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Sample records for bowel mri enteroclysis

  1. A prospective randomized comparison between two MRI studies of the small bowel in Crohn's disease, the oral contrast method and MR enteroclysis

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    Negaard, Anne [Ullevaal University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine University of Oslo, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Vemund; Lygren, Idar [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo (Norway); Sandvik, Leiv [Ullevaal University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Oslo (Norway); Berstad, Audun E. [Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Borthne, Arne; Try, Kirsti [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Storaas, Tryggve [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Oslo (Norway); Klow, Nils-Einar [Ullevaal University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-09-15

    The aim was to compare bowel distension and diagnostic properties of magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel with oral contrast (MRI per OS) with magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE). Forty patients with suspected Crohn's disease (CD) were examined with both MRI methods. MRI per OS was performed with a 6% mannitol solution and MRE with nasojejunal intubation and a polyethylenglycol solution. MRI protocol consisted of balanced fast field echo (B-FFE), T2 and T1 sequences with and without gadolinium. Two experienced radiologists individually evaluated bowel distension and pathological findings including wall thickness (BWT), contrast enhancement (BWE), ulcer (BWU), stenosis (BWS) and edema (EDM). The diameter of the small bowel was smaller with MRI per OS than with MRE (difference jejunum: 0.55 cm, p < 0.001; ileum: 0.35 cm, p < 0.001, terminal ileum: 0.09 cm, p = 0.08). However, CD was diagnosed with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values: MRI per OS 88%, 89%, 89%, 89%; MRE 88%, 84%, 82%, 89%) and inter-observer agreement (MRI per OS k = 0.95; MRE k = 1). In conclusion, bowel distension was inferior in MRI per OS compared to MRE. However, both methods diagnosed CD with a high diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. (orig.)

  2. CT enteroclysis in small bowel Crohn's disease

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    Kohli, Marc D. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Maglinte, Dean D.T. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)], E-mail: dmaglint@iupui.edu

    2009-03-15

    The diagnostic evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease has changed dramatically over the last decade. The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon endoscopy and the introduction of newer therapeutic agents have changed the role of imaging in the small bowel. Additionally, advances in multidetector CT technology have further changed how radiologic investigations are utilized in the diagnosis and management of small bowel Crohn's disease. This article describes how we perform CT enteroclysis in the investigation of small bowel Crohn's disease and discusses the role of CT enteroclysis in the current management of small bowel Crohn's disease.

  3. [MRI of the abdomen combined with enteroclysis in Crohn disease using oral and intravenous Gd-DTPA].

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    Rieber, A; Wruk, D; Nüssle, K; Aschoff, A J; Reinshagen, M; Adler, G; Brambs, H J; Tomczak, R

    1998-01-01

    In spite of the improved MR-diagnosis of the abdomen, MRI is not used as a routine method for the diagnosis of inflammatory small bowel disease. The aim of this study was--after optimazation of the bowel opacification--the correlation of the findings obtained with enteroclysis and MRI in patients with known Crohns' disease. 60 patients between 17 and 72 years of age were investigated. First, an enteroclysis was performed in typical manner. The applicated methylcellulosis was blended with positive oral MR contrast media (Magnevist oral, Schering). After enteroclysis, MRI of the abdomen was performed using T1- and T2-weighted breathhold sequences (Flash 2D pre- and postcontrast and TSE) in axial and coronal planes. The length of the affected bowel and the stenosis seen with enteroclysis correlated well with the visible thickening of the small bowel wall and the stenosis seen in MRI. Using MRI, additional findings could be obtained in 28 patients, such as fistulas, abscesses or a hydronephrosis, or a better assessment of the stenosis was possible with MRI, because of the avoidance of overshadowing of the affected bowel loop with MRI. A brilliant MR-tomographic imaging of the small bowel is possible under the condition, that the small bowel contrast is optimal. The main prerequisite is a large filling volume of the small bowel to reach a homogeneous contrast and a good distension of the small bowel lumen.

  4. Radiological assessment of small bowel obstructions: value of conventional enteroclysis and dynamic MR-enteroclysis; Radiologische Diagnostik obstruktiver Duenndarmlaesionen: Wertigkeit von konventionellem Enteroklysma und dynamischem MR-Enteroklysma

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    Rohr, A.; Rohr, D.; Heller, M.; Reuter, M. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel (Germany); Kuehbacher, T.; Schreiber, S. [1. Medizinische Klinik, Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Purpose: To compare small bowel lesions, especially stenoses, with conventional enteroclysis, static MRI and dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with Crohn's disease or other suspected small bowel lesions were examined. MRI was performed in a static and a dynamic way either within one hour after conventional enteroclysis (n = 30) or a few days afterwards (n = 12). In order to monitor bowel filling and to characterize stenoses in a dynamic fashion, 4 series of coronal T2w HASTE breath hold sequences were used, first without additional bowel opacification and then during administration of 1,5 l methyl cellulose via a naso-intestinal tube in the MR unit. Intravenously applied Buscopan was used to reduce bowel movement. Results: In 4 out of 42 Patients, application of methylcellulose was limited to 1000 ml because of gastrointestinal complaints or visible gastral reflux. All patients could be evaluated. Static MRI performed within one hour after conventional enteroclysis and no additional bowel opacification showed insufficient bowel distension. Distension was still better than in MRI without prior application of contrast medium. On the contrary, dynamic MR - enteroclysis lead to controlled and complete bowel distension which allowed for significantly better evaluation of normal bowel anatomy and pathological alterations of the gut. Because of a better bowel distension and dynamic evaluation, MR-enteroclysis revealed significantly more stenoses (n = 42) than MRI obtained with less distension (n = 27, p < 0.001), and characterization of lesions was comparable to conventional enteroclysis (p < 0.001). Fixed and non-fixed stenoses could be differentiated by dynamic MR-enteroclysis. Furthermore, extraluminal complication of Crohn's disease such as abscesses and fistulae or large bowel manifestation of disease were shown in 13 patients. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Vergleich von konventionellem Enteroklysma und dynamischen MR

  5. Magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis in acquired small bowel diverticulitis and small bowel diverticulosis.

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    Mansoori, Bahar; Delaney, Conor P; Willis, Joseph E; Paspulati, Raj M; Ros, Pablo R; Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Herrmann, Karin A

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel (SB) diverticulosis is a rare disorder that may entail serious complications, including SB diverticulitis. Both are often missed in imaging. Magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis (MRE) is increasingly used to assess SB disease; awareness of the appearance of SB diverticulitis is essential to ensure appropriate management. Our aim was to systematically describe imaging characteristics of SB diverticulosis and diverticulitis in MRE. This retrospective, HIPAA-compliant study identified 186 patients with suspected SB diverticulosis/diverticulitis in medical databases of two tertiary medical centres between 2005 and 2011. Patients with surgically confirmed diagnoses of SB diverticulosis/diverticulitis were included. Two observers analyzed MR images for the presence, location, number, and size of diverticula, wall thickness, and mural and extramural patterns of inflammation. Seven patients were recruited. MRI analysis showed multiple diverticula in all (100 %). Diverticular size ranged from 0.5 to 6 cm. Prevalence of diverticula was higher in the proximal than the distal SB (jejunum 86 %, ileum 57 %, distal ileum43%). Diverticulitis occurred in 3/7 patients (43 %) showing asymmetric bowel wall thickening and focal mesenteric inflammation. SB diverticulitis demonstrates characteristic MRE imaging features to distinguish this rare disorder from more common diseases. Asymmetric, focal mesenteric and mural inflammation and presence of multiple diverticula are keys to diagnosis. • Small bowel diverticulosis and diverticulitis is rare and often missed in imaging • Acquired small bowel diverticula are variable in size and number • Small bowel diverticulitis demonstrates characteristic features on MR enterography/enteroclysis • A focal or segmental asymmetric small bowel inflammation should prompt the search for diverticula.

  6. Multislice CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis

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    Biscaldi, Ennio; Rollandi, Gian A. [' ' Duchesse of Galliera' ' -Hospital, Genoa (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Ferrero, Simone; Ragni, Nicola; Remorgida, Valentino [San Martino Hospital and Genoa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Obstretics and Gynaecology; Fulcheri, Ezio [San Martino Hospital and Genoa Univ. (Italy). Unit of Anatomy and Histopathology

    2007-01-15

    This prospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of multislice computed tomography combined with colon distension by water enteroclysis (MSCTe) in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. Ninety-eight women with symptoms suggestive of colorectal endometriosis underwent MSCTe; locations, number of nodule/s, size of the nodule/s and depth of bowel wall infiltration were determined. Independently from the findings of MSCTe, all women underwent laparoscopy. MSCTe findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Abnormal findings suggestive of bowel endometriotic nodules were detected by MSCTe in 75 of the 76 patients with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe identified 110 (94.8%) of the 116 bowel endometriotic nodules removed at surgery; 6 nodules missed at MSCTe were located on the rectum. MSCTe correctly determined the degree of infiltration of the bowel wall in all of the 34 serosal bowel nodules identified at MSCTe. In six nodules reaching the submucosa, the depth of infiltration was underestimated by MSCTe. MSCTe had a sensitivity of 98.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 95.7% in identifying women with bowel endometriosis. MSCTe is effective in determining the presence and depth of bowel endometriotic lesions. (orig.)

  7. Crohn's disease at the small bowel imaging by the ultrasound-enteroclysis

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    Valek, Vlastimil [Department of Radiology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Kysela, Petr [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: pkysel@email.cz; Vavrikova, Marketa [Department of Radiology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Summary: Crohn's disease is more likely a systemic disease governed by a shift in the immune response, thus affecting the whole MALT system. Its treatment should be as conservative as possible and surgery is usually taking place after complications like indolent fistulations, stenoses, bleeding, or bowel perforation started. Standard radiological methods to check the extent of the disease are loaded either with certain radiation exposure (enteroclysis, CT) or lack standardization (ultrasound). The aim of this small study was to evaluate the worth of ultrasound-enteroclysis in detecting the extent and complications of the Crohn's disease in surgically treated patients. Material and methods: Since 1997, when we started with the ultrasound-enteroclysis, 246 surgical performances were involved into our study. Out of them, 181 had conventional abdominal intestinal ultrasound as well as conventional enteroclysis within 1 week. Remaining 65 cases were diagnosed by the ultrasound-enteroclysis. Intestinal ultrasound was performed on the Ultramark 3000 HDI device with autofocussable convex 5 MHz and linear 7.5 MHz probes or nowadays ATL 5000 HDI, 7-12 MHz linear probe. No contrast enhancement was used. Enteroclysis was done with the Micropaque suspension diluted 1:1 with HP-7000 300 ml with its application rate up to 75 ml/min followed by HP-7000 solution 2000 ml, application rate of 120 ml/min. The patients with ultrasound-enteroclysis were applied HP 7000 solution only (2000 ml, rate 100 ml/s) via an enteroclysis catheter. All investigations were video-recorded. Results: Consent with the per-operative finding was reached in 162 from 181 enteroclyses and in 169 of 181 ultrasounds. Ultrasound-enteroclysis was precise in 61 cases from 65. Among these, 60 patients had the recurrence during the treatment proved by clinical and laboratory results. This re-activation was clearly revealed in 38 from 43 cases by enteroclysis, 41 from 43 by US and in 16 from 17 by

  8. Jejunum abnormalities at MR enteroclysis

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    Wiarda, Bart A.; Heine, Dimitri G. N.; Rombouts, Marieke C.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Stoker, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Objective: MR enteroclysis has become an important tool to visualize the complete small bowel wall and extramural structures. In many centers, this technique is rapidly becoming the first-line technique for small bowel visualization. MR enteroclysis yields a diagnosis of thickened jejunal loops in

  9. Multislice CT enteroclysis: technique and clinical applications

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    Rajesh, A. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)]. E-mail: arajesh27@hotmail.com; Maglinte, D.D.T. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-01-15

    Computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis was introduced to overcome the individual deficiencies of barium enteroclysis and abdominal CT. The use of multislice CT technology has made the procedure a feasible extension of the intubation infusion method of small bowel examination. This review is an update of the technique and clinical application of CT enteroclysis with illustrations.

  10. Gradient-enhanced volume rendering: an image processing strategy to facilitate whole small bowel imaging with MRI

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    Wyss, Michael [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Patak, Michael A.; Juli, Christoph F.; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Scheidegger, Markus B. [ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wentz, Klaus U. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); University of Witten Herdecke, Herdecke (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    MRI of the small bowel with positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent is a promising non-invasive imaging method. The aim of our study was to introduce small bowel MRI in a display format that clinicians are accustomed to and that maximizes the amount of information visualized on a single image. Twelve healthy volunteers, median age 32 years (range 18-49 years) participated in the study. A mixture of 20 ml Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), 0.8 g/kg body weight psyllium fibre (Metamucil) and 1.2 l water were sequentially administered over a period of 4 h. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T unit (Philips Gyroscan, Intera). Fat-saturated, 3D, gradient echo imaging was performed while the patient was in apnea (30 s). Bowel motion was reduced with 40 mg intravenously administered scopolamine (Buscopan). A 3D, gradient-enhanced, volume rendering technique was applied to the 3D data sets. Standard projections [left anterior oblique (LAO), right anterior oblique (RAO), supine and prone] resembling conventional enteroclysis were successfully generated within fewer than 10 min processing time. Reconstructions were reproducible and provided an entire overview of the small bowel. In addition thin-slab volume rendering allowed an overlap-free display of individual structures. Positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent, combined with a gradient enhanced volume rendering method, allows the reconstruction of the small bowel in a pattern resembling conventional double-contrast enteroclysis. Segmental display without overlay is possible. (orig.)

  11. Computed tomographic enterography and enteroclysis: pearls and pitfalls.

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    Dave-Verma, Hetal; Moore, Scott; Singh, Ajay; Martins, Noel; Zawacki, John

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) enterography and enteroclysis improve visualization of the small bowel mucosa and wall in comparison with traditional CT and fluoroscopic studies by distending the small bowel through enteric hyperhydration with a negative contrast agent. Although CT enterography is performed with oral hyperhydration, CT enteroclysis requires the placement of an enteroclysis tube, often in patients who are unable to orally consume the amount of liquid. When tolerated, CT enterography is often preferred due to its lack of invasiveness. Magnetic resonance enterography and enteroclysis are other modalities that are still being studied and show promise in the imaging of small bowel. Unlike small bowel follow-through, conventional enteroclysis, or capsule endoscopy, extraenteric findings are best assessed on CT enterography. These include findings in the surrounding mesentery, perienteric fat, and the adjacent solid organs that may be associated with the small bowel process and include fistulas or abscesses, mural hyperenhancement, prominent vasa recta, and other inflammatory changes. CT enterography has developed into the first-line modality in the imaging of Crohn's disease and is considered the most appropriate imaging modality in patients with suspected Crohn's disease. It is also increasingly being used in the assessment of small bowel infections, neoplasms, adhesions, and polyps.

  12. Paediatric magnetic resonance enteroclysis under general anaesthesia - initial experience

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    Sadigh, Sophie; Chopra, Mark; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Watson, Tom A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Sury, Michael R. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Anaesthetics, London (United Kingdom); Shah, Neil [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    MR enterography is the accepted imaging reference standard for small bowel assessment in inflammatory bowel disease. There is an increasing cohort of children with inflammatory bowel disease presenting at an early age (<5 years) with severe disease. Younger children present a technical challenge for enterography because of the need for sedation/general anaesthesia to allow image optimisation and the need for oral contrast to allow adequate luminal assessment. Through our experiences, MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia has proven to be a successful imaging technique for the work-up of these patients. In this paper, we present our institutional practice for performing MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia. (orig.)

  13. Transabdominal ultrasonography of the small bowel after oral administration of a non-absorbable anechoic solution: Comparison with barium enteroclysis

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    Cittadini, Giuseppe; Giasotto, Veronica; Garlaschi, Giacomo; De Cicco, Enzo; Gallo, Alessandra; Cittadini, Giorgio

    2001-03-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine if oral administration of a non-absorbable anechoic solution conveys any benefit during abdominal ultrasound (US), with special reference to its accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-three adult out-patients scheduled for small bowel barium enema (SBE) were included. The day before SBE all patients underwent abdominal US before and after oral administration of an isotonic non-absorbable electrolyte solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG-ELS). Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated using SBE as a gold standard. RESULTS: After ingestion of PEG-ELS satisfactory distension of the intestinal lumen was obtained (11-25 mm) with sequential visualization of jejunoileal loops in 30.9 {+-} 17.3 min. In 15 out of 53 cases both US and SBE showed bowel changes characteristic of Crohn's disease. In three out of 53 cases both US and SBE showed neoplasms. In one out of 53 cases US was negative, SBE positive for local nodularity and ulcerations typical of Crohn's disease. In one out of 53 cases US was negative, SBE positive for macronodularity consistent with coeliac disease. In five out of 53 cases US was negative, while SBE was positive for mininodularity expressive of lymphoid hyperplasia. In 28 out of 53 cases both examinations were negative. CONCLUSION: PEG-ELS administration allows a thorough US investigation of the small bowel, with fair sensitivity (72%) and excellent specificity (100%). False negative findings are mainly due to lymphoid hyperplasia, a feature of uncertain significance in adults. Cittadini G. et al.(2001)

  14. Modern MRI of the small bowell; Moderne MRT des Duenndarms

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    Scharitzer, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The radiological diagnostics of diseases of the small intestine have undergone a great change in the last two decades. Through rapid progress with new treatments and an increasing therapeutic focus on transmural healing, a complete evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is now crucial. With the introduction of endoscopy, gastrointestinal imaging with a relatively high radiation exposure had only limited applications. The development of cross-sectional imaging allowed a much broader radiological evaluation of abdominal diseases. Due to rapid investigation techniques, excellent soft tissue contrast and the distinct advantage of eliminating exposure to radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the gastrointestinal tract has gained increasing importance. With sufficient filling of the intestinal lumen, simultaneous imaging of all the intestinal wall layers, the perienteric structures and associated abdominal pathologies is now possible. New MR sequences, such as diffusion-weighted sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences and MR fluoroscopy, enable the detection of morphological changes, with additional characterization of affected bowel loops as well as the assessment of functional pathologies with dynamic information about intestinal motility disturbances. Recent guidelines of European radiological and gastroenterological organizations have confirmed the importance of cross-sectional imaging and particularly of MRI for diagnostics and follow-up in patients with Crohn's disease. Due to the possibility of assessment of all the layers of the intestinal wall and the presence of extramural complications, MRI has a significant impact on further therapeutic treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, MR enterography and MR enteroclysis should be the methods of choice for the evaluation of small bowel pathologies because of radiation issues and the great diagnostic value they provide. A

  15. Characteristic imaging features of carcinoid tumors of the small bowel in MR enteroclysis; Morphologisches Erscheinungsbild neuroendokriner Tumoren des Duenndarms im MR-Enteroklysma

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    Schmid-Tannwald, C.; Zech, C.J.; Panteleon, A.; Sommer, W.H.; Herrmann, K.A. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maxilimians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Auernhammer, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Medizinische Klinik II, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    To determine the value of MR enteroclysis (MRE) in the localization and characterization of primary carcinoid tumors of the small bowel and to describe typical imaging features. Twenty patients with suspicion of primary small bowel carcinoid tumors (pCT) were recruited to undergo MRE following nasojejunal intubation and small bowel filling with 2.5 l of 0.5% methylcellulose solution under MR fluoroscopic guidance. MRE was performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner including T2w SSFSE, SSFP and contrast enhanced T1w GRE sequences with fat saturation. Fifteen patients, who subsequently had surgery for resection of their pCT, were retrospectively included in the study. All MRE were analyzed as for the presence, location, number, size, multiplicity and morphologic appearance of the pCT by two board certified radiologists in consensus. The conspicuity of the tumors was rated for each sequence type separately, according to a 4-point rating scale. Signal intensity measurements were performed in tumor and muscle. The presence of desmoplastic reaction, vascular involvement and lymph node metastases was also analyzed. pCT were correctly identified and localized in 14/15 patients. Due to their hyperenhancement tumors was best detected on contrast-enhanced T1w fat saturated GRE sequences. SSFSE was clearly inferior with the tumors being either hyperintense or isointense to muscle. pCT appeared as nodular intraluminal masses in 40% of the cases, as focal wall thickening in 33.3% and in 20% with both. Mean size was 25 (7-46 mm) with a tendency to smaller size for ileal tumors. MRE failed to depict superficial micronodular peritoneal spread in one patient. Desmoplastic reaction was observed in 73.3% of the cases with mesenteric masses exhibiting lower signal than the pCT due to fibrotic changes. MRE is a valuable method for the detection and localization of primary carcinoid tumors, provided that appropriate bowel distension is achieved. Various characteristic morphologic features could be

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the perineum in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Jamieson, Douglas H; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis and colonography) can accurately evaluate bowel inflammation in IBD. With recent technological innovations leading to faster and higher resolution, the role of MRI in IBD will likely continue to expand. The present article focuses on MRI of the perineum in pediatric IBD.

  17. Use of a small-bore catheter for enteroclysis: technical note

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    Lou, T.J. [Univ. of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffer, N.; Margolis, M. [Mount Sinai Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ho, C.-S. [Toronto General Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-12-01

    Enteroclysis is a well-accepted method for the detailed visualization of the small bowel. This examination is especially valuable in patients with Crohn's disease, small bowel obstruction, and occult gastrointestinal bleeding. One of the main drawbacks for patients who undergo enteroclysis is discomfort related to intubation with large-bore (12- to 14-French), polyvinylchloride catheters. The use of a smaller tube with a hydrophilic coating may therefore reduce the level of discomfort and render this examination more acceptable to patients and clinicians. We report our initial experience with this approach. (author)

  18. Small bowel imaging - still a radiologic approach?

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    Markova, Ingrid; Kluchova, Katerina; Zboril, Radek; Mashlan, Miroslav; Herman, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in small bowel imaging using a variety of radiologic or endoscopic techniques. This article gives an overview and comparison of old and new techniques used in small bowel imaging. New imaging methods as computed tomography (CT), CT enteroclysis (CTEc), CT enterography (CTEg), ultrasound (US), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), US enteroclysis, US enterography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MR enteroclysis (MREc) and MR enterography (MREg) are compared with the older techniques such as small- bowel follow- through (SBFT), conventional enteroclysis (CE) and endoscopic techniques including push enteroscopy, ezofagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), sonde enteroscopy, ileocolonoscopy, double-balloon enteroscopy, intraoperative enteroscopy and wireless capsule enteroscopy (WCE). Systematic scan of Pubmed, Medline, Ovid, Elsevier search engines was used.. Additional information was found through the bibliographical review of relevant articles. SBFT has only secondary role in small bowel imaging. US is still the method of choice in imaging for pediatric populations. US and CEUS are also accepted as a method of choice especially in inflammatory cases. CE has been replaced by new cross - sectional imaging techniques (CTEc/CTEg or MREc/MREg). CTEc combines the advantages of CT and CE. MREc combines the advantages of MRI and CE. Some authors prefer CTEg or MREg with peroral bowel preparation and they strictly avoid nasojejunal intubation under fluoroscopic control. MREc has better soft tissue contrast, showing it to be more sensitive in detecting mucosal lesions than CTEc in inflammatory diseases. CTEg/MREg are techniques preferred for patients in follow-up of the inflammatory diseases. The radiologic community is not unanimous however about their role in the imaging process. CTEc/MREc as well as CTEg/MREg are superior to endoscopic methods in the investigation of small-bowel tumors. WCE gives unparalleled imaging of the mucosal

  19. Enteroclysis in older children and teenagers

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    Kurugoglu, Sebuh; Korman, Ugur; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Selcuk, Dogan [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    Enteroclysis (EC) has been widely and successfully used for evaluation of the small bowel in adults for about 30 years. However, despite recently improved intubation and examination techniques, in many paediatric radiology centres it is still not the preferred conventional barium study for the evaluation of small bowel pathology in children. To share our 10 years of experience and review the feasibility of EC in 83 older children and teenagers, in terms of both technique and pathological findings. Between 1996 and 2006, EC was performed by the standard technique described by Herlinger to 83 children between 7 and 18 years of age. The indication for the study was jointly decided by the paediatric radiologist and the clinician. None of the examinations was converted to follow-through studies because of patient refusal or technical failure. Morphological changes, mucosal abnormalities, luminal abnormalities, perienteric structures, the location of the disease, indirect findings regarding the bowel wall and functional information were evaluated. All the children tolerated the procedure without difficulty. Out of 83 patients, 63 had abnormal findings. The spectrum of diagnoses were Crohn disease (n = 23), nonspecific enteritis (n = 10), malabsorption (n = 8), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 6), intestinal lymphoma (n = 5), Peutz-Jegher syndrome (n = 3), adhesions (n = 2), Behcet disease (n = 2), back-wash ileitis due to ulcerative colitis (n = 2), common-variable immune deficiency (n = 1) and lymphangiectasis (n = 1). EC can easily be performed in children over 7 years of age and when performed using a correct technique it shows high diagnostic performance without any complications in the evaluation of small bowel diseases in older children and teenagers. (orig.)

  20. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease; MRT chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen

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    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Elsing, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. IV - Gastroenterologie

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung: Die Standardverfahren in der Diagnostik und der Verlaufskontrolle chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen, speziell des Morbus Crohn und der Colitis ulcerosa, sind die Koloskopie und das Enteroklysma. Die MRT hat sich dazu ihren festen Platz in der Diagnostik perirektaler Fisteln erobert. Mit schnellen, T{sub 1}-gewichteten Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen und T{sub 2}-gewichteten Turbo-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen koennen auch Duenn

  1. CT enteroclysis in the developing world: How we do it, and the pathology we see

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merwe, B.S. van der, E-mail: attiemalan@mweb.co.za; Ackermann, C.; Els, H.

    2013-08-15

    Introduction: Imaging and diagnosis of small bowel disease is challenging, especially in developing countries where access to supplementary imaging equipment is not readily available. Imaging of the small bowel has evolved from small bowel follow-through to the first enteroclysis by Pesquera in 1929. This technique evolved over time with advances in enteral intubation catheters, enteral contrast media and techniques for infusing enteral contrast. Objective: (1) Describe our modification of performing CTE and (2) to show pathology and discuss its relevance in our clinical practice. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study that included 73 patients since the introduction of our modified technique of performing CT enteroclysis (CTE) using saline vaculitres, intravenous line connection sets and a drip stand. We recorded patient data in Microsoft Corporation Excel 2007 to include indications for the CTE, patient demographics and imaging findings related to small bowel pathology with associated extra luminal findings and incidental extra-intestinal non small bowel findings that was statistically analyzed. Results: Of the 73 patients included in the study 42 where females and 31 males. 15 (20.5%) had small bowel pathology and 12 (16.4%) had non-small bowel pathology that could explain the clinical symptoms. Malabsorption/chronic diarrhea group was the largest indication for referral (26% of referrals). Most prevalent small bowel findings were in the inflammatory bowel subgroups where 30% had imaging features of active inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusion: Decades of experience have shown that only small bowel examinations that uniformly distend the small bowel lumen can confidently confirm or rule out small bowel pathology. With our modified technique performed, with readily available and affordable infusion equipment and enteral contrast we achieve diagnostic quality small bowel distention to demonstrate and diagnose with confidence small bowel pathology

  2. Fluoroscopic and CT enteroclysis in children: initial experience, technical feasibility, and utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Shanaree [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); University of Missouri, Department of Radiology, Columbia, MO (United States); Applegate, Kimberly E. [Riley Hospital for Children, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Jennings, S.G.; Garrett, Joshua; Maglinte, Dean T. [Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Skantharajah, Arunan [Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Partial small-bowel obstruction can be difficult to diagnose on clinical examination. These obstructions might not be detected on routine abdominal/pelvic CT. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and techniques of fluoroscopic enteroclysis (FE) and CT enteroclysis (CTE), and to review their indications and findings in children. We retrospectively reviewed all enteroclysis studies in children younger than 18 years performed between January 2002 and March 2007. We correlated the results with other abdominal imaging and surgical and pathological findings. The review revealed 112 FE and 74 CTE studies performed in 175 children (mean age 14 years, range 3-18 years). FE and CTE studies were performed most commonly for evaluation of known Crohn disease (FE 38%, CTE 29%) and abdominal pain (FE 26%, CTE 26%). One FE study was terminated because of patient anxiety, and one CTE study was terminated because of patient discomfort. No complications of FE or CTE were reported. The findings were normal in 54% of the FE studies and 46% of the CTE studies. The most common small bowel diagnoses were Crohn disease (FE 34%, CTE 28%) and partial small bowel obstruction (FE 3%, CTE 10%). Two FE studies (2%) and 14 CTE studies (19%) showed abnormalities outside the small bowel. In 54 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 11 FE studies and 25 CTE studies showed additional bowel abnormalities. Overall, 14 and 21 patients had surgery as a result of the findings of FE and CTE, respectively. FE and CTE are safe, feasible, and accurate in depicting small-bowel pathology in children. These techniques can be particularly useful in children with Crohn disease involving the small bowel. (orig.)

