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Sample records for bowel disease patients

  1. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been accurately established. Using single photon absorptiometry (SPA) and vertebral quantitative computerized tomography (QCT) the authors measured bone mineral content (BMC) in 75 unselected patients with IBD. Osteoporosis was present in 23 (31%). Seven had cortical and trabecular osteoporosis, 11 cortical only and five trabecular only. Three amenorrhoeic premenopausal females had clinically severe osteoporosis and a further 4 had vertebral crush fractures. The median lifetime steroid dose in osteoporotic patients was significantly greater than in patients with normal BMC; most patients with osteoporosis had small bowel IBD with one or more resections. Repeat QCT measurements in 18 patients after one year were unchanged in 12, increased in one and decreased between 10 and 37 mg/ml K2HPO4 in 5 of whom four were receiving steroids. Radial BMC decreased in one patient, increased in one and was unchanged in the remainder. Thus, osteoporosis was present in 30% of these patients, with severe clinical disease in three young females. Rapid spinal trabecular bone loss was demonstrated over the course of one year in some patients. Steroid therapy, amenorrhoe and small bowel IBD with resection appear to be important risk factors

  2. Small Bowel Imaging in Managing Crohn’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg G. Albert

    2012-01-01

    bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients.

  3. Steroid allergy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M

    2007-11-01

    Background: Contact allergy to a steroid enema leading to worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has recently been reported. This study was designed to look for evidence of steroid allergy in patients with IBD.

  4. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sinh, Preetika; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory b...

  5. Predictive factors of small bowel patency in Crohn's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Albuquerque

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patency capsule was developed to avoid small bowel video capsule endoscopy retention, namely in patients with Crohn's disease. Aims: To evaluate the predictive factors of small bowel patency in Crohn's disease patients. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis including 151 Crohn's disease patients submitted to patency capsule (Agile® Patency Capsule from 2011 to 2012. Patients that excreted the intact patency capsule were classified as having a patent small bowel (without patency capsule retention, other patients were considered to have negative patency of the small bowel (patency capsule retention. Results: Patients had a mean age of 41±14 years, 54% were female and 25% had been previously submitted to surgery. Stricturing disease was seen in 20% of cases and penetrating disease in 16% of cases. Left-sided colonic lesions and ileal strictures were observed at colonoscopy in 13% and 9% of patients, respectively. In our sample, 28% of patients had negative patency of the small bowel (patency capsule retention. In multivariate analysis, independent factors that were associated with negative patency of the small bowel in Crohn's disease patients were stricturing (OR 10.16, p < 0.001 and penetrating phenotypes (OR 11.73, p = 0.001, left-sided colonic lesions (OR 3.77, p = 0.038, ileal stricture (OR 9.76, p = 0.003; previous intestinal surgery was found to be protective (OR 0.16, p = 0.006. Conclusions: Stricturing or penetrating disease, ileal strictures, no previous surgery and left-sided colonic lesions were the factors associated with negative small bowel patency in Crohn's disease patients.

  6. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

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    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  7. Perceptions of medication safety among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Garret

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of medication safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients frequently require long-term treatment with potentially toxic medications. Techniques are employed to improve patient awareness of medication safety, but there are sparse data on their effectiveness.

  8. Nutrition in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebuterne, Xavier; Filippi, Jerome; Schneider, Stephane M

    2014-01-01

    Seventy five percent of hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease suffer from malnutrition. One third of Crohn's disease patients have a body mass index below 20. Sixty percent of Crohn's disease patients have sarcopenia. However some inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are obese or suffer from sarcopenic-obesity. IBD patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia, which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as metabolic disturbances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases. PMID:25266810

  9. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Da...

  10. Experiences of healing therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soundy, Andrew; Lee, Rhonda T.; Kingstone, Tom; Singh, Sukhdev; Pankaj R Shah; Roberts, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Background The use and value of different complementary therapies requires investigation. In particular, qualitative research is required to understand the perceptions and experiences of patients who undergo healing therapy as one type of complementary therapy. The aim of this research is to consider patients perceptions and experiences following a course of healing therapy. Methods Twenty two patients took part in this study. This included 13 patients with irritable bowel disease (3 male, 10...

  11. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cury DB

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dídia Bismara Cury,1,2 Alan C Moss,2 Nestor Schor3 1Scope Clinic, Campo Grande, Brazil; 2Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods: Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results: Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both. Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3 disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1 or colonic (L2 disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7. Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02. Conclusion: In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. Keywords: clinical activity indices, Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, nephrolithiasis, ulcerative colitis

  12. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in the pregnant patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flavio M Habal; Nikila C Ravindran

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disorder affecting young adults in their reproductive years.Many young women with IBD express concern about the effect their disease will have on fertility,pregnancy course and fetal development This article presents an approach to management of IBD in the pregnant patient,including counseling and investigation,and summarizes existing data on the safety of medications used to treat IBD in pregnancy and breastfeeding.

  13. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  14. Clostridium difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Czepiel, Jacek; Biesiada, Grażyna; Perucki, William; Mach, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium widely distributed in the human environment. In the last decade the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection has grown, particularly in Europe and North America, making it one of the more common nosocomial infections. A group particularly susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection are patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with involvement of the colon. This paper presents relevant data on Clostridium difficile infe...

  15. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most import...

  16. Prevalence of cholelithiasis in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang Kratzer; Mark M Haenle; Richard A Mason; Christian von Tirpitz; Volker Kaechele

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD) specific risk factors for cholecystolithiasis,as duration and involvement pattern of the disease and prior surgery in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS: A total of 222 patients with CD (135 females,87 males; average age, 35.8±11.8 years; range 17-81 years)and 88 patients with UC (39 females, 49 males; average age, 37.2±13.6 years; range 16-81 years) underwent clinical and ultrasound examinations. Besides age, sex and degree of obesity, patients' CIBD specific parameters, including duration and extent of disease and prior operations were documented and evaluated statistically using logistic regression.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of gallbladder stone disease in patients with CD was 13% (n = 30). Only age could be shown to be an independent risk factor (P = 0.014).Compared to a collective representative for the general population in the same geographic region, the prevalence of cholecystolithiasis was higher in all corresponding age groups. Patients with UC showed an overall prevalence of gallbladder stone disease of only 4.6%.CONCLUSION:Only age but not disease-specific factors such as duration and extent of disease, and prior surgery are independent risk factors for the development of cholecystolithiasis in patients with CIBD.

  17. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism and arterial cardiovascular events in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    This focused review describes the current knowledge of the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and as well as venous thromboembolism this disease shares inflammatory mechanisms with IBD. Patients...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  19. Risk factors for osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carla; Andrade; Lima; Andre; Castro; Lyra; Raquel; Rocha; Genoile; Oliveira; Santana

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) patients exhibit higher risk for bone loss than the general population. The chronic inflammation causes a reduction in bone mineral density(BMD), which leads to osteopenia and osteoporosis. This article reviewed each risk factor for osteoporosis in IBD patients. Inflammation is one of the factors that contribute to osteoporosis in IBD patients, and the main system that is involved in bone loss is likely RANK/RANKL/osteoprotegerin. Smoking is a risk factor for bone loss and fractures, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain this loss. Body composition also interferes in bone metabolism and increasing muscle mass may positively affect BMD. IBD patients frequently use corticosteroids, which stimulates osteoclastogenesis. IBD patients are also associated with vitamin D deficiency, which contributes to bone loss. However, infliximab therapy is associated with improvements in bone metabolism, but it is not clear whether the effects are because of inflammation improvement or infliximab use. Ulcerative colitis patients with proctocolectomy and ileal pouches and Crohn’s disease patients with ostomy are also at risk for bone loss, and these patients should be closely monitored.

  20. Social Media Use in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling; Reich, Jason; Groshek, Jacob; Farraye, Francis A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have been more keen to utilize the Internet and in particular, social media to obtain patient educational information in recent years. It is important for the gastroenterologist to be aware of these modalities and how they might affect information exchange and ultimately, disease management. This article addresses the current prevalence of social media use, advent of mobile health applications, social media usage in patients with chronic conditions, usage amongst providers, and most notably, the usage and preferences in IBD patients. Over the last decade there has been an increasing desire from patients to receive educational material about their disease through social media. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of IBD-related information on social media. Given the disparity of information available on the Internet, we remark on the quality of this information and stress the need for further research to assess the validity of IBD information posted on social media. PMID:26894839

  1. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P bowel length ≤230 cm are risk factors affecting the poor nutritional status of patients with Crohn disease after small bowel resection. PMID:27472702

  2. The Bowel Microbiota and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald W. Tannock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The human bowel contains a large and biodiverse bacterial community known as the microbiota or microbiome. It seems likely that the microbiota, fractions of the microbiota, or specific species comprising the microbiota provide the antigenic fuel that drives the chronic immune inflammation of the bowel mucosa that is characteristic of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. At least twenty years of microbiological research have been expended on analysis of the composition of the bowel microbiota of inflammatory bowel disease patients in comparison to that of control subjects. Despite extensive speculations about the aetiological role of dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases, knowledge that can be easily translated into effective remedies for patients has not eventuated. The causes of this failure may be due to poorly defined and executed bacteriological studies, as well as the overwhelming complexity of a biome that contains hundreds of bacterial species and trillions of bacterial cells.

  3. Prevalence and Incidence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Organisms among Hospitalized Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Vaisman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD experience frequent hospitalizations and use of immunosuppressive medications, which may predispose them to colonization with antimicrobial-resistant organisms (ARO.

  4. Systematic review: influenza A (H1N1) virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Infection with influenza A (H1N1)v (swine flu) has caused widespread anxiety, among patients who are potentially immunocompromised, such as those being treated for inflammatory bowel disease. Aims: Provide guidance for physicians and their patients on the risk, prevention and management of influenza A (H1N1)v infection. Methods: Medline was searched using the following key words: `swine flu?, `immunosuppression?, inflammatory bowel disease?, `recommendati...

  5. Risk of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease among offspring of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, Marianne; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    ) and Crohn's disease (CD) among first-degree relatives of patients with these diseases. To give more precise risk estimates we conducted a nationwide study using population-based data from the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP). METHODS: All patients from the entire Danish population (5......OBJECTIVE: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) varies among and within countries, but several studies have indicated that genetic factors may play an important role in the etiology of IBD. A Danish regional study has observed an almost 10-fold increased risk for ulcerative colitis (UC...

  6. Treatment of the Pregnant Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Rachel; Nørgård, Bente M; Friedman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    and on the rates of pregnancy loss and ectopic pregnancies. We do not know how to reliably measure disease activity during pregnancy or the effect of pregnancy on the microbiome. Although immunomodulators and anti-tumor necrosis factor medications are relatively safe during pregnancy, the long......Research regarding fertility, medication safety, and pregnancy outcomes is increasing, but there are still many knowledge gaps in these areas. Women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may have decreased fertility because of voluntary childlessness and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD......) surgery, and women with Crohn's disease may also have decreased ovarian reserve. Initial studies show that in vitro fertilization is a viable option, and laparoscopic ileoanal pouch anastomosis surgery improves fertility rates. Additional research is needed on the effect of disease activity on fertility...

  7. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery. (author)

  8. Age at diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease influences early development of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease patients: A nationwide, long-term survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Baars (Judith); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. van Haastert (M.); J.J. Nicolai (Jan); A.C. Poen (Alexander); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data on clinical characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related colorectal cancer (CRC) are scarce and mainly originate from tertiary referral centres. We studied patient and disease characteristics of IBD-related CRC in a nationwide IBD cohort in g

  9. Self-reported disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease largely determined by disease activity and illness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A; van der Valk, Mirthe E; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Clemens, Cees H M; Jansen, Jeroen M; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direc

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Skin Cancer: An Assessment of Patient Risk Factors, Knowledge, and Skin Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmel, Jessica N.; Taft, Tiffany H.; Laurie Keefer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk from skin cancer. Aims include assessing IBD patients' risk factors and knowledge of skin cancer and current skin protection practices to identify gaps in patient education regarding skin cancer prevention in IBD. Methods. IBD patients ≥ 18 years were recruited to complete an online survey. Results. 164 patients (mean age 43.5 years, 63% female) with IBD (67% Crohn's disease, 31% ulcerative colitis, and 2% indeter...

  11. Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenfield, C.; Aguilar Ramirez, J R; Pounder, R E; Williams, T.; Danvers, M; Marper, S R; Noone, P

    1983-01-01

    Stools from 109 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (13.4%) contained Clostridium difficile or its toxin, an incidence similar to the stools of 99 control patients with diarrhoea (11.9%), but significantly higher than the stools of 77 control patients with a normal bowel habit (1.4%). Sixty-six per cent of the diarrhoea controls, but only 11% of the inflammatory bowel disease patients, reported recent antibiotic use: however, 67% of inflammatory bowel disease patients were taking sulphas...

  12. Fat halo sign in the bowel wall of patients with Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence and localization of the deposition of submucosal fat, the 'fat halo sign' (FHS), using computed tomography (CT) in the bowel wall of patients with Crohn's Disease, and to assess its relation to the duration of the disease. Materials and methods: The abdominal CT examinations of 100 consecutive patients were reviewed for the presence of the FHS in the bowel wall. A measurement of less than -10 HU was regarded as indicative of fat. CT findings were correlated with the duration of the disease and statistically tested by simple regression analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: group A included 26 patients with a disease duration of less than 1 year and group B included 73 with a longer disease duration. In one patient disease duration was unknown. To test the relationship between disease duration and FHS the cumulative number of FHS positive and negative patients was plotted against disease duration. Results: The FHS was present in 17 of the 100 patients in 20 bowel segments, mainly in the ileum (10) and the ascending colon (8). The FHS was present in 3.8% in group A and in 21.9% in group B (p < 0.0375). Conclusion: The FHS was present in 17% of patients with CD. Its location was mainly in the terminal ileum and ascending colon, typical sites of the disease. Its prevalence was significantly duration dependent

  13. Ferric carboxymaltose prevents recurrence of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evstatiev, Rayko; Alexeeva, Olga; Bokemeyer, Bernd;

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common systemic complication of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Iron-deficiency anemia recurs frequently and rapidly after iron-replacement therapy in patients with IBD. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if administration...... of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) prevents anemia in patients with IBD and low levels of serum ferritin....

  14. Family planning and inflammatory bowel disease: the patient and the practitioner.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Desmond

    2013-02-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are commonly in their child-bearing years. Maintainance medication, as recommended by international guidelines, is an emotive topic and an anxiety source. This study measures the awareness of patients and primary practitioners of the issues involved.

  15. Usefulness of Measuring Serum Procalcitonin Levels in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Sook Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The relationships between serum procalcitonin, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and intestinal Behçet’s disease (BD) have not been completely determined. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of measuring serum procalcitonin levels to assess disease activity and infection stage in patients with IBD and intestinal BD. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 129 patients with IBD and intestinal BD for whom serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were...

  16. Small bowel neoplasia in coeliac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rampertab, S D; Forde, K A; Green, P. H. R.

    2003-01-01

    There is an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with coeliac disease compared with the normal population. It has been suggested that adenocarcinoma of the small intestine in coeliac disease arises through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but there has been only one reported case of a small bowel adenoma in a patient with coeliac disease. We report three additional cases of a small bowel adenoma in the setting of coeliac disease. In addition, four cases of small bowel adenoca...

  17. Critical Situations in Daily Life as Experienced by Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hjortswang, Henrik; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2016-01-01

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result "The bowels rule life." The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career. PMID:26870902

  18. Bowel wall thickening in patients with Crohn's disease: CT patterns and correlation with inflammatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To assess CT patterns of bowel wall thickening in patients with Crohn's disease and to correlate these patterns with inflammatory activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 58 helical abdominal CT scans of 53 patients with pathologically proven Crohn's disease. CT patterns of thickened bowel wall were divided into four types based on patterns of mural stratification and enhancement: type A, multilayered mural stratification; type B, two layers with strong mucosal enhancement and prominent low-density submucosa; type C, two layers without strong mucosal enhancement; and type D, homogeneous enhancement. We evaluated CT findings of the bowel and adjacent structures. We also reviewed pathologic features and clinical data to determine inflammatory activity. RESULTS: Fifty-five (95%) of 58 CT examinations showed bowel wall thickening. Of these 55 CT scans, type A pattern was found in 33 (60%), type B in 10 (18%), type C in five (9%), and type D in seven (13%). CT scans with type A showed significantly more wall thickening than those with either type C or type D. Histology revealed 43 cases with active disease and 12 with quiescent appearance. Thirty of 33 CT scans with type A and all 10 with type B were classified as acute disease, and three of five with type C and six of seven with type D as quiescent. CONCLUSION: In patients with Crohn's disease, CT patterns of bowel wall thickening correlated with inflammatory activity. Thickened bowel wall with layering enhancement is predictive of acute disease, and that of homogeneous enhancement suggests quiescence. Choi, D., et al. (2003)Clinical Radiology,58, 68--74

  19. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes Crohn's disease in some inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Saleh A; Sagramsingh, Sudesh R; Naser, Abed S; Thanigachalam, Saisathya

    2014-06-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition that plagues millions all over the world. This debilitating bowel disease can start in early childhood and continue into late adulthood. Signs and symptoms are usually many and multiple tests are often required for the diagnosis and confirmation of this disease. However, little is still understood about the cause(s) of CD. As a result, several theories have been proposed over the years. One theory in particular is that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is intimately linked to the etiology of CD. This fastidious bacterium also known to cause Johne's disease in cattle has infected the intestines of animals for years. It is believed that due to the thick, waxy cell wall of MAP it is able to survive the process of pasteurization as well as chemical processes seen in irrigation purification systems. Subsequently meat, dairy products and water serve as key vehicles in the transmission of MAP infection to humans (from farm to fork) who have a genetic predisposition, thus leading to the development of CD. The challenges faced in culturing this bacterium from CD are many. Examples include its extreme slow growth, lack of cell wall, low abundance, and its mycobactin dependency. In this review article, data from 60 studies showing the detection and isolation of MAP by PCR and culture techniques have been reviewed. Although this review may not be 100% comprehensive of all studies, clearly the majority of the studies overwhelmingly and definitively support the role of MAP in at least 30%-50% of CD patients. It is very possible that lack of detection of MAP from some CD patients may be due to the absence of MAP role in these patients. The latter statement is conditional on utilization of methodology appropriate for detection of human MAP strains. Ultimately, stratification of CD and inflammatory bowel disease patients for the presence or absence of MAP is necessary for appropriate and effective

  20. Immunoscintigraphy with 99Tc-labelled monoclonal anti granulocyte antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigranulocyte immunoscintigraphy with 99Tc-labelled monoclonal antigranolocyte antibodies (MAb BW 250/83, Granulozyt) was carried out in ten patients with symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease to exclude or confirm the presence of an inflammatory process. A slow iv infusion of 740 MBq of the antibodies was performed 40 minutes after labelling. A whole-body scan was done at hours 4 and 24 post injection. In four patients planar scintigraphy of abdominal region only was also performed for better visualization of the pathological findings. Immunoscintigraphy provided evidence of an inflammatory bowel process in 8 cases (true positive), and excluded the diagnosis in one case (true negative). There was one false negative result.The study shows that immunoscintigraphy with 99Tc-labelled antibodies (Granulozyt) is an easily performed procedure, with high specificity for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and can be carried out as a routine practice in nuclear medicine. 7 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs. (author)

  1. Effects of Formal Education for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Barbara M; Jensen, Louise; Richard N Fedorak

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suffer physical dysfunction and impaired quality of life (QOL), and need frequent health care. They often lack knowledge about their disease and desire more education. Educational interventions for other chronic diseases have demonstrated reduced health care use and increased knowledge, medication adherence and QOL.METHOD: Sixty-nine participants were randomly assigned to formal IBD education and standard of care (pamphlets and ad hoc...

  2. Cogan's Syndrome in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease - A Case Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Greuter, Thomas; Scharl, Michael; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Shitrit, Ariella B; Filip, Rafal; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Thoeringer, Christoph K; Boldys, Hubert; Wewer, Anne V; Yanai, Henit; Flores, Cristina; Schmidt, Carsten; Kariv, Revital; Rogler, Gerhard; Rahier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cogan's syndrome (CSy) is a very rare autoimmune disorder, mainly affecting the inner ear and the eye, and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This was a European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) retrospective observational study, performed as part of...... the CONFER project. A call to all ECCO members was made to report concomitant CSy and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cases. Clinical data were recorded in a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: This international case series reports on 22 concomitant CSy-IBD cases from 14 large medical centres. Mean...... duration of IBD until diagnosis of CSy was 8.7 years (range 0.0-38.0) and mean age at CSy diagnosis was 44.6 years (range 9.0-67.0). Six patients had underlying ulcerative colitis (UC) and 16 had Crohn's disease. Eleven patients (50%) had active disease at CSy diagnosis. Sixteen patients were under IBD...

  3. Comparison of three commercial fecal calprotectin ELISA test kits used in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Bachmann Holmetoft, Ulla; Ingdam Halkjær, Sofie;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fecal calprotectin is a noninvasive marker of intestinal inflammation used to distinguish between functional and organic bowel diseases and to evaluate disease activity among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The goal of this study was to compare three different ELISA tests...... measuring calprotectin in their accuracy to detect IBD and to distinguish between IBD patients with active or inactive disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study includes in total 148 fecal samples, 96 from patients with a previously confirmed IBD diagnosis and 52 from healthy controls, aged from 25 to 86...... tests (EK-CAL, CALPRO and HK325) were performed on fecal specimens and results compared. RESULTS: The CALPRO calprotectin ELISA test was shown to have the best specificity of 96% compared to the HK325 and the EK-CAL calprotectin ELISA tests with 28% specificity and 74% specificity, respectively. A...

  4. Lost in Translation: Helping patients understand the risks of inflammatory bowel disease therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Corey A.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are commonly treated with immunomodulators and biologic therapy. These treatments can be very effective, but are associated with risks of adverse events that need to be discussed with patients. Effectively communicating risks of therapy can be challenging based on time constraints, misinformation available on the Internet and from others, and the lack of tools to efficiently share accurate data with patients and their families. Providers need to acknow...

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after...

  6. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... fructose caused marked abdominal distress in patients with demonstrable malabsorption. Ingestion of sucrose in these patients gave less pronounced symptoms of abdominal distress. Malabsorption of a 5-g dose of sorbitol could be detected in 8 of 13 patients. Mixtures of 25 g of fructose and 5 g of sorbitol...... caused significantly increased abdominal distress, and more than additive malabsorption was found in several cases. The present study shows that pronounced gastrointestinal distress may be provoked by malabsorption of small amounts of fructose, sorbitol, and fructose-sorbitol mixtures in patients with...

  7. Genomic and Clinical Effects Associated with a Relaxation Response Mind-Body Intervention in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Braden; Bhasin, Manoj; Jacquart, Jolene; Scult, Matthew A.; Slipp, Lauren; Riklin, Eric Isaac Kagan; Lepoutre, Veronique; Comosa, Nicole; Norton, Beth-Ann; Dassatti, Allison; Rosenblum, Jessica; Thurler, Andrea H.; Surjanhata, Brian C.; Hasheminejad, Nicole N.; Kagan, Leslee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can profoundly affect quality of life and are influenced by stress and resiliency. The impact of mind-body interventions (MBIs) on IBS and IBD patients has not previously been examined. Methods: Nineteen IBS and 29 IBD patients were enrolled in a 9-week relaxation response based mind-body group intervention (RR-MBI), focusing on elicitation of the RR and cognitive skill building. Symptom questionnaires and infla...

  8. Quantification of disease activity in patients undergoing leucocyte scintigraphy for suspected inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body gamma camera counting is an alternative to faecal 111In collection for quantifying disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but requires administration of imaging activities of 111In. The aim of this study was to explore a dedicated whole-body counter which requires 20-fold less activity than gamma camera counting. Thirty patients with known or suspected IBD received 99mTc-granulocytes (∝200 MBq) and 111In-granulocytes (∝0.5 MBq). The 99mTc-cells were injected 45 min after the 111In-cells and immediately after a baseline 111In whole-body count. The decay-corrected count at 120 h was expressed as a fraction of baseline to give whole-body 111In retention (WBR). One patient was excluded as the injected cells were non-viable. Median 45-min intravascular 111In recovery was 35% in patients compared with 43% in six normal volunteers (p99mTc imaging from 87% to 96%. Only one of 11 patients with negative imaging had WBR 90%. There was a significant association between WBR and 99mTc image grade (Rs=0.73, ps=0.54, p>0.05). Dedicated whole-body counting is able to quantify disease activity in IBD but may give normal values in active CD. (orig.)

  9. Insufficient Knowledge of Korean Gastroenterologists Regarding the Vaccination of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Park, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims There is an increased risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to develop infections due to the use of immunomodulators and biologics. Several infections are preventable by immunizations. This study investigated the knowledge and awareness of Korean gastroenterologists regarding the vaccination of patients with IBD. Methods A self-reported questionnaire was sent by e-mail to the faculty members of tertiary hospitals. Gastroenterologists were asked ten questions regar...

  10. Idiopathic portal hypertension regarding thiopurine treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Suárez-Ferrer; Elba Llop-Herrera; Marta Calvo-Moya; María Isabel Vera-Mendoza; Irene González-Partida; Yago González-Lama; Virginia Matallana-Royo; José Luis Calleja-Panero; Luis Abreu-García

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The possibility of developing idiopathic portal hypertension has been described with thiopurine treatment despite compromises the prognosis of these patients, the fact its true prevalence is unknown. Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients followed at our unit, to determine the prevalence of diagnosis of idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) and its relationship with thiopurine treatment. Results: At the...

  11. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard A Awad

    2011-01-01

    Exciting new features have been described concerning neurogenic bowel dysfunction, including interactions between the central nervous system, the enteric nervous system, axonal injury, neuronal loss, neurotransmission of noxious and non-noxious stimuli, and the fields of gastroenterology and neurology. Patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease present with serious upper and lower bowel dysfunctions characterized by constipation, incontinence, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction and altered visceral sensitivity. Spinal cord injury is associated with severe autonomic dysfunction, and bowel dysfunction is a major physical and psychological burden for these patients. An adult myelomeningocele patient commonly has multiple problems reflecting the multisystemic nature of the disease. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system can lead to permanent neurological damage and clinical disability. Parkinson's disease is a multisystem disorder involving dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems, characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. Recent reports have shown that the lesions in the enteric nervous system occur in very early stages of the disease, even before the involvement of the central nervous system. This has led to the postulation that the enteric nervous system could be critical in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, as it could represent the point of entry for a putative environmental factor to initiate the pathological process. This review covers the data related to the etiology, epidemiology, clinical expression, pathophysiology, genetic aspects, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction, visceral sensitivity, management, prevention and prognosis of neurogenic bowel

  12. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel; Nielsen, Bent Windelborg

    1990-01-01

    macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... histamine per sample at anti-IgG4 challenge; however, the corresponding basophils did not respond to anti-IgG4. In addition, the anti-IgG4 mediated histamine release was primarily confined to patients with inflammatory bowel disease. This study substantiates previous histopathological findings that mast...... cells may play a functional role in the inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel diseases and provides evidence for a possible role of subclass IgG4 as a reaginic antibody....

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor causing small bowel intussusception in a patient with Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George E Theodoropoulos; Dimitrios Linardoutsos; Dimitrios Tsamis; Paraskevas Stamopoulos; Dimitrios Giannopoulos; Flora Zagouri; Nikolaos V Michalopoulos

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of jejunoileal intussusception in a 42-year-old patient with Crohn's disease caused by a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient complained of vague diffuse abdominal pain for a period of 4 mo. Intussusception was suspected at computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Segmental resection of the small intestine was performed. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor as well as aphthous ulcerations and areas of inflammation, which were characteristic of Crohn's disease. This is the first report of small bowel intussusception due to a gastrointestinal stromal tumor coexisting with Crohn's disease.

  14. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jingjing Wang; Qiaozhen Guo; Jianping Zhao; Mei Liu; Guangquan Liao; Nianjun Chen; Dean Tian; Xiaoli Wu

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overal...

  15. Low fecal calprotectin predicts sustained clinical remission in inflammatory bowel disease patients : a plea for deep remission

    OpenAIRE

    Mooiweer, Erik; Severs, Mirjam; Marguerite E I Schipper; Fidder, Herma H; Siersema, Peter D; Laheij, Robert J F; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal healing has become the treatment goal in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Whether low fecal calprotectin levels and histological healing combined with mucosal healing is associated with a further reduced risk of relapses is unknown. METHODS: Patients with CD, UC or inflammatory bowel disease-unclassified (IBD-U) scheduled for surveillance colonoscopy collected a stool sample prior to bowel cleansing. Only patients with mucosal healin...

  16. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn's disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A(+)B(+) strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  17. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Review of Patient-Targeted Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Jason K; Lee, Dale; Lewis, James

    2013-01-01

    Patients have strong beliefs about the role of diet in the cause of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in exacerbating or alleviating ongoing symptoms from IBD. The rapid increase in the incidence and prevalence of IBD in the past several decades strongly suggests an environmental trigger for IBD, one of which may be dietary patterns. There are several pathways where diet may influence intestinal inflammation such as direct dietary antigens, altering the gut microbiome, and affecting gastro...

  18. Treatment Adherence in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Perceptions from Adolescent Patients and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, in...

  19. The Biopsychosocial Model of Treatment the Patients with Inflammatory Chronic Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rakovec-Felser, Zlatka

    2011-01-01

    We present the organised psychological group interventions for persons with inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerose colitis, Morbus Crohn). The actual bio-psychosocial model of health and illness is used to explain the situation of chronically ill patient as stressful life position and their ways of coping with such, health-related problems. Considering that numerous psychological factors can lead to insufficient illness adaptation and (non) adherence to treatment – and all those – t...

  20. Self-reported Disability in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Largely Determined by Disease Activity and Illness Perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H.; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A.; van der Valk, Mirthe E.; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Background:The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direct

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of three different MRI protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Munkholm, Pia;

    2015-01-01

    MRE within seven days. For the evaluation, the bowel was divided into nine segments. One radiologist, blinded to clinical findings, evaluated bowel wall thickness, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), mural hyperenhancement, and other inflammatory changes in each bowel segment. RESULTS: Twenty patients...

  2. Association of celiac disease genes with inflammatory bowel disease in Finnish and Swedish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, A S; Lappalainen, M; Paavola-Sakki, P; Halme, L; Färkkilä, M; Turunen, U; Kontula, K; Aromaa, A; Salomaa, V; Peltonen, L; Halfvarson, J; Törkvist, L; D'Amato, M; Saavalainen, P; Einarsdottir, E

    2012-09-01

    Some genetic loci may affect susceptibility to multiple immune system-related diseases. In the current study, we investigated whether the known susceptibility loci for celiac disease (CelD) also associate with Crohn's disease (CD) and/or ulcerative colitis (UC), the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in Finnish patients. A total of 45 genetic markers were genotyped in a Finnish data set comprising 699 IBD patients and 2482 controls. Single-marker association with IBD and its subphenotypes was tested. A meta-analysis with a Swedish UC data set was also performed. A total of 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with CD and/or UC (PELMO1 (P=0.0002, odds ratio (OR): 2.20) and rs2298428-UBE2L3 (P=5.44 × 10(-5), OR: 2.59) associated with pediatric UC and CD, respectively. In the meta-analysis, rs4819388-ICOSLG (P=0.00042, OR: 0.79) associated with UC. In the subphenotype meta-analysis, rs1738074-TAGAP (P=7.40 × 10(-5), OR: 0.61), rs6974491-ELMO1 (P=0.00052, OR: 1.73) and rs4819388-ICOSLG (P=0.00019, OR: 0.75) associated with familial UC, pediatric UC and sporadic UC, respectively. Multiple CelD risk loci also confer susceptibility for CD and/or UC in the Finnish and Swedish populations. Certain genetic risk variants may furthermore predispose an individual for developing a particular disease phenotype. PMID:22592522

  3. Identification of a macro-alkaline phosphatase complex in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Malcolm P; Rawson, Catherine; Lawrence, David; Raney, Barbara S; Jaundrill, Linnet; Miller, Lorna A; Murtinho-Braga, Joseph; Kearney, Edward M

    2012-07-01

    We report the rare finding of a macro-alkaline phosphatase (macroALP) complex in a patient with a previously unexplained raised alkaline phosphatase activity. The clinical symptoms were persistent, daily diarrhoea for two months with blood in the stool. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, specifically ulcerative colitis, following a rectal biopsy and colonoscopy. Two cases of macroALP associated with ulcerative colitis have been reported before, suggesting there could be an increased prevalence of macroALP in these patients. PMID:22454544

  4. Risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with cronic inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are few epidemiologic data about the risk of acute pancreatitis in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases; we therefore wanted to estimate the risk of a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in the total Danish population. METHODS......: The study included all patients discharged from Danish hospitals with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis registered in the Danish National Registry of Patients in the period from 1977 to 1992. The first episode of acute pancreatitis was identified in the cohort. The observed number...... of patients with acute pancreatitis was compared with expected numbers on the basis of age, sex, and calendar-specific incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: Overall, 15,526 patients were discharged and followed up for 112,824 person-years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for...

  5. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disac...

  6. Mucosa-associated Faecalibacterium prausnitzii phylotype richness is reduced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Siles, Mireia; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Abellà, Carles; Busquets, David; Sabat-Mir, Miriam; Duncan, Sylvia H; Aldeguer, Xavier; Flint, Harry J; Garcia-Gil, L Jesús

    2015-11-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii depletion in intestinal diseases has been extensively reported, but little is known about intraspecies variability. This work aims to determine if subjects with gastrointestinal disease host mucosa-associated F. prausnitzii populations different from those hosted by healthy individuals. A new species-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method targeting the 16S rRNA gene was developed to fingerprint F. prausnitzii populations in biopsy specimens from 31 healthy control (H) subjects and 36 Crohn's disease (CD), 23 ulcerative colitis (UC), 6 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and 22 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The richness of F. prausnitzii subtypes was lower in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients than in H subjects. The most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs) consisted of four phylotypes (OTUs with a 99% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity [OTU99]), which were shared by all groups of patients. Their distribution and the presence of some disease-specific F. prausnitzii phylotypes allowed us to differentiate the populations in IBD and CRC patients from that in H subjects. At the level of a minimum similarity of 97% (OTU97), two phylogroups accounted for 98% of the sequences. Phylogroup I was found in 87% of H subjects but in under 50% of IBD patients (P = 0.003). In contrast, phylogroup II was detected in >75% of IBD patients and in only 52% of H subjects (P = 0.005). This study reveals that even though the main members of the F. prausnitzii population are present in both H subjects and individuals with gut diseases, richness is reduced in the latter and an altered phylotype distribution exists between diseases. This approach may serve as a basis for addressing the suitability of F. prausnitzii phylotypes to be quantified as a putative biomarker of disease and depicting the importance of the loss of these subtypes in disease pathogenesis. PMID:26296733

  7. Does pregnancy change the disease course? A study in a European cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, L; Vind, Ida; Politi, P; Wolters, F; Vermeire, S; Tsianos, E; Freitas, J; Mouzas, I; Ruiz Ochoa, V; O'Morain, C; Odes, S; Binder, V; Moum, B; Stockbrugger, R; Langholz, E; Munkholm, P; European Collaborative study group on Inflammatory Bowel disease, NN

    2006-01-01

    %, p = 0.005), whereas elective abortion was not significantly different. 48.6% of the patients took medication at the time of conception and 46.9% during pregnancy. The use of cesarean section increased after IBD diagnosis (8.1% vs 28.7% of pregnancies). CD patients pregnant during the disease course......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often affects patients in their fertile age. The aim of this study was to describe pregnancy outcome in a European cohort of IBD patients. As data are limited regarding the effect of pregnancy on disease course, our second objective was to...... investigate whether pregnancy influences disease course and phenotype in IBD patients. METHODS: In a European cohort of IBD patients, a 10-yr follow-up was performed by scrutinizing patient files and approaching the patients with a questionnaire. The cohort comprised 1,125 patients, of whom 543 were women...

