper portion of the digestive tract including the small intestine with biopsy for histopathology examinations. The treatment for chronic diarrhea is divided into supportive and causal therapy. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 179-89 Keywords: small bowel, chronic diarrhea, approaches to diagnosis, treatment

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeab, Dhafer A., E-mail: dhafer_ahmed@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dick, Elizabeth; Sergot, Antoni A.; Sundblon, Lauren; Gedroyc, Wady [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  9. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    radiation and availability of a variety of oral contrast agents, MR is well suited to play a critical role in the imaging of small bowel disorders. In this article we will review the technical issues related to the performance of MR enterography and enteroclysis and discuss the role and controversies of using MR in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Antenatal diagnosis of intestinal malrotation on fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biyyam, Deepa R. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States); Dighe, Manjiri [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Siebert, Joseph R. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Laboratories, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington, Department of Pathology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    We report a case of intestinal malrotation without any associated GI tract complications diagnosed antenatally by fetal MRI. Antenatal US revealed a midline stomach. Subsequent fetal MRI confirmed the midline stomach and, in addition, revealed all loops of small bowel to the right of the midline and all large bowel to the left. All these features were consistent with intestinal malrotation. There was no abnormal bowel wall thickening, bowel dilatation, ascites or polyhydramnios. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of intestinal malrotation without associated GI tract complications diagnosed antenatally on fetal MRI. (orig.)

  11. Antenatal diagnosis of intestinal malrotation on fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of intestinal malrotation without any associated GI tract complications diagnosed antenatally by fetal MRI. Antenatal US revealed a midline stomach. Subsequent fetal MRI confirmed the midline stomach and, in addition, revealed all loops of small bowel to the right of the midline and all large bowel to the left. All these features were consistent with intestinal malrotation. There was no abnormal bowel wall thickening, bowel dilatation, ascites or polyhydramnios. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of intestinal malrotation without associated GI tract complications diagnosed antenatally on fetal MRI. (orig.)

  12. Role of MRI in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional imaging of Crohn's disease has relied on barium and computed tomography (CT) examinations. In recent years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an imaging method that can be used in the diagnosis and assessment of Crohn's disease. The advantages of MRI include lack of ionizing radiation and its superior tissue contrast resolution. The clinical progression of Crohn's disease can be variable, and MRI can be used to assess inflammatory status, disease progression, and complications of Crohn's disease. MRI of the small bowel is an evolving technique and it has the potential to become the preferred technique for imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease in the future

  13. The role of nuclear medicine in inflammatory bowel disease. A review with experiences of aspecific bowel activity using immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) needs a complex diagnostic work-up. Beside verifying the disease itself, it is fundamental to assess disease extent and activity and to detect associated complications, to find the most effective treatment and for follow up. Scintigraphy with radiolabelled leukocytes is able to provide a complete survey of the whole intestinal tract, both the small and large bowel, and detects septic complications successfully with negligible risk. Radionuclide procedures are useful in establishing or ruling out IBD in patients with intestinal complaints, in assessing disease severity, and in the evaluation of extraintestinal septic complications. Widely available radionuclide procedures are discussed, i.e. scintigraphy by 111Indium oxime or 99mTechnetium HMPAO labelled white blood cells and immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies. Advantages and disadvantages of all three methods are stressed out. Patients and methods: The immunoscintigraphies with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies (ANTI-GRANULOCYTE[reg] BW 250/183) of 27 patients with suspicion of IBD were retrospectively analysed. Planar anterior and posterior images were obtained 4 and 24 h postinjection, respectively. The bowel was divided into six segments and the activity was visually graded with reference to bone marrow in each segments. The scans were compared with the results of radiological and endoscopical investigations. The diagnosis of IBD was proved or ruled out by means of enteroclysis, large bowel enema or endoscopy. Results: In the 27 patients, 74 bowel segments with increased activity were detected. In the case of 30 segments in 16 patients, bowel inflammation was revealed by the other methods (true positives). In the case of 44 bowel segments, no underlying bowel inflammation could be verified, and these activities were regarded as aspecific activity. We could not differentiate between true positive and aspecific activity based on scan pattern

  14. Multidetector CT and MRI in diseases of the GI tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of spiral scanning then multidetector technologies, the accuracy for diagnosing digestive tract diseases with CT has been highly improved, and CT is used more and more in the evaluation of patients with suspected gastrointestinal disorders. CT is able to demonstrate both the intramural and the extra-mural components of the disease, and has a major role in the preoperative staging and the follow-up Improvements of CT protocols, such as CT-enteroclysis, or multiplanar 2D and 3D post-processing, including now techniques for 'virtual endoscopy', lead to discuss new indications in which CT could now compete with conventional X-rays series and video-endoscopy. This precise study of the digestive wall, the peri-digestive fat, the digestive tract blood supply, may be performed by MRI, under the condition of access to high level machines and standardized protocols. MR-enteroclysis and MR-virtual colonoscopy could be performed with much lower risk for the patient, in terms of radiation dose or contrast adverse effects. Endo-luminal coils should give to MR an ultra-high resolution for analysing the different layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Learning objectives: to review how to perform CT and MRI protocols for digestive tract imaging, to recognize the CT arid MR patterns of the main digestive tract diseases, to discuss the value, limits and role of CT and MR in digestive tract diseases, to discuss the potential role of CT and MR new technological developments for digestive tract imaging in the upcoming future Conclusion: CT is nowadays a modality of choice for digestive imaging. Improvements in technologies and indications, the necessary discussion of the risks and benefits for the patient should let the radiologists consider MRI in gastrointestinal disorders as an important part of the routine activity in clinical MRI. (authors)

  15. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  16. Large bowel resection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000151.htm Large bowel resection - discharge To use the sharing features ... surgery to remove all or part of your large intestine (large bowel). You may also have had ...

  17. Large bowel resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002941.htm Large bowel resection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Large bowel resection is surgery to remove all or ...

  18. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intolerance Malabsorption Narcotic Bowel Syndrome Radiation Therapy Injury Short Bowel Syndrome Symptoms & Causes Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  19. The Bowel Microbiota and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald W. Tannock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The human bowel contains a large and biodiverse bacterial community known as the microbiota or microbiome. It seems likely that the microbiota, fractions of the microbiota, or specific species comprising the microbiota provide the antigenic fuel that drives the chronic immune inflammation of the bowel mucosa that is characteristic of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. At least twenty years of microbiological research have been expended on analysis of the composition of the bowel microbiota of inflammatory bowel disease patients in comparison to that of control subjects. Despite extensive speculations about the aetiological role of dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases, knowledge that can be easily translated into effective remedies for patients has not eventuated. The causes of this failure may be due to poorly defined and executed bacteriological studies, as well as the overwhelming complexity of a biome that contains hundreds of bacterial species and trillions of bacterial cells.

  20. Beneficial Effects of Combining Computed Tomography Enteroclysis/Enterography with Capsule Endoscopy for Screening Tumor Lesions in the Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Shibata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the efficacy of using computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography (CTE, capsule endoscopy (CE, and CTE with CE for diagnosing tumor lesions in the small intestine. Materials and Methods. We included 98 patients who underwent CE during the observation period and were subjected to CTE at our hospital from April 2008 to May 2014. Results. CTE had a significantly higher sensitivity than CE (84.6% versus 46.2%, P=0.039, but there were no significant differences in specificity, positive or negative predictive values, or diagnostic accuracy rates. The sensitivity of CTE/CE was 100%, again significantly higher than that of CE P=0.002. The difference in specificity between CTE/CE and CE was not significant, but there were significant differences in positive predictive values (100% for CTE/CE versus 66.7% for CE, P=0.012, negative predictive values (100% versus 92.1%, P=0.008, and diagnostic accuracy rate (100% versus 89.8%, P=0.001. The diagnostic accuracy rate was also significantly higher in CTE/CE versus CTE (100% versus 95.9%, P=0.043. Conclusion. Our findings suggested that a combination of CTE and CE was useful for screening tumor lesions in the small intestine. This trial is registered with number UMIN000016154.

  1. CT findings in acute small bowel diverticulitis; Computertomographie bei akuter Duenndarmdivertikulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferstl, F.J.; Obert, R. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinisches Zentrum (RNZ) am St. Theresienkrankenhaus Nuernberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Small bowel diverticulitis is a rare cause of an acute abdomen. Originating from acquired diverticula of the jejunum, less often of the ileum, or Meckel diverticulum, the symptoms are non-specific, simulating other acute inflammatory disorders, such as appendicitis, cholecystitis or colonic diverticulitis. The diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis is solely based on radiologic findings, with computed tomography (CT) regarded as the method of choice. In recent years, a number of case reports have described the spectrum of the CT features in acute small bowel diverticulitis and its dependence on the severity of the inflammatory process. Typical findings are an inflamed diverticulum, inflammatory mesenteric infiltration, extraluminal gas collection and mural edema of adjacent small bowel loops with resultant separation of bowel loops. An enterolith is rarely found in an inflamed diverticulum. Complications include abscesses, fistulae, small bowel obstruction and free perforation with peritonitis. Small bowel diverticulitis can be a diagnostic problem if it involves the terminal ileum or Meckel's diverticulum. For preoperative confirmation of the presumed diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis on CT, an enteroclysis for acquired diverticula or a technetium scan for Meckel's diverticulum should be performed. We present the CT findings in three patients of acute small bowel diverticulitis, two affecting the jejunum and one a Meckel's diverticulum. (orig.) [German] Die akute Duenndarmdivertikulitis ist eine seltene Ursache eines akuten Abdomens. Ausgehend von den erworbenen Divertikeln des Jejunums, seltener des Ileums, oder von einem Meckel-Divertikel, manifestiert sich die Divertikulitis klinisch durch eine unspezifische Symptomatik, die zuerst an die haeufigeren, akutentzuendlichen Erkrankungen des Abdomens wie z. B. Appendizitis, Cholezystitis oder Kolondivertikulitis denken laesst. Die Duenndarmdivertikulitis kann praeoperativ nur durch

  2. MRI of sequela of transverse myelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.C.; Lee, S.K.; Ho, Y.J. (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Radiology); Lee, K.R. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Hsin-Chu (Taiwan). Inst. of Life Science); Mak, S.C.; Chi, C.S. (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1992-09-01

    A 4-year-old boy developed acute paraplegia, associated with sensory impairement and bowel and urinary dysfunction after an URI. MRI showed diffuse hyperintensity in T2WI in the spinal cord below the T6 level. Acute transverse myelitis was diagnosed based on the clinical presentations and MRI findings. The patient had poor recovery and two months later, a follow-up MRI disclosed a severer diffuse atrophic change of the spinal cord in the affected segment. (orig.).

  3. MRI of sequela of transverse myelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 4-year-old boy developed acute paraplegia, associated with sensory impairement and bowel and urinary dysfunction after an URI. MRI showed diffuse hyperintensity in T2WI in the spinal cord below the T6 level. Acute transverse myelitis was diagnosed based on the clinical presentations and MRI findings. The patient had poor recovery and two months later, a follow-up MRI disclosed a severer diffuse atrophic change of the spinal cord in the affected segment. (orig.)

  4. Short bowel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes some aspects of short bowel syndrome. When approximately 1 m or less small bowel is retained after extensive resection, a condition called short bowel syndrome is present. Since the advent of parenteral nutrition, the prognosis of patients with a very short bowel has dramatically improved. Patients with 40 to 100 cm remaining jejunum and/or ileum can generally be maintained with oral nutrition due to increased absorption of the small bowel remnant as result of intestinal adaptation. This study reports clinical, biochemical and nutritional aspects of short bowel patients on oral or parenteral nutrition, emphasizing data on absorption of various nutrients and on bone metabolism. Furthermore, some technical apsects concerning long-term parenteral nutrition are discussed. (Auth.)

  5. Short Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include nutritional support medications surgery intestinal transplant Nutritional Support The main treatment for short bowel syndrome is nutritional support, which may include the following: Oral rehydration. Adults ...

  6. Small Bowel Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACG on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Podcasts and Videos GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity © ...

  7. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiki, Hassan [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Fidler, Jeff [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: fidler.jeff@mayo.edu

    2009-03-15

    ionizing radiation and availability of a variety of oral contrast agents, MR is well suited to play a critical role in the imaging of small bowel disorders. In this article we will review the technical issues related to the performance of MR enterography and enteroclysis and discuss the role and controversies of using MR in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Follow up of Crohn's disease under therapy with hydro-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of typical MRI-findings in patients with Crohn's disease receiving therapy.Correlation with the course of disease.Patients and methods 81 follow-up MRI-studies in 25 patients conducted within a period of 3 weeks to 4 years were evaluated retrospectively.Therapy consisted in various combinations of antibiotics and immunosuppressive agents and if necessary operation. The findings of the MRI-studies were correlated with clinical data (e.g.operation of Crohn's complications) and the subjective perception during therapy. The morphological substrate of Crohn's disease in the Hydro-MRI images is reliably detected. Especially in a delineation of extraluminal changes MRI is superior to endoscopy and enteroclysis.Independent from clinical symptoms short- and middleterm follow-up showed inflammatory changes of the intestinal wall in all 25 patients. In 24/81 studies there was persistence or even progression of Crohn's disease in the MRI-studies, although patients were free of symptoms by the time of image acquisition. Hydro-MRI is a modality for the evaluation of inflammatory changes in patients with Crohn's disease.Independent from clinical symptoms persistence of Crohn's disease is detectable. (orig.)

  9. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Symptoms The most common symptoms are: Abdominal ...

  10. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Incontinence and Aging Managing Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on ... is the word used to describe loss of control over when and where we go to the bathroom. It is also called accidental bowel leakage, or ...

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods are linked to other digestive conditions like lactose intolerance or celiac disease , though, so it's important to ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Lactose Intolerance Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcers Digestive System Eating Well ...

  12. Small bowel resection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incision is red, warm, swollen, or more painful Short of breath or chest pain Swollen legs or pain in your calves Alternative Names Small intestine surgery - discharge; Bowel resection - small intestine - discharge; Resection of ...

  13. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sclafani, Francesco; Peckitt, Clare [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cunningham, David, E-mail: david.cunningham@rmh.nhs.uk [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Tait, Diana [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Giralt, Jordi [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Department of Medical Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Glimelius, Bengt [University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Keränen, Susana Roselló [Biomedical Research Institute INCLIVA, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University of Valencia (Spain); Bateman, Andrew [Southampton General Hospital, Cancer Sciences Unit, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Hickish, Tamas [Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Oncology, Bournemouth University (United Kingdom); Tabernero, Josep [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Department of Medical Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Thomas, Janet; Brown, Gina; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-01

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term.

  14. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, E.; Hurwitz, B

    1992-01-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdomin...

  16. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Fornasa; Chiara Benassuti; Luca Benazzato

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD). Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged prese...

  17. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  18. Bowel vaginoplasty in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarin Yogesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe our experience with bowel vaginoplasty done in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study of eight children aged 10 months to 8 years, who underwent bowel vaginoplasty over a period of 5 years (2000-2005. The indications of bowel vaginoplasty included anorectovestibular fistula (ARVF associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome (n=6 and cloaca (n=2. The bowel segment used for vaginoplasty included colon (n=3, ileum (n=2 and duplicated rectum (n=1. In two patients of ARVF associated with uterovaginal agenesis, the distal- most part of ARVF was transected at the level of peritoneal reflection and left as neovagina, whereas the proximal bowel was pulled through at the proposed neo-anal site. All the patients were advised daily home dilatation of the neo vaginal orifice with Hegar′s dilators, for a period of six weeks. RESULTS: Bowel vaginoplasty was done in eight patients. None had any significant per-operative complication. Two patients had abdominal wound dehiscence, requiring secondary suturing. Two patients had mucosal prolapse of the neovagina, which required trimming. One patient died two months after discharge, because of meningitis. Out of the eight patients, seven are in regular follow-up. Six patients have neovagina, cosmetically acceptable to the parents; all have been radiologically proven to have adequate length. One patient had unacceptable perineal appearance with nipple-like vaginal orifice and scarred perineal wound, that merits a revision. None of the patients had vaginal stenosis and excessive mucus discharge, during follow-up visits. Although post surgical results are acceptable to the parents cosmetically, the sexual and psychological outcome is yet to be assessed. Conclusions: Bowel vaginoplasty is a safe and acceptable procedure to treat the pediatric patients of uterovaginal agenesis and cloaca.

  19. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  20. MRI of vulvar Crohn disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crohn disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the distal small bowel and colon. While certain extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease are relatively common and well-known, others, such as metastatic cutaneous involvement, are quite rare and may be difficult to recognize, particularly in the pediatric population. This case report illustrates the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of vulvar region cutaneous Crohn disease in an 11-year-old girl. (orig.)

  1. Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sustain life. Diarrhea is the main symptom of short bowel syndrome. Other symptoms may include cramping bloating heartburn weakness and fatigue vomiting excessive gas foul-smelling stool Short bowel syndrome is uncommon and can occur with Crohn’s ...

  2. Understanding Bowel Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will receive specific instructions. In general, here is what you can expect: Your doctor will prescribe the type of bowel prep that is best for you. ... out if you have any out-ofpocket costs. What determines the type of prep I get? Your medical condition is the most important factor in ...

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... epidemiology of IBD....

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Major, Giles; Robin C. Spiller

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response,...

  5. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  6. Computed tomography of the bowel: A prospective comparison study between four techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paparo, Francesco [Department of Radiology, E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Mura della Cappuccine 14, 16128 Genoa (Italy); Garlaschi, Alessandro [School of Radiology, University of Genoa, Via Leon Battista Alberti 4, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Biscaldi, Ennio; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Department of Radiology, E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Mura della Cappuccine 14, 16128 Genoa (Italy); Cevasco, Luca [School of Radiology, University of Genoa, Via Leon Battista Alberti 4, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Rollandi, Gian Andrea, E-mail: gianandrea.rollandi@galliera.it [Department of Radiology, E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Mura della Cappuccine 14, 16128 Genoa (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Objectives: The major objective was to prospectively compare the grade of bowel distension obtained with four different computed tomography (CT) techniques dedicated for the examination of the small intestine (CT enteroclysis [CTE] and enterography [CTe]), of the colon (CT with water enema [CT-WE]), or both (CTe with water enema [CTe-WE]). The secondary objective was to assess patients’ tolerance toward each CT protocol. Materials and methods: Recruitment was designed to obtain four groups of the same number of patients (30). Each group corresponded to a specific CT technique, for a total of 120 consecutive outpatients (65 male and 55 female, mean age 51.09 ± 13.36 years). CTE was performed after injection of methylcellulose through a nasojejunal tube, while in the CTe protocol a polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution was orally administered to patients prior to the CT acquisition. In the CT-WE protocol intraluminal contrast (water) was administered only by a rectal enema, while CTe-WE technique included both a rectal water enema and oral ingestion of neutral contrast material to obtain a simultaneous distension of small and large bowel. CT studies were reviewed in consensus by two gastrointestinal radiologists who performed a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bowel distension on a per segment basis. The presence and type of adverse effects were recorded. Results: CTE provided the best distension of jejunal loops (median diameter 27 mm, range 17–32 mm) when compared to all the other techniques (p < 0.0001). The frequency of patients with an adequate distension of the terminal ileum was not significantly different among the four groups (p = 0.0608). At both quantitative and qualitative analysis CT-WE and CTe-WE determined a greater and more consistent luminal filling of the large intestine than that provided by both CTE and CTe (p < 0.0001 for all colonic segments). Adverse effects were more frequent in patients belonging to the CTE group (p < 0

  7. Computed tomography of the bowel: A prospective comparison study between four techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The major objective was to prospectively compare the grade of bowel distension obtained with four different computed tomography (CT) techniques dedicated for the examination of the small intestine (CT enteroclysis [CTE] and enterography [CTe]), of the colon (CT with water enema [CT-WE]), or both (CTe with water enema [CTe-WE]). The secondary objective was to assess patients’ tolerance toward each CT protocol. Materials and methods: Recruitment was designed to obtain four groups of the same number of patients (30). Each group corresponded to a specific CT technique, for a total of 120 consecutive outpatients (65 male and 55 female, mean age 51.09 ± 13.36 years). CTE was performed after injection of methylcellulose through a nasojejunal tube, while in the CTe protocol a polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution was orally administered to patients prior to the CT acquisition. In the CT-WE protocol intraluminal contrast (water) was administered only by a rectal enema, while CTe-WE technique included both a rectal water enema and oral ingestion of neutral contrast material to obtain a simultaneous distension of small and large bowel. CT studies were reviewed in consensus by two gastrointestinal radiologists who performed a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bowel distension on a per segment basis. The presence and type of adverse effects were recorded. Results: CTE provided the best distension of jejunal loops (median diameter 27 mm, range 17–32 mm) when compared to all the other techniques (p < 0.0001). The frequency of patients with an adequate distension of the terminal ileum was not significantly different among the four groups (p = 0.0608). At both quantitative and qualitative analysis CT-WE and CTe-WE determined a greater and more consistent luminal filling of the large intestine than that provided by both CTE and CTe (p < 0.0001 for all colonic segments). Adverse effects were more frequent in patients belonging to the CTE group (p < 0

  8. MRI diagnosis of fetal congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of MRI on fetal congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Methods: Fourteen pregnant women with gestation from 16 to 39 weeks were studied with a 1.5 T superconductive MR unit within 24 to 48 hours after ultrasound studies. Fast-imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA), single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) and T1-weighted fast inversion recovery motion insensitive (FIRM) sequences were employed on the axial, coronal and sagittal planes of the fetal brain, thorax and abdomen, especially the thorax. Prenatal US and MR imaging findings were compared with postnatal diagnoses (13 fetuses) or autopsy (1 fetus). US, MR imaging and surgery were used for postnatal evaluation. Results: Fourteen pregnant women (12 with a single fetus and 2 with twin fetuses) were studied. There were 12 fetuses (in 2 cases, being one of twins) with a left-sided and 2 with right-sided diaphragmatic hernias. For all cases, the prenatal MRI diagnosis was correct when compared with postnatal diagnosis or autopsy. Two CDHs were missed and 2 were misdiagnosed by US. Intrathoracic herniated organs in 12 left CDH included the colon (n=1), the stomach (n=1), the bowel (n=5), or both the stomach and bowel (n=5). Intrathoracic herniated organs in 2 right CDH included the bowel (n=1), or the bowel and the right lobe of the liver (n=1). Conclusion: Prenatal MRI is effective in the assessment of fetal congenital diaphragmatic hernia. (authors)

  9. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , plasma and extracellular volume, balance function, and biochemical parameters were measured. RESULTS: Bowel preparation led to a significant decrease in exercise capacity (median, 9 percent) and weight (median, 1.2 kg). Plasma osmolality was significantly increased from 287 to 290 mmol kg(-1), as well as...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... increased phosphate and urea concentrations, whereas calcium and potassium concentrations decreased significantly after bowel preparation. No differences in plasma or extracellular volumes were seen. Orthostatic tolerance and balance function did not change after bowel preparation. CONCLUSIONS: Bowel...