  3. Enteroclysis

    Science.gov (United States)

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  4. Comparison of MR enteroclysis with MR enterography and conventional enteroclysis in patients with Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco [Academic Hospital ' ' Umberto I' ' . La Sapienza University Rome, Radiology DEA Department, Rome (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of MR enteroclysis with duodenal intubation with MRI after drinking oral contrast agent only (MR enterography) with conventional enteroclysis (conv-E) as reference standard in patients with Crohn's disease. Forty consecutive patients (22 males and 18 females; mean age 36; range 16-74 years) with proven Crohn's disease underwent conv-E and MR imaging. Twenty-two patients underwent MR enteroclysis with intubation (MRE) and 18 underwent MR-enterography (MR per OS). Two radiologists reached a consensus about the following imaging findings: luminal distension and visualization of superficial mucosal, mural and mesenteric abnormalities. Standard descriptive statistics and a Wilcoxon rank sum test were used. Statistical significance was inferred at P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in the adequacy of luminal distention between the MRE and conv-E (P = 0.08), and both were statistically superior in comparison to MR per OS in the distension of the jejunum (P < 0.01) and less significant at the ileum and terminal ileum levels (P < 0.05). MRE and conv-E were comparable for the accuracy of superficial mucosal abnormalities; meanwhile conv-E compared with MR per OS was statistically superior (P < 0.01). MRE compared with MR per OS was statistically better when visualizing superficial abnormalities (P < 0.01). No statistically significant differences were found in assessing the diagnostic efficacy between MR examinations for the depiction of mural stenosis (P = 0.105) and fistulae (P = 0.67). The number of detected mesenteric findings was significantly higher with both MRE and MR per OS compared to conv-E (P < 0.01). MRE can serve as the diagnostic procedure for initially evaluating patients suspected of having Crohn's disease. MR per OS may have a role in patients that refuse or have failed intubation and also for follow-up. (orig.)

  5. MR enteroclysis protocol optimization: comparison between 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous gadolinium injection and true FISP sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourtsoyiannis, N.; Papanikolaou, N.; Grammatikakis, J.; Maris, T.; Prassopoulos, P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce the true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence for MR enteroclysis and compare it with the already used T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. Twenty-one patients underwent both MR and conventional enteroclysis. The MR enteroclysis examination was performed after administration of an iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter and the following sequences were included: (a) true FISP; and (b) 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous injection of 20 mg Buscopan or 1 mg glucagon and 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium chelates. The true FISP sequence provided images with significantly fewer motion artifacts, whereas 3D FLASH was less sensitive to susceptibility and chemical shift artifacts. The homogeneity of endoluminal opacification, wall conspicuity, and distention of the small bowel were very good to excellent and the two sequences presented no statistically significant differences here. True FISP provided significantly better overall image quality than did 3D FLASH. The true FISP sequence can provide good anatomic demonstration of the small bowel on T2-like images and could be combined with T1-weighted FLASH images for an integrated protocol of MR enteroclysis. (orig.)

  6. Self-administered, inhaled methoxyflurane improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation for computed tomography enteroclysis for suspected small bowel disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, A; Parrish, F J; Naidoo, P; Upton, A; Prime, H; Leaney, B; Gibson, P R

    2011-02-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of self-administered, inhaled analgesic, methoxyflurane, used to improve patient comfort during computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed at two Australian hospitals (one tertiary referral public hospital and one private hospital). Patients were randomized to 3 ml methoxyflurane or saline (scented to maintain blindness) via hand-held inhaler. The main outcome measures were patient comfort during each stage of CTE and an overall rating as recorded by patients 1h post-procedure on a 10 cm visual analogue scale. Patient willingness to undergo repeat CTE, radiologist-rated ease of nasoduodenal intubation, and patient-rated ease of use of the inhaler were also assessed. Sixty patients (mean age 45 years; 41 women) were enrolled; 30 received methoxyflurane and were well matched to 30 receiving placebo. Procedural success was 98%. The mean dose of methoxyflurane consumed was 0.9 ml (SD 0.5). Patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation was better with methoxyflurane {5.0 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 4.0-6.0]} than with placebo [2.7 (95% CI 1.8-3.7); p=0.002, t-test), but there were no significant differences for comfort levels at other times or overall. The inhaler was easy to use, was well tolerated, and there were no episodes of oxygen desaturation, aspiration, or anaphylaxis. Inhalational methoxyflurane safely improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation, but does not improve overall procedure comfort. Copyright © 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-administered, inhaled methoxyflurane improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation for computed tomography enteroclysis for suspected small bowel disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, A., E-mail: dralanmoss@hotmail.co [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Monash University, Box Hill Campus, Melbourne (Australia); Parrish, F.J.; Naidoo, P.; Upton, A. [Department of Radiology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Prime, H.; Leaney, B. [Department of Radiology, Epworth Eastern Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gibson, P.R. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Monash University, Box Hill Campus, Melbourne (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of self-administered, inhaled analgesic, methoxyflurane, used to improve patient comfort during computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE). Materials and methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed at two Australian hospitals (one tertiary referral public hospital and one private hospital). Patients were randomized to 3 ml methoxyflurane or saline (scented to maintain blindness) via hand-held inhaler. The main outcome measures were patient comfort during each stage of CTE and an overall rating as recorded by patients 1 h post-procedure on a 10 cm visual analogue scale. Patient willingness to undergo repeat CTE, radiologist-rated ease of nasoduodenal intubation, and patient-rated ease of use of the inhaler were also assessed. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 45 years; 41 women) were enrolled; 30 received methoxyflurane and were well matched to 30 receiving placebo. Procedural success was 98%. The mean dose of methoxyflurane consumed was 0.9 ml (SD 0.5). Patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation was better with methoxyflurane {l_brace}5.0 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 4.0-6.0]{r_brace} than with placebo [2.7 (95% CI 1.8-3.7); p = 0.002, t-test), but there were no significant differences for comfort levels at other times or overall. The inhaler was easy to use, was well tolerated, and there were no episodes of oxygen desaturation, aspiration, or anaphylaxis. Conclusions: Inhalational methoxyflurane safely improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation, but does not improve overall procedure comfort.

  8. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  9. Breathhold MRI of the small bowel in Crohn`s disease after enteroklysis with oral magnetic particles; Duenndarm-MRT mit schnellen MR-Sequenzen bei Morbus Crohn nach Enteroklysma mit oralen Eisenpartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzknecht, N.; Helmberger, T.; Gauger, J.; Faber, S.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Ritter, C. von [Medizinische Klinik 2, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of breathhold MRI following enteroclysis with addition of oral magnetic particles to study the extension, detection of stenoses and extraluminal manifestations in Crohn`s disease. Results: Typical findings were marked bowel wall thickening with strong contrast enhancement. 95.8% of affected small bowel segments and 94.7% of stenoses were correctly detected by MRI. All four fistulas were detected and important extraluminal findings were seen in 6/18 patients. Additionally, one ileoileal and two ileosigmoidal adhesions, two extraluminal abscesses and affection of the right ureter were delineated. Conclusion: MRI in Crohn`s disease offers the potential to avoid radiation exposure in this relatively young patient group. Important additional findings relevant to indication of surgery are seen in approximately one third of cases. The replacement of transduodenal intubation by oral contrast application remains to be further studied. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Das Ziel dieser Arbeit war der Vergleich der diagnostischen Effizienz des konventionellen Duenndarmenteroklysmas mit anschliessender MRT mit negativem oralem Kontrastmittel bezueglich der Ausdehnung, Stenoseerkennung und relevanter Zusatzinformation bei Morbus Crohn. Im Vergleich mit dem Enteroklysma konnte die MRT-Untersuchung 95,8% der befallenden Segmente und 94,7% der Stenosen identifizieren. Alle 4 Fisteln wurden detektiert und zusaetzlich relevante Befunde in 6 von 18 Patienten gesehen (eine ileoileale und 2 ileosigmoidale Adhaesionen, 2 extraluminale Abzesse und ein entzuendlicher Pseudotumor mit Einbeziehung des rechten Ureters). Das Stenosegrading zeigte keine signifikanten Unterschiede (p=0,11). Zusaetzlich wurden extraluminal eine mesenteriale Lymphadenopathie (15/18) und mesenteriale Fettgewebsproliferation (12/18) mittels MRT nachgewiesen. (orig./AJ)

  10. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoad, C L [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Marciani, L [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Foley, S [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Totman, J J [Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Wright, J [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bush, D [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Cox, E F [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Campbell, E [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Spiller, R C [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gowland, P A [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-07

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug interventio000.

  11. Multidetector computed tomography enteroclysis (MDCT-E) with neutral enteral and IV contrast enhancement in tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania; Lutio, Elisabetta de; Romano, Luigia [Cardarelli Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Naples (Italy); Rollandi, Gian Andrea [San Martino Hospital, 2. Service of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Second University of Naples, Institute of Radiology, Naples (Italy); Maglinte, Dean D.T. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2005-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of MDCT-enteroclysis (MDCT-E), an emerging technique of small bowel examination that combines the advantages of MDCT examination of the abdomen and the enteral volume challenge of enteroclysis, in evaluation of small bowel neoplasms. In our institutions, MDCT-E was used to study 456 patients (age range 21-84 years, mean 53 years) admitted for suspicion of small bowel disease. All examinations were done on multichannel CT units, 129 on a 16-slice scanner and 327 on a four-slice scanner. Post-processing and multiplanar reformatting and interpretation were performed on dedicated workstations. After adequate gastrointestinal preparation and naso-enteric intubation, small bowel was distended by methylcellulose infused by a peristaltic pump. One volumetric MDCT acquisition was obtained after 120-130 ml of intravenous contrast medium. Multiplanar reformatting was based on the image reconstruction parameters from 3 to 4 mm. Forty-five small bowel neoplasms were found; in the remaining cases, 223 Crohn's diseases and 149 other abnormalities were detected. All findings were confirmed by surgery, endoscopy or clinical follow-up. In our experience, MDCT-E with neutral enteral and IV contrast seems to be a reliable method in the diagnosis of small bowel neoplasms. (orig.)

  12. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Henning; Evangelista, Laura; Wirth, Clemens; Beer, Meinrad [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Pabst, Thomas; Machann, Wolfram; Koestler, Herbert; Hahn, Dietbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dick, Anke [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 {+-} 3 years (mean {+-} standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition. (orig.)

  13. Recurrent or residual pelvic bowel cancer: Accuracy of MRI local extent before salvage surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Philip; Carrington, Bernadette M.; Swindell, Ric; Shanks, Johnathan H.; O' Dwyer, Sarah T

    2002-06-01

    PURPOSE: To determine pre-operative MRI accuracy in assessing local disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer by comparing MRI assessment and staging examination under anaesthesia (EUA), with laparotomy/histopathological findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with recurrent (n = 21) or residual (n = 6) pelvic bowel cancer (13 of the rectum, eleven of the anus and three of the colon) underwent EUA and pelvic MRI (1T) using a phased array pelvic coil. Retrospective analysis of eight specific anatomical regions for tumour involvement on MRI was performed. Findings at EUA and biopsy were recorded. The MRI and EUA findings were correlated with findings at surgery and histopathology. Statistical comparison between MRI and EUA results was performed using the chi-squared test . RESULTS: Overall MRI accuracy in determining tumour invasion for all sites assessed was 452/499 (91%), sensitivity was 95/109 (87%), specificity was 357/390 (92%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 95/128 (74%) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 357/371 (96%). PPV and NPV for specific areas were 21/38 (55%) and 134/136 (99%) for genitourinary tract, 4/6 (67%) and 61/65 (94%) for pelvic side wall, 21/26 (81%) and 40/41 (98%) for pelvic floor, 1/6 (17%) and 40/43 (93%) for the posterior pelvis pre-sacrum/sacrum. For those anatomical sites evaluated by both EUA and MRI, MRI was superior to EUA, with an accuracy of 89% vs 73%(P < 0.05) . CONCLUSION: MRI is an accurate technique for assessing disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer. Robinson, P. et al. (2002)

  14. MRI of small bowel Crohn's disease: determining the reproducibility of bowel wall gadolinium enhancement measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharman, A.; Zealley, I.A. [Ninewells Hospital, Dundee (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, R.; Taylor, S.A. [University College Hospital, Department of Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bassett, P. [Stats Consultancy, Ruislip (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    This study aims to determine inter- and intra-observer variation in MRI measurements of relative bowel wall signal intensity (SI) in Crohn's disease. Twenty-one small bowel MRI examinations (11 male, mean age 40), including T1-weighted acquisitions acquired 30 to 120s post-gadolinium, were analysed. Maximal bowel wall SI (most avid, conspicuous contrast enhancement) in designated diseased segments was measured by two radiologists and two trainees using self-positioned ''free'' regions of interest (ROIs) followed by ''fixed'' ROIs chosen by one radiologist, and this procedure was repeated 1 month later. Relative enhancement (post-contrast SI minus pre-contrast SI/pre-contrast SI) was calculated. Data were analysed using Bland-Altman limits of agreement and intra-class correlation. Inter-observer agreement for relative enhancement was poor (spanning over 120%) using a free ROI - 95% limits of agreement -0.69, 0.70 and -0.47, 0.74 for radiologists and trainees, respectively, only marginally improved by use of a fixed ROI -0.60, 0.67 and -0.59, 0.49. Intra-class correlation ranged from 0.46 to 0.72. Intra-observer agreement was slightly better and optimised using a fixed ROI - 95% limits of agreement -0.52, 0.50 and -0.34, 0.28 for radiologists and trainees, respectively. Intra-class correlation ranged from 0.49 to 0.86. Relative bowel wall signal intensity measurements demonstrate wide limits of observer agreement, unrelated to reader experience but improved using fixed ROIs. (orig.)

  15. Abdominal MRI without Enteral Contrast Accurately Detects Intestinal Fibrostenosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy G; Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego; Dhere, Tanvi; Perez, Sebastian D; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K

    2015-11-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting for surgical evaluation require thorough small bowel surveillance as it improves accuracy of diagnosis (ulcerative colitis versus Crohn's) and differentiates those who may respond to nonoperative therapy, preserving bowel length. MRI has not been validated conclusively against histopathology in IBD. Most protocols require enteral contrast. This study aimed to 1) evaluate the accuracy of MRI for inflammation, fibrosis, and extraluminal complications and 2) compare MRI without enteral contrast to standard magnetic resonance enterography. Adults with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis who underwent abdominal MRI and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Of 65 patients evaluated, 55 met inclusion criteria. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for disease involvement localized by segment were 93 per cent (95% confidence interval = 89.4-95.0) and 95 per cent (95% confidence interval = 92.3-97.0), respectively (positive predictive value was 86%, negative predictive value was 98%). Sensitivity and specificity between MRI with and without oral and rectal contrast were similar (96% vs 91% and 99% vs 94%, P > 0.10). As were positive predictive value and negative predictive value (85% vs 96%, P = 0.16; 97% vs 99%, P = 0.42). Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive and specific for localized disease involvement and extraluminal abdominal sequelae of IBD. It accurately differentiates patients who have chronic transmural (fibrotic) disease and thus may require an operation from those with acute inflammation, whose symptoms may improve with aggressive medical therapy alone. MRI without contrast had comparable diagnostic yield to standard magnetic resonance enterography.

  16. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Henning; Pabst, Thomas; Dick, Anke; Machann, Wolfram; Evangelista, Laura; Wirth, Clemens; Köstler, Herbert; Hahn, Dietbert; Beer, Meinrad

    2013-01-01

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 ± 3 years (mean ± standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition.

  17. Software-assisted small bowel motility analysis using free-breathing MRI: feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Froehlich, Johannes M; Cattin, Roger; Raible, Stephan; Bouquet, Hanspeter; Bill, Urs; Patak, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    To validate a software prototype allowing for small bowel motility analysis in free breathing by comparing it to manual measurements. In all, 25 patients (15 male, 10 female; mean age 39 years) were included in this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a 1.5T system after standardized preparation acquiring motility sequences in free breathing over 69-84 seconds. Small bowel motility was analyzed manually and with the software. Functional parameters, measurement time, and reproducibility were compared using the coefficient of variance and paired Student's t-test. Correlation was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and linear regression. The 25 segments were analyzed twice both by hand and using the software with automatic breathing correction. All assessed parameters significantly correlated between the methods (P software (3.90%, standard deviation [SD] ± 5.69) than manual examinations (9.77%, SD ± 11.08). The time needed was significantly less (P software (4.52 minutes, SD ± 1.58) compared to manual measurement, lasting 17.48 minutes for manual (SD ± 1.75 minutes). The use of the software proves reliable and faster small bowel motility measurements in free-breathing MRI compared to manual analyses. The new technique allows for analyses of prolonged sequences acquired in free breathing, improving the informative value of the examinations by amplifying the evaluable data. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Assessment of small bowel motility in patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Kessoku, Takaomi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Inamori, Masahiko; Fujii, Tetsuro; Kawamura, Harunobu; Hata, Yasuo; Manabe, Noriaki; Chiba, Toshimi; Kwee, Thomas C; Haruma, Ken; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takahara, Taro

    2013-07-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare, serious motility disorder, with life-threatening complications over time. However, lack of an established, non-invasive diagnostic method has caused delays in the diagnosis of this intractable disease. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging technique, with a potential to evaluate the motility of the entire bowel. We compared small bowel motility in healthy volunteers, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and those with CIPO, using cine-MRI, and evaluated the usefulness of cine-MRI as a novel diagnostic method for CIPO. Twelve healthy volunteers, IBS patients, and CIPO patients prospectively underwent cine-MRI at 1.5 T. Luminal diameter, contraction ratio, and contraction cycle were measured and compared between the groups. Cine-MRI provided sufficient dynamic images to assess the motility of the entire small bowel. Luminal diameter (mean±s.d.) in CIPO patients was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers and IBS patients (43.4±14.1, 11.1±1.5, and 10.9±1.9 mm, respectively), and contraction ratio was significantly lower in CIPO patients than that in healthy volunteers and IBS patients (17.1±11.0%, 73.0±9.3%, and 74.6±9.4%, respectively). No significant differences were observed in the contraction cycle. This study is the first to assess the clinical utility of cine-MRI in CIPO patients. Cine-MRI clearly detected contractility impairments in CIPO patients. Cine-MRI is noninvasive, radiation-free, and can directly evaluate the entire small bowel peristalsis, and can detect the affected loops at a glance; therefore, it might be extremely useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of CIPO patients in clinical practice.

  19. MRI enterography with divided dose oral preparation: Effect on bowel distension and diagnostic quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Sinha

    2013-01-01

    divided dose resulted in the majority of patients being scanned in a single visit to the MRI suite. Dividing the oral contrast into aliquots can promote uniform distension of the entire small bowel and provide better bowel distension and improve the diagnostic quality.

  20. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) vs. MRI of the small bowel in the evaluation of Crohn's disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagò, R; D'Onofrio, M; Mantovani, W; D'Alpaos, G; Foti, G; Pezzato, A; Caliari, G; Cusumano, D; Benini, L; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    2012-03-01

    The presence of disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD) is one of the main parameters used to establish whether optimal therapy should be drug therapy or surgery. However, a major problem in monitoring CD is the common mismatch between the patient's symptoms and imaging objective signs of disease activity. Bowel ultrasonography (US) has emerged as a low-cost, noninvasive technique in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CD. Accordingly, the use of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) has made possible an evaluation of the vascular enhancement pattern, similar to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of CEUS in comparison with small-bowel MRI for assessing Crohn's disease activity. We prospectively enrolled 30 consecutive patients with known CD. Clinical and laboratory data were compared with imaging findings obtained from MRI and CEUS of the small bowel. MRI was performed with a 1.5-T system using phased-array coils and biphasic orally administered contrast agent prior to and after gadolinium chelate administration. We performed US with a 7.5-MHz linear-array probe and a second-generation contrast agent. The parameters analysed in both techniques were the following: lesion length, wall thickness, layered wall appearance, comb sign, fibroadipose proliferation, presence of enlarged lymph nodes and stenosis. We classified parietal enhancement curves into two types in relation to the contrast pattern obtained with the time-intensity curves at MRI and CEUS: (1) quick washin, quick washout, (2) slow washin, plateau with a slow washout. Comparison between Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) and MRI showed a low correlation, with an rho=0.398; correlation between CDAI-laboratory data and CEUS activity was low, with rho=0.354; correlation between MRI activity and CEUS activity was good, with rho = 0.791; high correlation was found between CEUS and MRI of the small bowel when assessing wall-thickness, lymph nodes and

  1. Diagnostic performance of MRI for detection of intestinal fistulas in patients with complicated inflammatory bowel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S.; Meuwly, J.Y.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Denys, A. [Universitaire Vaudois - CHUV, Service de radiodiagnostic et radiologie interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet II, Imagerie Medicale, Nice (France); Bessoud, B. [Hopital Kremlin-Bicetre, Radiologie Generale, Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Felley, C. [University Hospital, CHUV, Service de Gastroenterologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    The diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of intestinal fistulas, other than perianal, in patients with known complicated inflammatory bowel conditions (CIBC) was investigated. Our study group consisted of 20 patients (12 women, mean age 43 years) with CIBC, including Crohn's disease (n=13), colonic diverticulitis (n=3), colitis after radiotherapy (n=3) and of postoperative origin (n=1). Eleven surgically proven enteral fistulas were known in ten (50%) of these patients, being of enterovesical (n=3), enterocolic (n=2), enteroenteral (n=2), rectovaginal (n=2), rectovaginovesical (n=1) and of entercutaneous (n=1) localisation. The other ten patients (50%), used as the control group, showed MR features of CIBC, although without any fistulous tract. Multiplanar T1- and T2-weighted sequences had been performed, including gadolinium-enhanced acquisition with fat saturation (1.5 T). MR findings were independently blindly and retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists for the presence and etiology of any fistula, as well as visualization and characterization of the fistulous tract. Results were compared with surgical findings (n=16) and clinical evolution (n=4). Interobserver agreement was calculated. Interobserver agreement kappa for fistula detection was 0.71. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for fistula detection were 78.6%, 75% and 77.2%, respectively. Sensitivity for fistula characterization was 80.6%, with visualization of the fistulous tract in all cases, whereby T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated images were considered the most useful sequences. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is a reliable and reproducible tool for detection of enteral fistulas secondary to inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  2. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary comparison of 64-section CT enteroclysis with video capsule endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalife, Samer; Vahedi, Kouroche; Dray, Xavier; Marteau, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Digestive Diseases, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Soyer, Philippe; Hamzi, Lounis; Place, Vinciane; Boudiaf, Mourad [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Alatawi, Abdullah [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Digestive Diseases, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris Cedex 10 (France)

    2011-01-15

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic capabilities of 64-section CT enteroclysis with those of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) to elucidate the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Thirty-two patients who had 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE because of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were included. Imaging findings were compared with those obtained at double balloon endoscopy, surgery and histopathological analysis, which were used as a standard of reference. Concordant findings were found in 22 patients (22/32; 69%), including normal findings (n = 13), tumours (n = 7), lymphangiectasia (n = 1) and inflammation (n = 1), and discrepancies in 10 patients (10/32; 31%), including ulcers (n = 3), angioectasias (n = 2), tumours (n = 2) and normal findings (n = 3). No statistical difference in the proportions of abnormal findings between 64-section CT enteroclysis (11/32; 34%) and VCE (17/32, 53%) (P = 0.207) was found. However, 64-section CT enteroclysis helped identify tumours not detected at VCE (n = 2) and definitely excluded suspected tumours (n = 3) because of bulges at VCE. Conversely, VCE showed ulcers (n = 3) and angioectasias (n = 2) which were not visible at 64-section CT enteroclysis. Our results suggest that 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE have similar overall diagnostic yields in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the two techniques are complementary in this specific population. (orig.)

  3. SU-C-BRA-01: Interactive Auto-Segmentation for Bowel in Online Adaptive MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy by Using a Multi-Region Labeling Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y; Chen, I; Kashani, R; Wan, H; Maughan, N; Muccigrosso, D; Parikh, P [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-guided online adaptive radiation therapy, re-contouring of bowel is time-consuming and can impact the overall time of patients on table. The study aims to auto-segment bowel on volumetric MR images by using an interactive multi-region labeling algorithm. Methods: 5 Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer underwent fractionated radiotherapy (18–25 fractions each, total 118 fractions) on an MRI-guided radiation therapy system with a 0.35 Tesla magnet and three Co-60 sources. At each fraction, a volumetric MR image of the patient was acquired when the patient was in the treatment position. An interactive two-dimensional multi-region labeling technique based on graph cut solver was applied on several typical MRI images to segment the large bowel and small bowel, followed by a shape based contour interpolation for generating entire bowel contours along all image slices. The resulted contours were compared with the physician’s manual contouring by using metrics of Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. Results: Image data sets from the first 5 fractions of each patient were selected (total of 25 image data sets) for the segmentation test. The algorithm segmented the large and small bowel effectively and efficiently. All bowel segments were successfully identified, auto-contoured and matched with manual contours. The time cost by the algorithm for each image slice was within 30 seconds. For large bowel, the calculated Dice coefficients and Hausdorff distances (mean±std) were 0.77±0.07 and 13.13±5.01mm, respectively; for small bowel, the corresponding metrics were 0.73±0.08and 14.15±4.72mm, respectively. Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the proposed algorithm in auto-segmenting large and small bowel on low field MRI images in MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy. Further work will be focused on improving its segmentation accuracy and lessening human interaction.

  4. Delayed gastric emptying and reduced postprandial small bowel water content of equicaloric whole meal bread versus rice meals in healthy subjects: novel MRI insights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marciani, L; Pritchard, S E; Hellier-Woods, C; Costigan, C; Hoad, C L; Gowland, P A; Spiller, R C

    2013-01-01

    ... kJ WMB or an equicaloric RP meal. Subjects underwent serial MRI scans every 45 min up to 270 min to assess gastric volumes and small bowel water content, and completed a GI symptom questionnaire...

  5. Ultrasound and MRI predictors of surgical bowel resection in pediatric Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G; Conrad, Maire A; Biko, David M; Ruchelli, Eduardo D; Kelsen, Judith R; Anupindi, Sudha A

    2017-01-01

    Imaging predictors for surgery in children with Crohn disease are lacking. To identify imaging features of the terminal ileum on short-interval bowel ultrasound (US) and MR enterography (MRE) in children with Crohn disease requiring surgical bowel resection and those managed by medical therapy alone. This retrospective study evaluated patients 18 years and younger with Crohn disease undergoing short-interval bowel US and MRE (within 2 months of one another), as well as subsequent ileocecectomy or endoscopy within 3 months of imaging. Appearance of the terminal ileum on both modalities was compared between surgical patients and those managed with medical therapy, with the following parameters assessed: bowel wall thickness, mural stratification, vascularity, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on bowel US; bowel wall thickness, T2 ratio, enhancement pattern, mesenteric edema, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on MRE. A two-sided t-test was used to compare means, a Mann-Whitney U analysis was used for non-parametric parameter scores, and a chi-square or two-sided Fisher exact test compared categorical variables. Imaging findings in surgical patients were correlated with location-matched histopathological scores of inflammation and fibrosis using a scoring system adapted from the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn Disease, and a Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to compare inflammation and fibrosis on histopathology. Twenty-two surgical patients (mean age: 16.5 years; male/female: 13/9) and 20 nonsurgical patients (mean age: 14.8; M/F: 8/12) were included in the final analysis. On US, the surgical group demonstrated significantly increased mean bowel wall thickness (6.1 mm vs. 4.7 mm for the nonsurgical group; P = 0.01), loss of mural stratification (odds ratio [OR] = 6.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-28.4; P = 0.02) and increased fibrofatty proliferation (P = 0.04). On MRE, the

  6. Ultrasound and MRI predictors of surgical bowel resection in pediatric Crohn disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G. [NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Conrad, Maire A.; Kelsen, Judith R. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Biko, David M.; Anupindi, Sudha A. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ruchelli, Eduardo D. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Anatomic Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Imaging predictors for surgery in children with Crohn disease are lacking. To identify imaging features of the terminal ileum on short-interval bowel ultrasound (US) and MR enterography (MRE) in children with Crohn disease requiring surgical bowel resection and those managed by medical therapy alone. This retrospective study evaluated patients 18 years and younger with Crohn disease undergoing short-interval bowel US and MRE (within 2 months of one another), as well as subsequent ileocecectomy or endoscopy within 3 months of imaging. Appearance of the terminal ileum on both modalities was compared between surgical patients and those managed with medical therapy, with the following parameters assessed: bowel wall thickness, mural stratification, vascularity, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on bowel US; bowel wall thickness, T2 ratio, enhancement pattern, mesenteric edema, fibrofatty proliferation, abscess, fistula and stricture on MRE. A two-sided t-test was used to compare means, a Mann-Whitney U analysis was used for non-parametric parameter scores, and a chi-square or two-sided Fisher exact test compared categorical variables. Imaging findings in surgical patients were correlated with location-matched histopathological scores of inflammation and fibrosis using a scoring system adapted from the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn Disease, and a Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to compare inflammation and fibrosis on histopathology. Twenty-two surgical patients (mean age: 16.5 years; male/female: 13/9) and 20 nonsurgical patients (mean age: 14.8; M/F: 8/12) were included in the final analysis. On US, the surgical group demonstrated significantly increased mean bowel wall thickness (6.1 mm vs. 4.7 mm for the nonsurgical group; P = 0.01), loss of mural stratification (odds ratio [OR] = 6.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-28.4; P = 0.02) and increased fibrofatty proliferation (P = 0.04). On MRE, the surgical group showed

  7. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in healthy volunteers assessed with questionnaires and MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Matias; Poulsen, Jakob L; Brock, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five healthy men were assigned randomly to oxycodone or placebo for 5 days in a cross-over design. The analgesic effect was assessed with muscle pressure algometry and adverse effects were measured using questionnaires including the bowel function index, gastrointestinal symptom rating scale....../ascending colon by 41% (P =0.005) and in the transverse colon by 20% (P= 0.005). No associations were detected between questionnaire scores and colorectal volumes. Conclusion Experimental OIBD in healthy volunteers was induced during oxycodone treatment. This model has potential for future interventional studies...