  8. Comparative genomics of Escherichia coli isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Petersen, Andreas M; Krogfelt, Karen; Klemm, Per

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe a state of idiopathic, chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The two main phenotypes of IBD are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The major cause of IBD-associated mortality is colorectal cancer. Although both host......-genetic and exogenous factors have been found to be involved, the aetiology of IBD is still not well understood. In this study we characterized thirteen Escherichia coli strains from patients with IBD by comparative genomic hybridization employing a microarray based on 31 sequenced E. coli genomes from a wide...

  9. Health care and patients' education in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Vegh, Z; Pedersen, N;

    2014-01-01

    care and education of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A quality of care (QoC) questionnaire was developed in the EpiCom group consisting of 16 questions covering 5 items: time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, information, education, empathy and access to...... was the Internet (92% vs. 88% p=0.23). In Western Europe, significantly more patients were educated by nurses (19% vs. 1%, p<0.05), while in Eastern Europe, gastroenterologists were easier to contact (80% vs. 68%, p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Health care differed significantly between Eastern and Western...

  10. Abdominal MRI without Enteral Contrast Accurately Detects Intestinal Fibrostenosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy G; Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego; Dhere, Tanvi; Perez, Sebastian D; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K

    2015-11-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting for surgical evaluation require thorough small bowel surveillance as it improves accuracy of diagnosis (ulcerative colitis versus Crohn's) and differentiates those who may respond to nonoperative therapy, preserving bowel length. MRI has not been validated conclusively against histopathology in IBD. Most protocols require enteral contrast. This study aimed to 1) evaluate the accuracy of MRI for inflammation, fibrosis, and extraluminal complications and 2) compare MRI without enteral contrast to standard magnetic resonance enterography. Adults with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis who underwent abdominal MRI and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Of 65 patients evaluated, 55 met inclusion criteria. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for disease involvement localized by segment were 93 per cent (95% confidence interval = 89.4-95.0) and 95 per cent (95% confidence interval = 92.3-97.0), respectively (positive predictive value was 86%, negative predictive value was 98%). Sensitivity and specificity between MRI with and without oral and rectal contrast were similar (96% vs 91% and 99% vs 94%, P > 0.10). As were positive predictive value and negative predictive value (85% vs 96%, P = 0.16; 97% vs 99%, P = 0.42). Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive and specific for localized disease involvement and extraluminal abdominal sequelae of IBD. It accurately differentiates patients who have chronic transmural (fibrotic) disease and thus may require an operation from those with acute inflammation, whose symptoms may improve with aggressive medical therapy alone. MRI without contrast had comparable diagnostic yield to standard magnetic resonance enterography. PMID:26672581

  11. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Fornasa; Chiara Benassuti; Luca Benazzato

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD). Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged prese...

  12. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  13. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain. (orig.)

  14. Comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio López San Román; Fernando Mu(n)oz

    2011-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be affected by other unrelated diseases. These are called comorbid conditions, and can include any secondary health problem that affects a person suffering from a primary or main disease, and which is neither linked physiopathologically to the primary condition, nor is it due to the treatments used for the primary condition or to its long-term anatomical or physiological consequences.Different comorbid conditions, as well as their influence on IBD, are discussed.

  15. Low Risk of Unemployment, Sick Leave, and Work Disability Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Vind, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study...... underscores the need for the early identification of risk factors. A multidisciplinary approach to secure IBD patients' participation in the labor market is recommended....... rates between patients with IBD and controls (P = 0.23). The risk of SL was significantly increased in patients with IBD (hazard ratio 2.0; 95% confidence interval 1.7-2.4). Patients with IBD showed a higher risk of WD (hazard ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.8), particularly male patients older...

  16. Survival in Danish patients with breast cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: A nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Pedersen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Incidences of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and of breast cancer have increased over the last decades. The influence of IBD on breast cancer prognosis, however, is unknown. We therefore examined the impact of IBD on treatment receipt and survival in breast cancer patients...... colitis (UC). Patients with CD had more advanced stage and received radiotherapy less, and chemotherapy more, frequently than patients without IBD. In the adjusted analyses there was no substantial survival difference in breast cancer patients with and without IBD (MRR(CD) = 1.22; 95% confidence interval...... [CI] = 0.85-1.75; MRR(UC) = 1.09; 95% CI = 0.86-1.38). In a stratified analysis, chemotherapy was associated with poorer survival in patients with CD (MRR(CD) = 1.93; 95% CI = 1.00-3.72).Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with UC receive the same treatment and have similar survival to breast cancer...

  17. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlin Xie; Steven H Itzkowitz

    2008-01-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Many of the molecular alterations responsible for sporadic colorectal cancer, namely chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation, also play a role in colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of CRC and degree of inflammation of the bowel. Chemoprevention includes aminosalicylates, ursodeoxycholic acid, and possibly folic acid and statins. To reduce CRC mortality in IBD, colonoscopic surveillance with random biopsies remains the major way to detect early mucosal dysplasia. When dysplasia is confirmed, proctocolectomy is considered for these patients. Patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease are at increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis patients with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal- anastomosis have a rather low risk of dysplasia in the ileal pouch, but the anal transition zone should be monitored periodically. Other extra intestinal cancers, such as hepatobiliary and hematopoietic cancer, have shown variable incidence rates. New endoscopic and molecular screening approaches may further refine our current surveillance guidelines and our understanding of the natural history of dysplasia.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... epidemiology of IBD....

  19. Restriction of dairy products: a reality in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Brasil Lopes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcium deficiency is considered a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients. Various dietary restrictions, including milk products are reported by these patients. Objective: To evaluate dairy product and dietary calcium intake by IBD patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 65 outpatients with IBD recruited from one reference center for IBD. A semi-structured questionnaire (to collect demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data and a quantitative food frequency questionnaire were administered. With regard to clinical data, we evaluated the anthropometric nutritional status, the disease classification, the disease activity index and the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Selfreported modifications in the use of dairy products were evaluated. Results: The IBD patients´ ages ranged from 20-75 years and 67.0% were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. The majority (64.7% reported restricting dairy products. The frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among the Crohn´s disease patients who restricted dairy products than among those with no restrictions (100% vs 42.9%; p = 0.013; this result was not observed among the UC (ulcerative colitis patients. Disease activity was also more frequent in the IBD patients who restricted dairy products than in those with no restrictions (23.8% vs 4.5%; p = 0.031, and among the UC patients, extensive disease was more common in the patients who restricted dairy products than in those with no restrictions (42.9% vs 20.0%; p = 0.03. Conclusion: Restricting dairy products is common among IBD patients, possibly due to disease activity, the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the extension of the disease.

  20. Severe infusion reactions to infliximab: aetiology, immunogenicity and risk factors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Svenson, M; Bendtzen, K;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab (IFX) elicits acute severe infusion reactions in about 5% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). AIM: To investigate the role of anti-IFX antibodies (Ab) and other risk factors. METHODS: The study included all IBD patients treated with IFX at a Danish university...... hospital until 2010 either continuously (IFX every 4-12 weeks) or episodically (reinitiation after >12 weeks). Anti-IFX Ab were measured using radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Twenty-five (8%) of 315 patients experienced acute severe infusion reactions. Univariate analysis showed that patients who reacted were...... younger at the time of diagnosis (19 vs. 26 years, P=0.013) and at first IFX infusion (28 vs. 35 years, P=0.012). Furthermore, they more often received episodic therapy (72% vs. 31%, P<0.001) and logistic regression revealed this as the only significant predictor of reactions (OR 5 [2-13]; P<0.001). IFX...

  1. Current use of immunosuppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease patients in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Juan Huang; Qin Zhu; Min Lei; Qian Cao

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate immunosuppressive agents used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in East China. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted, involving 227 patients with IBD admitted to Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University from June 2000 to December 2007. Data regarding demographic, clinical characteristics and immunosuppressants usage were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 227 eligible patients were evaluated in this study, including 104 patients with Crohn's disease and 123 with ulcerative colitis. Among the patients, 61 had indications for immunosuppressive agents use. However, only 21 (34.4%) received immunosuppressive agents. Among the 21 patients, 6 (37.5%) received a subtherapeutic dose of azathioprine with no attempt to increase the dosage. Of the 20 patients that received immunosuppressive agent treatment longer than 6 mo, 15 patients went into remission, four patients were not affected and one relapsed. Among these 20 patients, four patients suffered from myelotoxicity and one suffered from hepatotoxicity. CONCLUSION: Immunosuppressive agents are used less frequently to treat IBD patients from East China compared with Western countries. Monitoring immunosuppressive agent use is recommended to optimize dispensation of drugs for IBD in China.

  2. Measurement and clinical implications of choroidal thickness in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Koral Onal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Ocular inflammation is a frequent extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and may parallel disease activity. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a choroidal thickness measurement in assessing IBD activity.Methods:A total of 62 eyes of 31 patients with IBD [Crohn's disease (CD, n=10 and ulcerative colitis (UC, n=21] and 104 eyes of 52 healthy blood donors were included in this study. Choroidal thickness was measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. The Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI and the modified Truelove Witts score were used to assess disease activity in CD and UC, respectively.Results:No significant differences in mean subfoveal, nasal 3000 μm, or temporal 3000 μm choroidal thickness measurements (P>0.05 for all were observed between IBD patients and healthy controls. Age, smoking, CD site of involvement (ileal and ileocolonic involvement, CDAI, CD activity, and UC endoscopic activity index were all found to be significantly correlated with choroidal thickness by univariate analysis (P<0.05. Smoking (P<0.05 and the CD site of involvement (P<0.01 were the only independent parameters associated with increased choroidal thickness at all measurement locations.Conclusions:Choroidal thickness is not a useful marker of disease activity in patients with IBD but may be an indicator of ileal involvement in patients with CD.

  3. Evaluation of factors associated with response to hepatitis B vaccination in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Cem; Aslan, Fatih; Krc, Adnan; Gümüs, Zeynep Zehra; Arabul, Mahmut; Yüksel, Elif Sartas; Vatansever, Sezgin; Yurtsever, Süreyya Gül; Alper, Emrah; Ünsal, Belks

    2015-06-01

    It is recommended to investigate the serology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and vaccinate seronegative patients at the time of diagnosis in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of HBV vaccine and factors affecting the response.In this retrospective, observational study, HBV-seronegative IBD patients were administered 3 doses (at months 0, 1, and 6) recombinant 20  μg HbsAg. Patients' demographics, IBD attributes, and treatment methods were investigated as the factors with potential impacts on vaccination outcomes.One hundred twenty-five patients with IBD were evaluated. The number of patients with Anti-HBs >10  IU/L was 71 (56.8%), and the number of patients with anti-HBs >100  IU/L was 50 (40%). Age, disease activity, Crohn disease subtype, and immunosuppressive treatment (IST) were found to have significant effects on immune response (P = 0.011, P vaccination during remission (OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.3-14, P vaccine response.The likelihood of achieving adequate immune response with standard HBV vaccination protocol in IBD is low. Selecting vaccination protocols with more potent immunogenicity is a better approach to achieve effective vaccine response in patients with multiple unfavorable factors. PMID:26039133

  4. Fatigue Severity and Factors Associated with High Fatigue Levels in Korean Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Suhyeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often complain of fatigue. To date, only a few studies in Western countries have focused on fatigue related to IBD, and fatigue has never been specifically studied in Asian IBD patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the fatigue level and fatigue-related factors among Korean IBD patients. Methods Patients in remission or with mild to moderate IBD were included. Fatigue was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue and the Brief Fatigue Inventory. Corresponding healthy controls (HCs) also completed both fatigue questionnaires. Results Sixty patients with Crohn disease and 68 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) were eligible for analysis. The comparison group consisted of 92 HCs. Compared with the HCs, both IBD groups were associated with greater levels of fatigue (p<0.001). Factors influencing the fatigue score in UC patients included anemia and a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Conclusions Greater levels of fatigue were detected in Korean IBD patients compared with HCs. Anemia and ESR were determinants of fatigue in UC patients. Physicians need to be aware of fatigue as one of the important symptoms of IBD to better understand the impact of fatigue on health-related quality of life. PMID:24672655

  5. Computed tomography of the whole bowel in patients suspected of Crohn's disease. Preliminary report - assessment of examination technique and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the usefulness of new technique - computed tomography (CT) of the whole bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and correlation of obtained images with other modalities (MR of the bowel, enteroclysis, barium enema, colonoscopy) and operation results. CT examination was performed in 20 patients suspected of having Crohn's disease, which was confirmed in 16 cases. CT was performed after filling small bowel with fluid administered by catheter placed in duodenum (in 10 patients) or orally (in 10 patients), distension of large bowel with air and intravenous injection of contrast material. Distension of small bowel was assessed in both groups by two radiologists. In 7 patients immediately after CT examination MR of the bowel was performed with contrast enhanced T1-weighted images. Distension of small bowel was better in patients examined after administration of fluid directly to duodenum, although the difference was not statistically significant. In 16 CT studies performed in patients with confirmed Crohn's disease all narrowed bowel segments (n = 25) were diagnosed and extraintestinal abnormalities were visualized (thickening of the mesenteries, enlarged lymph nodes, perirectal changes, abscess, fistula). In 7 patients examined by MR 2 of 10 narrowing (20%) were not diagnosed. CT of the whole bowel is promising method in diagnosis of patients with Crohn's disease. The best views of the small bowel were obtained with the use of CT enteroclysis. (author)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Perineum in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Douglas H.; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis a...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the perineum in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Douglas H.; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis a...

  8. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile diarrhea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ramos-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the growing incidence of Clostridium difficile diarrhea (CCD in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, little is known about the associated risk factors. Method: A retrospective study comparing cases of CCD in patients with IBD to IBD carriers who did not develop CCD. A comparison was also made with patients who developed CCD but did not suffer IBD. Results: Three cases (20 % with IBD and CCD had received antibiotics during the previous three months versus none of the controls (IBD without CCD, p = 0.22. Ten cases (67 % received treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs versus 2 (13 % in the control group (IBD without CCD, p = 0.001. Seven cases underwent colonoscopy and pseudomembranes were seen in one (14 %. Fourteen (93 % patients demonstrated a favourable response to metronidazole. Patients with IBD and CCD presented with younger age (36 ± 10 years, a higher degree of community-acquired infection (13 patients, 87 %, immunosuppressive treatment (7 patients, 47 % and less patients had received previous antibiotic treatment (3 patients, 20 % than those with CCD without IBD. The proportion of patients who received treatment with PPIs was similar (66 % and 80 %, respectively p = 0.266. Conclusions: CCD in IBD carriers affects younger patients, the majority are community acquired (less nosocomial and it is more related to previous treatment with PPIs than with the antibiotic treatment. Clinical evolution is also favourable.

  9. Pregnancy related issues in inflammatory bowel disease:Evidence base and patients' perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian P Selinger; Rupert WL Leong; Simon Lal

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects women of childbearing age and can influence fertility,pregnancy and decisions regarding breastfeeding.Women with IBD need to consider the possible course of disease during pregnancy,the benefits and risks associated with medications required for disease management during pregnancy and breastfeeding and the effects of mode of delivery on their disease.When indicated,aminosalicylates and thiopurines can be safely used during pregnancy.Infliximab and Adalimumab are considered probably safe during the first two trimesters.During the third trimester the placenta can be crossed and caution should be applied.Methotrexate is associated with severe teratogenicity due to its folate antagonism and is strictly contraindicated.Women with IBD tend to deliver earlier than healthy women,but can have a vaginal delivery in most cases.Caesarean sections are generally recommended for women with active perianal disease or after ileo-anal pouch surgery.While the impact of disease activity and medication has been addressed in several studies,there are minimal studies evaluating patients' perspective on these issues.Women's attitudes may influence their decision to have children and can positively or negatively influence the chance of conceiving,and their beliefs regarding therapies may impact on the course of their disease during pregnancy and/or breastfeeding.This review article outlines the impact of IBD and its treatment on pregnancy,and examines the available data on patients' views on this subject.

  10. Tuberculin skin testing in inflammatory bowel disease patients from an endemic area of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Puig Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic disorder involving the gastrointestinal tract. Immunosuppressive drugs are usually prescribed to treat IBD patients, and this treatment can lead to tuberculosis reactivation. This paper aimed to analyze tuberculin skin test (TST results in IBD patients at a reference center in Brazil. Methods: We evaluated TST results in IBD patients using a cross-sectional study. We also analyzed the medical records of patients treated at a reference IBD outpatient unit where TST is routinely performed. Results: We reviewed 119 medical records of 57 (47.9% Crohn's disease (CD, 57 (47.9% ulcerative colitis (UC and 5 (4.2% indeterminate colitis (IC patients. The mean (SD age was 43.5 (13.7 years old. TST was positive in 24 (20.2% of the patients. TST was positive in 16/57 (28.1% UC and 6/57 (10.5% CD patients (prevalence ratio [PR] 2.7. Forty-one patients (34.5% were taking immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine or prednisone at the time of the TST, and six of these patients (14.6% had positive test results. Two patients using infliximab had negative TST results. Thirty-five of the 41 patients (85.4% on immunosuppressive treatment were anergic compared with 73.1% (57/78 of the untreated patients (PR 1.2. Conclusions: Patients with IBD have TST results similar to the general Brazilian population. Within the IBD population, CD patients have a lower frequency of TST positivity than UC patients.

  11. Short bowel syndrom as a complication of Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Skok, Pavel; Ocepek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    During the course of Crohn's disease, some patients require surgical bowel resection due to intestinal stenosis. Attention is drawn to a possible complication of such surgical procedures: in a patients with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome developed following several small and large intestine resections that were necessary in the treatment of recidiving acute bowel obstructions. When the remnant small bowel is shorter than 200 cm, characteristic symptoms of short bowel syndrome develop i...

  12. Comprehensive mutation screening for 10 genes in Chinese patients suffering very early onset inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan; Wang, Xin-Qiong; Yu, Yi; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Gong, Ling; Zhou, Tong; Li, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chun-Di

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform sequencing analysis in patients with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD) to determine the genetic basis for VEO-IBD in Chinese pediatric patients. METHODS: A total of 13 Chinese pediatric patients with VEO-IBD were diagnosed from May 2012 and August 2014. The relevant clinical characteristics of these patients were analyzed. Then DNA in the peripheral blood from patients was extracted. Next generation sequencing (NGS) based on an Illumina-Miseq platform was used to analyze the exons in the coding regions of 10 candidate genes: IL-10, IL-10RA, IL-10RB, NOD2, FUT2, IL23R, GPR35, GPR65, TNFSF15, and ADAM30. The Sanger sequencing was used to verify the variations detected in NGS. RESULTS: Out of the 13 pediatric patients, ten were diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, and three diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. Mutations in IL-10RA and IL-10RB were detected in five patients. There were four patients who had single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with IBD. Two patients had IL-10RA and FUT2 polymorphisms, and two patients had IL-10RB and FUT2 polymorphisms. Gene variations were not found in the rest four patients. Children with mutations had lower percentile body weight (1.0% vs 27.5%, P = 0.002) and hemoglobin (87.4 g/L vs 108.5 g/L, P = 0.040) when compared with children without mutations. Although the age of onset was earlier, height was shorter, and the response to treatment was poorer in the mutation group, there was no significant difference in these factors between groups. CONCLUSION: IL-10RA and IL-10RB mutations are common in Chinese children with VEO-IBD. Patients with mutations have an earlier disease onset, lower body weight and hemoglobin, and poorer prognosis. PMID:27350736

  13. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae Sung; Bang, Ki Bae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Quality of life is closely related to anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several studies have reported on anemia in patients with IBD in Western countries. This study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with IBD. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 92 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who were followed regularly at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between January 2003 and December 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds used to define anemia were <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women according to the World Health Organization criteria. We chose the lowest Hb level in each year as a representative value because Hb levels changed at each examination and anemia was associated with disease deterioration. The relationship between clinical variables and lowest Hb level was assessed. Results The prevalence of anemia was 36.3% in patients with UC and 41.6% in patients with CD. Anemia in patients with CD was associated with hospital admission, 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) and infliximab treatment in men. Anemia in patients with UC was associated with hospital admission, oral steroid use, thiopurine and infliximab treatment in men. Conclusions The prevalence of anemia in Korean patients with IBD was comparable to that of patients in Western countries. Anemia was associated with male patients with CD who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including 5-ASA and infliximab, and men with UC who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including oral steroids, thiopurine and infliximab. PMID:26884734

  14. TNF Blocking Therapies and Immunomonitoring in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Altwegg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their appearance in the armamentarium for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD more than a decade ago, antitumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors have demonstrated beneficial activity in induction and maintenance of clinical remission, mucosal healing, improvement in quality of life, and reduction in surgeries and hospitalizations. However, more than one-third of patients present primary resistance, and another one-third become resistant over time. One of the main factors associated with loss of response is the immunogenicity of anti-TNF biologics leading to the production of antidrug antibodies (ADAbs accelerating their clearance. In this review we present the current state of the literature on the place of TNF and its blockage in the treatment of patients with IBD and discuss the usefulness of serum trough levels and ADAb monitoring in the optimization of anti-TNF therapies.

  15. The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, M; Lomholt-Beck, B; Gundersen, D

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is based on symptom assessment such as the Rome III criteria. It is sometimes difficult to clinically distinguish IBS from adult-onset celiac disease (CD). Individuals with CD presenting with relatively vague abdominal symptoms are at risk of been dismissed as having IBS. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of patients with CD among those that fulfill the Rome III criteria for IBS from among patients referred to the gastroenterology section of our hospital over the last 5 years. The study included a total of 968 patients with an average age of 32 years (range 18-59 years). Females constituted 95% of all patients. Duodenal biopsies were obtained during standard gastroscopy. Sections from these biopsies were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and immunostained for human leucocytes CD45 using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method. The sections were then histopathologically examined. Four patients had CD: one with Marsh type 3b, and 3 with Marsh type 1. All four of these patients were positive for tissue transglutminase antibodies (anti-t-TG) IgA and were females aged 24, 20, 36 and 38 years. These 4 patients fulfilled the Rome III criteria for the sub-type IBS-diarrhea. This amounts to a prevalence of 0.4% of CD in IBS patients. The present findings support the notion that IBS patients should be routinely examined for CD. This applies to all subtypes of IBS. PMID:21468583

  16. PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM WITH INFLAMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Guru Prasad; Jhansi Lakshmi; Krishna Rao; Parvathi; Durga Bhavani

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a chronic , painful ulcerated skin disease of unknown etiology. Its association with inflammatory bowel disease like ulcerative colitis is common . The lesions generally appear dur ing the course of active bowel disease , frequently concur with exacerbations of colitis , sometimes with inactive ulcerative colitis. 15 to 20 % of patients with Pyoderma gangrenosum have ulcerative colitis and 0.5 to 5 % of patients w...

  17. Is the prevalence of colonic neuroendocrine tumors increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Vierdag, Wouter-Michiel A M; Kievit, Wietske; Bosch, Steven; Hoentjen, Frank; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients may bear an increased neuroendocrine tumor (NET) risk. These tumors are mostly reported as coincidental findings during surgery. We aimed to determine the prevalence of colonic NET in a Dutch nationwide IBD cohort and calculate the prevalence rate ratios (PRR) compared with the general Dutch population. Our second aim was to investigate whether a high bowel surgery rate in IBD could result in a high PRR for NET. The Dutch Pathology Registry (PALGA) was searched to identify all IBD patients with colonic NET in The Netherlands between 1991 and 2011. We determined the prevalence and PRR of colonic NET in a 20-year period. For our second aim, we compared NET prevalence in colonic resection specimens between IBD cases and non-IBD controls (diverticulitis and ischemia). We identified 51 IBD patients who developed colonic NET resulting in a prevalence of 60.4-89.3 per 100,000 patients in a 20-year period with a PRR of 2.8-4.1. However, adjusted for resection type, sex and age, a higher NET prevalence was shown in diverticulitis (OR 5.52, 95% CI 3.47-8.78) and ischemia (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.09-3.58) compared with IBD. Our key finding is that NET are more prevalent in IBD patients compared with the general population (PRR 2.8-4.1). This might be attributed to a high rate of incidental NET as IBD patients frequently undergo intestinal surgery. A lower adjusted NET prevalence in colonic resection specimens for IBD compared to ischemia and diverticulitis supports this hypothesis. PMID:26992110

  18. Serological markers for inflammatory bowel disease in AIDS patients with evidence of microbial translocation.

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    Anupa Kamat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier during chronic HIV infection allows translocation of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS from the gut into the circulation. Microbial translocation also occurs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. IBD serological markers are useful in the diagnosis of IBD and to differentiate between Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. Here, we evaluate detection of IBD serological markers in HIV-infected patients with advanced disease and their relationship to HIV disease markers. METHODS: IBD serological markers (ASCA, pANCA, anti-OmpC, and anti-CBir1 were measured by ELISA in plasma from AIDS patients (n = 26 with low CD4 counts (<300 cells/µl and high plasma LPS levels, and results correlated with clinical data. For meta-analysis, relevant data were abstracted from 20 articles. RESULTS: IBD serological markers were detected in approximately 65% of AIDS patients with evidence of microbial translocation. An antibody pattern consistent with IBD was detected in 46%; of these, 75% had a CD-like pattern. Meta-analysis of data from 20 published studies on IBD serological markers in CD, UC, and non-IBD control subjects indicated that IBD serological markers are detected more frequently in AIDS patients than in non-IBD disease controls and healthy controls, but less frequently than in CD patients. There was no association between IBD serological markers and HIV disease markers (plasma viral load and CD4 counts in the study cohort. CONCLUSIONS: IBD serological markers may provide a non-invasive approach to monitor HIV-related inflammatory gut disease. Further studies to investigate their clinical significance in HIV-infected individuals are warranted.

  19. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public. PMID:26968556

  20. Insufficient Knowledge of Korean Gastroenterologists Regarding the Vaccination of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims There is an increased risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to develop infections due to the use of immunomodulators and biologics. Several infections are preventable by immunizations. This study investigated the knowledge and awareness of Korean gastroenterologists regarding the vaccination of patients with IBD. Methods A self-reported questionnaire was sent by e-mail to the faculty members of tertiary hospitals. Gastroenterologists were asked ten questions regarding the immunization of patients with IBD. A total of 56 gastroenterologists completed the questionnaire. Results A majority of gastroenterologists (>60%) had rarely or never recorded an immunization history from their patients with IBD. Moreover, 50% to 70% of the gastroenterologists did not know that live vaccines should be avoided in immunosuppressed patients. The most commonly mentioned resistance to vaccinations was "the lack of concern and knowledge regarding vaccination." Gastroenterologists more frequently asked about the immunization history of influenza, pneumococcal, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B vaccines and recommended these vaccines more often than others. Conclusions Korean gastroenterologists' awareness and knowledge regarding the vaccination of patients with IBD were very poor. Intensive educational programs on immunization guidelines directed toward gastroenterologists who care for patients with IBD are required to ensure that these patients receive the necessary vaccinations. PMID:24827619

  1. Preventative care for patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nivedita; Herrera, Henry H; Johnson, Christopher M; MacCarthy, Andrea A; Copeland, Laurel A

    2016-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have underlying immune dysregulation. Immunosuppressive medications put them at risk of infection. This study assessed rates of recommended vaccinations and preventative screening in patients with IBD.Nationwide data on patients diagnosed with IBD in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) October 2004 to September 2014 were extracted. Variation in vaccination, screenings, and risk of death by demographic factors (age group, gender) were estimated in bivariate and multivariable analyses.During the 10-year study period, 62,002 patients were treated for IBD. Nonmelanoma skin cancer was found in 2.6%, and these patients more commonly accessed dermatology clinic (22.5% vs 15.2%; chi-square = 66.6; df = 1; P patient populations); 34% had no record of Pap smear in VHA data. Vaccination rates were modest: pneumococcal 39%; TDAP 23%; hepatitis B 3%; varicella and PPD patients diagnosed with IBD. Interventions such as education and increased awareness may be needed to improve these rates. PMID:27399081

  2. Evaluation of QT and P Wave Dispersion and Mean Platelet Volume among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

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    Yuksel DOGAN, Aliye SOYLU, Gulay A. EREN, Sule POTUROGLU, Can DOLAPCIOGLU, Kenan SONMEZ, Habibe DUMAN, Isa SEVINDIR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD number of thromboembolic events are increased due to hypercoagulupathy and platelet activation. Increases in mean platelet volume (MPV can lead to platelet activation, this leads to thromboembolic events and can cause acute coronary syndromes. In IBD patients, QT-dispersion and P-wave dispersion are predictors of ventricular arrhythmias and atrial fibrilation; MPV is accepted as a risk factor for acute coronary syndromes, we aimed at evaluating the correlations of these with the duration of disease, its localization and activity.Methods: The study group consisted of 69 IBD (Ulcerative colitis n: 54, Crohn's Disease n:15 patients and the control group included 38 healthy individuals. Disease activity was evaluated both endoscopically and clinically. Patients with existing cardiac conditions, those using QT prolonging medications and having systemic diseases, anemia and electrolyte imbalances were excluded from the study. QT-dispersion, P-wave dispersion and MPV values of both groups were compared with disease activity, its localization, duration of disease and the antibiotics used.Results: The P-wave dispersion values of the study group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Duration of the disease was not associated with QT-dispersion, and MPV levels. QT-dispersion, P-wave dispersion, MPV and platelet count levels were similar between the active and in mild ulcerative colitis patients. QT-dispersion levels were similar between IBD patients and the control group. No difference was observed between P-wave dispersion, QT-dispersion and MPV values; with regards to disease duration, disease activity, and localization in the study group (p>0.05.Conclusions: P-wave dispersion which is accepted as a risk factor for the development of atrial fibirilation was found to be high in our IBD patients. This demonstrates us that the risk of developing atrial fibrillation may be high in patients

  3. Quality of Life Considering Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - Natural and Parenteral Nutrition

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    Raczkowska Aneta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the elements of treatment considering inflammatory bowel diseases is nutritional therapy. The duration of the above-mentioned depends on the prevalence of such symptoms as fever, bowel move-ments, length of the functioning gastrointestinal tract, stoma and intestinal fistula presence. Nutritional therapy is an essential element of successful treatment alongside pharmacological, surgical, and biological therapy, as well as other methods. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis considered as chronic diseases, lead towards physical and biopsychosocial disability, being responsible for the reduction in the quality of life.

  4. Idiopathic portal hypertension regarding thiopurine treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

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    Cristina Suárez-Ferrer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The possibility of developing idiopathic portal hypertension has been described with thiopurine treatment despite compromises the prognosis of these patients, the fact its true prevalence is unknown. Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients followed at our unit, to determine the prevalence of diagnosis of idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH and its relationship with thiopurine treatment. Results: At the time of the analysis, 927/1,419 patients were under treatment with thiopurine drugs (65%. A total of 4 patients with IBD type Crohn's disease with idiopathic portal hypertension probably related to the thiopurine treatment were identified (incidence of 4.3 cases per 1,000. Seventy-five percent of patients started with signs or symptoms of portal hypertension. Only one patient was asymptomatic but the diagnosis of IPH because of isolated thrombocytopenia is suspected. However, note that all patients had thrombocytopenia previously. Abdominal ultrasound with fibroscan, hepatic vein catheterization and liver biopsy were performed on all of them as part of the etiology of portal hypertension. In the abdominal ultrasound, indirect portal hypertension data were observed in all patients (as splenomegaly cirrhosis was also ruled out. The fibroscan data showed significant liver fibrosis (F2-F3. Conclusion: Idiopathic portal hypertension following thiopurine treatment in IBD patients is a rare occurrence, but it must be borne in mind in the differential diagnosis for early diagnosis, especially in patients undergoing thiopurine treatment over a long period. The presence of thrombocytopenia is often the only predictor of its development in the preclinical stage.

  5. Enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal en pacientes celíacos Inflammatory bowel disease in celiac patients

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    M. Masachs

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: se ha sugerido una potencial asociación entre la enfermedad celíaca y la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, que puede justificar que ambas enfermedades puedan presentarse en un mismo enfermo o en sus familiares de primer orden con mayor frecuencia de lo esperado. Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de la enfermedad de Crohn y la colitis ulcerosa en los enfermos celíacos y en sus familiares. Método: estudio epidemiológico prospectivo transversal en un grupo de pacientes celíacos, sus familiares de primer grado y un grupo control de características epidemiológicas similares, constituido por familiares de pacientes que acuden al Servicio de Urgencias por un problema agudo. Para detectar la existencia de colitis ulcerosa y enfermedad de Crohn en los celíacos y sus familiares, se realizó una entrevista semiestructurada. Resultados: se han incluido 86 celíacos y 432 familiares, que se han comparado con 809 controles (129 pacientes con una enfermedad aguda y 680 familiares de primer grado suyos. Se han detectado 3 casos de enfermedad de Crohn en el grupo de los enfermos celíacos y 4 casos de enfermedad de Crohn en sus familiares. Sólo se ha detectado 1 caso de enfermedad de Crohn en el grupo control (p Introduction: a potential association between celic disease and inflammatory bowel disease hs been suggested, which may explain the fact that both disorders occasionally present in one patient or in his/her first-degree relatives more frequently than expected. Objective: to establish the prevalence of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in celiac patients and their relatives. Method: a cross-sectional, prospective epidemiological study in a group of celiac patients, their first-degree relatives, and a control group with similar epidemiological characteristics including the relatives of patients presenting at the ER for acute conditions. A semistructured interview was used to identify the presence of Crohn's disease and

  6. Internet and electronic resources for inflammatory bowel disease: a primer for providers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Fournier, Marc R; Benchimol, Eric I

    2012-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly turning to the Internet to research their condition and engage in discourse on their experiences. This has resulted in new dynamics in the relationship between providers and their patients, with misinformation and advertising potentially presenting barriers to the cooperative patient-provider partnership. This article addresses important issues of online IBD-related health information and social media activity, such as quality, reliability, objectivity, and privacy. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of online information provided to IBD patients, and summarized the most commonly accessed Websites related to IBD. We also assessed the activity on popular social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube), and evaluated currently available applications for use by IBD patients and providers on mobile phones and tablets. Through our review of the literature and currently available resources, we developed a list of recommended online resources to strengthen patient participation in their care by providing reliable, comprehensive educational material. PMID:22147497

  7. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider–patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient–provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management.