  10. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery. (author)

  11. Short bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2012-02-01

    The short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption following intestinal resection where there is less than 200 cm of intestinal length. The management of short bowel syndrome can be challenging and is best managed by a specialised multidisciplinary team. A good understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of resection of different portions of the small intestine is necessary to anticipate and prevent, where possible, consequences of SBS. Nutrient absorption and fluid and electrolyte management in the initial stages are critical to stabilisation of the patient and to facilitate the process of adaptation. Pharmacological adjuncts to promote adaptation are in the early stages of development. Primary restoration of bowel continuity, if possible, is the principle mode of surgical treatment. Surgical procedures to increase the surface area of the small intestine or improve its function may be of benefit in experienced hands, particularly in the paediatric population. Intestinal transplant is indicated at present for patients who have failed to tolerate long-term parenteral nutrition but with increasing experience, there may be a potentially expanded role for its use in the future.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Enteroclysis in the Diagnosis of Small-Intestinal Crohn's Disease: Diagnostic Accuracy and Inter- and Intra-observer Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and inter- and intra-observer agreement of magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in patients with or without Crohn's disease of the small intestine. Material and Methods: 60 consecutive patients with or without Crohn's disease examined with MRE were included. Two observers independently reviewed the MRE examinations, searching for 12 pathological signs. The reference standard was ileoscopy or surgery of the terminal ileum performed in 41 patients. Results: Crohn's disease of the small intestine was found in 24 (40%) patients. MRE findings of increased intestinal wall thickness, intestinal wall enhancement, intestinal wall ulcer, and inflammatory activity of the terminal ileum showed high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Intestinal stenosis had sensitivities ranging from 43% to 100%, depending on the cut-off value. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was good or excellent for most pathological signs. However, observer agreement of intestinal wall edema was only fair and moderate. Conclusion: MRE evaluated Crohn's disease with a high diagnostic accuracy in the terminal ileum. Most MRE variables were evaluated with good or excellent observer agreement, indicating that the method was highly reproducible. Our study supports the notion that MRE is an appropriate method for diagnosing Crohn's disease

  13. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  14. Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your anus. The doctor will fill your large intestine with barium . You may be asked to change positions several times during the test. ​​​​​ ​February 23, 2015​​​​ Previous: Symptoms and Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Next: Treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Digestive Disease ...

  15. Small bowel transplantation: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron); E. Heineman (Erik); R.L. Marquet (Richard)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSmall bowel transplantation (SBT) would, in theory, be the treatment of choice for patients suffering from the short bowel syndrome. Although SBT has been done with a considerable degree of success in some centers [36,145], it is by no means an established or widely applicable therapy fo

  16. Does hydro-MRI allow an assessment of the activity in Crohn's disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the value of hydro-MRI in the assessment of the activity of Crohn's disease. Materials and methods: After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2,5% mannitol solution, axial and coronal breathhold sequences (T2W HASTE±FS, contrast-enhanced T1W FLASH FS) were acquired in 63 patients with Crohn's disease at 1.0 T. The enhancement of the bowel wall was correlated with other MRI findings, with the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), and the C-reactive protein (CRP). Results: In Crohn's disease, contrast enhancement of the affected bowel wall is markedly increased in comparison with the normal bowel wall (+80±23% vs. +43±11%; p=8x10-11). Positive correlations could be established between the increase of bowel wall enhancement and other MRI findings. Between the increase of bowel wall enhancement and the CDAI a poor correlation was found (r=0.25; p=0.046). There was no statistical correlation between the increase of bowel wall enhancement and the CRP (r=0.09; p=0.24). Conclusion: Hydro-MRI allows an assessment of the activity of Crohn's disease. (orig.)

  17. Bowel imaging - a reevaluation. Pt. 1. Conventional techniques and ultrasonography; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Darms - eine Neubewertung. T. 1. Konventionelle Techniken und Ultraschall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohl, C.; Muehlenbruch, G.; Schmidt, T.; Guenther, R.W. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Haage, P. [Universitaetsklinik Witten/Herdecke (Germany). HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2007-07-15

    For decades fluoroscopy was the only adequate imaging modality in the diagnostic evaluation of the bowel. In the 1980 s new techniques such as MRI, CT and flexible fiber-optic endoscopy were introduced into the daily routine and revolutionized bowel imaging. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is the latest technical innovation for visualizing the bowel. Today a broad range of different imaging methods is available. This article provides a review of state-of-the-art bowel imaging and is divided into two parts. The first part addresses conventional X-ray techniques and ultrasonography and the second part discusses bowel imaging with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The goal of this article is to present the imaging techniques and to discuss them in the context of competitive methods. (orig.)

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain-gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  19. Imaging the small bowel.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-03-01

    Radiologic investigations continue to play a pivotal role in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the small intestine despite enhancement of capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy. Imaging techniques continue to evolve and new techniques in MRI in particular, are being developed.

  20. Accuracy of abdominal auscultation for bowel obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Birger Michael; Rud, Bo; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy and inter-observer variation of bowel sound assessment in patients with clinically suspected bowel obstruction. METHODS: Bowel sounds were recorded in patients with suspected bowel obstruction using a Littmann(®) Electronic Stethoscope. The recordings were processed...

  1. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging colonography with conventional colonoscopy for the assessment of intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Schreyer, A G; Rath, H C; Kikinis, R.; Völk, M; Schölmerich, J; Feuerbach, S; Rogler, G; Seitz, J; Herfarth, H

    2005-01-01

    Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based colonography represents a new imaging tool which has mainly been investigated for polyp screening. To evaluate this approach for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we compared MRI based colonography with conventional colonoscopy for assessing the presence and extent of colonic inflammation.

  2. Fetal MRI clues to diagnose cloacal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenatal US detection of cloacal malformations is challenging and rarely confirms this diagnosis. To define the prenatal MRI findings in cloacal malformations. We performed a retrospective study of patients with cloacal malformations who had pre- and post-natal assessment at our institution. Fetal MRI was obtained in six singleton pregnancies between 26 and 32 weeks of gestation. Imaging analysis was focused on the distal bowel, the urinary system and the genital tract and compared with postnatal clinical, radiological and surgical diagnoses. The distal bowel was dilated and did not extend below the bladder in five fetuses. They had a long common cloacal channel (3.5-6 cm) and a rectum located over the bladder base. Only one fetus with a posterior cloacal variant had a normal rectum. Three fetuses had increased T2 signal in the bowel and two increased T1/decreased T2 signal bladder content. All had renal anomalies, four had abnormal bladders and two had hydrocolpos. Assessment of the anorectal signal and pelvic anatomy during the third trimester helps to detect cloacal malformations in the fetus. The specificity for this diagnosis was highly increased when bowel fluid or bladder meconium content was identified. (orig.)

  3. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenocarcinoma of small bowel is generally a rather rare primary tumour of small bowel with a prevalence rate of 0.5 - 3.0 / 100.000 population, but the most frequent tumour of small intestine. It more often involves the duodenum and jejunum than the ileum. The aim of this paper is also to point out the value of small bowel follow through (SBFT) in the diagnosis of stenosing lesions. An 83 - year old male patient suffered from abdominal pain, malaise, vomiting, cachexia and diarrhoea for 3 months. The result of occult blood testing was negative. Haemoglobin level was normal. Proctoscopy, colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and ultrasonography (US) did not explain the patient's problems. Ileus of the small bowel was established with abdominal plain film. Small bowel follow through (SBFT) and computer tomography (CT) showed a stenosing tumour in the jejunum. Adenocarcinoma of the small bowel was established with histological examination after resection of the tumor. SBFT, with manual compression of all segments of the small bowel, can be a very accurate diagnostic investigation for evaluation of stenosing lesions in this part of the intestine. (author)

  4. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... fructose caused marked abdominal distress in patients with demonstrable malabsorption. Ingestion of sucrose in these patients gave less pronounced symptoms of abdominal distress. Malabsorption of a 5-g dose of sorbitol could be detected in 8 of 13 patients. Mixtures of 25 g of fructose and 5 g of sorbitol...... caused significantly increased abdominal distress, and more than additive malabsorption was found in several cases. The present study shows that pronounced gastrointestinal distress may be provoked by malabsorption of small amounts of fructose, sorbitol, and fructose-sorbitol mixtures in patients with...

  5. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  6. Modern imaging methods for diagnostic evaluation of Crohn's disease: The value of MRI as compared to conventional methods; Moderne Bildgebung bei Morbus Crohn: Stellenwert der MRT im Vergleich zu den konventionellen Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, A.; Wruk, D.; Nuessle, K.; Potthast, S.; Brambs, H.J. [Ulm Univ. (DE). Abt. Radiologie 1 (Roentgendiagnostik); Reinshagen, M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Innere Medizin 1

    2000-07-01

    Only recently was the magnetic resonance imaging method (MRI) optimized to an extent advocating its application as a tool in clinical routine examinations for diagnostic evaluation of Crohn's disease. The paper gives a comparative outline analysis of currently applied diagnostic methods, such as ultrasonography, enteroclysis, and CT, and the progress achieved in clinical research into the applicability of MRI. (orig./CB) [German] Erst in juengster Zeit konnte die Methode soweit optimiert werden, dass ueber ihren Einsatz in der klinischen Routine bei der Morbus Crohn Diagnostik diskutiert wird. Es wird ein Abriss ueber die derzeit zur Verfuegung stehenden Verfahren Sonographie, Enteroklyse und CT gegeben werden und die Methodik und der Stand der klinischen Forschung der MR-Diagnostik erlaeutert. (orig.)

  7. Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children Page Content On this page: What is irritable ... GI tract [ Top ] How common is IBS in children? Limited information is available about the number of ...

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. IBD (which is not the same thing as irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS), can cause more serious problems than ...

  9. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bruce D. Naliboff, PhD, Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology in the Dept. of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, ... Gynecological Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptom Diary Testing in IBS Changes You Should Not Ignore if ...

  10. Short bowel syndrome in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matarese, Laura E; Jeppesen, Palle B; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with broad variation in disease severity arising from different types of intestinal resection. The spectrum of malabsorption ranges from intestinal insufficiency to intestinal failure. Individualized patient strategies involving modifications...

  11. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of IBS Who We Are Contact Us Donate Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Sleep difficulties are common ... More: Treating Pain in IBS How to improve sleep While there are a variety of medications that ...

  12. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    J. Worsøe; Rasmussen, M.; Christensen, P.; Krogh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD). It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NB...

  13. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris Irene

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coel...

  14. Small Bowel Review - Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, ABR; Wild, G.

    1997-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the study of the small bowel. Part I of this two-part review of the small bowel examines carbohydrates, including brush border membrane hydrolysis and sugar transport; amino acids, dipeptides, proteins and food allergy, with a focus on glutamine, peptides and macromolecules, and nucleosides, nucleotides and polyamines; salt and water absorption, and diarrhea, including antidiarrheal therapy and oral rehydration treatment; lipids (digestion and absorption...

  15. Abdominal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney and ureter Insulinoma Islet of Langerhans tumor Medullary cystic disease Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Multiple endocrine neoplasia ( ... kidney and ureter Insulinoma Kidney stones Lymphofollicular ... kidney disease MRI Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Multiple endocrine ...

  16. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  17. Enteroelysis and spiral CT examination in diagnosis and evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: During the last few decades introducing many of new radiologic methods, diagnostic conditions and facilities of Crohn's disease has became markedly improved. Appropriate using of these techniques definitely modifies the management of patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease serving reliable information about extent, severity and possible complications of disease. Enteroclysis and Computed tomography are the two major and basic methods to disclose or confirm diagnosis of Crohn's disease, obtain appropriate inforination about disease either with mucosal, transmural or extraintestinal manifestation. Methods and patients: We evaluated 281 patients who were referred in our institution under suspicion of Crohn's disease. Enteroclysis and abdominal spiral CT in all cases were carried out usually within 1 week. The 172 patients underwent abdominal spiral CT as the primary examination to evaluate diagnostic value of spiral CT in this entity, while 109 patients had enteroclysis followed by abdominal CT. In 11 cases we also perforined CT enteroclysis with administration of 0.5% methylcellulose solution thorough nasojejunal tube controlled by electric motor driven contrast pump. Results were compared with final clinical, pathological or surgical data were available. Results: From the 281 patients eventually 74 proved Crohn's disease; sensitivity and specificity of enteroclysis proved to be 96 and 98%, while spiral CT sensitivity and specificity was 94 and 95%, respectively. Enteroclysis was superior to the spiral CT in demonstration of early lesions and functional disorders, while spiral CT proved to be essential in evaluation of transmural and extraintestinal complications. Conclusions: Regarding enteroclysis and spiral CT as complementary methods, they provide excellent results in diagnosis of Crohn's disease

  18. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuhal Ozisler; Kurtulus Koklu; Sumru Ozel; Sibel Unsal-Delialioglu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efifcacy of bowel program on gas-trointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-ifve spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysrelfexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral med-ication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identiifed in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were signiifcantly decreased and constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were signiifcantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  19. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Ozisler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80% of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55 and incontinence (42%, 23/55 were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55 and after (73%, 40/55 bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  20. Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenfield, C.; Aguilar Ramirez, J R; Pounder, R E; Williams, T.; Danvers, M; Marper, S R; Noone, P

    1983-01-01

    Stools from 109 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (13.4%) contained Clostridium difficile or its toxin, an incidence similar to the stools of 99 control patients with diarrhoea (11.9%), but significantly higher than the stools of 77 control patients with a normal bowel habit (1.4%). Sixty-six per cent of the diarrhoea controls, but only 11% of the inflammatory bowel disease patients, reported recent antibiotic use: however, 67% of inflammatory bowel disease patients were taking sulphas...

  1. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Walsham NE; Sherwood RA

    2016-01-01

    Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Acc...

  2. Small bowel neoplasia in coeliac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rampertab, S D; Forde, K A; Green, P. H. R.

    2003-01-01

    There is an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with coeliac disease compared with the normal population. It has been suggested that adenocarcinoma of the small intestine in coeliac disease arises through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but there has been only one reported case of a small bowel adenoma in a patient with coeliac disease. We report three additional cases of a small bowel adenoma in the setting of coeliac disease. In addition, four cases of small bowel adenoca...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important ... MRI is often used for diagnosis or for monitoring disease. For example, if someone is having severe ...

  4. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  5. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  6. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  7. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  8. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  9. Hydro-MRI with fast sequences in Crohn's disease: Comparison with barium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the value of hydro-MRI with that of barium studies in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and methods: After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution, axial and coronal breathhold sequences (T2W HASTE±FS, contrast-enhanced T1W FLASH FS) were acquired in 46 patients with Crohn's disease at 1,0 T. The findings of hydro-MRI were compared with those of barium studies. Results: In the stomach and the small bowel, hydro-MRI and barium studies demonstrated similar numbers of Crohn's involvements (39 vs. 36); in the colon, hydro-MRI showed clearly more affections (23 vs. 10). Hydro-MRI showed 12.7 cm of inflamed bowel per patient, on average (barium studies: 10,4 cm; p=0,004). There was a good agreement between the two methods regarding the assessment of the extent of Crohn's disease and the severity of bowel stenoses (r=0.89 and 0.88, respectively). Conclusions: For the assessment of Crohn's disease, hydro-MRI is preferable to the barium study because of the superior imaging quality and the lack of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  10. Software-assisted quantitative analysis of small bowel motility compared to manual measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To validate a newly developed software prototype that automatically analyses small bowel motility by comparing it directly with manual measurement. Material and methods: Forty-five patients with clinical indication for small bowel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were retrospectively included in this institutional review board-approved study. MRI was performed using a 1.5 T system following a standard MR-enterography protocol. Small bowel motility parameters (contractions-per-minute, luminal diameter, amplitude) were measured three times each in identical segments using the manual and the semiautomatic software-assisted method. The methods were compared for agreement, repeatability, and time needed for each measurement. All parameters were compared between the methods. Results: A total of 91 small-bowel segments were analysed. No significant intra-individual difference (p > 0.05) was found for peristaltic frequencies between the methods (mean: 4.14/min manual; 4.22/min software-assisted). Amplitudes (5.14 mm; 5.57 mm) and mean lumen diameters (17.39 mm; 14.68) differed due to systematic differences in the definition of the bowel wall. Mean duration of single measurement was significantly (p < 0.01) shorter with the software (6.25 min; 1.30 min). The scattering of repeated measurements was significantly (p < 0.05) lower using the software. Conclusion: The software-assisted method accomplished highly reliable, fast and accurate measurement of small bowel motility. Measurement precision and duration differed significantly between the two methods in favour of the software-assisted technique

  11. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard proced...

  12. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonography is the method of choice for prenatal malformation screening, but it does not always provide sufficient information for correct diagnosis or adequate abnormality evaluation. Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to complete sonographic findings. It was initially used for evaluation of cerebral abnormalities but is increasingly being applied to other fetal areas. In vivo investigation of fetal brain maturation has been enhanced by MRI. An adequate analysis of fetal chest and abdomen can be achieved with fast T2-, T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The advantages include the great field of view and the excellent soft tissue contrast. This allows correct diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and evaluation of the consequences on pulmonary growth. Other pulmonary malformations, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration and brochogenic cysts, can also be easily identified. Renal position can be quickly determined using DWI sequences and renal agenesia can be easily diagnosed with only one sequence. Prenatal MRI is virtually as effective as postnatal examination, dispenses with transport of a potentially very ill newborn, and provides logistic advantages. Therefore, prenatal MRI is useful for adequate postnatal treatment of newborns with malformations. (orig.)

  13. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Roxana Georgescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nodosum and pyodermagangrenosum. The pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood but it seems that related mechanisms are involved in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment should be aimed at both the cutaneous manifestations and the bowel inflammation

  14. Dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tamboli, C P; Neut, C; Desreumaux, P; Colombel, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Abundant data have incriminated intestinal bacteria in the initiation and amplification stages of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the precise role of intestinal bacteria remains elusive. One theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of “protective” versus “harmful” intestinal bacteria—this concept has been termed “dysbiosis”. Arguments in support of this concept are discussed.

  15. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlin Xie; Steven H Itzkowitz

    2008-01-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Many of the molecular alterations responsible for sporadic colorectal cancer, namely chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation, also play a role in colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of CRC and degree of inflammation of the bowel. Chemoprevention includes aminosalicylates, ursodeoxycholic acid, and possibly folic acid and statins. To reduce CRC mortality in IBD, colonoscopic surveillance with random biopsies remains the major way to detect early mucosal dysplasia. When dysplasia is confirmed, proctocolectomy is considered for these patients. Patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease are at increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis patients with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal- anastomosis have a rather low risk of dysplasia in the ileal pouch, but the anal transition zone should be monitored periodically. Other extra intestinal cancers, such as hepatobiliary and hematopoietic cancer, have shown variable incidence rates. New endoscopic and molecular screening approaches may further refine our current surveillance guidelines and our understanding of the natural history of dysplasia.

  16. A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction in Adults: Left Paraduodenal Internal Hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Sardarian, Hossein; Maleki, Iradj; Mortazian, Meisam; Jafari, Ramezan; Tayebi, Pouya; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    A 47 years old lady presented with repeated intermittent, colicky, left upper, and periumblical abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting since two years prior to admission. Each episode of the pain spontaneously subsided after bilious vomiting. The patient had no history of surgery, abdominal trauma or intra-abdominal infection, weight loss or previous history for small bowel obstruction (SBO). MRI enterography was suggestive of internal hernia and surgery documented left paraduoden...

  17. The challenge of segmental small bowel motility quantitation using MR enterography

    OpenAIRE

    Menys, A.; Plumb, A.; Atkinson, D.; Taylor, S A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of “cine” MRI using segmental regions of interest (ROIs) has become increasingly popular for investigating bowel motility; however, variation in motility in healthy subjects both within and between scans remains poorly described. Methods: 20 healthy individuals (mean age, 28 years; 14, males) underwent MR enterography to acquire dynamic motility scans in both breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) on 2 occasions. Motility data were quantitatively assessed by placing four...

  18. Bowel resection in Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur-Rahman L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Although bowel resections are commonly done for congenital malformations in children in developed countries, they usually follow neglected and preventable acquired diseases of the intestine in developing countries. Objectives : To determine the indications and outcome of bowel resections in children of a developing country in a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Data of the patients operated (from birth to 15 years was retrospectively collected over eight years (January 1999 to December 2006. The biodata of children included the following: Indications for operation, type of operations, duration of admission, and outcome of treatment including complications. Patients with Hirschsprung′s disease were excluded from the study because bowel resection forms part of their definitive surgical management. Results : There were 70 patients (38 boys and 32 girls. The age ranged between four hours to 15 years (median, five months. There were 16 (22.9% neonates, 26 (37.1% infants, and 28 (40% grown children. The indications were congenital anomalies in the 16 neonates. Also, 23 (88.5% infants had intussusception, 2 (7.7% had midgut vovulusm and 1 (3.8% had congenital small intestine band. Among the grown children, typhoid ileal perforation (TIP was seen in 14 (50.0%, intussusception in 5 (17.9%, and other causes in nine patients. Overall, intussusception was the most common indication for bowel resection, followed by TIP. A total of 24 patients developed 33 complications. Complications included wound infection in 47.8% and anastomotic leak in 42.8%. The duration of admission ranged between 4-35 days (median, 15 days. The overall mortality was 17.1% -; which was highest among neonates (56.3%, followed by the infants (26.9% -. Conclusion : Bowel resections are mainly done for intussusception and complications of TIP at our centre. Late presentation, preexisting malnutrition, and nonavailability of parenteral nutrition

  19. The short-bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, J M

    1995-06-01

    Patients with a short bowel have usually had a bowel resection for Crohn's disease. Two types of short-bowel patient can be distinguished: those with a jejunostomy and those with their jejunum anastomosed to a functioning colon. Both types of patient have problems with macronutrient absorption, although those with a colon experience fewer problems because some energy from unabsorbed carbohydrate is salvaged in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have problems with large stomal losses of water, sodium and magnesium, whereas those with a jejuno-colic anastomosis rarely have problems with water and electrolyte absorption. Patients with a jejunostomy 100-200 cm from the duodeno-jejunal flexure ('absorbers') usually absorb more from the diet than they pass through the stoma and therefore require oral electrolyte or nutrient supplements. Those with a residual jejunal length of less than 100 cm usually secrete more from the stoma than they take in orally ('secretors') and therefore require long-term parenteral fluid or nutrient supplements. A high output resulting from a jejunostomy is treated by reducing the oral intake of hypotonic fluid, administering a sipped glucose-saline solution and, often, by giving drugs that reduce intestinal motility (most effective in absorbers) or gastrointestinal secretions (most effective in secretors). Gallstones are common both in short-bowel patients with and in those without a colon (45%), and calcium oxalate renal stones occur in the former (25%). However, it is now possible to provide adequate nutrition and fluid supplements for most patients with a short bowel, and the prospects for the rehabilitation of such patients are good. PMID:7552632

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Rydberg, Jonas; Akisik, Fatih M. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Rajesh, Arumugam [United Leicester Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Rushing, Daniel A. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Oncology, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Henley, John D. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to report the CT and MRI appearances of primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The clinical and imaging findings of 31 patients with histological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of GIST were reviewed. The CT and MRI findings were assessed independently for size, location, enhancement characteristics, and pattern of metastatic disease. The tumors were of enteric (n=13), gastric (n=12), duodenal (n=2), and rectal (n=3) origin. In one case the primary site was the mesentery, without involvement of bowel. Primary tumors were typically exophytic (79%), larger than 5 cm (84%), and inhomogeneously enhancing (84%). Central necrosis of all tumors (37%) and aneurysmal dilation of enteric tumors (33%) were less common. Metastases were most commonly to mesentery (26%) or liver (32%). Less common findings were ascites (7%) and omental caking (3%). Liver metastases were hypervascular in 92% of patients and rapidly became cystic following therapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ, USA). Lung metastases, bowel obstruction, vascular invasion, and significant lymphadenopathy were not seen in any patient. GISTs have some specific CT findings which could help differentiate them from other gastrointestinal tumors. Liver metastases became cystic following therapy, mimicking simple cysts. MRI was better than single-phase CT for assessing liver metastases, while CT was more sensitive for mesenteric metastases. (orig.)