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of three different MRI protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    thickening, and 0-37%, 59-89%, and 50-86% for DWI in plain MRI, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were in the range of 0-50%, 96-100%, and 90-100% for wall thickening, 0-50%, 84-97%, and 82-95% for DWI, and 0-71%, 94-100%, and 85-100% for mural hyperenhancement in MRFT, respectively...

  9. Hydro-MRI in inflammatory bowel diseases: a comparison with colonoscopy and histopathology; Hydro-MRT bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen - Eine koloskopisch-histologische Vergleichsstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, K.; Reiter, S.; Kern, A. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Orth, T.; Wanitschke, R. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2001-08-01

    Purpose: To compare hydro-MRI with colonoscopy and biopsy specimen regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity and the differentiation of inflammatory bowel diseases. Material and methods: After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution and a rectal bowel opacification using 250-500 ml of a 0.9% saline solution, axial and coronal breath-hold sequences {+-}Gd-DTPA (HASTE-['half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo'] and dynamic FLASH-['fast low angle shot']) were acquired in 27 patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The enhancement of the bowel wall as well as morphological MRI findings were correlated with colonoscopy and biopsy specimens. By means of the MRI findings, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) should be differentiated. Results: In CD, a significant correlation between the contrast enhancement of the inflamed bowel wall ({delta} SI) and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be established (r=0.52; p=0.02 and r=0.72; p=0.001). In UC, no correlations between {delta} SI and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be found. The correct diagnosis of CD and UC by MRI findings was possible in 22/27 patients (81%). Conclusion: Hydro-MRI with dynamic studies is suitable for the assessment of disease activity in CD, but unreliable in UC. Hydro-MRI provides useful information for the differentiation of CD and UC. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Vergleich der Hydro-MRT mi Koloskopie und Histopathologie bezueglich der Beurteilung der entzuendlichen Aktivitaet und der Differenzierung entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen. Patienten und Methodik: Bei 27 Patienten mit einer entzuendlichen Darmerkrankung wurden nach einer oralen Darmkontrastierung mit 1000 ml einer 2,5%igen Mannitolloesung und einer rektalen Darmkontrastierung mit 250-500 ml einer 0,9%igen NaCl-Loesung atemangehaltene transversale und koronare Sequenzen {+-} intravenoese Gd-DTPA-Applikation (HASTE

  10. Does MRI with oral contrast medium allow single-study depiction of inflammatory bowel disease enteritis and colitis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, Carmel G.; Lohan, Derek G.; Browne, Ann Michelle; Roche, Clare; Murphy, Joseph M. [University College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Galway (Ireland)

    2010-07-15

    To assess the feasibility and utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the bowel in concurrent small- and large-bowel evaluation for the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Over a 5-year period, 62 MR examinations performed on 53 patients demonstrated evidence of IBD. Sixteen of these 53 (30.1%) patients had imaging findings of colonic disease and underwent 19 formal MR small bowel examinations. These were further evaluated for bowel distention and image quality. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique compared with colonoscopy as the 'gold standard' was evaluated. Simultaneous imaging of the colon is feasible at MR small bowel follow-through with moderate-to-excellent colonic visibility and colon distention obtained when the contrast medium is present in the colon at the time of image acquisition. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 80% (0.56-0.93), specificity of 100% (0.77-1.00), positive predictive value (PPV) of 1 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.8 for the identification of colitis (based on available concurrent correlation of 38/62 examinations with colonoscopy). Small and large bowel MR imaging with orally consumed contrast medium represents a promising, feasible, non-invasive, non-radiating single mode of assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract, performed at a single sitting. (orig.)

  11. Clinical importance of cine-MRI assessment of small bowel motility in patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: a retrospective study of 33 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyuki, Akiko; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Higurashi, Takuma; Iida, Hiroshi; Inoh, Yumi; Inamori, Masahiko; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2017-05-01

    Although chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare and extremely severe functional digestive disorder, its clinical course and severity show various patterns. We assessed small bowel peristalsis in CIPO patients using cine-MRI (video-motion MRI) and their clinical characteristics to evaluate the clinical importance of performing cine-MRI in patients with this intractable disease. The medical records of 131 patients referred to our institution with a suspected diagnosis of CIPO between 2010 and 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Thirty-three patients (22 female/11 male; age range 16-79 years) who met the criteria for CIPO and underwent cine-MRI were enrolled. Mean luminal diameter (MLD), contraction ratio (CR), and contraction cycle (CC) were determined and compared with these parameters in healthy volunteers. Clinical outcomes in patients with CIPO were also evaluated. The median follow-up time was 25.2 months (range, 1-65 months). Of the 33 patients with CIPO, 23 (70 %) showed apparently disturbed small intestinal peristalsis, whereas 10 (30 %) did not. The percentage of patients requiring intravenous alimentation was significantly higher (p = 0.03), and the mean serum albumin level was significantly lower (p = 0.04), in patients with than without impaired small intestinal peristalsis. Although both cine-MRI and CT findings in the latter ten cases were within the normal range, MLD and CR differed significantly from healthy volunteers. Cine-MRI is useful in predicting severe clinical features in patients with CIPO, and in detecting slightly impaired small contractility that cannot be detected on CT.

  12. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...

  13. Non-perforating small bowel Crohn's disease assessed by MRI enterography: Derivation and histopathological validation of an MR-based activity index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, Michael J., E-mail: mikejsteward@gmail.com [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Punwani, Shonit, E-mail: shonit.punwani@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Imaging, Division of Medicine, University College London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Proctor, Ian, E-mail: ian.proctor@nhs.net [Department of Histopathology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Adjei-Gyamfi, Yvette, E-mail: yvette.adjei-gyamfi@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Chatterjee, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.chaterjee@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Bloom, Stuart, E-mail: stuart.bloom@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Gastroenterology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Novelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.novealli@uclh.nhs.net [Department of Histopathology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve, E-mail: S.halligan@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Specialist Imaging, University College Hospital London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Imaging, Division of Medicine, University College London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.rodriguez-justo@uclh.nhs.uk [Department of Histopathology, University College London Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-09-15

    Objectives: To develop and validate a qualitative scoring system for enteric Crohn's disease activity using MR enterography (MRE). Methods: MRE was performed in 16 patients (mean age 33, 8 male) undergoing small bowel resection. Mural thickness, T2 signal, contrast enhancement, and perimural oedema were scored qualitatively (0–3) at 44 locations. Transmural histopathological scoring of acute inflammation (AIS) was performed at all locations (score 0–13). MRI parameters best predicting AIS were derived using multivariate analysis. The MRI activity index was applied to 26 Crohn's patients (mean age 32, range 13–69 years, 15 male) and correlated to terminal ileal biopsy scores of acute inflammation (“eAIS” score 1–6). Receiver operator characteristic curves were calculated. Results: Mural thickness (coefficient 1.34 (95% CI 0.36, 2.32)], p = 0.007) and T2 signal (coefficient 0.90 (95% CI −0.24, 2.04) p = 0.06) best predicted AIS (AIS = 1.79 + 1.34*mural thickness + 0.94*mural T2 score [R-squared 0.52]). There was a significant correlation between the MRI index and eAIS (Kendall's tau = 0.40, 95% CI 0.11–0.64, p = 0.02). The model achieved a sensitivity of 0.81 (95% CI 0.54–0.96), specificity of 0.70 (0.35–0.93) and AUC 0.77 for predicting acute inflammation (eAIS ≥2). Conclusions: A simple qualitative MRI Crohn's disease activity score appears predictive against a histopathological standard of reference.

  14. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and radio waves to create pictures of the body. It does not use radiation (x-rays). Single MRI images are called slices. The images can be stored on a computer or printed on film. One exam produces dozens or sometimes hundreds of ...

  15. Anti-tumor necrosis factor α prevents bowel fibrosis assessed by messenger RNA, histology, and magnetization transfer MRI in rats with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jeremy; Rahal, Kinan; Swanson, Scott D; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Rittershaus, Ahren C; Reingold, Laura J; Brudi, Josh S; Shealy, David; Cai, Ann; McKenna, Barbara J; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) with anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) decreases intestinal inflammation, but the effect on fibrosis remains unclear. We hypothesized that treatment with rat-specific anti-TNFα will decrease the development of intestinal fibrosis in a rat model of CD. We further hypothesized that magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging (MT-MRI) will be sensitive in detecting these differences in collagen content. Rats were injected in the distal ileum and cecum with peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS) or human serum albumin (control) at laparotomy and then received intraperitoneal injections of rat-specific anti-TNFα or vehicle daily for 21 days after laparotomy. Rats underwent MT-MRI abdominal imaging on day 19 or 20. MT ratio was calculated in the cecal wall. Cecal tissue histologic inflammation was scored. Cecal tissue procollagen, cytokine, and growth factor messenger RNAs were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. PG-PS-injected rats treated with anti-TNFα had less histologic inflammation, and cecal tissue expressed lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine messenger RNAs than vehicle-treated PG-PS-injected rats (IL-1β: 5.59 ± 1.53 versus 10.41 ± 1.78, P = 0.02; IL-6: 23.23 ± 9.33 versus 45.89 ± 11.79, P = 0.07). PG-PS-injected rats treated with anti-TNFα developed less intestinal fibrosis than vehicle-treated PG-PS-injected rats by tissue procollagen I (2.87 ± 0.66 versus 9.28 ± 1.11; P = 0.00002), procollagen III (2.25 ± 0.35 versus 7.28 ± 0.76; P = 0.0000009), and MT-MRI (MT ratio: 17.79 ± 1.61 versus 27.95 ± 1.75; P = 0.0001). Insulin-like growth factor I (2.52 ± 0.44 versus 5.14 ± 0.60; P = 0.0007) and transforming growth factor β1 (2.34 ± 0.29 versus 3.45 ± 0.29; P = 0.006) were also decreased in anti-TNFα-treated PG-PS-injected rats. Anti-TNFα prevents the development of bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis in the PG-PS rat model of CD. MT-MRI measurably demonstrates this decrease in intestinal

  16. CO{sub 2} as a distending medium for gastric and small bowel MRI: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomas, D.J.; Habib, S.H.; Joubert, I.J.; Sala, E.; Graves, M.J. [University of Cambridge and Addenbrooke' s NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    This work evaluates carbon dioxide as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging of the stomach and small bowel. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent rapid magnetic resonance imaging after oral administration of a carbon dioxide generating agent using a combination of breath-hold and interactive fluoroscopic imaging during breathing. Diagnostic-quality images were obtained in 100% of cases for the stomach and in 92, 75, 67 and 42% of cases for the duodenal segments 1-4, respectively. Visualisation of the jejunum and ileum proved unacceptable for clinical use and anti-peristaltic agents did not significantly influence the results. Further development of fast imaging and magnetic resonance interactive fluoroscopic methods may allow the use of carbon dioxide as a contrast medium for clinical imaging of the stomach and duodenum. (orig.)

  17. Bowel Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... passes through the large intestine too slowly. Bowel incontinence is a problem controlling your bowel movements. Other abnormalities with bowel movements may be a sign of a digestive problem. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  18. Pilot study of endoscopic retrograde 3-dimensional - computed tomography enteroclysis for the assessment of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroki; Ito, Takahiro; Inaba, Yuhei; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Nomura, Yoshiki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kashima, Shin; Moriichi, Kentaro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde ileography (ERIG) is developed in our institute and applied clinically for the diagnosis and assessment of the Crohn's disease activity. We have further improved the technique using 3-dimensional - computed tomography enteroclysis (3D-CTE) and conducted a retrospective study to determine the feasibility and the diagnostic value of endoscopic retrograde 3D-CTE (ER 3D-CTE) in Crohn's disease patients in a state of remission. Thirteen Crohn's patients were included in this pilot study. CTE was performed after the infusion of air or CO2 through the balloon tube following conventional colonoscopy. The primary endpoint of this study was to assess the safety of this method. Secondarily, the specific findings of Crohn's disease and length of the visualized small intestine were assessed. The procedures were completed without any adverse events. Gas passed through the small intestine and enterographic images were obtained in 10 out of 13 cases, but, in the remaining patients, insertion of the balloon tubes into the terminal ileum failed. Various features specific to Crohn's disease were visualized using ER 3D-CTE. A cobble stone appearance or hammock-like malformation was specific and effective for diagnosing Crohn's disease and the features of anastomosis after the surgical operations were also well described. Therefore, this technique may be useful after surgery. In this study, ER 3D-CTE was performed safely in Crohn's disease patients and may be used for the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease.

  19. Conscious sedation for patients undergoing enteroclysis: Comparing the safety and patient-reported effectiveness of two protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglinte, Dean D.T. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, 550 N, University Boulevard, University Hospital Room 0279, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States)], E-mail: dmaglint@iupui.edu; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Rajesh, Arumugam; Jennings, S. Gregory; Ford, Jason M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, 550 N, University Boulevard, University Hospital Room 0279, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States); Savabi, Mojgan Sarah [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 550 N, University Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States); Lappas, John C. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, 550 N, University Boulevard, University Hospital Room 0279, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5253 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Objective: To compare the safety and patient-reported effectiveness of two regimens for conscious sedation during enteroclysis. Materials and methods: We surveyed two groups of outpatients and retrospectively reviewed procedure records for conscious sedation and complications. Patients were divided into Group One (received sedative/amnesic diazepam), and Group Two, (received amnesic/sedative, midazolam and analgesic fentanyl). Results: All enteroclyses were successfully completed; there were no hospital admissions due to complications. In Group One (n = 106), mean dose of diazepam was 12.7 mg. 25% had oxygen desaturation (n = 25), and post-procedure vomiting without aspiration (n = 1). 56% of outpatients completed phone surveys, and 68% recalled procedural discomfort. In Group Two (n = 45), mean doses were 3.9 mg midazolam and 108 mcg fentanyl. 31% had desaturation (n = 13), and post-procedure vomiting without aspiration (n = 1). 87% had only a vague recall of the procedure or of any discomfort. Conclusion: A combination of amnesic and fentanyl prevented the recall of discomfort of nasoenteric intubation and infusion in most patients who had enteroclysis compared to diazepam. Most of the patients would undergo the procedure again, if needed.

  20. Diagnostic approach to small bowel involvement in inflammatory bowel disease: view of the endoscopist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic small bowel (SB) techniques have revolutionalized the diagnostic approach of patients with suspected or known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has become an important diagnostic tool for the evaluation of suspected CD of the SB or in patients with known IBD to rule out SB involvement. The greatest utility of WCE has been observed in cases of suspected CD, where the initial evaluation with traditional radiographic and endoscopic studies has failed to establish the diagnosis. WCE can detect early SB lesions that can be overlooked by traditional radiological studies. The sensitivity of diagnosing SB CD by WCE is superior to other endoscopic or radiological methods such as push enteroscopy, computed tomography or magnetic resonance enteroclysis. The utility of WCE in patients with known CD, IBD unclassified (IBDU) and a select group of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) can better define the diagnosis and extent of the disease and may lead to reclassification of IBD from UC/IBDU to definitive CD. In addition, previously diagnosed patients with CD may be found to have more significant disease burden in the SB. This information may facilitate more targeted and effective therapies and potentially lead to better patient outcomes. A disadvantage of WCE is its low specificity and the risk of being retained in a strictured area of the SB. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy has essentially replaced push enteroscopy, and has been used to treat CD strictures, obtain biopsies from areas of SB involvement and even retrieving a retained capsule.

  1. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Kralik; Peter Trnovsky; Marcela Kopáčová

    2013-01-01

    In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow dop...

  2. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    prior to capsule endoscopy in these patients (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In the presence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis, ESGE recommends that dedicated small bowel cross-sectional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis or computed tomography enterography/enteroclysis should be used first (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 In patients with established Crohn's disease, based on ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends dedicated cross-sectional imaging for small-bowel evaluation since this has the potential to assess extent and location of any Crohn's disease lesions, to identify strictures, and to assess for extraluminal disease (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In patients with unremarkable or nondiagnostic findings from such cross-sectional imaging of the small bowel, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as a subsequent investigation, if deemed to influence patient management (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). When capsule endoscopy is indicated, ESGE recommends use of the PillCam patency capsule to confirm functional patency of the small bowel (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 7 ESGE strongly recommends against the use of small-bowel capsule endoscopy for suspected coeliac disease but suggests that capsule endoscopy could be used in patients unwilling or unable to undergo conventional endoscopy (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Complicated Jejunal Diverticulosis: Small Bowel Volvulus with Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Singh Mohi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of the diverticulum of the small bowel varies from 0.2-1.3% in autopsy studies to 2.3% when assessed on enteroclysis. It occurs mostly in patients in the 6th decade of their life. Of all the small bowel diverticuli, jejunal diverticulum is the most common type. This rare entity is usually asymptomatic. However, they may cause chronic non-specific symptoms for a long period of time like dyspepsia, chronic postprandial pain, nausea, vomiting, borborgymi, alternating diarrhoea and constipation, weight loss, anaemia, steatorrhea or rarely lead to complications like haemorrhage, obstruction, perforation. Obstruction can be due to enterolith, adhesions, intussusception, and volvulus. The condition is difficult to diagnose because patients are generally presented with symptoms that mimic other diseases. It is important for clinicians to have awareness of this entity. Here, we present a case of multiple jejunal diverticuli with a history of repeated attacks of diverticulitis over past 20 years, which were misdiagnosed and now presented with intestinal obstruction due to volvulus of the involved segment along with mesentery around its axis. Resection of the diverticuli segment of jejunum was done with end-to-end jejuno-jejunal anastomosis. The patient is asymptomatic since 10 months of follow-up.

  4. Diseases of the small bowel in chronic diarrhea: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simadibrata

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic diarrhea in Asia is between 0.8-1.0%. The diseases and abnormalities according to the location, which can cause chronic diarrhea, are divided into three locations: the small bowel, the large bowel and extraintestinal. The small bowel diseases include infectious and non-infectious diseases. The infectious diseases are bacterial infections, parasitic infections etc. The non-infectious diseases include of Crohn’s disease, Celiac sprue, NSAID enteropathy, lactose intolerance, benign tumor, carcinoid tumor, carcinoma, post surgery complications, laxative etc. The approaches to diagnosis include good anamnesis, careful physical examination, supporting laboratory tests, more specialized supporting examinations including X-ray of the colon, esophagogastroduodenum follow-through, enteroclysis, ileo-colonoscopy and endoscopy on the upper portion of the digestive tract including the small intestine with biopsy for histopathology examinations. The treatment for chronic diarrhea is divided into supportive and causal therapy. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 179-89 Keywords: small bowel, chronic diarrhea, approaches to diagnosis, treatment

  5. Beneficial Effects of Combining Computed Tomography Enteroclysis/Enterography with Capsule Endoscopy for Screening Tumor Lesions in the Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Shibata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the efficacy of using computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography (CTE, capsule endoscopy (CE, and CTE with CE for diagnosing tumor lesions in the small intestine. Materials and Methods. We included 98 patients who underwent CE during the observation period and were subjected to CTE at our hospital from April 2008 to May 2014. Results. CTE had a significantly higher sensitivity than CE (84.6% versus 46.2%, P=0.039, but there were no significant differences in specificity, positive or negative predictive values, or diagnostic accuracy rates. The sensitivity of CTE/CE was 100%, again significantly higher than that of CE P=0.002. The difference in specificity between CTE/CE and CE was not significant, but there were significant differences in positive predictive values (100% for CTE/CE versus 66.7% for CE, P=0.012, negative predictive values (100% versus 92.1%, P=0.008, and diagnostic accuracy rate (100% versus 89.8%, P=0.001. The diagnostic accuracy rate was also significantly higher in CTE/CE versus CTE (100% versus 95.9%, P=0.043. Conclusion. Our findings suggested that a combination of CTE and CE was useful for screening tumor lesions in the small intestine. This trial is registered with number UMIN000016154.

  6. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Kralik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism, is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in small bowel examination.

  7. Transabdominal ultrasonography of the small bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Rudolf; Trnovsky, Peter; Kopáčová, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism), is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in small bowel examination.

  8. Enteroclysis CT and PEG-CT in patients with previous small-bowel surgical resection for Crohn's disease: CT findings and correlation with endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minordi, Laura Maria; Vecchioli, Amorino; Poloni, Giuliana; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Radiology Institute, UCSC, Department of Bio-Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Guidi, Luisa; De Vitis, Italo [Catholic University (UCSC), Gastrointestinal Department, Complesso Integrato Columbus, Rome (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multidetector CT in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) relapse after ileocolic resection compared with endoscopy. Thirty-four patients were studied by endoscopy and multidetector CT, after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution (n = 21) or after administration of methylcellulose via nasojejunal tube (n = 13). In CT examinations we evaluated the presence of mural thickening, target sign, perienteric stranding, comb sign, fibrofatty proliferation and complications. Endoscopic results were classified in accordance with Rutgeerts score (from 0 to 4). The statistical evaluations were carried out by using Fisher's exact text and {chi} {sup 2} testing (p < 0.05, statistically significant difference). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the CT were 96.9%, 100% and 97%, respectively. We found a statistically significant correlation between an endoscopic score of 4 and the CT signs of target sign, perienteric stranding, comb sign and fibrofatty proliferation, and between scores 1 and 2 and mucosal hyperdensity without or with mural thickening, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, only CT identified the presence of jejunal and proximal ileum disease in two and three patients, respectively, and fistulas in three patients. CT is a reliable method in the diagnosis of CD relapse and shows agreement with the approved endoscopic Rutgeerts score. (orig.)

  9. CT findings in acute small bowel diverticulitis; Computertomographie bei akuter Duenndarmdivertikulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferstl, F.J.; Obert, R. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinisches Zentrum (RNZ) am St. Theresienkrankenhaus Nuernberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Small bowel diverticulitis is a rare cause of an acute abdomen. Originating from acquired diverticula of the jejunum, less often of the ileum, or Meckel diverticulum, the symptoms are non-specific, simulating other acute inflammatory disorders, such as appendicitis, cholecystitis or colonic diverticulitis. The diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis is solely based on radiologic findings, with computed tomography (CT) regarded as the method of choice. In recent years, a number of case reports have described the spectrum of the CT features in acute small bowel diverticulitis and its dependence on the severity of the inflammatory process. Typical findings are an inflamed diverticulum, inflammatory mesenteric infiltration, extraluminal gas collection and mural edema of adjacent small bowel loops with resultant separation of bowel loops. An enterolith is rarely found in an inflamed diverticulum. Complications include abscesses, fistulae, small bowel obstruction and free perforation with peritonitis. Small bowel diverticulitis can be a diagnostic problem if it involves the terminal ileum or Meckel's diverticulum. For preoperative confirmation of the presumed diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis on CT, an enteroclysis for acquired diverticula or a technetium scan for Meckel's diverticulum should be performed. We present the CT findings in three patients of acute small bowel diverticulitis, two affecting the jejunum and one a Meckel's diverticulum. (orig.) [German] Die akute Duenndarmdivertikulitis ist eine seltene Ursache eines akuten Abdomens. Ausgehend von den erworbenen Divertikeln des Jejunums, seltener des Ileums, oder von einem Meckel-Divertikel, manifestiert sich die Divertikulitis klinisch durch eine unspezifische Symptomatik, die zuerst an die haeufigeren, akutentzuendlichen Erkrankungen des Abdomens wie z. B. Appendizitis, Cholezystitis oder Kolondivertikulitis denken laesst. Die Duenndarmdivertikulitis kann praeoperativ nur durch

  10. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  11. Daily bowel care program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000133.htm Daily bowel care program To use the sharing features on this page, ... Work with your health care provider. Basic Bowel Program Keeping active helps prevent constipation. Try to walk, ...

  12. Accidental Bowel Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I do to help treat accidental bowel leakage? Kegel exercises strengthen the muscles that surround the openings ... bowels that may cause cramping, diarrhea, or constipation. Kegel Exercises: Pelvic muscle exercises that assist in bladder ...

  13. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Shoulder Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder ... limitations of MRI of the shoulder? What is MRI of the shoulder? MRI of the shoulder provides ...

  14. Knee MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Knee Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee ... of a knee MRI? What is a Knee MRI? MRI of the knee provides detailed images of ...

  15. Frequent Bowel Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/irritable-bowel-syndrome. Accessed Nov. 15, 2017. Nov. 18, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/frequent-bowel- ...

  16. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiki, Hassan [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Fidler, Jeff [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: fidler.jeff@mayo.edu

    2009-03-15

    ionizing radiation and availability of a variety of oral contrast agents, MR is well suited to play a critical role in the imaging of small bowel disorders. In this article we will review the technical issues related to the performance of MR enterography and enteroclysis and discuss the role and controversies of using MR in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. The role of nuclear medicine in inflammatory bowel disease. A review with experiences of aspecific bowel activity using immunoscintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc anti-granulocyte antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoerke, Tamas E-mail: gyorke@radi.sote.hu; Duffek, Laszlo; Bartfai, Katalin; Mako, Erno; Karlinger, Kinga; Mester, Adam; Tarjan, Zsolt

    2000-09-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) needs a complex diagnostic work-up. Beside verifying the disease itself, it is fundamental to assess disease extent and activity and to detect associated complications, to find the most effective treatment and for follow up. Scintigraphy with radiolabelled leukocytes is able to provide a complete survey of the whole intestinal tract, both the small and large bowel, and detects septic complications successfully with negligible risk. Radionuclide procedures are useful in establishing or ruling out IBD in patients with intestinal complaints, in assessing disease severity, and in the evaluation of extraintestinal septic complications. Widely available radionuclide procedures are discussed, i.e. scintigraphy by {sup 111}Indium oxime or {sup 99m}Technetium HMPAO labelled white blood cells and immunoscintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc anti-granulocyte antibodies. Advantages and disadvantages of all three methods are stressed out. Patients and methods: The immunoscintigraphies with {sup 99m}Tc anti-granulocyte antibodies (ANTI-GRANULOCYTE[reg] BW 250/183) of 27 patients with suspicion of IBD were retrospectively analysed. Planar anterior and posterior images were obtained 4 and 24 h postinjection, respectively. The bowel was divided into six segments and the activity was visually graded with reference to bone marrow in each segments. The scans were compared with the results of radiological and endoscopical investigations. The diagnosis of IBD was proved or ruled out by means of enteroclysis, large bowel enema or endoscopy. Results: In the 27 patients, 74 bowel segments with increased activity were detected. In the case of 30 segments in 16 patients, bowel inflammation was revealed by the other methods (true positives). In the case of 44 bowel segments, no underlying bowel inflammation could be verified, and these activities were regarded as aspecific activity. We could not differentiate between true positive and aspecific

  18. MRI of sequela of transverse myelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.C.; Lee, S.K.; Ho, Y.J. (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Radiology); Lee, K.R. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Hsin-Chu (Taiwan). Inst. of Life Science); Mak, S.C.; Chi, C.S. (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1992-09-01

    A 4-year-old boy developed acute paraplegia, associated with sensory impairement and bowel and urinary dysfunction after an URI. MRI showed diffuse hyperintensity in T2WI in the spinal cord below the T6 level. Acute transverse myelitis was diagnosed based on the clinical presentations and MRI findings. The patient had poor recovery and two months later, a follow-up MRI disclosed a severer diffuse atrophic change of the spinal cord in the affected segment. (orig.).

  19. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... with functional bowel disease. The findings may have direct influence on the dietary guidance given to a major group of patients with functional bowel disease and may make it possible to define separate entities in this disease complex....