  8. Serious events with infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a 9-year cohort study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, H.S. de; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Jong, D.J. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor infliximab is incorporated in the treatment guidelines for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, concerns about serious adverse events such as infections, malignancies and death do exist. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence

  9. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease exhibit dysregulated responses to microbial DNA.

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    Naomi S C Hotte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A critical role for the gut epithelium lies in its ability to discriminate between pathogens and commensals and respond appropriately. Dysfunctional interactions between microbes and epithelia are believed to have a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. In this study, we analyzed microbiota and gene expression in IBD patients and examined responses of mucosal biopsies to bacterial DNA. METHODS: Biopsies were taken from non-inflamed areas of the colon in healthy controls (HC and Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC patients in remission. Biopsies were snap-frozen or cultured with DNA from Lactobacillus plantarum (LP or Salmonella dublin (SD. Gene expression was analyzed under basal conditions and in response to DNA. Gene networks were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways software. Mucosal-associated microbiota was analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms in NOD2 and TLR9 was assessed. RESULTS: Patients with IBD had altered microbiota, enhanced expression of inflammatory genes, and increased correlations between specific gene expression and microbes. Principle component analysis showed CD and UC patients to cluster independently from healthy controls in both gene expression and microbial analysis. DNA from LP stimulated anti-inflammatory pathways in controls and UC patients, but induced an upregulation of IL17A in CD patients. There were no differences in SNP frequencies of TLR9 or NOD2 in the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Crohn's disease exhibit altered responses to bacterial DNA. These findings suggest that the gut response to bacterial DNA may depend not only on the specific type of bacterial DNA, but also on the host.

  10. Remarkable prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome plus fibromyalgia in comparison with those with isolated irritable bowel syndrome: a case-finding study

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Sáez, Luis Ricardo; Blanco, Ignacio; Bobes, Julio; de Serres, Frederick J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are two common central sensitization disorders frequently associated in the same patient, and some of these patients with IBS plus FMS (IBS/FMS) could actually be undiagnosed of coeliac disease (CD). The present study was an active case finding for CD in two IBS cohorts, one constituted by IBS/FMS subjects and the other by people with isolated IBS. Methods A total of 104 patients (89.4% females) fulfilling the 1990 AC...

  11. Patients’ perceptions on the impact of coffee consumption in inflammatory bowel disease: friend or foe? – a patient survey

    OpenAIRE

    Barthel, C; Wiegand, S.; Scharl, S; Scharl, M; Frei, P.; Vavricka, S R; FRIED, M.; Sulz, M.C.; Wiegand, N; Rogler, G; Biedermann, L

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental factors are an integral component in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There is an increasing interest in nutritive components. While the potential disease-modifying role of coffee has been intensively investigated in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, the data on the potential impact on IBD is very limited. We aimed to determine the patients’ perspective on coffee consumption in IBD. Methods We conducted a questionnaire among IBD patients in ...

  12. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

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    Lindsay Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn's Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration. The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. Results One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response. The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07. Twenty-six patients (33 percent did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent. For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent. Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given

  13. Risk factors of work disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease - A Dutch nationwide web-based survey Work disability in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E.; Mangen, Marie-Josee J.; Leenders, Max; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Fidder, Herma H.; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with high costs to society. Few data on the impact of IBD on work disability and potential predictive factors are available. Aim: To assess the prevalence of and predictive factors for work disability in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative c

  14. NATURAL AGENTS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Darji Vinay Chhanalal; Bariya Aditi Hemrajbhai; Deshpande Shrikalp Shrikant

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract. It comprises the two conditions, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by chronic recurrent ulceration of the bowel. Conventional drugs for colitis treatment include aminosalicylate, corticosteroids,antibiotics & immunomodulators. 5- Amino salicylic acid having side effects in 30% of the patients. Systemic corticosteroids producing incidence of complication is 4.3%. Antibiotic therapy...

  15. Clinical experience with infliximab biosimilar Remsima (CT-P13) in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnsen, Jørgen

    2016-05-01

    Many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, and therefore a number of biosimilars have been or will be developed. The term biosimilar can be defined as a biotherapeutic product that is similar in efficacy, safety and quality to the licensed reference product. Biosimilars may lead to a reduced price and significant cost savings for the health community and hopefully more patients globally will have easier access to biological therapy when indicated. CT-P13, which is a TNF-alfa inhibitor, is the first monoclonal antibody biosimilar being used in clinical practice. The drug is approved for all indications as an innovator product although clinical efficacy has only been demonstrated in rheumatic diseases. Until now the number of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with CT-P13 is confined, but experience is continuously growing. Based on current data, CT-P13 seems to be efficacious and generally well tolerated in IBD especially in patients who are naïve to biological therapy. Knowledge with regard to interchangeability between CT-P13 and the originator infliximab is however, still rather sparse and more data are desired. Immunogenicity and long-term safety related to CT-P13 are other areas of great importance and good and reliable postmarketing pharmacovigilance is therefore required in the coming years. PMID:27134662

  16. Medication beliefs among patients with inflammatory bowel disease who report low quality of life: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Hungin APS; Rubin Gregory P; Hall Nicola J; Dougall Audrey

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-adherence to drug therapy is common in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Patients' beliefs about treatment have an important influence on adherence. An in-depth understanding of this area is, therefore, important for patient-centred care. The aim of the study was to assess patients' perspectives and beliefs about their medication and to determine how this relates to medicine taking and other related health behaviour as part of a larger qualitative study on health care ...

  17. Older Age and Steroid Use Are Associated with Increasing Polypharmacy and Potential Medication Interactions Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Parian, Alyssa; Ha, Christina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity and polypharmacy, more prevalent among older persons, may impact the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to assess the frequency of polypharmacy and medication interactions within a cohort of older patients with IBD and describe IBD treatment patterns. Methods: Cohort study of 190 patients with IBD 65 years or older followed at a tertiary IBD referral center from 2006 to 2012. Data collected included demographics, IB...

  18. How to Optimize Colon Cancer Surveillance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Jill K J; Bickston, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia (CRN) is a well-known complication of chronic inflammation of the colon either with ulcerative colitis (UC) or colonic Crohn's disease (CD). Studies have shown that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an overall higher risk for colorectal dysplasia and cancer compared to the general population and this risk is further increased by certain associated factors, including extent of disease, duration of disease, and age at onset. In addition, other risk factors not related to IBD can also further increase the risk for CRN, such as a family history of sporadic colon cancer and a concomitant diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The society guidelines mostly agree on the appropriate time to begin CRN surveillance but vary somewhat on the appropriate intervals between surveillance colonoscopies. In addition, there is not yet a consensus on the appropriate method for surveillance. In this review, we discuss the risk for CRN in colonic IBD, the associated factors that further increase the risk for CRN, the current surveillance guidelines and the current methods available for CRN surveillance. PMID:26926040

  19. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  20. Is safety infliximab during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: in most cases, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD debuts at reproductive age. The data available in the literature show infliximab (IFX to be a safe drug during pregnancy but there is very little evidence about the activity of the disease following drug withdrawal during pregnancy. Aims: determine the drug´s safety in pregnant women in our setting and assess its effect on the foetus, drawing on the experience of several hospitals. Secondly, observe the effect of treatment withdrawal on disease activity during pregnancy. Material and methods: a retrospective study was conducted of women with IBD who had received IFX treatment during pregnancy in five hospitals in Spain. Disease activity was assessed using Crohn´s Disease Activity Index, while UC was assessed using the Truelove-Witts Index in each trimester of pregnancy. Gestational age, weight and diseases in the foetus were determined at birth. Results: the study included 12 women with a mean age of 29 years; 4 had ulcerative colitis and 8 Crohn´s disease, with mean disease duration of 7 years. All but one, who was diagnosed during pregnancy, was receiving IFX treatment at conception. Six patients received uninterrupted treatment throughout the pregnancy, 2 requested voluntary interruption and in 3 cases treatment was interrupted in the third trimester as a precaution. They received a mean IFX dose of 400 mg every 8 weeks. Of the 6 patients who received continuous treatment, in 50% disease was held in remission. The 6 remaining patients suspended treatment for different reasons, presenting disease recurrence in all but one case (83.3%. Eight deliveries were vaginal and 4 by caesarean section. Newborns presented no congenital anomalies, intrauterine growth retardation or low birth weight and there was only one premature delivery. Conclusions: although cases included in the stduy are not significant, in our experience, IFX during pregnancy is a safe treatment for the mother and the

  1. Dominant Fecal Microbiota in Newly Diagnosed Untreated Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

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    Lill Therese Thorkildsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge about the microbiota associated with the onset of IBD is limited. The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation between IBD and the fecal microbiota for early diagnosed untreated patients. The fecal samples used were a part of the Inflammatory Bowel South-Eastern Norway II (IBSEN II study and were collected from CD patients (n=30, UC patients (n=33, unclassified IBD (IBDU patients (n=3, and from a control group (n=34. The bacteria associated with the fecal samples were analyzed using a direct 16S rRNA gene-sequencing approach combined with a multivariate curve resolution (MCR analysis. In addition, a 16S rRNA gene clone library was prepared for the construction of bacteria-specific gene-targeted single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE probes. The MCR analysis resulted in the recovery of five pure components of the dominant bacteria present: Escherichia/Shigella, Faecalibacterium, Bacteroides, and two components of unclassified Clostridiales. Escherichia/Shigella was found to be significantly increased in CD patients compared to control subjects, and Faecalibacterium was found to be significantly reduced in CD patients compared to both UC patients and control subjects. Furthermore, a SNuPE probe specific for Escherichia/Shigella showed a significant overrepresentation of Escherichia/Shigella in CD patients compared to control subjects. In conclusion, samples from CD patients exhibited an increase in Escherichia/Shigella and a decrease in Faecalibacterium indicating that the onset of the disease is associated with an increase in proinflammatory and a decrease in anti-inflammatory bacteria.

  2. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Erbayrak; Cansel Turkay; Elife Eraslan; Hulya Cetinkaya; Benan Kasapoglu; Mehmet Bektas

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatie...

  3. Patients' preferences regarding shared decision-making in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: Results from a patient-empowerment study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Baars (Judith); T. Markus; E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractShared decision-making is gaining favor in clinical practice, although the extent to which patients want to be involved in choosing their treatment varies substantially. Because data are lacking on the preferences of patients with chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

  4. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Patrick B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv) infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc) injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn\\'s Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration.The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK) between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous) were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response). The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent) preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent) preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07). Twenty-six patients (33 percent) did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv) was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent). For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc) the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent). Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab) six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given the choice

  5. Environmental factors in a population-based inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, S;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior ...

  6. Faecal calprotectin for screening of patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease : diagnostic meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Patrick F; Van de Vijver, Els; Fidler, Vaclav

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether including a test for faecal calprotectin, a sensitive marker of intestinal inflammation, in the investigation of suspected inflammatory bowel disease reduces the number of unnecessary endoscopic procedures. Design Meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies. Data sourc

  7. Expression of integrin alphavbeta6 in the intestinal epithelial cells of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Sui Feng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is about 0.05% in industrialized countries. The pathogenesis of IBD remains to be further understood. The present study aims to elucidate the expression of integrin αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBD. Materials and Methods: Colonic biopsy was obtained from a group of IBD patients. The expression of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa was detected by Western blotting. Human colonic epithelial cell line T84 cells were stimulated by microbial antigen flagellin. The expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: The levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa were much lower than it in normal control subjects. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO were higher in IBD patients that were negatively correlated with the levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa. The expression of αvβ6 was detectable in T84 cells at naïve status that could be upregulated by exposure to microbial antigen flagellin. Pretreatment with MPO dramatically suppressed the expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells. Conclusions: We conclude that the expression of αvβ6 was suppressed in IBD intestinal mucosa, which could be resulted from the high levels of MPO.

  8. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  9. Regulatory T cells in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases treated with adacolumn granulocytapheresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emilio Cuadrado; Marta Alonso; Maria Dolores de Juan; Pilar Echaniz; Juan Ignacio Arenas

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate if the clinical efficacy of granulocytes and monocytes by adsorption (GMA) is associated with an increased frequency of peripheral regulatory T cells (Tregs),as these cells have proven to be successful in suppressing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in animal models.METHODS:We report four cases of corticosteroiddependent ulcerative colitis (UC) and two Crohn's disease (CD) cases with severe cutaneous lesions who received GMA therapy.The frequency of CD4+ CD25high(Tregs)in peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry and the expression of FoxP3 and TGF beta in purified CD4+T cells was determined by real time PCR prior to and one month after the last apheresis session,and at the time of endoscopic and clinical assessing.RESULTS:Increased expression of Fox P3 mRNA was found in all five patients who responded to cytapheresis with remission of clinical symptoms,mucosal inflammation and cutaneous lesions,and an increased frequency of circulating Tregs was found in four patients.These changes were not observed in the patient with UC who did no respond to GMA.Variations in TGF-β(mRNA)did not parallel that of FoxP3 mRNA.CONCLUSION:The clinical efficacy of GMA on IBD and related extra intestinal manifestations was associated with an expansion of circulating CD4+CD25+Treqs and higher expression of FoxP3 in CD4+T cells.Accordingly,an elevated CD4+CD25+FoxP3 may be a valuable index of remission in patients with IBD and other chronic relapsing-remitting inflammatory conditions during treatment with GMA.

  10. Analysis of serum antibodies in patients suspected of having inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M; Hill, Harry R

    2006-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the general term used for a heterogeneous group of intestinal disorders, including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Serological markers such as anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and atypical perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (atypical pANCA) have proven useful in the diagnosis and differentiation of CD and UC. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody directed against the outer membrane protein C (OmpC) of Escherichia coli is said by one group to have clinical utility in diagnosing IBD, specifically in ASCA-negative CD patients. Our objective in this study was to compare the results obtained from two separate laboratories offering similar IBD tests using sera from suspected IBD patients. One hundred ninety-seven sera received for IBD testing were included in the study. The agreement between the two laboratories was 93.4% for ASCA IgA, 90.9% for ASCA IgG, and 87.8% for atypical pANCA IgG. There were 25 sera with ASCA-negative/OmpC-positive results reported by one laboratory. Thirteen of these 25 (52.0%) ASCA-negative/OmpC-positive sera were also atypical pANCA positive (9 as determined by both laboratories, 3 by one, and 1 by the other). Atypical pANCA antibody is found primarily in IBD patients with UC and colon-limited CD (Crohn's colitis). We conclude that the ASCA and atypical pANCA assays showed good agreement between the two laboratories, but the data for ASCA-negative/OmpC-positive sera suggest that many (52.0%) of these patients were more likely to have had UC or Crohn's colitis based on the presence of an atypical pANCA. PMID:16760323

  11. Experiences of gay and lesbian patients with inflammatory bowel disease:a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Dibley, Lesley; Norton, Christine; Schaub, Jason; Bassett, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Chronic illness research involving lesbian and gay people typically focuses on HIV/AIDS, cancer, and mental health. The authors extend the evidence with a two-phase mixed methods exploration of gay and lesbian people's experiences with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), collecting demographic, disease history, and outness data from 50 community-based respondents and conducting 22 semi-structured interviews. Of the12 key themes identified, 8 resonate with concerns reported in the heterosexual I...

  12. Analysis of Serum Antibodies in Patients Suspected of Having Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M.; Hill, Harry R.

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the general term used for a heterogeneous group of intestinal disorders, including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Serological markers such as anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and atypical perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (atypical pANCA) have proven useful in the diagnosis and differentiation of CD and UC. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody directed against the outer membrane protein C (OmpC) of Escherichia co...

  13. Treatment adherence in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease: perceptions from adolescent patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Kevin A; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N; Barg, Frances K

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, interfering activities, parent-child conflict and oppositional behaviour and inadequate planning for treatment as challenges to adherence. Participants reported that family support and good parent-child relationships, routines, monitoring and reminding and organisational tools such as pill boxes facilitated treatment adherence. Other issues that emerged included immediacy of treatment effects and parent-adolescent responsibility for treatment. Patients and parents experience a number of challenges related to adherence within behavioural, educational, organisational and health belief domains. Behavioural interventions should focus on these issues, reduction of perceived barriers, and effective transition of responsibility for treatment adherence. Future research considerations are discussed. PMID:21143544

  14. Screening of coeliac disease in undetected adults and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman S

    2016-07-01

    The present study is to determine the prevalence and implication of coeliac disease (CD) among adult Saudis and compared to those with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome. This prospective study was conducted among 980 adults. Out of that, 482 subjects (staff and students of Riyadh Health Science College) were designated as control cohorts for undetected coeliac disease. Furthermore, another contingent of 498 subjects diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at Prince Salman Hospital and Al-Iman General Hospital also constituted a segment of the overall initial 1020 subjects. Both cases and control were tested for serological markers of coeliac disease (tissues transglutaminase (tTGAs) and endomysial autoantibody (EMAs) and were confirmed by histopathology test. All the positive for cases of coeliac disease were screened for iron deficiency anaemia, Vitamin D deficiency, and osteoporosis and weight assessment. The percentage of coeliac disease in control subjects and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were found to be 1.9% and 9.6% respectively, about 38% of the total coeliac disease patients are among females of middle age (20-39-years) and 16% of the males in the same age range. Whereas, 20% and 25% of all coeliac disease cases with ages of 40-59 were remarked as females and males respectively. The identical nature and overlap of symptoms of the two conditions could possibly result in misdiagnosis of coeliac diseases or over-diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. The findings of the study might also give considerable implications of the disease in the nutritional level which is noticeable. PMID:27298578

  15. [Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pregnant women in their characteristics do not differ from general population, unless they had operations on the pelvic organs. Women with a first pregnancy, regardless of the activity of IBD have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy and high risk births. Most treatment methods are compatible with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Women affected by IBD should discuss their plans for pregnancy with the doctor first in order to know the possible dangers. Every patient in the IBD during pregnancy must be observed by a gastroenterologist, accoucheur and pediatrician to ensure peace of mother and child. PMID:22830229

  16. Phosphotidylserine exposure and neutrophil extracellular traps enhance procoagulant activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhangxiu; Si, Yu; Jiang, Tao; Ma, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yan; Cao, Muhua; Li, Tao; Yao, Zhipeng; Zhao, Lu; Fang, Shaohong; Yu, Bo; Dong, Zengxiang; Thatte, Hemant S; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Yang, Shufen; Piao, Daxun; Hao, Lirong; Zhou, Jin; Shi, Jialan

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated thromboembolic event often lacks precise aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) towards the hypercoagulable state in IBD. We demonstrated that the levels of PS exposed MPs and the sources of MP-origin, platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes and cultured endothelial cells (ECs) were higher in IBD groups than in healthy controls using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Wright-Giemsa and immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the elevated NETs were released by activated IBD neutrophils or by control neutrophils treated with IBD sera obtained from patients with the active disease. MPs and MP-origin cells in IBD groups, especially in active stage, markedly shortened coagulation time and had increased levels of fibrin, thrombin and FXa production as assessed by coagulation function assays. Importantly, we found that on stimulated ECs, PS rich membranes provided binding sites for FXa and FVa, promoting fibrin formation while TNF blockage or IgG depletion attenuated this effect. Treatment of control neutrophils with TNF and isolated IgG from PR3-ANCA-positive active IBD patients also resulted in the release of NETs. Blockade of PS with lactadherin prolonged coagulation time, decreased fibrin formation to control levels, and inhibited the procoagulant enzymes production in the MPs and MP-origin cells. NET cleavage by DNase I partly decreased PCA in IBD or stimulated neutrophils. Our study reveals a previously unrecognised link between hypercoagulable state and PS exposure or NETs, and may further explain the epidemiological association of thrombosis within IBD patients. PMID:26660948

  17. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. PMID:26869808

  18. Distinct inflammatory and cytopathic characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Brynskov, Jørn; Krogfelt, Karen A; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Brix, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) may be implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as implied from a higher prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli in the gut of IBD-affected individuals. However, it is unclear whether different non-diarrheagenic E. coli spp. segregate from each other in their ability to promote intestinal inflammation. Herein we compared the inflammation-inducing properties of non-diarrheagenic LF82, 691-04A, E. coli Nissle 1917 (ECN) and eleven new intestinal isolates from different locations in five IBD patients and one healthy control. Viable E. coli were cultured with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), followed by analysis of secreted cytokines, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular death. The IBD-associated E. coli LF82 induced the same dose-dependent inflammatory cytokine profile as ECN and ten of the new E. coli isolates displayed as high level IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-23 and TNF-α from moDCs irrespective of their site of isolation (ileum/colon/faeces), disease origin (diseased/non-diseased) or known virulence factors. Contrarily, 691-04A and one new IBD E. coli isolate induced a different cellular phenotype with enhanced killing of moDCs and IECs, coupled to elevated IL-18. The cytopathic nature of 691-04A and one other IBD E. coli isolate suggests that colonization with specific non-diarrheagenic E. coli could promote intestinal barrier leakage and profound intestinal inflammation, while LF82, ECN and the remaining non-diarrheagenic E. coli isolates hold notorious pro-inflammatory characteristics that can progress inflammation in case of intestinal barrier leakage. PMID:26522075

  19. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05, while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05. The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis.

  20. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Qiaozhen; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Mei; Liao, Guangquan; Chen, Nianjun; Tian, Dean; Wu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05). The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26962305

  1. MGMT-B gene promoter hypermethylation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease - a novel finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarram, Pooneh; Kavousipour, Soudabeh; Sarabi, Mostafa Moradi; Mehrabani, Golnosh; Fahmidehkar, Mohammad Ali; Shamsdin, Seyedeh Azra; Alipour, Abbas; Naini, Mahvash Alizade

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disease strongly associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) as a well-known precancerous condition. Alterations in DNA methylation and mutation in K-ras are believed to play an early etiopathogenic role in CRC and may also an initiating event through deregulation of molecular signaling. Epigenetic silencing of APC and SFRP2 in the WNT signaling pathway may also be involved in IBD-CRC. The role of aberrant DNA methylation in precancerous state of colorectal cancer (CRC) is under intensive investigation worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of promoter methylation of MGMT-B, APC1A and SFRP2 genes, in inflamed and normal colon tissues of patients with IBD compared with control normal tissues. A total of 52 IBD tissues as well as corresponding normal tissues and 30 samples from healthy participants were obtained. We determined promoter methylation status of MGMT-B, SFRP2 and APC1A genes by chemical treatment with sodium bisulfite and subsequent MSP. The most frequently methylated locus was MGMT-B (71%; 34 of 48), followed by SFRP2 (66.6 %; 32 of 48), and APC1A (43.7%; 21 of 48). Our study demonstrated for the first time that hypermethylation of the MGMT-B and the SFRP2 gene promoter regions might be involved in IBD development. Methylation of MGMT-B and SFRP2 in IBD patients may provide a method for early detection of IBD-associated neoplasia. PMID:25773792

  2. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for the U.S. health care system and frequently complicates the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are more likely to be colonized with C. difficile and develop active infection than the general population. They are also more likely to have severe CDI and develop subsequent complications such as IBD flare, colectomy, or death. Even after successful initial treatment and recovery, recurrent CDI is common. Management of CDI in IBD is fraught with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges because the clinical presentations of CDI and IBD flare have considerable overlap. Fecal microbiota transplantation can be successful in curing recurrent CDI when other treatments have failed, but may also trigger IBD flare and this warrants caution. New experimental treatments including vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile offer promise but are not yet available for clinicians. A better understanding of the complex relationship between the gut microbiota, CDI, and IBD is needed. PMID:27120571

  3. The Short Health Scale: a valid and reliable measure of health related quality of life in English speaking inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Edel

    2013-09-01

    Health related quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease is influenced both by disease activity as well as by the psychosocial characteristics of the individual patient. The Short Health Scale (SHS) is a four-part visual analogue scale questionnaire using open-ended questions that are designed to assess the impact of inflammatory bowel disease on a health related quality of life. The four dimensions include bowel symptoms, activities of daily life, worry and general wellbeing. It has previously been validated in Swedish and Norwegian speaking patients.

  4. Diagnostic Workup of Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients In Europe: Results of A 5-Year Audit of The EUROKIDS Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bie, Charlotte I; Buderus, Stephan; Sandhu, Bhupinder K; de Ridder, Lissy; Paerregaard, Anders; Veres, Gabor; Dias, Jorge Amil; Escher, Johanna C

    2011-01-01

    . METHODS:: IBD patients (aged 0-18 years) were registered in 44 centres in 18 countries. Data on diagnostic workup were analysed according to year of diagnosis, type of IBD, and centre size. Diagnostic yield of OGD and ileal intubation was evaluated. RESULTS:: Between 2004 and 2009, 2087 newly diagnosed......OBJECTIVES:: In 2005, the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Working Group of ESPGHAN published consensus guidelines on the diagnostic workup of paediatric IBD, the Porto criteria. According to these guidelines, children suspected of IBD should have an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD......), ileocolonoscopy, and (except in cases of definitive ulcerative colitis (UC)) adequate imaging of the small bowel. To audit and evaluate the diagnostic workup of paediatric IBD patients in Europe, the Working Group created EUROKIDS, a prospective, web-based registry of newly diagnosed paediatric IBD patients...

  5. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune...

  6. May you never forget what is worth remembering: the relation between recall of medical information and medication adherence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, A.J.; Dijk, L. van; Smit, E.G.; Jansen, J.; Weert, J.C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nurses play an important role in educating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) about immunosuppressive or biological therapy during prescribing consultations. The education for immunosuppressive or biological therapy often contains complex information. Poor medication intake b

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. IBD (which is not the same thing as irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS), can cause more serious problems than ...

  8. Serological Screening for Celiac Disease in Adult Chinese Patients With Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongling; Zhou, Guoying; Luo, Linjie; Crusius, J Bart A; Yuan, Anlong; Kou, Jiguang; Yang, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wu, Jing; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Morré, Servaas A; Peña, A Salvador; Xia, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is common in Caucasians, but thought to be rare in Asians. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CD in Chinese patients with chronic diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D).From July 2010 to August 2012, 395 adult patients with IBS-D and 363 age and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and Xiaogan Central Hospital in Hubei province, central China. Patients with IBS-D were diagnosed according to the Rome III criteria. Serum Immunoglobulin (IgA/IgG) anti-human tissue transglutaminase (anti-htTG)-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) antibodies were measured in a single ELISA (QUANTA Lite h-tTG/DGP Screen). Upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies and HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 genotyping were performed in seropositive subjects and a gluten-free diet was prescribed.Seven IBS-D patients (7/395, 1.77%) and 2 healthy controls (2/363, 0.55%), were positive for anti-htTG/DGP antibodies. Of these 9 cases, 1 was lost to follow-up, 3 were suspected to have CD and 5 were eventually diagnosed as CD with intestinal histological lesions classified as Marsh Type II in 2 and Type III in 3. Of these 5 diagnosed CD patients, 4 (4/395, 1.01%) were from the IBS-D group and 1 (1/363, 0.28%) from the healthy control had asymptomatic CD. Two Type III CD patients with relatively high titers in the serologic assay were homozygous and heterozygous for haplotype HLA-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), respectively.In the present study, CD was present in 1.01% of patients with IBS-D and in 0.28% of the control group. We like to suggest that the haplotype HLA-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), which is common in Chinese, is a new susceptibility factor for CD in China. Larger screening and genetic studies are needed in the Chinese population of different regions. PMID:26496305

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  10. Interaction of the major inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility alleles in Crohn’s disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronika; Csngei; Luca; Járomi; EnikSáfrány; Csilla; Sipeky; Lili; Magyari; Bernadett; Faragó; Judit; Bene; Noémi; Polgár; Lilla; Lakner; Patrícia; Sarlós; Márta; Varga; Béla; Melegh

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the interaction of interleukin-23 receptor(IL23R)(rs1004819 and rs2201841),autophagy-related 16-like 1(ATG16L1)(rs2241880), caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 15 (CARD15)genes,and IBD5 locus in Crohn's disease(CD) patients. METHODS:A total of 315 unrelated subjects with CD and 314 healthy controls were genotyped.Interactions and specific genotype combinations of a total of eight variants were tested.The variants of IBD5locus(IGR2198a_1 rs11739135 and IGR2096a_1 rs12521868),CARD...

  11. The impact of nurse-led annual telephone follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterised by periods of disease activity and period with disease in remission. In Denmark all patients are seen in hospital settings. The aim of this study was to introduce a nurse-led phone service for stable patients replacing annual visits. The study....... Budget impact analysis (BIA) and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) were done. Furthermore, the staff evaluated the process. Almost 30% (n = 474) of the total cohort was enrolled in the service. Eighty-seven per cent of the patients welcomed the phone service beforehand. After implementation, 94% of the...... patients included were pleased with the service. The programme has shortened the waiting time for most other services, but no improvement in the workload was observed. The BIA showed limited savings. The CEA showed an annual saving of 100€ per patient when using the annual phone service over routine visits...

  12. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  13. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  14. Low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report on the follow-up of 24 patients with a prior history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (17 with ulcerative colitis (UC), 7 with Crohn's disease [CD]) underwent prostate brachytherapy between 1992 and 2004. Fifteen patients were treated with I-125 implantation and 6 patients were treated with Pd-103 alone or in combination with 45 Gy external beam radiation. Charts were reviewed for all patients, and all living patients were contacted by phone. National Cancer Institute common toxicity scores for proctitis were assigned to all patients. Actuarial risk of late toxicity was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 126 months (median, 48.5 months; mean, 56.8 months). Results: None of the patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 rectal toxicity. Four patients experienced Grade 2 late rectal toxicity. The 5-year actuarial freedom from developing late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 81%. At a median follow-up of 48.5 months, 23 patients were alive and had no evidence of disease with a median prostate-specific antigen for the sample of 0.1 ng/mL (range, <0.05-0.88 ng/mL). One patient died of other causes unrelated to his prostate cancer. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of controlled IBD. Therefore, brachytherapy should be considered a viable therapeutic option in this patient population

  15. Development, validation and clinical assessment of a short questionnaire to assess disease-related knowledge in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Denise

    2013-02-01

    Only two inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) knowledge scales are available, both primarily aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of clinical education programs. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short knowledge questionnaire for clinical and academic research purposes.

  16. Common diagnostic flow charts for diagnosis and management of patients with an inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the different views of the gastroenterologist, the radiologist and the nuclear medicine specialist in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. The role of clinical parameters and biochemical marker as well as the progressive use of the different imaging modalities: magnetic resonance, computerized tomography and nuclear medicine techniques is presented. The paper is an effort to combine the published European Crohn’s and Colitis Organization, European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology and European Association of Nuclear Medicine consensus with the conclusions of the multidisciplinary meeting organized in 2012 Milan during the EANM Congress with the objective of find a common diagnostic flowchart.

  17. High altitude journeys and flights are associated with an increased risk of flares in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vavricka, Stephan R.; Rogler, Gerhard; Maetzler, Sandra; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Safroneeva, Ekaterina; Frei, Pascal; Manser, Christine N.; Biedermann, Luc; Fried, Michael; Higgins, Peter; Wojtal, Kacper A.; Schoepfer, Alain M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hypoxia can induce inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. However, the impact of hypoxia on the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is poorly understood. We aimed to evaluate whether flights and/or journeys to regions lying at an altitude of >2000m above the sea level are associated with flare-ups within 4weeks of the trip. METHODS: IBD patients with at least one flare-up during a 12-month observation period were compared to a group of patients in remission. ...

  18. Arthritic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, C. H.; Lee, C H; Lee, J.; Song, C. H.; Lee, C.W.; Kim, W. H.; S.K. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is commonly associated with arthritic manifestations. They are divided into three clinical categories; peripheral arthritis, spondylitis, and sacroiliitis. To evaluate the incidence of arthritis associated with IBD in Korea, we retrospectively reviewed one hundred and twenty-nine patients with IBD, 77 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 52 with Crohn's disease (CD). Arthritis occurred in twenty-two patients (17.1%); 15 with UC(19.6%), 7 with CD (13.5%). Patients ...

  19. Capsule endoscopy retention as a helpful tool in the management of a young patient with suspected small-bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chryssostomos Kalantzis; Periklis Apostolopoulos; Panagiota Mavrogiannis; Dimitrios Theodorou; Xenofon Papacharalampous; Ioannis Bramis; Nikolaos Kalantzis

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an easy and painless procedure permitting visualization of the entire small-bowel during its normal peristalsis. However, important problems exist concerning capsule retention in patients at risk of small bowel obstruction. The present report describes a young patient who had recurrent episodes of overt gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, 18 years after small bowel resection in infancy for ileal atresia.Capsule endoscopy was performed, resulting in capsule retention in the distal small bowel. However, this event contributed to patient management by clearly identifying the site of obstruction and can be used to guide surgical intervention, where an anastomotic ulcer is identified.

  20. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsham NE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. Keywords: calprotectin, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation 

  1. Fecal Calprotectin Measured By Patients at Home Using Smartphones--A New Clinical Tool in Monitoring Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Kristoffer Kofod; Elsberg, Henriette; Thorkilgaard, Tine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fecal calprotectin is a reliable noninvasive marker for intestinal inflammation usable for monitoring patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Tests are usually performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which is time consuming and delays results, thus limiting its use in...... clinical practice. Our aim was to evaluate CalproSmart, a new rapid test for fecal calprotectin performed by patients themselves at home, and compare it to gold standard ELISA. METHODS: A total of 221 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (115 ulcerative colitis and 106 Crohn's disease) were included...... using CalproSmart at home, patients also sent in 2 fecal samples to be analyzed by ELISA. RESULTS: Totally, 894 fecal calprotectin results were obtained by ELISA, and 632 of them from CalproSmart. The correlation coefficient was 0.685, higher for academics than nonacademics (0.768 versus 0.637; P = 0...