  1. Battlefield MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  2. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations...

  3. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disac...

  4. Comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio López San Román; Fernando Mu(n)oz

    2011-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be affected by other unrelated diseases. These are called comorbid conditions, and can include any secondary health problem that affects a person suffering from a primary or main disease, and which is neither linked physiopathologically to the primary condition, nor is it due to the treatments used for the primary condition or to its long-term anatomical or physiological consequences.Different comorbid conditions, as well as their influence on IBD, are discussed.

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Tezel; Muzaffer Demir

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a group of chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal system. In these cases, findings are detected in extraintestinal systems also. There is a tendency for thrombotic events in IBD, as in the other inflammatory processes. The pathogenesis of this thrombotic tendency is multidimensional, including lack of natural anticoagulants, prothrombotic media induced via the inflammatory process, long-term sedentary life style, steroid use, s...

  6. Somatostatin in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Bergeijk, J D; Wilson, J H P

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is controlled by various immunomodulating cells, interacting by molecular mediators. Neuropeptides, released by enteric nerve cells and neuroendocrine mucosa cells, are able to affect several aspects of the general and intestinal immune system, with both pro- as well as anti-inflammatory activities. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) there is both morphological as well as experimental evidence for involvement of neuropeptides in the pathogenesis. Somatostatin is the m...

  7. Perianal disease in pediatric Crohn disease: a review of MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compton, Gregory L.; Bartlett, Murray [Royal Children' s Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Perianal complications of Crohn disease are a common occurrence in children and can result in significant morbidity when not accurately characterized prior to surgical intervention. MRI is an excellent imaging modality for the evaluation of perianal inflammatory bowel disease - allowing characterization and detailed description of perianal fistulas. MRI has many advantages over other imaging modalities for the pediatric patient. Radiologists will benefit from a sophisticated understanding of perianal anatomy, the classification of perianal fistulas, the advantages MRI offers in characterization of perianal fistulas as well as the common and incidental findings that are important in the MRI evaluation of perianal inflammatory bowel disease in children. Perianal fistulas are found at a high rate in pediatric referrals and are more commonly found in male patients. (orig.)

  8. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Worsøe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD. It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NBD treated by sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS, sacral nerve stimulation (SNS, peripheral nerve stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and nerve re-routing was made in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library. Results. SARS improves bowel function in some patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI. Nerve re-routing is claimed to facilitate defecation through mechanical stimulation of dermatomes in patients with complete or incomplete SCI or myelomeningocele. SNS can reduce NBD in selected patients with a variety of incomplete neurological lesions. Peripheral stimulation using electrical stimulation or magnetic stimulation may represent non-invasive alternatives. Conclusion. Numerous methods of neurostimulation to treat NBD have been investigated in pilot studies or retrospective studies. Therefore, larger controlled trials with well-defined inclusion criteria and endpoints are recommended before widespread clinical use of neurostimulation against NBD.

  9. Management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Akira; Toda, Gotaro

    2004-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. The prevalence rate is 10-20% and women have a higher prevalence. IBS adversely affects quality of life and is associated with health care use and costs. IBS comprises a group of functional bowel disorders in which abdominal discomfort or pain is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit, and with features of disordered defecation. The consensus definition and criteria for IBS have been formalized in the "Rome II criteria". Food, psychiatric disorders, and gastroenteritis are risk factors for developing IBS. The mechanism in IBS involves biopsychosocial disorders; psychosocial factors, altered motility, and heightened sensory function. Brain-gut interaction is the most important in understanding the pathophysiology of IBS. Effective management requires an effective physician-patient relationship. Dietary treatment, lifestyle therapy, behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic therapy play a major role in treating IBS. Calcium polycarbophil can benefit IBS patients with constipation or alternating diarrhea and constipation. PMID:15206545

  10. Primary Amyloidosis Presenting as Small Bowel Encapsulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Jennifer; van Rosendaal, Guido; Cleary, Cynthia; Urbanski, Stefan; Woodman, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a pathological process which encompasses a spectrum of diseases that result from extracellular deposition of pathological fibrillar proteins. Clinical presentations vary depending on the organs involved. There is no documented case of amyloidosis presenting as small bowel encapsulation. A previously healthy 62-year-old man developed a small bowel obstruction in 1997. At surgery, a peculiar membrane encasing his entire small bowel was discovered. This appeared to have no vascula...

  11. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Roxana Georgescu; Cristina Iulia Mitran; Madalina Irina Mitran; Monica Costescu; Vasile Benea; Maria Isabela Sarbu; Mircea Tampa

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nod...

  12. Anorexia nervosa complicating inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallett, P; MURCH, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in adolescence and complicated by anorexia nervosa, are presented. The management of the bowel disease with corticosteroids appeared to precipitate the eating disorder in one case whereas covert withdrawal of steroid treatment led to life threatening complications of inflammatory bowel disease in the other. The difficulties of managing two serious conditions, each ideally treated in a specialist centre, are discussed and the dangers of treati...

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  14. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  15. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - knee ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ... less anxious. Your provider may suggest an "open" MRI, in which the machine is not as close ...

  16. MRI of persistent cloaca: Can it substitute conventional imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar, E-mail: shaimaa96@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University (Egypt); AbouZeid, Amr Abdelhamid, E-mail: amrabdelhamid@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To define the role of MRI in the preoperative assessment of patients with persistent cloaca and whether it can substitute other imaging modalities. Methods: We prospectively examined eleven patients with persistent cloaca between July 2007 and March 2012. Non contrast MRI examinations were performed on 1.5 T magnet using head coil. Multiple pulse sequences (T1WI, T2WI, fat suppression) were obtained in axial, sagittal and coronal planes of the pelvis, abdomen, and spine. The scans were reviewed for the following: the level and type of rectal termination, the developmental state of striated muscle complex (SMC), associated genitourinary and spinal anomalies. MRI findings were compared to conventional fluoroscopic imaging, operative and endoscopic findings. We applied novel MRI parameters (urethral length, relative hiatal distance and vaginal volume). The relation between different parameters was tested statistically using Pearson correlation test. Results: MRI could accurately demonstrate the level of bowel termination in patients with persistent cloaca, in addition to its high sensitivity for detection of mullerian anomalies which were present in 73% of patients. Furthermore, MRI could disclose associating renal and spinal anomalies, and assess the developmental state of SMC. The shorter the urethra (higher urogenital confluence), the narrower the pelvic hiatus, and the more was the obstruction (vaginal distension). Conclusion: MRI is a valuable tool in exploring the different internal anatomical features of the cloacal anomaly; and when combined with endoscopy, MRI can make other preoperative conventional imaging unnecessary.

  17. Billeddiagnostiske og endoskopiske metoder ved Crohns sygdom i tyndtarmen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Kjeldsen, Jens; Nathan, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosing Crohn's disease in the small intestine can be troublesome. Traditionally, the small bowel is evaluated by ileocolonoscopy and small bowel follow-through or enteroclysis. In recent years MRI, CT, ultrasound and capsule endoscopy have emerged. All are validated and implemented in clinical...... practice. Double-balloon enteroscopy, PET-CT and SPECT are newer methods, which are still being evaluated in clinical trials. The purpose of this article is to review clinical studies focusing on the validity of modalities for diagnosing Crohn's disease of the small intestine. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Aug-17...

  18. Segmental reversal of the small bowel as treatment of short bowel syndrome in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Qvist, Niels; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is the result of extensive surgical resection, inherited defects or loss of functional absorbing intestine. Parenteral nutrition is associated with high economical expenses, increased morbidity and decreased quality of life. Intestinal transplantation is associated with high...... morbidity and mortality rates. Segmental reversal of the small bowel can prolong the transit time in the small bowel and in many cases permanently end parenteral nutrition dependency. Segmental reversal of the small bowel should be integrated in the surgical treatment of adults with short bowel syndrome....

  19. Bowel perforation detection using metabolic fluorescent chlorophylls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Hyun; Jo, Young Goun; Kim, Jung Chul; Choi, Sujeong; Kang, Hoonsoo; Kim, Yong-Chul; Hwang, In-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Thus far, there have been tries of detection of disease using fluorescent materials. We introduce the chlorophyll derivatives from food plants, which have longer-wavelength emissions (at >650 nm) than those of fluorescence of tissues and organs, for detection of bowel perforation. To figure out the possibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a monitoring sensor of bowel perforation, fluorescence from organs of rodent models, intestinal and peritoneal fluids of rodent models and human were analyzed. In IVIS fluorescence image of rodent abdominal organ, visualization of perforated area only was possible when threshold of image is extremely finely controlled. Generally, both perforated area of bowel and normal bowel which filled with large amount of chlorophyll derivatives were visualized with fluorescence. The fluorescence from chlorophyll derivatives penetrated through the normal bowel wall makes difficult to distinguish perforation area from normal bowel with direct visualization of fluorescence. However, intestinal fluids containing chlorophyll derivatives from food contents can leak from perforation sites in situation of bowel perforation. It may show brighter and longer-wavelength regime emissions of chlorophyll derivatives than those of pure peritoneal fluid or bioorgans. Peritoneal fluid mixed with intestinal fluids show much brighter emissions in longer wavelength (at>650 nm) than those of pure peritoneal fluid. In addition, irrigation fluid, which is used for the cleansing of organ and peritoneal cavity, made of mixed intestinal and peritoneal fluid diluted with physiologic saline also can be monitored bowel perforation during surgery.

  20. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D; D'Inca, R; Gionchetti, P; Panelli, M R; Ardizzone, S; Sanroman, A L; Gisbert, J P; Arena, I; Riegler, G; Marrollo, M; Valpiani, D; Corbellini, A; Segato, S; Castiglione, F; Munkholm, P

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  1. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before the...

  2. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before the r...

  3. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  4. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain. (orig.)

  5. Surgical techniques in short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, K L; Heller, K

    1990-01-01

    An operation according to Bianchi in a 2-year-old girl is described and indications as well as technical procedure are discussed. The girl was born with a gastroschisis. There was a jejunal perforation 10 cm below the ligament of Treitz caused by a volvulus. Only 20 cm of the jejunum remained. Moreover, only the left part of the colon was present. Total parenteral nutrition for 2 years was necessary. The principle of the operation is based on a longitudinal division of the remaining bowel and a creation of two separate bowel tubes out of the divided bowel halves, thus effecting an isoperistaltic serial connection by means of two anastomoses. This is technically possible since each half of the bowel wall has its own blood supply. The vessels originating from the mesenterium branch off before they reach the bowel wall so that the mesenteric dissection line can be anastomosed longitudinally with the antimesenteric border. This results in doubling of the bowel length, narrowing of the preoperatively dilated bowel diameter, closer contact of bowel contents with the mucosa, prolonged transit time and a Bacteroides colonization which is reduced by more effective peristalsis. Indications, time of operation and our own experiences are discussed and three cases are described. All children are alive and show marked improvement in nutrition. PMID:2105523

  6. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatt, Harpreet S; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, computed tomography (CT) findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In our article, we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and nonocclusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26526436

  7. [Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pregnant women in their characteristics do not differ from general population, unless they had operations on the pelvic organs. Women with a first pregnancy, regardless of the activity of IBD have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy and high risk births. Most treatment methods are compatible with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Women affected by IBD should discuss their plans for pregnancy with the doctor first in order to know the possible dangers. Every patient in the IBD during pregnancy must be observed by a gastroenterologist, accoucheur and pediatrician to ensure peace of mother and child. PMID:22830229

  8. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Q Shih; Stephan R Targan

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing immune mediated disorders that results from an aberrant response to gut luminal antigen in genetically susceptible host. The adaptive immune response that is then triggered was widely considered to be a T-helper-1 mediated condition in Crohn's disease and T-helper-2 mediated condition in ulcerative colitis. Recent studies in animal models, genome wide association, and basic science has provided important insights in in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, one of which was the characterization of the interleukin-23/Th-17 axis.

  9. PPARγ in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Annese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is member of a family of nuclear receptors that interacts with nuclear proteins acting as coactivators and corepressors. The colon is a major tissue which expresses PPARγ in epithelial cells and, to a lesser degree, in macrophages and lymphocytes and plays a role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Indeed, both natural and synthetic PPARγ ligands have beneficial effects in different models of experimental colitis, with possible implication in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. This paper will specifically focus on potential role of PPARγ in the predisposition and physiopathology of IBD and will analyze its possible role in medical therapy.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  11. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public. PMID:26968556

  12. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fornasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged present if a small bowel segment had >80% lumen reduction as compared to an adjacent normal loop and mural thickening of >3 mm. At the level of the stenosis, both T2 signal intensity and post-gadolinium T1 enhancement were quantified using a 5-point scale (0: very low; 1: low; 2: moderate; 3: high; and 4: very high. A stenosis was considered fibrotic if the sum of the two values (activity score: AS did not exceed 1. Results: A small bowel stenosis was identified in 48 out of 111 patients. Fibrosis was confirmed at histology in all of the 23 patients with AS of 0 or 1, who underwent surgery within 3 days of the MRI examination. In the remaining 25 patients (AS: 2-8, an active inflammatory stenosis was suspected and remission of the obstructive symptoms was obtained by means of medical treatment. One of these patients (AS: 2, however, underwent surgery after 14 days, due to recurrence. MRI had 95.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 97.9% accuracy in the diagnosis of fibrotic stenosis. Conclusion: MRI is reliable in differentiating fibrotic from inflammatory small bowel stenosis in CD.

  13. Brain regions involved in moxibustion-induced analgesia in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yi; Wu, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaopeng; Liu, Huirong; Bao, Chunhui; YANG, LING; Cui, Yunhua; Zhou, Cili; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Yuemin; Zhang, Zhongwei; Zhang, Huan; Jia, Haipeng; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Background Moxibustion is one of the most commonly used therapies in acupuncture practice, and is demonstrated to be beneficial for patients with diarrhea from irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS). But its mechanism remains unclear. Because visceral hypersensitivity in IBS patients has been documented by evaluation of perceived stimulations through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, we focused on observing brain imaging changes in D-IBS patients during rectal balloon distention...

  14. Current Role of Ultrasound in Small Bowel Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Anita; Pilcher, James

    2016-08-01

    Bowel ultrasound is cheap, relatively quick, allows dynamic evaluation of the bowel, has no radiation burden, is well tolerated by patients, and allows repeat imaging. Bowel ultrasound requires a systematic assessment of the entire bowel using high-frequency probes. In addition, hydrosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be performed. We present the normal sonographic appearances of large and small bowel and the sonographic appearances of acute appendicitis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, intestinal tuberculosis, small bowel ileus and obstruction, small bowel ischemia, and malignant tumors. PMID:27342894

  15. Short bowel syndrom as a complication of Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Skok, Pavel; Ocepek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    During the course of Crohn's disease, some patients require surgical bowel resection due to intestinal stenosis. Attention is drawn to a possible complication of such surgical procedures: in a patients with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome developed following several small and large intestine resections that were necessary in the treatment of recidiving acute bowel obstructions. When the remnant small bowel is shorter than 200 cm, characteristic symptoms of short bowel syndrome develop i...

  16. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Aldona Dlugosz; Björn Winckler; Elin Lundin; Katherina Zakikhany; Gunnar Sandström; Weimin Ye; Lars Engstrand; Greger Lindberg

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy voluntee...

  17. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  18. Semitransparent peroral small bowel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emons, D.

    1981-10-01

    171 follow-through examinations of the small bowel performed in children and adolescents with a large contrast medium meal and the high voltage-low density barium technique (10 to 25 g BaSO/sub 4//100 ml, depending on age), are described. A ready made suspension, diluted with water, proved unsatisfactory. Coating properties and stability of the diluted, weak suspension were then greatly improved by hydroxyethylcellulose as a thickening agent and in addition by premedication of the patient with cimetidine. Pure cellulose solution instead of the last portion of barium prevented thickening in the ileum. The procedure has the well known advantages of a large contrast medium meal without the problem of overly dense superpositions.

  19. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  20. Genetics of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henström, Maria; D'Amato, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition with a complex and largely unknown etiology. There is no cure, and treatment options are mainly directed to the amelioration of symptoms. IBS causes reduced quality of life and poses considerable repercussions on health and socioeconomic systems. There is a heritable component in IBS, and genetic research is a valuable tool for the identification of causative pathways, which will provide important insight into the pathophysiology. However, although some gene-hunting efforts have been conducted and a few risk genes proposed, IBS genetic research is lagging behind compared to other complex diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize existing genetic studies, discuss the main challenges in IBS genetic research, and propose strategies to overcome these challenges for IBS gene discovery. PMID:26873717

  1. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The component in wheat that triggers symptoms in NCGS appears to be the carbohydrates. Patients with NCGS appear to be IBS patients who are self-diagnosed and self-treated with a gluten-free diet. IBS symptoms are triggered by the consumption of the poorly absorbed fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and insoluble fibre. On reaching the distal small intestine and colon, FODMAPS and insoluble fibre increase the osmotic pressure in the large-intestine lumen and provide a substrate for bacterial fermentation, with consequent gas production, abdominal distension and abdominal pain or discomfort. Poor FODMAPS and insoluble fibres diet reduces the symptom and improve the quality of life in IBS patients. Moreover, it changes favourably the intestinal microbiota and restores the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. Five gastrointestinal endocrine cell types that produce hormones regulating appetite and food intake are abnormal in IBS patients. Based on these hormonal abnormalities, one would expect that IBS patients to have increased food intake and body weight gain. However, the link between obesity and IBS is not fully studied. Individual dietary guidance for intake of poor FODMAPs and insoluble fibres diet in combination with probiotics intake and regular exercise is to be recommended for IBS patients. PMID:25880820

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  3. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine ...

  4. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. PMID:26869808

  5. Genetic epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Makker, Jasbir; Chilimuri, Sridhar; Bella, Jonathan N

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by presence of abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits. It has three main subtypes - constipation predominant IBS (C-IBS), diarrhea predominant IBS (D-IBS) and IBS with mixed features of both diarrhea as well as constipation (M-IBS). Its pathophysiology and underlying mechanisms remain elusive. It is traditionally believed that IBS is a result of multiple factors incl...

  6. Modern treatment of short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle B

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency approved the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS), and this review describes the physiological basis for its clinical use.......Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency approved the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS), and this review describes the physiological basis for its clinical use....

  7. Rifaximin Therapy of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Saman Sabounchi; Huang, David B.; Herbert L. DuPont

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of stu...

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  9. NATURAL AGENTS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Darji Vinay Chhanalal; Bariya Aditi Hemrajbhai; Deshpande Shrikalp Shrikant

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract. It comprises the two conditions, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by chronic recurrent ulceration of the bowel. Conventional drugs for colitis treatment include aminosalicylate, corticosteroids,antibiotics & immunomodulators. 5- Amino salicylic acid having side effects in 30% of the patients. Systemic corticosteroids producing incidence of complication is 4.3%. Antibiotic therapy...

  10. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta Ajay; Ahmed Shwan J; Rimington Peter

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with low...

  11. Small bowel emergency surgery: literature's review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Saverio Salomone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emergency surgery of the small bowel represents a challenge for the surgeon, in the third millennium as well. There is a wide number of pathologies which involve the small bowel. The present review, by analyzing the recent and past literature, resumes the more commons. The aim of the present review is to provide the main indications to face the principal pathologies an emergency surgeon has to face with during his daily activity.

  12. The Immune System in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Carini, Giovanni; Bellacosa, Lara; Zecchi, Lisa; De Giorgio, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The potential relevance of systemic and gastrointestinal immune activation in the pathophysiology and symptom generation in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is supported by a number of observations. Infectious gastroenteritis is the strongest risk factor for the development of IBS and increased rates of IBS-like symptoms have been detected in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in remission or in celiac disease patients on a gluten free diet. The number of T cells and mast cells in the...

  13. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  14. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune...

  15. PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM WITH INFLAMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Guru Prasad; Jhansi Lakshmi; Krishna Rao; Parvathi; Durga Bhavani

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a chronic , painful ulcerated skin disease of unknown etiology. Its association with inflammatory bowel disease like ulcerative colitis is common . The lesions generally appear dur ing the course of active bowel disease , frequently concur with exacerbations of colitis , sometimes with inactive ulcerative colitis. 15 to 20 % of patients with Pyoderma gangrenosum have ulcerative colitis and 0.5 to 5 % of patients w...

  16. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    De Sol Angelo A; Migliaccio Carla; Delmonaco Pamela; Cattorini Lorenzo; Morelli Umberto; La Mura Francesco; Cirocchi Roberto; Farinella Eriberto; Cozzaglio Luca; Sciannameo Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed th...

  17. Short Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Celayir, Sinan; Sarımurat, Nüvit; Ilıkkan, Barbaros; ERAY, Nur; Yeşildağ, Ebru; Yeker, Daver

    1996-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis atresia volvulus gastroschisis are the most common causes of short bowel syndrome in the pediatric population Although the prognosis for patients with short bowel syndrome improved since the advent of parenteral nutrition the cost of long term total parenteral nutrition and attendant morbidity and mortality cannot be ignored in these patients Long term follow up of a case with short small intestine of 25 cm length following surgery is presented and the problems assoc...