  20. US and MRI of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Vogt, Susanna; Behrendt, Werner; Kaiser, Werner A. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany); Kentouche, Karim; Gruhn, Bemd; Sauerbrey, Axel; Fuchs, Dietlinde; Zintl, Felix [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena (Germany); Kosmehl, Hartwig [Department of Pathology, University of Jena (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Abdominal problems often complicate the clinical course after bone marrow transplantation. Graft-versus-host disease occurs as a complication of allogenic bone marrow transplantation. In this report, the findings of intestinal involvement are described and correlated with histopathological findings. Increased bowel-wall thickness and increased vascularity were shown by US. MRI demonstrated generalised increased bowel-wall thickness associated with bowel-wall enhancement after administration of IV gadolinium. (orig.)

  1. Bowel Diseases and Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Dorofeiev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review of contemporary publications analyzes the prevalence of combinations of bowel and renal diseases. Special attention is paid to the problem of correlation between bowel diseases and urolithiasis. We consider the possible pathogenic mechanisms of lesions, such as genetically determined violations of intestinal absorption and secretion, changes in the intestinal microbiota, systemic inflammatory response, water and electrolyte disturbances.

  2. Pilot study of endoscopic retrograde 3-dimensional – computed tomography enteroclysis for the assessment of Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanabe

    Full Text Available Purpose: Endoscopic retrograde ileography (ERIG is developed in our institute and applied clinically for the diagnosis and assessment of the Crohn’s disease activity. We have further improved the technique using 3-dimensional – computed tomography enteroclysis (3D-CTE and conducted a retrospective study to determine the feasibility and the diagnostic value of endoscopic retrograde 3D-CTE (ER 3D-CTE in Crohn’s disease patients in a state of remission. Methods: Thirteen Crohn’s patients were included in this pilot study. CTE was performed after the infusion of air or CO2 through the balloon tube following conventional colonoscopy. The primary endpoint of this study was to assess the safety of this method. Secondarily, the specific findings of Crohn’s disease and length of the visualized small intestine were assessed. Results: The procedures were completed without any adverse events. Gas passed through the small intestine and enterographic images were obtained in 10 out of 13 cases, but, in the remaining patients, insertion of the balloon tubes into the terminal ileum failed. Various features specific to Crohn’s disease were visualized using ER 3D-CTE. A cobble stone appearance or hammock-like malformation was specific and effective for diagnosing Crohn’s disease and the features of anastomosis after the surgical operations were also well described. Therefore, this technique may be useful after surgery. Conclusion: In this study, ER 3D-CTE was performed safely in Crohn’s disease patients and may be used for the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease. Keywords: Crohn’s disease, Ileography, Computed tomography, 3-Dimension

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines Inflammatory Bowel Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Inflammatory Bowel Disease Print A ... en español Enfermedad inflamatoria del intestino What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a condition that ...

  4. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  5. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sclafani, Francesco; Peckitt, Clare [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cunningham, David, E-mail: david.cunningham@rmh.nhs.uk [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Tait, Diana [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Giralt, Jordi [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Department of Medical Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Glimelius, Bengt [University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Keränen, Susana Roselló [Biomedical Research Institute INCLIVA, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University of Valencia (Spain); Bateman, Andrew [Southampton General Hospital, Cancer Sciences Unit, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Hickish, Tamas [Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Oncology, Bournemouth University (United Kingdom); Tabernero, Josep [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Department of Medical Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Thomas, Janet; Brown, Gina; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-01

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term.

  6. Bowel transit time

    Science.gov (United States)

    You will be asked to swallow 2 gelatin capsules filled with a colored food dye. You take these capsules with a meal. Afterwards, you observe your bowel movements and write down how long it takes for the ...

  7. MRI of vulvar Crohn disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Deepa; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, F3503, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Adler, Jeremy [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Crohn disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the distal small bowel and colon. While certain extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease are relatively common and well-known, others, such as metastatic cutaneous involvement, are quite rare and may be difficult to recognize, particularly in the pediatric population. This case report illustrates the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of vulvar region cutaneous Crohn disease in an 11-year-old girl. (orig.)

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bowel Disease Print A A A en español Enfermedad inflamatoria del intestino What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease? ... of IBD? There are two kinds of IBD: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (say: UL-sur-uh- ...

  9. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings...

  11. Bowel Endometriosis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riiskjær, M; Egekvist, A G; Hartwell, D

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is it possible to develop a validated score that can identify women with Bowel Endometriosis Syndrome (BENS) and be used to monitor the effect of medical and surgical treatment? SUMMARY ANSWER: The BENS score can be used to identify women with BENS and to monitor the effect...

  12. Prenatal magnetic resonance and ultrasonographic findings in small-bowel obstruction: imaging clues and postnatal outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, Eva I.; Blask, Anna R.; Bulas, Dorothy I. [Children' s National Medical System, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Badillo, Andrea T. [Children' s National Medical System, Division of General and Thoracic Surgery, Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Prenatal small-bowel obstruction can result from single or multiple atresias, and it can be an isolated abnormality or part of a syndrome. It is sometimes the first manifestation of cystic fibrosis. Accurate prediction of the level of obstruction and length of bowel affected can be difficult, presenting a challenge for counseling families and planning perinatal management. To review the prenatal US and MRI findings of small-bowel obstruction and to assess whether fetal MRI adds information that could improve prenatal counseling and perinatal management. We retrospectively reviewed 12 prenatally diagnosed cases of small-bowel obstruction evaluated by both US and MRI from 2005 to 2015. We analyzed gestational age at evaluation, US and MRI findings, gestational age at delivery and postnatal outcomes. The final diagnoses were jejunal atresia (7), ileal atresia (1), cystic fibrosis (3) and combined jejunal and anal atresia (1). Four of the eight with jejunal atresia were found to have multiple small-bowel atresias. Prenatal perforation was noted in three. We identified a trend of increasing complexity of bowel contents corresponding to progressively distal level of obstruction, as indicated by increasing US echogenicity and high T1 signal on MRI. Seven cases of jejunal atresia and one case of ileal atresia demonstrated small ascending, transverse and descending colon (microcolon) with filling of a normal-diameter rectum. In contrast, all three fetuses with cystic fibrosis and the fetus with jejunal-anal atresia demonstrated microcolon as well as abnormal paucity or absence of rectal meconium. Polyhydramnios was present in nine. Eight were delivered prematurely, of whom seven had polyhydramnios. The fetus with jejunal and anal atresia died in utero. Postnatally, three had short gut syndrome, all resulting from multiple jejunal atresias; these three were among a subset of four fetuses whose bowel diameter measured more than 3 cm. Eight infants had no further

  13. Short bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2012-02-01

    The short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption following intestinal resection where there is less than 200 cm of intestinal length. The management of short bowel syndrome can be challenging and is best managed by a specialised multidisciplinary team. A good understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of resection of different portions of the small intestine is necessary to anticipate and prevent, where possible, consequences of SBS. Nutrient absorption and fluid and electrolyte management in the initial stages are critical to stabilisation of the patient and to facilitate the process of adaptation. Pharmacological adjuncts to promote adaptation are in the early stages of development. Primary restoration of bowel continuity, if possible, is the principle mode of surgical treatment. Surgical procedures to increase the surface area of the small intestine or improve its function may be of benefit in experienced hands, particularly in the paediatric population. Intestinal transplant is indicated at present for patients who have failed to tolerate long-term parenteral nutrition but with increasing experience, there may be a potentially expanded role for its use in the future.

  14. Advances in small bowel transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Gürkan, Alp

    2017-01-01

    Small bowel transplantation is a life-saving surgery for patients with intestinal failure. The biggest problem in intestinal transplantation is graft rejection. Graft rejection is the main reason for morbidity and mortality. Rejection has a negative effect on the survival of the graft. While 50%–75% of small bowel transplantation patients experience acute rejection, chronic rejection occurs in approximately 15% of patients. Immune monitoring is crucial after small bowel transplantation. Unlik...

  15. Asymptomatic Brain Lesions on Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Guleryuzlu, Yuksel; Uygur-Bayramicli, Oya; Ahishali, Emel; Dabak, Resat

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to examine the frequency and type of asymptomatic neurological involvement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) using cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Fifty-one IBD patients with no known neurological diseases or symptoms and 30 controls with unspecified headaches without neurological origins were included. Patients and controls underwent cranial MRI assessments for white matter lesions, sinusitis, otitis-mastoiditis, and other brain parenchyma...

  16. Role of MRI in Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R. [Department of Radiology, GI Unit, South Warwickshire NHS Trust, and IBD Network, Coventry and South Warwickshire (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rakesh.sinha@swh.nhs.uk; Murphy, P. [Department of Surgery, GI Unit, South Warwickshire NHS Trust, and IBD Network, Coventry and South Warwickshire (United Kingdom); Hawker, P. [Department of Gastroenterology, GI Unit, South Warwickshire NHS Trust, and IBD Network, Coventry and South Warwickshire (United Kingdom); Sanders, S. [Department of Pathology, GI Unit, South Warwickshire NHS Trust and IBD Network, Coventry and South Warwickshire (United Kingdom); Rajesh, A.; Verma, R. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The traditional imaging of Crohn's disease has relied on barium and computed tomography (CT) examinations. In recent years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an imaging method that can be used in the diagnosis and assessment of Crohn's disease. The advantages of MRI include lack of ionizing radiation and its superior tissue contrast resolution. The clinical progression of Crohn's disease can be variable, and MRI can be used to assess inflammatory status, disease progression, and complications of Crohn's disease. MRI of the small bowel is an evolving technique and it has the potential to become the preferred technique for imaging of small bowel Crohn's disease in the future.

  17. Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvendijk J. van, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is de verzamelnaam voor Colitis ulcerosa en de ziekte van Crohn. Het zijn chronische darmontstekingen, waarvan de ziekteactiviteit wisselt en zich niet laat voorspellen. Door de lichamelijke klachten en het onvoorspelbare karakter

  18. Fetal MRI clues to diagnose cloacal malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Patel, Manish N.; Kraus, Steven [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Levitt, Marc A.; Pena, Alberto [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Colorectal Center for Children, Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen; Crombleholme, Timothy M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Fetal Care Center of Cincinnati, Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Linam, Leann E. [Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Prenatal US detection of cloacal malformations is challenging and rarely confirms this diagnosis. To define the prenatal MRI findings in cloacal malformations. We performed a retrospective study of patients with cloacal malformations who had pre- and post-natal assessment at our institution. Fetal MRI was obtained in six singleton pregnancies between 26 and 32 weeks of gestation. Imaging analysis was focused on the distal bowel, the urinary system and the genital tract and compared with postnatal clinical, radiological and surgical diagnoses. The distal bowel was dilated and did not extend below the bladder in five fetuses. They had a long common cloacal channel (3.5-6 cm) and a rectum located over the bladder base. Only one fetus with a posterior cloacal variant had a normal rectum. Three fetuses had increased T2 signal in the bowel and two increased T1/decreased T2 signal bladder content. All had renal anomalies, four had abnormal bladders and two had hydrocolpos. Assessment of the anorectal signal and pelvic anatomy during the third trimester helps to detect cloacal malformations in the fetus. The specificity for this diagnosis was highly increased when bowel fluid or bladder meconium content was identified. (orig.)

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  20. MRI of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  1. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast ... limitations of MRI of the Breast? What is MRI of the Breast? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest ...

  3. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite the universal use of bowel preparation before colonoscopy and colorectal surgery, the physiologic effects have not been described in a standardized setting. This study was designed to investigate the physiologic effects of bowel preparation. METHODS: In a prospective study, 12...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance......, plasma and extracellular volume, balance function, and biochemical parameters were measured. RESULTS: Bowel preparation led to a significant decrease in exercise capacity (median, 9 percent) and weight (median, 1.2 kg). Plasma osmolality was significantly increased from 287 to 290 mmol kg(-1), as well...

  4. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite the universal use of bowel preparation before colonoscopy and colorectal surgery, the physiologic effects have not been described in a standardized setting. This study was designed to investigate the physiologic effects of bowel preparation. METHODS: In a prospective study, 12...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  5. Imaging the small bowel.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-03-01

    Radiologic investigations continue to play a pivotal role in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the small intestine despite enhancement of capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy. Imaging techniques continue to evolve and new techniques in MRI in particular, are being developed.

  6. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard....... MRI was done using a Philips Achieva 1.5 T system and CT was performed using a Siemens Somatom system. Axial and sagittal slices were acquired using standard T1w and T2w MRI sequences, and visualization was made using the Mistar software (Apollo Imaging Technology, Melbourne, Australia). Images were...

  7. Accuracy of abdominal auscultation for bowel obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Birger Michael; Rud, Bo; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy and inter-observer variation of bowel sound assessment in patients with clinically suspected bowel obstruction. METHODS: Bowel sounds were recorded in patients with suspected bowel obstruction using a Littmann(®) Electronic Stethoscope. The recordings were processed...

  8. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  9. Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... interfere with the MRI machine or cause skin burns. Tattoos may cause a problem because older tattoo ...

  10. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... interfere with the MRI machine or cause skin burns. Tattoos may cause a problem because older tattoo ...

  11. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  12. Assessment of the extension and the inflammatory activity in Crohn's disease: comparison of ultrasound and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María J; Ripollés, Tomás; Paredes, José M; Blanc, Esther; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was twofold: to examine the efficacy of MRI and sonography in the assessment of Crohn's disease (CD) activity in comparison with clinical scoring and biologic tests and to compare both techniques in the evaluation of extension and transmural complications. Thirty patients with histologically proven Crohn's disease were prospectively examined the same day first with sonography and after MRI. Sonographic exam included evaluation of bowel wall thickness, vascularity pattern, and perienteric changes. Thirty minutes prior to MRI imaging, patients were given 250 mL of dilute sodium phosphate solution and additional 750 mL of water orally. MRI images evaluation included bowel wall thickening, bowel wall enhancement, and perienteric changes. The gastrointestinal tract was divided into five segments. Findings and extension of the both techniques were verified by means of barium studies, surgery, or/and colonoscopy. The sonographic and MR findings were compared with clinical and laboratory data. About 53 of 119 (45%) bowel segments showed pathological changes in gold standard tests. Sonography was superior to MRI in the localization of affected bowel segments (sensitivity: US 91%; MRI 83%; intertechniques agreement, kappa: 0.905) and in recognizing transmural complications (sensitivity: US 80%; MRI 72%), although significant differences were not found (p > 0.05). A statistically significant correlation between color Doppler flow and MR bowel wall enhancement (segment-by-segment analysis and per patient analysis; p > 0.5), and between perienteric changes in both techniques (p > 0.5) were found. Wall thickness measured on sonography was significantly greater in the group of patients with clinical activity (p = 0.023) or with clinical-biologic activity (p = 0.024). Grades of hyperemia and MR contrast enhancement of patients with clinical-biologic activity was higher than in patients without clinical-biologic activity (p = 0.019; p = 0

  13. Ageing with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-01-01

    at 18% in 1996 and 19% in 2015. During the 19-year period, there had been no significant change in the methods for bowel care, but 22 (20%) had undergone surgery for bowel dysfunction, including 11 (10%) who had some form of stoma. Conclusion: Self-assessed severity of constipation increased but quality...... of life remained stable in a cohort of people with SCI followed prospectively for 19 years. Methods for bowel care remained surprisingly stable but a large proportion had undergone stoma surgery....

  14. Plain magnetic resonance imaging as an alternative in evaluating inflammation and bowel damage in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke B; Rezanavaz-Gheshlagh, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    unclassified (IBD-U), and 7 had other diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CD ranged 50-86%, 93-94%, and 91-92% for wall thickening and 49-82%, 85-93%, and 84-89% for DWI, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in UC range 0-40%, 87-100%, and 80-100% for wall thickening and 0......-52%, 83-94% and 76-92% for DWI, respectively. The κ values for bowel wall thickening, DWI, and mural hyperenhancement were detected with fair agreement (κ = 0.26-0.39) at both MRI examinations, whereas only bowel wall thickening in MRFT were detected with moderate agreement (κ = 0.47) Conclusion. Plain...

  15. Short bowel syndrome in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matarese, Laura E; Jeppesen, Palle B; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with broad variation in disease severity arising from different types of intestinal resection. The spectrum of malabsorption ranges from intestinal insufficiency to intestinal failure. Individualized patient strategies involving modifications...

  16. Bowel Control Problems (Fecal Incontinence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Bowel Control Problems (Fecal Incontinence) View or Print All Sections ... NIDDK would like to thank: William E. Whitehead, Ph.D., University of North Carolina School of Medicine ...

  17. IRRITATED BOWEL SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Privorotskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritated bowel syndrome is a significant and underestimated problem in childhood. This condition is not so good studied in pediatrics in comparison with adult practice. Pediatricians often diagnosed this disease in infants and young children without proper reasons. The authors analyze current opinions about etiology and pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosticsand treatment of irritated bowel syndrome in children. An emphasis is made on diagnostic criteria, which allow suggesting and confirming the diagnosis.

  18. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  19. Mebeverine alters small bowel motility in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, P R; Bak, Y T; Kellow, J E

    1996-10-01

    Despite its widespread use in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), limited clinical data exist on the effects of mebeverine hydrochloride on gastrointestinal motility. Human motor activity in the small bowel is more reproducible than that in the large bowel; therefore the aim of this study was to determine in the small bowel the effects of oral mebeverine in both IBS patients and in healthy controls. Twelve IBS patients (11 females/1 male, 46 +/- 13 years old)-predominant constipation (IBS-C, n = 6) and predominant diarrhoea (IBS-D, n = 6)-and six healthy controls, underwent continuous 48 h ambulant recording of small bowel motor activity. One low energy (400 kcal) and one high energy (800 kcal) standard meal were administered in each consecutive 24-h period. Subjects received, in blinded fashion, placebo tablets in the first 24 h then mebeverine 135 mg q.d.s. in the second 24 h. Mebeverine had no effect on parameters of small bowel motility in controls. In contrast, in both IBS-C (P = 0.01) and IBS-D (P mebeverine administration. Also, after mebeverine the proportion of the migrating motor complex cycle occupied by phase 2 was reduced in IBS-D (P = 0.01), while phase 2 burst frequency was reduced in IBS-C (P mebeverine, in the initial dosing period, has a normalizing effect in the small bowel in IBS, enhancing contractile activity in a similar fashion to 'prokinetic' agents, as well as producing alterations in motor activity consistent with an 'antispasmodic' effect.

  20. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  1. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: Is it "irritable brain" or "irritable bowel"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta Kumar Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS has been recognized as one of the most common and best studied disorders among the group of functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit. In the Western world, IBS appears to affect up to 20% of the population at any given time but in Asian countries, the median value of IBS prevalence defined by various criteria ranges between 6.5% and 10.1%, and community prevalence of 4% is found in North India. Those attending gastroenterology clinics represent only the tip of the iceberg. The disorder substantially impairs the quality of life, and the overall health-care costs are high. IBS has therefore gained increased attention from clinicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical industries. It is often frustrating to both patients and physicians as the disease is usually chronic in nature and difficult to treat. However, the understanding of IBS has been changing from time to time and still most of its concepts are unknown. In this review we have discussed, debated, and synthesized the evidence base, focusing on underlying mechanisms in the brain and bowel. We conclude that it is both brain and bowel mechanisms that are responsible. The clinical implication of such mechanisms is discussed.

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  5. T1-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison Between 1.5 and 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnemann, Maria L; Kraff, Oliver; Orzada, Stephan; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2015-08-01

    T1-weighted (T1w) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the small bowel at 1.5 T magnetic field strength has become a standard technique in investigating diseases of the small bowel. High-field MRI potentially offers improved soft tissue contrast and spatial resolution, providing increased image detail. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced small bowel MRI at 7 T and to compare results with 1.5 T. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent small bowel MRI on a 1.5 T and 7 T MRI system. A coronal fat-saturated T1w spoiled gradient-echo sequence (3-dimensional [3D] FLASH) was applied precontrast and at 20 seconds, 75 seconds, and 120 seconds after intravenous contrast administration. Furthermore, late-phase coronal and axial fat-saturated T1w 2-dimensional (2D) FLASH data sets were acquired. Visual evaluation of tissue contrast and image detail of the small bowel wall and mesentery as well as contrast ratios were compared between 1.5 T and 7 T in an intraindividual comparison. In addition, subjective ratings of image impairment by artifacts were assessed at both field strengths. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel at 7 T revealed equal tissue contrast and image detail compared with 1.5 T. Higher contrast and improved image detail of mesentery structures at 7 T were found in nonenhanced 3D FLASH. Quantitatively measured contrast between the bowel wall and bowel lumen showed significantly lower contrast at 7 T in nonenhanced 3D FLASH and in late-phase 2D FLASH. Image quality was more impaired at 7 T compared with 1.5 T, mainly due to increased susceptibility artifacts and B1 inhomogeneities. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI of the small bowel at 7 T represents a promising MR technique for establishing ultra-high magnetic field strengths in clinical applications. Despite increased artifacts at 7 T, depiction of the small bowel was achieved with comparable quality to the current state-of-the-art field strength

  6. Cinematographic techniques in the diagnostics of intestinal diseases using MRT enteroclysma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttgen, Rainer; Ocran, Kenneth; Lochs, Herbert; Hamm, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether an additional cine sequence in MR enteroclysis examination is practicable and would provide additional findings in the diagnostics of patients with abdominal diseases. Seventeen consecutively presenting patients with known or presumed abdominal disease (known or presumed intestinal illness; age range, 21-57 years; mean age, 34.1 years; male:female ratio, 4:13) were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent MRI enteroclysis at 1.5 T subsequent to conventional ileocolonoscopy, which was used as reference standard. A gastroenterologist and a radiologist evaluated the MRI examinations together to see whether the additional cine sequences would provide any additional findings. The cine sequences provided relevant diagnostic information in at least 11 of 17 patients (60.6%). In five patients, we were able to determine a stenosis as scarred; in two patients, normal peristalsis of the bowel was demonstrated, showing that the stenosis had not been scarred. This study provides strong evidence that the implementation of cine sequences in MRI enteroclysis examination provides additional findings with clinical relevance, especially for distinguishing scarred and functional stenoses.

  7. Tumours in the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurniawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel tumours are rare and originate from a wide variety of benign and malignant entities. Adenocarcinomas are the most frequent primary malignant small bowel tumours. Submucosal tumours like gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST or neuroendocrine tumours (NET may show a central umbilication, pathologic vessels, bridging folds or an ulceration of the overlying mucosa. These signs help to differentiate them from harmless bulges caused by impression from outside, e.g. from other intestinal loops. Sarcomas of the small bowel are rare neoplasias with mesenchymal origin, sometimes presenting as protruding masses. Benign tumours like lipoma, fibrolipoma, fibroma, myoma, and heterotopias typically present as submucosal masses. They cannot be differentiated endoscopically from those with malignant potential as GIST or NET. Neuroendocrine carcinomas may present with diffuse infiltration, which may resemble other malignant tumours. The endoscopic appearance of small bowel lymphomas has a great variation from mass lesions to diffuse infiltrative changes. Melanoma metastases are the most frequent metastases to the small bowel. They may be hard to distinguish from other tumours when originating from an amelanotic melanoma.

  8. Primary small bowel anastomosis in generalised peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, JS; van Goor, Harry; Bleichrodt, RP

    Objective: To find out if primary small bowel anastomosis of the bowel is safe in patients with generalised peritonitis who are treated by planned relaparotomies. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital, The Netherlands. Subjects. 10 Patients with generalised purulent peritonitis

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to inflammatory bowel disease may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  10. Laparoscopic Bowel Injuries Among Gynecologic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. R. Garcia

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bowel injury is an uncommon but recognized risk of operative laparoscopy. Because of the significant morbidity that can occur with this complication, it is important that clinicians be aware of its incidence, presentation, and management. This manuscript outlines the common causes of bowel injury, including herniation and traumatic bowel perforation. Management of laparoscopic bowel injuries is discussed and recommendations are made for avoidance of such complications.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewska, Anna Małgorzata; Warska, Aleksandra; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sawicki, Włodzimierz

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprising Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) may appear at any age. As such, IBD commonly affects young patients in their reproductive age. Rate of voluntary childlessness among women with IBD far exceed that of the general population, as patients with IBD fear not only the effect of pregnancy on the course of inflammatory bowel disease, but also the increased risk of the offspring developing the disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, the effect IBD treatment may have on the health and development of the infant or the risk of relapse during pregnancy and the influence of lactation on child development and disease course. This article aims at improving pre-conception counseling of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with a change in bowel habit, or with features of disordered defecation. Patients and doctors in primary care generally agree on IBS symptomatology and consider pain and bloating as its

  13. Perforated small bowel in omphalocele at birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The rupture of an omphalocele sac during birth is a well recognized entity. The associated lesions due to vascular compromise can result in necrosis of the bowel with perforation. Spontaneous bowel perforation in an omphalocele at birth is not reported in the literature. We describe a case with bowel perforation at the fundus of an omphalocele in a newborn.

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Roxana Georgescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nodosum and pyodermagangrenosum. The pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood but it seems that related mechanisms are involved in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment should be aimed at both the cutaneous manifestations and the bowel inflammation

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  16. Capsule endoscopy: Beyond small bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel N Adler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the brief and dramatic history of capsule endoscopy of the digestive tract is reviewed. Capsule endoscopy offers a non invasive method to diagnose diseases that affect the esophagus, small bowel and colon. Technological improvements relating to optics, software, data recorders with two way communication have revolutionized this field. These advancements have produced better diagnostic performance.

  17. Small Bowel Review: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past year there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology. In preparation for this review, over 500 papers were assessed; some have been selected and reviewed, with a particular focus on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist.

  18. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatt, Harpreet S.; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, CT findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In this chapter we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and non-occlusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. In the setting of an acute abdomen, rapid evaluation is necessary to identify intraabdominal processes that require emergent surgical intervention (1). While a wide-range of intraabdominal diseases may be present from trauma to inflammation, one of the most feared disorders is mesenteric ischemia, also known as intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel (2). Initial imaging evaluation for intestinal ischemia is typically obtained with CT. Close attention to technique and search for key radiologic features with relation to the CT technique is required. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the vascular anatomy, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of various forms of mesenteric ischemia and their corresponding radiological findings on MDCT. At imaging, not only is inspection of the bowel itself important, but evaluation of the mesenteric fat, vasculature, and surrounding peritoneal cavity also helps improves accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel ischemia. PMID:26526436

  19. Bowel resection in Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur-Rahman L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Although bowel resections are commonly done for congenital malformations in children in developed countries, they usually follow neglected and preventable acquired diseases of the intestine in developing countries. Objectives : To determine the indications and outcome of bowel resections in children of a developing country in a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Data of the patients operated (from birth to 15 years was retrospectively collected over eight years (January 1999 to December 2006. The biodata of children included the following: Indications for operation, type of operations, duration of admission, and outcome of treatment including complications. Patients with Hirschsprung′s disease were excluded from the study because bowel resection forms part of their definitive surgical management. Results : There were 70 patients (38 boys and 32 girls. The age ranged between four hours to 15 years (median, five months. There were 16 (22.9% neonates, 26 (37.1% infants, and 28 (40% grown children. The indications were congenital anomalies in the 16 neonates. Also, 23 (88.5% infants had intussusception, 2 (7.7% had midgut vovulusm and 1 (3.8% had congenital small intestine band. Among the grown children, typhoid ileal perforation (TIP was seen in 14 (50.0%, intussusception in 5 (17.9%, and other causes in nine patients. Overall, intussusception was the most common indication for bowel resection, followed by TIP. A total of 24 patients developed 33 complications. Complications included wound infection in 47.8% and anastomotic leak in 42.8%. The duration of admission ranged between 4-35 days (median, 15 days. The overall mortality was 17.1% -; which was highest among neonates (56.3%, followed by the infants (26.9% -. Conclusion : Bowel resections are mainly done for intussusception and complications of TIP at our centre. Late presentation, preexisting malnutrition, and nonavailability of parenteral nutrition

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  5. Perianal disease in pediatric Crohn disease: a review of MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compton, Gregory L.; Bartlett, Murray [Royal Children' s Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Perianal complications of Crohn disease are a common occurrence in children and can result in significant morbidity when not accurately characterized prior to surgical intervention. MRI is an excellent imaging modality for the evaluation of perianal inflammatory bowel disease - allowing characterization and detailed description of perianal fistulas. MRI has many advantages over other imaging modalities for the pediatric patient. Radiologists will benefit from a sophisticated understanding of perianal anatomy, the classification of perianal fistulas, the advantages MRI offers in characterization of perianal fistulas as well as the common and incidental findings that are important in the MRI evaluation of perianal inflammatory bowel disease in children. Perianal fistulas are found at a high rate in pediatric referrals and are more commonly found in male patients. (orig.)