  2. Endoscopic and symptoms analysis in Mexican patients with irritable Bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Camacho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the data of endoscopy and symptoms in 118 Mexican patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, dyspepsia, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD and erosive esophagitis (EE. IBS criteria were fulfilling for dyspepsia patients in 47%, for NERD in 48%, and for EE patients in 48% of cases. Esophagitis was present in 42% of patients with IBS and in 45% of patients with dyspepsia. A higher prevalence of hiatus hernia was found in EE vs. NERD. Heartburn and acid eructation were associated with the presence of esophagitis; acid eructation, regurgitation and nocturnal pain with duodenitis; and heartburn and regurgitation with hiatus hernia. Males more frequently reported: ucus in feces, abdoinal distension, nausea and gastritis; and oen ore frequently reported esophagitis and duodenitis. Patients with NERD (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.08 to 5.99, p=0.04, tenesmus and early satiety, and men had an increase risk for reporting hard or lumpy stools. In conclusion, nearly half of the Mexican patients with NERD, EE and dyspepsia fulfill criteria for IBS. A large number of symptoms were correlated with endoscopy, which can be used to improve the indication of the endoscopy and its implementation in clinical studies.O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os dados de endoscopia e sintomas de 118 pacientes mexicanos com síndrome do intestino irritável (IBS, dispepsia, doença do refluxo não-erosiva (NERD e esofagite erosiva (EE. Os pacientes com IBS preencheram os critérios para dispepsia em 47%, para NERD em 48%, e para pacientes EE em 48% dos casos. Esofagite estava presente em 42% dos pacientes com IBS e em 45% dos pacientes com dispepsia. A maior prevalência de hérnia de hiato foi encontrada na EE em comparação com NERD. Azia e eructação ácida foram associadas à presença de esofagite; eructação ácida, regurgitação e dor noturna, com duodenite; e azia e regurgitação com hérnia de hiato. Os homens relataram mais

  3. Is the disease course predictable in inflammatory bowel diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Kiss, Lajos S

    2010-01-01

    During the course of the disease, most patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) may eventually develop a stricturing or a perforating complication, and a significant number of patients with both CD and ulcerative colitis will undergo surgery. In recent years, research has focused on the determination of factors important in the prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases to improve stratification of patients, identify individual patient profiles, including clinical, laboratory and m...

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Major, Giles; Robin C. Spiller

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response,...

  5. Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie Pierik; Paul Rutgeerts; Robert Vlietinck; Severine Vermeire

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the association between variability in drug response and (or) drug toxicity and polymorphisms in genes. The goal of this field of science is to adapt drugs to a patient's specific genetic background and therefore make them more efficacious and safe. In this article we describe the variants in genes that influence either the efficacy or toxicity of common drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC),and Crohn's disease (CD) including sulfasalazine and mesalazine, azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), methotrexate (MTX), glucocorticosteroids (CSs) and infliximab. Furthermore, difficulties with pharmacogenetic studies in general and more specifically in IBD are described. Although pharmacogenetics is a promising field that already contributed to a better understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms of action of drugs used in IBD, the only discovery translated until now into daily practice is the relation between thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene polymorphisms and hematological toxicity of thiopurine treatment. In the future it is necessary to organize studies in well characterized patient cohorts who have been uniformly treated and systematically evaluated in order to quantitate drug response more objectively. An effort should be made to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials after appropriate informed consent for pharmacogenetic studies.

  6. The vexed relationship between Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease: an assessment of carriage in an outpatient setting among patients in remission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clayton, Evelyn M

    2009-05-01

    Comorbidity with Clostridium difficile may cause diagnostic delay in newly presenting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, trigger relapse in established disease, confound therapies, and serve as an indicator of an underlying defect in innate immunity. Retrospective analyses have suggested community acquisition; to address this we conducted a prospective analysis of C. difficile carriage in IBD patients using molecular methods specifically in an outpatient setting.

  7. Prognosis after first-time myocardial infarction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease according to disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    , 0.95-2.77) for persistent activity, and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.78-1.19) for remission when compared with the non-IBD group. Among 73 451 patients, including 863 with IBD, alive 30 days after discharge, IBD was associated with hazard ratios of 1.21 (95% CI, 0.99-1.49) for recurrent MI, 1.14 (95% CI, 1.......01-1.28) for all-cause mortality, and 1.17 (95% CI, 1.03-1.34) for the composite end point. When compared with the non-IBD group, IBD flares, in particular, were associated with increased risks of recurrent MI (hazard ratio, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.79-5.32), all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.......61-3.15), and the composite end point (hazard ratio, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.35-3.06), whereas no increased risk was identified in remission. CONCLUSIONS: Active inflammatory bowel disease worsens prognosis after MI, in particular, in relation with flares....

  8. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD and a...

  9. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla; Holubar, Stefan D

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased su...

  10. Serum YKL-40, a potential new marker of disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Ida; Johansen, J S; Price, P A; Munkholm, P

    2003-01-01

    microg/L (95% CI: 26-258 microg/L), P < 0.001) than patients with inactive UC (33 microg/L (19-163)) and age-matched controls (43 microg/L (20-124)). Patients with severe active CD had higher serum YKL-40 (59 microg/L (21-654), P < 0.001) than age-matched controls, but not higher than inactive CD...

  11. Smoking and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D T; Hanauer, S B

    2000-08-01

    It is well established that smoking cigarettes is associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and that non-smoking is associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). Furthermore, there is convincing evidence that smoking cigarettes has a negative effect on the course of CD, and that smoking cigarettes may improve the disease severity or have a 'protective' effect in some patients with UC. Despite these well-described associations, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects CD and UC is not known. Researchers have studied the systemic effects, cellular and humoral immune effects, mucosal changes, and the intestinal permeability changes with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and smoking. To date, none of these studies adequately explains the observed clinical patterns. It has been assumed that nicotine is the active agent in these associations, but clinical trials of nicotine chewing gum and transdermal nicotine in UC have shown limited benefit, and have been complicated by significant side-effects. Topical delivery systems for nicotine therapy are currently under development and await future clinical trials. PMID:10958212

  12. Genomic and clinical effects associated with a relaxation response mind-body intervention in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braden Kuo

    Full Text Available Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD can profoundly affect quality of life and are influenced by stress and resiliency. The impact of mind-body interventions (MBIs on IBS and IBD patients has not previously been examined.Nineteen IBS and 29 IBD patients were enrolled in a 9-week relaxation response based mind-body group intervention (RR-MBI, focusing on elicitation of the RR and cognitive skill building. Symptom questionnaires and inflammatory markers were assessed pre- and post-intervention, and at short-term follow-up. Peripheral blood transcriptome analysis was performed to identify genomic correlates of the RR-MBI.Pain Catastrophizing Scale scores improved significantly post-intervention for IBD and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD. Trait Anxiety scores, IBS Quality of Life, IBS Symptom Severity Index, and IBD Questionnaire scores improved significantly post-intervention and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD, respectively. RR-MBI altered expression of more genes in IBD (1059 genes than in IBS (119 genes. In IBD, reduced expression of RR-MBI response genes was most significantly linked to inflammatory response, cell growth, proliferation, and oxidative stress-related pathways. In IBS, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage related gene sets were significantly upregulated after RR-MBI. Interactive network analysis of RR-affected pathways identified TNF, AKT and NF-κB as top focus molecules in IBS, while in IBD kinases (e.g. MAPK, P38 MAPK, inflammation (e.g. VEGF-C, NF-κB and cell cycle and proliferation (e.g. UBC, APP related genes emerged as top focus molecules.In this uncontrolled pilot study, participation in an RR-MBI was associated with improvements in disease-specific measures, trait anxiety, and pain catastrophizing in IBS and IBD patients. Moreover, observed gene expression changes suggest that NF-κB is a target focus molecule in both IBS and IBD-and that its regulation may contribute to

  13. Dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tamboli, C P; Neut, C; Desreumaux, P; Colombel, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Abundant data have incriminated intestinal bacteria in the initiation and amplification stages of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the precise role of intestinal bacteria remains elusive. One theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of “protective” versus “harmful” intestinal bacteria—this concept has been termed “dysbiosis”. Arguments in support of this concept are discussed.

  14. Thromboembolism in inflammatory bowel disease: role of platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Webberley, M. J.; M. 't Hart; Melikian, V.

    1993-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are susceptible to thromboembolism and recently small vessel thrombosis has been implicated as an aetiological factor in Crohn's disease. This study therefore investigated platelet function in 104 patients with inflammatory bowel disease of whom eight had previous thromboembolism. Thirty five patients had reproducible spontaneous platelet aggregation of more than 30% (0 in controls) (p < 0.0001). A further 20 patients showed hypersensitivity of platele...

  15. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and the Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Patients With Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Tascilar, Koray; Yin, Hui; Aprikian, Armen; Bitton, Alain; Azoulay, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the mainstay treatment for advanced prostate cancer. By lowering androgen levels, ADT inhibits the progression of prostate cancer, but it may also affect gut autoimmunity. We investigated the association between ADT and the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease using a cohort of 31,842 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1988 and 2014, identified in the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Exposure to ADT was treated as a time-varying variable and lagged by 1 year to account for diagnostic delays, with nonuse as the reference category. During 133,018 person-years of follow-up, 48 men were newly diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (incidence rate (IR) = 36/100,000 person-years (PY)) and 12 were diagnosed with Crohn's disease (IR = 9/100,000 PY). In Cox proportional hazards models, ADT was associated with a decreased risk of ulcerative colitis (IR = 24/100,000 PY vs. IR = 50/100,000 PY; hazard ratio = 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.99) and a nonsignificant decreased risk of Crohn's disease (hazard ratio = 0.38, 95% confidence interval: 0.11, 1.37). These findings indicate that the use of ADT may be associated with intestinal autoimmunity. Further research is warranted to replicate these findings and assess their clinical significance. PMID:27268031

  16. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations...

  17. Iron requirements based upon iron absorption tests are poorly predicted by haematological indices in patients with inactive inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomer, Miranda C E; Cook, William B; Jan-Mohamed, Hamid Jan B; Hutchinson, Carol; Liu, Ding Yong; Hider, Robert C; Powell, Jonathan J

    2012-06-01

    Fe deficiency and Fe-deficiency anaemia are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Traditional clinical markers of Fe status can be skewed in the presence of inflammation, meaning that a patient's Fe status can be misinterpreted. Additionally, Fe absorption is known to be down-regulated in patients with active IBD. However, whether this is the case for quiescent or mildly active disease has not been formally assessed. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between Fe absorption, Fe requirements and standard haematological indices in IBD patients without active disease. A group of twenty-nine patients with quiescent or mildly active IBD and twenty-eight control subjects undertook an Fe absorption test that measured sequential rises in serum Fe over 4 h following ingestion of 200 mg ferrous sulphate. At baseline, serum Fe, transferrin saturation, non-transferrin-bound Fe (NTBI), ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor were all measured. Thereafter (30-240 min), only serum Fe and NTBI were measured. Fe absorption did not differ between the two groups (P = 0·9; repeated-measures ANOVA). In control subjects, baseline haematological parameters predicted Fe absorption (i.e. Fe requirements), but this was not the case for patients with IBD. Fe absorption is normal in quiescent or mildly active IBD patients but standard haematological parameters do not accurately predict Fe requirements. PMID:22152498

  18. The role of telemedicine and e-health in the management of inflammatory bowel disease: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi LJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leyla J Ghazi,1,2 Raymond K Cross1 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 2Veterans Affairs, Maryland Heath Care System, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Telemedicine has been used successfully in monitoring patients with a variety of chronic illnesses. Studies in the field of gastroenterology have shown that telemedicine is a feasible and well accepted method of patient monitoring. Several inflammatory bowel disease (IBD centers have developed telemedicine systems to improve the management of these complex diseases. Implementation of these systems is feasible, and telemedicine is well received by patients. Telemedicine has been shown to improve disease activity, quality of life, adherence with short-term treatment, and to shorten relapses. Telemedicine has also been shown to decrease health care utilization; however, use of telemedicine systems is also associated with increased “non-billable” encounters (phone calls and electronic messages. Telemedicine has also been shown to be an effective mechanism to provide remote care in areas without access to IBD specialty care. It is likely that telemedicine will be increasingly utilized in the future as an adjunct to traditional monitoring, especially for patients at high risk for nonadherence, and for those with limited access to IBD centers of excellence, to improve patient self-management, and as a mechanism to provide education, health maintenance, and medication reminders to patients. Keywords: IBD, patient self-management, remote care, adherence to treatment, quality of life, health care utilization, telemedicine

  19. Potential viral pathogenic mechanism for new variant inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlmann, V; Martin, C. M.; Sheils, O; Pilkington, L; I. Silva; Killalea, A; Murch, S B; Walker-Smith, J; Thomson, M.; Wakefield, A J; O'Leary, J J

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A new form of inflammatory bowel disease (ileocolonic lymphonodular hyperplasia) has been described in a cohort of children with developmental disorder. This study investigates the presence of persistent measles virus in the intestinal tissue of these patients (new variant inflammatory bowel disease) and a series of controls by molecular analysis.

  20. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Roxana Georgescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nodosum and pyodermagangrenosum. The pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood but it seems that related mechanisms are involved in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment should be aimed at both the cutaneous manifestations and the bowel inflammation

  1. Use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: Statements of the Italian Group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annese, Vito; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of biological therapies, particularly anti-TNFα agents, has revolutionized the management of inflammatory bowel disease in those cases which are refractory to conventional treatment; however these drugs are not risk-free and their use has substantially increased the cost of treatment. As marketing protection expires for original, first-generation biopharmaceuticals, lower-cost "copies" of these drugs produced by competitor companies-referred to as biosimilars-are already entering the market. In September 2013, the European Medicines Agency approved two infliximab biosimilars for treatment of adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients, a decision based largely on efficacy and safety data generated in studies of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For many clinicians, extrapolation practices and the general question of interchangeability between biosimilars and reference biologics are cause for concern. In the present paper, the Italian Group for inflammatory bowel disease presents its statements on these issues, with emphasis on the peculiar clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease and the importance of providing physicians and patients with adequate information and guarantees on the safety and efficacy of these new drugs in the specific setting of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25139379

  2. CT enteroclysis in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The role of CT enteroclysis is gaining on importance in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. The aim of the study was to present own experiences in CT enteroclysis application, with the use of a 64-detector CT unit. Material/Methods: CT enteroclyses were performed in 60 patients: 53 with the suspicion of the Crohns disease, 2 suspected for carcinoid, 1 with suspicion of the fistula between the small bowel and the bladder, 2 suspected for the tumor of the ileo-caecal region, and in 1 case, the aim of examination was to carry out an evaluation of the postsurgical state of the bowel-bowel anastomosis. We used own endoscopic technique of catheter insertion into the bowel, which shortens the examination time and improves patients comfort. Results: The catheter was correctly introduced into the small bowel in 58 patients (endoscopy had to be repeated in 4 cases). Only 2 examinations failed, because patients refused repeated endoscopy. Radiological signs of the Crohns disease were found in 50 out of 53 patients. In the 3 remaining patients, the appearance of the small bowel was normal. In 5 non-Crohns disease patients, CT enteroclysis enabled a good visualization of the pathology (tumors, fistula). Conclusions: CT enteroclysis with the use of the 64-detector CT unit is a valuable method in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. It could supplement or precede capsule endoscopy. (authors)

  3. NOD2/CARD15 gene polymorphism in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: Is Hungary different?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carsten Büning; Tomas Mlolnar; Ferenc Nagy; Janos Lonovics; Renita Weltrich; Bettina Bochow; Janine Genschel; Hartmut Schmidt; Herbert Lochs

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the impact of NOD2/CARD15 mutations on the clinical course of Crohn's disease patients from an eastern European country (Hungary).METHODS: We investigated the prevalence of the three common NOD2/CARD15 mutations (Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg,1007finsC) in 148 patients with Crohn's disease, 128patients with ulcerative colitis and 208 controls recruited from the University of Szeged, Hungary. In patients with Crohn's disease, the prevalence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations was correlated to the demographical and clinical parameters.RESULTS: In total, 32.4% of Crohn's disease patients carried at least one mutant allele within NOD2/CARD15compared to 13.2% of patients with ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0002) and to 11.5% of controls (P<0.0001). In Crohn's disease patients, the allele frequencies for Arg702Trp,Gly908Arg and 1007finsC were 7.1%, 3.0% and 10.8%respectively. Interestingly, only the 1007finsC mutation was associated with a distinct clinical phenotype. The patients positive for the 1007finsC mutation suffered more frequently from stenotic disease behaviour (P = 0.008). Furthermore,51.9% of patients positive for the 1007finsC mutation underwent a surgical resection within the ileum compared to only 17.4% of patients without the 1007finsC mutation (P = 0.001). With respect to the other two mutations (Arg702Trp and Gly908Arg), no associations were found with all investigated clinical parameters.CONCLUSION: NOD2/CARD15 mutations are frequently found in Crohn's disease patients from Hungary. The 1007finsC mutation is associated with stenotic disease behaviour and frequent ileal resections.

  4. FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cell Modifications in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Treated with Anti-TNFα Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Guidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treg modulation has been hypothesized as one of the mechanisms by which antitumor necrosis factor α (TNFα agents exert their action in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. However, data in IBD are still conflicting. We evaluated CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ (Tregs by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 32 adult IBD patient before (T0 and after the induction of anti-TNFα therapy (T1. Eight healthy controls (HCs were included. We also evaluated the number of FOXP3+ cells in the lamina propria (LP in biopsies taken in a subset of patients and controls. Treg frequencies were significantly increased in peripheral blood from our patients after anti-TNFα therapy compared to T0. T1 but not T0 levels were higher than HC. The increase was detectable only in clinical responders to the treatment. A negative correlation was found among delta Treg levels and the age of patients or disease duration and with the activity score of Crohn’s disease (CD. No significant differences were found in LP FOXP3+ cells. Our data suggest the possibility that in IBD patients the treatment with anti-TNFα may affect Treg percentages and that Treg modifications may correlate with clinical response, but differently in early versus late disease.

  5. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. PMID:24969296

  6. CT enteroclysis in small bowel Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease has changed dramatically over the last decade. The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon endoscopy and the introduction of newer therapeutic agents have changed the role of imaging in the small bowel. Additionally, advances in multidetector CT technology have further changed how radiologic investigations are utilized in the diagnosis and management of small bowel Crohn's disease. This article describes how we perform CT enteroclysis in the investigation of small bowel Crohn's disease and discusses the role of CT enteroclysis in the current management of small bowel Crohn's disease.

  7. 5-aminosalicylic acid is an attractive candidate agent for chemoprevention of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Cheng; Pierre Desreumaux

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is classically subdivided into ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Patients with IBD have increased risk for colorectal cancer. Because the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma has not been entirely defined yet and there is no ideal treatment for colon cancer, cancer prevention has become increasingly important in patients with IBD. The two adopted methods to prevent the development of colon cancer in clinical practice include the prophylactic colectomy and colonoscopic surveillance.But patients and physicians seldom accept colectomy as a routine preventive method and most patients do not undergo appropriate colonoscopic surveillance. Chemoprevention refers to the use of natural or synthetic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or to delay the process of carcinogenesis.Chemoprevention is a particularly useful method in the management of patients at high risk for the development of specific cancers based on inborn genetic susceptibility, the presence of cancer-associated disease, or other known risk factors. Prevention of colorectal cancer by administration of chemopreventive agents is one of the most promising options for IBD patients who are at increased risks of the disease. The chemopreventive efficacy of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against intestinal tumors has been well established. But with reports that NSAIDs aggravated the symptoms of colitis, their sustained use for the purpose of cancer chemoprevention has been relatively contraindicated in IBD patients. Another hopeful candidate chemoprevention drug for IBD patients is 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is well tolerated by most patients and has limited systemic adverse effects, and no gastrointestinal toxicity. 5-ASA lacks the well-known side effects of longterm NSAIDs use. Retrospective correlative studies have suggested that the long-term use of 5-ASA in IBD patients may significantly reduce the risk of development of colorectal cancer

  8. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  9. Gastric emptying and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Binnewies, Ulrich; Rösch, Marie;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric emptying (GE) is delayed in a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We have shown before that altered release of gastrointestinal hormones may contribute to GE disturbances, but overall effects of disease activity remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate GE...

  10. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grace; Y; Lam; Brendan; P; Halloran; Anthea; C; Peters; Richard; N; Fedorak

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders(LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus(EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system’s ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders(PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here,we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD.

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Tezel; Muzaffer Demir

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a group of chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal system. In these cases, findings are detected in extraintestinal systems also. There is a tendency for thrombotic events in IBD, as in the other inflammatory processes. The pathogenesis of this thrombotic tendency is multidimensional, including lack of natural anticoagulants, prothrombotic media induced via the inflammatory process, long-term sedentary life style, steroid use, s...

  12. Somatostatin in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Bergeijk, J D; Wilson, J H P

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is controlled by various immunomodulating cells, interacting by molecular mediators. Neuropeptides, released by enteric nerve cells and neuroendocrine mucosa cells, are able to affect several aspects of the general and intestinal immune system, with both pro- as well as anti-inflammatory activities. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) there is both morphological as well as experimental evidence for involvement of neuropeptides in the pathogenesis. Somatostatin is the m...

  13. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Q Shih; Stephan R Targan

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing immune mediated disorders that results from an aberrant response to gut luminal antigen in genetically susceptible host. The adaptive immune response that is then triggered was widely considered to be a T-helper-1 mediated condition in Crohn's disease and T-helper-2 mediated condition in ulcerative colitis. Recent studies in animal models, genome wide association, and basic science has provided important insights in in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, one of which was the characterization of the interleukin-23/Th-17 axis.

  14. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Germany – a survey of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Eckhart G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of CAM in German patients with IBD. Methods A questionnaire was offered to IBD patients participating in patient workshops which were organized by a self-help association, the German Crohn's and Colitis Association. The self-administered questionnaire included demographic and disease-related data as well as items analysing the extent of CAM use and satisfaction with CAM treatment. Seven commonly used CAM methods were predetermined on the questionnaire. Results 413 questionnaires were completed and included in the analysis (n = 153 male, n = 260 female; n = 246 Crohn's disease, n = 164 ulcerative colitis. 52 % of the patients reported CAM use in the present or past. In detail, homeopathy (55%, probiotics (43%, classical naturopathy (38%, Boswellia serrata extracts (36% and acupuncture/Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM (33% were the most frequently used CAM methods. Patients using probiotics, acupuncture and Boswellia serrata extracts (incense reported more positive therapeutic effects than others. Within the statistical analysis no significant predictors for CAM use were found. 77% of the patients felt insufficiently informed about CAM. Conclusion The use of CAM in IBD patients is very common in Germany, although a large proportion of patients felt that information about CAM is not sufficient. However, to provide an evidence-based approach more research in this field is desperately needed. Therefore, physicians should increasingly inform IBD patients about benefits and limitations of CAM treatment.

  15. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course of...... period, stool specimens for C. difficile toxins analysis were collected from 112 children with celiac disease as controls. RESULTS: Clostridium difficile occurrence was significantly higher in patients with IBD compared with patients with celiac disease (7.5% versus 0.8%; P = 0.008). Clostridium...... C. difficile infected patients. METHODS: In this prospective, comparative, multicenter study, 211 pediatric patients with IBD were enrolled from October 2010 to October 2011 and tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins A and B in their stools at 0, 6, and 12 months. During the same study...

  16. Complementary Practitioners’ View of Treatment for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, Marja J; Rapchuk, Ivan; Liew, Trina; Weir, Vanessa; Hilsden, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    A substantial number of patients with inflammatory bowel disease use complementary therapies to manage their disease, including chiropractic and herbal therapies. The objective of this study was to explore whether providers of these therapies see patients with inflammatory bowel disease and recommend therapies, and to determine their opinions about the treatments that they recommend. The study sample comprised 66 chiropractors, 19 pharmacists, 16 herbalists and 15 health food store employees ...

  17. The prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease with inflammatory low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lo Nigro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, are Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, are frequently complicated by joint complaints with prevalence that varies between 10 and 28 %. The IBD related arthropathy may be expressed as peripheral arthritis or axial one frequently indistinguishable from the classical ankylosing spondylitis (AS. According to ESSG criteria for spondyloarthropathy, the presence of synovitis or the inflammatory back pain (IBP in IBD patients is diagnostic for spondyloarthropathy, but for diagnosis of as also radiological criteria must be fulfilled. There are few studies regarding the radiological prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with IBD. We examined, by plain film radiograms of pelvis, 100 sacroiliac joints (SJ of 50 IBD patients with IBP. The New York (1984 SJ radiological score with gradation from 0 to 4 was applied. Total sacroiliac score (SJS was summarized between left and right side (from 0 to 8. Fourteen patients fulfilled New York modified criteria for AS and 8 patients had unilateral 2nd grade sacroiliitis. Only 4 of 14 AS patients (28% were HLA B27 positive. Thirty patients had localized IBP, 10 extended to buttock and 4 extended to sacrum. Sixteen patients had sciatica-like extension of back pain. A difference in SJS between left and right side were observed only in CD patients (1,3± 0,8 e 0,8± 0,9 respectively; p<0,05, but not in UC (1,5± 1,2 vs 1,5± 1,3; p=ns nor in total IBD patients (1,4± 1 vs 1,2± 1,2; p=ns. Total SJS was higher in UC respect CD, but not significantly (2,9± 2,3 vs 2,1± 1,5; p=ns. Our data confirm the importance of these symptoms in patients with IBD, who need to be carefully investigated also for these aspects.

  18. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Roxana Georgescu; Cristina Iulia Mitran; Madalina Irina Mitran; Monica Costescu; Vasile Benea; Maria Isabela Sarbu; Mircea Tampa

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nod...

  19. Depression and anxiety levels in therapy-na(i)ve patients with inflammatory bowel disease and cancer of the colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Branislav R Filipovi(c); Branka F Filipovi(c); Mirko Kerkez; Nikola Milini(c); Tomislav Ran(d)elovi(c)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether depression and anxiety are more expressed in patients with the first episode of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in individuals with newly discovered cancer of the colon (CCa).METHODS: A total of 32 patients with IBD including 13males and 19 females, aged 27 to 74, and 30 patients with CCa including 20 males and 10 females, aged 39-78,underwent a structured interview, which comprised Hamilton's Depression Rating Inventory, Hamilton's Anxiety Rating Inventory and Paykel's Stressful Events Rating Scale.RESULTS: Patients of the IBD group expressed both depression and anxiety. Depressive mood, sense of guilt, psychomotor retardation and somatic anxiety were also more pronounced in IBD patients. The discriminant function analysis revealed the total depressive score was of high importance for the classification of a newly diagnosed patient into one of the groups.CONCLUSION: Newly diagnosed patients with IBD have higher levels of depression and anxiety. Moreover, a psychiatrist in the treatment team is advisable from the beginning.

  20. Biologic Concentration Testing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically pe...

  1. Oral metronidazole, an effective treatment for Sweet's syndrome in a patient with associated inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banet, D E; McClave, S A; Callen, J P

    1994-09-01

    A 39-year-old woman with chronic, recurrent Sweet's syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and possible Crohn's disease was successfully treated with oral metronidazole. After 4 years of recurrent skin lesions which involved the hands and face, our patient developed genital and perianal ulcerations which were also histopathologically characterized by a neutrophilic infiltrate. In addition, she had a nondeforming polyarthritis that accompanied recurrences of her skin lesions. The patient was given oral metronidazole, an agent frequently used for perianal Crohn's disease, and achieved complete resolution of the perianal and perineal ulcers, the cutaneous lesions of Sweet's syndrome and the associated polyarthritis. PMID:7799365

  2. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Walsham NE; Sherwood RA

    2016-01-01

    Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Acc...

  3. The impact of biologics on health-related quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauran Vogelaar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Lauran Vogelaar1, Adriaan van’t Spijker2, C Janneke van der Woude11Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2Department of Psychology and Psychotherapy, Erasmus Medical Centre, RotterdamBackground: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by a chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Adult IBD patients suffer from a disabling disease which greatly affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL. A worse HRQoL in these patients may result in a defensive and ineffective use of medical attention and thus higher medical costs. Because of its chronic nature, IBD may also cause psychological problems in many patients which may also influence HRQoL and care-seeking behavior. An important factor reducing HRQoL is disease activity. Induction of remission and long-term remission are important goals for improving HRQoL. Furthermore, remission is associated with a decreased need for hospitalization and surgery and increased employment, which in turn improve HRQoL. Treatment strategies available for many years are corticosteroids, 5-aminosalicylates and immunnosuppressants, but these treatments did not show significant long-term improvement on HRQoL. The biologics, which induce rapid and sustained remission, may improve HRQoL.Objective: To review and evaluate the current literature on the effect of biologics on HRQoL of IBD patients.Methods: We performed a MEDLINE search and reviewed the effect of different biologics on HRQoL. The following subjects and synonyms of these terms were used: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, quality of life, health-related quality of life, fatigue, different anti-TNF medication, and biologicals/biologics (MESH. Studies included were limited to English-language, adult population, full-text, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled in which HRQoL was measured.Results: Out of 202 identified articles, 8 randomized controlled trials (RCT met the inclusion

  4. Brain involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zikou, Anastasia K.; Astrakas, Loukas G.; Tzarouchi, Loukia C.; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidou, Maria; Tsianos, Epameinondas [University of Ioannina, 1st Department of Internal Medicine (Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit), Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    To investigate structural brain changes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 IBD patients (aged 45.16 ± 14.71 years) and 20 aged-matched control subjects. The imaging protocol consisted of a sagittal-FLAIR, a T1-weighted high-resolution three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and a multisession spin-echo echo-planar diffusion-weighted sequence. Differences between patients and controls in brain volume and diffusion indices were evaluated using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) methods, respectively. The presence of white-matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) was evaluated on FLAIR images. VBM revealed decreased grey matter (GM) volume in patients in the fusiform and the inferior temporal gyrus bilaterally, the right precentral gyrus, the right supplementary motor area, the right middle frontal gyrus and the left superior parietal gyrus (p < 0.05). TBSS showed decreased axial diffusivity (AD) in the right corticospinal tract and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus in patients compared with controls. A larger number of WMHIs was observed in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with IBD show an increase in WMHIs and GM atrophy, probably related to cerebral vasculitis and ischaemia. Decreased AD in major white matter tracts could be a secondary phenomenon, representing Wallerian degeneration. (orig.)

  5. Brain involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate structural brain changes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 IBD patients (aged 45.16 ± 14.71 years) and 20 aged-matched control subjects. The imaging protocol consisted of a sagittal-FLAIR, a T1-weighted high-resolution three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and a multisession spin-echo echo-planar diffusion-weighted sequence. Differences between patients and controls in brain volume and diffusion indices were evaluated using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) methods, respectively. The presence of white-matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) was evaluated on FLAIR images. VBM revealed decreased grey matter (GM) volume in patients in the fusiform and the inferior temporal gyrus bilaterally, the right precentral gyrus, the right supplementary motor area, the right middle frontal gyrus and the left superior parietal gyrus (p < 0.05). TBSS showed decreased axial diffusivity (AD) in the right corticospinal tract and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus in patients compared with controls. A larger number of WMHIs was observed in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with IBD show an increase in WMHIs and GM atrophy, probably related to cerebral vasculitis and ischaemia. Decreased AD in major white matter tracts could be a secondary phenomenon, representing Wallerian degeneration. (orig.)

  6. Effects of dermatan sulfate derivatives on platelet surface P-selectin expression and protein C activity in blood of inflammatory bowel disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Sheng-Li; Du, Hai-Yan; Chi, Yan-Qing; Cui, Hui-Fei; Cao, Ji-Chao; Geng, Mei-yu; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of dermatan sulfate (DS) derivatives on platelet surface P-selectin expression and blood activated protein C (APC) activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to clarity the anti-inflammatory mechanism of DS derivatives.

  7. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging colonography with conventional colonoscopy for the assessment of intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Schreyer, A G; Rath, H C; Kikinis, R.; Völk, M; Schölmerich, J; Feuerbach, S; Rogler, G; Seitz, J; Herfarth, H

    2005-01-01

    Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based colonography represents a new imaging tool which has mainly been investigated for polyp screening. To evaluate this approach for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we compared MRI based colonography with conventional colonoscopy for assessing the presence and extent of colonic inflammation.

  8. Vertebral fractures in patients with inflammatory bowel disease COMPARED with a healthy population: a prospective case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prospective study was performed to compare the prevalence of morphometric vertebral fractures (MVF between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and healthy subjects and to identify predictive factors of fracture. Methods A total of 107 patients with IBD (53 with Crohn’s disease and 54 with ulcerative colitis and 51 healthy subjects participated in the study. Information about anthropometric parameters, toxins, previous fractures, and parameters related to this disease were evaluated. The index of vertebral deformity, bone mass density (BMD, and biochemical parameters were calculated. Results A total of 72 fractures were detected in 38.32% of patients with IBD, and 10 fractures were detected in 13.73% of healthy subjects; the risk of fracture in patients with IBD was higher than that in control subjects (OR, 4.03; 95% CI, 1.652–9.847; p p = 0.17 and femoral neck, r = −0.138, p = 0.07. Corticosteroid treatment was not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures nor with taking corticosteroids (r = 0.135, p = 0.14 or the duration for which they were taken (r = 0.08, p = 0.38, whereas this relationship was present in the controls (r = −0.365, p = 0.01. In the multivariate analysis, none of the measured parameters were significantly predictive of fracture, only to manifested IBD. Hypovitaminosis D was observed in 55.14% of patients with IBD. Conclusions The prevalence of morphometric vertebral fractures is higher in patients with IBD than in the healthy population, without association with BMD or corticoid treatment. Simply having IBD was proven to be a predictive factor of fracture. We observed a high incidence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with IBD.

  9. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  10. Consumption of Dental Treatment in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, a Register Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Annsofi; Fored, Michael C.; Håkansson, Jan; Ekbom, Anders; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the consumption of dental treatment among patients with Crohn´s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) compared to age and gender matched control groups. Design The study group comprised 2085 patients with CD and 3161 with UC from the Uppsala-Örebro region and from the Stockholm region. The patients in the cohort were diagnosed between 1960 and 1989. Patients up to 70 years of age were included in the study. The two patients groups were compared to age- and gender-matched, randomly selected control groups from the same geographic area comprising a corresponding number of participants. Results CD patients had significantly higher total number of procedures registered (p < 0.000). The difference was most pronounced for removable dentures (+65%), fillings in front teeth (+52%) and endodontic treatment (+46%) when Crohn’s patients were compared to controls (p<0.001). The corresponding figures for UC patients were also a significantly higher total number of procedures (p < 0.005), more clinical examinations (p<0.000), fillings in canines and incisors (p < 0.001) and fillings in bicuspids and molars (p < 0.000). Conclusion This study demonstrate that CD and UC individuals use more dental treatment compared to an age-gender matched control group, and more caries-related treatments. The difference was most pronounced for restorative treatment in patients with Crohn’s. PMID:26267797

  11. Anorexia nervosa complicating inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallett, P; MURCH, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in adolescence and complicated by anorexia nervosa, are presented. The management of the bowel disease with corticosteroids appeared to precipitate the eating disorder in one case whereas covert withdrawal of steroid treatment led to life threatening complications of inflammatory bowel disease in the other. The difficulties of managing two serious conditions, each ideally treated in a specialist centre, are discussed and the dangers of treati...