  18. [Contemporary dietotherapy of the irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, V I; Burliaeva, E A; Isakov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional disease of the gastrointestinal tract. This highly prevalent condition is best diagnosed by assessing the constellation of symptoms with which patients present to their physicians. Because some critics have previously questioned whether irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal disorders truly exist because they do not have defining structural features, the Rome Foundation fostered the use of symptom-based criteria for universal use. In most cases treatment is reduced to symptomatic therapy because a lot of unknown in pathogenesis by irritable bowel syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome leads to decrease of quality of life of the patients and could be one of the reasons of patients' disability. Food is believed by patients promotes symptoms and the diet or avoiding specific food can reduce symptoms. Possible role of different food and microbiota in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome, as well as the data from randomized, controlled clinical trials dedicated to the effects of diet in irritable bowel syndrome are summarized and discussed in this review. The efficacy of the diet, enriched by fiber, prebiotics, probiotics, peppermint oil, curcumin and vitamin B6 in irritable bowel syndrome patients was shown in numerous studies. In some studies restriction in consumption of fermented carbohydrates, coffee and alcohol, as well as diet with elimination IgG-sensed food was also shown to be effective in irritable bowel syndrome. Food intolerances, defined as non-toxic non-immune adverse reactions to food, include reactions to bioactive chemicals in foods and metabolic reactions to poorly absorbed dietary carbohydrates. New dietary approaches like polyunsaturated fatty acids intake correction and the low tryptophan intake are discussed. PMID:23808281

  19. Interventional MRI: update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lufkin, R.B. [Department of Radiology, University of California Los Angeles, School of Medicine, 10 833 Le Comte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1721 (United States); Gronemeyer, D.H.W.; Seibel, R.M.M. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Computerscience, University Witten/Herdecke (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Interventional MRI is in its early stages of development. Nevertheless, the design of new interventional MRI scanners that allow maximum direct access to the patient combined with the development of new interventional MRI pulse sequences and localization systems, means that the archetypal operating rooms of the 21st century may well contain dedicated interventional MRI units for combined radiological and surgical procedures. The present article looks at the state of interventional MRI today and looks ahead to what may be forthcoming in the not-too-distant future. After briefly discussing the instrumentation necessary for practical interventional MRI, the article will go on to describe a number of different approaches to, and clinical applications for, interventional MRI. The use of MRI in guiding and controlling tumor ablation, aspiration cytology and surgical biopsy of different body parts is described. (orig.) With 13 figs., 1 tab., 114 refs.

  20. Abdominal MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  1. MRI of Stroke Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Quan; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2009-01-01

    MRI is a vital tool for the measurement of acute stroke and has been used to visualize changes in activation patterns during stroke recovery. There is emerging interest on using MRI to monitor the structural substrates of spontaneous recovery and neurorestorative treatment of stroke. In this review, we describe the use of MRI and its associated challenges to measure vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to spontaneous and therapy-induced stroke recovery. We demonstrate that MRI methodo...

  2. Effects of Bolus and Continuous Nasogastric Feeding on Gastric Emptying, Small Bowel Water Content, Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow, and Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L.; Costigan, Carolyn; Marciani, Luca; Macdonald, Ian A.; Bowling, Timothy E.; Lobo, Dileep N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate the effect of continuous or bolus nasogastric feeding on gastric emptying, small bowel water content, and splanchnic blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the context of changes in plasma gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Background: Nasogastric/nasoenteral tube feeding is often complicated by diarrhea but the contribution of feeding strategy to the etiology is unclear. Methods: Twelve healthy adult male participants who underwent nasogastric intubation before a baseline MRI scan, received 400 mL of Resource Energy (Nestle) as a bolus over 5 minutes or continuously over 4 hours via pump in this randomized crossover study. Changes in gastric volume, small bowel water content, and superior mesenteric artery blood flow and velocity were measured over 4 hours using MRI and blood glucose and plasma concentrations of insulin, peptide YY, and ghrelin were assayed every 30 minutes. Results: Bolus nasogastric feeding led to significant elevations in gastric volume (P < 0.0001), superior mesenteric artery blood flow (P < 0.0001), and velocity (P = 0.0011) compared with continuous feeding. Both types of feeding reduced small bowel water content, although there was an increase in small bowel water content with bolus feeding after 90 minutes (P < 0.0068). Similarly, both types of feeding led to a fall in plasma ghrelin concentration although this fall was greater with bolus feeding (P < 0.0001). Bolus feeding also led to an increase in concentrations of insulin (P = 0.0024) and peptide YY (P < 0.0001), not seen with continuous feeding. Conclusion: Continuous nasogastric feeding does not increase small bowel water content, thus fluid flux within the small bowel is not a major contributor to the etiology of tube feeding-related diarrhea. PMID:25549202

  3. MRI in cranial tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, M.; Higer, H.P.; Betting, O.; Bockenheimer, S.; Pfannenstiel, P.

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of the high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. (orig.)

  4. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  5. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.;

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  6. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  7. Getting an MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en ... Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  8. Getting an MRI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en ... Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  9. Getting an MRI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  10. Contrast enema depiction of small-bowel volvulus in complicated neonatal bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Oscar M.; Daneman, Alan; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    About one-half of patients with meconium ileus (MI) present with a complication such as volvulus, atresia, meconium peritonitis or giant cystic meconium peritonitis. The treatment of these complications requires surgery. However, the preoperative diagnosis of complicated MI is difficult. We describe two neonates with complicated small-bowel obstruction, one with MI related to cystic fibrosis and the other not related to cystic fibrosis. In both, contrast enema depicted a spiral appearance of the distal small bowel, which at surgery proved to be the result of volvulus associated with antenatal bowel perforation. This appearance of the small bowel on contrast enema in this clinical setting has not been previously described. The recognition of this spiral appearance of the distal small bowel suggests the need for surgery. (orig.)

  11. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Claudio Fiocchi

    2006-01-01

    Theories explaining the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proposed ever since Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were recognized as the two major forms of the disease. Although the exact cause(s) and mechanisms of tissue damage in CD and UC have yet to be completely understood, enough progress has occurred to accept the following hypothesis as valid: IBD is an inappropriate immune response that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals as the result of a complex interaction among environmental factors, microbial factors, and the intestinal immune system. Among an almost endless list of environmental factors, smoking has been identified as a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC. Among microbial factors, no convincing evidence indicates that classical infectious agents cause IBD, while mounting evidence points to an abnormal immune response against the normal enteric flora as being of central importance. Gut inflammation is mediated by cells of the innate as well as adaptive immune systems, with the additional contribution of non-immune cells, such as epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and platelets.

  12. Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie Pierik; Paul Rutgeerts; Robert Vlietinck; Severine Vermeire

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the association between variability in drug response and (or) drug toxicity and polymorphisms in genes. The goal of this field of science is to adapt drugs to a patient's specific genetic background and therefore make them more efficacious and safe. In this article we describe the variants in genes that influence either the efficacy or toxicity of common drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC),and Crohn's disease (CD) including sulfasalazine and mesalazine, azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), methotrexate (MTX), glucocorticosteroids (CSs) and infliximab. Furthermore, difficulties with pharmacogenetic studies in general and more specifically in IBD are described. Although pharmacogenetics is a promising field that already contributed to a better understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms of action of drugs used in IBD, the only discovery translated until now into daily practice is the relation between thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene polymorphisms and hematological toxicity of thiopurine treatment. In the future it is necessary to organize studies in well characterized patient cohorts who have been uniformly treated and systematically evaluated in order to quantitate drug response more objectively. An effort should be made to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials after appropriate informed consent for pharmacogenetic studies.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  14. Smoking and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D T; Hanauer, S B

    2000-08-01

    It is well established that smoking cigarettes is associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and that non-smoking is associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). Furthermore, there is convincing evidence that smoking cigarettes has a negative effect on the course of CD, and that smoking cigarettes may improve the disease severity or have a 'protective' effect in some patients with UC. Despite these well-described associations, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects CD and UC is not known. Researchers have studied the systemic effects, cellular and humoral immune effects, mucosal changes, and the intestinal permeability changes with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and smoking. To date, none of these studies adequately explains the observed clinical patterns. It has been assumed that nicotine is the active agent in these associations, but clinical trials of nicotine chewing gum and transdermal nicotine in UC have shown limited benefit, and have been complicated by significant side-effects. Topical delivery systems for nicotine therapy are currently under development and await future clinical trials. PMID:10958212

  15. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS. PMID:27598274

  16. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  17. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sol Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed the reference lists of the key manuscripts. We also added a review based on international non-indexed sources. Results The feasibility of diagnostic laparoscopy is high (60–100%, while that of therapeutic laparoscopy is low (40–88%. The frequency of laparotomic conversions is variable ranging from 0 to 52%, depending on patient selection and surgical skill. The first cause of laparotomic conversion is a difficult exposition and treatment of band adhesions. The incidence of laparotomic conversions is major in patients with anterior peritoneal band adhesions. Other main causes for laparotomic conversion are the presence of bowel necrosis and accidental enterotomies. The predictive factors for successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis are: number of previous laparotomies ≤ 2, non-median previous laparotomy, appendectomy as previous surgical treatment causing adherences, unique band adhesion as phatogenetic mechanism of small bowel obstruction, early laparoscopic management within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms, no signs of peritonitis on physical examination, experience of the surgeon. Conclusion Laparoscopic adhesiolysis in small bowel obstruction is feasible but can be convenient only if performed by skilled surgeons in selected patients. The laparoscopic adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction is satisfactorily carried out when early indicated in patients with a low number of laparotomies resulting in a short hospital stay and a lower postoperative

  18. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsham NE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. Keywords: calprotectin, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation 

  19. Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Constipation Personal Stories Contact Us Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live Without the Problem Home Biofeedback ... donation. Adapted from IFFGD Publication: Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem by Mary ...

  20. Visceral hypersensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome:pathophysiological mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, A.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disease characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a disordered defecation. No unique pathophysiological mechanism has been identified. It is most likely a multifactorial disease involving alterations in intestinal microbiota co

  1. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. PMID:24969296

  2. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-09-28

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  3. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Erbayrak; Cansel Turkay; Elife Eraslan; Hulya Cetinkaya; Benan Kasapoglu; Mehmet Bektas

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatie...

  4. Transient small bowel angioedema due to intravenous iodinated contrast media

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiu-Hua; Gong, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Three cases of transient proximal small bowel angioedema induced by intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media (CM) are presented. Computed tomography (CT) images in the venous phase displayed the proximal small bowel with circumferential thickening of the wall including the duodenum and proximal segment of the jejunum. The bowel wall was normal in non-enhanced images, and normal or inconspicuous in arterial phase enhanced images. In one of the three cases, the bowel wall...

  5. Arteriovenous Malformation Detected by Small Bowel Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Fujii

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding that originates in the small intestine is often difficult to diagnose. When successful diagnosis reveals a lesion that can be localized preoperatively, the laparoscopic approach is an appropriate and beneficial treatment modality for small bowel resection. A 69-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of gastrointestinal bleeding and symptomatic transfusion-dependent anemia. Upper and lower endoscopy were normal. Double-balloon endoscopy established the source of the bleeding as a 0.5-cm polypoid mass appearing as a submucosal tumor with redness and pulsation in the lower ileum, suggesting a vascular lesion. Laparoscopic small bowel resection was successful in removing the mass in the ileum. Histological evaluation of the mass revealed an arteriovenous malformation. Preoperative small bowel endoscopy can be useful for diagnosing the cause and localization of arteriovenous malformation in the small intestine.

  6. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    -intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......: No alterations in intestinal permeability in patients with CC could be demonstrated. Impairment of the integrity of the mucosa of the small bowel and the presence of a general dysfunction of the small intestine in patients with CC seem unlikely....

  7. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  8. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Chauvin, Nancy A.; Coleman, Beverly G.; Victoria, Teresa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management. (orig.)

  9. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Bonasso, Patrick C.; Brandon Lucke-Wold; Uzer Khan

    2016-01-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  10. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Bonasso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  11. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  12. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  13. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  14. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  16. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Ajay

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with lower abdominal scar. The risk may be reduced with the use of ultrasound scan guidance.

  17. Case report: Congenital short bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Lalitha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital short bowel syndrome (SBS is a relatively rare condition as compared to acquired SBS. It is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infants usually present with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and diarrhea. It is important to suspect and diagnose this condition promptly, as early initiation of parenteral nutrition or surgery, if necessary, may result in a favorable outcome. We discuss a case of an infant aged 26 days, who presented with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and weight loss. A contrast study of the gastrointestinal tract revealed a short small bowel, with malrotation. The infant was started on parenteral nutrition, but succumbed shortly thereafter to severe disseminated sepsis.

  18. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  19. Abdominal MRI in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI provides diagnostic information in multiple abdominal diseases in childhood. Additional information to sonographic findings can be achieved in the diagnosis of abdominal malformation as well as in several inflammatory processes. In childhood cancer imaging MRI is essential at the beginning as well as during therapy to assess response to therapy. Because of radiation protection MRI has to replace CT in abdominal imaging in children. Some technical details have to be considered when children are examined. (orig.)

  20. SU-F-BRF-10: Deformable MRI to CT Validation Employing Same Day Planning MRI for Surrogate Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, K; Stoyanova, R; Johnson, P; Dogan, N; Pollack, A [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Piper, J; Javorek, A [MIM Software, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare rigid and deformable registrations of the prostate in the multi-modality setting (diagnostic-MRI to planning-CT) by utilizing a planning-MRI as a surrogate. The surrogate allows for the direct quantitative analysis which can be difficult in the multi-modality domain where intensity mapping differs. Methods: For ten subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day in which the planning CT was collected (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was deformed to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. The deformed MRI was then rigidly aligned to the planning MRI which was used as the surrogate for the planning-CT. Agreement between the two MRI datasets was scored using intensity based metrics including Pearson correlation and normalized mutual information, NMI. A local analysis was performed by looking only within the prostate, proximal seminal vesicles, penile bulb and combined areas. A similar method was used to assess a rigid registration between the diagnostic-MRI and planning-CT. Results: Utilizing the NMI, the deformable registrations were superior to the rigid registrations in 9 of 10 cases demonstrating a 15.94% improvement (p-value < 0.001) within the combined area. The Pearson correlation showed similar results with the deformable registration superior in the same number of cases and demonstrating a 6.97% improvement (p-value <0.011). Conclusion: Validating deformable multi-modality registrations using spatial intensity based metrics is difficult due to the inherent differences in intensity mapping. This population provides an ideal testing ground for MRI to CT deformable registrations by obviating the need

  1. SU-F-BRF-10: Deformable MRI to CT Validation Employing Same Day Planning MRI for Surrogate Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare rigid and deformable registrations of the prostate in the multi-modality setting (diagnostic-MRI to planning-CT) by utilizing a planning-MRI as a surrogate. The surrogate allows for the direct quantitative analysis which can be difficult in the multi-modality domain where intensity mapping differs. Methods: For ten subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day in which the planning CT was collected (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was deformed to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. The deformed MRI was then rigidly aligned to the planning MRI which was used as the surrogate for the planning-CT. Agreement between the two MRI datasets was scored using intensity based metrics including Pearson correlation and normalized mutual information, NMI. A local analysis was performed by looking only within the prostate, proximal seminal vesicles, penile bulb and combined areas. A similar method was used to assess a rigid registration between the diagnostic-MRI and planning-CT. Results: Utilizing the NMI, the deformable registrations were superior to the rigid registrations in 9 of 10 cases demonstrating a 15.94% improvement (p-value < 0.001) within the combined area. The Pearson correlation showed similar results with the deformable registration superior in the same number of cases and demonstrating a 6.97% improvement (p-value <0.011). Conclusion: Validating deformable multi-modality registrations using spatial intensity based metrics is difficult due to the inherent differences in intensity mapping. This population provides an ideal testing ground for MRI to CT deformable registrations by obviating the need

  2. MRI of adrenal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic usefulness of MRI was evaluated on 38 adrenal masses. The most important finding differentiating adenomas from metastases was the size of the tumor and the signal intensity of the mass. Adenomas showed a tendency to be smaller and homogeneous in signal intensity. On MRI with Gd-DTPA adenomas also showed moderate homogeneous enhancement, but metastases were inhomogeneously enhanced. The detectability by MRI was almost comparable with CT. Three cases of small adenomas and hyperplasia 1-1.5 cm in diameter were detectable only with CT. MRI seems to be complementary to CT in the diagnosis of adrenal masses. (author)

  3. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  4. Nanoparticle-based imaging of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingwei; Briley, Karen; Tao, Xiaofeng

    2016-03-01

    Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been extensively studied, the pathogenesis is still not completely understood. As a result, the treatment options remain unsatisfactory and nonspecific. With the rapid advancement of diagnostic imaging techniques, imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are playing a more important role in IBD diagnosis and evaluation. Recent developments in nanotechnology utilize an interdisciplinary approach to specifically target molecular or cellular IBD pathological process thereby generating nanoparticles (NPs) with high specificity and diagnostic and/or therapeutic efficacy. Nano-based imaging, which incorporates nanotechnology and imaging modalities, may allow for the early detection of IBD, the monitoring of disease activity, and may be used to monitor the therapeutic response at cellular and/or molecular level. In this review, we highlight issues related to nano-based imaging and its application in IBD field. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:300-315. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1357 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26371464

  5. German Bowel Cancer Center: An Attempt to Improve Treatment Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Jannasch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancies, but treatment results show high diversity. Certified bowel cancer centres (BCC are the basis of a German project for improvement of treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze if certification would enhance short-term outcome in rectal cancer surgery. Material and Methods. This quality assurance study included 8197 patients with rectal cancer treated between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2010. We compared cohorts treated in certified and noncertified hospitals regarding preoperative variables and perioperative outcomes. Outcomes were verified by matched-pair analysis. Results. Patients of noncertified hospitals had higher ASA-scores, higher prevalence of risk factors, more distant metastases, lower tumour localization, lower frequency of pelvic MRI, and higher frequencies of missing values and undetermined TNM classifications (significant differences only. Outcome analysis revealed more general complications in certified hospitals (20.3% versus 17.4%, p=0.03. Both cohorts did not differ significantly in percentage of R0-resections, intraoperative complications, anastomotic leakage, in-hospital death, and abdominal wall dehiscence. Conclusions. The concept of BCC is a step towards improving the structural and procedural quality. This is a good basis for improving outcome quality but cannot replace it. For a primary surgical disease like rectal cancer a specific, surgery-targeted program is still needed.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  8. Fecal lactoferrin in discriminating inflammatory bowel disease from Irritable bowel syndrome: a diagnostic meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xing-lu; Xu, Wen; Tang, Xiao-xiao; Luo, Lai-sheng; Tu, Jiang-feng; Zhang, Chen-jing; Xu, Xiang; Wu, Qin-dong; Pan, Wen-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background To perform a meta-analysis evaluating the diagnostic ability of fecal lactoferrin (FL) to distinguish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods The Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane library and CNKI databases were systematically searched for studies that used FL concentrations to distinguish between IBD and IBS. The sensitivity, specificity, and other diagnostic indexes of FL were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Seven studies...

  9. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26467550

  10. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sinh, Preetika; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory b...

  11. Comparison of Ultrasound and MRI in Detecting Fetal Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abdi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Ultrasound (US and MRI are considered complementary technologies, and MRI is utilized as an adjunct to US in the evaluation of fetal anomalies. Overall ultrasound remains the prime mo-dality for evaluating disorders of the fetus and pregnancy. Ultrasound continues to have several obvious advan-tages over MRI. It is safe and relatively inexpensive and is widely available It also allows for real-time imaging. However, US does have important limitations. First, it is uniquely operator-and interpreter-dependent. In ad-dition, compared to MRI, US provides a smaller field-of-view, and the resolution of US images is restricted by penetration through soft tissues and bone. Thus, the sensitivity of US in evaluating the fetus is reduced in obese patients and in women whose pregnancies are complicated by low amniotic fluid volume. There is a growing body of literature on the use of MRI and has documented its usefulness in confirming or expanding upon US findings. On the contrary, MRI visualization of the fetus is not significantly limited by maternal obe-sity, fetal position, or oligohydramnios, and visualization of the brain is not restricted by the ossified skull. It provides superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and the ability to distinguish individual structures such as lung, liver, kidney, bowel, and gray and white matter. Patients & Methods: In this study, patients in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy were recruited on the basis of abnormal fetal US results within 2 days of MR imaging by another radiologist. Results: In some cases such as anencephaly which is associated with polyhydraminous or in multicystic dys-plastic kidney disease, MRI added no more information to ultrasonography; but in the following cases MRI had more data. In a fetus with bilateral hydronephrosis, MRI could differentiate PUV from UPJ stenosis by visualizing distention of the ureters. MRI allowed better depiction of complex anomalies

  12. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  13. Unusual causes of mechanical small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We herein report our experience regarding unusual causes of bowel obstruction to increase the awareness of surgeons regarding this disease. From 1991 to 2003, we had experience at the University affiliated hospitals, northern Jordan with 24 patients with small bowel obstruction resulting from unusual causes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients with regards to the mode of presentation, cause of obstruction, radiological and operative findings, management and outcome. We recorded 15 patients who underwent previous abdominal surgery. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in only one patient with an internal hernia, but the abdominal CT scan suggested the diagnosis in 5 of the 9 patients who had the scan. The final diagnosis was internal hernias in 11 patients, foreign bodies in 5, ischemic strictures in 3, carcinoid tumors in 2, endometriosis in 2, and metastatic deposit from interstitial bladder carcinoma in one patient. Nine of the 12 patients with recurrent obstruction had either short course or recurrence obstruction during the same hospital admission. W carried out bowel resections in 15 patients (5 resections were due to bowel strangulation). Post operative death occurred in 4 patients. Awareness of these rare causes of intestinal obstruction even in patients with previous abdominal operation might improve the outcome. The tentative diagnosis of adhesion obstruction in patients with unusual obstructive etiology might lead to a higher rate of gangrenous complications. Rigorous preoperative evaluation including careful history and early abdominal CT may show the obstructive cause. (author)

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S;

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These new...

  15. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    , indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  16. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD and a...

  17. A rare cause of small bowel infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, L.; Collier, K; Harland, R; Temperley, D

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of small bowel infarction due to superior mesenteric artery occlusion secondary to cardiac tumour embolism. To our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in the literature. This case highlights a rare case and reviews current knowledge on the subject.

  18. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects from prescription drugs.  Being unaware that you need to use the bathroom.  Weakness in the muscle that holds a bowel ... toilet  Occupational therapists can help if your home needs to be ... issues. They can with grants to adapt the bathroom or to build a new one, and can ...