  6. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  7. What do patients with irritable bowel syndrome dream about? A comparison with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, S; Whorwell, P J

    2002-07-01

    It is a common experience for people to dream of events about which they are either anxious or concerned. We therefore hypothesised that the dreams of patients with irritable bowel syndrome may reflect their worries about their problem especially as hospital out-patients with this disorder tend to exhibit some anxiety. In addition, dreaming about, for instance bowels, in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in excess of that observed in other gastrointestinal disorders may be of importance. To establish whether patients with irritable bowel syndrome dream about bowel-related issues more than controls or patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A total of 57 patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 57 patients with inflammatory bowel disease were compared with 60 healthy controls. All subjects completed a structured questionnaire concerning sleeping habits and dream characteristics as well as an assessment of anxiety and depression. There were no differences in the sleeping habits between any of the groups. However, significantly more patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease dreamt about their bowels (22% inflammatory bowel disease patients, 18% irritable bowel syndrome patients vs 3% of controls, p disorders, of both a functional and organic nature, may influence the nature of dreams. In those patients who dream about their symptoms, it would be interesting to know whether this affects the course of their disease, either positively or negatively, in any way.

  8. MRI of persistent cloaca: Can it substitute conventional imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar, E-mail: shaimaa96@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University (Egypt); AbouZeid, Amr Abdelhamid, E-mail: amrabdelhamid@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To define the role of MRI in the preoperative assessment of patients with persistent cloaca and whether it can substitute other imaging modalities. Methods: We prospectively examined eleven patients with persistent cloaca between July 2007 and March 2012. Non contrast MRI examinations were performed on 1.5 T magnet using head coil. Multiple pulse sequences (T1WI, T2WI, fat suppression) were obtained in axial, sagittal and coronal planes of the pelvis, abdomen, and spine. The scans were reviewed for the following: the level and type of rectal termination, the developmental state of striated muscle complex (SMC), associated genitourinary and spinal anomalies. MRI findings were compared to conventional fluoroscopic imaging, operative and endoscopic findings. We applied novel MRI parameters (urethral length, relative hiatal distance and vaginal volume). The relation between different parameters was tested statistically using Pearson correlation test. Results: MRI could accurately demonstrate the level of bowel termination in patients with persistent cloaca, in addition to its high sensitivity for detection of mullerian anomalies which were present in 73% of patients. Furthermore, MRI could disclose associating renal and spinal anomalies, and assess the developmental state of SMC. The shorter the urethra (higher urogenital confluence), the narrower the pelvic hiatus, and the more was the obstruction (vaginal distension). Conclusion: MRI is a valuable tool in exploring the different internal anatomical features of the cloacal anomaly; and when combined with endoscopy, MRI can make other preoperative conventional imaging unnecessary.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  11. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Musculoskeletal Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... the limitations of a Musculoskeletal MRI? What is MRI of the Musculoskeletal System? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  13. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R B; Lichtenstein, G R; Rombeau, J L

    1999-09-01

    Clinical and basic research continues to expand our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. The potential roles played by fatty acid intake, serum leptin, and nitric oxide in the promotion of intestinal inflammation in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis will be reviewed. In addition, important advances in the areas of bone disease, vitamin deficiency, growth failure, and home parenteral nutrition will be discussed.

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is most often a polygenic disorder with contributions from the intestinal microbiome, defects in barrier function, and dysregulated host responses to microbial stimulation. There is, however, increasing recognition of single gene defects that underlie a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly those with early-onset disease, and this review focuses on the primary immunodeficiencies associated with early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. The advent of next-generation sequencing has led to an improved recognition of single gene defects underlying some cases of inflammatory bowel disease. Among single gene defects, immune response genes are the most frequent category identified. This is also true of common genetic variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease, supporting a pivotal role for host responses in the pathogenesis. This review focuses on practical aspects related to diagnosis and management of children with inflammatory bowel disease who have underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  15. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Worsøe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD. It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NBD treated by sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS, sacral nerve stimulation (SNS, peripheral nerve stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and nerve re-routing was made in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library. Results. SARS improves bowel function in some patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI. Nerve re-routing is claimed to facilitate defecation through mechanical stimulation of dermatomes in patients with complete or incomplete SCI or myelomeningocele. SNS can reduce NBD in selected patients with a variety of incomplete neurological lesions. Peripheral stimulation using electrical stimulation or magnetic stimulation may represent non-invasive alternatives. Conclusion. Numerous methods of neurostimulation to treat NBD have been investigated in pilot studies or retrospective studies. Therefore, larger controlled trials with well-defined inclusion criteria and endpoints are recommended before widespread clinical use of neurostimulation against NBD.

  16. Acute arterial mesenteric ischemia and reperfusion: Macroscopic and MRI findings, preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Luca; Berritto, Daniela; Iacobellis, Francesca; Scaglione, Mariano; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Cozzolino, Santolo; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Di Mizio, Veronica; Grassi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To explore the physiopathology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in an animal model of acute arterial mesenteric ischemia (AAMI) with and without reperfusion. METHODS: In this study, 8 adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent superior mesenteric artery (SMA) ligation and were then randomly divided in two groups of 4. In group I, the ischemia was maintained for 8 h. In group II, 1-h after SMA occlusion, the ligation was removed by cutting the thread fixed on the back of the animal, and reperfusion was monitored for 8 h. MRI was performed using a 7-T system. RESULTS: We found that, in the case of AAMI without reperfusion, spastic reflex ileus, hypotonic reflex ileus, free abdominal fluid and bowel wall thinning are present from the second hour, and bowel wall hyperintensity in T2-W sequences are present from the fourth hour. The reperfusion model shows the presence of early bowel wall hyperintensity in T2-W sequences after 1 h and bowel wall thickening from the second hour. CONCLUSION: Our study has shown that MRI can assess pathological changes that occur in the small bowel and distinguish between the presence and absence of reperfusion after induced acute arterial ischemia. PMID:24187457

  17. Non-small-bowel abnormalities identified during small bowel capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemakers, Reinier; Westerhof, Jessie; Weersma, Rinse K.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of non-small-bowel abnormalities in patients referred for small bowel capsule endoscopy, this single center study was performed. METHODS: Small bowel capsule endoscopy is an accepted technique to investigate obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. This is defined as

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful ... Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  19. Definition and Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Health Professionals Diabetes Discoveries & Practice Blog Health Communication Programs FAQs ... Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Related Topics Section Navigation Irritable Bowel Syndrome ( ...

  20. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  1. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... approaches for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2008;23(3):284–292. Wu JC. Complementary and alternative medicine modalities for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: facts or myths? Gastroenterology & Hepatology. 2010;6(11):705–711. Yoon ...

  2. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  3. Surgical perspectives on inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VikasC

    J. Inflammatory bowel disease in Towsend: Sabiston. Textbook of Surgery. ... 1998; 44:28991. 19. Xie J, Itzkowitz SH. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease. World J Gastroenterol 2008;14:37889. 20. Roses RE, Rombeau JL. Recent trends in the surgical ... dyselectrolytemia, anemia, and malnutrition are commonly present.

  4. Childhood Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Libya: Epidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background & Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be rare in Libya. The aim is to determine the prevalence of juvenile onset inflammatory bowel disease in Libya. Setting: Al-Fateh childrens' hospital, Benghazi, Libya. Methods: This is a retrospective study of all cases diagnosed over 10 years (1997-2006) with ...

  5. Bowel injury as a complication of laparoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voort, M.; Heijnsdijk, E. A. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Bowel injury is a rare but serious complication of laparoscopic surgery. This review examines the incidence, location, time of diagnosis, causative instruments, management and mortality of laparoscopy-induced bowel injury. Methods: The review was carried out using the MeSH browser within

  6. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations...... of heritability estimates, it is unlikely that a true value for heritability will be reached. Further work aimed at quantifying the variance explained across GWAS, epigenome-wide, and microbiota-wide association studies will help to define factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease....

  7. [Pregnancy and inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walldorf, J; Zwirnmann, K; Seufferlein, T

    2011-01-01

    Medical advice regarding the desire to have children and pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is often requested. The influence of IBD on pregnancy and--vice versa--of pregnancy on the activity of IBD is discussed. Based on three clinical cases the chances and limitations of medical treatment of CED during pregnancy are reviewed. Generally it is important to balance the therapy between the patients desire to be treated most effectively and to deliver a healthy child after an uncomplicated pregnancy. An interdisciplinary treatment is always advisable in patients with IBD and a desire to have children.

  8. [Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pregnant women in their characteristics do not differ from general population, unless they had operations on the pelvic organs. Women with a first pregnancy, regardless of the activity of IBD have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy and high risk births. Most treatment methods are compatible with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Women affected by IBD should discuss their plans for pregnancy with the doctor first in order to know the possible dangers. Every patient in the IBD during pregnancy must be observed by a gastroenterologist, accoucheur and pediatrician to ensure peace of mother and child.

  9. Small Bowel Review: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past year, there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology. More than 1500 papers were assessed in preparation for this review. Some were selected and reviewed, with a particular focus on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist. Relevant review articles have been highlighted, and important clinical learning points have been stressed. The topics are varied in scope, and wherever possible show a logical progression from basic physiology to pathophysiology to clinical disorders and management.

  10. Synthetic MRI for visualization of quantitative MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging technique that is used in hospitals worldwide. The images are acquired through the use of an MRI scanner and the clinical information is provided through the image contrast, which is based on the magnetic properties in biological tissue. By altering the scanner settings, images with different contrast properties can be obtained. Conventional MRI is a qualitative imaging technique and no absolute measurements are performed. At Center for Medical I...

  11. The first joint ESGAR/ ESPR consensus statement on the technical performance of cross-sectional small bowel and colonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.A.; Torkzad, M.R.; Bhatnagar, G. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Avni, F. [Lille University Hospitals, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Lille (France); Cronin, C.G. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Hoeffel, C. [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims (France); Kim, S.H. [Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, A. [Sapienza University of Rome, I.C.O.T. Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy); Napolitano, M. [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Petit, P. [Timone Enfant Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Marseille (France); Rimola, J. [University of Barcelona, Radiology Department, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Tolan, D.J. [St James' s University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Zappa, M. [Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Universite Paris 7, INSERM CRI U1149, Department of Radiology, Clichy (France); Puylaert, C.A.J.; Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach to patient preparation and acquisition protocols for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) of the small bowel and colon, with an emphasis on imaging inflammatory bowel disease. An expert consensus committee of 13 members from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) and European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) undertook a six-stage modified Delphi process, including a detailed literature review, to create a series of consensus statements concerning patient preparation, imaging hardware and image acquisition protocols. One hundred and fifty-seven statements were scored for agreement by the panel of which 129 statements (82 %) achieved immediate consensus with a further 19 (12 %) achieving consensus after appropriate modification. Nine (6 %) statements were rejected as consensus could not be reached. These expert consensus recommendations can be used to help guide cross-sectional radiological practice for imaging the small bowel and colon. (orig.)

  12. Nutrigenomics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2010-07-01

    The field of nutrigenomics recognizes gene-diet interactions, with regard to both the impact of genetic variation on nutrient requirements, and conversely nutrient regulation of the expression of genes. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are inflammatory bowel diseases for which twin studies reveal genetic susceptibility that is impacted by diet and environment. Apparently contradictory data on the role of diet in inflammatory bowel disease would be entirely explainable if genetic variability determined dietary requirements and intolerances. Considering Crohn's disease, we recognize three major classes of genes. The first of these involves bacterial recognition through pattern recognition receptors and autophagy genes, while the second act through secondary immune response, and the third concern epithelial barrier integrity. Despite genetic overlap with CD, the first two groups of genes appear to be less important in ulcerative colitis, while other genes, particularly those involved in barrier function, gain prominence. Case-control studies suggest that these different genetic groups reflect distinct dietary requirements. Such studies suggest nutrigenomic approaches to maintaining disease remission at present, and preventing disease development in the future.

  13. Small Bowel Dissemination of Coccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmei Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal coccidioidomycosis is extremely rare, with less than 10 cases reported in the literature. We report a case of small bowel dissemination of coccidioidomycosis in a 21-year-old African American male with a history of living in San Joaquin Valley. The patient presented with one week of abdominal pain, nausea, shortness of breath, intermittent fever, and sweat, and one month of abdominal distention. A chest radiograph revealed complete effusion of left lung. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed diffuse small bowel thickening and enhancement, as well as omental and peritoneal nodules, and ascites. The coccidioidal complement fixation titer was 1 : 256. The duodenal biopsy revealed many spherules filled with round fungal endospores. Later, blood fungal culture showed positivity for Coccidioides immitis. The final diagnosis is disseminated coccidioidomycosis involving lungs, blood, and duodenum. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy, the patient’s clinical situation deteriorated and he succumbed to multisystem organ failure one and half months later. A high index of suspicion for gastrointestinal coccidioidomycosis should be maintained in patients from an endemic area presenting as abdominal distention and pain.

  14. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fornasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged present if a small bowel segment had >80% lumen reduction as compared to an adjacent normal loop and mural thickening of >3 mm. At the level of the stenosis, both T2 signal intensity and post-gadolinium T1 enhancement were quantified using a 5-point scale (0: very low; 1: low; 2: moderate; 3: high; and 4: very high. A stenosis was considered fibrotic if the sum of the two values (activity score: AS did not exceed 1. Results: A small bowel stenosis was identified in 48 out of 111 patients. Fibrosis was confirmed at histology in all of the 23 patients with AS of 0 or 1, who underwent surgery within 3 days of the MRI examination. In the remaining 25 patients (AS: 2-8, an active inflammatory stenosis was suspected and remission of the obstructive symptoms was obtained by means of medical treatment. One of these patients (AS: 2, however, underwent surgery after 14 days, due to recurrence. MRI had 95.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 97.9% accuracy in the diagnosis of fibrotic stenosis. Conclusion: MRI is reliable in differentiating fibrotic from inflammatory small bowel stenosis in CD.

  15. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, C. [Dept. of Radiology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M. [Div. of Neuro-ophthalmology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mullaney, P. [Division of Pediatrics, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2000-02-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  17. Abdominal MRI scan

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    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician for ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items ... and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... eyes or other reactions. If you experience allergic symptoms, notify the technologist. A radiologist or other physician ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ... the technologist or nurse will monitor your vital signs to minimize this risk. Although the strong magnetic ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) before being safe for MRI ... devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ...

  20. Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0368 TITLE: Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE with Click Chemistry : : Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Click Chemistry Understanding Microbial...Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Click Chemistry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click

  1. Towards an integrated psychoneurophysiological approach of irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veek, Patrick Petrus Johannes van der

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort accompanied by disturbed bowel habits. It is among the most frequently occurring functional bowel syndromes, but the pathophysiology is poorly understood. A variety of mechanisms

  2. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel at 7 Tesla in comparison to 1.5 Tesla: First steps towards clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnemann, Maria L; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Johst, Soeren; Orzada, Stephan; Umutlu, Lale; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    To perform non-enhanced (NE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the small bowel at 7 Tesla (7T) and to compare it with 1.5 Tesla (1.5T). Twelve healthy subjects were prospectively examined using a 1.5T and 7T MRI system. Coronal and axial true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) imaging and a coronal T2-weighted (T2w) half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were acquired. Image analysis was performed by 1) visual evaluation of tissue contrast and detail detectability, 2) measurement and calculation of contrast ratios and 3) assessment of artifacts. NE MRI of the small bowel at 7T was technically feasible. In the vast majority of the cases, tissue contrast and image details were equivalent at both field strengths. At 7T, two cases revealed better detail detectability in the TrueFISP, and better contrast in the HASTE. Susceptibility artifacts and B1 inhomogeneities were significantly increased at 7T. This study provides first insights into NE ultra-high field MRI of the small bowel and may be considered an important step towards high quality T2w abdominal imaging at 7T MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscoloskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Wide ranges in prevalence have been reported, depending on the criteria used to define spondylarthropathy. In 1991, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group developed classification criteria that included previously neglected cases of undifferentiated spondylarthropathies, which had been ignored in most of the oldest epidemiological studies on inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease patients includes all of the clinical features of spondylarthropathies: peripheral arthritis, inflammatory spinal pain, dactylitis, enthesitis (Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis, buttock pain and anterior chest wall pain. Radiological evidence of sacroiliitis is common but not obligatory. The articular manifestations begin either concomitantly or subsequent to the bowel disease; however, the onset of spinal disease often precedes the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of the different muscoloskeletal manifestations is similar in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Symptoms usually disappear after proctocolectomy. The pathogenetic mechanisms that produce the muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are unclear. Several arguments favour an important role of the intestinal mucosa in the development of spondylarthropathy. The natural history is characterized by periods of flares and remission; therefore, the efficacy of treatment is difficult to establish. Most patients respond to rest, physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs may activate bowel disease. Sulphasalazine may be recommended in some patients. There is no indication for the systemic use of steroids.

  4. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is helpful to assess the vessels of ... child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images ...

  6. MRI of Cerebellar Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing brain infarction. Because of few or atypical clinical symptoms and a relatively low sensitivity of CT scans, many cerebellar infarctions may be detected only with MRI. With adequate recognition of cerebellar infarction on MRI and

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia ( ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  9. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... tumors. MRI can help physicians evaluate both the structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to ...

  11. Intestino Corto Short bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Matilde Socarrás Suárez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available El intestino corto está asociado a pérdida o disfunción del intestino delgado por resección del mismo, que causa diarreas, tránsito intestinal acelerado, malabsorción intestinal, y eventualmente la pérdida de peso y el desgaste muscular. El objetivo de este trabajo fue actualizar el conocimiento acerca de este síndrome. Se realiza una revisión del tema de intestino corto donde se refiere a su definición, causas fundamentales frecuentes e infrecuentes en el niño y en el adulto, cómo se adapta el intestino a la resección de diferentes extensiones, las funciones del íleon terminal. Se hacen una valoración clínica inicial, con el interrogatorio médico, revisión minuciosa de la historia clínica para cuantificar la capacidad de absorción. Se habla de los síntomas y signos de deficiencia nutricional. Se explican las estrategias del tratamiento, que tienen 3 etapas de evolución clínica. Se concluye que se indica la dietoterapia adecuada según el estado nutricional del paciente y la resección intestinal realizada, evitando las complicaciones para lograr una calidad máxima de vidaShort bowel is associated with loss or dysfunction of the small bowel due to its resection, which causes diarrheas, accelerated intestinal transit, intestinal malabsorption and, eventually, weight loss ansd muscular waste. The objective of this paper was to update knowledge about this syndrome. A review of the short intestine topic is made, making reference to its definition, common and uncommon main cuases in the child and adult, how the bowel adapts itslef to resection of different extensions, and the functions of the terminal ileum. An initial clinical assessment is made with the medical questionnaire and a detailed review of the medical history to quantify the absorption capacity. The symptoms and signs of nutritional deficiency are dealt with. The strategies of the treatment consisting of 3 stages of clinical evolution are explained. It is concluded

  12. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  13. [MRI enterography in the assessment of paediatric Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Beltran, M; Barber Martinez de la Torre, I; Segarra Cantón, O; Redecillas Ferreiro, S; Castellote Alonso, A; Infante Pina, D

    2013-05-01

    To determine the usefulness of MRI enterography for assessing the extension and activity of paediatric Crohn's disease. MRI findings were compared with clinical, biological, endoscopic and other imaging data. Studies of MRI enterography use in patients younger than 18 years of age were reviewed. Patients received 500-1000mL of polyethylene glycol one hour before examination (1.5-TMR). T2 HASTE sequences with or without fat saturation, T2 true-FISP, T1 with fat saturation, pre- and post gadolinium-enhanced VIBE sequences, and dynamic and diffusion HASTE were acquired. Thickening of the bowel wall, mucosal enhancement, and extra-luminal complications were evaluated. Five MRI patterns (normal, fibrosis, mild, moderate, and severe transmural activity) were defined. Findings were compared with PCDAI scores, inflammatory parameters, and endoscopic and histological results. Twenty-two studies were reviewed. Optimal intestinal distension was present in 82% of the cases. Mild side effects were observed in 12% of patients. There was a significant relationship between MRI patterns and PCDAI scores (P=.002), sedimentation rate (P=.006) and serum PCR levels (P=.047) and a non-significant relationship with the histology (P=.571). MRI enterography correctly assessed the ileal (80%) and colonic (66%) extension. Extra-luminal complications unrelated to MRI classification (P=.274) were reported in 86.4% of studies. There was a significant relationship between MRI patterns and PCR, sedimentation rate, and PCDAI scores. MRI enterography showed excellent agreement with ileoscopies, and allowed endoscopically non-accessible areas to be assessed, as well as the diagnosis of extra-luminal complications without irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  15. Infections in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez de Santiago, Enrique; Albillos Martínez, Agustín; López-Sanromán, Antonio

    2017-05-10

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease constitute a population with a special predisposition to develop bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Iatrogenic immunosuppression, frequent contact with healthcare facilities and surgical interventions are some of the risk factors that explain why these infections are one of the main causes of morbi-mortality in this disease. Some of these infections follow a subtle and paucisymptomatic evolution; their diagnosis and management may become a real challenge for the attending physician if their screening is not systematized or they are not considered in the differential diagnosis. The objective of this review is to provide an update from a practical and concise perspective on the knowledge regarding the epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the most common infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-09-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS.

  17. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Unambiguous diagnosis of the two main forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD): Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), represents a challenge in the early stages of the diseases. The diagnosis may be established several years after the debut of symptoms. Hence, protein biomarkers...... for early and accurate diagnostic could help clinicians improve treatment of the individual patients. Moreover, the biomarkers could aid physicians to predict disease courses and in this way, identify patients in need of intensive treatment. Patients with low risk of disease flares may avoid treatment...... with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...

  18. Thalidomide for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramuzzo, Matteo; Ventura, Alessandro; Martelossi, Stefano; Lazzerini, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug used in the experimental treatment of refractory Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. We aimed to review the existing evidence on the efficacy and safety of thalidomide in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, LILACS, POPLINE, CINHAL, and Web of Science were searched in March 2016. Manual search included conference and reference lists. All types of studies, except single case reports, were included. Outcomes evaluated were: induction of remission; maintenance of remission; steroid reduction; effect on penetrating Crohn disease; endoscopic remission; adverse events. Results: The research strategies retrieved 722 papers. Two randomized controlled trials and 29 uncontrolled studies for a total of 489 patients matched the inclusion criteria. Thalidomide induced a clinical response in 296/427 (69.3%) patients. Clinical remission was achieved in 220/427 (51.5%) cases. Maintenance of remission was reported in 128/160 (80.0%) patients at 6 months and in 96/133 (72.2%) at 12 months. Reduction in steroid dosage was reported in 109/152 (71.7%) patients. Fistulas improved in 49/81 (60.5%) cases and closed in 28/81 (34.6%). Endoscopic improvement was observed in 46/66 (69.7%) and complete mucosal healing in 35/66 (53.0%) patients. Cumulative incidence of total adverse events and of those leading to drug suspension was 75.6 and 19.7/1000 patient-months, respectively. Neurological disturbances accounted for 341/530 (64.3%) adverse events and were the most frequent cause of drug withdrawal. Conclusion: Existing evidence suggests that thalidomide may be a valid treatment option for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases refractory to other first- and second-line treatments. PMID:27472695

  19. Endoscopic evaluation of surgically altered bowel in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinh, Preetika; Shen, Bo

    2015-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory bowel disease with altered bowel anatomy under conscious sedation without fluoroscopy. Carefully planned stricture therapy with balloon dilation or needle knife stricturotomy can be performed for simple, short, and fibrotic strictures. A multidisciplinary approach involving a team of endoscopist, endoscopy nurse, colorectal surgeon, gastrointestinal pathologist, and gastrointestinal radiologist is important for a safe and effective endoscopy. We attempt to review the aspects that need consideration before the endoscopy, the technique of endoscopy, and briefly the therapies that can be performed during endoscopy of the bowel through an ileostomy, a colostomy, in the diverted large bowel or ileal pouch, and small bowel after stricturoplasty and bowel bypass surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

  20. Multidetector row computed tomography in bowel obstruction. Part 2. Large bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R. [Department of Radiology, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rakesh.sinha@uhl-tr.nhs.uk; Verma, R. [Department of Radiology, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    Large bowel obstruction may present as an emergency as high-grade colonic obstruction and can result in perforation. Perforated large bowel obstruction causes faecal peritonitis, which can result in high morbidity and mortality. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has the potential of providing an accurate diagnosis of large bowel obstruction. The rapid acquisition of images within one breath-hold reduces misregistration artefacts than can occur in critically ill or uncooperative patients. The following is a review of the various causes of large bowel obstruction with emphasis on important pathogenic factors, CT appearances and the use of multiplanar reformatted images in the diagnostic workup.

  1. Abdominal tuberculous lymphadenopathy: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backer, A.I. De [General Hospital Sint-Lucas, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Mortele, K.J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Division of Abdominal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Deeren, D. [Ziekenhuisnetwerk Antwerpen, Department of Internal Medicine, Campus Stuivenberg, Antwerp (Belgium); Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Vanschoubroeck, I.J. [Ziekenhuisnetwerk Antwerpen, Department of Internal Medicine, Campus Stuivenberg, Antwerp (Belgium); Keulenaer, B.L. De [Royal Darwin Hospital, Intensive Care Unit, Tiwi, NT (Australia)

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the MRI features of abdominal tuberculous lymphadenopathy. MRI studies of 13 patients with abdominal tuberculous lymphadenopathy were reviewed with regard to anatomic distribution and size. Signal intensities, in relation to abdominal wall muscle, on unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted images and patterns of contrast enhancement of lymphadenopathy were evaluated in each patient. In each patient, the largest lymph node with the same imaging characteristic was evaluated. The upper paraaortic region was the most common site of involvement (n=12 patients), followed by the lesser omentum (n=10 patients), the anterior pararenal space (n=9 patients), the lower paraaortic area (n=8 patients), the small bowel mesentery (n=6 patients), the greater omentum (n=2 patients) and the originating site of the inferior mesenteric artery (n=2 patients). The mean lymph node size was 1.8 cm (range 0.5-5 cm). The overall mean lymph node number per patient was 16 (range 2-50). A total of 41 lymph nodes were evaluated in 13 patients. On T2-weighted images, 40 lesions were hyperintense and one lesion was isointense. Nine hyperintense lesions showed a hypointense peripheral rim and seven internal heterogeneity. Perinodal T2-hyperintensity was present in 23 lesions. The latter finding was valid for all patients. On T1-weighted images, 30 lesions were hypointense and 11 isointense. Nine hypointense lesions demonstrated a hyperintense peripheral rim, and six were heterogeneous. Contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images demonstrated predominant peripheral enhancement in 28 lesions: (1) peripheral uniform, thin (n=19); (2) thick irregular, complete (n=3); and (3) conglomerate group of nodes showing peripheral and central areas of rim enhancement (n=6). Heterogeneous and homogeneous enhancement was present in ten and three lesions, respectively. Combinations of enhancing patterns in the same nodal group and different nodal groups were seen in eight and

  2. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......-intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...

  3. Recent advances in inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    analysis comparing capsule endoscopy with small- bowel barium radiology, colonoscopy with ileoscopy, computer tomography ..... Each tablet contains Aspirin 81mg. Reg.No.: 29/2.7/0767. Pharmafrica (Pty) Ltd, 33 Hulbert Road, ...

  4. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  5. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine...

  6. Symptoms and Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you haven’t finished a bowel movement whitish mucus in your stool Women with IBS often have ... as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of ...

  7. Diverticulosis of the small bowel with Diverticulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barner, L.; Doldt, H.; Strecker, E.P.

    1980-11-01

    Case report of diverticulosis of the small bowel complicated by diverticulitis. Radiography is the method of choice to demonstrate this finding preoperatively. This entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of right lower quadrant abdominal pecin.

  8. Hirschsprung disease-Bowel function beyond childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Tomas; Granström, Anna Löf

    2017-10-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a developmental defect of the enteric nervous system characterized by lack of enteric neurons in the distal hindgut. There are numerous reports on short-term outcomes indicating that impaired bowel function is common. Recently, several controlled studies show that bowel function outcomes are affected beyond childhood, in adolescents and adults, compared with healthy control subjects. Constipation and fecal incontinence are common. The impaired bowel function appears to have a negative impact on quality of life, although, a majority of patients have adapted to their symptoms. On the other hand, Hirschsprung disease seems to have limited impact on education and occupation in adult life. The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge of bowel function outcome beyond childhood in patients with Hirschsprung disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Building a second brain in the bowel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avetisyan, Marina; Schill, Ellen Merrick; Heuckeroth, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is sometimes called the "second brain" because of the diversity of neuronal cell types and complex, integrated circuits that permit the ENS to autonomously regulate many processes in the bowel...

  10. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before...... the rectal surgery to clean the rectum and facilitate the manipulation for the mechanical anastomosis is used for many surgeons. This is analysed separately...