  12. Clinical features of active tuberculosis that developed during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kang, Sang Bum; Koo, Ja Seol; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, You Sun; Joo, Young Eun; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased risks of tuberculosis (TB) infection. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who developed active TB during anti-TNF therapy. Methods Ten cases of active TB developed in patients treated with infliximab (n=592) or adalimumab (n=229) for UC (n=160) or CD (n=661) were reviewed. We analyzed demographics, interval between start of anti-TNF therapy and active TB development, tests for latent TB infection (LTBI), concomitant medications, and the details of diagnosis and treatments for TB. Results The incidence of active TB was 1.2% (10/821): 1.5% (9/592) and 0.4% (1/229) in patients receiving infliximab and adalimumab, respectively. The median time to the development of active TB after initiation of anti-TNF therapy was three months (range: 2–36). Three patients had past histories of treatment for TB. Positive findings in a TB skin test (TST) and/or interferon gamma releasing assay (IGRA) were observed in three patients, and two of them received anti-TB prophylaxis. Two patients were negative by both TST and IGRA. The most common site of active TB was the lungs, and the active TB was cured in all patients. Conclusions Active TB can develop during anti-TNF therapy in IBD patients without LTBI, and even in those with histories of TB treatment or LTBI prophylaxis. Physicians should be aware of the potential for TB development during anti-TNF therapy, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB.

  13. Effect of oral lactulose on clinical and immunohistochemical parameters in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manns Michael P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prebiotic potential of lactulose is well established and preclinical studies demonstrated a protective effect of lactulose in murine models of colitis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical and histological efficacy of lactulose in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, for which probiotic therapy yielded promising results. Methods Patients were treated with standard medication alone or combined with 10 g lactulose daily as adjuvant therapy for 4 months. Clinical efficacy of treatment was assessed using clinical activity indices, a quality of life index (IBDQ, endoscopic scores, defecation frequency and monitoring corticosteroid medication. Orsomucoid, alpha1-antitrypsin and other laboratory parameters were determined. In addition, in some participants colonic biopsies were analyzed with haematoxylin-eosin staining or with antibodies against HLA-DR, CD68, IgA and CD3, and evaluated systematically. All measurements were performed both at enrolment and at the end of the trial. Results 14 patients presenting ulcerative colitis (UC and 17 patients presenting Crohn's disease (CD, most of them in a clinically active state, were enrolled in this pilot study. After 4 month no significant improvement of clinical activity index, endoscopic score or immunohistochemical parameters was observed in CD or UC patients receiving lactulose in comparison to the control group. However, significant improvement of quality of life was observed in UC patients receiving lactulose compared to the control group (p = 0.04. Conclusion The findings of the present pilot study indicate that oral lactulose has no beneficial effects in IBD patients in particular with regard to clinical activity, endoscopic score or immunohistochemical parameters. The importance of the beneficial effect of lactulose in UC patients regarding the quality of life needs further evaluation in larger controlled clinical trials. Trial registration

  14. Medication beliefs among patients with inflammatory bowel disease who report low quality of life: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hungin APS

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-adherence to drug therapy is common in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD. Patients' beliefs about treatment have an important influence on adherence. An in-depth understanding of this area is, therefore, important for patient-centred care. The aim of the study was to assess patients' perspectives and beliefs about their medication and to determine how this relates to medicine taking and other related health behaviour as part of a larger qualitative study on health care related behaviour in patients with IBD. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews and focus groups. An iterative approach following principles of grounded theory was applied to data collection and analysis. Results Main emerging themes were: balance of perceived necessity versus concerns, perceived impact of symptoms and willingness to self-manage medication. There was a clear distinction made between steroids and other preparations. Concerns included the fear of both short and long-term side-effects (mainly steroids, uncertainties about drug interactions and development of long-term immunity. Adapting to and accepting medication use was linked to acceptance of IBD. Conclusion A concordant approach including flexible and pro-active support as well as accurate information is important in assisting patients with IBD to self-manage their medication effectively. Health professionals should be aware that attitudes to medicine taking and other related behaviours may be medicine specific and change over time.

  15. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, S; Andoh, A; Bamba, S; Ogawa, A.; Hata, K.; Araki, Y; Bamba, T; Fujiyama, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: Interleukin (IL) 17 is a cytokine which exerts strong proinflammatory activities. In this study we evaluated changes in IL-17 expression in the inflamed mucosa and in the serum of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  16. Management of the Pregnant Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient on Antitumour Necrosis Factor Therapy: State of the Art and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette PY Leung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy has been a major advance in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by improving rates of mucosal healing, steroid-free remission, and decreasing rates of hospitalization and surgery. Because IBD affects women in their reproductive years, clinicians have and will continue to be asked in the future about the safety profile of these agents and their potential impact on pregnancy, the developing fetus and newborn. Immunoglobulin G transfer from the mother to fetus begins in the second trimester, with an elevation starting at 22 weeks of gestation and the largest amount transferred in the third trimester. Although research investigating the long-term outcomes of children exposed to anti-TNF therapy in utero is limited, there is no known adverse effect on either pregnancy or newborn outcomes including infectious complications with this class of drugs. The World Congress of Gastroenterology consensus statement on biological therapy for IBD considered infliximab and adalimumab to be low risk and compatible with use during conception and during pregnancy in at least the first two trimesters. Based on a clinical algorithm used at the University of Calgary Pregnancy and IBD clinic (Calgary, Alberta, recommendations have been provided on the management of pregnant patients on anti-TNF therapy, particularly with regard to third-trimester dosing, taking into account disease characteristics of individual patients. When educated about the safety of anti-TNF therapy during pregnancy, patients often choose to continue on therapy during the third trimester.

  17. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients. PMID:26354428

  18. Distinct inflammatory and cytopathic characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from inflammatory bowel disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Thysen, Anna Hammerich;

    2015-01-01

    cytokine profile as ECN and ten of the new E. coli isolates displayed as high level IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-23 and TNF-α from moDCs irrespective of their site of isolation (ileum/colon/faeces), disease origin (diseased/non-diseased) or known virulence factors. Contrarily, 691-04A and one new IBD E. coli......Escherichia coli (E. coli) may be implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as implied from a higher prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli in the gut of IBD-affected individuals. However, it is unclear whether different non-diarrheagenic E. coli spp. segregate from each...... other in their ability to promote intestinal inflammation. Herein we compared the inflammation-inducing properties of non-diarrheagenic LF82, 691-04A, E. coli Nissle 1917 (ECN) and eleven new intestinal isolates from different locations in five IBD patients and one healthy control. Viable E. coli were...

  19. Does pregnancy change the disease course? A study in a European cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, L; Vind, Ida; Politi, P;

    2006-01-01

    investigate whether pregnancy influences disease course and phenotype in IBD patients. METHODS: In a European cohort of IBD patients, a 10-yr follow-up was performed by scrutinizing patient files and approaching the patients with a questionnaire. The cohort comprised 1,125 patients, of whom 543 were women.......18 flares/yr, p = 0.008) and CD patients (0.76 vs 0.12 flares/yr, p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy did not influence disease phenotype or surgery rates, but was associated with a reduced number of flares in the following years....

  20. PPARγ in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Annese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is member of a family of nuclear receptors that interacts with nuclear proteins acting as coactivators and corepressors. The colon is a major tissue which expresses PPARγ in epithelial cells and, to a lesser degree, in macrophages and lymphocytes and plays a role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Indeed, both natural and synthetic PPARγ ligands have beneficial effects in different models of experimental colitis, with possible implication in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. This paper will specifically focus on potential role of PPARγ in the predisposition and physiopathology of IBD and will analyze its possible role in medical therapy.

  1. A Look into the Small Bowel in Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Soo Jung; Kim, Won Ho

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease that can affect the entire gastrointestinal tract, with the small bowel (SB) being the most commonly affected site. In some patients, refractory inflammation or chronic strictures of the SB are responsible for a debilitating course of the disease that might lead to severely reduced quality of life. Therefore, SB imaging is a crucial element in diagnosing and/or managing SB CD, and continues to evolve because of technologic advances. SB end...

  2. [Evidence-based and consented pathways for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspe, H; Conrad, S; Muche-Borowski, C

    2009-06-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are diseases characterized by remission and relapse, an early age of onset and restrictions on activities and participation. IBD patients need a comprehensive, easily accessible and problem-oriented health care. This requires the integration and coordination of different health care sectors, medical and non-medical professionals, social and health care facilities and funding agencies. The pathways to guide patients through integrated health care were based on clinical considerations, interviews with patients and specialists, systematically searched evidence and results of a questionnaire survey. Within a systematic assessment-assignment approach relevant problems were identified and subsequently related to different medical and non-medical professionals, health care services and medical sectors. The pathways further imply (1) medical care according to evidence-based guideline recommendations, (2) patient education programs to foster shared decision making and self-management and (3) suggestions for further research. The pathways were consented in a consensus conference using nominal group process methods. Their feasibility and effect will be evaluated within a regional implementation project. PMID:19533545

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinical aspects and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhoury M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc Fakhoury,1 Rebecca Negrulj,2 Armin Mooranian,2 Hani Al-Salami2 1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is defined as a chronic intestinal inflammation that results from host-microbial interactions in a genetically susceptible individual. IBDs are a group of autoimmune diseases that are characterized by inflammation of both the small and large intestine, in which elements of the digestive system are attacked by the body's own immune system. This inflammatory condition encompasses two major forms, known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients affected by these diseases experience abdominal symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloody stools, and vomiting. Moreover, defects in intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of patients affected by IBD. In this review, we first describe the types and symptoms of IBD and investigate the role that the epithelial barrier plays in the pathophysiology of IBD as well as the major cytokines involved. We then discuss steps used to diagnose this disease and the treatment options available, and finally provide an overview of the recent research that aims to develop new therapies for such chronic disorders. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, cytokines

  4. Efficacy of intravenous iron in treating iron deficiency anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: Are there predictors of response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Ferreiro Iglesias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is a very common disorder. Until recently, oral iron has been the mainstay therapy, nevertheless it has been associated with intolerance and noncompliance. Therefore, the goal of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous iron in IDA in IBD patients and the secondary aim was to investigate whether other potential factors could influence in the response to the treatment. Design: an open-label, prospective, consecutive, single centre study. Material and methods: we performed our study in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn's disease (CD with severe anaemia or intolerance with oral iron. All of them received intravenous sacarose iron and did biochemistry profile with haemoglobin (Hb. Moreover, the correlation with other variables was studied: age, sex, smoking habit, IBD type, previous surgery and type of surgery and other treatments. Response was defined as Hb increase of ≥ 2 g/dL or normalization of the levels. Results: fifty-four patients were included into the study, 34 (63% with UC y 20 (37% with CD, 18 (33.3% men and 36 women (66.6% and the average was 48 ± 14 years. The total proportion of responders was 52% (SD ± 05; 43% of the patients reached Hb ≥ 2 g/dl and y 9% of them normalized Hb. Only the utilization of 5-ASA was associated with low response to iron treatment (p < 0.05. Conclusions: our study suggests that response to intravenous iron is achievable in the majority of patients with IBD and severe IDA or intolerance treatment with oral iron. Moreover, the patients with consumption of 5-ASA could had less response to the treatment.

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Changing Associations to Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click, Benjamin; Whitcomb, David C

    2016-01-01

    Managing the health of individual patients suffering from complex disorders is a challenge and is costly. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a prototypic complex disorder of the small and large intestines. Susceptibility is complex, severity is variable, and response to treatment is unpredictable. Di Narzo et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e177; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.34) bring diverse teams of physicians and scientists together to break down the mechanisms of IBD by linking pathogenic genetic variants with altered gene expression in specific cell types causing IBD. Framing new findings in the context of other complex diseases provides a roadmap for predictive medicine. PMID:27607898

  6. MR colonography in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimola, Jordi; Ordás, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    MR colonography has a high diagnostic accuracy for detecting Crohn disease (CD) activity and determining the extent and severity of lesions. In the setting of stricturing CD, MR colonography can provide a detailed map of the lesions, which is useful for clinical decision making. MR colonography can be used as an alternative to conventional colonoscopy in the setting of CD, or as a complementary tool in selected patients with ulcerative colitis. This article reviews the spectrum of MR colonography findings in colonic inflammatory bowel disease and discusses the potential applications and limitations of MR colonography. PMID:24238130

  7. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, S.J.; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora.

  8. [The immune status changes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease under the influence of mesenchymal stromal cells and infliximab therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, L B; Sagynbaeva, V É; Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Efremov, L I; Guseĭnzade, M D; Ruchkina, I N; Konopliannikov, A G; Iakovleva, M V; Astrelina, T A

    2011-01-01

    Out of 28 patients with inflammatory bowel disease in 11 (39.3%) revealed the presence of autoantibodies to gastric parietal cells. Appointment of MSC and infliximab did not lead to a reduction in antibody levels, in fact, in 6 (21.4%) patients had a further increase in the content of mentioned autoantibodies. Identification of autoantibodies to gastric parietal cells is considered as adherence to IBD autoimmune gastritis (formation of a systemic process) that requires use of corticosteroids. Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells in IBD reduces enhanced circulation of autoantibodies against antigens of neutrophils cytoplasmic structures, thereby reducing the severity of autoimmune reactions. Transplantation of MSCs reduces autoaggression in patients with ulcerative colitis, reducing the autoreactive clone of B lymphocytes (CD19+CD5+). Analysis effectiveness of the therapy. Transplantation of MSCs in IBD has a systemic immunoregulatory effect: on the one hand, stimulates oppressed cytokine synthesis, on the other--reduses the intensity of the autoimmune reactions and activity of pathological processes. Infliximab selectively blocks TNF-alpha, without affecting other proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:22629769

  9. Associations between functional polymorphisms in the NFκB signaling pathway and response to anti-TNF treatment in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, S; Andersen, P S; Burisch, J;

    2014-01-01

    Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is used for treatment of severe cases of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). However, one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. Genetic markers may predict individual response to anti-T...... are applied in a clinical setting.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 29 April 2014; doi:10.1038/tpj.2014.19....

  10. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilton Marques dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents.DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" or "adolescents" and "nutritional evaluation" or "nutrition deficiency". The selection of studies was initially performed by reading the titles and abstracts. Review studies and those withouth data for pediatric patients were excluded. Subsequently, the full reading of the articles considered relevant was performed.RESULTS: 237 studies were identified, and 12 of them were selected according to the inclusion criteria. None of them was performed in South America. During the analysis of the studies, it was observed that nutritional characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be altered; the main reports were related to malnutrition, growth stunting, delayed puberty and vitamin D deficiency.CONCLUSION: There are nutritional consequences of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents, mainly growth stunting, slower pubertal development, underweight and vitamin deficiencies. Nutritional impairments were more significant in patients with Crohn's disease; overweight and obesity were more common in patients with ulcerative rectocolitis. A detailed nutritional assessment should be performed periodically in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. The heart in inflammatory bowel disease

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    Tsianos E.V.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cardiovascular involvement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been occasionally reported, mainly in the form of case reports. Endocardium derangement in IBD involves endocarditis and subendocardial abscess. Endocarditis may occur as a result of septicemia or due to the prolonged use of total parental nutrition (TPN catheters or/and immunosuppression. The cause of endocarditis may be bacterial or fungal and require surgery in several cases. Prophylaxis for endocarditis in selected IBD patients is discussed. Myocarditis or perimyocarditis in IBD is reported as an autoimmune phenomenon during bowel disease excacerbations or as a side-effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA formulations. Ulcerative colitis (UC patients seem to be at a higher risk for this complication compared to Crohn�s disease (CD patients. Myocardial infarctions, selenium deficiency during TPN, the role of prolonged steroid use and the association with giant cell myocarditis are topics which need further analysis. Pericardium involvement seems to be the most frequent type of cardiovascular complication in IBD caused by drugs (5-ASA, azathioprine, cyclosporine, pericardio-colonic fistulas or unknown causes (idiopathic and it may occasionally be the disease presenting symptom. Coronary artery status and other factors for cardiovascular risk, such as smoking, hyperlipidemia and exercise are also discussed. Electrocardiogram and ultrasonographic changes are not so uncommon and cardiogenic sudden death in IBD is reviewed. Intracavitary coagulation abnormalities, amyloidosis, heart failure and aortitis syndrome are topics included and discussed in this review. A list of tables contributes to a more systemic overview of this current knowledge. Key Words: heart, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, Crohn�s diseas

  12. Frequency and Nature of Incidental Extra-Enteric Lesions Found on Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MR-E) in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD)

    OpenAIRE

    Herfarth, Hans H.; Grunert, Michael; Klebl, Frank; Strauch, Ulrike; Feuerbach, Stefan; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Rogler, Gerhard; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of extra-enteric findings in a large cohort of patients undergoing magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E) and to classify the clinical significance of these findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 1154 MR-E performed in 1006 patients referred to our radiological department between 1999–2005. The reasons for referral were suspected or proven inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (n = 710), further diagnostic work-...

  13. Histopathology of duodenal mucosal lesions in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease: statistical analysis to identify distinctive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Steven; Alper, Arik; Pashankar, Dinesh S; Morotti, Raffaella A

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGT) are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Pediatric patients have a higher incidence of IBD-associated gastritis and duodenitis than do adults. This study aimed to identify histopathologic features of duodenal lesions in the pediatric population that are characteristic of IBD, compared to duodenal pathology of different etiopathogenesis. We performed a retrospective analysis of UGT biopsies from pediatric patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of duodenitis (0-18 years of age) over a 7-year period. We identified 40 cases of duodenitis associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and 10 cases associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) and compared the histopathologic characteristics of the duodenitis with age-matched controls consisting of 40 cases duodenitis associated with celiac disease and 40 non-Helicobacter pylori-associated (NOS) etiology duodenitis cases. The histologic features that were evaluated included presence of granulomas, duodenal cryptitis, erosion, lamina propria eosinophils, villous blunting, increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), and crypt hyperplasia, among others. Additionally, we evaluated the presence of associated gastritis in all of these groups. Statistical analysis to identify significant differences was performed using Kruskal-Wallis testing. Cryptitis was the most distinctive feature of IBD-associated duodenitis. Granulomas were exceptionally rare. The severity of villous blunting and presence of IELs was significantly different in the IBD versus the celiac group. There is a significant overlap with duodenal lesions of different etiopathogenesis, including villous blunting and eosinophilia. With the exclusion of granulomas, cryptitis seems the most distinctive feature of the duodenal lesions associated with IBD. PMID:25207874

  14. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D; D'Inca, R; Gionchetti, P; Panelli, M R; Ardizzone, S; Sanroman, A L; Gisbert, J P; Arena, I; Riegler, G; Marrollo, M; Valpiani, D; Corbellini, A; Segato, S; Castiglione, F; Munkholm, P

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  15. Pulse cyclophosphamide therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; László Tóth; Margit Zeher

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We included in our cohort eight patients with (moderate/severe) steroid refractory IBD (4 with ulcerative colitis and 4 with Crohn's disease). They all received 6 cycles of intravenous cyclophosphamide (800mg) per month.RESULTS: Patients entered into remission after the second/third cyclophosphamide pulse. Disease activity decreased. There were no side effects and toxicity. All the patients went into long lasting remission. All Crohn's disease patients and 3 of 4 ulcerative colitis patients achieved complete remission. One patient with ulcerative colitis showed an impressive clinical response but did not enter into remission. For the maintenance, patients with Crohn's disease were treated with methotrexate (15 mg/wk) and patients with ulcerative colitis were treated with azathioprine (2.5 mg/kg body weight/d).CONCLUSION: Remission was maintained in all patients for 6 mo on the average. The drug was well tolerated. These findings suggest that aggressive immunosuppressive therapy may be useful in some refractory patients and further controlled study should be considered in order to fully evaluate this type of treatment as a potential therapy for IBD.

  16. The Role of Fecal Calprotectin in Investigating Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbayrak, Mustafa; Turkay, Cansel; Eraslan, Elife; Cetinkaya, Hulya; Kasapoglu, Benan; Bektas, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease comprised the control group. RESULTS: In the present study, all patients in the control group had an fecal calprotectin value lower than the cut-off point (50 mg/kg). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fecal calprotectin was found to be strongly associated with colorectal inflammation indicating organic disease. Fecal calprotectin is a simple and non-invasive method for assessing excretion of macrophages into the gut lumen. Fecal calprotectin values can be used to evaluate the response to treatment, to screen asymptomatic patients, and to predict inflammatory bowel disease relapses. PMID:19488608

  17. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Erbayrak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease comprised the control group. RESULTS: In the present study, all patients in the control group had an fecal calprotectin value lower than the cut-off point (50 mg/kg. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fecal calprotectin was found to be strongly associated with colorectal inflammation indicating organic disease. Fecal calprotectin is a simple and non-invasive method for assessing excretion of macrophages into the gut lumen. Fecal calprotectin values can be used to evaluate the response to treatment, to screen asymptomatic patients, and to predict inflammatory bowel disease relapses.

  18. Fiber optic-SPR platform for fast and sensitive infliximab detection in serum of inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiadi; Van Stappen, Thomas; Spasic, Dragana; Delport, Filip; Vermeire, Séverine; Gils, Ann; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2016-05-15

    Infliximab (IFX) is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody used for treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In order to improve therapeutic outcomes it is recommended to monitor IFX trough concentrations. Although ELISA is currently widely used for this purpose, this method is not suitable for single patient testing. In this paper we describe the development of a fast bioassay for determining IFX concentration in serum using an in-house developed fiber-optic surface plasmon resonance (FO-SPR) biosensor. Studies were first conducted to optimize covalent immobilization of the IFX-specific antibody on the sensor surface as well as to select an optimal blocking buffer for restraining the non-specific binding. In order to reach clinically relevant sensitivity for detecting IFX in patients' serum, the SPR signal was amplified by employing gold nanoparticles functionalized with another set of IFX specific antibodies. Using the optimized sandwich bioassay, calibration curves were made with series of IFX concentrations spiked in buffer and 100-fold diluted serum, reaching the limit of detection of 0.3 and 2.2ng/ml, respectively. The established bioassay was finally validated using five IFX treated IBD patients samples. Results from the FO-SPR platform were compared with an in-house developed, clinically validated ELISA resulting in excellent Pearson and intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.998 and 0.983, respectively. Furthermore, the assay time of the FO-SPR platform was significantly reduced compared to ELISA, demonstrating the potential of this platform to be used as a point-of-care diagnostic tool for improving therapeutic outcomes of IBD patients. PMID:26706938

  19. Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Gil Shitrit, Ariella; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Goldin, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually affects women during their reproductive years and many concerns arise among these young patients. Pre-pregnancy consultation with a multi-disciplinary team is very important. The team should make patients aware of the critical importance of ensuring that conception occurs during a period of disease remission. Conception during an IBD flare-up results in disease activity or even exacerbates disease in two-thirds of women. Exacerbation of the disease is associated with increased frequency of maternal and fetal complications. Drug therapy constitutes a considerable source of patient anxiety but most drugs used for treating IBD are considered safe. Therefore, continuing pharmacological therapy during pregnancy is necessary to maintain disease control. Optimization of pre-conception nutritional status and smoking cessation are also emphasized. The general guideline for most patients, except for active perianal disease patients, is to aim for vaginal delivery in the absence of obstetric contraindications. Consistent, ongoing follow-up, as detailed in this review, should allay the anxieties and fears surrounding continuing immunosuppressive drugs during pregnancy, allowing each patient to attain the optimal conditions for achieving her goal of holding a healthy baby. PMID:27068171

  20. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine ...

  1. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  2. Presence of tissue transglutaminase IgA antibody as a celiac disease marker in a sample of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamot, Alberto L; Torres, Esther A; González, Henry; Marcial, Manuel A

    2015-03-01

    Recent medical literature agrees that celiac disease (CD) is much more prevalent in western civilization than it was thought to be in the past. Given the potential complications and consequences of untreated CD, screening programs have been considered. Symptoms of celiac disease may resemble those of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. A group of patients with IBS was screened for CE using the Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA serum test. A total of 18 patients were screened. All of our patients tested negative for TTG IgA. This finding may indicate that the prevalence of CD may be low in our population. Further population studies are needed to confirm our finding. PMID:25856876

  3. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26467550

  4. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  5. Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Differentiating between Fibrotic and Active Inflammatory Small Bowel Stenosis in Patients with Crohn′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fornasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in prospectively differentiating between fibrotic and active inflammatory small bowel stenosis in patients with Crohn′s disease (CD. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients with histologically proven CD presenting with clinical and plain radiographic signs of small bowel obstruction underwent coronal and axial MRI scans after oral administration of polyethylene glycol solution. A stenosis was judged present if a small bowel segment had >80% lumen reduction as compared to an adjacent normal loop and mural thickening of >3 mm. At the level of the stenosis, both T2 signal intensity and post-gadolinium T1 enhancement were quantified using a 5-point scale (0: very low; 1: low; 2: moderate; 3: high; and 4: very high. A stenosis was considered fibrotic if the sum of the two values (activity score: AS did not exceed 1. Results: A small bowel stenosis was identified in 48 out of 111 patients. Fibrosis was confirmed at histology in all of the 23 patients with AS of 0 or 1, who underwent surgery within 3 days of the MRI examination. In the remaining 25 patients (AS: 2-8, an active inflammatory stenosis was suspected and remission of the obstructive symptoms was obtained by means of medical treatment. One of these patients (AS: 2, however, underwent surgery after 14 days, due to recurrence. MRI had 95.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 97.9% accuracy in the diagnosis of fibrotic stenosis. Conclusion: MRI is reliable in differentiating fibrotic from inflammatory small bowel stenosis in CD.

  6. Coping with Stress in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Its Relationship with Disease Activity, Psychological Disorders, and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manizheh Danesh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are chronic diseases with significant impact on patients’ well-being. The aim of this study was the determination of stress coping strategies in IBD patients and their correlation with disease activity, psychological health, and quality of life (QOL. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on IBD patients referred to a gastroenterology clinic in Isfahan city (Iran. Disease activity, severity of anxiety and depression symptoms, stress coping strategies, and QOL were assessed using standard questionnaires. Coping strategies in IBD patients were compared to an unaffected control group. Results: 80 patients with mean age of 52.9 years (57.5% female and mean disease duration of 6.5 years were studied. Compared to the controls, IBD patients had higher scores in the maladaptive coping styles (evasive and palliative (P < 0.05. Association between coping strategies and disease activity was not significant. Severity of anxiety and depression was directly correlated with the maladaptive strategies (fatalistic and emotional (r = 0.283 to 0.468 and inversely correlated with the adaptive strategies (confrontive, optimistic, and self-reliant (r = -0.320 to -0.534. In addition, QOL was inversely correlated with the maladaptive strategies (fatalistic and emotional (r = -0.278 to -0.327 and directly correlated with the adaptive strategies (confrontive and optimistic (r = 0.262 to 0.355. Conclusion: Patients with IBD use more maladaptive and less adaptive stress coping strategies which are associated with their psychological health and QOL. Larger and prospective studies on the dynamic and interactive network of biopsychosocial factors in IBD patients are required.

  7. Case Report: Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a greater risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Patients admitted to the hospital with IBD flares often require insertion of long-term venous access devices, such as peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), to provide access for medications, blood draws, fluid management, and nutrition. PICCs have been associated with an increased risk for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. In this case study analysis, 2 patients with IBD and PICCs who developed VTE are examined. The case report includes a thorough discussion of medical history, symptomology, PICC insertion, and events leading to VTE development. A review of acquired risk factors for IBD patients and a comparison of risk factors that predisposed each to VTE are explored. These cases highlight the need for nurses and physicians to heighten surveillance and engage in proactive strategies to prevent VTE in this population of patients. PMID:27074991

  8. Current trends in inflammatory bowel disease: the natural history

    OpenAIRE

    Langholz, Ebbe

    2010-01-01

    The description of the prognosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is based on systematic follow-up of population-based cohorts. A steady increase in incidence of IBD has occurred. The distribution of ulcerative colitis (UC) is fairly uniform with a preponderance of left-sided disease. One-third of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients present with colonic disease, one-third with ileocolonic disease and one-third with small bowel disease. IBD is associated with extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs...

  9. MRI with oral filling in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases; MRT mit oraler Duenndarmdistension bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, C.; Nagel, B.; Leinsinger, G.; Reiser, M. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Aim Evaluation of mannitol-MRI in patients with suspected or established Crohn's disease (CD). 75 patients with suspected or established Crohn's disease were included. 1.5 l of mannitol-solution were administered orally within 1 h before imaging.A rectal filling was also employed.Butylscopolamin was applied i.v. Native-sequences were acquired. T1w sequences (axial, coronal) were acquired before and after (fs-T1-w-BH) i.v.Gd-DTPA.Additionally a dynamic CM-study was performed. In 45% of the examinations good image quality was achieved. In 28% opacification of the terminal ileum was insufficient. However, diagnostic assessment was possible. Motion artifacts due to breathing were rare, artifacts due to peristalsis were noted in 16% of the examinations. Alterations indicative to CD were found in 69% of the patients.The SI-increase of the thickened bowel-wall was significantly higher than the increase of not thickened wall (117 vs.75%; p = 0,001 in t-test).We detected stenoses in 56%, fistulas in 23% and an abscess in one patient. Mannitol-MRI is a valuable method in the diagnostic work-up of inflammatory bowel disease. Improvement of distal distension should be attempted, because of the good acceptance of the patients and high diagnostical value. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung Evaluation eines MRT-Untersuchungsprotokolls mit oraler Gabe von Mannitolloesung bei Patienten mit Verdacht auf oder gesichertem Morbus Crohn (MC).Patienten und Methode 75 Patienten wurden mittels Mannitol-MRT untersucht. Die Patienten wurden gebeten,1 h vor Untersuchungsbeginn 1,5 l Mannitol kontinuierlich zu trinken.Zur Unterdrueckung der Peristaltik wurde Butylscopolamin injiziert. HASTE- und T1w-Sequenzen wurden nativ in Atemanhaltetechnik akquiriert. Nach i.v.-Gd-DTPA folgten eine dynamische Kontrastmittelstudie in koronarer Schnittfuehrung und transversale fs-T1w-Sequenzen.Ergebnisse Bei 45% der Untersuchungen wurde eine gute Bildqualitaet erreicht.Bei 28% war die Distension

  10. Efficacy of duloxetine add on in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients: A double-blind controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD with antidepressants might be of utility to improve patient′s condition. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Duloxetine on depression, anxiety, severity of symptoms, and quality of life (QOL in IBD patients. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial on 2013-2014, in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran, 44 IBD patients were chosen to receive either duloxetine (60 mg/day or placebo. They were treated in a 12 weeks program, and all of the participants also received mesalazine, 2-4 g daily. We assessed anxiety and depression with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the severity of symptoms with Lichtiger Colitis Activity Index and QOL with World Health Organization Quality of Life Instruments, before and just after the treatment. The data were analyzed using Paired sample t-test and ANCOVA. Results: In 35 subjects who completed the study, the mean (standard error [SE] scores of depression and anxiety were reduced in duloxetine more than placebo group, significantly (P = 0.041 and P = 0.049, respectively. The mean (SE scores of severity of symptom were also reduced in duloxetine more than the placebo group, significantly (P = 0.02. The mean (SE scores of physical, psychological, and social dimensions of QOL were increased after treatment with duloxetine more than placebo group, significantly (P = 0.001, P = 0.038, and P = 0.015, respectively. The environmental QOL was not increased significantly (P = 0.260. Conclusion: Duloxetine is probably effective and safe for reducing depression, anxiety and severity of physical symptoms. It also could increase physical, psychological, and social QOL in patients.

  11. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Claudio Fiocchi

    2006-01-01

    Theories explaining the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proposed ever since Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were recognized as the two major forms of the disease. Although the exact cause(s) and mechanisms of tissue damage in CD and UC have yet to be completely understood, enough progress has occurred to accept the following hypothesis as valid: IBD is an inappropriate immune response that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals as the result of a complex interaction among environmental factors, microbial factors, and the intestinal immune system. Among an almost endless list of environmental factors, smoking has been identified as a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC. Among microbial factors, no convincing evidence indicates that classical infectious agents cause IBD, while mounting evidence points to an abnormal immune response against the normal enteric flora as being of central importance. Gut inflammation is mediated by cells of the innate as well as adaptive immune systems, with the additional contribution of non-immune cells, such as epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and platelets.

  12. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  14. Frequency and nature of incidental extra-enteric lesions found on magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD.

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    Hans H Herfarth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of extra-enteric findings in a large cohort of patients undergoing magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E and to classify the clinical significance of these findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 1154 MR-E performed in 1006 patients referred to our radiological department between 1999-2005. The reasons for referral were suspected or proven inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD (n = 710, further diagnostic work-up for small bowel disease because of non-specific abdominal symptoms (SBD; n = 182 or suspected small bowel malignancies (SBM; n = 114. All extra-enteric findings were reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist and were classified as having high, moderate, or low significance for further diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. RESULTS: The average age of all patients was 40+/-16 (Mean+/-SD years (y (IBD 35+/-13 y; SBD 49+/-16 y; SBM 57+/-15 y. A total of 1113 extra-enteric findings were detected in 600 of 1006 patients (59.6%. Of these findings 180 (16.2% were judged as having a high, 212 (19.0% a moderate and 721 (64.8% a low significance. On a per group basis in patients with IBD 12.0% of the findings were of major clinical significance compared to 13.7% and 33.3% in patients with SBD and SBM, respectively. The most common major findings were abscesses (69.9% in the IBD group and extraintestinal tumors, metastases or masses in the SBD and SBM groups (41.9% and 74.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: MR-E reveals a substantial number of extra-enteric findings, supporting the role of a cross-sectional imaging method for the evaluation of the small bowel.