  19. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Comito, Donatella; Cascio, Antonio; Romano, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes.

  20. Analysis of bowel perforation in necrotizing enterocolitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, E.E.; Smith, W.; Franken, E.A. Jr.; Wintermeyer, K.A.

    1987-07-01

    The most severe complication of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is bowel perforation. Identification of neonates at high risk for perforation and optimization of radiologic imaging to identify bowel perforation are necessary to reduce the high mortality rate associated with this catastrophic event. One hundred 55 cases of NEC were seen at our institution during a 5.5 year period. Nineteen (12%) progressed to perforation. A review of surgical findings, autopsy results and radiographs from these patients shows only 63% had radiographic evidence of free air in the peritoneal cavity at the time of perforation. Twenty-one percent had radiographic evidence of ascites but no pneumoperitoneum, and 16 percent had neither free air nor ascites. Thus purely radiographic criteria for bowel perforation in NEC are imprecise, and paracentesis is mandatory in NEC patients with ascites or clinical findings indicative of peritonitis. Timing of radiographic studies and site of bowel involvement are also important. Seventy-nine percent of perforations occurred by 30 h from confirmation of diagnosis (by clinical or radiographic criteria). Surgery or autopsy revealed involvement of the ileo-cecal region in 89% of cases with the actual site of perforation occurring in this area in 58% of patients.

  1. ARMA-based spectral bandwidth for evaluation of bowel motility by the analysis of bowel sounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 10%–20% of adults and adolescents suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) worldwide. IBS is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal dysfunction which may reflect in altered motility. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is made through expensive invasive radiographic and endoscopic examinations. However these are inconvenient and unsuited for community screening. Bowel sounds (BSs) can be easily recorded with non-invasive and low-cost equipment. Recently, several researchers have pointed out changes in features obtained from BS according to the pathological condition of bowel motility. However a widely accepted, simple automatic BS detection algorithm still has to be found, and the appropriate recording period needs to be investigated for further evaluation of bowel motility. In this study we propose a novel simple automatic method to detect the BSs based on the 3 dB bandwidth of the frequency peaks in the autoregressive moving average spectrum. We use the measure, sound-to-sound interval (SSI) obtained by the proposed method, to capture bowel motility. In this paper, we show that the proposed method for automatic detection could achieve a sensitivity of 87.8±5.88%, specificity of 91.7±4.33% and area under the curve of 0.923 when working on 16 healthy volunteers during mosapride administrations. Furthermore, we show that the measured SSI averaged over a period of 30 min can clearly capture bowel motility. Our findings should have the potential to contribute toward developing automated BS-based diagnosis of IBS. (paper)

  2. Effects of Bolus and Continuous Nasogastric Feeding on Gastric Emptying, Small Bowel Water Content, Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow, and Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Healthy Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L.; Costigan, Carolyn; Marciani, Luca; Macdonald, Ian A.; Bowling, Timothy E.; Lobo, Dileep N

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate the effect of continuous or bolus nasogastric feeding on gastric emptying, small bowel water content, and splanchnic blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the context of changes in plasma gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Background: Nasogastric/nasoenteral tube feeding is often complicated by diarrhea but the contribution of feeding strategy to the etiology is unclear. Methods: Twelve healthy adult male participants who underwent naso...

  3. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziech, Manon L.W.; Smets, Anne M.J.B.; Lavini, Cristina; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelofs, Joris J.T.H. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  4. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  5. MRI of Listeria rhombencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of Listeria rhombencephalitis in a patient, who was evaluated by MRI, is reported. MRI shows areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the rhombencephalon and confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a brainstem affection by Listeria monocytogenes. (orig.)

  6. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and radio waves are used for getting images of inner organs made of soft tissue, compared to X-ray imaging where you get images of hard tissue, ...

  7. Getting an MRI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... School Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) ...

  8. Getting an MRI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A ...

  9. CT findings of bowel injury following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the diagnostic value of CT, the author retrospectively reviewed preoperative CT findings of 57 cases with surgically proven bowel injury following blunt trauma. The small bowel injuries were divided into two groups, i.e., those without mesenteric injury, group A, and those with mesenteric injury, group B. The incidence of CT findings including extraluminal air, bowel wall thickening, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric thickening, and high density hematoma, were determined. CT findings were also assessed by time intervals between injury and examination. CT scans of small bowel injury were compared with those of surgically proven 25 cases of mesenteric injury without bowel injury, group C. CT showed findings suggestive of bowel injury in 96.4% of the cases. There were 5 false negative CT scans, which consisted of 4 small bowel and one large bowel injuries, all performed within 2 hours from injury. The patients in group A small bowel injury had a higher incidence of pneumoperitoneum on CT scans performed over 4 hours after injury than on those performed within 4 hours. Bowel wall thickening was more frequent in group A than in group B or C. Peritoneal fluid collection within 4 hours from injury was less frequent in group A than in group B or C. High density hematoma was more frequent in group B and C than in group A. The analysis suggested that early diagnosis of isolated small bowel injury was difficult because of lack of signs indicating mesenteric injury. In these cases bowel wall thickening appeared earlier, then peritoneal fluid developed, with and without mesenteric thickening or extraluminal air. Thus in those with suspicion of bowel injury, bowel wall thickening on initial CT should be carefully followed up in regard to additional or progressive findings. Operative indication can be determined with careful clinical correlation before detection of extraluminal air. (K.H.)

  10. Surveillance of FAP: a prospective blinded comparison of capsule endoscopy and other GI imaging to detect small bowel polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tescher Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is a hereditary disorder characterized by polyposis along the gastrointestinal tract. Information on adenoma status below the duodenum has previously been restricted due to its inaccessibility in vivo. Capsule Endoscopy (CE may provide a useful adjunct in screening for polyposis in the small bowel in FAP patients. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of CE in the assessment of patients with FAP, compared to other imaging modalities for the detection of small bowel polyps. Method 20 consecutive patients with previously diagnosed FAP and duodenal polyps, presenting for routine surveillance of polyps at The Royal Melbourne Hospital were recruited. Each fasted patient initially underwent a magnetic resonance image (MRI of the abdomen, and a barium small bowel follow-through study. Capsule Endoscopy was performed four weeks later on the fasted patient. An upper gastrointestinal side-viewing endoscopy was done one (1 to two (2 weeks after this. Endoscopists and investigators were blinded to results of other investigations and patient history. Results Within the stomach, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy found more polyps than other forms of imaging. SBFT and MRI generally performed poorly, identifying fewer polyps than both upper gastrointestinal and capsule endoscopy. CE was the only form of imaging that identified polyps in all segments of the small bowel as well as the only form of imaging able to provide multiple findings outside the stomach/duodenum. Conclusion CE provides important information on possible polyp development distal to the duodenum, which may lead to surgical intervention. The place of CE as an adjunct in surveillance of FAP for a specific subset needs consideration and confirmation in replication studies. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000616370

  11. Follow up of Crohn's disease under therapy with hydro-MRI; Hydro-MRT in der Verlaufsbeobachtung des Morbus Crohn unter Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganten, M.; Flosdorff, P.; Grueber-Hoffmann, B.; Erb, G.; Hansmann, J. [Abt. Radiodiagnostik, Radiologische Uniklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Encke, J. [Abt. Gastroenterologie, Medizinische Klinik IV, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of typical MRI-findings in patients with Crohn's disease receiving therapy.Correlation with the course of disease.Patients and methods 81 follow-up MRI-studies in 25 patients conducted within a period of 3 weeks to 4 years were evaluated retrospectively.Therapy consisted in various combinations of antibiotics and immunosuppressive agents and if necessary operation. The findings of the MRI-studies were correlated with clinical data (e.g.operation of Crohn's complications) and the subjective perception during therapy. The morphological substrate of Crohn's disease in the Hydro-MRI images is reliably detected. Especially in a delineation of extraluminal changes MRI is superior to endoscopy and enteroclysis.Independent from clinical symptoms short- and middleterm follow-up showed inflammatory changes of the intestinal wall in all 25 patients. In 24/81 studies there was persistence or even progression of Crohn's disease in the MRI-studies, although patients were free of symptoms by the time of image acquisition. Hydro-MRI is a modality for the evaluation of inflammatory changes in patients with Crohn's disease.Independent from clinical symptoms persistence of Crohn's disease is detectable. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Evaluation typischer MRT-Befunde des Morbus Crohn unter medikamentoeser Therapie im Vergleich zum klinischen Krankheitsverlauf.Patienten und Methoden 81 Verlaufs-MRT von 25 Patienten ueber einen Zeitraum von 3 Wochen bis zu 4 Jahren mit gesichertem Morbus Crohn wurden retrospektiv ausgewertet. Die Therapie bestand aus unterschiedlichen Kombinationen von Antibiotika und Immunsuppressiva und bei klinischer Notwendigkeit in Operationen.Die MRT-Befunde wurden im Verlauf mit den klinischen Daten (OP von Komplikationen) und dem subjektiven Befinden der Patienten unter Therapie verglichen.Ergebnisse Das bildmorphologische Korrelat des Morbus Crohn laesst sich bei allen Patienten zuverlaessig in Hydro-MRT-Technik erfassen

  12. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  13. MRI in perianal fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI has become the method of choice for evaluating perianal fistulae due to its ability to display the anatomy of the sphincter muscles orthogonally, with good contrast resolution. In this article we give an outline of the classification of perianal fistulae and present a pictorial assay of sphincter anatomy and the MRI findings in perianal fistulae. This study is based on a retrospective analysis of 43 patients with a clinical diagnosis of perianal fistula. MRI revealed a total of 44 fistulae in 35 patients; eight patients had only perianal sinuses

  14. MRI of brachial plexopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sureka, J. [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)], E-mail: drjyoticmch@rediffmail.com; Cherian, R.A.; Alexander, M.; Thomas, B.P. [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)

    2009-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the primary imaging technique in the evaluation of brachial plexus pathology, and plays an important role in the identification, localization, and characterization of the cause. Improvements in MRI technique have helped in detecting changes in the signal intensity of nerves, subtle enhancement, and in detecting perineural pathology, thereby refining the differential diagnosis. The present review of the visualization of brachial plexus abnormalities using MRI is based on a review of 26 cases. The causes include trauma and a spectrum of non-traumatic causes, such as acute idiopathic/viral plexitis, metastases, immune-mediated plexitis, and mass lesions compressing the brachial plexus.

  15. Relative efficacy of different MRI signs in diagnosing active Crohn's disease, compared against a histological gold standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been growing interest in the use of MRI in assessing Crohn's disease because of its lack of ionising radiation. Many MRI signs have been described in the literature, but their relative utility is unknown. The MRIs of the bowel performed at 1.5 Tesla were blindly reviewed on 26 patients with recent histology (surgery and/or colonoscopy and their associated reports) according to a dedicated pro forma. Each patient's bowel was divided into nine segments. Each segment was assessed as to the presence or absence of 15 MRI signs described in the literature: abnormal gadolinium enhancement (both subjective and objective), wall oedema, fat oedema, fat proliferation, nodal enlargement, free fluid, wall nodularity, serosal blurring, mural thickening >4 mm, stricture, multi-segmental disease, fistula, abscess and layered contrast enhancement. The results were compared against a histological gold standard with a six-point scale of disease severity. MRI correctly identified all 15 patients with at least established mucosal disease, and three of eight with only mild mucosal disease. Combining these results, a positive MRI correlated highly with at least early mucosal disease (positive predictive value 95%), while the presence of established mucosal disease was unlikely if MRI was negative (negative predictive value 100%). The MRI signs found to be the most sensitive for detecting active Crohn's disease were those related to the bowel wall, namely, wall thickening, nodularity, contrast enhancement and oedema. The most specific signs were the presence of multi-segmental disease, layered contrast enhancement and complications (fistula and abscess).

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  17. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  19. Use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: Statements of the Italian Group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annese, Vito; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of biological therapies, particularly anti-TNFα agents, has revolutionized the management of inflammatory bowel disease in those cases which are refractory to conventional treatment; however these drugs are not risk-free and their use has substantially increased the cost of treatment. As marketing protection expires for original, first-generation biopharmaceuticals, lower-cost "copies" of these drugs produced by competitor companies-referred to as biosimilars-are already entering the market. In September 2013, the European Medicines Agency approved two infliximab biosimilars for treatment of adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients, a decision based largely on efficacy and safety data generated in studies of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For many clinicians, extrapolation practices and the general question of interchangeability between biosimilars and reference biologics are cause for concern. In the present paper, the Italian Group for inflammatory bowel disease presents its statements on these issues, with emphasis on the peculiar clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease and the importance of providing physicians and patients with adequate information and guarantees on the safety and efficacy of these new drugs in the specific setting of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25139379

  20. Leukocyte migration in experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Van Rees

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of leukocytes from the circulation into tissue by transendothelial migration, is mediated subsequently by adhesion molecules such as selectins, chemokines and integrins. This multistep paradigm, with multiple molecular choices at each step, provides a diversity in signals. The influx of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes into inflamed tissue is important in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of each of these groups of adhesion molecules in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, either in human disease or in animal models, will be discussed below. Furthermore, the possibilities of blocking these different steps in the process of leukocyte extravasation in an attempt to prevent further tissue damage, will be taken into account.

  1. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy is an endoscopic method that provides in vivo real-time imaging of the mucosa at a cellular level, elucidating mucosal changes that are undetectable by white light endoscopy. This paper systematically reviews current indications and perspectives...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...

  2. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck;

    2012-01-01

    European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These...... results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects....

  3. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 ± 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 ± 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 ± 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air

  4. Arthritic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, C. H.; Lee, C H; Lee, J.; Song, C. H.; Lee, C.W.; Kim, W. H.; S.K. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is commonly associated with arthritic manifestations. They are divided into three clinical categories; peripheral arthritis, spondylitis, and sacroiliitis. To evaluate the incidence of arthritis associated with IBD in Korea, we retrospectively reviewed one hundred and twenty-nine patients with IBD, 77 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 52 with Crohn's disease (CD). Arthritis occurred in twenty-two patients (17.1%); 15 with UC(19.6%), 7 with CD (13.5%). Patients ...

  5. Small bowel neoplasm - a diagnostic dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although uncommon, small bowel tumors often present as a diagnostic dilemma for the clinicians. This important clinical entity requires various diagnostic steps and quite often these steps have to be repeated to reach a firm diagnosis. We present here our experience with three such cases and a brief review of the literature regarding the presentation and the diagnostic steps found helpful in arriving at a diagnosis. (author)

  6. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  7. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    OpenAIRE

    NasirKhan, Mohammad U; Abir, Farshad; Longo, Walter; Kozol, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial. Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique, some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are...

  8. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  9. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: PartⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan BR Thomson; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Hugh Freeman

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology,in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases.Over 1000 publications were reviewed,and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered.In Part Ⅱ we review six topics:absorption,short bowel syndrome,smooth muscle function and intestinal motility,tumors,diagnostic imaging,and cystic fibrosis.

  10. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and thioguanine. We will briefly summarize dose recommendations, indications for thiopurine therapy and side effects which are relevant in clinical practice. We discuss some currently debated topics, ...

  11. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  12. Environment and the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G; on behalf of the Alberta IBD Consortium

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  13. Environmental Triggers for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD; Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC)] are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that are due to a dysregulated immune response to intestinal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Despite advances in genetics, the likelihood of occurrence of disease remains incompletely explained and there appears to be a strong role for the environment in mediating risk of disease. Smoking remains the most widely studied and replicated risk factor, contributin...

  14. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  15. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, N. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Atri, M. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)]. E-mail: mostafa.atri@sw.ca; Ryan, S. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Haddad, R. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Smith, A. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 {+-} 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 {+-} 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 {+-} 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  16. Functional findings in irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Posserud, Iris; Ersryd, Amanda; Simrén, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    The pathophysiology of IBS is complex and still incompletely known. Both central and peripheral factors, including psychosocial factors, abnormal GI motility and secretion, and visceral hypersensitivity, are thought to contribute to the symptoms of IBS. Several studies have demonstrated altered GI motor function in IBS patients and the pattern differs between IBS subgroups based on the predominant bowel pattern. Few studies have so far addressed GI secretion in IBS, but there are some evidenc...

  17. Asian Motility Studies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-01-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotili...

  18. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad U NasirKhan; Farshad Abir; Walter Longo; Robert Kozol

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial.Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique,some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are paramount.

  19. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H2 and CH4 gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence...

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of ...

  1. Biologic Concentration Testing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically pe...

  2. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla; Holubar, Stefan D

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased su...

  3. An atypical case of large bowel obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Kaylie E.; Arthur, James

    2013-01-01

    In Europe up to nine per cent of people suffer from renal calculi during their lifetime. Staghorn calculi are common and account for ∼11% of cases. Classic presentations include persistent loin pain, recurrent pyelonephritis or cystitis-like symptoms, renal colic or occasional haematuria. We present what we believe to be the first documented case of large bowel obstruction caused by a benign colonic stricture formed secondary to extravasation of a staghorn calculus.

  4. Immunogenetic Susceptibilities in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rotter, Jerome I

    1990-01-01

    It is now clear that the major identified risk factor for the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is a positive family history. Furthermore, the available data in spouses and twins indicate that the genetic susceptibility is due in large measure to shared familial predisposition. This emphasizes the importance of identifying the actual familial susceptibilities. Given the data for immunopathogenetic etiologies in the genesis of IBD, the logical candidate genes are those that involve the immune...

  5. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  6. Sellar inflammatory mass with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh J; Maguire, John

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with different intracranial disorders. An inflammatory sellar mass is very rare but includes a variety of noninfectious causes including lymphocytic hypophysitis, granulomatous inflammation and Wegener’s granulomatosis. A 32-year-old man was diagnosed with an inflammatory sellar mass associated with an extensive colonic inflammatory process clinically characteristic of Crohn’s disease. The concurrent onset of these inflammatory disorders in distinc...

  7. Case report: Congenital short bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Palle Lalitha; Reddy Balaji

    2010-01-01

    Congenital short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a relatively rare condition as compared to acquired SBS. It is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infants usually present with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and diarrhea. It is important to suspect and diagnose this condition promptly, as early initiation of parenteral nutrition or surgery, if necessary, may result in a favorable outcome. We discuss a case of an infant aged 26 days, who presented with failure to thrive, recur...

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome and its psychological management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikesh Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic and disabling gastrointestinal problem that affects psychosocial functioning as well as the quality of life. This case study reports the utility of cognitive behavior therapy as a psychological intervention procedure in a chronic case of IBS. The use of psychological intervention was found to result in a reduction of anxiety; amelioration of the symptoms associated with IBS and improved functioning.

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  10. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become available at a time in which shoulder pathology is more frequently seen. It is a noninvasive procedure that does not use ionizing radiation. It provides detailed visualization of soft-tissue structures that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Though not as widely available as conventional radiographs or computed tomography scanning, the number of MRI units worldwide is increasing steadily. The main features of the present book are as follows: The physical basis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), normal shoulder anatomy and MRI, diagnosis of shoulder disorders, MRI of patients with shoulder pain or instability, case studies as well as treatment of shoulder disorders. (orig./MG) With 145 figs

  11. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  12. MRI of myelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hodel, J.; Outteryck, O; Jissendi, P; Zins, M.; Leclerc, X; Pruvo, J P

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of myelitis relies on MRI. The purpose of this review is to describe the imaging findings in patients with myelitis through clinical cases. MR findings in Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica and others Transverse Myelitis are highlighted.

  13. Persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction in an adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haridimos Markogiannakis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Konstantinos G Toutouzas; Panagiotis Drimousis; Sotirios Georgios Panoussopoulos; Stilianos Katsaragakis

    2007-01-01

    An extremely rare case of persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction is presented. A 20-year-old female patient without medical history presented with colicky abdominal pain, vomiting, absence of passage of gas and feces, and abdominal distension of 24 h duration. Physical examination and blood tests were normal. Abdominal X-ray showed small bowel obstruction.Computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated dilated small bowel and a band originating from the umbilicus and continuing between the small bowel loops;an omphalomesenteric duct remnant was suspected. In exploratory laparotomy, persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small bowel obstruction was identified and resected. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. Although persistent omphalomesenteric duct is an extremely infrequent cause of small bowel obstruction in adult patients, it should be taken into consideration in patients without any previous surgical history.

  14. The epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canavan C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Canavan, Joe West, Timothy Card Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Abstract: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional condition of the bowel that is diagnosed using clinical criteria. This paper discusses the nature of the diagnostic process for IBS and how this impacts epidemiological measurements. Depending on the diagnostic criteria employed, IBS affects around 11% of the population globally. Around 30% of people who experience the symptoms of IBS will consult physicians for their IBS symptoms. These people do not have significantly different abdominal symptoms to those who do not consult, but they do have greater levels of anxiety and lower quality of life. Internationally, there is a female predominance in the prevalence of IBS. There is 25% less IBS diagnosed in those over 50 years and there is no association with socioeconomic status. IBS aggregates within families and the genetic and sociological factors potentially underlying this are reviewed. Patients diagnosed with IBS are highly likely to have other functional disease and have more surgery than the general population. There is no evidence that IBS is associated with an increased mortality risk. The epidemiological evidence surrounding these aspects of the natural history is discussed. Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, epidemiology, prevalence, mortality, natural history

  15. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been accurately established. Using single photon absorptiometry (SPA) and vertebral quantitative computerized tomography (QCT) the authors measured bone mineral content (BMC) in 75 unselected patients with IBD. Osteoporosis was present in 23 (31%). Seven had cortical and trabecular osteoporosis, 11 cortical only and five trabecular only. Three amenorrhoeic premenopausal females had clinically severe osteoporosis and a further 4 had vertebral crush fractures. The median lifetime steroid dose in osteoporotic patients was significantly greater than in patients with normal BMC; most patients with osteoporosis had small bowel IBD with one or more resections. Repeat QCT measurements in 18 patients after one year were unchanged in 12, increased in one and decreased between 10 and 37 mg/ml K2HPO4 in 5 of whom four were receiving steroids. Radial BMC decreased in one patient, increased in one and was unchanged in the remainder. Thus, osteoporosis was present in 30% of these patients, with severe clinical disease in three young females. Rapid spinal trabecular bone loss was demonstrated over the course of one year in some patients. Steroid therapy, amenorrhoe and small bowel IBD with resection appear to be important risk factors

  16. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients. PMID:24516961

  17. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients. PMID:26354428

  18. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences. PMID:26648465

  19. MRI of intracranial calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Wha; Chang, Kee Hyun; Park, Jung Mi; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Recently computed tomography(CT) has been rapidly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of majority of intracranial diseases. But MRI still has some limitation, one of which is its inferiority in detecting calcification. MRI of intracranial calcification has been known to be variable in signal intensity. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI of 26 patients with intracranial calcified lesions in order to evaluate the MR intensity of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detecting calcification in various intracranial lesions. All the MRI were obtained using routine T1-and T2-weighted spin eco pulse sequences on 2.0T superconducting system. The 26 patients consisted of 13 brain tumors (4 oligodendrogliomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 2 astrocytomas, 1 gem cell tumor, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 ependympma, and pathologically unconfirmed 2 cases), 11 infectious diseases (1 paragonimiasis, 1 sparganosis, 2 cysticercosis, 3 tuberculosis, and 4 unknown cases), and 2 undetermined pathologies. Eighty-two percent (9/11) of infections disease, and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group showed signal diminution or signal void on both T1-and T2-weighted image (T1W1, T2W1). Twenty-four percent (3/13) of brain tumors showed signal diminution on both T1W1 and T2W1. In 46% (6/13) and 61% (8/13) of brain tumors the signal intensities were isointense on T1W1 and T1W1, respectively. Unexpectedly, 3 oligodendrogliomas showed high signal intensity on T1W1, two of which showed com plexed signal intensity mixed with high, iso, and low signal intensities on T2W1. In remained cases (18% (2/11) of infectious diseases and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group) the signal intensities were mixed. With simultaneous review of CT and MRI in each case, the calcification (at least one in cases showing multiple ones) was identifiable on MRI in 62% (8/13) of rumors, 82% (9/11) of infectious diseases, and 100% (2/2) in undetermined group. In 36% (4/11) of infectious diseases, fewer number of

  20. MRI of the penis

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparen...