  11. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease - methodics of MSCT and clinical results; Die Computertomographie in der Diagnostik entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen: Methodik der MSCT und klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitterling, H.; Rock, C.; Reiser, M. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the diagnostic yield of multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in inflammatory bowel disease. Contrast media are administered intraluminally (colon, small intestine) and intravenously (triple contrast CT).Filling of small bowel is achieved by means of jejunal tube (''Sellink CT'') or via the oral route. Pharmacological relaxation of the intestine decreases motion artifact. Intraluminal contrast media consist of either hyperdense, ''positive'' or hypodense, ''negative'' liquids. Thin-slice MSCT of the entire abdomen allows high-quality post processing (MPR, thin-slice MIP). Due to superior distension, Sellink CT improves estimation of stenosis or changes in thickness and contrast of bowel wall.Positive contrast is superior in the detection and preoperative localization of abscess, fistula or conglomerate tumour, because it accurately differentiates between intra- and extraluminal structures.However, negative contrast facilitates quantitative evaluation of bowel wall thickening or enhancement and demonstrates gastrointestinal bleeding. MSCT of the small intestine is superior to conventional enteroclysis, especially in the diagnosis of mesenterial or other extraintestinal disease. As a side effect, the colon is assessed in the same examination. Radiation dose is less in MSCT (7.8-13.3 mSv) than in conventional fluoroscopy (13.99{+-}7.57 mSv). MSCT can be performed as an alternative or adjunct to colonoscopy, if endoscopic access is restricted. It is already the imaging modality of choice in acute diverticulitis. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Die vorliegende Arbeit betrachtet die Aussagekraft der Mehrschichtspiral-CT (MSCT) fuer die Diagnostik entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen.Methodik Die Kontrastierung erfolgt an Duenn- und Dickdarm kombiniert mit intravenoesem Kontrast (Tripel-Kontrast-CT). Die Duenndarmfuellung kann mittels Jejunalsonde (Sellink-CT) oder oral erfolgen, zusaetzlich erfolgt

  12. Implementation of the victoria bowel performance scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Philippa; Barwich, Doris; Kirk, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    There is a lack of evidence to guide constipation management in patients receiving palliative care. Data collection requires the systematic use of validated assessment tools. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Victoria Bowel Performance Scale (BPS) as an audit tool. Charts were reviewed before and after the implementation of a program to monitor constipation through repeated use of the Victoria Bowel Scale. The program was initiated at three oncology pain and symptom management clinics, four palliative care units, and four residential hospices. An additional "control" palliative care unit introduced new nursing assessment tools without the new scale. The Victoria BPS was recorded at 86% of 192 postimplementation outpatient clinic visits and was easy to use in this setting. Documentation of bowel performance at comparable visits improved from 44% to 66% (Passessment tool, uniquely incorporating the patient's usual bowel function. Modifications to the scale have been made to improve clarity and allow for the expected drop in bowel activity seen in end-of-life care. Considerable educational effort and appropriate organization of the charts are required for optimal implementation. The proportion of revised BPS scores ranging from -1 to +1 is proposed as an indicator of satisfactory bowel management for clinical, audit, and research purposes. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-FODMAP diet reduces irritable bowel symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natalia; Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Felding, Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a low-FODMAP diet on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This was a randomised controlled open-label trial of patients with IBD in remission or with mild-to-moderate disease and coexisting IBS...

  14. Grading Crohn disease activity with MRI: interobserver variability of MRI features, MRI scoring of severity, and correlation with Crohn disease endoscopic index of severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielbeek, Jeroen A W; Makanyanga, Jesica C; Bipat, Shandra; Pendsé, Doug A; Nio, C Yung; Vos, Frans M; Taylor, Stuart A; Stoker, Jaap

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess the interobserver variability for scoring MRI features of Crohn disease activity and to correlate two MRI scoring systems to the Crohn disease endoscopic index of severity (CDEIS). Thirty-three consecutive patients with Crohn disease undergoing 3-T MRI examinations (T1-weighted with IV contrast medium administration and T2-weighted sequences) and ileocolonoscopy within 1 month were independently evaluated by four readers. Seventeen MRI features were recorded in 143 bowel segments and were used to calculate the MR index of activity and the Crohn disease MRI index (CDMI) score. Multirater analysis was performed for all features and scoring systems using intraclass correlation coefficient (icc) and kappa statistic. Scoring systems were compared with ileocolonoscopy with CDEIS using Spearman rank correlation. Thirty patients (median age, 32 years; 21 women and nine men) were included. MRI features showed fair-to-good interobserver variability (intraclass correlation coefficient or kappa varied from 0.30 to 0.69). Wall thickness in millimeters, presence of edema, enhancement pattern, and length of the disease in each segment showed a good interobserver variability between all readers (icc = 0.69, κ = 0.66, κ = 0.62, and κ = 0.62, respectively). The MR index of activity and CDMI scores showed good reproducibility (icc = 0.74 and icc = 0.78, respectively) and moderate CDEIS correlation (r = 0.51 and r = 0.59, respectively). The reproducibility of individual MRI features overall is fair to good, with good reproducibility for the most commonly used features. When combined into the MR index of activity and CDMI score, overall reproducibility is good. Both scores show moderate agreement with CDEIS.

  15. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  16. Contrast enema depiction of small-bowel volvulus in complicated neonatal bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Oscar M.; Daneman, Alan; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    About one-half of patients with meconium ileus (MI) present with a complication such as volvulus, atresia, meconium peritonitis or giant cystic meconium peritonitis. The treatment of these complications requires surgery. However, the preoperative diagnosis of complicated MI is difficult. We describe two neonates with complicated small-bowel obstruction, one with MI related to cystic fibrosis and the other not related to cystic fibrosis. In both, contrast enema depicted a spiral appearance of the distal small bowel, which at surgery proved to be the result of volvulus associated with antenatal bowel perforation. This appearance of the small bowel on contrast enema in this clinical setting has not been previously described. The recognition of this spiral appearance of the distal small bowel suggests the need for surgery. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  18. Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Robin C.

    2003-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely common cause of consultation, and at present is diagnosed on the basis of symptoms and a few simple exclusion tests. Exclusion diets can be successful, but many patients have already attempted and failed such treatments before consulting. Anxiety and somatization may be an important driver of consultation. Patients' concerns should be understood and addressed. Those with prominent psychiatric disease may benefit from psychotherapy. Hypnotherapy benefits symptoms in those without psychologic disturbance, but its availability is limited. Antidepressants are effective in improving both mood and IBS symptoms globally, and the evidence is particularly good for tricyclic antidepressants. Although antispasmodics are currently the most commonly prescribed drugs, most responses (75%) are due to the placebo effect and not specific to the drug. Bulk laxatives such as ispaghula can increase stool frequency and help pain, but bloating may be aggravated. Loperamide is effective treatment for urgency and loose stools, but less effective for bloating and pain. 5-HT(3) antagonists such as alosetron improve urgency, stool consistency, and pain in diarrhea-predominant-IBS. The 5-HT(4) agonist tegaserod shows modest benefit in constipation-predominant IBS, improving stool frequency, consistency, and bloating as well as global improvement. There are many new drugs, such as cholecystokinin, neurokinin, and corticotropin receptor antagonists, in development.

  19. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  20. Immunopathology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kori L; Zheng, Li-Bo; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Shih, David Q

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the environment, and the immune system. The host microbiome, as well as viruses and fungi, play important roles in the development of IBD either by causing inflammation directly or indirectly through an altered immune system. New technologies have allowed researchers to be able to quantify the various components of the microbiome, which will allow for future developments in the etiology of IBD. Various components of the mucosal immune system are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD and include intestinal epithelial cells, innate lymphoid cells, cells of the innate (macrophages/monocytes, neutrophils, and dendritic cells) and adaptive (T-cells and B-cells) immune system, and their secreted mediators (cytokines and chemokines). Either a mucosal susceptibility or defect in sampling of gut luminal antigen, possibly through the process of autophagy, leads to activation of innate immune response that may be mediated by enhanced toll-like receptor activity. The antigen presenting cells then mediate the differentiation of naïve T-cells into effector T helper (Th) cells, including Th1, Th2, and Th17, which alter gut homeostasis and lead to IBD. In this review, the effects of these components in the immunopathogenesis of IBD will be discussed.

  1. Selenium and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Avinash K; Shay, Ashley E; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-07-15

    Dietary intake of the micronutrient selenium is essential for normal immune functions. Selenium is cotranslationally incorporated as the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, into selenoproteins that function to modulate pathways involved in inflammation. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we summarize the current literature on the pathophysiology of IBD, which is multifactorial in origin with unknown etiology. We have focused on a few selenoproteins that mediate gastrointestinal inflammation and activate the host immune response, wherein macrophages play a pivotal role. Changes in cellular oxidative state coupled with altered expression of selenoproteins in macrophages drive the switch from a proinflammatory phenotype to an anti-inflammatory phenotype to efficiently resolve inflammation in the gut and restore epithelial barrier integrity. Such a phenotypic plasticity is accompanied by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive metabolites, including eicosanoids that not only mitigate inflammation but also partake in restoring gut homeostasis through diverse pathways involving differential regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. The role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating inflammation and aiding in selenium-dependent resolution of gut injury is highlighted to provide novel insights into the beneficial effects of selenium in IBD. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Pregnancy and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashash, Jana G; Kane, Sunanda

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), whether Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, are of reproductive age. Young women with IBD are usually very worried about their fertility, the activity of their disease during pregnancy, the heritability of the disease to their unborn child, and the effect of their underlying IBD on the pregnancy itself. Additionally, patients express concerns about using IBD medications during pregnancy, fearing that the medications may negatively affect the fetus. For this reason, it is of the utmost importance that gastroenterologists and patients with IBD be aware of the effect of IBD on pregnancy, the effect of pregnancy on IBD, and the effect of IBD medications on the fetus and on pregnancy outcomes. Increasing the awareness of patients with IBD about the importance of maintaining disease remission at the time of conception and throughout pregnancy is key to improving the outcomes of both mothers and fetuses. This article addresses the fertility of patients with IBD, the effect of pregnancy on disease activity, and the effect of IBD on pregnancy. Also discussed are which IBD medications can be used during conception and pregnancy and which medications must be avoided.

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Dawn B; Kane, Sunanda

    2011-06-14

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient. Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population. Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  4. [Treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In addition to immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNF, there are a number of new options in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Vedolizumab has been approved by the FDA and EMA and has demonstrated utility both in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), even in anti-TNF refractory patients. Other monoclonal antibodies with different targets such as PF-005447659 (antiMAd-CAM1), ustekinumab (anti-IL23/IL12) or MEDI2070 (anti-IL23) have shown promising results in distinct clinical scenarios. Mongersen (antisense oligonucleotide anti-Smad7) and oznimod (an SP-1 modulator) are new alternatives with proven efficacy in clinical trials in CD and UC, respectively. Some data suggest that faecal microbiota transplantation could be efficacious in individual patients, although controlled data do not show clear differences with placebo. Autologous stem-cell transplantation has shown long-term efficacy in "ultra-refractory" CD. The number of possible treatments is constantly increasing, and future research should focus both on the selection of the most appropriate treatment for any given patient and on comparative trials between options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [Irritable bowel syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, N; Villata, L; Santini, B; Fantino, N; Robazza, V; Ciervo, T; Barbera, C; Elia, G; Oderda, G

    1987-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common chronic functional gastroenterological disorder both in adults and in children. In this study we evaluate the different aspects of this syndrome, comparing our observations on 332 children with other studies. Epidemiological data (frequency, sex, age) are examined so as the family histories of gastroenterological disorders. We take in account several pathogenic hypotheses, especially with reference to the alterations of gastrointestinal motility, which could be caused by several factors (psychological, prostaglandins, bile acids, etc.). The clinical picture is very variable, variations depending on the age of children and on the time of onset of IBS. The colic of neonate, caused by retention of air, is the main symptom in the first months of life, followed by chronic diarrhoea, also defined as toddler's diarrhoea, sometime alternating with constipation. In later childhood, recurrent abdominal pain represents a common complaint, in association with diarrhoea or constipation. The principal steps for a proper diagnosis so as the main differential diagnosis are defined. We explain the most important features of management (reassuring parents, free diet), excluding prescription of drugs, that produce only a transitory and symptomatic relief, so as elimination diets, that cause only a failure to thrive without any improvement of symptoms.

  6. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sol Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed the reference lists of the key manuscripts. We also added a review based on international non-indexed sources. Results The feasibility of diagnostic laparoscopy is high (60–100%, while that of therapeutic laparoscopy is low (40–88%. The frequency of laparotomic conversions is variable ranging from 0 to 52%, depending on patient selection and surgical skill. The first cause of laparotomic conversion is a difficult exposition and treatment of band adhesions. The incidence of laparotomic conversions is major in patients with anterior peritoneal band adhesions. Other main causes for laparotomic conversion are the presence of bowel necrosis and accidental enterotomies. The predictive factors for successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis are: number of previous laparotomies ≤ 2, non-median previous laparotomy, appendectomy as previous surgical treatment causing adherences, unique band adhesion as phatogenetic mechanism of small bowel obstruction, early laparoscopic management within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms, no signs of peritonitis on physical examination, experience of the surgeon. Conclusion Laparoscopic adhesiolysis in small bowel obstruction is feasible but can be convenient only if performed by skilled surgeons in selected patients. The laparoscopic adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction is satisfactorily carried out when early indicated in patients with a low number of laparotomies resulting in a short hospital stay and a lower postoperative

  7. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  8. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Chauvin, Nancy A.; Coleman, Beverly G.; Victoria, Teresa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management. (orig.)

  9. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa; Epelman, Monica; Johnson, Ann M; Chauvin, Nancy A; Coleman, Beverly G; Victoria, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  15. Identifying decreased peristalsis of abnormal small bowel segments in Crohn's disease using cine MR enterography: the frozen bowel sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; O'Kane, Patrick L; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Burach, Ilene; Burns, Aaron; Dulka, Susan; Parker, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether affected bowel in Crohn's disease patients can be identified by observing decreased peristalsis (frozen bowel sign) using cine balanced steady-state free precession (cine BSSFP) images. 5 radiologists independently reviewed cine BSSFP sequences from randomized MR Enterography (MRE) exams for 30 normal and 30 Crohn's disease patients, graded overall small bowel peristalsis from slowest to fastest, and graded peristalsis for the most abnormal small bowel segment. Sensitivity and specificity of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease were calculated. T tests of the peristalsis difference between abnormal segments and overall small bowel were conducted. For 5 readers, the sensitivity and specificity of cine BSSFP of the frozen bowel sign for diagnosing Crohn's disease ranged from 70% to 100% and 87% to 100%, respectively. There were significant differences in peristalsis between abnormal small bowel segments and the overall small bowel for Crohn's patients, but not in the overall small bowel between normal-MRE patients and Crohn's disease patients. Abnormal Crohn's small bowel segments have significantly decreased peristalsis compared to normal small bowel, which can be identified using cine BSSFP sequences as the frozen bowel sign.

  16. Fibromyalgia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, D; Odes, L R; Neumann, L; Odes, H S

    1999-05-01

    Studies of the rheumatological complications of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) have focused on peripheral arthritis and spondylitis, and less is known about soft tissue rheumatism, specifically the fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of FM and assess pain thresholds in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Seventy-two patients with UC and 41 with CD attending consecutively at the Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic were assessed for the presence of FM and tenderness thresholds. FM was diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria. Tenderness was measured by manual palpation and with a dolorimeter. One hundred twenty healthy subjects served as controls. FM was documented in 30 of 113 patients with IBD (30%), specifically in 49% of patients with CD and 19% with UC (p = 0.001); in controls the rate was 0%. Subjects with CD exhibited more tenderness and reported more frequent and more severe FM associated symptoms than subjects with UC. Patients with CD had a higher tender point count, 11.3 (+/- 6.5), than those with UC, 6.4 (+/- 5.7) (p = 0.001); in healthy controls, the count was 0.1 (+/- 0.5). Tenderness thresholds (kg) were lower in CD 2.9 (+/- 1.7) than UC 3.9 (+/- 2.0) (p = 0.005) and controls 5.8 (+/- 0.9). FM is common in IBD, particularly Crohn's disease. The lower pain threshold in Crohn's disease may suggest a disease-specific effect. Recognizing FM in patients with IBD will prevent misdiagnosis and ensure correct treatment.

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need for sedation or anesthesia. They prepare the children for MRI by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ... perform than other imaging modalities. MRI of the chest takes more time than an x-ray or CT exam. Because of the length of ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... zippers and similar metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike ... (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses ...

  3. Cervical MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer in the spine Arthritis in the spine MRI works better than CT scan in diagnosing these problems ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants to not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious ... for MRI by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a ... resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have ... may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. MRI of ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome: new insights into symptom mechanisms and advances in treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most common conditions leading to gastroenterological referral, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood. However, recent years have seen major advances. These include new understanding of the role of both inflammation and altered microbiota as well as the impact of dietary intolerances as illuminated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has thrown new light on IBS. This article will review new data on how excessive bile acid secretion mediates diarrhea and evidence from post infectious IBS which has shown how gut inflammation can alter gut microbiota and function. Studies of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have also shown that even when inflammation is in remission, the altered enteric nerves and abnormal microbiota can generate IBS-like symptoms. The efficacy of the low FODMAP diet as a treatment for bloating, flatulence, and abdominal discomfort has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. MRI studies, which can quantify intestinal volumes, have provided new insights into how FODMAPs cause symptoms. This article will focus on these areas together with recent trials of new agents, which this author believes will alter clinical practice within the foreseeable future. PMID:27158477

  9. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Intestinal Xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Barrera-Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast majority of bowel obstruction is due to postoperative adhesions, malignancy, intestinal inflammatory disease, and hernias; however, knowledge of other uncommon causes is critical to establish a prompt treatment and decrease mortality. Xanthomatosis is produced by accumulation of cholesterol-rich foamy macrophages. Intestinal xanthomatosis is an uncommon nonneoplastic lesion that may cause small bowel obstruction and several cases have been reported in the English literature as obstruction in the jejunum. We report a case of small intestinal xanthomatosis occurring in a 51-year-old female who presented with one day of copious vomiting and intermittent abdominal pain. Radiologic images revealed jejunal loop thickening and inflammatory changes suggestive of foreign body obstruction, diagnostic laparoscopy found two strictures at the jejunum, and a pathologic examination confirmed a segmental small bowel xanthomatosis. This case illustrates that obstruction even without predisposing factors such as hyperlipidemia or lymphoproliferative disorders.

  10. Small Bowel Obstruction caused by a Carcinoid Tumour | Shallaly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a rare case of carcinoid tumour presenting as a small bowel obstruction in a young male patient. Pitfalls of diagnosis, including confusion with irritable bowel syndrome are high-lighted. The current management strategies of this tumour are reviewed. Keywords: irritable bowel, appendicitis, choleystitis.

  11. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  12. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  13. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, H.S.; Woo, J.Y.; Hong, H.S.; Park, M.H.; Ha, H.I.; Yang, I.; Lee, Y.; Jung, A.Y.; Hwang, J.Y.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in

  14. Achieving the best bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Blanco, Adolfo; Ruiz, Alex; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Amorós, Ana; Gana, Juan Cristóbal; Ibáñez, Patricio; Ono, Akiko; Fujii, Takahiro

    2014-12-21

    Bowel preparation is a core issue in colonoscopy, as it is closely related to the quality of the procedure. Patients often find that bowel preparation is the most unpleasant part of the examination. It is widely accepted that the quality of cleansing must be excellent to facilitate detecting neoplastic lesions. In spite of its importance and potential implications, until recently, bowel preparation has not been the subject of much study. The most commonly used agents are high-volume polyethylene glycol (PEG) electrolyte solution and sodium phosphate. There has been some confusion, even in published meta-analyses, regarding which of the two agents provides better cleansing. It is clear now that both PEG and sodium phosphate are effective when administered with proper timing. Consequently, the timing of administration is recognized as one of the central factors to the quality of cleansing. The bowel preparation agent should be administered, at least in part, a few hours in advance of the colonoscopy. Several low volume agents are available, and either new or modified schedules with PEG that usually improve tolerance. Certain adjuvants can also be used to reduce the volume of PEG, or to improve the efficacy of other agents. Other factors apart from the choice of agent can improve the quality of bowel cleansing. For instance, the effect of diet before colonoscopy has not been completely clarified, but an exclusively liquid diet is probably not required, and a low-fiber diet may be preferable because it improves patient satisfaction and the quality of the procedure. Some patients, such as diabetics and persons with heart or kidney disease, require modified procedures and certain precautions. Bowel preparation for pediatric patients is also reviewed here. In such cases, PEG remains the most commonly used agent. As detecting neoplasia is not the main objective with these patients, less intensive preparation may suffice. Special considerations must be made for patients

  15. Antibiotics during childhood and inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Four epidemiological studies, including two large cohort studies in children aged 17 years or under, have studied the link between antibiotic therapy and inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of inflammatory bowel disease appeared to be twice as high in children exposed to an antibiotic as in unexposed children. The risk appeared higher following exposure during the first year of life, with beta-lactam antibiotics, and with repeated antibiotic courses. One postulated mechanism is through destruction of the anaerobic intestinal flora by antibiotics. In practice, these data provide yet another reason to avoid unnecessarily exposing children to antibiotics.

  16. Caring for Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagins, Linda A; Kane, Sunanda V

    2016-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease are chronic inflammatory diseases with typical onset in early adulthood. These diseases, therefore, can affect a woman throughout the many stages of her life, including menstruation, sexuality, pregnancy, and menopause. Unique health issues face women during these stages and can affect the course of their inflammatory bowel disease as well as treatment strategies and health maintenance. This article covers the non-pregnancy-related issues that are important in caring for women with inflammatory bowel disease. The topics of pregnancy and fertility are covered in a separate review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted laparoscopic anorectoplasty for imperforate anus: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tina T; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Smith, Ethan A; Dillman, Jonathan R; Vellody, Ranjith; Jarboe, Marcus D

    2017-01-01

    Surgical procedures for high imperforate anus have ranged from the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) to laparoscopic-assisted anorectoplasty (LAARP). PSARP bisects the sphincter muscle complex, introducing muscle injury and scarring. LAARP uses a straight trocar to traverse an often non-linear sphincter muscle complex. MRI-assisted LAARP (MRI-LAARP) guides the neorectum precisely through the middle of the entire sphincter complex along its trajectory. We present our experience utilizing MRI intraoperatively during LAARP. Ten children underwent MRI-LAARP procedures. Intraoperative MRI was performed to delineate the sphincter complex, and to guide the advancement of an MRI-compatible needle through the center of the complex from skin to the peritoneal cavity. The remainder of the procedure was completed using the standard LAARP technique. All had successful MRI needle placement through the sphincter complex. Nine patients had successful laparoscopic pull-through procedures; one was converted to open due to severe intraperitoneal adhesions. Postoperative stay averaged 5.4 ± 4.4 days. Out of the ten patients, one child had mild dehiscence of the anal anastomosis requiring revision 11 days postoperatively. The theoretical advantage of the MRI-LAARP is placing the neorectum through the entire sphincter complex without transecting the muscle. Follow-up of these patients shows good short-term results; however, long-term follow-up will be needed to best assess sphincter and bowel function.

  18. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ... MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ...

  19. MRI of the Body (Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body ... limitations of MRI of the Body? What is MRI of the Body? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  20. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziech, Manon L.W.; Smets, Anne M.J.B.; Lavini, Cristina; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelofs, Joris J.T.H. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  1. Hybrid imaging of the bowel using PET/MR enterography: Feasibility and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Kinner, Sonja; Gomez, Benedikt; Lenga, Lukas; Bellendorf, Alexander; Heusch, Philipp; Umutlu, Lale; Langhorst, Jost; Ruenzi, Michael; Gerken, Guido; Bockisch, Andreas; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2016-02-01

    To implement a protocol for PET/MR enterography for a multimodal assessment of intestinal pathologies. 19 patients with bowel malignancies, Crohn's disease or fever of unknown origin (male: n=14, female: n=5, age: 57±13years) underwent PET/MR enterography with either [(18)F]FDG (n=10) or [(68)Ga]-DOTATOC (n=9) using an integrated scanner. For small bowel distension a contrast solution (1500 cm(3) of mannitol and locust bean gum) was ingested. The following sequences were acquired: (a) coronal TrueFISP; (b) coronal T2w HASTE; (c) coronal dynamic T1w VIBE; (d) axial and coronal T1w FLASH post gadolinium. All datasets were reviewed by two readers with regard to co-registration of anatomical structures based on a 3-point ordinal scale as well as overall image quality using a 4-point ordinal scale. Furthermore, visualization of intestinal and extra-intestinal pathologies was assessed. PET/MR enterography was well tolerated by all patients. High overall MR image quality was achieved (mean score: 3.2±0.6) with good co-registration of PET and MRI (mean scores: 2.6 to 3.0). PET/MR enterography allowed for an excellent visualization of both intestinal as well as extra-intestinal pathologies. PET/MR enterography is technically feasible and offers good co-registration of bowel structures. This novel method enables a multimodal assessment of bowel lesions in malignant and inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI/linac integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Overweg, Johan; Brown, Kevin J; Kerkhof, Ellen M; van der Put, Richard W; Hårdemark, Björn; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2008-01-01

    In radiotherapy the healthy tissue involvement still poses serious dose limitations. This results in sub-optimal tumour dose and complications. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is the key development in radiation oncology to solve this problem. MRI yields superb soft-tissue visualization and provides several imaging modalities for identification of movements, function and physiology. Integrating MRI functionality with an accelerator can make these capacities available for high precision, real time IGRT. The system being built at the University Medical Center Utrecht is a 1.5T MRI scanner, with diagnostic imaging functionality and quality, integrated with a 6MV radiotherapy accelerator. The realization of a prototype of this hybrid system is a joint effort between the Radiotherapy Department of the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, Elekta, Crawley, U.K., and Philips Research, Hamburg, Germany. Basically, the design is a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MRI scanner with a Magnex closed bore magnet surrounded by a single energy (6 MV) Elekta accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the radiation beam properties of the hybrid system, dosimetry equipment and for the construction of patient specific dose deposition kernels in the presence of a magnetic field. The latter are used to evaluate the IMRT capability of the integrated MRI linac. A prototype hybrid MRI/linac for on-line MRI guidance of radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is under construction. The aim of the system is to deliver the radiation dose with mm precision based on diagnostic quality MR images.

  3. Gender differences in inflammatory bowel disease: Explaining body image dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Inês A; Ferreira, Cláudia; Duarte, Cristiana; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of body image problems in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and to explore gender differences in these associations. A sample of inflammatory bowel disease patients (60 males and 140 females) was collected. Findings from a multi-group analysis show that inflammatory bowel disease symptomatology may impact on body image in both male and female patients through the effect of body-image-related cognitive fusion. Body image difficulties in the context of inflammatory bowel disease should not be a neglected dimension in research aiming at understanding the psychosocial effects of inflammatory bowel disease and by health professionals working with these patients.

  4. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI scans......, while lower leg muscles were relatively spared even in advanced disease. A proximodistal gradient of involvement of vasti muscles was a consistent finding in these patients, including the most severe ones. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle involvement on MRI is consistent in patients with LGMD2C-F and can be helpful...

  5. Methods for diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuk, L.; Vos, de W.M.; Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method for diagnosing Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in a test sample by determining the level of several bacterial taxa in the test sample, comparing this level with the levels of those bacterial taxa in a control sample, and relating the level to a diagnosis of

  6. Methods for diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuk, L.; Vos, de W.M.; Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.

    2012-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method for diagnosing Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in a test sample by determining the level of several bacterial taxa in the test sample, comparing this level with the levels of those bacterial taxa in a control sample, and relating the level to a diagnosis of

  7. Isotretinoin-induced inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, J L M; Srivastava, N; van Puijenbroek, E P

    Three case reports on inflammatory bowel disease associated with use of isotretinoin are described. All three patients were male adolescents, in good health when starting isotretinoin (for acne treatment for about six months). Several weeks after discontinuation of isotretinoin the patients

  8. Adult Bochdalek hernia with bowel incarceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yeh-Huang; Chien, Yu-Hon; Yan, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2008-10-01

    Bochdalek hernias are rare in adults. We report 2 cases of Bochdalek hernia with bowel obstruction. The first case was a 74-year-old male patient who suffered from abdominal pain and chest tightness for 1 day. Chest radiography indicated a mass-like lesion above the left diaphragm. The pain could not be relieved by nasogastric tube decompression for 12 hours. We arranged computed tomography, which revealed a dilated bowel above the diaphragm and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous change. The patient received emergency laparotomy, and a Bochdalek hernia was detected during the operation. The second case was a 75-year-old female patient who suffered from chest tightness and dyspnea for about 1 week. Chest X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging revealed herniation of small and large bowels at the right posterior aspect of the thoracic cavity. She received transthoracic repair of diaphragmatic hernia, recovered, and was discharged 15 days later. We recommend that adult Bochdalek hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction.