  15. Frequency and Nature of Incidental Extra-Enteric Lesions Found on Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MR-E) in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfarth, Hans H.; Grunert, Michael; Klebl, Frank; Strauch, Ulrike; Feuerbach, Stefan; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Rogler, Gerhard; Schreyer, Andreas G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of extra-enteric findings in a large cohort of patients undergoing magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E) and to classify the clinical significance of these findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 1154 MR-E performed in 1006 patients referred to our radiological department between 1999–2005. The reasons for referral were suspected or proven inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (n = 710), further diagnostic work-up for small bowel disease because of non-specific abdominal symptoms (SBD; n = 182) or suspected small bowel malignancies (SBM; n = 114). All extra-enteric findings were reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist and were classified as having high, moderate, or low significance for further diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results The average age of all patients was 40±16 (Mean±SD) years (y) (IBD 35±13 y; SBD 49±16 y; SBM 57±15 y). A total of 1113 extra-enteric findings were detected in 600 of 1006 patients (59.6%). Of these findings 180 (16.2%) were judged as having a high, 212 (19.0%) a moderate and 721 (64.8%) a low significance. On a per group basis in patients with IBD 12.0% of the findings were of major clinical significance compared to 13.7% and 33.3% in patients with SBD and SBM, respectively. The most common major findings were abscesses (69.9%) in the IBD group and extraintestinal tumors, metastases or masses in the SBD and SBM groups (41.9% and 74.2%, respectively). Conclusions MR-E reveals a substantial number of extra-enteric findings, supporting the role of a cross-sectional imaging method for the evaluation of the small bowel. PMID:19337373

  16. Short Bowel Syndrome and Intestinal Failure in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Parian, Alyssa M; Shah, Neha D; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the availability of powerful immunosuppressants, many patients with Crohn's disease still require one or more intestinal resections throughout the course of their disease. Multiple resections and a progressive reduction in bowel length can lead to the development of short bowel syndrome, a form of intestinal failure that compromises fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient absorption. The pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome involves a reduction in intestinal surface area, alteration in the enteric hormonal feedback, dysmotility, and related comorbidities. Most patients will initially require parenteral nutrition as a primary or supplemental source of nutrition, although several patients may eventually wean off nutrition support depending on the residual gut anatomy and adherence to medical and nutritional interventions. Available surgical treatments focus on reducing motility, lengthening the native small bowel, or small bowel transplantation. Care of these complex patients with short bowel syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach of physicians, dietitians, and nurses to provide optimal intestinal rehabilitation, nutritional support, and improvement in quality of life. PMID:26818425

  17. Outcome after discontinuation of infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in clinical remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Molazahi, Akbar; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew;

    2012-01-01

    -center, retrospective study of all patients with a primary response to IFX who discontinued IFX therapy while in steroid-free remission. Relapse was defined as reintroduction of treatment with a biologic, systemic steroid or surgery. Results. Of 219, 53 (24%) CD patients, and 28 of 97 (30%) UC patients discontinued IFX......%) experienced complete clinical remission when retreated with IFX after relapse. Conclusion. While the short-term prognosis seems favorable, the majority of patients who discontinue IFX while in remission relapse over time. The response to retreatment with IFX at relapse seems favorable in this subpopulation....

  18. Qualidade de vida em pacientes portadores de doença inflamatória intestinal: tradução para o português e validação do questionário "Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire" (IBDQ Quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: translation to Portuguese language and validation of the "Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire" (IBDQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Meire Albuquerque Pontes

    2004-06-01

    ser utilizada na avaliação da qualidade de vida de pacientes brasileiros portadores de doenças inflamatórias intestinais.BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease comprises, together with ulcerative colitis, the inflammatory bowel diseases, which because their morbidity and chronic evolution have a considerable impact on the patient's quality of life. The measurement of quality of life requires the determination of the degree of subjective well-being attributed to the lack of symptoms, to psychological state and daily activity, and is useful as an instrument of evaluation, both in clinical trials and health programs. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire is an instrument developed by North-American investigators of McMaster University which reproducibility and validity has been determined in several countries studies, and has shown its use in the measurement of the quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. AIMS: Our purpose was to translate that instrument into Portuguese language, its adaptation to Brazilian culture and verify its psychometric properties (validity and reproducibility. METHODS: It was applied to a population of 50 inflammatory bowel diseases patients (24 with Crohn's disease, 26 with ulcerative colitis. To test the criteria and construction validity of the instrument's, it was compared with SF-36, a general questionnaire for establishing quality of life, and the Crohn's Disease Activity Index and Lichtiger's Index. RESULTS: The correlations obtained were mostly moderate. About the intestinal diseases activity index, Lichtiger's index showed better correlations than Crohn's Disease Activity Index. To evaluate its reproducibility, the instrument was applied on three occasions, twice by the same observer (12 days average between applications and once by a second observer, resulting in a high degree of intra- and interobserver correlation. CONCLUSIONS: Portuguese version of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire is a valid and reproducible

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-08-15

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  1. Biologic concentration testing in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Byron P; Sandborn, William J; Cheifetz, Adam S

    2015-06-01

    Anti-TNF medications have revolutionized the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, despite an initial robust effect, loss of response is common and long-term results are disappointing. Much of this lack of durability may be due to inadequate dose optimization, and recent studies suggest a correlation between serum drug concentrations and clinical outcomes. Currently, in clinical practice, measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies to drug are typically performed only when a patient presents with active inflammatory bowel disease symptoms or during a potential immune-mediated reaction to anti-TNF ("reactive" setting). However, proactive monitoring of anti-TNF concentrations with titration to a therapeutic window (i.e., therapeutic concentration monitoring) represents a new strategy with many potential clinical benefits including prevention of immunogenicity, less need for IFX rescue therapy, and greater durability of IFX treatment. This review will cover the salient features of anti-TNF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and provide a rational approach for the use of anti-TNF concentration testing in both the reactive and proactive settings. PMID:25590953

  2. Differential mucosal expression of Th17-related genes between the inflamed colon and ileum of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Verbruggen Gust; Boon Nico; Olievier Kim; Melis Lode; Peeters Harald; Laukens Debby; Bogaert Sara; Vandesompele Jo; Elewaut Dirk; De Vos Martine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Immunological and genetic findings implicate Th17 effector cytokines in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Expression of Th17 pathway-associated genes is mainly studied in colonic disease. The present study assessed the mRNA expression levels of Th17 effector cytokines (IL17A, IL17F, IL21, IL22 and IL26) and genes involved in differentiation (IL6, IL1B, TGFB1, IL23A and STAT3) and recruitment of Th17 cells (CCR6 and CCL20) by quantitative real-time PCR a...

  3. Prevalence of hepatobiliary dysfunction in a regional group of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, V; Gluud, C; Schlichting, P; Burcharth, F; Binder, V

    1991-01-01

    -22%) had at least 1 abnormal laboratory value. Serum bilirubin was elevated in 5%, alkaline phosphatases in 8%, aspartate aminotransferases in 4%, and alanine aminotransferases in 8% of the patients. Two per cent had decreased plasma coagulation factors (2.7 and 10) and serum albumin. Further diagnositc...... laboratory value. Serum bilirubin was elevated in 2%, alkaline phosphatases in 18%, asparetate aminotransferases in 3%, and alanine aminotransferases in 10% of the patients. One per cent had decreased plasma coagulation factors (2.7 and 10) and serum albumin concentrations. Three patients (2%) fulfilled the...

  4. Practical Evaluation and Handling of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bodil Ohlsson

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder by unknown aetiology. Several reviews are written about pharmacological and psychological treatment of the disease. Nevertheless, healthcare professionals consider these patients difficult to handle in daily practice. There is an uncertainty about how to measure symptoms and to evaluate the effect of any given treatment. In the absence of objective markers, professionals feel unsure of how to manage the condition and the patients d...

  5. Provider Awareness Alone Does Not Improve Transition Readiness Skills in Adolescent Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fishman, Laurie N.; Ziniel, Sonja I.; Adrichem, Max E.; Fernandes, Susan M.; Arnold, Janis

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Adolescent patients with chronic health conditions must gradually assume responsibility for their health. Self-management skills are needed for a successful transfer from adolescent to adult health care, but the development of these skills could be resource intensive. Pediatric providers are already instrumental in teaching patients about their health and may improve these skills. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether informal education of pediatric providers regard...

  6. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  7. Inflammatory bowel diseases and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoszko-Bilska, Agnieszka; Sobkiewicz, Slawomir; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) constitute a group of chronic intestinal diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which typically involve patients of reproductive age and may influence several features of human reproduction. There are many concerns regarding the interactions between the course of IBD, applied treatment (pharmacological or surgical), and fertility, reproductive outcomes, and also neonatal outcomes. To review the literature describing fertility in IBD patients (separately for female and male), and possible infertility treatment in this group of patients, a PubMed search for English only publications (articles and/or abstracts) was conducted. Initially, the titles of publications and their abstracts were screened, and the most appropriate articles were selected and reviewed. Overall, in patients with quiescent IBD, fertility is almost identical to the general population, but particular subgroups of patients (with active disease, on pharmacological treatment, and after pelvic or abdominal surgery) may be affected by reduced fertility. Additionally, patients with IBD have fewer children than the general population, mainly as a result of voluntary childlessness. The main objectives for successful reproductive outcomes in IBD patients are proper guidance and also optimal treatment for achieving and maintaining disease remission. Recently, the European Evidence-Based Consensus on Reproduction and Pregnancy in IBD (the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization Guidelines) has been established to optimize preconceptional counseling and to promote an appropriate clinical management for patients planning to conceive. However, further studies are needed regarding the preservation of fertility in IBD patients and introduction of optimal infertility treatment in this group of patients. PMID:27117378

  8. Laparoscopic versus Open Bowel Resection for Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tabet, Jeanine; Hong, Dennis; Kim, Cei-Whan; Wong, Jason; Goodacre, Robert; Anvari, Mehran

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic bowel resection is an alternative to open surgery for patients with Crohn's disease requiring surgical resection. The present report describes a seven-year experience with the laparoscopic treatment of Crohn's disease compared with the open technique in a tertiary Canadian centre.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 61 consecutive patients undergoing elective resection for Crohn's disease was carried out between October 1992 and June 1999. This analysis i...

  9. Monocytes in inflammatory bowel disease: absolute monocyte counts.

    OpenAIRE

    Mee, A. S.; Berney, J.; Jewell, D P

    1980-01-01

    Using a cytochemical staining technique, peripheral blood monocytes have been precisely identified and enumerated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and compared with healthy and disease control subjects. For ulcerative colitis there was a significant monocytosis, which was closely correlated with the total white cell count and with the activity of the disease. For patients with Crohn's disease, the peripheral blood monocyte count was also raised compared with that of the control gro...

  10. Spontaneous in vitro IL-6 production in various intestinal segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drastich, P.; Frolová-Břízová, Lenka; Zanvit, P.; Špičák, J.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2011), 185-190. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA ČR GA305/08/0535; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA MŠk 2B06155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA * ULCERATIVE-COLITIS * CROHNS-DISEASE Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2011

  11. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Comito, Donatella; Cascio, Antonio; Romano, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes.

  12. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wurnig, Moritz; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.Patak@patak.ch [University Hospital Zürich, Department of Radiology, Rämistrasse 100, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Clinic, Radiology, Witellikerstrasse 40, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments.

  13. Correlation between morphological expansion and impairment of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients with Crohn's disease – Preliminary data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to investigate if alterations of intra- and prelesionary motility in inflamed small-bowel segments correlate with length, wall-thickness and prelesionary dilatation of inflammatory small bowel lesions in patients suffering from Crohn's disease assessed with MRI. Methods and materials: This retrospective IRB approved study included 25 patients (12 males, 18–77y) with inflammatory lesions examined using (MRE) magnetic resonance imaging enterography. Cine MRE was performed using a coronal 2D steady-state free precession sequence (TR 2.9, TE 1.25) on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Small bowel motility was examined using a dedicated MR-motility assessment software (Motasso, Vers. 1.0, Sohard AG, Bern, Switzerland). Motility patterns (contraction frequency, relative occlusion rate and mean diameter) were assessed in correlation to wall thickness, length and prelesionary dilatation of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by calculation of the Pearson's-Correlation coefficient. Results: The length of the inflammatory segments, the wall thickening and prelesionary dilatation did not correlate with the frequency of the contractions (r = 0.17, p = 0.477; r = 0.316, p = 0.123; r = 0.161, p = 0.441) or the impairment of luminal occlusion (r = 0.274, p = 0.184; r = 0.199, p = .0339; r = 0.015, p = 0.945) and only the prelesionary dilatation (r = 0.410, p = 0.042) correlated to the mean luminal diameter of the segment. Conclusion: The degree of motility impairment within inflammatory small bowel lesions does not significantly correlate with the extent of the lesion but with the motility measured in prelesionary, non-affected segments, suggesting an interdependent functional aspect of inflammation even in morphologically non-affected small bowel segments

  14. Comparative genomics of Escherichia coli isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Petersen, Andreas M.;

    2011-01-01

    both host-genetic and exogenous factors have been found to be involved, the aetiology of IBD is still not well understood. In this study we characterized thirteen Escherichia coli strains from patients with IBD by comparative genomic hybridization employing a microarray based on 31 sequenced E. coli...... prototypic CD isolate, LF82, suggesting that the IBD-inducing effect of the strains is multifactorial. Several of the IBD isolates carried a number of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC)-related virulence determinants such as the pap, sfa, cdt and hly genes. The isolates were also found to carry genes...... of ExPEC-associated genomic islands. Conclusions: Combined, these data suggest that E. coli isolates obtained from UC and CD patients represents a heterogeneous population of strains, with genomic profiles that are indistinguishable to those of ExPEC isolates. Our findings indicate that IBD...

  15. INVASIVE AMOEBIASIS COMPLICATING IFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziglam H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONAmoebiasis, which is caused by the intestinal protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, is a ubiquitous parasitic infection affecting approximately 10% of the world’s population and causing more deaths every year (100,000 deaths than any other parasitic infection, with the exception of malaria and schistosomiasis [1–3]. Most individuals with an E. histolytica infection are asymptomatic, but some develop severe invasive disease, such as amoebic colitis. Other manifestations, such as pulmonary, cardiac or brain involvement, are rare. Intestinal amoebiasis can probably also present as a chronic, non-dysenteric syndrome of diarrhoea, weight loss, and abdominal pain that can last for years and mimic inflammatory bowel disease. Fulminant colitis with bowel necrosis leading to perforation and peritonitis occurs in only about 0.5% of cases, but it is associated with a mortality rate of more than 40%. Patients with invasive amoebiasis living in the United Kingdom and other developed countries generally acquire the infection in another country in which the pathogenic species is endemic. Areas that have high rates of amoebic infection include India, Africa, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. Infection with pathogenic E. histolytica is not a common cause of travelers’ diarrhoea, and gastrointestinal infection is uncommon in travelers who have spent less than one month in endemic areas.

  16. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfarht, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD in......OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD...... pronounced in relatives of CD cases. IRRs increased with two or more IBD-affected relatives and were modified by age, with the highest family-related IRR observed in early life. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of IBD is significantly increased in first -, second-, and third-degree relatives of IBD-affected cases, with...

  17. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based on...... the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (n=8,295,773). Through a unique personal identification number assigned to each Danish citizen, sex, date and location of birth, identity of parents, and information on vital status and emigration were available. This information was used to establish...... kinship in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall...

  18. Genetics and Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2016-05-23

    We are currently in an exciting time when our understanding of genetic underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has undergone a revolution, based in large part on novel genotyping and sequencing technologies. With >160 susceptible loci identified for IBD, the goal is now to understand at a fundamental level the function of these susceptibility alleles. Determining the clinical relevance of how these susceptible genes shape the development of IBD is also a high priority. The main challenge is to understand how the environment and microbiome play a role in triggering disease in genetically susceptible individuals, as the interactions may be complex. To advance the field, novel in vitro and mouse models that are designed to interrogate complex genetics and functionally test hypotheses are needed. Ultimately, the goal of genetics studies will be to translate genetics to patients with IBD and improve their care. PMID:26907531

  19. Targeting intestinal microflora in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR In their recent review article[1], Andoh and Fujiyama examined the various therapeutic approaches targeting intestinal microflora in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I would like to provide some additional data to complete and update their comments. First of all, when considering the role of probiotics in 1BD treatment it must be emphasized that, in addition to Bifidobacteria, the Nissle 1917 E. coli strain and cocktails of microorganisms such as VSL # 3 mentioned in the article, other probiotic agents have been tested in the short- and long-term treatment of either ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the results of those studies being reported in major international scientific journals.

  20. Recent advances using immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Herfarth, Hans;

    2013-01-01

    Use of the immunomodulators thiopurines and methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC), is considered to be good clinical practice. However, despite being administered to a considerable number of IBD patients over...

  1. NASPGHAN Clinical Report: Surveillance, Diagnosis, and Prevention of Infectious Diseases in Pediatric Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardura, Monica I; Toussi, Sima S; Siegel, Jane D; Lu, Ying; Bousvaros, Athos; Crandall, Wallace

    2016-07-01

    Children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receiving therapy with tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (anti-TNFα) pose a unique challenge to health care providers in regard to the associated risk of infection. Published experience in adult populations with distinct autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases treated with anti-TNFα therapies demonstrates an increased risk of serious infections with intracellular bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi, and some viruses; however, there is a paucity of robust pediatric data. With a rising incidence of pediatric IBD and increasing use of biologic therapies, heightened knowledge and awareness of infections in this population is important for primary care pediatricians, pediatric gastroenterologists, and infectious disease (ID) physicians. This clinical report is the result of a consensus review performed by pediatric ID and gastroenterology physicians detailing relevant published literature regarding infections in pediatric patients with IBD receiving anti-TNFα therapies. The objective of this document is to provide comprehensive information for prevention, surveillance, and diagnosis of infections based on current knowledge, until additional pediatric data are available to inform evidence-based recommendations. PMID:27027903

  2. The Polymorphism rs3024505 (C/T) Downstream of the IL10 Gene Is Associated with Crohn's Disease in Serbian Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijac, Dragana; Petrovic, Irena Vukovic; Djuranovic, Srdjan; Perovic, Vladimir; Bojic, Daniela; Culafic, Djordje; Popovic, Dragan; Krstic, Miodrag; Jankovic, Goran; Djoric, Milica; Pravica, Vera; Markovic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), manifesting as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is characterized by recurring episodes of inflammation in gastrointestinal tract, in which aberrant production of regulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) presumably plays important role. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that affect IL-10 production, such as rs1800896 (G/A) at position -1082 and rs1800871 (C/T) at position -819 in the promoter region of the IL10 gene, have been associated with CD and/or UC, but the results were inconsistent. Another SNP that may alter IL-10 production, rs3024505 (C/T) located immediately downstream of the IL10 gene has been recently identified. T allele of rs3024505 was associated with both UC and CD in Western populations, but the studies from East European countries are lacking. Therefore, our aim was to assess the association of rs3024505, rs1800896 and rs1800871 with Serbian IBD patients. To this end, 107 CD and 99 UC patients and 255 healthy controls were genotyped. As a result, T allele of rs3024505 was associated with CD at allelic, genotypic (GT genotype) and haplotypic (GCCT haplotype) level, suggesting potential role of this variant in susceptibility to CD. In contrast, CD patients carrying C allele of rs3024505 had significantly increased risk of anemia and stricturing/penetrating behavior. No association was observed between rs3024505 and UC or SNPs in IL10 promoter region and any form of IBD. In conclusion, rs3024505 SNP flanking the IL10 gene is associated with susceptibility and severity of disease in Serbian CD patients, further validating its role as a potential biomarker in IBD. PMID:27558476

  3. The fecal microbiome in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in the intestinal microbiome of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) are thought to significantly affect clinical outcome. These changes may not only delay enteral diet advancement but may also predispose patients to bacterial translocation, bacteremia, and liver disease. Patients with S...

  4. Prognosis and prognostic factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson Nicholas; Wakefield Andrew; Pounder Roy

    1995-01-01

    The chance of normal survival for patients with inflammatory bowel disease is generally good. There may be a small excess mortality for those with Crohn′s disease; however recent studies do not confirm this trend. For those with ulcerative colitis, there may be an excess mortality in the first two years after diagnosis, especially in those who undergo surgery. The necessity for an operation varies, but at least 50% of patients with Crohn′s disease will be an operation in ...

  5. Minimally invasive approaches for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zoccali, Marco; Fichera, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in medical management of inflammatory bowel disease, many of these patients still require surgery at some point in the course of their disease. Their young age and poor general conditions, worsened by the aggressive medical treatments, make minimally invasive approaches particularly enticing to this patient population. However, the typical inflammatory changes that characterize these diseases have hindered wide diffusion of laparoscopy in this setting, current...

  6. Psychological characteristics of patients with functional and inflammatory bowel disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlova I.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the psychological characteristics of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, ulcerative colitis (UC, Crohn's disease (CD. Material and methods. The study group included 98 patients with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease and IBS, the control group included 30 healthy individuals. Set of psychological tests included questionnaire (multifactorial systemic examination of the person, the Luscher color test, Beck Depression Inventory, a test on health, activity, mood. Results. Premorbid personality traits, communication disorders with stress have been revieled. According to the nosology different types of emotional response to the disease, changes in health and activity have been marked. There is a high level of frustration needs, increased frequency of anxiety and depression in all patients. Conclusion. Psychological mechanisms of pathology are similar in functional and organic bowel diseases with the greatest influence on the course of functional disorders.

  7. Role of nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, M L

    1986-01-01

    Although many patients with inflammatory bowel disease are malnourished, the role of nutritional support is still controversial. It is universally accepted that with adequate nutritional support patients will put on weight and that their biochemical functions may improve; the question nevertheless remains: does this help the patient get over his or her disease more quickly and, more importantly, does this affect morbidity and mortality? There are several ways of providing nutritional support ...

  8. Surgery for inflammatory bowel disease in the era of laparoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sica, Giuseppe S.; Biancone, Livia

    2013-01-01

    During the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), surgery may be needed. Approximately 20% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) will require surgery, whereas up to 80% of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients will undergo an operation during their lifetime. For UC patients requiring surgery, total proctocolectomy and ileoanal pouch anastomosis (IPAA) is the operation of choice as it provides a permanent cure and good quality of life. Nevertheless a permanent stoma is a good option in selecte...

  9. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuhal Ozisler; Kurtulus Koklu; Sumru Ozel; Sibel Unsal-Delialioglu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efifcacy of bowel program on gas-trointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-ifve spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysrelfexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral med-ication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identiifed in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were signiifcantly decreased and constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were signiifcantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  10. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Ozisler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80% of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55 and incontinence (42%, 23/55 were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55 and after (73%, 40/55 bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  11. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Celestine Wong; Harris, Philip J.; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove ...

  12. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  13. Environmental Triggers for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD; Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC)] are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that are due to a dysregulated immune response to intestinal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Despite advances in genetics, the likelihood of occurrence of disease remains incompletely explained and there appears to be a strong role for the environment in mediating risk of disease. Smoking remains the most widely studied and replicated risk factor, contributin...

  14. Clinical outcomes at 12 months and risk of inflammatory bowel disease in patients with an intermediate raised fecal calprotectin: a ‘real-world’ view

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Michael; Chambers, Samantha; Malik, Ahmad; Lee, Bee; Sung, Edmond; Nwokolo, Chuka; Waugh, Norman; Arasaradnam, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A recent systematic review confirmed the usefulness of fecal calprotectin (FC) in distinguishing organic (inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) from non-organic gastrointestinal disease (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)). FC levels 92% to exclude organic gastrointestinal (GI) disease. Levels >250 μg/g correlate with endoscopic IBD disease activity; sensitivity 90%. We aimed to determine clinical outcomes in intermediate raised FC results (50–250 μg/g). Setting Primary care general practi...

  15. Noninvasive Multidetector Computed Tomography Enterography in Patients with Small-Bowel Crohn's Disease: Is a 40-Second Delay Better than 70 Seconds?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, F.; Mortele, K.J.; Tatli, S.; Pelsser, V.; Erturk, S.M.; Mey, J. de; Silverman, S.G. (Div. of Abdominal Imaging and Intervention, Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (US))

    2007-11-15

    Background: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enterography combines neutral enteric contrast with intravenously administered contrast material. The optimal intravenous (IV) contrast material protocol has still not been established. Purpose: To determine the optimal delay time to image patients with small-bowel Crohn's disease during MDCT enterography. Material and Methods: After oral administration of 1350 ml of neutral contrast medium, 26 patients with small-bowel Crohn's disease underwent MDCT enterography; scans were obtained 40 s (enteric phase) and 70 s (parenchymal phase) after IV administration of 100 ml of iodinated contrast material. Three radiologists, blinded to clinical and pathological findings, independently and retrospectively evaluated each scan in two separate reading sessions for the presence or absence of CT features of Crohn's disease activity. The interobserver agreement was evaluated, and the efficacy of each phase in detecting active disease in the terminal ileum for each reader was determined. The gold standard was pathology (n = 13), endoscopy (n = 3), and clinical evaluation (n = 10). Results: No statistically significant difference was present between the enteric and the parenchymal phase for each reader in each segment regarding the presence or absence of CT features of Crohn's disease. The interobserver agreement for the presence of five main features of active Crohn's disease in the terminal ileum ranged from poor to excellent. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy for active Crohn's disease in the terminal ileum ranged from 40 to 90%, 88 to 100%, 70 to 94%, 44 to 100%, and 69 to 96%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the two phases for each reader. Conclusion: MDCT enterography in patients with suspected active Crohn's disease can be obtained at either 40 s or 70 s after IV contrast material

  16. Noninvasive Multidetector Computed Tomography Enterography in Patients with Small-Bowel Crohn's Disease: Is a 40-Second Delay Better than 70 Seconds?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enterography combines neutral enteric contrast with intravenously administered contrast material. The optimal intravenous (IV) contrast material protocol has still not been established. Purpose: To determine the optimal delay time to image patients with small-bowel Crohn's disease during MDCT enterography. Material and Methods: After oral administration of 1350 ml of neutral contrast medium, 26 patients with small-bowel Crohn's disease underwent MDCT enterography; scans were obtained 40 s (enteric phase) and 70 s (parenchymal phase) after IV administration of 100 ml of iodinated contrast material. Three radiologists, blinded to clinical and pathological findings, independently and retrospectively evaluated each scan in two separate reading sessions for the presence or absence of CT features of Crohn's disease activity. The interobserver agreement was evaluated, and the efficacy of each phase in detecting active disease in the terminal ileum for each reader was determined. The gold standard was pathology (n = 13), endoscopy (n = 3), and clinical evaluation (n 10). Results: No statistically significant difference was present between the enteric and the parenchymal phase for each reader in each segment regarding the presence or absence of CT features of Crohn's disease. The interobserver agreement for the presence of five main features of active Crohn's disease in the terminal ileum ranged from poor to excellent. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy for active Crohn's disease in the terminal ileum ranged from 40 to 90%, 88 to 100%, 70 to 94%, 44 to 100%, and 69 to 96%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the two phases for each reader. Conclusion: MDCT enterography in patients with suspected active Crohn's disease can be obtained at either 40 s or 70 s after IV contrast material

  17. Experience With and Attitudes Toward Psychotherapy and Antidepressants Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: An Online Patient Survey to Inform System Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Andrews, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore and compare experiences with and attitudes toward psychotherapy and antidepressants of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGiDs). Patients from gastroenterology clinic databases were invited to an online survey. Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square test, and Fisher's test were used to compare patients with IBD and FGiD on demographics and variables of interest. Of 86 participants, 56 (65%) had IBD and 30 (35%) had FGiDs. Mean levels of anxiety, depressive, and stress symptoms were within the moderate to severe range. Psychological care and antidepressants were offered to significantly more FGiD than to IBD respondents (37% vs. 9%; p = .009). Although the symptoms were generally reduced after the prescription of antidepressants, only 30% of IBD respondents and 21% of FGiD respondents using antidepressants would recommend them to others. In contrast, 53% of IBD respondents and 69% of FGiD respondents who used psychotherapy would recommend it to others. Both these therapies were valued by recipients; however, neither was reported to improve gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Given the high desire for and positive experiences of psychological care for these 2 common GI conditions, access to formal psychological support services within GI clinics would appear to be the most efficient model. PMID:27148830

  18. Abdominal scintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes in patients with seronegative spondylarthropathies without clinical evidence of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Virgen de Alarcos, Ciudad Real (Spain); Lopez-Longo, F.J. [Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Lampreave, J.L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, C.M. [Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vegazo, O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Carreno, L. [Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Almoguera, I. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO)-labelled leucocytes is an excellent tool for evaluating disease extent and activity of intestinal lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In some cases of seronegative spondylarthropathies (SSp), IBD may remain subclinical. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of positive abdominal scintigraphy in patients with SSp and without clinical symptoms or signs of IBD. To this end we studied 32 patients with active SSp (European Spondylarthropathy Study Group 1991 criteria) without clinical evidence of IBD (eight had ankylosing spondylitis, four psoriatic arthritis, three reactive arthritis an 17 undifferentiated SSp) and 11 controls without SSp. All SSp and control patients received similar doses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Abdominal scintigraphic images were obtained at 30 and 120 min after re-injection of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes. The {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scan was positive in 17 patients with SSp (53.1%) (six with ankylosing spondylitis, three with psoriatic arthritis, two with reactive arthritis and six with undifferentiated SSp). Fourteen patients scored from 2 to 4 on the intensity of uptake scale. The colon and terminal ileum were predominantly involved. Axial involvement was more frequent in patients with a positive scan than in patients with negative results (P<0.05) (64.7% vs 26.6%; odds ratio: 5). No control patient showed a positive scan. It is concluded that {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scan shows increased uptake among patients with SSp without evidence of IBD. These findings provide new evidence linking SSp with intestinal inflammation and suggest that in some cases a bowel-related process could contribute to the development of SSp. Long-term follow-up studies with more patients are necessary to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these results.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S;

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These new...

  20. Prognosis and prognostic factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Nicholas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The chance of normal survival for patients with inflammatory bowel disease is generally good. There may be a small excess mortality for those with Crohn′s disease; however recent studies do not confirm this trend. For those with ulcerative colitis, there may be an excess mortality in the first two years after diagnosis, especially in those who undergo surgery. The necessity for an operation varies, but at least 50% of patients with Crohn′s disease will be an operation in the first 10 years; whereas only about 20% of patients with ulcerative colitis will require a colectomy. Most patients with inflammatory bowel disease are able to lead a normal life and are not disabled by their disease. The prognosis in the elderly is usually good; however there is an increased mortality over younger patients, which is probably due to the presence of coexistent disease. Children also have a slightly higher mortality; this may be due to the relative frequency of a particularly extensive disease and the development of colorectal cancer. Growth retardation occurs in up to one-third of children with Crohn′s disease, but it may be resol" d if remission can be obtained. Pregnancy has not been shown to have an impact on inflammatory bowel disease, but its onset during pregnancy confers a significant risk for both mother and child. Extensive involvement is a poor prognosis factor in both diseases; conversely, isolated small bowel Crohn′s disease and ulcerative proctitis carry particularly good prognoses. A short clinical history, fistulae or abscesses at presentation probably represent an aggressive form of Crohn′s disease. Hypoalbuminemia, anemia and raised inflammatory markers are laboratory markers which suggest a worse prognosis in the short and possibly long-term.

  1. Abdominal scintigraphy using 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes in patients with seronegative spondylarthropathies without clinical evidence of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal scintigraphy with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO)-labelled leucocytes is an excellent tool for evaluating disease extent and activity of intestinal lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In some cases of seronegative spondylarthropathies (SSp), IBD may remain subclinical. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of positive abdominal scintigraphy in patients with SSp and without clinical symptoms or signs of IBD. To this end we studied 32 patients with active SSp (European Spondylarthropathy Study Group 1991 criteria) without clinical evidence of IBD (eight had ankylosing spondylitis, four psoriatic arthritis, three reactive arthritis an 17 undifferentiated SSp) and 11 controls without SSp. All SSp and control patients received similar doses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Abdominal scintigraphic images were obtained at 30 and 120 min after re-injection of 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes. The 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scan was positive in 17 patients with SSp (53.1%) (six with ankylosing spondylitis, three with psoriatic arthritis, two with reactive arthritis and six with undifferentiated SSp). Fourteen patients scored from 2 to 4 on the intensity of uptake scale. The colon and terminal ileum were predominantly involved. Axial involvement was more frequent in patients with a positive scan than in patients with negative results (P99mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scan shows increased uptake among patients with SSp without evidence of IBD. These findings provide new evidence linking SSp with intestinal inflammation and suggest that in some cases a bowel-related process could contribute to the development of SSp. Long-term follow-up studies with more patients are necessary to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these results. (orig.). With 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the bifidobacterial microbiota in the colonic mucosa of patients with colorectal cancer, diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the bifidobacterial microbiota of the colonic mucosa in patients with colon cancer,inflammatory bowel disease or diverticulitis.METHODS: A sample of the distal colonic mucosa was taken during surgery from a total of 34 patients,twenty-one with diagnosed colorectal cancer, nine with diverticulitis and four with inflammatory bowel disease, requiring surgery for their condition. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the resected mucosal samples and bifidobacterial mucosa-associated microbiota was qualitatively and quantitatively determined by means of qualitative and quantitative PCR.RESULTS: Bifidobacteria were found in 100% of the samples from patients with diverticulitis or IBD and a 76% of those suffering colon cancer. The species B. longum and B. bifidum were the most widely found, followed by B. animalis, B. catenulatum and B.adolescentis. B. breve, B. dentium and B. angulatum were not detected in any sample. A significantly higher occurrence of B. longum was observed in patients with diverticulitis than in those with colon cancer or IBD (100%, 62% and 75%, respectively, P < 0.05).Similar results were obtained for B. animalis (56%, 0%and 25%, P < 0.05), while B. adolescentis was only found in the mucosa from patients with colon cancer (5 out of 21, 24%). At the quantitative level, patients with colon cancer or IBD showed lower counts of total Bifidobacterium (4.94 and 5.91 vs 6.96 log Cells/sample,respectively, P < 0.05) and of the species B.longum (4.05 and 4.79 vs 6.76, P < 0.05) than those with diverticulitis.CONCLUSION: Aberrancies in mucosa associated microbiota are present in different intestinal diseases.This may indicate a role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  3. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. PMID:26671147

  4. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Dobrowolska-Zachwieja, Agnieszka; Łuczak, Michał; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease--ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients' neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptotic activity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity. PMID:27117102

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Owen P. Smith; Nasir Mahmud; Weir, Donald G.; Lesley Mynett-Johnson; Judith Conroy; Livingstone, Wendy J; Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n= 172) and healthy controls (n= 389) for polymorphisms in genes encoding va...