  1. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MRI Assessment Program involves installation and operation of five MRI units in Australian public hospitals and the evaluation at each unit of the cost and efficacy of the technology over a period of two years. This first report in a series presents preliminary usage and cost data for the year to 30 June 1987 as well as describing the background and the data set. 6 figs., tabs

  2. MRI in osteochondrosis dissecans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The osseous manifestations of osteochondrosis dissecans are well demonstrated by conventional and computerised tomography. Beyond that, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is effective in evaluating the vitality and loosening of an osseous dissecate. Subchondral cavities and cartilaginous defects are detected with high acccuracy. Further, MRI seems to be a useful method in childhood to differentiate a variant irregularity of the osseous articular surface from definite osteochondrosis dissecans. (orig.)

  3. MRI of plantar fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, B.; Grenier, P. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente Diagnostique et Interventionelle, Hopital de la Pitie, 83, boulevard de l`Hopital, F-75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1997-12-01

    At present, MRI is the only imaging method that can precisely visualize lesions of the superficial plantar aponeurosis, whether they be musculoaponeurositides, enthesopathies or tears, and whether they be acute or chronic, with or without complications. By its direct visualization of the lesion, MRI enables an accurate assessment of the injury to be made and thereby better orients the therapeutic strategy. (orig.) With 11 figs., 15 refs.

  4. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  5. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  6. Rifaximin in irritable bowel syndrome: rationale, evidence and clinical use

    OpenAIRE

    Saadi, Mohammed; McCallum, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional bowel disease that affects up to 15% of the US population. The majority of patients with IBS have significant bloating and gas. Recent evidence is beginning to suggest that patients with IBS may have an alteration in the gastrointestinal flora. Specifically, findings suggest that patients with IBS have excessive bacteria in the small bowel, referred to as bacterial overgrowth. Therefore there may be benefits of antibiotic-based ther...

  7. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  8. 18B. Integrative Solutions for the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mullin, Gerard; Lee, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Pediatrics The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel movements. The diagnosis of IBS is established by the Rome III criteria. IBS afflicts 10% to 15% of the US population (30 million Americans) and is the most common digestive disorder seen in the primary care setting. Patients with IBS have an impaired quality of life and high rate of absenteeism from work with diminished pr...

  9. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible cau...

  10. Dysmotility of the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kellow, J E; Phillips, S F; Miller, L J; Zinsmeister, A R

    1988-01-01

    Though the pathophysiology of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is commonly attributed to dysfunction of the large intestine, evidence exists to incriminate the small bowel. In order to further explore the role of the small bowel in IBS several stimuli were applied, in an attempt to unmask the dysmotility of the jejunum and ileum. These included infusions of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-OP), a high fat meal, neostigmine and balloon distension of the ileum. Three groups (n = 8) each of ag...

  11. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwani, N., E-mail: nsarwani@hmc.psu.ed [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Tappouni, R.; Tice, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  12. The Usefulness of Capsule Endoscopy for Small Bowel Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Su; Shim, Ki-Nam; Choi, Myung-Gyu; ,

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has expanded the range of endoscopic examination of the small bowel. The clinical application of VCE is mainly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and small bowel tumor is one of the clinically significant diagnoses of VCE, often requiring subsequent invasive interventions. Small bowel tumors are detected with a frequency of around 4% with VCE in indications of OGIB, iron deficiency anemia, unexplained abdominal pain, and others. Protruding mass with ble...

  13. The diagnostic role of MDCT enterography in small bowel lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan I. Megally; Hosam eldin Mohamed Elmalah; Gehan S. Seifeldein; Nisreen Adel Abbas; Hussien Ahmed Elamin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of MDCT enterography in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases. Patient and methods: Thirty nine patients suspected to have small bowel diseases were examined with 64 MDCT enterography. Result: MDCT enterography easily diagnosed small intestinal diseases which confirmed with histopathological results, operative data and follow up. Conclusions: MDCT can be used as a front-line imaging and one stop imaging modality for the detection of small bowel diseases....

  14. Effect of cholecystectomy on bowel function: a prospective, controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Hearing, S; Thomas, L.; HEATON, K; Hunt, L.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Published estimates of the prevalence of postcholecystectomy diarrhoea derive from retrospective or uncontrolled data. They ignore functional bowel syndromes and possible changes in diet and drug use.
AIMS—To determine prospectively whether and how often cholecystectomy leads to changes in bowel function and bowel symptoms, especially to liquid stools, over and above any non-specific effect of laparoscopic surgery.
SUBJECTS—Patients: 106 adults undergoing laparoscopic cholecystecto...

  15. 5-Millimeter Trocar-Site Bowel Herniation Following Laparoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Khurshid, Nauman; Chung, Maurice; Horrigan, Terrence; Manahan, Kelly; Geisler, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This is a case report of a 5-mm trocar-site large bowel herniation following laparoscopic tubal sterilization. During laparoscopic sterilization, the 5-mm port site was closed initially. Large bowel herniation was recognized at the end of the case and managed immediately by laparoscopically reducing the hernia and closing the port site without any short- or long-term complications. Trocar-site bowel hernia is a rare complication after laparoscopic surgery. It is usu...

  16. Small bowel obstruction secondary to a liberated Meckel's enterolith

    OpenAIRE

    Demetriou, Vias; McKean, David; Briggs, James; Moore, Niall

    2013-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a short history of abdominal pain which rapidly progressed to absolute constipation. An abdominal radiograph demonstrated a paucity of bowel gas and a 4 cm lesion with concentric laminar calcification projected over the pelvis. A CT scan revealed a 4 cm giant Meckel's diverticulum, downstream of which a laminated mass was impacted in the lumen of the distal ileum causing small bowel obstruction. Subsequent surgery confirmed small bowel obstruction secondary ...

  17. Intussusception of the bowel in adults: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Marinis, Athanasios; Yiallourou, Anneza; Samanides, Lazaros; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Anastasopoulos, Georgios; Vassiliou, Ioannis; Theodosopoulos, Theodosios

    2009-01-01

    Intussusception of the bowel is defined as the telescoping of a proximal segment of the gastrointestinal tract within the lumen of the adjacent segment. This condition is frequent in children and presents with the classic triad of cramping abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and a palpable tender mass. However, bowel intussusception in adults is considered a rare condition, accounting for 5% of all cases of intussusceptions and almost 1%-5% of bowel obstruction. Eight to twenty percent of cases a...

  18. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  19. MRI of fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, rats and mice are popular and useful as an experimental model for MRI. However, MRI for fishes has been unknown. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of living fishes as a new experimental model for MRI. MR images were collected with a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE) or echo-planar imaging pulse sequence (EPI) using 2T MR imaging system for animal. Carp, which was able to be alive for a long time in the air, was examined. Enhancement study was examined by use of Gd-DOTMA (gadolinium hydrogen alpha, alpha', alpha'', alpha'''-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate). On both SE and EPI images, the internal components of the head and chest in carp were clearly recognized. On the T1-weighted image acquisition time of MRI with sufficient resolution was short (in about one minute) in comparison with that of rat. The head in carp was well enhanced by administration of Gd-DOTMA on the T1-weighted image. In addition, the time course of contrast enhancement effect of images was observed after administration of Gd-DOTMA. The authors concluded that fishes, such as a carp, can be readily imaged on MRI, and could be potential in the future investigation of contrast enhancement effect and relaxation effect as a living body phantom for MRI. (author)

  20. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Abdelmoumene, A.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Gailloud, M.C.; Resnick, D. [CHUV, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  1. Pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is just at the resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they can be seen radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor, inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  2. Multi-detector CT (MDCT in bowel and mesenteric injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajjalla Ravikumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate multi-detector CT (MDCT findings in bowel and mesenteric injury due to blunt abdominal trauma.Method: Retrospective evaluation of MDCT scan reports of patients admitted in Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar with bowel and mesenteric injury during the period of January 2005 to April 2008.Results: MDCT, without using oral contrast, clearly demonstrated various specific and less specific findings of bowel and mesenteric injury.Conclusion: Multi-detector CT is an excellent diagnostic modality in bowel and mesenteric injury. Routine administration of oral contrast agent is not mandatory for initial evaluation of these patients.

  3. CT findings of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of CT in the detection of injuries of the solid visceral organ is well established, but the value of CT in diagnosing small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma is controversal. This study was conducted to ascertain CT finding of small bowel rupture result from abdominal trauma. A retrospective analysis of preoperative abdominal CT findings in 40 patients was performed. Small bowel rupture was confirmed by surgery. Precontrast and postcontrast enhanced CT images were obtained in all patients. Diagnostic findings of small bowel rupture including pneumoperitoneum or retroperitoneal air, discontinuity of the bowel wall and extravasation of oral contrast materials were observed in 33 cases(83%). Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free air was seen in 31 cases(78%) and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free fluid collection was seen in 38 patients(95%). Small bowel wall was thickened in 31 cases(78%), bowel wall was enhanced in 12 cases(30%) and bowel wall discontinuity and extravasation of oral contrast material was seen in 5 cases, respectively. The CT scan is sensitive and effective modality for evaluation of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma, because of high detectability of diagnostic and suggestive CT findings

  4. The pathophysiology of the nodular and micronodular small bowel fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal small bowel fold is easily seen on conventional studies of the small intestine, but visualization of the small bowel villus is at the limit of resolution of current roentgenographic technique. When the villi are enlarged, they appear radiographically as an irregularity or micronodularity of the small bowel fold. The anatomy of the fold and the pathophysiology of diseases producing fold nodularity (tumor,inflammatory disease, NLH, mastocytosis) and micronodularity (lymphangiectasia, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, Whipple disease) are presented, with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. The radiologist should suggest certain diseases or conditions based on the roentgenographic characteristics of the closely analyzed small bowel fold

  5. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wurnig, Moritz; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.Patak@patak.ch [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Clinic, Radiology, Witellikerstrasse 40, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments.

  6. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments

  7. Fetal gastrointestinal MRI: all that glitters in T1 is not necessarily colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been described that both the colon and distal ileum present with a physiological hypersignal on T1-weighted sequences during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy because of their protein-rich meconium content, it was unclear whether the normal characteristics that have been described on fetal MRI can be applied to gastrointestinal (GI) obstructions. To analyse the localisation value of T1 hypersignal within dilated bowel loops in fetuses with gastrointestinal tract obstruction. A retrospective 4-year multicentre study analysing cases of fetal GI obstruction in which MRI demonstrated T1 hypersignal content in the dilated loops. Data collected included gestational age (GA) at diagnosis, bowel appearance on US, CFTR gene mutations and amniotic levels of gastrointestinal enzymes. The suggested prenatal diagnosis was eventually compared to postnatal imaging and surgery. Eleven patients were included. The median GA at US diagnosis was 23 weeks (range 13-32). In eight cases there was a single dilated loop, while several segments were affected in three. The median GA at MRI was 29 weeks (range 23-35). One case presented with cystic fibrosis mutations. Final prenatally suspected diagnoses were distal ileal atresia or colon in nine cases and proximal atresia in two. Postnatal findings were proximal jejunal atresia in nine cases and meconium ileus in two. In five cases the surgical findings demonstrated short bowel syndrome. In cases of fetal occlusion, T1 hypersignal should not be considered as a sign of distal ileal or colonic occlusion. The obstruction may be proximal, implying a risk of small bowel syndrome, which requires adequate parental counselling. (orig.)

  8. Fetal gastrointestinal MRI: all that glitters in T1 is not necessarily colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombani, Marina [La Timone Children' s Hospital, Service de Radiopediatrie, Marseille (France); Ferry, Mathilde [Groupe Rennais d' Imagerie Medicale, Service de Radiologie, Rennes (France); Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Cassart, Marie [Erasme Hospital, Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Couture, Alain [Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Pediatric Radiology, Montpellier (France); Guibaud, Laurent [Hopital Femme Mere Enfant, Pediatric and Fetal Imaging, Lyon (France); Avni, Fred [Erasme Hospital, Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Gorincour, Guillaume [La Timone Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, Marseille (France)

    2010-07-15

    It has been described that both the colon and distal ileum present with a physiological hypersignal on T1-weighted sequences during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy because of their protein-rich meconium content, it was unclear whether the normal characteristics that have been described on fetal MRI can be applied to gastrointestinal (GI) obstructions. To analyse the localisation value of T1 hypersignal within dilated bowel loops in fetuses with gastrointestinal tract obstruction. A retrospective 4-year multicentre study analysing cases of fetal GI obstruction in which MRI demonstrated T1 hypersignal content in the dilated loops. Data collected included gestational age (GA) at diagnosis, bowel appearance on US, CFTR gene mutations and amniotic levels of gastrointestinal enzymes. The suggested prenatal diagnosis was eventually compared to postnatal imaging and surgery. Eleven patients were included. The median GA at US diagnosis was 23 weeks (range 13-32). In eight cases there was a single dilated loop, while several segments were affected in three. The median GA at MRI was 29 weeks (range 23-35). One case presented with cystic fibrosis mutations. Final prenatally suspected diagnoses were distal ileal atresia or colon in nine cases and proximal atresia in two. Postnatal findings were proximal jejunal atresia in nine cases and meconium ileus in two. In five cases the surgical findings demonstrated short bowel syndrome. In cases of fetal occlusion, T1 hypersignal should not be considered as a sign of distal ileal or colonic occlusion. The obstruction may be proximal, implying a risk of small bowel syndrome, which requires adequate parental counselling. (orig.)

  9. An immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease of the small bowel: CT and small bowel series findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is rare and is known to involve various organs. We present a case of histologically proven IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel with imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and small bowel series. CT showed irregular wall thickening, loss of mural stratification and aneurysmal dilatation of the distal ileum. Small bowel series showed aneurysmal dilatations, interloop adhesion with traction and abrupt angulation.

  10. An immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease of the small bowel: CT and small bowel series findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Jeong Won; Hong, Hye Sook; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul [Hallym University Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is rare and is known to involve various organs. We present a case of histologically proven IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the small bowel with imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and small bowel series. CT showed irregular wall thickening, loss of mural stratification and aneurysmal dilatation of the distal ileum. Small bowel series showed aneurysmal dilatations, interloop adhesion with traction and abrupt angulation.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease—the role of cross-sectional imaging techniques in the investigation of the small bowel

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasakos, Athanasios; Mazioti, Argyro; Economopoulos, Nikolaos; Kontopoulou, Christina; Stathis, Georgios; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis; Alexopoulou, Efthymia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and adolescents is based on the integration of clinical, biological, endoscopic, histological and radiological data. Methods: The most important part of the diagnosis is the histology, which is acquired by endoscopy. Imaging of the small bowel has changed in recent years, but the imaging goals are primarily to determine the extent of small bowel involvement, assess complications and define candidates for surger...

  12. The value of hyoscine butylbromide in pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, M.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ben.taylor@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk; Carrington, B.M.; Bonington, S.C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Swindell, R. [Department of Medical Statistics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of hyoscine butylbromide (HBB) on image quality and lesion and organ visualization in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Materials and methods: A prospective, ethically approved study was undertaken of 47 patients attending for pelvic MRI at a cancer centre. T2-weighted transverse and sagittal sequences were performed before and after intravenous injection of 20 mg HBB. Three radiologists independently scored anonymized image series for overall image quality, visualization of pelvic lesions and visualization of individual pelvic organs. Statistical analysis was performed to assess improvements in radiologists' scores post-HBB administration. Radiologists also assessed pre-HBB administration T1-weighted images for degree of bowel peristalsis to determine whether this could predict improvement in post-HBB T2-weighted image scores. Side effects of HBB were recorded using a patient questionnaire. Results: Radiologists' scores for image quality and lesion visualization were significantly higher on the post-HBB administration T2-weighted series (p < 0.0005). Scores for the visualization of the bladder, rectum, pelvic bowel, prostate, and seminal vesicles (all p < 0.0005), cervix (p = 0.019) and vagina (p = 0.0001) were also significantly higher post-HBB administration. Scores for the degree of peristalsis on T1-weighted images were not related to improvement in image quality or lesion visualization on T2-weighted images post-HBB administration. Side effects of HBB were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion: Intravenous HBB administration improves image quality and lesion visualization in oncological pelvic MRI and is recommended for routine use.

  13. Ileo-ileal Intussusception and Bowel Obstruction Caused by Plasmablastic Lymphoma of Small Bowel- A Rare Entity in Rare Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Intussusception of small bowel is considered a rare cause of bowel obstruction in adults accounting for only about 1% of bowel obstruction in adults. Intussusception in adults is uncommon with 95% cases of intussusceptions occurring in children. Adult intussusception from small intestinal lymphoma is also rare with only 36 cases reported in the literature between 2000 and 2011. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is an aggressive lymphoid neoplasm usually seen in the oral cavity in the clinical setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the small intestine is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of plasmablastic lymphoma of small bowel with ileoileal intussusception in an HIV-negative immunocompetent male patient.

  14. Incidental findings at MRI-enterography in patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Nathan, Torben; Kjeldsen, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency and clinical impact of incidental findings detected with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-enterography in patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Incidental findings were defined as unexpected lesions outside the small intestine, not...... previously known or suspected at the time of referral, and not related to inflammatory bowel disease. Through a systematic review of medical charts we analyzed the clinical impact of incidental findings, and compared the MRI findings with subsequent diagnostic procedures. RESULTS: A total of 283 patients...... detected in 17 patients (6.0%). Incidental findings led to 12 further interventions in 9 patients (3.2%) revealing previously unknown pathological conditions in 5 (1.8%). One patient (0.4%) underwent surgery and one patient was diagnosed with a malignant disease. MRI detected incidental colonic lesions in...

  15. Pelvic actinomycosis presenting with a large abscess and bowel stenosis with marked response to conservative treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozawa Hiroaki

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pelvic actinomycosis is a rare disease that can result in abscess formation, bowel obstruction, and other serious complications. Moreover, the correct diagnosis can seldom be established before radical surgery because the disease often mimics pelvic neoplasms. It has been recently recognized that pelvic actinomycosis is associated with long-term use of an intrauterine contraceptive device. We report a woman with a long-standing intrauterine contraceptive device who visited our hospital complaining of symptoms mimicking large bowel ileus with a subacute course. X-ray fluorography and sigmoidoscopy showed marked stenosis in the sigmoid colon but rejected the possibility of colon cancers. Abdomino-pelvic CT and MRI revealed a huge abscess lying over the urinary bladder and anterior to the uterus. Furthermore, a cervical Papanicolaou smear disclosed Actinomyces species. We removed the intrauterine device from the patient. Subsequent high-dose ampicillin administration led to dramatic shrinkage of the abscess and improved the management of the bowel movement quickly. This is a successful case of symptomatic pelvic actinomycosis that was correctly diagnosed and treated without unnecessary surgical intervention.

  16. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  17. MRI in Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Kalita, J. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Salwani, V. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gupta, R.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gujral, R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We document the MRI features in seven patients with Japanese encephalitis. MRI was carried out on a 1.5 T system within 10-60 days of onset. In all the patients MRI revealed bilateral thalamic lesions, haemorrhagic in five. Signal changes were present in the cerebrum in four patients, the midbrain and cerebellum in three each, the pons in two and the basal ganglia in one. The lesions were haemorrhagic in three of the four patients with lesions in the cortex, two of the three with lesions in the midbrain and cerebellum, but the pontine lesions were haemorrhagic in both patients. Spinal cord involvement was seen in one of the three patients who underwent MRI. In two patients MRI was repeated 3 years after the onset, showing marked reduction in abnormal signal; and all the lesions gave low signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Bilateral thalamic involvement, especially haemorrhagic, may be considered characteristic of Japanese encephalitis, especially in endemic areas. (orig.)