  9. Adult Bochdalek Hernia with Bowel Incarceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh-Huang Hung

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bochdalek hernias are rare in adults. We report 2 cases of Bochdalek hernia with bowel obstruction. The first case was a 74-year-old male patient who suffered from abdominal pain and chest tightness for 1 day. Chest radiography indicated a mass-like lesion above the left diaphragm. The pain could not be relieved by nasogastric tube decompression for 12 hours. We arranged computed tomography, which revealed a dilated bowel above the diaphragm and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous change. The patient received emergency laparotomy, and a Bochdalek hernia was detected during the operation. The second case was a 75-year-old female patient who suffered from chest tightness and dyspnea for about 1 week. Chest X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging revealed herniation of small and large bowels at the right posterior aspect of the thoracic cavity. She received transthoracic repair of diaphragmatic hernia, recovered, and was discharged 15 days later. We recommend that adult Bochdalek hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction.

  10. Preoperative bowel preparation in children: Polyethylene glycol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colorectal surgeries frequently require bowel preparation. In children, (is this standard of care?: this method is mostly followed) this is usually performed using normal saline, which is very cumbersome and causes unnecessary discomfort. This study compared polyethylene glycol (PEG) with normal saline for ...

  11. Neuropeptide receptor expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Willy Pascale ter

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Neuropeptides are involved in the regulation of intestinal motility, chloride secretion and inflammatory response, three processes that are

  12. Bowel injury following gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When bowel injury is recognized during the first laparoscopic procedure then laparoscopic primary suturing could be tried although laparotomy may be needed. When diagnosis is delayed, then laparotomy is the treatment of choice. The role of robotic surgery and three-dimensional laparoscopic gynecological surgery on ...

  13. Future directions in inflammatory bowel disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Haens, Geert R.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Silverberg, Mark S.; Petersson, Joel; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), new treatment modalities and the potential impact of personalised medicine remain topics of intense interest as our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD expands. Potential future strategies for IBD management are discussed, based on

  14. Anatomy and Physiology of the Small Bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Neil; Lacy, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Comprehension of small intestine physiology and function provides a framework for the understanding of several important disease pathways of the gastrointestinal system. This article reviews the development, anatomy and histology of the small bowel in addition to physiology and digestion of key nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Ørskov; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Andersson, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population...

  16. Innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C. P.; Mjösberg, J. M.; Bernink, J. H.; Spits, H.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible individuals. The exact contribution of the adaptive and innate immune system has not been elucidated. However, recent advances in treatments

  17. The epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, L. R.; Engsbro, A. L.; Jones, M. P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to explore the natural history of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Denmark over 3 years by studying development of IBS symptoms and associated factors. Methods: A cohort study was carried out using a web panel representative of the Danish general population 18-50 years...

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  19. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Frederik Trier; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD...

  20. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Vermeire (Silvio); F. Carbonnel (Franck); P.G. Coulie (Pierre); V. Geenen (Vincent); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); P.L. Masson (Pierre); F. de Keyser (Filip); E. Louis (Edouard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease affecting mainly young people in their reproductive years. IBD therefore has a major impact on patients' family planning decisions. Management of IBD in pregnancy requires a challenging balance between optimal

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  2. Bowel injury following gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High clinical suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis. Diagnostic workup of suspected cases includes serial ab- dominal examination, measuring inflammatory markers, and performing imaging studies including abdominal ultrasound and. CT scan. When bowel injury is recognized during the first laparoscopic procedure then ...

  3. Dynamic bowel obstruction: aetiology, clinical presentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were analyzed using SPSS software system. A total of .... This was a descriptive prospective study of patients operated for dynamic bowel obstruction at Bugando ... The modal age group was 31-40 years accounting for 32.2% of cases (Table 1). Two hundred and six (60.2%) patients were aged 40 years and below.

  4. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD...

  5. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: OUTPATIENT TREATMENT PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Miranda dos SANTOS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The incidence and prevalence of both conditions have increased and are progressively increasing. These diseases are frequently recurrent and clinically highly severe. In Brazil, the lack of epidemiological data related to such diseases has left these patients in a vulnerable state and contributed to increased morbidity. OBJECTIVE To describe the profiles of patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated in an outpatient service in Brazil. METHODS This descriptive, exploratory, and retrospective documentary study with a quantitative approach was performed in an outpatient treatment service for inflammatory bowel disease, at a university polyclinic located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from May to July 2016. The study included 556 patients and was approved by the research ethics committee of the institution (CAAE no. 55179316.6.0000.5259/2016. RESULTS The data showed a high prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in white female patients. Crohn’s disease was diagnosed in more patients than was ulcerative colitis; the ileocolon was the most commonly affected location in patients with Crohn’s disease. The stenotic phenotype was prevalent in patients with Crohn’s disease. CONCLUSION The prevalence of the stenotic phenotype in Crohn’s disease in relation to others demonstrates the need for further investigations in this field of study in Brazil. In conclusion, the data showed that the epidemiologic profile of the study population is similar to that published in the national and international literature.

  6. Helping Patients Cope with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Recovery (mastectomy patients) and the Ostomy Association. They consist of people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Members support one another by sharing...problems 10 unique to single people. Subjects such as dating, social relationships, sexuality , and career planning are discussed. The couples group

  7. Opioid-Induced Constipation and Bowel Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Bassotti, Gabrio; Coffin, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT) system. RESULTS:  From a list of 10,832 potentially relevant studies, 33 citations were identified for review. Screening the reference lists of the pertinent papers identified additional publications. Current definitions, prevalence, and mechanism of opioid-induced bowel...

  8. Role of alimentation in irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapoigny, M.; Stockbrügger, R. W.; Azpiroz, F.; Collins, S.; Coremans, G.; Müller-Lissner, S.; Oberndorff, A.; Pace, F.; Smout, A.; Vatn, M.; Whorwell, P.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different food items are made responsible for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms, but the physiopathology of IBS remains unclear. AIMS: During a meeting in Nice, France, experts of the European Working Team of the IBiS Club discussed selected data regarding the relationships between

  9. Dynamic bowel obstruction: aetiology, clinical presentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to describe in our region, the aetiology, clinical presentation, management and outcome of dynamic bowel obstruction. Data were analyzed using SPSS software system. A total of 342 patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2.1: 1. The median age of patients at presentation ...

  10. Review of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadir M.R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders striking 10-20% of the world population. Although most patients do not take medical assistance, this disease enforces significant cost on the patient and health systems and has negative effects on quality of life of the individual. After diagnosis ,treatment of this disease is the next step. Many pathways of treatment has been introduced and the efficacy of each other has been established in one way or another. The first step in the path of treatment is education and confidence of patients that might also be the most important step. Fiber diet, probiotic, anti-cholinergic and anti antispasmodics, laxatives, anti-diarrhea, the drugs affecting serotonin receptors, antidepressants and anti-anxiety, the chloride channel activator and non-drug methods such as cognitive-behavior therapy, hypnotherapy, acupuncture and herbal medicine each of which has been tested on irritable bowel syndrome and efficacy of each one has been indicated in one way or another. This paper tried to outline new treatments available in addition to categorization and discussion of various treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.Keywords: Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Probiotics; Parasmpatholytics; Laxatives.

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Medical and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albersnagel, Frans; Dijkstra, Gerard

    A review is presented in which the state of the art of behavioural-scientific research on inflammatory bowel disease (BID) is sorted out. After a short introduction on medical aspects of the two diseases that constitute IBD, i.e. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the factors that may have an

  12. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  14. MR enterography-histology comparison in resected pediatric small bowel Crohn disease strictures: can imaging predict fibrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkmeier, Daniel T; Dillman, Jonathan R; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud; Heider, Amer; Davenport, Matthew S; Smith, Ethan A; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that can lead to intestinal strictures. The presence of fibrosis within strictures alters optimal management but is not reliably detected by current imaging methods. To correlate the MRI features of surgically resected small-bowel strictures in pediatric Crohn disease with histological inflammation and fibrosis scoring. We included children with Crohn disease who had symptomatic small-bowel strictures requiring surgical resection and had preoperative MR enterography (MRE) within 3 months of surgery (n = 20). Two blinded radiologists reviewed MRE examinations to document stricture-related findings. A pediatric pathologist scored stricture histological specimens for fibrosis (0-4) and inflammation (0-4). MRE findings were correlated with histological data using Spearman correlation (ρ) and exact logistic regression analysis. There was significant positive correlation between histological bowel wall fibrosis and inflammation in resected strictures (ρ = 0.55; P = 0.01). Confluent transmural histological fibrosis was associated with pre-stricture upstream small-bowel dilatation >3 cm at univariate (odds ratio [OR] = 51.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.6- > 999.9; P = 0.0002) and multivariate (OR = 43.4; 95% CI: 6.1- > 999.9; P = 0.0006, adjusted for age) analysis. The degree of bowel wall T2-weighted signal intensity failed to correlate with histological bowel wall fibrosis or inflammation (P-values >0.05). There were significant negative correlations between histological fibrosis score and patient age at resection (ρ = -0.48, P = 0.03), and time from diagnosis to surgery (ρ = -0.73, P = 0.0002). Histological fibrosis and inflammation co-exist in symptomatic pediatric Crohn disease small-bowel strictures and are positively correlated. Pre-stenotic upstream small-bowel dilatation greater than 3 cm is significantly associated with confluent transmural fibrosis.

  15. Managing neonatal bowel obstruction: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desoky SM

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah M Desoky,1 Ranjit I Kylat,2 Unni Udayasankar,1 Dorothy Gilbertson-Dahdal1 1Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Neonatal intestinal obstruction is a common surgical emergency and occurs in approximately 1 in 2,000 live births. The causes of obstruction are diverse with varied embryological origins, and some underlying etiologies are not yet well described. Some findings of neonatal bowel obstruction can be detected prenatally on ultrasound imaging. The obstruction is classified as “high” when the level of obstruction is proximal to the ileum, and “low” when the level of obstruction is at the ileum or colon. Early diagnosis of the type of intestinal obstruction and localization of the obstructive bowel segment guides timely and appropriate management of the underlying pathologic entity. Neonatal bowel obstructions are ideally managed at specialized centers with a large volume of neonatal surgery and dedicated pediatric surgical and anesthesia expertise. Although surgical intervention is necessary in most cases, initial management strategies often target underlying metabolic, cardiac, or respiratory abnormalities. Imaging plays a key role in early and accurate diagnosis of the abnormalities. When bowel obstruction is suspected clinically, initial imaging workup usually involves abdominal radiography, which may direct further evaluation with fluoroscopic examination such as upper gastrointestinal (UGI contrast study or contrast enema. This article provides a comprehensive review of clinical and radiological features of common and less common causes of intestinal obstruction in the neonatal age group, including esophageal atresia, enteric duplication cysts, gastric volvulus, congenital microgastria, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ... projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ... For more information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. The ... You may be able to relax between imaging sequences, but will be asked to maintain your position ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood ... procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... the iodine-based contrast materials used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. MRI of the chest is ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... period is necessary. You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On ... that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to detect and identify any metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no ... units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not ...

  11. Constrained MRI Impedance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plewes, Donald

    2002-01-01

    An approach for imaging electric tissue properties in vivo is proposed. The technique relies upon the integration of MRI data with electrical potential measurements made over the surface of the patient...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam ... soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x- ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow to the heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ... the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... for more information. top of page How should I prepare? You may be asked to wear a ... total exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... maintain your position without movement as much as possible. You will usually be alone in the exam ...

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    Full Text Available ... activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made ... Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ... being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. The electric ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... MRI exam, a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an ...

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  6. MRI of the Chest

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  7. MRI of the Chest

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  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... asked to wear a gown. If you have claustrophobia or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at ... you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ... A physician or nurse specializing in sedation or anesthesia for children should be available during the exam ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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  1. MRI of the Chest

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  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ... who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

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  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  7. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissues surrounding the eye (orbital cellulitis) Nasal polyps Sinusitis -- acute Sinusitis -- chronic Talk to your provider if you have ... therefore is not typically used for suspected acute sinusitis. Alternative Names MRI of the sinuses; Magnetic resonance ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ... believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients ...

  12. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, ... doctor for a mild sedative prior to the exam. What is MRI of the Chest? What are ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ... a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MR images of the heart ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam ... Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the eyes are particularly important because they may move during ...

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist preparing patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... time an MRI takes to complete, many young children and infants require sedation to hold still for ...

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast materials used for ... There is a very slight risk of an allergic reaction if contrast material is injected. Such reactions are ...

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    Full Text Available ... your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... the metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

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    Full Text Available ... systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication of MRI believed to be caused by the ... injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication. There is a very slight risk of an ...

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    Full Text Available ... devices they may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit ... room from the scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations ...

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    Full Text Available ... implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, ... risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of another imaging procedure. ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

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  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine-containing contrast ... information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media . ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity ... magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data ...

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    Full Text Available ... These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can be damaged pins, ... devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is ...

  10. [MRI features of neurosyphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, M; Chadenat, M L; Cordoliani, Y; Kamga-Tallom, R; D'Anglejean, J; Pico, F

    2011-04-01

    Neurosyphilis is rare today. It arises on average 20 years after poorly treated or untreated primary syphilis. Considering the decline in the incidence of syphilitic meningo encephalitis and the little known MRI aspects, we report the case of a patient affected by neurosyphilis occurring after primary syphilis untreated for 25 years. A 65-year-old man presented typical clinical features including general paresis with psychiatric disorders, maniac access, and frontal syndrome as well as tabes dorsalis and Argyll-Robertson pupil. Brain MRI showed bilateral high intensity signals on the T2 weighted sequence located in mesiotemporal, insular, frontal regions. Very few cases of neurosyphilis with detailed brain MRI aspects have been reported. The interest of this case report is first to recall the importance of syphilitic serology in patients with subacute psychiatric disorders and secondly to present rarely reported aspects of the brain MRI. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... there is any question of their presence, an x-ray may be taken to detect and identify any ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will I ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of structures within ...

  15. MRI of intracranial calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Wha; Chang, Kee Hyun; Park, Jung Mi; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Recently computed tomography(CT) has been rapidly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of majority of intracranial diseases. But MRI still has some limitation, one of which is its inferiority in detecting calcification. MRI of intracranial calcification has been known to be variable in signal intensity. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI of 26 patients with intracranial calcified lesions in order to evaluate the MR intensity of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detecting calcification in various intracranial lesions. All the MRI were obtained using routine T1-and T2-weighted spin eco pulse sequences on 2.0T superconducting system. The 26 patients consisted of 13 brain tumors (4 oligodendrogliomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 2 astrocytomas, 1 gem cell tumor, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 ependympma, and pathologically unconfirmed 2 cases), 11 infectious diseases (1 paragonimiasis, 1 sparganosis, 2 cysticercosis, 3 tuberculosis, and 4 unknown cases), and 2 undetermined pathologies. Eighty-two percent (9/11) of infections disease, and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group showed signal diminution or signal void on both T1-and T2-weighted image (T1W1, T2W1). Twenty-four percent (3/13) of brain tumors showed signal diminution on both T1W1 and T2W1. In 46% (6/13) and 61% (8/13) of brain tumors the signal intensities were isointense on T1W1 and T1W1, respectively. Unexpectedly, 3 oligodendrogliomas showed high signal intensity on T1W1, two of which showed com plexed signal intensity mixed with high, iso, and low signal intensities on T2W1. In remained cases (18% (2/11) of infectious diseases and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group) the signal intensities were mixed. With simultaneous review of CT and MRI in each case, the calcification (at least one in cases showing multiple ones) was identifiable on MRI in 62% (8/13) of rumors, 82% (9/11) of infectious diseases, and 100% (2/2) in undetermined group. In 36% (4/11) of infectious diseases, fewer number of

  16. Surveillance of FAP: a prospective blinded comparison of capsule endoscopy and other GI imaging to detect small bowel polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tescher Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is a hereditary disorder characterized by polyposis along the gastrointestinal tract. Information on adenoma status below the duodenum has previously been restricted due to its inaccessibility in vivo. Capsule Endoscopy (CE may provide a useful adjunct in screening for polyposis in the small bowel in FAP patients. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of CE in the assessment of patients with FAP, compared to other imaging modalities for the detection of small bowel polyps. Method 20 consecutive patients with previously diagnosed FAP and duodenal polyps, presenting for routine surveillance of polyps at The Royal Melbourne Hospital were recruited. Each fasted patient initially underwent a magnetic resonance image (MRI of the abdomen, and a barium small bowel follow-through study. Capsule Endoscopy was performed four weeks later on the fasted patient. An upper gastrointestinal side-viewing endoscopy was done one (1 to two (2 weeks after this. Endoscopists and investigators were blinded to results of other investigations and patient history. Results Within the stomach, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy found more polyps than other forms of imaging. SBFT and MRI generally performed poorly, identifying fewer polyps than both upper gastrointestinal and capsule endoscopy. CE was the only form of imaging that identified polyps in all segments of the small bowel as well as the only form of imaging able to provide multiple findings outside the stomach/duodenum. Conclusion CE provides important information on possible polyp development distal to the duodenum, which may lead to surgical intervention. The place of CE as an adjunct in surveillance of FAP for a specific subset needs consideration and confirmation in replication studies. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000616370

  17. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care....

  18. MRI Physics Workshop:

    OpenAIRE

    Daryoush Saedi

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the basic principle of imaging physics helps better understanding of normal anatomy and pathological imaging findings of the diseases."n"n This is more necessary in advanced imaging techniques like MRI because of the complexity of the basic physics of the technique. In basic MRI physics workshop, we discuss about this technique from the primary concepts. The content is very simplified and is showed by slides, animation and easy pictures for better understanding...

  19. MRI of plantar fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, B.; Grenier, P. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente Diagnostique et Interventionelle, Hopital de la Pitie, 83, boulevard de l`Hopital, F-75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1997-12-01

    At present, MRI is the only imaging method that can precisely visualize lesions of the superficial plantar aponeurosis, whether they be musculoaponeurositides, enthesopathies or tears, and whether they be acute or chronic, with or without complications. By its direct visualization of the lesion, MRI enables an accurate assessment of the injury to be made and thereby better orients the therapeutic strategy. (orig.) With 11 figs., 15 refs.

  20. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  1. CT and MRI of experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H M; Klosterhalfen, B; Kinzel, S; Jansen, A; Seggewiss, C; Weghaus, P; Kamp, M; Töns, C; Günther, R W

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of CT and MRI for the detection of bowel wall changes in experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia. in 18 female pigs, a percutaneous embolization of the superior mesenteric artery was performed with buthyl-2-cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol (1:1) (experimental group). In six animals, only diagnostic imaging and histologic evaluation were performed (control group). CT was carried out 3, 6, and 12 h after occlusion. Incremental CT (1 s scan time, 5 mm slice thickness, 7 mm increment, 120 kV/290 mAs) and spiral CT (slice thickness 5 mm, pitch 1.5, 120 kV/165 mA) were performed pre and post contrast injection (Somatom Plus/Siemens). Serial CT was carried out after intravenous contrast injection (1 ml/kg, 2 ml/s). MRI (Magnetom 1.5 T; Siemens) was performed with T1 (pre and post 0.01 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA; Magnevist; Schering, Germany), T2, and proton density images in axial orientation. Slice thickness was 3 mm and slice gap 1 mm. Additionally, a T1-weighted GE sequence (multislice FLASH 2D) was obtained in dynamic technique (before and 30, 60, and 90 s after contrast agent injection) with a slice thickness of 5 mm. Biometrical monitoring included blood pressure, heart frequency, blood cell count, electrolyte status, blood gas analysis, and determination of serum lactate. Image evaluation included morphological analysis and determination of the enhancement pattern. Histological specimens were obtained and analyzed according to the Chiu classification. The histologic workup of the specimen 3, 6, and 12 h after vascular occlusion revealed an average Chiu state 3, 4, and 5. On CT, the bowel wall had a thickness of 4.7 mm on average in the ischemic segments. There was a significant difference from the control group (average 3 mm). Free intraperitoneal fluid and intramural gas were seen after 12 h of ischemia in 80%. In ischemic bowel segments, no mural enhancement was seen. Normal segments and the bowel of the control animals showed an enhancement of

  2. Semi-automatic bowel wall thickness measurements on MR enterography in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziroglu, Robiel E; Puylaert, Carl A J; Tielbeek, Jeroen A W; Makanyanga, Jesica; Menys, Alex; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Hatzakis, Haralambos; Taylor, Stuart A; Stoker, Jaap; van Vliet, Lucas J; Vos, Frans M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate a semi-automatic method for delineation of the bowel wall and measurement of the wall thickness in patients with Crohn's disease. 53 patients with suspected or proven Crohn's disease were selected. Two radiologists independently supervised the delineation of regions with active Crohn's disease on MRI, yielding manual annotations (Ano1, Ano2). Three observers manually measured the maximal bowel wall thickness of each annotated segment. An active contour segmentation approach semi-automatically delineated the bowel wall. For each active region, two segmentations (Seg1, Seg2) were obtained by independent observers, in which the maximum wall thickness was automatically determined. The overlap between (Seg1, Seg2) was compared with the overlap of (Ano1, Ano2) using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. The corresponding variances were compared using the Brown-Forsythe test. The variance of the semi-automatic thickness measurements was compared with the overall variance of manual measurements through an F-test. Furthermore, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of semi-automatic thickness measurements was compared with the ICC of manual measurements through a likelihood-ratio test. Patient demographics: median age, 30 years; interquartile range, 25-38 years; 33 females. The median overlap of the semi-automatic segmentations (Seg1 vs Seg2: 0.89) was significantly larger than the median overlap of the manual annotations (Ano1 vs Ano2: 0.72); p = 1.4 × 10-5. The variance in overlap of the semi-automatic segmentations was significantly smaller than the variance in overlap of the manual annotations (p = 1.1 × 10-9). The variance of the semi-automated measurements (0.46 mm2) was significantly smaller than the variance of the manual measurements (2.90 mm2, p = 1.1 × 10-7). The ICC of semi-automatic measurement (0.88) was significantly higher than the ICC of manual measurement (0.45); p = 0.005. The semi-automatic technique

  3. Care of the Pregnant Patient With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Uma; Matro, Rebecca

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease affects women in their peak reproductive years. Patients and physicians often have questions regarding the effect of inflammatory bowel disease on a woman's ability to conceive and to carry a pregnancy safely to term as well as the effect of inflammatory bowel disease and the medications used to treat it on pregnancy outcomes. Women with inflammatory bowel disease have the same rates of fertility as women without inflammatory bowel disease unless they have had prior surgery in the pelvis or active disease. However, women with inflammatory bowel disease do have higher rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach involving gastroenterologists, obstetricians, and maternal-fetal medicine physicians should focus on preconception planning and disease optimization before pregnancy. Women with inflammatory bowel disease should be followed as high-risk obstetric patients. Most medications used to treat inflammatory bowel disease can be continued safely during pregnancy and lactation. The greatest risk to the pregnancy is active disease, which can be precipitated by discontinuation of effective maintenance medications. Preconception counseling should include education regarding the low risk of most inflammatory bowel disease medications during pregnancy and lactation and the high risk of a significant disease flare during pregnancy. This review outlines important considerations for obstetricians caring for women with inflammatory bowel disease before and during pregnancy and in the postpartum period.

  4. [Value of contrast-enhanced MR enterography in pediatric Crohn's disease: preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, C; Pilleul, F; Dugougeat, F; Yzèbe, D; Lachaux, A; Pracros, J P; Valette, P J

    2005-11-01

    Feasibility study of contrast enhanced MR enterography without enteroclysis as a new diagnostic tool for children with known or suspected Crohn's disease. We prospectively included 15 children, 8-18 years old, with clinical suspicion of Crohn's disease. MR enterography without enteroclysis was performed on a 1,5 T clinical MR system. A total of 1000 ml of mannitol 5% was orally administered 60 minutes prior to MRI. Coronal and axial breath-hold sequences were acquired. The following sequences were obtained: True-FISP, FLASH T1 2D/3D with Fat saturation before and after gadolinium injection. Two radiologists, blinded to patient information, independently reviewed all examinations to record image quality, the degree of distension of the distal ileum, the presence of abnormal bowel segments and the presence of extra-intestinal complications. MRI findings were correlated to sonographic, endoscopic and biological results (sensitivity, specificity, Kappa test). The examinations were considered of satisfactory diagnostic quality in 93.3% of patients. Respiratory artifacts were present in one case. The entire GI tract could be identified on all sequences. Distention of the distal ileum was recorded as good to excellent in 89% of healthy subjects. Five MR examinations were considered abnormal with isolated ileal involvement in 2 cases, ileocolic involvement in 2 cases, and isolated colonic involvement in 1 case. The sensitivity and specificity of MR for the positive diagnosis of Crohn's disease were 100% and 83% respectively. Three extra-intestinal complications were detected: one case of ileo-ileal fistula, not identified on ultrasonography, an asymptomatic anal fistula and a symptomatic inflammatory stricture. MR enterography without enteroclysis is a well tolerated, effective non invasive method in the evaluation of known or suspected Crohn's disease. Because of the absence of ionizing radiation, MR enterography should become the gold standard in pediatric patients.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Colonography May Predict the Need for Bowel Resection in Colorectal Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Scardapane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To define if MRI findings in patients with deep pelvic endometriosis (DPE may be predictive for the need of bowel resection. Material and Methods. A retrospective survey of 196 pelvic MRIs of women who received laparoscopic procedures for DPE was carried out. A pelvic MRI was performed in all patients: it consisted in T2w-TSE sequences in axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and T1w and THRIVE sequences in the axial plane; the exam was completed by MR-Colonography. Intestinal lesions were measured in short and long axis and the degree of stenosis was established. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of intestinal resection. Results. 57/196 patients received an intestinal resection. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a predictive value of short axis (Odds-Ratio = 2.29, p=0.011 and stenosis (Odds-Ratio = 1.20, p=0.003. ROC analysis showed that a cut-off value of 11 mm for the short axis and 30% for the stenosis may correctly classify, respectively, 96,94% (sensitivity 92,9% and specificity 98,56% and 97,96% (sensitivity 94,74% and specificity 99,3% of the cases. Conclusion. The presence of an endometriotic rectal nodule > 11 mm in short axis causing a stenosis > 30% in pelvic MRI reliably predicts the need of a rectal resection.

  6. Clinical peculiarities of antibiotic associated bowels impairment and its significance in irritable bowel syndrome appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. O. Pasichna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the main objective of this study was to investigate bowels impairment due to treatment with antibiotics, its incidence and clinical peculiarities; to evaluate its role in appearance of in irritable bowel syndrome. Material and Methods. We studied 110 patients (33 males and 77 females, age range 16-83 years, who received treatment with antibiotic. We evaluated the function of the intestine before treatment with antibiotic, then in 1 week, 3 months after treatment finish (1, 2, 3, 4 visits respectively. Control group included 20 healthy persons, who haven't had antibiotics administered during recent two years. Results. We revealed that the signs of bowel function impairment took place at the first visit in 18.2% of patients, at the second visit – in 60.0% of patients, at the third visit – in 45.5% of patients and at the fourth visit – in 41.1% of patients. At the second, third and fourth visits the signs of bowels function impairment were observed reliably more often then at the first visit (before antibiotic administration, p<0.001. At the second visit the signs bowels function disorders were the most prominent: abdominal pain – in 44.5%, distention – in 46.4%, diarrhea – in 29.1%, constipation – in 18.2%, presence of both (diarrhea and periodically constipation manifestations – in 2.7%; and extraintestinal manifestations (depression. depressed mood, sorrow, apathy, decreased stamina, sleep disturbances – in 29.1% of patients. Clinical manifestations of irritable bowel syndrome occured in 6 months of observation in 32.2% of patients. Conclusions. The signs of bowel function impairment were observed in 60.0% of patients after finishing treatment with antibiotic. This incidence is much higher than in control group (р<0.001. Bowel disorders mostly manifested as the changes in quantity and consistency of feaces, pain, abdominal distention and extraintestinal manifestations. In 32.2% of patients clinical manifestations of

  7. The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic relapsing disorders of unknown aetiology. The aim of this review is to present the latest epidemiology data on occurrence, disease course, risk for surgery, as well as mortality...... and cancer risks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Gold standard epidemiology data on the disease course and prognosis of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are based on unselected population-based cohort studies. RESULTS: The incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) has increased...... IBD patients. CONCLUSION: In recent years, self-management and patient empowerment, combined with evolving eHealth solutions, has utilized epidemiological knowledge on disease patterns and has been improving compliance and the timing of adjusting therapies, thus optimizing efficacy by individualizing...

  8. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck

    2012-01-01

    dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect...... on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... acids may be protective. No effect was found of intake of dietary fibres, sugar, macronutrients, total energy, vitamin C, D, E, Carotene, or Retinol (vitamin A) on risk of ulcerative colitis. No prospective data was found on risk related to intake of fruits, vegetables or food microparticles (titanium...