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children, an Evolving Problem in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Wafa′a A Al-Qabandi; Eman K Buhamrah; Khaled A Hamadi; Al-Osaimi, Suad A.; Al-Ruwayeh, Ahlam A.; JohnPatrick Madda

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was previously thought a rare disease among children in Kuwait since most diarrhea cases were attributed to infections. In the past few years we observed an increase in the number of patients presenting with IBD. In this study we aimed to determine the epidemiology of IBD among children in the State of Kuwait. Patients and Methods: The charts of all children with IBD who were referred to the pediatric gastroenterology unit during the period Fe...

  7. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex inter

  8. Biomarkers for inflammation and surveillance strategies in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the colonic mucosa, as observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Endoscopic surveillance aimed at the detection of dysplasia and asymptomatic CRC is therefore recommended in order to mitigate t

  9. Neutrophilic dermatoses and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, A V; Menicanti, C; Crosti, C; Trevisan, V

    2013-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's Syndrome (SS) are inflammatory skin diseases caused by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin and, rarely, in internal organs, which led to coining the term of neutrophilic dermatoses (ND) to define these conditions. Recently, ND have been included among the autoinflammatory diseases, which are forms due to mutations of genes regulating the innate immune responses. Both PG and SS are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic intestinal disorders which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and whose pathogenesis involves both the innate and adaptive immunity in genetically prone individuals. Patients with IBD develop PG in 1-3% of cases, while SS is rarer. PG presents with deep erythematous-to-violaceous painful ulcers with undermined borders, but bullous, pustular, and vegetative variants can also occur. SS, also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by the abrupt onset of fever, peripheral neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions and a diffuse neutrophilic dermal infiltrate. In this review that will be focused on PG and SS, we will describe also the aseptic abscesses syndrome, a new entity within the spectrum of ND which frequently occurs in association with IBD and is characterized by deep abscesses mainly involving the spleen and skin and by polymorphic cutaneous manifestations including PG- and SS-like lesions. PMID:23588144

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease: immunodiagnostics, immunotherapeutics, and ecotherapeutics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reflect a continuing shift from empiricism to strategies based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In susceptible individuals, IBD appears to be the result of defective regulation of mucosal immune interactions with the enteric microflora. This has prompted research directed at the interface of the traditional disciplines of immunology, microbiology, and epithelial cell biology. Whereas immunodiagnostics have been of limited clinical value in IBD, assessments of mucosal rather than systemic immune function are promising. Therapeutically, there is an increasing trend toward more aggressive and earlier use of immunomodulatory agents, particularly for prevention of relapse, with cytokine manipulation as a bridge therapy to achieve remission in patients with acute severe disease. Although most drug treatments are directed toward altering the host response, the rationale for manipulating the enteric flora appears sound and will be the basis of additional future therapeutic strategies. Notwithstanding the widening range of options for drug therapy in IBD, other outcome modifiers and well-established principles of managing chronic disease are as important as ever.

  11. Single-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Emile Rijcken; Rudolf Mennigen; Norbert Senninger; Matthias Bruewer

    2012-01-01

    Background. Single Port Laparoscopic Surgery (SPLS) is being increasingly employed in colorectal surgery for benign and malignant diseases. The particular role for SPLS in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been determined yet. In this review article we summarize technical aspects and short term results of SPLS resections in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Methods. A systematic review of the literature until January 2012 was performed. Publications were assessed for...

  12. Pharmacological treatment of bowel obstruction in cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Brenda

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO) is a common complication of advanced cancer, occurring most frequently in gynaecological and colorectal cancer. Its management remains complex and variable. This is in part due to the lack of evidence-based guidelines for the clinicians involved. Although surgery should be considered the primary treatment, this may not be feasible in patients with a poor performance status or advanced disease. Advances have been made in the medical management of MBO which can lead to a considerable improvement in symptom management and overall quality of life. AREAS COVERED: This review emphasizes the importance of a prompt diagnosis of MBO with early introduction of pharmacological agents to optimize symptom control. The authors summarize the treatment options available for bowel obstruction in those patients for whom surgical intervention is not a feasible option. The authors also explore the complexities involved in the introduction of parenteral hydration and total parenteral nutrition in this group of patients. EXPERT OPINION: It is not always easy to distinguish reversible from irreversible bowel obstruction. Early and aggressive management with the introduction of pharmacological agents including corticosteroids, octreotide and anti-cholinergic agents have the potential to maintain bowel patency, and allow for more rapid recovery of bowel transit. A combination of analgesics, anti-emetics and anti-cholinergics with or without anti-secretory agents can successfully improve symptom control in patients with irreversible bowel obstruction.

  13. Risk factors for small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashner, B A

    1992-08-01

    Suspected risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the small bowel in Crohn's disease include surgically excluded small bowel loops, chronic fistulous disease, and male sex. Review of all seven University of Chicago cases failed to confirm any suspected risk factor. A case-control study was performed to identify possible alternatives. Each case was matched to four randomly selected controls from an inflammatory bowel disease registry matched for year of birth, sex, and confirmed small bowel Crohn's disease. Three factors were significantly associated with the development of cancer: (1) Four cancers developed in the jejunum, and jejunal Crohn's disease was associated with the development of cancer [odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-39.3]. (2) There was an association between the development of cancer and occupations known to be associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk (OR 20.3, CI 2.7-150.5). Three cases (a chemist with exposure to halogenated aromatic compounds and aliphatic amines, a pipefitter with exposure to asbestos, and a machinist with exposures to cutting oils, solvents, and abrasives) and one of 28 controls (a fireman with multiple hazardous exposures) had an occupational risk factor. (3) Among medications taken for at least six months, only 6-mercaptopurine use was associated with cancer (OR 10.8, CI 1.1-108.7). In conclusion, proximal small bowel disease, 6-mercaptopurine use, and hazardous occupations are associated with cancer of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and can be added to the list of suspected risk factors. PMID:1499440

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  15. Role of cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Sanchez-Muñoz, Aaron Dominguez-Lopez, Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, which includes Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, represents a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, typically with a relapsing and remitting clinical course. Mucosal macrophages play an important role in the mucosal immune system, and an increase in the number of newly recruited monocytes and activated macrophages has been noted in the inflamed gut of patients with IBD. Activated macrophages are thought to be major contributors to the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gut, and imbalance of cytokines is contributing to the pathogenesis of IBD. The intestinal inflammation in IBD is controlled by a complex interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Cytokines play a key role in IBD that determine T cell differentiation of Th1, Th2, T regulatory and newly described Th17 cells. Cytokines levels in time and space orchestrate the development, recurrence and exacerbation of the inflammatory process in IBD. Therefore, several cytokine therapies have been developed and tested for the treatment of IBD patients.

  16. Morpho-functional evaluation of small bowel using wireless motility capsule and video capsule endoscopy in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Diana; Douglas, Sarah; Hobson, Anthony R.; Giannakou, Andry; Plevris, John N.; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: SmartPill® (Given Imaging Corp.,Yoqneam,Israel) is an ingestible, non-imaging capsule that records physiological data including contractions and pH throughout the gastrointestinal tract. There are scarce data looking at SmartPill® assessment of patients with known/suspected small-bowel Crohn’s Disease (CD). This pilot study aims to investigate feasibility and safety of SmartPill® to assess gut motility in this group.  Patients and methods: Over 1 year, patients with known/suspected CD, referred for small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE), were invited to participate and 12 were recruited (7 female, 5 male, mean age 44.2 ± 16.6 years). They underwent hydrogen breath test to exclude small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, patency capsule (Agile®), and provided stool samples for fecal calprotectin (FC). Patients ingested PillCam®SB2 and SmartPill® 4 hours apart. Using unpublished data, 33 healthy controls also were identified for the study. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of the 12 patients enrolled, 10 underwent complete Smartpill® examination (1 stomach retention, 1 dropout). Pillcam® was complete in 10 (1 dropout, 1 stomach retention). Mean fecal calprotectin was 340 ± 307.71 mcg/g. The study group had longer transit times and lower gut motility index than did the controls. The difference in motility appears to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Longer transit times for SmartPill® (not statistically significant) may have been due to different specifications between the capsules. Limitations included transient Smartpill® signal loss (5/10 studies). Conclusions: This is the first pilot to attempt combining SBCE and SmartPill® to assess small-bowel CD. Data on motility in CD are scarce. Multimodal information can provide a clearer clinical picture. Despite concerns about capsule retention in CD patients, SmartPill® seems safe for use if a patency capsule is employed beforehand. PMID

  17. Mucosal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease:Key pathogenic players or disease predictors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Franco; Scaldaferrii; Carmen; Correale; Antonio; Gasbarrini; Silvio; Danese

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases(IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders of the bowel,including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.A single etiology has not been identified,but rather the pathogenesis of IBD is very complex and involves several major and minor contributors,employing different inflammatory pathways which have different roles in different patients.Although new and powerful medical treatments are available,many are biological drugs or immunosuppressants,which are associated with significant si...

  18. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Schoepfer, Alain; Scharl, Michael; Lakatos, Peter L; Navarini, Alexander; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and may occur before or after IBD diagnosis. EIM may impact the quality of life for patients with IBD significantly requiring specific treatment depending on the affected organ(s). They most frequently affect joints, skin, or eyes, but can also less frequently involve other organs such as liver, lungs, or pancreas. Certain EIM, such as peripheral arthritis, oral aphthous ulcers, episcleritis, or erythema nodosum, are frequently associated with active intestinal inflammation and usually improve by treatment of the intestinal activity. Other EIM, such as uveitis or ankylosing spondylitis, usually occur independent of intestinal inflammatory activity. For other not so rare EIM, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the association with the activity of the underlying IBD is unclear. Successful therapy of EIM is essential for improving quality of life of patients with IBD. Besides other options, tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy is an important therapy for EIM in patients with IBD. PMID:26154136

  19. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna, Cynthia Martínez-Reyes, Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  20. Oats and bowel disease: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Frank; Masson, Lindsey F; Boffetta, Paolo; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2014-10-01

    Whole-grain foods such as oats may protect against colorectal cancer and have benefits on inflammatory bowel disease and coeliac disease. The present study aimed to systematically review the literature describing intervention studies that investigated the effects of oats or oat bran on risk factors for bowel disease. A literature search was conducted using Embase, Medline and the Cochrane library, which identified 654 potential articles. Thirty-eight articles describing twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Two studies carried out in participants with a history of colorectal adenomas found no effects of increased oat-bran intake on indirect risk makers for colorectal cancer. One of two interventions with oat bran in patients with ulcerative colitis showed small improvements in the patients' conditions. Most of the eleven studies carried out in adults with coeliac disease showed no negative effects of uncontaminated oat consumption. The fourteen studies carried out in volunteers with no history of bowel disease suggest that oats or oat bran can significantly increase stool weight and decrease constipation, but there is a lack of evidence to support a specific effect of oats on bowel function compared with other cereals. A long-term dietary intake of oats or oat bran could benefit inflammatory bowel disorders, but this remains to be proven. A protective effect on colorectal adenoma and cancer incidence has not yet been convincingly shown. The majority of patients with coeliac disease could consume up to 100 g/d of uncontaminated oats, which would increase the acceptability of, and adherence to, a gluten-free diet. PMID:25267242

  1. Correlation between extraintestinal manifestations and clinical parameters with the histologic activity index in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štulić Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory diseases of the digestive tract. The aim of this study was to determine a possible correlation between the clinical parameters of the disease activity degree and the presence of extraintestinal manifestations with disease activity histopathological degree, in patients presented with CD and UC. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 134 patients (67 with CD and UC, respectively treated at the Clinic of Gastroenterology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade. After clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, histopathologic and radiologic diagnostics, the patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological activity. The group I comprised 79 patients whose values of five-grade histopathological activity were less than 5 (45 with CD and 34 with UC, while the group II consisted of 55 patients with the values higher than 5 (22 with CD and 33 with UC. The CD activity index (CDAI and Truelove and Witts' scale of UC were used for clinical evaluation of the disease activity. Results. CD extraintestinal manifestations were present in 28.9% and 63.6% of the patients in the groups I and II, respectively (p 0.05. Conclusion. In the patients presented with CD, the extraintestinal manifestations with higher CDAI suggested a higher degree of histopathological activity. On the contrary, in the UC patients, Truelove and Witts' scale and extraintestinal manifestations were not valid predictors of the disease histopathological activity.

  2. Prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis of obstructive bowel disease: A retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Heydanus, Rogier; Spaargaren, M.C.; Wladimiroff, Juriy

    1994-01-01

    textabstractFetal obstructive bowel disease was diagnosed in 29 patients at 22–37 weeks (median 32 weeks) of gestation, seven (24 per cent) of whom also displayed other anomalies. Polyhydramnios was present in 20/29 cases (69 per cent). An abnormal karyotype existed in 7/29 cases (24 per cent), of which six were diagnosed prenatally (trisomy 21, n = 5; 69, XXX, n = 1) and one postnatally (trisomy 21). There was always an association with the ultrasonic ‘double bubble’ sign. Obstructive bowel ...

  3. Non-invasive investigation of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JA Tibble; I Bjarnason

    2001-01-01

    The assessment of inflammatory activity in intestinal disease in man can be done using a variety of different techniques. These range from the use of non - invasive acute phase inflammatory markers measured in plasma such as C reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (both of which give an indirect assessment of disease activity) to the direct assessment of disease activity by intestinal biopsy performed during endoscopy in association with endoscopic scoring systems. Both radiology and endoscopy are conventional for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).However these techniques have severe limitations when it comes to assessing functional components of the disease such as activity and prognosis. Here we briefly review the value of two emerging intestinal function tests. Intestinal permeability, although ideally suited for diagnostic screening for small bowel Crohns disease, appears to give reliable predictive data for imminent relapse of small bowel Crohns disease and it can be used to assess responses to treatment. More significantly it is now clear that single stool assay of neutrophil specific proteins (calprotectin, lactoferrin) give the same quantitative data on intestinal inflammation as the 4 - day faecal excretion of 111lndium labelled white cells. Faecal calprotectin is shown to be increased in over 95% of patients with IBD and correlates with clinical disease activity. It reliably differentiates between patients with IBD and irritable bowel syndrome. More importantly, at a given faecal calprotectin concentration in patients with quiescent IBD,the test has a specificity and sensitivity in excess of 85% in predicting clinical relapse of disease. This suggests that relapse of IBD is closely related to the degree of intestinal inflammation and suggests that targeted treatment at an asymptomatic stage of the disease may be indicated.

  4. Neuro-glial crosstalk in inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Neunlist, Michel; Van Landeghem, Lien; Bourreille, Arnaud; Savidge, T.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease in which environmental, immune and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis. Although biological therapies (antibodies anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha or anti-integrin) have considerably improved the symptoms and quality of life of IBD patients, some drawbacks have emerged limiting their long-term use. In addition, prevention of relapses and treatment of resistant ulcers remains a clinical challenge. In this context, a bet...

  5. ENTERAL NUTRITION SUPPORT TO TREAT MALNUTRITION IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Altomare; Giuseppe Damiano; Alida Abruzzo; Vincenzo Davide Palumbo; Giovanni Tomasello; Salvatore Buscemi; Attilio Ignazio Lo Monte

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diet has an important role in the management of IBD, as it prevents and corrects malnutrition. It is well known that diet may be implicated in the aetiology of IBD and that it plays a central role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal-tract disease. Often oral nutrition alone is not sufficient in the management of IBD patients, especially in children or the elderly, and must be combined with oral supplementation or r...

  6. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and thioguanine. We will briefly summarize dose recommendations, indications for thiopurine therapy and side effects which are relevant in clinical practice. We discuss some currently debated topics, ...

  7. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  8. Environment and the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G; on behalf of the Alberta IBD Consortium

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  9. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  10. Sellar inflammatory mass with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh J; Maguire, John

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with different intracranial disorders. An inflammatory sellar mass is very rare but includes a variety of noninfectious causes including lymphocytic hypophysitis, granulomatous inflammation and Wegener’s granulomatosis. A 32-year-old man was diagnosed with an inflammatory sellar mass associated with an extensive colonic inflammatory process clinically characteristic of Crohn’s disease. The concurrent onset of these inflammatory disorders in distinc...

  11. Role of CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)], E-mail: dregge@mauriziano.it; Neri, Emanuele; Turini, Francesca [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    CT colonography (CTC), or virtual colonoscopy, is a non-invasive imaging method that uses CT data sets combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon. CTC is not used routinely in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, investigating contemporarily the colon, other abdominal organs and the peritoneum with CTC is at times useful in patients with IBD, especially when other diagnostic tools fail. Furthermore, since symptoms of colorectal cancer sometimes superimpose to those of inflammatory disease, it may happen to image patients with IBD incidentally. If clinical signs are suggestive for inflammatory disease, exam technique should be modified accordingly and distinguishing radiological findings searched for.

  12. Role of CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT colonography (CTC), or virtual colonoscopy, is a non-invasive imaging method that uses CT data sets combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon. CTC is not used routinely in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, investigating contemporarily the colon, other abdominal organs and the peritoneum with CTC is at times useful in patients with IBD, especially when other diagnostic tools fail. Furthermore, since symptoms of colorectal cancer sometimes superimpose to those of inflammatory disease, it may happen to image patients with IBD incidentally. If clinical signs are suggestive for inflammatory disease, exam technique should be modified accordingly and distinguishing radiological findings searched for.

  13. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease; MRT chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Elsing, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. IV - Gastroenterologie

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung: Die Standardverfahren in der Diagnostik und der Verlaufskontrolle chronisch entzuendlicher Darmerkrankungen, speziell des Morbus Crohn und der Colitis ulcerosa, sind die Koloskopie und das Enteroklysma. Die MRT hat sich dazu ihren festen Platz in der Diagnostik perirektaler Fisteln erobert. Mit schnellen, T{sub 1}-gewichteten Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen und T{sub 2}-gewichteten Turbo-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen koennen auch Duenn

  14. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nynne; Nyboe; Andersen; Tine; Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abundant scientific evidence supporting an association between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and venous thromboembolic events, caused by an IBD related hypercoagulability, is acknowledged and thromboprophylactic treatment strategies are now implemented in the management of IBD patients. In contrary, the risk of arterial thromboembolic disease, as ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular events, and mesenteric ischemia in patients with IBD remains uncertain and the magnitude of a potentially increased risk is continuously debated, with ambiguous risk estimates among studies. The evident role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis forms the basis of a biological plausible link; the chronic systemic inflammation in IBD patients increases the risk of atherosclerosis and thereby the risk of thrombotic events. Further, studies have shown that the burden of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia is lower in IBD populations, thus further strengthen the role of non-traditional risk factors, as chronic inflammation in the linking of the two disease entities. Likewise, mortality from cardiovascular disease in IBD remains questioned. The aim of the current review is to give an up-date on the existing evidence of the possible association between IBD and cardiovascular disease and to discuss traditional and non-traditional risk factors.

  15. Clinical outcomes at 12 months and risk of inflammatory bowel disease in patients with an intermediate raised fecal calprotectin: a ‘real-world’ view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Samantha; Malik, Ahmad; Lee, Bee; Sung, Edmond; Nwokolo, Chuka; Arasaradnam, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A recent systematic review confirmed the usefulness of fecal calprotectin (FC) in distinguishing organic (inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) from non-organic gastrointestinal disease (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)). FC levels 92% to exclude organic gastrointestinal (GI) disease. Levels >250 μg/g correlate with endoscopic IBD disease activity; sensitivity 90%. We aimed to determine clinical outcomes in intermediate raised FC results (50–250 μg/g). Setting Primary care general practices in Coventry and Warwickshire, and 3 secondary care hospitals. Participants 443 FC results in adults (>16 years old) were reviewed from July 2012 to October 2013. Clinical data was collected from hospital databases and general practitioners. Long-term clinical data was available in 41 patients (out of 48). Primary and secondary outcome measures The number of new diagnoses of IBD, IBS and other diagnoses for the intermediate group. The number referred and discharged from secondary care. Results A new IBD diagnosis was made in 19% (n=8) of intermediate results (1% of normal and 38% of raised results). 5% (n=2) of intermediate results had known IBD in remission. A new IBS diagnosis was made in 27% (n=11) of intermediate results, while 34% (n=14) remained undiagnosed, although 8 of these were not referred to secondary care. Conclusions FC testing remains useful in aiding diagnosis of organic GI conditions. However, unlike negative and strongly positive FC results, intermediate FC results lead to a mixture of diagnoses. The OR of a new diagnosis of IBD for an intermediate result compared to normal FC result was 26.6, while an intermediate FC result gave an OR of 0.54 for a new IBS diagnosis compared to normal FC. For intermediate FC results, 1 in 3 patients remained in secondary care after 12 months with an OR of 3.6 compared to a normal FC result. PMID:27266773

  16. Health-related quality of life improves during one year of medical and surgical treatment in a European population-based inception cohort of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Weimers, P; Pedersen, N;

    2014-01-01

    : The EpiCom inception cohort consists of 1560 IBD patients from 31 European centres covering a background population of approximately 10.1 million. Patients answered the disease specific Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ) and generic Short Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire at diagnosis......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is impaired in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The aim was prospectively to assess and validate the pattern of HRQoL in an unselected, population-based inception cohort of IBD patients from Eastern and Western Europe. METHODS...... 57.4 and from 48.8 to 55.7, respectively. UC patients needing surgery or biologicals had lower SIBDQ scores before and after compared to the rest, while biological therapy improved SIBDQ scores in CD. CD and UC patients in both regions improved all SF-12 scores. Only Eastern European UC patients...

  17. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan; Pedersen, Natalia; Roug, Stine; Galsgaard, Julie; Turino, Stine Ydegaard; Brodersen, Jacob Broder; Rashid, Shaista; Avlund, Sara; Olesen, Thomas; Green, Anders; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen; Vogel, Ulla; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    unique personal identification number of Danish citizens (the CPR number) from blood samples with data from the National Patient Registry, patients with International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10) codes K50-K63 were identified. Treatment efficacy reflected the maximum response within 22...

  18. Leukocyte migration in experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Van Rees

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of leukocytes from the circulation into tissue by transendothelial migration, is mediated subsequently by adhesion molecules such as selectins, chemokines and integrins. This multistep paradigm, with multiple molecular choices at each step, provides a diversity in signals. The influx of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes into inflamed tissue is important in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of each of these groups of adhesion molecules in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, either in human disease or in animal models, will be discussed below. Furthermore, the possibilities of blocking these different steps in the process of leukocyte extravasation in an attempt to prevent further tissue damage, will be taken into account.

  19. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy is an endoscopic method that provides in vivo real-time imaging of the mucosa at a cellular level, elucidating mucosal changes that are undetectable by white light endoscopy. This paper systematically reviews current indications and perspectives...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...

  20. The effectiviness of hepatitis-B vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    DİŞİBEYAZ, Selçuk; TÜRKMEN, Aygül; Parlak, Erkan; SAYDAM, Gül; ÜLKER, Aysel

    2002-01-01

    Background and aim: Inflammatory bowel disease patients are at high risk for hepatitis- B Virus infection due to the frequent need for hospitalisation, blood transfusion and endoscopic examination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of inflammatory bowel disease patients to hepatitis- B Virus vaccination. Material and methods: A total of 41 patients (24 ulcerative colitis and 17 Crohn's disease) and 28 healthy controls were vaccinated with a recombinant hepatitis- ...

  1. Overlapping gastroesophageal reflux disease and irritable bowel syndrome: Increased dysfunctional symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Yarandi, Shadi Sadeghi; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Mostajabi, Pardis; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Iranian patients and examine the prevalence of functional symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract in patients presenting with either IBS, GERD or both.

  2. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...... before. In this review, we report the current status of the proteomics IBD biomarkers and discuss various emerging proteomic strategies for identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, as well as suggesting future targets for analysis....

  3. Withdrawal of corticosteroids in inflammatory bowel disease patients after dependency periods ranging from 2 to 45 years: a proposed method.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, S J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Even in the biologic era, corticosteroid dependency in IBD patients is common and causes a lot of morbidity, but methods of withdrawal are not well described. AIM: To assess the effectiveness of a corticosteroid withdrawal method. METHODS: Twelve patients (10 men, 2 women; 6 ulcerative colitis, 6 Crohn\\'s disease), median age 53.5 years (range 29-75) were included. IBD patients with quiescent disease refractory to conventional weaning were transitioned to oral dexamethasone, educated about symptoms of the corticosteroid withdrawal syndrome (CWS) and weaned under the supervision of an endocrinologist. When patients failed to wean despite a slow weaning pace and their IBD remaining quiescent, low dose synthetic ACTH stimulation testing was performed to assess for adrenal insufficiency. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess predictors of a slow wean. RESULTS: Median durations for disease and corticosteroid dependency were 21 (range 3-45) and 14 (range 2-45) years respectively. Ten patients (83%) were successfully weaned after a median follow-up from final wean of 38 months (range 5-73). Disease flares occurred in two patients, CWS in five and ACTH testing was performed in 10. Multivariate analysis showed that longer duration of corticosteroid use appeared to be associated with a slower wean (P = 0.056). CONCLUSIONS: Corticosteroid withdrawal using this protocol had a high success rate and durable effect and was effective in patients with long-standing (up to 45 years) dependency. As symptoms of CWS mimic symptoms of IBD disease flares, gastroenterologists may have difficulty distinguishing them, which may be a contributory factor to the frequency of corticosteroid dependency in IBD patients.

  4. MR imaging of the small bowel in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR and CT techniques optimized for small bowel imaging are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of small bowel disorders. Several studies have shown the advantage of these techniques over tradition barium fluoroscopic examinations secondary to improvements in spatial and temporal resolution combined with improved bowel distending agents. The preference of MR vs. CT has been geographical and based on expertise and public policy. With the increasing awareness of radiation exposure, there has been a more global interest in implementing techniques that either reduce or eliminate radiation exposure [Brenner DJ, Hall EJ. Computed tomography-an increasing source of radiation exposure. N Engl J Med 2007;357:2277-84]. This is especially important in patients with chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease who may require multiple studies over a lifetime or in studies that require sequential imaging time points such as in assessment of gastrointestinal motility [Froehlich JM, Patak MA, von Weymarn C, Juli CF, Zollikofer CL, Wentz KU. Small bowel motility assessment with magnetic resonance imaging. J Magn Reson Imaging 2005;21:370-75]. A recent study showed that certain subgroups of patients with Crohn's disease may be exposed to higher doses of radiation; those diagnosed at an early age, those with upper tract inflammation, penetrating disease, requirement of intravenous steroids, infliximab or multiple surgeries [Desmond AN, O'Regan K, Curran C, et al. Crohn's disease: factors associated with exposure to high levels of diagnostic radiation. Gut 2008;57:1524-29]. Therefore it has been suggested that techniques that can reduce or eliminate radiation exposure should be considered for imaging [Brenner DJ, Hall EJ. Computed tomography-an increasing source of radiation exposure. N Engl J Med 2007;357:2277-84]. Owing to the excellent softtissue contrast, direct multiplanar imaging capabilities, new ultrafast breath-holding pulse sequences, lack of ionizing

  5. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck;

    2012-01-01

    European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These...... results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects....

  6. Practical Evaluation and Handling of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Ohlsson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional bowel disorder by unknown aetiology. Several reviews are written about pharmacological and psychological treatment of the disease. Nevertheless, healthcare professionals consider these patients difficult to handle in daily practice. There is an uncertainty about how to measure symptoms and to evaluate the effect of any given treatment. In the absence of objective markers, professionals feel unsure of how to manage the condition and the patients do not feel that they are taken seriously. The development of the short, self-reported questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (VAS-IBS, offers a practical guide to objective measurement of symptoms and effect of given treatments into numerical values in the daily practice.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease in young patients: challenges faced by black and minority ethnic communities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Christopher; Nash, Avril; Lloyd, Michele; Brooks, Fiona; Lindsay, James O; Poullis, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing among black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Despite this rise in prevalence, there is a paucity of research relating to ethnicity and IBD outside the USA. Furthermore, the symptoms of IBD are reported to start during childhood or adolescence in 20-25% of people with the condition. It is therefore important that young people's experiences of diagnosis, treatment and living with IBD are fully understood to ensure effective services and information provision. The study reported on in this paper was commissioned by a UK charity (Crohn's and Colitis UK) with the aim of increasing understanding of the specific issues and service needs of young people with IBD from BME communities. Empirical research entailed in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 young people from BME groups accessed through gastroenterology departments at three collaborating NHS hospitals in England serving ethnically diverse populations. Interviews were carried out from June to December 2010 and sought to capture young people's views with IBD. A thematic analysis of their experiences identified many commonalities with other young people with IBD, such as the problematic route to formal diagnosis and the impact of IBD on education. The young people also experienced tensions between effective self-management strategies and cultural norms and practices relating to food. Moreover, the ability of parents to provide support was hampered for some young people by the absence of culturally competent services that were responsive to the families' communication needs. The findings highlight the need for more culturally appropriate information concerning IBD, and improved responsiveness to young people with IBD within primary care and the education system, as well as culturally competent messaging relating to the specific nature of the condition among the wider South Asian and black communities. PMID:25660726

  8. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: PartⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan BR Thomson; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Hugh Freeman

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology,in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases.Over 1000 publications were reviewed,and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered.In Part Ⅱ we review six topics:absorption,short bowel syndrome,smooth muscle function and intestinal motility,tumors,diagnostic imaging,and cystic fibrosis.

  9. Immunogenetic Susceptibilities in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rotter, Jerome I

    1990-01-01

    It is now clear that the major identified risk factor for the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is a positive family history. Furthermore, the available data in spouses and twins indicate that the genetic susceptibility is due in large measure to shared familial predisposition. This emphasizes the importance of identifying the actual familial susceptibilities. Given the data for immunopathogenetic etiologies in the genesis of IBD, the logical candidate genes are those that involve the immune...

  10. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  11. Bone loss in inflammatory Bowel disease: our multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Geraci

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing disorder in bone and mineral metabolism The study was aimed to determine if inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a risk factor for osteoporosis in 103 adult patients. We included 103 IBD patients, 67 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD and 36 with ulcerative colitis (UC. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We used T score to express bone loss (osteopenia: -2.5 SD <-1 SD, osteoporosis: T <-2.5 SD. Plain x-rays were examined to search for vertebral compression or spontaneous fractures before DEXA. Among the 103 patients, 47.7% exhibited osteopenia of the femoral neck and 62.3% of the lumbar spine, with no significant difference between CD and UC. The prevalence of osteoporosis of the lumbar spine was significantly higher in CD patients (41.2% versus 8.7%. Osteoporosis is frequent in IBD patients, especially in CD patients. Female gender, malnutrition (body mass index <20 kg/m2, disease course (>2 years and active disease would be risk factors of bone mineral loss in IBD.

  12. Influenza vaccination coverage in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Klincewicz, Beata; Łazowska-Przeorek, Izabella; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Kąkol, Paulina; Mytyk, Aleksandra; Kofla, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influenza vaccination status among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Poland. This was a questionnaire-based study. 242 patients with IBD and 142 controls were enrolled in the study. Of patients with IBD, 7·8% received an influenza vaccine, compared to 18·3% of controls (P = 0·0013). There were no statistically significant differences in time from IBD diagnosis, disease activity and in drugs, between vaccinated and non-vaccin...

  13. Overcoming challenges of treating inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Jill K J; Kane, Sunanda V

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently diagnosed before or during the peak reproductive years. Overall management of inflammatory bowel disease is becoming more complex given the nuances involved with multiple mechanisms of action of the current treatment and need for therapeutic monitoring for safety and efficacy; another layer of complexity is added in the setting of a pregnancy. In this review, we have identified several key challenges that health care providers face when caring for patients with IBD during pregnancy. The goal of this review is to provide the most up-to-date evidence and provide our expert recommendations so that providers can more comfortably address patients' questions about pregnancy in IBD and the associated risks as well as optimize their care to ensure the best outcomes possible. PMID:26981845

  14. Low fecal calprotectin predicts sustained clinical remission in inflammatory bowel disease patients : a plea for deep remission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, Erik; Severs, Mirjam; Schipper, Marguerite E I; Fidder, Herma H; Siersema, Peter D; Laheij, Robert J F; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal healing has become the treatment goal in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Whether low fecal calprotectin levels and histological healing combined with mucosal healing is associated with a further reduced risk of relapses is unknown. METHODS

  15. Low fecal calprotectin predicts sustained clinical remission in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a plea for deep remission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, E.; Severs, M.; Schipper, M.E.; Fidder, H.H.; Siersema, P.D.; Laheij, R.J.; Oldenburg, B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal healing has become the treatment goal in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Whether low fecal calprotectin levels and histological healing combined with mucosal healing is associated with a further reduced risk of relapses is unknown. METHODS

  16. Treatment Steps, Surgery, and Hospitalization Rates During the First Year of Follow-up in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases from the 2011 ECCO-Epicom Inception Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegh, Z; Burisch, J; Pedersen, N.; Kaimakliotis, I; Duricova, D; Bortlik, M; Vinding, K Kofod; Avnstrøm, S; Olsen, J; Nielsen, K R; Katsanos, K H; Tsianos, E V; Lakatos, L; Schwartz, D; Odes, S; D'Incà, R; Beltrami, M; Kiudelis, G; Kupcinskap, L; Jucov, A; Turcan, S; Barros, L F; Magro, F; Lazar, D; Goldis, A; de Castro, L; Hernandez, V; Niewiadomski, O; Bell, S; Langholz, E; Munkholm, P; Lakatos, P L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The ECCO-EpiCom study investigates the differences in the incidence and therapeutic management of inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD] between Eastern and Western Europe. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences in the disease phenotype, medical therapy, surgery, and...

  17. Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicer, Zaira; Santiago, Jesus Manuel; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Alonso, Vicent; Antón, Rosario; Bosca, Marta Maia

    2012-01-01

    Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions. Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet’s syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous dise...

  18. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Montiel MP; Casis-Herce B; Gómez-Gómez GJ; Masedo-González A; Yela-San Bernardino C; Piedracoba C; Castellano-Tortajada G

    2015-01-01

    MP Martínez-Montiel, B Casis-Herce , GJ Gómez-Gómez, A Masedo-González, C Yela-San Bernardino, C Piedracoba, G Castellano-Tortajada Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with emphasis on random...

  19. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Montiel, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    MP Martínez-Montiel, B Casis-Herce , GJ Gómez-Gómez, A Masedo-González, C Yela-San Bernardino, C Piedracoba, G Castellano-Tortajada Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with em...

  20. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montiel, MP; Casis-Herce, B; Gómez-Gómez, GJ; Masedo-González, A; Yela-San Bernardino, C; Piedracoba, C; Castellano-Tortajada, G

    2015-01-01

    Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with emphasis on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and Cochrane reviews on the management of IBD refractory to corticosteroids. Based on this evidence, we propose algorithms and optimization strategies for use of immunomodulator and biologic therapy in IBD refractory to corticosteroids. PMID:26316792

  1. Diagnostic Considerations in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Cuffari, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) first presents in childhood or adolescence, and approximately 10% of the estimated 1.4 million Americans with IBD are under age 17. Diagnosis in pediatric patients may be complicated at presentation due to atypical symptoms and/or extraintestinal manifestations (eg, short stature, chronic anemia, unexplained fever, arthritis, mouth ulcers). Pediatric IBD is traditionally diagnosed using endoscopic evaluations of the upper and lower gas...