  18. MRI of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  19. Contrast agents for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible. - Highlights: • This paper studies the contrast agents for MRI. • Fe―Co alloys and Mn-ferrites exhibit suitable contrast enhancement. • Nonhydrolytic thermal-decomposition synthetic method is suitable to produce MNPs. • This method allows controlling the size, magnetic dopants, magneto-crystalline anisotropy. • The increase in the superparamagnetic size leads to the contrast-enhancement

  20. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosz, Aldona; Winckler, Björn; Lundin, Elin; Zakikhany, Katherina; Sandström, Gunnar; Ye, Weimin; Engstrand, Lars; Lindberg, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy volunteers (11 females) aged 20-(32)-48 years. Sequences were analysed based on taxonomic classification. The phyla with the highest total abundance across all samples were: Firmicutes (43%), Proteobacteria (23%), Bacteroidetes (15%), Actinobacteria (9.3%) and Fusobacteria (7.0%). The most abundant genera were: Streptococcus (19%), Veillonella (13%), Prevotella (12%), Rothia (6.4%), Haemophilus (5.7%), Actinobacillus (5.5%), Escherichia (4.6%) and Fusobacterium (4.3%). We found no difference among major phyla or genera between patients with IBS and controls. We identified a cluster of samples in the small bowel microbiota dominated by Prevotella, which may represent a common enterotype of the upper small intestine. The remaining samples formed a gradient, dominated by Streptococcus at one end and Escherichia at the other. PMID:25687743

  1. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  2. The heart in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsianos E.V.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cardiovascular involvement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been occasionally reported, mainly in the form of case reports. Endocardium derangement in IBD involves endocarditis and subendocardial abscess. Endocarditis may occur as a result of septicemia or due to the prolonged use of total parental nutrition (TPN catheters or/and immunosuppression. The cause of endocarditis may be bacterial or fungal and require surgery in several cases. Prophylaxis for endocarditis in selected IBD patients is discussed. Myocarditis or perimyocarditis in IBD is reported as an autoimmune phenomenon during bowel disease excacerbations or as a side-effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA formulations. Ulcerative colitis (UC patients seem to be at a higher risk for this complication compared to Crohn�s disease (CD patients. Myocardial infarctions, selenium deficiency during TPN, the role of prolonged steroid use and the association with giant cell myocarditis are topics which need further analysis. Pericardium involvement seems to be the most frequent type of cardiovascular complication in IBD caused by drugs (5-ASA, azathioprine, cyclosporine, pericardio-colonic fistulas or unknown causes (idiopathic and it may occasionally be the disease presenting symptom. Coronary artery status and other factors for cardiovascular risk, such as smoking, hyperlipidemia and exercise are also discussed. Electrocardiogram and ultrasonographic changes are not so uncommon and cardiogenic sudden death in IBD is reviewed. Intracavitary coagulation abnormalities, amyloidosis, heart failure and aortitis syndrome are topics included and discussed in this review. A list of tables contributes to a more systemic overview of this current knowledge. Key Words: heart, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, Crohn�s diseas

  3. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsy uses imaging ... Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsies are performed ...

  4. MRI Physics Workshop:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Saedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of the basic principle of imaging physics helps better understanding of normal anatomy and pathological imaging findings of the diseases."n"n This is more necessary in advanced imaging techniques like MRI because of the complexity of the basic physics of the technique. In basic MRI physics workshop, we discuss about this technique from the primary concepts. The content is very simplified and is showed by slides, animation and easy pictures for better understanding. In the beginning of the lecture, the structure of atoms and their magnetic characteristics are explained and then step by step, we learn how to use this character to produce signal and usages of it to make an image. Also basic pulse sequence will be explained subsequently. This workshop is recommended for all radiologists, residents of radiology, technologists and anyone who wants to know more about MRI.    

  5. MRI in gout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance of gouty tophus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is characteristic. On T1- and T2-weighted SE images, the signal intensity of tophaceous lesions is similar to that of muscles. According to the histology, T2-weighted SE images demonstrate extremely hyperintense signals, which reflect the high protein content in the amorpheous center of the tophus. The microscopic urate crystals deposited there have no MRI signal and are of no further diagnostic impact. Vascularized granulation tissue surrounding the tophus center enhance after intervenous application of contrast agents (Gadolinium). The inflammed tophus is associated with local edema, causing high signal intensity. MRI is superior to plain radiography for early detection of intraosseous tophi. Involvement of anatomical structures such as ligaments and tendons can be evaluated sufficiently. For peripheral joints, axial slice orientation is most helpful. (orig.)

  6. What I Need to Know about Bowel Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español What I Need to Know about Bowel Control Page ... about anal discomfort? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is a bowel control problem? You have a ...

  7. Blunt abdominal trauma with transanal small bowel evisceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushif Medappil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel evisceration through the anus can occur spontaneously or post traumatically. Traumatic transanal small bowel evisceration results from iatrogenic injuries, suction injuries, and blunt abdominal trauma (BAT. We report a 48-year-old female who presented with evisceration of small intestinal loops through the anus following BAT and discuss the etiologies and mechanisms of injury of this rare presentation.

  8. Visceral hypersensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome:pathophysiological mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kerckhoffs, A.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disease characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a disordered defecation. No unique pathophysiological mechanism has been identified. It is most likely a multifactorial disease involving alterations in intestinal microbiota composition, intestinal mucosal barrier, serine protease and serotonergic signalling components which may play a role in the visceral hypersensitivity. We showed alterations in microbiota composition...

  9. Small bowel angiodysplasia and novel disease associations: a cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holleran, Grainne

    2013-04-01

    Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias recurrently bleed, accounting for 3-5% of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The advent of small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has led to an increased recognition of small bowel angiodysplasias (SBAs) but little is known about their etiology. Previous small cohorts and case reports suggest an equal gender incidence and associations with cardiovascular disease, renal impairment, and coagulopathies.

  10. Potential viral pathogenic mechanism for new variant inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlmann, V; Martin, C. M.; Sheils, O; Pilkington, L; I. Silva; Killalea, A; Murch, S B; Walker-Smith, J; Thomson, M.; Wakefield, A J; O'Leary, J J

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A new form of inflammatory bowel disease (ileocolonic lymphonodular hyperplasia) has been described in a cohort of children with developmental disorder. This study investigates the presence of persistent measles virus in the intestinal tissue of these patients (new variant inflammatory bowel disease) and a series of controls by molecular analysis.

  11. Infantile Short Bowel Syndrome: short and long term evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Olieman

    2009-01-01

    textabstractInfantile short bowel syndrome is a condition which is characterized by malabsorption of nutrients, as a result of congenital intestinal shortening or massive small bowel resection. Survival rates have improved over the years, but morbidity remains high and clinical management of these p

  12. Small Bowel Imaging in Managing Crohn’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg G. Albert

    2012-01-01

    bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients.

  13. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal symptoms without a demonstrable physical cause. In a subgroup of patients, irritable bowel syndrome may be part of a cluster of psychosomatic symptoms related to childhood sexual abuse. To investigate this possibility, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the…

  14. Effects of bowel rehabilitation and combined trophic therapy on intestinal adaptation in short bowel patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Hao Wu; Zhao-Han Wu; Zhao-Guang Wu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of bowel rehabilitation and combined trophic therapy on intestinal adaptation in short bowel patients.METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with severe short-bowel syndrome (SBS) were employed in the present study, whose average length of jejunum-ileum was 35.8±21.2 cm. The TPN treatment was initiated early to attain positive nitrogen balance and prevent severe weight loss. The TPN composition was designated to be individualized and altered when necessary. Enteral feeding was given as soon as possible after resection and increased gradually. Meals were distributed throughout the day. Eight patients received treatment of growth hormone (0.14 mg/kg.day) and glutamine (0.3 g/kg.day) for 3 weeks. D-xylose test, 15N-Gly trace test and 13C-palmitic acid breath test were done to determine the patients' absorption capability.RESULTS: Thirty-three patients maintained well body weight and serum albumin concentration. The average time of follow-up for 33 survival patients was 5.9±4.3 years.Twenty-two patients weaned from TPN with an average TPN time of 9.5±6.6 months. Two patients, whose whole small bowel, ascending and transverse colon were resected received home TPN. An other 9 patients received parenteral or enteral nutritional support partly as well as oral diet. Three week rhGH+GLN therapy increased nutrients absorption but the effects were transient.CONCLUSION: By rehabilitation therapy, most short bowel patients could wean from parenteral nutrition. Dietary manipulation is an integral part of the treatment of SBS.Treatment with growth hormone and glutamine may increase nutrients absorption but the effects are not sustained beyond the treatment period.

  15. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Changing Associations to Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click, Benjamin; Whitcomb, David C

    2016-01-01

    Managing the health of individual patients suffering from complex disorders is a challenge and is costly. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a prototypic complex disorder of the small and large intestines. Susceptibility is complex, severity is variable, and response to treatment is unpredictable. Di Narzo et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e177; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.34) bring diverse teams of physicians and scientists together to break down the mechanisms of IBD by linking pathogenic genetic variants with altered gene expression in specific cell types causing IBD. Framing new findings in the context of other complex diseases provides a roadmap for predictive medicine. PMID:27607898

  16. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  17. Bowel Function in Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Jin Hwa; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young; Park, Ji Young

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate factors related to bowel function and colon motility in acute stroke patients. Method Fifty-one stroke patients (29 males, mean age 63.4±13.6 years, onset 13.4±4.8 days) were recruited and divided into two groups: constipation (n=25) and non-constipation (n=26) groups. We evaluated the amount of intake, voiding function, concomitant swallowing problem and colon transit time (CTT) using radio-opaque markers for ascending, descending and rectosigmoid colons. The Adapted...

  18. MR colonography in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimola, Jordi; Ordás, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    MR colonography has a high diagnostic accuracy for detecting Crohn disease (CD) activity and determining the extent and severity of lesions. In the setting of stricturing CD, MR colonography can provide a detailed map of the lesions, which is useful for clinical decision making. MR colonography can be used as an alternative to conventional colonoscopy in the setting of CD, or as a complementary tool in selected patients with ulcerative colitis. This article reviews the spectrum of MR colonography findings in colonic inflammatory bowel disease and discusses the potential applications and limitations of MR colonography. PMID:24238130

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene; Frisch, Morten; Langholz, Ebbe; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR...

  20. Retrospective comparison of magnetic resonance imaging features and histopathology in Crohn's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare histopathological findings of surgically resected bowel segments with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on Crohn's disease activity. Materials and methods: Patients who underwent a MR enterography or enteroclysis before surgery were included after informed consent. MRI features (T1-enhancement, T1 and T2 stratification, T2 signal intensity, bowel wall thickness, presence of ulcerations, comb sign, creeping fat, and disease activity) were assessed by three experienced abdominal radiologists. An acute inflammatory score based on histopathology (parameters: mucosal ulceration, edema, depth and degree of neutrophils) was calculated. Interobserver variability for subjective MRI features was also assessed. Results: Thirty-nine segments in 25 patients (mean age 38 years) were included. Of the MRI features, disease activity per segment and bowel wall thickness had a positive association with the acute inflammatory score (p < 0.05). T1-enhancement had a positive correlation with disease chronicity. All other MRI features did not have an association with the acute inflammatory score. Interobserver agreement between the three observers was weak to moderate. Conclusion: MR features bowel wall thickness and disease activity per-segment reflect disease activity in Crohn's disease patients.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... than 30 minutes from the onset of symptoms. Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ... CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have this exam in the first trimester of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... during MRI, but this is rarely a problem. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain ( ...

  13. MRI of vaginal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, C. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: carolina.lopez@bwhct.nhs.uk; Balogun, M. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Ganesan, R. [Department of Histopathology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Olliff, J.F. [University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the assessment of suspected vaginal pathology. This pictorial review demonstrates the MRI features and some of the histopathological findings of a variety of vaginal conditions. These may be congenital (total vaginal agenesis, partial vaginal agenesis, longitudinal vaginal septum, transverse vaginal septum), benign (Bartholin's cyst, diffuse vaginal inflammation, invasive endometriosis, ureterovaginal fistula, post-surgical appearances with the formation of a neovagina and adhesions) or malignant, usually due to extension or recurrence from another pelvic malignancy. In this paper, examples of the above are described and illustrated together with examples of the much rarer primary vaginal malignancies.

  14. MRI evaluation of tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present four cases of tuberous sclerosis examined with MRI. The patho-anatomic aspects are reviewed and analysed with respect to MRI data. MRI appears superior to the CT particularly for imaging of cortical tubers, cystic lesions, and heterotopic clusters; these last two features were never described with MRI before. Here is also presented the second progressive case of giant intracranial aneurysm associated with tuberous sclerosis. (orig.)

  15. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. (orig.)

  16. Imaging differentiation of phytobezoar and small-bowel faeces: CT characteristics with quantitative analysis in patients with small- bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ya-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Hsu, Hsian-He; Yu, Chih-Yung [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Wang, Hong-Hau [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Tri-Service General Hospital Songshan Branch, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Fan, Hsiu-Lung [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Chen, Ran-Chou [Taipei City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming Univeristy, Department of Biochemical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Chang, Wei-Chou [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming Univeristy, Department of Biochemical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China)

    2015-04-01

    The objective is to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to differentiate phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces in patients with small-bowel obstruction (SBO). We retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive SBO patients with surgically proven phytobezoars (n = 31) or adhesion with small-bowel faeces (n = 60). Two readers blinded to the diagnosis recorded the following MDCT features: degree of obstruction, transition point, mesenteric fatty stranding, intraperitoneal fluid, air-fluid level, pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal venous gas. MDCT measurements of the food debris length, attenuation, luminal diameter, and wall thickness of the obstructed bowel were also compared. A higher grade of obstruction with an absence of mesenteric fatty stranding and intraperitoneal fluid was more commonly seen in the phytobezoar group than in the small-bowel faeces group (p < 0.01). The food debris length (phytobezoar, 5.7 ± 2.8 cm; small-bowel feces, 20.3 ± 7.9 cm, p < 0.01) and mean attenuation (phytobezoar, -59.6 ± 43.3 Hounsfield units (HU); small-bowel faeces, 8.5 ± 7.7 HU, p <0.01) were significantly different between the two groups. The ROC curve showed that food debris length <9.5 cm and mean attenuation value < -11.75 HU predicted phytobezoar impaction. MDCT features with measurements of the food debris length and mean attenuation assist the differentiation of phytobezoar impaction and small-bowel faeces. (orig.)

  17. Plain magnetic resonance imaging as an alternative in evaluating inflammation and bowel damage in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke B; Rezanavaz-Gheshlagh, Bijan;

    2015-01-01

    carried out in addition to MRFT, to which the patients were referred. All patients underwent both examinations on the same day. For the evaluation, the bowel was divided into nine segments. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical findings, evaluated bowel wall thickness, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ...

  19. Management of patients with a short bowel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeremy M D Nightingale

    2001-01-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undemutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration,sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B12. Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalats renal atones and they may have problems with D (-)lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel,even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good.

  20. Biologic concentration testing in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2015-06-01

    Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically performed only when a patient presents with active inflammatory bowel disease symptoms or during a potential immune-mediated reaction to anti-TNF ("reactive" setting). However, proactive monitoring of anti-TNF concentrations with titration to a therapeutic window (i.e., therapeutic concentration monitoring) represents a new strategy with many potential clinical benefits including prevention of immunogenicity, less need for IFX rescue therapy, and greater durability of IFX treatment. This review will cover the salient features of anti-TNF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and provide a rational approach for the use of anti-TNF concentration testing in both the reactive and proactive settings. PMID:25590953

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinical aspects and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhoury M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc Fakhoury,1 Rebecca Negrulj,2 Armin Mooranian,2 Hani Al-Salami2 1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is defined as a chronic intestinal inflammation that results from host-microbial interactions in a genetically susceptible individual. IBDs are a group of autoimmune diseases that are characterized by inflammation of both the small and large intestine, in which elements of the digestive system are attacked by the body's own immune system. This inflammatory condition encompasses two major forms, known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients affected by these diseases experience abdominal symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloody stools, and vomiting. Moreover, defects in intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of patients affected by IBD. In this review, we first describe the types and symptoms of IBD and investigate the role that the epithelial barrier plays in the pathophysiology of IBD as well as the major cytokines involved. We then discuss steps used to diagnose this disease and the treatment options available, and finally provide an overview of the recent research that aims to develop new therapies for such chronic disorders. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, cytokines

  2. Nutritional therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, G

    1989-09-01

    Nutritional factors relative to IBS include diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Etiologically, foods do not cause IBS. A small percentage of patients with childhood allergic diatheses, usually in association with atopic dermatitis and asthma, may be intolerant to one or more of wheat, corn, dairy products, coffee, tea, or citrus fruits. Diagnostically, many patients labeled as IBS subjects are in fact intolerant to the ingestion of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, or combinations of fructose and sorbitol. A precise dietary history will characterize this group. Taken in its broadest context, IBS involves the entire hollow tract inclusive of esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The symptomatic presentation relative to the hollow organ involved allows the selection of dietary manipulations that may help to reduce symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux, a consequence of low LES pressure in some IBS patients, may be treated with the elimination of fatty foods, alcohol, chocolate, and peppermint. Delayed gastric emptying may be helped by the elimination of fatty foods and reduction of soluble fiber. Aberrant small bowel motor function may be ameliorated by reduction of lactose, sorbitol, and fructose and the addition of soluble fiber. Gas syndromes may be improved by reduced intake of beans, cabbage, lentils, legumes, apples, grapes, and raisins. Colonic motor dysfunction may be overcome by the gradual addition of combinations of soluble and insoluble fiber-containing foods and supplements. The selective use of activated charcoal and simethicone may be helpful. PMID:2553606

  3. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  4. Psychosocial determinants of irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodora Surdea-Blaga; Adriana Bǎban; Dan L Dumitrascu

    2012-01-01

    From a pure motor disorder of the bowel,in the past few years,irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has become a multifactorial disease that implies visceral hypersensitivity,alterations at the level of nervous and humoral communications between the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system,alteration of the gut microflora,an increased intestinal permeability and minimum intestinal inflammation.Psychological and social factors can interfere with the communication between the central and enteric nervous systems,and there is proof that they are involved in the onset of IBS and influence the response to treatment and outcome.There is evidence that abuse history and stressful life events are involved in the onset of functional gastrointestinal disorders.In order to explain clustering of IBS in families,genetic factors and social learning mechanisms have been proposed.The psychological features,such as anxiety,depression as well as the comorbid psychiatric disorders,health beliefs and coping of patients with IBS are discussed in relation to the symptoms and outcome.

  5. Bacteria, genetics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla F

    2010-06-01

    EVALUATION OF: Villani AC, Lemire M, Thabane M et al. Genetic risk factors for post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome following a waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis. Gastroenterology 138, 1502-1513 (2010). While the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains to be fully defined, two clinical observations - the occurrence, de novo, of IBS following bacterial gastroenteritis and the history, commonly obtained from IBS patients, of other instances of the syndrome within their families - have instigated investigations, in IBS, of the potential roles, on the one hand, of the gut microbiota and the host response and, on the other hand, of genetic factors. The study reviewed here relates to both of these factors by studying genetic predisposition to postinfective IBS in a large population of individuals who were exposed to a multimicrobial enteric infection, which resulted in a severe outbreak of gastroenteritis and was followed by the development of IBS in over a third. In this detailed study, the investigators identified a number of genes that were linked significantly to the development of postinfectious-IBS in the Toll-like receptor 9, IL-6 and cadherin 1 regions. These genes play important roles in bacterial recognition, the inflammatory response and epithelial integrity, respectively, and provide considerable support for the hypothesis that links IBS onset to disturbances in the microbiota and the host response.

  6. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  7. INVASIVE AMOEBIASIS COMPLICATING IFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziglam H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONAmoebiasis, which is caused by the intestinal protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, is a ubiquitous parasitic infection affecting approximately 10% of the world’s population and causing more deaths every year (100,000 deaths than any other parasitic infection, with the exception of malaria and schistosomiasis [1–3]. Most individuals with an E. histolytica infection are asymptomatic, but some develop severe invasive disease, such as amoebic colitis. Other manifestations, such as pulmonary, cardiac or brain involvement, are rare. Intestinal amoebiasis can probably also present as a chronic, non-dysenteric syndrome of diarrhoea, weight loss, and abdominal pain that can last for years and mimic inflammatory bowel disease. Fulminant colitis with bowel necrosis leading to perforation and peritonitis occurs in only about 0.5% of cases, but it is associated with a mortality rate of more than 40%. Patients with invasive amoebiasis living in the United Kingdom and other developed countries generally acquire the infection in another country in which the pathogenic species is endemic. Areas that have high rates of amoebic infection include India, Africa, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. Infection with pathogenic E. histolytica is not a common cause of travelers’ diarrhoea, and gastrointestinal infection is uncommon in travelers who have spent less than one month in endemic areas.

  8. Sleep disturbances and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tauseef; Orr, William C

    2014-11-01

    With an estimated 70 million Americans suffering, sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many clinical research studies. Sleep is now also considered to be an important environmental and behavioral factor associated with the process of inflammation and the immune system. Increased sleepiness is considered part of the acute phase of response to tissue injury, and sleep loss activates inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Clinical studies in many immune-mediated diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, have revealed an association of sleep disturbances with disease activity. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. The importance of sleep in inflammatory bowel disease has recently gained attention with some published studies demonstrating the association of sleep disturbances with disease activity, subclinical inflammation, and risk of disease relapse. A comprehensive review of sleep physiology and its association with the immune system is provided here. Experimental and clinical studies exploring this relationship in inflammatory bowel disease are reviewed, and the clinical implications of this relationship and future directions for research are also discussed. PMID:25025716

  9. Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Skroza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and psoriasis has been investigated by epidemiological studies. It is only starting from the 1990s that genetic and immunological aspects have been focused on. Psoriasis and IBD are strictly related inflammatory diseases. Skin and bowel represent, at the same time, barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. The most important genetic correlations involve the chromosomal loci 6p22, 16q, 1p31, and 5q33 which map several genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. The genetic background represents the substrate to the common immune processes involved in psoriasis and IBD. In the past, psoriasis and IBD were considered Th1-related disorders. Nowadays the role of new T cells populations has been highlighted. A key role is played by Th17 and T-regs cells as by the balance between these two cells types. New cytokines and T cells populations, as IL-17A, IL-22, and Th22 cells, could play an important pathogenetic role in psoriasis and IBD. The therapeutic overlaps further support the hypothesis of a common pathogenesis.

  10. Dual registration of abdominal motion for motility assessment in free-breathing data sets acquired using dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, registration-based quantification of bowel motility from dynamic MRI is limited to breath-hold studies. Here we validate a dual-registration technique robust to respiratory motion for the assessment of small bowel and colonic motility. Small bowel datasets were acquired in breath-hold and free-breathing in 20 healthy individuals. A pre-processing step using an iterative registration of the low rank component of the data was applied to remove respiratory motion from the free breathing data. Motility was then quantified with an existing optic-flow (OF) based registration technique to form a dual-stage approach, termed Dual Registration of Abdominal Motion (DRAM). The benefit of respiratory motion correction was assessed by (1) assessing the fidelity of automatically propagated segmental regions of interest (ROIs) in the small bowel and colon and (2) comparing parametric motility maps to a breath-hold ground truth. DRAM demonstrated an improved ability to propagate ROIs through free-breathing small bowel and colonic motility data, with median error decreased by 90% and 55%, respectively. Comparison between global parametric maps showed high concordance between breath-hold data and free-breathing DRAM. Quantification of segmental and global motility in dynamic MR data is more accurate and robust to respiration when using the DRAM approach. (paper)

  11. MRI of intact plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  12. Cardiac MRI tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac MRI tagging is an original technique based upon the perturbation of the magnetization of determined regions of the myocardium (tags). The motion of the tags accurately reflects the deformation of the underlying tissue. Data analysis requires special techniques to reconstruct the 3D motion of the heart, and to evaluate the myocardial strain, locally and throughout the whole heart. (authors)

  13. MRI of intact plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, H. van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  14. MRI and interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ Interventional radiology was started not long after the discovery of X - rays. Interventions started as image guided biopsies and angiographies early this century, later emerged computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound-guided interventions in the 1970s and ultimately the magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) guided interventions at the 1980s.