  9. Liver Disorders in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Uko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the hepatobiliary system are relatively common extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. These disorders are sometimes due to a shared pathogenesis with IBD as seen in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and small-duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (small-duct PSC. There are also hepatobiliary manifestations such as cholelithiasis and portal vein thrombosis that occur due to the effects of chronic inflammation and the severity of bowel disease. Lastly, medications used in IBD such as sulfasalazine, thiopurines, and methotrexate can adversely affect the liver. It is important to be cognizant of these disorders as some do have serious long-term consequences. The management of these disorders often requires the expertise of multidisciplinary teams to achieve the best outcomes.

  10. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...... either directly from mucosal biopsies or from directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells may constitute complementary treatment options for patients with mucosal damage, as intestinal epithelial stem cells are multipotent and may give rise to all epithelial cell types of the intestine...

  11. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979......, asking whether their first- and second-degree relatives had this disorder. Ninety-six percent of the patients (504 with ulcerative colitis and 133 with Crohn's disease) provided adequate information. RESULTS: As compared with the general population, the first-degree relatives of the 637 patients...... with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease had a 10-fold increase in the risk of having the same disease as the patients, after standardization for age and sex. The risk of having the other of the two diseases was also increased, but less so, and the increase in the risk of having Crohn's disease...

  12. Vedolizumab in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledder, Oren; Assa, Amit; Levine, Arie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), but the data in pediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-center pediatric IBD cohort. Method: Retro...... was safe and effective in this cohort of pediatric refractory IBD. These data support previous findings of slow induction rate of vedolizumab in CD and a trend to be less effective compared to patients with UC.......Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), but the data in pediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-center pediatric IBD cohort. Method...

  13. Leukocyte migration in experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Van Rees

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of leukocytes from the circulation into tissue by transendothelial migration, is mediated subsequently by adhesion molecules such as selectins, chemokines and integrins. This multistep paradigm, with multiple molecular choices at each step, provides a diversity in signals. The influx of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes into inflamed tissue is important in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of each of these groups of adhesion molecules in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, either in human disease or in animal models, will be discussed below. Furthermore, the possibilities of blocking these different steps in the process of leukocyte extravasation in an attempt to prevent further tissue damage, will be taken into account.

  14. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which are both inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Both types of inflammatory bowel disease have a complex etiology, resulting from a genetically determined susceptibility interacting with environmental factors, including the diet and gut microbiota. Genome Wide Association Studies have implicated more than 160 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in disease susceptibility. Consideration of the different pathways suggested to be involved implies that specific dietary interventions are likely to be appropriate, dependent upon the nature of the genes involved. Epigenetics and the gut microbiota are also responsive to dietary interventions. Nutrigenetics may lead to personalized nutrition for disease prevention and treatment, while nutrigenomics may help to understand the nature of the disease and individual response to nutrients.

  15. [SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME AND NUTRITIONAL ENTERAL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariadel Cobo, Diana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Socas Macías, María; Serrano Aguayo, Pilar; Gómez Liébana, Eulalia; Morales Conde, Salvador; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The particularity of this case is the nutritional management that has managed to avoid the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and possible complications by placing jejunal tube at the distal end in patients with short bowel. It is a 34-year-old colecistectomizado complicated with postoperative peritonitis and dehiscence; two years he studied with small bowel obstruction, he was made de-volvulus and was complicated with two leak at different times after the second escape took place jejunostomy side double barreled shotgun level dehiscence, presented high debits by afferent loop of the terminal jejunostomy; during admission, polyurethane probe enteral feeding was inserted by the efferent loop jejunostomy. He received jejunal tube feeding laundry in the efferent loop terminal with decreased weight gain and subsequent reconstruction of intestinal transit debit proximal jejunostomy. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  17. MRI in Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Kalita, J. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Salwani, V. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gupta, R.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gujral, R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We document the MRI features in seven patients with Japanese encephalitis. MRI was carried out on a 1.5 T system within 10-60 days of onset. In all the patients MRI revealed bilateral thalamic lesions, haemorrhagic in five. Signal changes were present in the cerebrum in four patients, the midbrain and cerebellum in three each, the pons in two and the basal ganglia in one. The lesions were haemorrhagic in three of the four patients with lesions in the cortex, two of the three with lesions in the midbrain and cerebellum, but the pontine lesions were haemorrhagic in both patients. Spinal cord involvement was seen in one of the three patients who underwent MRI. In two patients MRI was repeated 3 years after the onset, showing marked reduction in abnormal signal; and all the lesions gave low signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Bilateral thalamic involvement, especially haemorrhagic, may be considered characteristic of Japanese encephalitis, especially in endemic areas. (orig.)

  18. Fetal gastrointestinal MRI: all that glitters in T1 is not necessarily colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombani, Marina [La Timone Children' s Hospital, Service de Radiopediatrie, Marseille (France); Ferry, Mathilde [Groupe Rennais d' Imagerie Medicale, Service de Radiologie, Rennes (France); Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Cassart, Marie [Erasme Hospital, Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Couture, Alain [Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Pediatric Radiology, Montpellier (France); Guibaud, Laurent [Hopital Femme Mere Enfant, Pediatric and Fetal Imaging, Lyon (France); Avni, Fred [Erasme Hospital, Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Gorincour, Guillaume [La Timone Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, Marseille (France)

    2010-07-15

    It has been described that both the colon and distal ileum present with a physiological hypersignal on T1-weighted sequences during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy because of their protein-rich meconium content, it was unclear whether the normal characteristics that have been described on fetal MRI can be applied to gastrointestinal (GI) obstructions. To analyse the localisation value of T1 hypersignal within dilated bowel loops in fetuses with gastrointestinal tract obstruction. A retrospective 4-year multicentre study analysing cases of fetal GI obstruction in which MRI demonstrated T1 hypersignal content in the dilated loops. Data collected included gestational age (GA) at diagnosis, bowel appearance on US, CFTR gene mutations and amniotic levels of gastrointestinal enzymes. The suggested prenatal diagnosis was eventually compared to postnatal imaging and surgery. Eleven patients were included. The median GA at US diagnosis was 23 weeks (range 13-32). In eight cases there was a single dilated loop, while several segments were affected in three. The median GA at MRI was 29 weeks (range 23-35). One case presented with cystic fibrosis mutations. Final prenatally suspected diagnoses were distal ileal atresia or colon in nine cases and proximal atresia in two. Postnatal findings were proximal jejunal atresia in nine cases and meconium ileus in two. In five cases the surgical findings demonstrated short bowel syndrome. In cases of fetal occlusion, T1 hypersignal should not be considered as a sign of distal ileal or colonic occlusion. The obstruction may be proximal, implying a risk of small bowel syndrome, which requires adequate parental counselling. (orig.)

  19. Association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Mallbris, L; Warren, R B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis, Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping genetic architecture. However, data on the frequency and risk of CD and UC in psoriasis are scarce and poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between CD......-associated increased risk of CD and UC, which was higher in severe psoriasis, and an increased risk of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Increased focus on gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with psoriasis may be warranted....

  20. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesus K

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different le...

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome and its psychological management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikesh Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic and disabling gastrointestinal problem that affects psychosocial functioning as well as the quality of life. This case study reports the utility of cognitive behavior therapy as a psychological intervention procedure in a chronic case of IBS. The use of psychological intervention was found to result in a reduction of anxiety; amelioration of the symptoms associated with IBS and improved functioning.

  2. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  3. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, N. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Atri, M. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)]. E-mail: mostafa.atri@sw.ca; Ryan, S. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Haddad, R. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Smith, A. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 {+-} 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 {+-} 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 {+-} 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  4. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, N; Atri, M; Ryan, S; Haddad, R; Smith, A

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10+/-5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14+/-11 SD) for the control group (p=0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4+/-6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p=0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  5. Novel targeted therapies for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Vermeire, Severine; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2017-01-01

    Our growing understanding of the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has opened new avenues for developing targeted therapies. These advances in treatment options targeting different mechanisms of action offer new hope for personalized management. In this review we highlight...... to intestinal sites of inflammation (e.g., sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulators). We also provide an update on the current status in clinical development of these new classes of therapeutics....

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: a comparison of subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey de Castro, Nicolas G; Miller, Vivien; Carruthers, Helen R; Whorwell, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally divided into subtypes depending on the bowel habit abnormality, but there is little clarity in the literature about whether these subtypes differ symptomatically or psychologically. Furthermore, there are conflicting reports on the relationship between symptom severity and psychological status. The aim of this study was to address these issues in a large cohort of patients defined by bowel habit. One thousand IBS patients were divided into diarrhea (IBS-D), constipation (IBS-C), and mixed (IBS-M) bowel habit subtypes and completed a series of validated questionnaires capturing symptom severity, non-colonic symptomatology (somatization), quality of life, and anxiety or depression levels. Comparisons were made using SPSS version 20. There were no significant differences between the three subtypes with respect to symptom severity, abdominal pain intensity, non-colonic symptomatology, quality of life, and anxiety or depression scores (all Ps > 0.05). In addition, there was only a small but statistically significant correlation between IBS symptom severity and both anxiety or depression, as well as quality of life (highest r = 0.34), while the relationship between somatization and disease severity was moderate (r = 0.42). This study suggests that there are no differences in the symptom profiles and anxiety or depression scores between different subtypes of IBS. In addition, anxiety and depression do not appear to be strongly associated with symptom severity, although this does not exclude the possible interplay between these and other psychological drivers of severity, such as poor coping skills. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The value of hyoscine butylbromide in pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, M.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ben.taylor@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk; Carrington, B.M.; Bonington, S.C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Swindell, R. [Department of Medical Statistics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of hyoscine butylbromide (HBB) on image quality and lesion and organ visualization in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Materials and methods: A prospective, ethically approved study was undertaken of 47 patients attending for pelvic MRI at a cancer centre. T2-weighted transverse and sagittal sequences were performed before and after intravenous injection of 20 mg HBB. Three radiologists independently scored anonymized image series for overall image quality, visualization of pelvic lesions and visualization of individual pelvic organs. Statistical analysis was performed to assess improvements in radiologists' scores post-HBB administration. Radiologists also assessed pre-HBB administration T1-weighted images for degree of bowel peristalsis to determine whether this could predict improvement in post-HBB T2-weighted image scores. Side effects of HBB were recorded using a patient questionnaire. Results: Radiologists' scores for image quality and lesion visualization were significantly higher on the post-HBB administration T2-weighted series (p < 0.0005). Scores for the visualization of the bladder, rectum, pelvic bowel, prostate, and seminal vesicles (all p < 0.0005), cervix (p = 0.019) and vagina (p = 0.0001) were also significantly higher post-HBB administration. Scores for the degree of peristalsis on T1-weighted images were not related to improvement in image quality or lesion visualization on T2-weighted images post-HBB administration. Side effects of HBB were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion: Intravenous HBB administration improves image quality and lesion visualization in oncological pelvic MRI and is recommended for routine use.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  9. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  10. The epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canavan C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Canavan, Joe West, Timothy Card Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Abstract: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional condition of the bowel that is diagnosed using clinical criteria. This paper discusses the nature of the diagnostic process for IBS and how this impacts epidemiological measurements. Depending on the diagnostic criteria employed, IBS affects around 11% of the population globally. Around 30% of people who experience the symptoms of IBS will consult physicians for their IBS symptoms. These people do not have significantly different abdominal symptoms to those who do not consult, but they do have greater levels of anxiety and lower quality of life. Internationally, there is a female predominance in the prevalence of IBS. There is 25% less IBS diagnosed in those over 50 years and there is no association with socioeconomic status. IBS aggregates within families and the genetic and sociological factors potentially underlying this are reviewed. Patients diagnosed with IBS are highly likely to have other functional disease and have more surgery than the general population. There is no evidence that IBS is associated with an increased mortality risk. The epidemiological evidence surrounding these aspects of the natural history is discussed. Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, epidemiology, prevalence, mortality, natural history

  11. Monitoring of small bowel Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, Uri; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Klang, Eyal; Carter, Dan; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Eliakim, Rami

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, the therapeutic paradigm in Crohn's disease has shifted from a mere symptom-oriented approach, to aiming to healing of the underlying inflammation and prevention of long-term structural complications. Such 'treat-to-target' approach may allow for a more stable disease course with less hospitalizations, lower requirement for surgery and improved quality of life. In Crohn's disease, the small bowel is affected in the majority of patients; frequently, Crohn's involves only the small bowel, which remains inaccessible to conventional ileocolonoscopic techniques. Thus, non-invasive monitoring techniques are crucial for accurate disease assessment. Areas covered: This review addresses the indications and clinical implications of non-invasive small bowel monitoring modalities (magnetic resonance enterography, intestinal ultrasound, capsule endoscopy) in the assessment and management of Crohn's disease. Expert commentary: This review addresses the limitations of the current knowledge and future areas of research, including the possible utilization of transmural healing as an imaging target and the need to establish clear quantitative target values to guide treatment by imaging findings in Crohn's disease.

  12. Review of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Ghadir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders striking 10-20% of the world population. Although most patients do not take medical assistance, this disease enforces significant cost on the patient and health systems and has negative effects on quality of life of the individual. After diagnosis ,treatment of this disease is the next step. Many pathways of treatment has been introduced and the efficacy of each other has been established in one way or another. The first step in the path of treatment is education and confidence of patients that might also be the most important step. Fiber diet, probiotic, anti-cholinergic and anti antispasmodics, laxatives, anti-diarrhea, the drugs affecting serotonin receptors, antidepressants and anti-anxiety, the chloride channel activator and non-drug methods such as cognitive-behavior therapy, hypnotherapy, acupuncture and herbal medicine each of which has been tested on irritable bowel syndrome and efficacy of each one has been indicated in one way or another. This paper tried to outline new treatments available in addition to categorization and discussion of various treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

  13. [MRI for myocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutberlet, M; Lücke, C; Krieghoff, C; Hildebrand, L; Lurz, P; Steiner, J; Adam, J; Eitel, I; Thiele, H; Grothoff, M; Grotthoff, M; Lehmkuhl, L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has become the primary tool for the non-invasive assessment in patients with suspected myocarditis, especially after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the differential diagnosis. Various MRI parameters are available which have different accuracies. Volumetric and functional ventricular assessment and the occurrence of pericardial effusion alone demonstrate only a poor sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the T2-ratio (edema assessment), the early or global relative myocardial enhancement (gRE) and the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), which represents irreversibly injured myocardium, are more specific parameters. All MRI parameters demonstrate the best accuracy in infarct-like acute myocarditis, whereas in chronic myocarditis sensitivity and specificity are less accurate. Therefore, a multisequential (at least two out of three parameters are positive) approach is recommended. The assessment of the value of newer, more quantitative MRI sequences, such as T1 and T2-mapping is still under investigation.

  14. MRI Conditional Pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, magnetic resonance [MR] imaging is an absolute contraindication for those with an implanted pacemaker.This represents a significant clinical problem as several studies have shown approximately 75% of patients with pacemakers will have an indication for an MRI scan. Patients over the age of 65 are twice as likely to require an MRI and 80% of pacemaker patients are over the age of 65. MR imaging is an important source of information for neurological disorders and several soft tissue abnormalities. Hence denying this important diagnostic modality for those with an implanted pacemaker and other cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIED] is a tremendous clinical problem both because of concerns about MRI signals interfering with the function of the pacemaker and the pacemaker in turn interfering with the MR images.

  15. MRI of oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, N.A., E-mail: ahmad77chinar@gmail.co [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India); Robbani, I.; Kosar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India)

    2011-02-15

    Oriental cholangiohepatitis (OCH) also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized by intrahepatic duct calculi, strictures, and recurrent infections. In turn cholangitis can result in multiple hepatic abscesses, further biliary strictures, and in severe cases, progressive hepatic parenchymal destruction, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and conventional T1-weighted (T1 W) and T2-weighted (T2 W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have been described in patients with OCH. MRCP findings include duct dilation, strictures, and calculi. MRCP can help to localize the diseased ducts and determine the severity of involvement. T1 and T2 W sequences reveal the parenchymal changes of atrophy, abscess formation, and portal hypertension in addition to calculi. Post-treatment changes are also well depicted using MRI. Comprehensive, non-invasive assessment is achieved by using conventional MRI and MRCP in OCH providing a roadmap for endoscopic or surgical management.

  16. Changes of smooth muscle contractile filaments in small bowel atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Gfrörer, Stefan; Fiegel, Henning; Ramachandran, Priya; Rolle, Udo; Metzger, Roman

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate morphological changes of intestinal smooth muscle contractile fibres in small bowel atresia patients. METHODS: Resected small bowel specimens from small bowel atresia patients (n = 12) were divided into three sections (proximal, atretic and distal). Standard histology hematoxylin-eosin staining and enzyme immunohistochemistry was performed to visualize smooth muscle contractile markers α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and desmin using conventional paraffin sections of the proxi...

  17. THE ROLE OF A COLONOSCOPY IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)

    OpenAIRE

    Davorin Dajčman

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal endoscopy provides details of the surface of the gastrointestinal tract, whichhas made it possible to examine it. Despite significant advances in our understanding andtreatment of inflammatory bowel disease, the role of gastrointestinal endoscopy in diagnosis, surveillance and therapy of inflammatory bowel disease patients is still controversal.Of course, endoscopy plays a key role in the management of inflammatory bowel disease.Indication for endoscopy in patie...

  18. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwani, N., E-mail: nsarwani@hmc.psu.ed [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Tappouni, R.; Tice, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  19. ARMA-based spectral bandwidth for evaluation of bowel motility by the analysis of bowel sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Takahiro; Shono, Koichi; Abeyratne, Udantha R; Okahisa, Toshiya; Yano, Hiromi; Akutagawa, Masatake; Konaka, Shinsuke; Kinouchi, Yohsuke

    2013-08-01

    Approximately 10%-20% of adults and adolescents suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) worldwide. IBS is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal dysfunction which may reflect in altered motility. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is made through expensive invasive radiographic and endoscopic examinations. However these are inconvenient and unsuited for community screening. Bowel sounds (BSs) can be easily recorded with non-invasive and low-cost equipment. Recently, several researchers have pointed out changes in features obtained from BS according to the pathological condition of bowel motility. However a widely accepted, simple automatic BS detection algorithm still has to be found, and the appropriate recording period needs to be investigated for further evaluation of bowel motility. In this study we propose a novel simple automatic method to detect the BSs based on the 3 dB bandwidth of the frequency peaks in the autoregressive moving average spectrum. We use the measure, sound-to-sound interval (SSI) obtained by the proposed method, to capture bowel motility. In this paper, we show that the proposed method for automatic detection could achieve a sensitivity of 87.8±5.88%, specificity of 91.7±4.33% and area under the curve of 0.923 when working on 16 healthy volunteers during mosapride administrations. Furthermore, we show that the measured SSI averaged over a period of 30 min can clearly capture bowel motility. Our findings should have the potential to contribute toward developing automated BS-based diagnosis of IBS.

  20. Identification of a Functional TPH1 Polymorphism Associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Bowel Habit Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasberger, Helmut; Chang, Lin; Shih, Wendy; Presson, Angela P.; Sayuk, Gregory S.; Newberry, Rodney D.; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Mayer, Emeran; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Alterations in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) signaling have been implicated as a factor contributing to the altered bowel habit of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) is the rate–limiting enzyme in enterochromaffin cell 5-HT biosynthesis. We hypothesized that genetic variants affecting TPH1 gene expression might alter intestinal 5-HT bioavailability and subsequently the propensity for distinct bowel habit subtypes in IBS. In this study, we assessed the only common TPH1 proximal promoter variant (-347C/A; rs7130929) and its association with bowel habit predominance in IBS. Methods Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed to assess whether the -347C/A allele variant affects the DNA-binding of nuclear factors. Genotype distribution was determined for 422 IBS patients subtyped using Rome III criteria and for 495 healthy controls recruited from two university medical centers. Association with bowel habit was tested using a multinomial logistic regression model controlling for race, anxiety, depression, and study site. Results Early growth response factor 1 (EGR-1) bound with higher affinity to a site comprising the minor A-allele of SNP -347C/A. TPH1 genotype frequencies did not differ between IBS patients and controls overall. The CC genotype was more prevalent in the IBS-D subtype (47%) than in the IBS-C (25%) and IBS-M (37%) subtypes (P=0.039) after adjusting for race and other covariates. Colonic biopsies from a small cohort of IBS patients from one center were tested for higher TPH1 mRNA expression in samples with CC compared to CA genotype, but the results did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The TPH1 promoter SNP -347C/A differentially binds EGR1, correlates with IBS bowel habit subtypes and possibly colonic TPH1 expression consistent with its role in modulating intestinal 5-HT signaling. PMID:24060757

  1. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wurnig, Moritz; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.Patak@patak.ch [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Clinic, Radiology, Witellikerstrasse 40, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments.

  2. Hypnotherapy for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, A N; Kukuruzovic, R H; Catto-Smith, A G; Sawyer, S M

    2007-10-17

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder of unknown aetiology. Current pharmacological treatments have limited value. Hypnotherapy has been reported to have beneficial effects for IBS symptoms. To evaluate the efficacy of hypnotherapy for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials and quasi-randomised clinical trials were identified through structured searches of MEDLINE (1966 to March 2006), EMBASE (1980 to March 2006), PsycINFO (1806 to March 2006), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, 1982 to March 2006), AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, 1985 to March 2006) and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials. Conference proceedings from Digestive Disease Week (1980 to 2005) were also searched. Eligible studies included all randomised and quasi-randomised clinical studies comparing hypnotherapy for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with no treatment or another therapeutic intervention. All studies were evaluated for eligibility for inclusion. Included studies were assessed for quality and data were extracted independently by four authors. The primary outcome measure of interest was the overall bowel symptom severity score which combines abdominal pain, diarrhoea or constipation and bloating. Secondary outcomes included abdominal pain, diarrhoea, constipation, bloating, quality of life, patient's overall assessment of well-being, psychological measures as per validated questionnaires, and adverse events. Four studies including a total of 147 patients met the inclusion criteria. Only one study compared hypnotherapy to an alternative therapy (psychotherapy and placebo pill), two studies compared hypnotherapy with waiting-list controls and the final study compared hypnotherapy to usual medical management. Data were not pooled for meta-analysis due to differences in outcome measures and study design. The therapeutic

  3. Primary Amyloidosis Presenting as Small Bowel Encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jones

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a pathological process which encompasses a spectrum of diseases that result from extracellular deposition of pathological fibrillar proteins. Clinical presentations vary depending on the organs involved. There is no documented case of amyloidosis presenting as small bowel encapsulation. A previously healthy 62-year-old man developed a small bowel obstruction in 1997. At surgery, a peculiar membrane encasing his entire small bowel was discovered. This appeared to have no vascularity and was removed without difficulty, exposing a grossly normal bowel. Histopathology revealed thick bands of collagen overlying the peritoneal surface, which was congo red positive and showed apple green birefringence. The findings were consistent with encapsulating peritonitis due to amyloidosis. There was no history or symptoms of any chronic inflammatory condition and he became symptom-free postoperatively. An abdominal fat pad biopsy failed to demonstrate amyloidosis. Endoscopic duodenal biopsies revealed classical primary amyloidosis. Quantitative immunoglobulins, lactate dehydrogenase, C3, C4 and beta-2 microglobulin were normal. Protein electrophoresis identified monoclonal paraprotein, immunoglobulin G lambda 3.7 g/L. Bone marrow biopsy and aspirate revealed only a mild plasmacytosis (5% to 10%. Echocardiogram and skeletal survey were normal. He had mild proteinuria. Complete blood count, C-reactive protein, calcium, albumin and total protein were normal. No specific therapy was instituted. In January of 1998 the patient remained asymptomatic with no gastrointestinal, cardiovascular or constitutional symptoms. He had developed nephrotic range proteinuria (3.95 g/24 h, microalbuminuria, hypoalbuminemia and a renal biopsy consistent with renal amyloidosis. In 1999 there was an increase in the monoclonal paraprotein (6.2 g/L. The remaining investigations were normal except for an echocardiogram which showed left ventricular hypertrophy but a normal

  4. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY IN ADHESIVE BOWEL OBSTRUCTION

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    Gerald Anand Raja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Peritoneal adhesions can be defined as abnormal fibrous bands between organs or tissues or both in the abdominal cavity that are normally separated. Adhesions may be acquired or congenital; however, most are acquired as a result of peritoneal injury, the most common cause of which is abdominopelvic surgery. Less commonly, adhesions may form as the result of inflammatory conditions, intraperitoneal infection or abdominal trauma. The extent of adhesion formation varies from one patient to another and is most dependent on the type and magnitude of surgery performed as well as whether any postoperative complications develop. Fortunately, most patients with adhesions do not experience any overt clinical symptoms. For others, adhesions may lead to any one of a host of problems and can be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study of 50 patients admitted in Government Royapettah Hospital with adhesive bowel obstruction between September 2008 to September 2010. All patients were admitted and managed either conservatively or surgically. RESULTS 1. Adhesive bowel disease is the most common cause for bowel obstruction followed by hernias. 2. Increased incidence is noted in females. 3. Increased incidence of adhesions was documented in gynaecological and colorectal surgeries. 4. Below umbilical incisions have higher propensity for adhesion formation. 5. Laparotomies done for infective aetiology have higher adhesion risks. 6. Most of adhesive obstructions can be managed conservatively. 7. Adhesiolysis preferably laparoscopic can be done. For gangrenous bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy done. 8. Given the above risk factors, adhesive bowel disease can be prevented to a certain extent. CONCLUSION The formation of peritoneal adhesions continues to plague patients, surgeons and society. Although, research in this area is ongoing, there is currently no method that is 100% effective in

  5. Small bowel diverticulitis: an imaging review of an uncommon entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transue, Darren L; Hanna, Tarek N; Shekhani, Haris; Rohatgi, Saurabh; Khosa, Faisal; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari

    2017-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the clinical and radiologic findings of small bowel diverticulosis, which is infrequently encountered during practice and far less common than colonic diverticulosis. Small bowel diverticulosis can present with a range of emergent symptomatic complications including diverticulitis, perforation, or hemorrhage. Here, we focus on the clinical features, pathogenesis, radiologic findings, and treatment of small bowel diverticulitis. Although not routinely considered in the differential diagnosis of an acute abdomen, prospective radiologic diagnosis of small bowel diverticulitis is important and can lead to conservative treatment thus preventing unnecessary exploratory laparotomy.

  6. Nonocclusive ischaemic bowel disease in patients on chronic haemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A.; Adler, O.B.; Loberant, N.; Rosenberger, A.; Weissman, I.

    1989-06-01

    Six patients with chronic renal failure on longstanding haemodialysis are presented, in whom nonocclusive bowel ischaemia occurred as a rare complication of their underlying disorder. Factors implicated in the development of bowel ischaemia in these patients are chronic constipation resulting in increased intraluminal pressure on the bowel wall, premature and progressive arterial disease and bouts of hypotension accompanying the haemodialysis procedure. Contrast studies of the bowel and computed tomography examination can suggest the diagnosis, but angiography alone provides the exact answer in demonstrating nonocclusive mesenteric ischaemia. In patients with chronic renal failure and longstanding dialysis presenting with abdominal symptoms this diagnosis should be considered. (orig.).

  7. Small bowel cancer diagnosis: role of nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Morotti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of small intestine tumors is challenging. Even in the era of modern medicine, standard approaches including echography, computed tomography-scan and conventional endoscopy are unable to reveal small bowel lesions. Video-capsule has substantially improved the evaluation of small bowel; however this procedure cannot be proposed to all patients and in particular to those experiencing intestine sub-occlusion. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of the abdomen is an additional diagnostic approach that offers high sensitivity in the identification of small bowel lesions. Here, we describe a case of small bowel neoplasia identified with NMR of the abdomen.

  8. Multi-detector CT (MDCT in bowel and mesenteric injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajjalla Ravikumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate multi-detector CT (MDCT findings in bowel and mesenteric injury due to blunt abdominal trauma.Method: Retrospective evaluation of MDCT scan reports of patients admitted in Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar with bowel and mesenteric injury during the period of January 2005 to April 2008.Results: MDCT, without using oral contrast, clearly demonstrated various specific and less specific findings of bowel and mesenteric injury.Conclusion: Multi-detector CT is an excellent diagnostic modality in bowel and mesenteric injury. Routine administration of oral contrast agent is not mandatory for initial evaluation of these patients.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  13. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems....... Minimizing image noise and maximizing system stability is critical in fMRI because the blood oxygenation level- dependent (BOLD) signal changes that are used for most fMRI studies represent only a small fraction of the total MR signal. In addition, multiple imaging volumes must be acquired over time to track...... cognitive processes. As a result, MRI scanners must have excellent time-series stability to accurately measure BOLD signal changes over the course of a long time series (typically on the order of 10 min per scan). fMRI studies are particularly demanding on the scanner hardware because they utilize fast...

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  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  12. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

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    ... Weight for Me? What Is an Intellectual Disability? Movie: Endocrine System Getting an MRI ... MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of the inside of the body. The test is painless. All you'll need ...

  13. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

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