  15. MRI in decompression illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of decompression illness in which the patient developed paraparesis during scuba diving after rapid ascent. MRI of the spine revealed a focal intramedullary lesion consistent with the symptoms. The pathophysiological and radiological aspects of spinal decompression illness are discussed. (orig.)

  16. CT imaging signs of surgically proven bowel trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBedis, Christina A; Anderson, Stephan W; Bates, David D B; Khalil, Ramy; Matherly, David; Wing, Heidi; Burke, Peter A; Soto, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and interobserver agreement of individual CT findings as well as the bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) in surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was IRB approved and consent was waived. All patients 14 years or older who sustained surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma between 1/1/2004 and 6/30/2015 were included. Admission trauma MDCT scans were independently interpreted by two abdominal fellowship-trained radiologists who recorded the following CT findings: intraperitoneal fluid, mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding, bowel wall thickening/hematoma, active intravenous contrast extravasation, free intraperitoneal air, bowel wall discontinuity, and focal bowel hypoenhancement. Subsequently, the electronic medical records of the included patients, admission abdominal physical exam results, admission white blood cell count, and findings at exploratory laparotomy of the included patients were recorded. Thirty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The incidence and interobserver agreement of the CT findings were as follows: intraperitoneal fluid 93.9 %, kappa = 0.784 (good); mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding 84.8 %, kappa = 0.718 (good); bowel wall thickening/hematoma 42.4 %, kappa = 0.491 (moderate); active IV contrast extravasation 36.3 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); free intraperitoneal air 21.2 %, kappa = 0.904 (very good), bowel wall discontinuity 6.1 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); and focal bowel hypoenhancement 6.1 %, kappa = 0.468 (moderate). An absence of the specified CT findings was encountered in 9.1 % with surgically proven bowel injuries (kappa = 1.00, perfect). In our study, 9/16 patients or 56.3 % had a bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) of 2 or more as defined by McNutt et al. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg 78(1):105-111, 2014). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid and

  17. Cine MRI of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine MRI was performed using 1.5T or 0.5T MR units in eleven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Septal and posterior wall thickness measured by cine MRI correlated well with those obtained by ultrasonographic cardiogram. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, cine MRI demonstrated the site and nature of obstructive change in left ventricle. Cine MRI also showed flow void due to mitral regurgitation successfully. We considered cine MRI is useful means to evaluate the anatomical and functional findings in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  18. High-quality breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  19. Cerebral processing of auditory stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viola Andresen; Peter Kobelt; Claus Zimmer; Bertram Wiedenmann; Burghard F Klapp; Hubert Monnikes; Alexander Poellinger; Chedwa Tsrouya; Dominik Bach; Albrecht Stroh; Annette Foerschler; Petra Georgiewa; Marco Schmidtmann; Ivo R van der Voort

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine by brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) whether cerebral processing of non-visceral stimuli is altered in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients compared with healthy subjects. To circumvent spinal viscerosomatic convergence mechanisms,we used auditory stimulation, and to identify a possible influence of psychological factors the stimuli differed in their emotional quality.METHODS: In 8 IBS patients and 8 controls, fMRI measurements were performed using a block design of 4 auditory stimuli of different emotional quality (pleasant sounds of chimes, unpleasant peep (2000 Hz), neutral words, and emotional words). A gradient echo T2*-weighted sequence was used for the functional scans.Statistical maps were constructed using the general linear model.RESULTS: To emotional auditory stimuli, IBS patients relative to controls responded with stronger deactivations in a greater variety of emotional processing regions, while the response patterns, unlike in controls, did not differentiate between distressing or pleasant sounds.To neutral auditory stimuli, by contrast, only IBS patients responded with large significant activations.CONCLUSION: Altered cerebral response patterns to auditory stimuli in emotional stimulus-processing regions suggest that altered sensory processing in IBS may not be specific for visceral sensation, but might reflect generalized changes in emotional sensitivity and affectire reactivity, possibly associated with the psychological comorbidity often found in IBS patients.

  20. Transient small-bowel intussusception in children on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, Peter J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, F3503, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0252 (United States); DiPietro, Michael A.; Saez, Fermin [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2003-05-01

    To determine the frequency and significance of small-bowel intussusception identified in children on CT. All abdomen CT reports between July 1995 and April 2002 were reviewed to identify patients with small-bowel intussusception. Intussusceptions were identified as an intraluminal mass with a characteristic layered appearance and/or continuity with adjacent mesenteric fat. Ileocolic intussusceptions and intussusceptions related to feeding tubes were excluded. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Twenty-five pediatric patients (16 boys, 9 girls; mean age 11.2 years) were identified with small-bowel intussusception on CT. No patient had a persistent intussusception requiring surgery. Fourteen had limited immediate repeat CT images as part of the same examination, ten of which demonstrated resolution of the CT abnormality. Follow-up CT [n=13 (6 within 24 h)], ultrasound (n=3), small-bowel follow-through (n=4) and surgery (n=3) showed no intussusception. In four patients with persistent symptoms, underlying pathology was identified requiring treatment (giardiasis, 2; small-bowel inflammation/strictures, 1; abscess and partial small-bowel obstruction after perforated appendicitis, 1). In 21 other patients, direct correlation of symptoms to CT abnormality was absent or questionable, no treatment was required, and there was no clinical or imaging evidence of persistence or recurrence. Most small-bowel intussusceptions identified in children by CT are transient and of no clinical significance. (orig.)

  1. Transient small-bowel intussusception in children on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency and significance of small-bowel intussusception identified in children on CT. All abdomen CT reports between July 1995 and April 2002 were reviewed to identify patients with small-bowel intussusception. Intussusceptions were identified as an intraluminal mass with a characteristic layered appearance and/or continuity with adjacent mesenteric fat. Ileocolic intussusceptions and intussusceptions related to feeding tubes were excluded. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Twenty-five pediatric patients (16 boys, 9 girls; mean age 11.2 years) were identified with small-bowel intussusception on CT. No patient had a persistent intussusception requiring surgery. Fourteen had limited immediate repeat CT images as part of the same examination, ten of which demonstrated resolution of the CT abnormality. Follow-up CT [n=13 (6 within 24 h)], ultrasound (n=3), small-bowel follow-through (n=4) and surgery (n=3) showed no intussusception. In four patients with persistent symptoms, underlying pathology was identified requiring treatment (giardiasis, 2; small-bowel inflammation/strictures, 1; abscess and partial small-bowel obstruction after perforated appendicitis, 1). In 21 other patients, direct correlation of symptoms to CT abnormality was absent or questionable, no treatment was required, and there was no clinical or imaging evidence of persistence or recurrence. Most small-bowel intussusceptions identified in children by CT are transient and of no clinical significance. (orig.)

  2. Intussusception of the bowel in adults: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athanasios Marinis; Anneza Yiallourou; Lazaros Samanides; Nikolaos Dafnios; Georgios Anastasopoulos; Ioannis Vassiliou; Theodosios Theodosopoulos

    2009-01-01

    Intussusception of the bowel is defined as the telescoping of a proximal segment of the gastrointestinal tract within the lumen of the adjacent segment. This condition is frequent in children and presents with the classic triad of cramping abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and a palpable tender mass. However, bowel intussusception in adults is considered a rare condition, accounting for 5% of all cases of intussusceptions and almost 1%-5% of bowel obstruction. Eight to twenty percent of cases are idiopathic, without a lead point lesion. Secondary intussusceptionis caused by organic lesions, such as inflammatory bowel disease,postoperative adhesions,Meckel's diverticulum, benign and malignant lesions, metastatic neoplasms or even iatrogenically, due to the presence of intestinal tubes, jejunostomy feeding tubes or after gastricsurgery. Computed tomography is the most sensitive diagnostic modality and can distinguish between intussusceptions with and without a lead point. Surgery is the definitive treatment of adult intussusceptions. Formal bowel resection with oncological principles is followed for every case where a malignancy is suspected. Reduction of the intussuscepted bowel is considered safe for benign lesions in order to limit the extent of resection or to avoid the short bowel syndrome in certain circumstances.

  3. Effect of small bowel preparation with simethicone on capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-hong FANG; Chun-xiao CHEN; Bing-ling ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Background: Capsule endoscopy is a novel non-invasive method for visualization of the entire small bowel. The diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy depends on the quality of visualization of the small bowel mucosa and its complete passage through the small bowel. To date, there is no standardized protocol for bowel preparation before capsule endoscopy. The addition ofsimethicone in the bowel preparation for the purpose of reducing air bubbles in the intestinal lumen had only been studied by a few investigators. Methods: Sixty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups to receive a bowel preparation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution (Group 1) and both PEG solution and simethicone (Group 2). The PEG solution and sime-thicone were taken the night before and 20 min prior to capsule endoscopy, respectively. Frames taken in the small intestine were examined and scored for luminal bubbles by two professional capsule endoscopists. Gastric emptying time and small bowel transit time were also recorded. Results: Simethicone significantly reduced luminal bubbles both in the proximal and distal small intes-tines. The mean time proportions with slight bubbles in the proximal and distal intestines in Group 2 were 97.1% and 99.0%, respectively, compared with 67.2% (P<0.001) and 68.8% (P<0.001) in Group 1. Simethicone had no effect on mean gastric emptying time, 32.08 min in Group 2 compared with 30.88 min in Group 1 (P=0.868), but it did increase mean small intestinal transit time from 227.28 to 281.84 min (P=0.003). Conclusion: Bowel preparation with both PEG and simethicone significantly reduced bubbles in the intestinal lumen and improved the visualization of the small bowel by capsule endoscopy without any side effects observed.

  4. Experiences of healing therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soundy, Andrew; Lee, Rhonda T.; Kingstone, Tom; Singh, Sukhdev; Pankaj R Shah; Roberts, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Background The use and value of different complementary therapies requires investigation. In particular, qualitative research is required to understand the perceptions and experiences of patients who undergo healing therapy as one type of complementary therapy. The aim of this research is to consider patients perceptions and experiences following a course of healing therapy. Methods Twenty two patients took part in this study. This included 13 patients with irritable bowel disease (3 male, 10...

  5. Bringing the Inflamed and Fibrotic Bowel into Focus: Imaging in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Jeremy; Stidham, Ryan. W.; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiologic imaging has been a critical aid in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of inflammatory bowel disease since the first description of the disease by Crohn in 1932. Newer techniques, including computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and ultrasound, have entered clinical use for assessing disease activity and complications, and have largely replaced classic barium studies. We review the clinical utility of these imaging modalities and examine several im...

  6. Imaging for crohn disease: use of 3-T MRI in a paediatric setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study was carried out to review our experience with 3-T MRI in the assessment of Crohn disease in a paediatric population. Twenty-four patients with biopsy proven Crohn disease identified on the radiology information system underwent abdominal MRI, with or without pelvic MRI. Twenty-eight studies were carried out on a 3-T scanner at a tertiary paediatric hospital. Eight of 24 of these (30%) had a gastrointestinal barium study, 2 of 24 (8%) a CTand 9 of 24 (38%) an abdominal ultrasound. The different MRI sequences were rated for observation of the bowel wall and abnormalities (0-5). The findings were correlated to relevant findings on endoscopy, examination under anaesthesia (EUA) and where available surgery, barium studies, CTand ultrasound. In this study, the colon was involved in 5 of 28 (18%), small bowel in 7 of 28 (25%), terminal ileum in 5 of 28 (18%). All the perineal studies (9 of 9) showed abnormalities. Sinus tracts or fistulas were identified in 7 of 28 (25%) studies. The mean rating of the different MRI sequences in showing bowel wall and changes of Crohn disease was T2 TSE 3.6, T2 half fourier aquisition single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) with a long TE 3.6, T2 HASTE with short TE 3.4, true fast imaging with steady state precession (FISP) 2.7, T1 4.1 and Post-contrast T1 4.3. The T2 HASTE sequences with thinner slices improved observation. Detection of superficial abnormalities was similar on the 3D VIBE images and on the post-contrast T1 spin-echo (SE) sequences. In five of nine (56%) of those that had ultrasound, both studies were abnormal, with incomplete correlation of the abnormalities. Computed tomography and MRI were abnormal in two of two (100%) patients with good correlation of the abnormalities in one; in the other there was a minimal discrepancy in the estimation of the length of involved bowel. In 7 of 11 (64%) the barium study was abnormal. Good correlation to MRI findings was found in five of seven (71%) of patients. In

  7. Diagnostic yield of small bowel capsule endoscopy depends on the small bowel transit time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessie Westerhof; Jan J Koornstra; Reinier A Hoedemaker; Wim J Sluiter; Jan H Kleibeuker; Rinse K Weersma

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO investigate whether the small bowel transit time (SBTT) influences the diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy (CE).METHODS:Six hundred and ninety-one consecutive CE procedures collected in a database were analyzed.SBTT and CE findings were recorded.A running mean for the SBTT was calculated and correlated to the diagnostic yield with a Spearman's correlation test.Subgroup analyses were performed for the various indications for the procedure.RESULTS:There was a positive correlation between the diagnostic yield and SBTT (Spearman's rho 0.58,P < 0.01).Positive correlations between diagnostic yield and SBlT were found for the indication obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (r =0.54,P < 0.01),for polyposis and carcinoid combined (r =0.56,P < 0.01) and for the other indications (r =0.90,P <0.01),but not for suspected Crohn's disease (r =-0.40).CONCLUSION:The diagnostic yield in small bowel capsule endoscopy is positively correlated with the small bowel transit time.This is true for all indications except for suspected Crohn's disease.

  8. Normal small bowel wall characteristics on MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the normal small bowel parameters, namely bowel diameter, bowel wall thickness, number of folds (valvulae connivientes) per 2.5 cm (in.), fold thickness and interfold distance per small bowel segment (duodenum, jejunum, proximal ileum, distal ileum and terminal ileum) on MR enterography. Materials and methods: Between September 2003 and January 2008, 280 MR enterography examinations were performed for investigation of known or suspected small bowel pathology. 120 of these examinations were normal. Sixty-five (m = 29, f = 36, mean age = 34 years, range = 17-73 years) of 120 examinations without a prior small bowel diagnosis, with no prior or subsequent abnormal radiology or endoscopy examinations, no prior small bowel surgery and with a minimum 3 years follow-up demonstrating normality were retrospectively evaluated for the described small bowel parameters. Results: We found the mean diameter of the duodenum to be 24.8 mm (S.D. = 4.5 mm), jejunum to be 24.5 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm), proximal ileum to be 19.5 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm), distal ileum to be 18.9 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm) and terminal ileum to be 18.7 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm). The number of folds per 2.5 cm varied from 4.6 in the jejunum to 1.5 in the terminal ileum. The fold thickness varied from 2.1 mm in the duodenum to 1.8 mm in the terminal ileum. The small bowel parameters gradually decreased in size from the duodenum to the smallest measurements which were in the terminal ileum. The bowel wall is similar in size throughout the small bowel measuring 1.5 ± 0.5 mm. Conclusion: These results provide the mean, range of normality and standard deviation of the small bowel parameters per segment on the current population on MR enterography. From our experience, knowledge of these parameters is extremely helpful and essential in the everyday assessment of MR enterography studies.

  9. Normal small bowel wall characteristics on MR enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, Carmel G., E-mail: carmelcronin2000@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Delappe, Eithne; Lohan, Derek G.; Roche, Clare; Murphy, Joseph M. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the normal small bowel parameters, namely bowel diameter, bowel wall thickness, number of folds (valvulae connivientes) per 2.5 cm (in.), fold thickness and interfold distance per small bowel segment (duodenum, jejunum, proximal ileum, distal ileum and terminal ileum) on MR enterography. Materials and methods: Between September 2003 and January 2008, 280 MR enterography examinations were performed for investigation of known or suspected small bowel pathology. 120 of these examinations were normal. Sixty-five (m = 29, f = 36, mean age = 34 years, range = 17-73 years) of 120 examinations without a prior small bowel diagnosis, with no prior or subsequent abnormal radiology or endoscopy examinations, no prior small bowel surgery and with a minimum 3 years follow-up demonstrating normality were retrospectively evaluated for the described small bowel parameters. Results: We found the mean diameter of the duodenum to be 24.8 mm (S.D. = 4.5 mm), jejunum to be 24.5 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm), proximal ileum to be 19.5 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm), distal ileum to be 18.9 mm (S.D. = 4.2 mm) and terminal ileum to be 18.7 mm (S.D. = 3.6 mm). The number of folds per 2.5 cm varied from 4.6 in the jejunum to 1.5 in the terminal ileum. The fold thickness varied from 2.1 mm in the duodenum to 1.8 mm in the terminal ileum. The small bowel parameters gradually decreased in size from the duodenum to the smallest measurements which were in the terminal ileum. The bowel wall is similar in size throughout the small bowel measuring 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm. Conclusion: These results provide the mean, range of normality and standard deviation of the small bowel parameters per segment on the current population on MR enterography. From our experience, knowledge of these parameters is extremely helpful and essential in the everyday assessment of MR enterography studies.

  10. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth is Associated with Intestinal Inflammation in the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana David; Alexandru Babin; Alina Picos; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is encountered in bowel disorders, including irritable bowel symptoms. Low degrees of inflammation have been recently reported in the irritable bowel syndrome. We looked for the association between intestinal inflammation and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome.Methods. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was assessed by the H2 glucose breath test in 90 consecutive patients with irritable bowel syndrome....

  11. Neurobiology of Depression and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Donat Eker

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome is a disabling functional disorder with a frequent comorbidity of depression though underlying mechanisms remain yet little understood. Various signs and symptoms have been determined as diagnostic criteria in recent years and standardized as Rome-III criteria. Irritable bowel syndrome can have constipation-dominant, diarrhea-dominant or mixed clinical presentations. Main features can be summarized as continuous and recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a change of stool frequency or consistency and usually relief of symptoms with defe-cation in the absence of physical or laboratory abnormalities indicative of an organic etiology. The frequency of major depressive disorder diagnosis reaches up to two thirds of irritable bowel syndrome patients. Moreover, the comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome among patients with major depression is highly frequent (30%. The mechanism underlying irritable bowel syndrome which have been considered as a kind of a somatization disorder for a long time and now as a functional bowel disease is in the brain-gut axis. Low grade mucosal inflammation and cytokines originating from mucosal inflammation have important functions in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome and its comorbidity with major depression. Besides the inflammatory factors lumbosacral visceral hyperexcitability which is an individual variation is proposed as the main underlying cause of irritable bowel syndrome. Visceral hyper-excitability is mediated by cytokines and neuro-mediators and stress is known to increase the effect of this mechanism. Furthermore, molecules participating in this mechanism (e.g. cytokines, corticotrophin releasing factor, neurokinins and monoamines play important roles in the pathophysiology of depression. Increased activation in the pain matrix (thalamus – insula – prefrontal cortex and insufficiency of endogenous pain inhibitory system are regarded as possible

  12. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract,which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different levels of the inflammatory processes. New therapies are classified as: (1) Anti-TNFα antibodies; (2) Recombinant cytokines; (3) Selective adhesion blockade;(4) Growth factors; (5) Innate immunostimulation; (6) Nucleic acid based therapies; (7) Gene therapy; (8) Autologous bone-marrow transplantation; (9) Helminths and (10) Extracorporeal immunomodulation. All treatments have the potential to provide more effective and safe treatment for IBD.

  13. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfarht, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD in......OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD...... pronounced in relatives of CD cases. IRRs increased with two or more IBD-affected relatives and were modified by age, with the highest family-related IRR observed in early life. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of IBD is significantly increased in first -, second-, and third-degree relatives of IBD-affected cases, with...

  14. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based on...... the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (n=8,295,773). Through a unique personal identification number assigned to each Danish citizen, sex, date and location of birth, identity of parents, and information on vital status and emigration were available. This information was used to establish...... kinship in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall...

  15. Case Report: Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a greater risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Patients admitted to the hospital with IBD flares often require insertion of long-term venous access devices, such as peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), to provide access for medications, blood draws, fluid management, and nutrition. PICCs have been associated with an increased risk for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. In this case study analysis, 2 patients with IBD and PICCs who developed VTE are examined. The case report includes a thorough discussion of medical history, symptomology, PICC insertion, and events leading to VTE development. A review of acquired risk factors for IBD patients and a comparison of risk factors that predisposed each to VTE are explored. These cases highlight the need for nurses and physicians to heighten surveillance and engage in proactive strategies to prevent VTE in this population of patients. PMID:27074991

  16. Changing face of irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eamonn MM Quigley

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is evident that this is a truly global disease associated with significant symptoms and impairments in personal and social functioning for afflicted individuals. Advances in our understanding of gut flora-mucosal interactions, the enteric nervous system and the brain-gut axis have led to substantial progress in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS and have provided some hints towards the basic etiology of this disorder, in some subpopulations, at the very least. We look forward to a time when therapy will be addressed to pathophysiology and perhaps, even to primary etiology. In the meantime, a model based on a primary role for intestinal inflammation serves to integrate the various strands, which contribute to the presentation of IBS

  17. Innate immunity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The human intestinal tract is home to an enormous bacterial flora. The host defense against microorganisms can be divided into innate and adaptive immunity. The former is the most immediate line of response to immunologic challenges presented by bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The mucosal immune system has evolved to balance the need to respond to pathogens while co-existing with commensal bacteria and food antigens. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this hyporesponsiveness or tolerance breaks-down and inflammation supervenes driven by the intestinal microbial flora. Bacteria contain compounds and are recognized by a variety of receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NODs (a family of intracellular bacterial sensors) and are potent stimuli of innate immune responses. Several mutations in these receptors have been associated with development of IBD.

  18. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-02-21

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and thioguanine. We will briefly summarize dose recommendations, indications for thiopurine therapy and side effects which are relevant in clinical practice. We discuss some currently debated topics, including the combination of azathioprine and allopurinol, switching of thiopurine therapy in case of side effects, the use of azathioprine in pregnancy, the infection risk using thiopurines and the evidence when to stop thiopurines. Excellent reviews have been published on the thiopurine metabolic pathway which will not be discussed here in detail. PMID:23467510

  19. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  20. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A; Barkema, Herman W; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Fedorak, Richard N; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge of the association between environmental risk factors and IBD. A number of environmental risk factors were investigated including smoking, hygiene, microorganisms, oral contraceptives, antibiotics, diet, breastfeeding, geographical factors, pollution and stress. Inconsistent findings among the studies highlight the complex pathogenesis of IBD. Additional studies are necessary to identify and elucidate the role of environmental factors in IBD etiology. PMID:23516681