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease in children--clinical, endoscopic, radiologic and histopathologic investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, J. K.; Yeon, K. M.; Chi, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews our five years' clinical experience (1987 to 1991) of 22 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There were 12 patients with Crohn's disease and 10 patients with ulcerative colitis. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.7 years (2 to 14 years). Clinical impressions before referral were chronic diarrhea in 11, irritable bowel syndrome in 5, colon polyp in 4, lymphoma in 3, intestinal tuberculosis in 2, amoebic colitis in 2, ulcerative colitis in 2 children and other diseas...

  3. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences. PMID:26648465

  4. Pharmacogenomics in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Egan; L.J.J. Derijks; D.W. Hommes

    2006-01-01

    Inherited variations in the nucleotide sequence of genes influence how individual patients respond to drugs. Most commonly, clinically significant genetic variations consist of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes that affect drug disposition or drug targets. Up to now, relatively few

  5. Capsule Endoscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Current Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singeap, Ana-Maria; Stanciu, Carol; Cojocariu, Camelia; Sfarti, Catalin; Trifan, Anca

    2015-06-01

    Since its introduction to clinical practice in 2001, small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has become an important investigation procedure in many small bowel pathologies, including both suspected and known Crohn's disease (CD). SBCE has higher diagnostic yield than other radiologic and endoscopic modalities used in evaluation of patients with suspected CD. In addition, SBCE has proved useful, in a non-invasive and safe manner, as a monitoring method for evaluating the severity and extent of lesions, postoperative recurrence, and mucosal healing in patients with known CD. Monitoring of colonic inflammation in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) using second-generation of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE-2) has also been reported. Besides its advantages, CE also has several limitations such as the inability to obtain biopsies and lack of therapeutic capabilities, hopefully to be overcome in the near future by advances in modern technologies. PMID:26058935

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of teduglutide following repeated subcutaneous administrations in healthy participants and in patients with short bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marier, Jean-Francois; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Beliveau, Martin; Cyran, Jane; Wallens, John

    2010-01-01

    Teduglutide is a GLP-2 analog currently evaluated for the treatment of short bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. The population pharmacokinetics (PK) of teduglutide were assessed following daily subcutaneous (SC) administrations of 2.5 to 80 mg doses in a total of 256 patients. A 1-compartment model with a site-specific rate constant of absorption in the abdomen, arm, and thigh was used to assess the PK of teduglutide. Apparent clearance (CL/F) of teduglutide in male participants was approximately 18% higher than that observed in female participants (12.4 vs 10.5 L/h, respectively). Body weight was detected as a significant covariate explaining the volume of distribution of teduglutide. The elimination half-life (t((1/2))) of teduglutide was also influenced by the body weight of participants. For a male patient weighing 50 and 90 kg, t((1/2)) of teduglutide was 0.897 and 2.99 hours, respectively. Renal and hepatic function of patients did not affect the PK of teduglutide. As a result, no dose adjustment was deemed necessary in patients with altered renal or liver function. The population PK model will help to support adequate drug labeling following SC administrations in patients and determine whether an individualized dosage is required. PMID:19773525

  7. The impact of glutathione S-transferase genotype and phenotype on the adverse drug reactions to azathioprine in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Ding, Liang; Zhang, Fangbin; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Xiang; Hu, Pinjin; Bi, Huichang; Huang, Min

    2015-10-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is a thiopurine prodrug which is widely used in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the use is limited in one-third of patients because of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) or a lack of clinical response. It has been considered that the polymorphic enzyme thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) plays an important role in the in vivo process of AZA and the occurrence of its myelotoxicity. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) mutation is another pharmacogenetic polymorphism which is probably involved in AZA metabolism and tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the association among GST polymorphism, enzyme activity and AZA-related ADRs in Chinese Han patients with IBD. We found that the patients who became neutropenic had a significantly higher GSTs activity when compared with of the patients who did not develop ADRs (analysis of variance, P GST activity constituted a pharmacogenetic high risk group for leucopenia during AZA treatment. GST-P1 Ile105/Ile105 genotype appeared to be a promising marker indicating predisposition to AZA-related ADRs. PMID:26432087

  8. Sleep disturbances and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tauseef; Orr, William C

    2014-11-01

    With an estimated 70 million Americans suffering, sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many clinical research studies. Sleep is now also considered to be an important environmental and behavioral factor associated with the process of inflammation and the immune system. Increased sleepiness is considered part of the acute phase of response to tissue injury, and sleep loss activates inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Clinical studies in many immune-mediated diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, have revealed an association of sleep disturbances with disease activity. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. The importance of sleep in inflammatory bowel disease has recently gained attention with some published studies demonstrating the association of sleep disturbances with disease activity, subclinical inflammation, and risk of disease relapse. A comprehensive review of sleep physiology and its association with the immune system is provided here. Experimental and clinical studies exploring this relationship in inflammatory bowel disease are reviewed, and the clinical implications of this relationship and future directions for research are also discussed. PMID:25025716

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene; Frisch, Morten; Langholz, Ebbe; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR...

  10. Fecal calprotectin is equally sensitive in Crohn's disease affecting the small bowel and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Kjeldsen, Jens; Nathan, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The utility of fecal calprotectin (fCal) in small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) remains to be clarified. The primary aim of this study was to determine levels of fCal in CD restricted to the small bowel compared with CD affecting the colon, in patients undergoing their first diagnostic work-up. In...

  11. [Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Xavier; Cavaille, Alaric; Clavel, Léa; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Fecal calprotectine is of interest for diagnosis of IBD at the beginning. CRP and fecal calprotectine are predictive of long-term response in patients treated by anti-TNF therapy. Trough levels of anti-TNF are associated to clinical remission and mucosal healing. Detectable antibodies to anti-TNF are associated with lower response to treatment. Interventional studies are waiting before optimization of treatment in function of biomarkers. Trough levels of anti-TNF help to modify our treatment (optimization or de-escalation). PMID:24373717

  12. Initial Disease Course and Treatment in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inception Cohort in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, Silvja; Turk, Niksa; Kaimakliotis, Ioannis; Duricova, Dana; Shonová, Olga; Vind, Ida; Avnstrøm, Søren; Thorsgaard, Niels; Krabbe, Susanne; Andersen, Vibeke; Dahlerup Jens, Frederik; Kjeldsen, Jens; Salupere, Riina; Olsen, Jóngerð; Nielsen, Kári Rubek; Manninen, Pia; Collin, Pekka; Katsanos, Konstantinnos H; Tsianos, Epameinondas V; Ladefoged, Karin; Lakatos, Laszlo; Bailey, Yvonne; O'Morain, Colm; Schwartz, Doron; Odes, Selwyn; Martinato, Matteo; Lombardini, Silvia; Jonaitis, Laimas; Kupcinskas, Limas; Turcan, Svetlana; Barros, Louisa; Magro, Fernando; Lazar, Daniela; Goldis, Adrian; Nikulina, Inna; Belousova, Elena; Fernandez, Alberto; Hernandez, Vicent; Almer, Sven; Zhulina, Yaroslava; Halfvarson, Jonas; Tsai, Her-Hsin; Sebastian, Shaji; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Langholz, Ebbe; Munkholm, Pia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The EpiCom cohort is a prospective, population-based, inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients from 31 European centers covering a background population of 10.1 million. The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome in the EpiCom cohort. METHODS: Patients...

  13. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  14. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwani, N., E-mail: nsarwani@hmc.psu.ed [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States); Tappouni, R.; Tice, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Abdominal Imaging, Penn State Milton Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  15. Disease Course and Surgery Rates in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Jess, Tine; Andersson, Mikael; Bengtsson, Bo G; Blixt, Thomas; Munkholm, Pia; Bendtsen, Flemming; Vind, Ida

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this population-based 7-year follow-up of incident patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD), we aimed to describe disease progression and surgery rates in an era influenced by the increased use of immunosuppressants and the introduction of biological therapy....... METHODS: From 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2004, all incident cases (562) of patients diagnosed with UC, CD, or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified in a well-defined Copenhagen area were registered. Medical records were reviewed from 1 November 2011 to 30 November 2012, and clinical data were......, immunomodulators, and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents in CD was 86.4%, 64.3%, and 23.5%, respectively. The rate of first-time intestinal resection in CD was 29.1% (n=62), and the 7-year cumulative risk was 28.5%. The cumulative risk of colectomy in UC was 12.5% at 7 years. CONCLUSIONS: UC and CD are dynamic...

  16. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD: Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Schnitzler

    Full Text Available Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort.Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31 between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment.4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC and 0.84% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10(-6, UC vs. CD. 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4% required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2% heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%. After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT. 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR: 10.29; 95% CI 1.26-84.06. Four patients (13.0% needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%.SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated.

  17. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Aldona Dlugosz; Björn Winckler; Elin Lundin; Katherina Zakikhany; Gunnar Sandström; Weimin Ye; Lars Engstrand; Greger Lindberg

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy voluntee...

  18. Management of Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Sheth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases. Some appendicular manifestations are independent of gut inflammation and are treated with standard anti-inflammatory strategies. On the other hand, axial involvement is linked to gut inflammatory activity; hence, there is a considerable amount of treatment overlap. Biological therapies have revolutionized management of inflammatory bowel diseases as well as of associated articular manifestations. Newer mechanisms driving gut associated arthropathy have surfaced in the past decade and have enhanced our interests in novel treatment targets. Introduction of biosimilar molecules is expected in the US market in the near future and will provide an opportunity for considerable cost savings on healthcare. A multidisciplinary approach involving a gastroenterologist, rheumatologist, and physical therapist is ideal for these patients.

  19. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Sebastian; Piotrowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-10

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  20. The role of vitamin D3 in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmowska-Miśków, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D3, combined with its nuclear receptor, regulates more than 900 genes, which is the reason why its effect is pleiotropic. Among other effects, it influences the immunological system. Its deficit may be one of the environmental factors taking part in the development of auto-immunological diseases. The studies reveal that, among others things, inflammatory bowel diseases occur in higher latitudes, with lower exposure to solar radiation and with decreased production of vitamin D3 in the skin. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have vitamin D3 deficiency more frequently. The application of vitamin D3, especially among adults with inflammatory bowel diseases, positively influences bone turnover markers and mostly due to its influence on immunological processes, vitamin D3 may be useful in the treatment of the primary health condition. It is necessary to determine the dosage range, as well as the optimal level of vitamin D3 metabolite-25OHD3, where the immunosuppressant effect is the best, with no toxic effects. Studies of vitamin D3 analogues deprived of the hypercalcemic influence, but with other merits of the basic substance remaining intact, are particularly promising. PMID:25166432

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease in children, an evolving problem in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa′a A Al-Qabandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD was previously thought a rare disease among children in Kuwait since most diarrhea cases were attributed to infections. In the past few years we observed an increase in the number of patients presenting with IBD. In this study we aimed to determine the epidemiology of IBD among children in the State of Kuwait. Patients and Methods: The charts of all children with IBD who were referred to the pediatric gastroenterology unit during the period February 1998 to January 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Out of a total of 130 children with IBD, 92 (71% had Crohn′s disease, 36 (28% had ulcerative colitis and two (1% had indeterminate colitis. The estimated annual incidence for IBD was 2.16/10 5 /year. The age range was nine months-15 years (median: 11 years. Fifty-three percent of all patients were females and 77% were Kuwaiti nationals. Positive family history was found in 23%. The commonest presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (87% and diarrhea (82%. Failure to thrive was detected in 35% and short stature in 20% at presentation. The ileocolonic region was the most common presentation site affected in Crohn′s patients and pancolitis was the commonest in ulcerative colitis. Conclusion: Inflammatory bowel disease is not uncommon in our children. We found no differences regarding disease presentation and clinical features compared to the Western world.

  2. Role of endoscopy in predicting the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthieu; Allez; Marc; Lémann

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopy provides a direct evaluation of mucosal lesions in inflammatory bowel disease(IBD),permitting the description of elementary lesions,their surface extent and severity.The severity of mucosal lesions directly reflects disease activity and may help to identify an aggressive behavior of the disease.Several studies have recently pointed out the potential role of endoscopy in the prediction of IBD outcome.Indeed,severe endoscopic lesions in Crohn's disease(CD) patients,defined by deep and extensive ulce...

  3. Role of endoscopy in predicting the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Allez, Matthieu; Lémann, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopy provides a direct evaluation of mucosal lesions in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), permitting the description of elementary lesions, their surface extent and severity. The severity of mucosal lesions directly reflects disease activity and may help to identify an aggressive behavior of the disease. Several studies have recently pointed out the potential role of endoscopy in the prediction of IBD outcome. Indeed, severe endoscopic lesions in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients, defined by...

  4. Environmental triggers for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD; Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC)] are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that are due to a dysregulated immune response to intestinal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Despite advances in genetics, the likelihood of occurrence of disease remains incompletely explained and there appears to be a strong role for the environment in mediating risk of disease. Smoking remains the most widely studied and replicated risk factor, contributing to increased risk and severity of CD while conferring protection against UC. Recent data has suggested novel risk factors. Lower plasma vitamin D is associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease, and vitamin D supplementation may prevent relapse of disease. Several medications including oral contraceptives, post-menopausal hormone replacement, aspirin, NSAIDs, and antibiotics may increase risk of CD or UC with the mechanisms of effect remaining inadequately defined. There is continuing evidence that depression and psychosocial stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of both CD and UC, while at the same time also increasing risk for disease flares. There is also a growing understanding of the role of diet on IBD, in particular through its effect on the microbiome. Animal protein intake and n-6 fatty acids may increase risk of UC while n-3 fatty acids and dietary fiber may confer protection. The effect of diet on established disease remains poorly studied. There is need for routine measurement of a spectrum of environmental exposures in prospective studies to further our understanding. PMID:23250702

  5. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy on the quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: multi-center design and study protocol (KL!C- study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evertsz’ Floor Bennebroek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD patients report poorer quality of life (QoL and more anxiety and depressive symptoms than controls from the general population. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is effective for anxiety and depression, but questionable in case of co-morbidity with IBD. Therefore, an adapted new CBT specifically designed for IBD patients was developed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of adapted CBT on QoL. Methods/design IBD patients with a poor level of mental QoL (score less than or equal to 23 on the mental health scale of SF-36 will be randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 40 or waiting-list control condition (n = 40. The experimental condition will then immediately start CBT. The waiting-list control condition will wait 3,5 months before CBT begins with pre- and post assessments. Both conditions will complete a baseline and follow-up assessment following CBT and a mid-treatment assessment. The primary outcome is IBD-specific QoL (IBDQ. Secondary outcomes are generic QoL (SF-36 and anxiety and depression complaints (HADS, CES-D. Additionally, we will examine the working mechanism of the psychological intervention by investigating the impact of the intervention on illness-related cognitions, attitudes, coping styles and their associations with outcome. Data will be analysed on an intention to treat (ITT as well as treatment completer basis (greater than or equal to five sessions followed. Discussion If found effective, this IBD-specific CBT is a first step to enhance poor QoL in IBD patients and possibly, other gastroenterological diseases. By enhancing IBD patients’ QoL, we may also improve their mental and physical health, and lower unnecessary health care consumption. Trial registration number NTR (TC = 1869

  6. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease: Safety issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anastasia; Konidari; Wael; El; Matary

    2014-01-01

    Thiopurines are widely used for maintenance treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Interindividual variability in clinical response to thiopurines may be attributed to several factors including genetic polymorphisms, severity and chronicity of disease, comorbidities, duration of administration, compliance issues and use of concomitant medication, environmental factors and clinician and patient preferences. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current evidence on thiopurine safety and toxicity, to describe adverse drug events and emphasise the significance of drug interactions, and to discuss the relative safety of thiopurine use in adults, elderly patients, children and pregnant women. Thiopurines are safe to use and well tolerated, however dose adjustment or discontinuation of treatment must be considered in cases of non-response, poor compliance or toxicity. Drug safety, clinical response to treatment and short to long term risks and benefits must be balanced throughout treatment duration for different categories of patients. Treatment should be individualised and stratified according to patient requirements. Enzymatic testing prior to treatment commencement is advised. Surveillance with regular clinic follow-up and monitoring of laboratory markers is important. Data on long term efficacy, safety of thiopurine use and interaction with other disease modifying drugs are lacking, especially in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease. High quality, collaborative clinical research is required so as to inform clinical practice in the future.

  7. Mucosal antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease are directed against intestinal bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Macpherson, A.; Khoo, U Y; Forgacs, I; Philpott-Howard, J.; Bjarnason, I

    1996-01-01

    In contrast with normal subjects where IgA is the main immunoglobulin in the intestine, patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) produce high concentrations of IgG from intestinal lymphocytes, but the antigens at which these antibodies are directed are unknown. To investigate the specificities of these antibodies mucosal immunoglobulins were isolated from washings taken at endoscopy from 21 control patients with irritable bowel syndrome, 10 control patients with intestinal inflam...

  8. Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Skroza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and psoriasis has been investigated by epidemiological studies. It is only starting from the 1990s that genetic and immunological aspects have been focused on. Psoriasis and IBD are strictly related inflammatory diseases. Skin and bowel represent, at the same time, barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. The most important genetic correlations involve the chromosomal loci 6p22, 16q, 1p31, and 5q33 which map several genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. The genetic background represents the substrate to the common immune processes involved in psoriasis and IBD. In the past, psoriasis and IBD were considered Th1-related disorders. Nowadays the role of new T cells populations has been highlighted. A key role is played by Th17 and T-regs cells as by the balance between these two cells types. New cytokines and T cells populations, as IL-17A, IL-22, and Th22 cells, could play an important pathogenetic role in psoriasis and IBD. The therapeutic overlaps further support the hypothesis of a common pathogenesis.

  9. The Vitamin D Status in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, Lauren Elizabeth; Maranda, Louise; Fong, Jay; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2014-01-01

    Context There is no consensus on the vitamin D status of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To determine the vitamin D status of patients with IBD by comparing their serum 25(OH)D concentration to that of healthy controls. Hypothesis Serum 25(OH)D concentration will be lower in patients with IBD compared to controls. Subjects and Methods A case-controlled retrospective study of subjects with IBD (n = 58) of 2–20 years (male n = 31, age 16.38±2.21 years; female...

  10. Overexpression of GRß in colonic mucosal cell line partly reflects altered gene expression in colonic mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zsolt; Acs, Bence; Butz, Henriett; Feldman, Karolina; Marta, Alexa; Szabo, Peter M; Baghy, Kornelia; Pazmany, Tamas; Racz, Karoly; Liko, Istvan; Patocs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) plays a crucial role in inflammatory responses. GR has several isoforms, of which the most deeply studied are the GRα and GRß. Recently it has been suggested that in addition to its negative dominant effect on GRα, the GRß may have a GRα-independent transcriptional activity. The GRß isoform was found to be frequently overexpressed in various autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study, we wished to test whether the gene expression profile found in a GRß overexpressing intestinal cell line (Caco-2GRß) might mimic the gene expression alterations found in patients with IBD. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed in both normal and GRß overexpressing Caco-2 cell lines with and without dexamethasone treatment. IBD-related genes were identified from a meta-analysis of 245 microarrays available in online microarray deposits performed on intestinal mucosa samples from patients with IBD and healthy individuals. The differentially expressed genes were further studied using in silico pathway analysis. Overexpression of GRß altered a large proportion of genes that were not regulated by dexamethasone suggesting that GRß may have a GRα-independent role in the regulation of gene expression. About 10% of genes differentially expressed in colonic mucosa samples from IBD patients compared to normal subjects were also detected in Caco-2 GRß intestinal cell line. Common genes are involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Overexpression of GRß in intestinal cells may affect appropriate mucosal repair and intact barrier function. The proposed novel role of GRß in intestinal epithelium warrants further studies. PMID:26480216

  11. The Social Construction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Social Media Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Dennis Owen

    2016-11-01

    Many people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sometimes lacking adequate face-to-face sources of support, turn to online communities to meet others with the disease. These online communities are places of support and education, but through the use of social media communication technologies, people with IBD are redefining what it means to live with the disease. This ethnographic study followed 14 online communities to understand how people with IBD used social media technologies to construct their own meanings about living with the disease. The following redefinitions were observed: the refiguring of the body is beautiful; inflammatory bowel disease is serious and deadly; inflammatory bowel disease is humorous; the disease makes one stronger; and the disease is invisible, but needs to be made visible. This study will help health communication scholars understand how technology is appropriated by patients, and will help practitioners understand how their patients conceptualize their disease. PMID:27050670

  12. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract,which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different levels of the inflammatory processes. New therapies are classified as: (1) Anti-TNFα antibodies; (2) Recombinant cytokines; (3) Selective adhesion blockade;(4) Growth factors; (5) Innate immunostimulation; (6) Nucleic acid based therapies; (7) Gene therapy; (8) Autologous bone-marrow transplantation; (9) Helminths and (10) Extracorporeal immunomodulation. All treatments have the potential to provide more effective and safe treatment for IBD.

  13. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-02-21

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and thioguanine. We will briefly summarize dose recommendations, indications for thiopurine therapy and side effects which are relevant in clinical practice. We discuss some currently debated topics, including the combination of azathioprine and allopurinol, switching of thiopurine therapy in case of side effects, the use of azathioprine in pregnancy, the infection risk using thiopurines and the evidence when to stop thiopurines. Excellent reviews have been published on the thiopurine metabolic pathway which will not be discussed here in detail. PMID:23467510

  14. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  15. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A; Barkema, Herman W; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Fedorak, Richard N; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge of the association between environmental risk factors and IBD. A number of environmental risk factors were investigated including smoking, hygiene, microorganisms, oral contraceptives, antibiotics, diet, breastfeeding, geographical factors, pollution and stress. Inconsistent findings among the studies highlight the complex pathogenesis of IBD. Additional studies are necessary to identify and elucidate the role of environmental factors in IBD etiology. PMID:23516681

  16. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of...... inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  17. Importance of nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfredo José Lucendo; Livia Cristina De Rezende

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from the interaction between an individual's immune response and precipitant environmental factors, which generate an anomalous chronic inflammatory response in those who are genetically predisposed. Various feeding practices have been implicated in the origin of IBD based on epidemiological observations in developed countries, but we do not have solid evidence for the etiological role played by specific food types. IBD is associated with frequent nutritional deficiencies, the pattern and severity of which depends on the extent, duration and activity of the inflammation. Nutritional support allows these deficiencies in calories, macro and micronutrients to be rectified. Enteral nutrition is also a primary therapy for IBD, especially for Crohn's disease, as it allows the inflammatory activity to be controlled, kept in remission, and prevents or delays the need for surgery. Nutritional support is especially important in childhood IBD as an alternative to pharmacological t reatment . This repor t discusses the complex relationship between diet and IBD.

  18. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  19. [Fecal Calprotectin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun

    2016-05-25

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis comprise conditions characterized by chronic, relapsing immune activation and inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract. Objective estimation of intestinal inflammation is the mainstay in the diagnosis and observation of IBD, but is primarily dependent on expensive and invasive procedures such as endoscopy. Therefore, a simple, noninvasive, inexpensive, and accurate test would be extremely important in clinical practice. Fecal calprotectin is a calcium-containing protein released into the lumen that is excreted in feces during acute and chronic inflammation. It is well-researched, noninvasive, and has high sensitivity and specificity for identification of inflammation in IBD. This review will focus on the use of fecal calprotectin to help diagnose, monitor, and determine treatment in IBD. PMID:27206433

  20. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arvind Batra; Thorsten Stroh; Britta Siegmund

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature.Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease,but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets.

  1. Five personality dimensions in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farnam

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alireza Farnam, Mohammad H Somi, Firouz Sarami, Sara FarhangLiver and Gastrointestinal Diseases Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranAim: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS as a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract has been related to psychological factors. Aim of this study is to study the differences of personality factors between IBS patients compared to our general population.Methods: This study was performed in clinics of Tabriz Medical University during 2006–2007. IBS was diagnosed using the Rome II diagnostic criteria after exclusion of organic bowel pathology. The entry of each patient was confirmed following a psychiatric interview and after any comorbid psychiatry disorder was ruled out. Personality traits and score of each factor was evaluated using NEO five factor personality inventory compared to results of a previous study on general population of Iran.Results: One hundred and sixty six patients were studied. The mean age (±SD of them was 33.6(±11.4 years (60.8% female. Our study population had their symptoms for a mean interval of 47.3 month. The bowel problems were provoked by distress in more than 80% of patients. Pain in female patients was reported to be more frequent but both gender described the association between stressors and their symptoms. NEO Five-Factor Inventory showed a significantly higher level of neuroticism and conscientiousness and lower level of openness and agreeableness in theses nonpsychiatric IBS patients. Women with IBS had significantly higher levels of openness, conscientiousness, and extraversion compared to men.Conclusion: Differences were observed between IBS patients and general population. Patients with IBS may benefit from psychological interventions.Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, personality, five-factor model

  2. Management of difficult inflammatory bowel disease: where are we now?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.S. Rampton

    2000-01-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease includes not only drug, endoscopic and surgical therapy but alsopsychosocial support, dietary and specific nutritional measures: a multidisciplinary medical, surgical, nursingand dietetic approach is essential for all patients, particularly those with complex or refractory disease. Inthis paper, current treatment of acute severe ulcerative colitis and steroid-refractory or -dependent Crohn'sdisease is reviewed. Adjunctive intravenous cyclosporin is an alternative to urgent colectomy in steroid-refractory patients with acute severe ulcerative colitis, while the place of intravenous heparin for thisindication awaits clarification. Azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine are useful options in chronically active,steroid-refractory or -dependent Crohn's disease, but may take up to 4 months to work. Methotrexate is amore recent immunomodulatory alternative. Of new therapies selectively aimed at specific pathophysiologicaltargets, the first to reach clinical application is anti-TNF-alpha antibody (infliximab) for refractory Crohn'sdisease: its benefits are promising, but experience with it is limited to date, its cost is high and there areuncertainties about long-term safety. In view of the increasing variety and complexity of management optionsin inflammatory bowel disease, whether apparently responsive or difficult to treat, patients must participatein decisions about which therapies they are to be given.

  3. Sonography in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in diagnosing active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is assessed on the basis of a randomized prospective study of 61 patients. Twenty-six of the patients were affected with crohn's disease (CD) and 12 with ulcerative colitis, while the remaining 23 patients were control subjects with no specific chronic IBD. The US signs considered as a significant for active CD and UC were: -visualization of a typical target image, that is a hyperechoic center corresponding to luminal bowel content, surrounded by a hypoechoic ring corresponding to loop walls; -at least 2 of the following: solid abdominal mass, distended loops, luminal narrowing, reduced peristalsis, stiff loops, and accumulation of fluid between the loops. US sensitivity and specificity for CD were 77% and 95.6%, respectively. As for UC, no significant results were obtained. In our experiance, US is a reliable method for detecting alterations and, especially, comlpications typical of CD in its active phase. Considering the young age of patients affected with CD and the number of exams they must undergo, US is considered as a useful tool in disease follow-up

  4. Job Strain and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Madsen, Ida E H; Nyberg, Solja T;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many clinicians, patients and patient advocacy groups believe stress to have a causal role in inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, this is not corroborated by clear epidemiological research evidence. We investigated the associa.......48). There was negligible heterogeneity among the study-specific associations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that job strain, an indicator of work-related stress, is not a major risk factor for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis.......-Work Consortium. Work-related psychosocial stress was operationalised as job strain (a combination of high demands and low control at work) and was self-reported at baseline. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were ascertained from national hospitalisation and drug reimbursement registers. The associations...

  5. Serologic and laboratory markers in prediction of the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The search for biologic markers that can assess the natural history and perhaps predict the course of individual’s disease including response to treatments over time has become an important focus of inflammatory bowel disease research. The knowledge of an individual’s prognosis can help physicians and patients make important management decisions and aid communication on risk and benefits of disease and treatment.

  6. Risk of inflammatory bowel disease following a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Chad K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD symptoms often overlap. In some IBS cases there are subtle inflammatory changes similar to the immune-mediated pathophysiology of IBD, and the risk of both increases after infectious gastroenteritis (IGE. Methods To evaluate the effect of IBS and IGE on IBD risk utilizing US Department of Defense medical encounter data, active duty personnel with IBS were matched to subjects without IBS. Medical encounter history was analyzed to assess for incident IBD. IGE was identified from documented medical encounters and by self-report. Relative risks were calculated using Poisson regression models. Results We identified 9,341 incident IBS cases and 18,678 matched non-IBS subjects and found an 8.6-fold higher incidence (p p  Conclusions These data reflect a complex interaction between illness presentation and diagnosis of IBS and IBD and suggest intercurrent IGE may increase IBD risk in IBS patients. Additional studies are needed to determine whether IBS lies on the causal pathway for IBD or whether the two are on a pathophysiological spectrum of the same clinical illness. These data suggest consideration of risk reduction interventions for IGE among IBS patients at high disease risk.

  7. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  8. Bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called "pelvic organ" dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and "prokinetic" drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  9. Whipple's disease demonstrated by double contrast small bowel enema with barium and methylcellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiologic findings on small bowel enema examination using barium and methylcellulose (SBE+Ba+MC) in a patient with Whipple's disease before and after treatment are described. The changes on SBE+Ba+MC corresponded well to the clinical and morphologic picture. The advantages of this double contrast technique compared to the enteroclysis with barium alone are demonstrated. The SBE+Ba+MC is a good method to demonstrate the manifestations of Whipple's disease involving the small bowel and the mesentery. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease with /sup 99mTc-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadir, S.; Strauss, H.W.

    1979-02-01

    Technetium-99m-labelled DTPA was found to localize in segments of bowel with inflammation due to ulcerative colitis, regional enteritis, and other forms of enterocolitis. The concentration of tracer was apparently related to the clinical activity of the disease process. Imaging with /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA may offer an appealing, noninvasive alternative for identifying and following up patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. Bowel Function in Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Jin Hwa; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young; Park, Ji Young

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate factors related to bowel function and colon motility in acute stroke patients. Method Fifty-one stroke patients (29 males, mean age 63.4±13.6 years, onset 13.4±4.8 days) were recruited and divided into two groups: constipation (n=25) and non-constipation (n=26) groups. We evaluated the amount of intake, voiding function, concomitant swallowing problem and colon transit time (CTT) using radio-opaque markers for ascending, descending and rectosigmoid colons. The Adapted...

  12. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-09-01

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn's disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment. PMID:25206258

  13. Colorectal cancer and dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman, Timothy L; Rubin, David T

    2008-05-01

    Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease carry an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Established risk factors for cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include the younger age at diagnosis, greater extent and duration of disease, increased severity of inflammation, family history of colorectal cancer and coexisting primary sclerosing cholangitis. Recent evidence suggests that current medical therapies and surgical techniques for inflammatory bowel disease may be reducing the incidence of this complication. Nonetheless heightened vigilance and a careful, comprehensive approach to prevent or minimize the complications of invasive cancer are warranted in this unique cohort of patients. Current guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cancer in this high risk population are grounded in the concept of an inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. A thorough understanding of the definition and natural history of dysplasia in IBD, as well as the challenges associated with detection and interpretation of dysplasia are fundamental to developing an effective strategy for surveillance and prevention, and understanding the limitations of the current approach to prevention. This article reviews the current consensus guidelines for screening and surveillance of cancer in IBD, as well as presenting the evidence and rationale for chemoprevention of cancer and a discussion of emerging technologies for the detection of dysplasia. PMID:18461651

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease: is it a primary immunodeficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Erik; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic and relapsing conditions, characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhea, bleeding and malabsorption. IBD has been considered a hyperinflammatory state due to disturbed interactions between the immune system and the commensal bacterial flora of the gut. However, there is evidence that Crohn's disease might be the consequence of a reduced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an impaired acute inflammatory response, thereby suggesting that IBD might be an immunodeficiency rather than an excessive inflammatory reaction. This theory has been supported by observations in patients with primary immunodeficiencies such as the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and IPEX (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome). In contrary, defects in the anti-inflammatory down-regulation of the immune response as they are seen in patients with Mendelian defects in the IL10 signaling pathway support the hyper-inflammatory theory. In this review, we describe and discuss primary immunodeficiencies associated with IBD and show that the bowel is a highly sensitive indicator of dysregulations, making IBD a model disease to study and identify key regulators required to balance the human mucosal immune system. PMID:21997382

  15. Colorectal cancer and dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy L Zisman; David T Rubin

    2008-01-01

    Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease carry an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer.Established risk factors for cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include the younger age at diagnosis,greater extent and duration of disease,increased severity of inflammation,family history of colorectal cancer and coexisting primary sclerosing cholangitis.Recent evidence suggests that current medical therapies and surgical techniques for inflammatory bowel disease may be reducing the incidence of this complication.Nonetheless heightened vigilance and a careful,comprehensive approach to prevent or minimize the complications of invasive cancer are warranted in this unique cohort of patients.Current guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cancer in this high risk population are grounded in the concept of an inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence.A thorough understanding of the definition and natural history of dysplasia in IBD,as well as the challenges associated with detection and interpretation of dysplasia are fundamental to developing an effective strategy for surveillance and prevention,and understanding the limitations of the current approach to prevention.This article reviews the current consensus guidelines for screening and surveillance of cancer in IBD,as well as presenting the evidence and rationale for chemoprevention of cancer and a discussion of emerging technologies for the detection of dysplasia.

  16. Management of patients with a short bowel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeremy M D Nightingale

    2001-01-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undemutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration,sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B12. Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalats renal atones and they may have problems with D (-)lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel,even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good.

  17. Innate immunity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The human intestinal tract is home to an enormous bacterial flora. The host defense against microorganisms can be divided into innate and adaptive immunity. The former is the most immediate line of response to immunologic challenges presented by bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The mucosal immune system has evolved to balance the need to respond to pathogens while co-existing with commensal bacteria and food antigens. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this hyporesponsiveness or tolerance breaks-down and inflammation supervenes driven by the intestinal microbial flora. Bacteria contain compounds and are recognized by a variety of receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NODs (a family of intracellular bacterial sensors) and are potent stimuli of innate immune responses. Several mutations in these receptors have been associated with development of IBD.

  18. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Vezza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects.

  19. Endoscopic assessment of inflammatory bowel disease: colonoscopy/esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Grace

    2012-06-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the initial diagnosis of IBD, including the evaluation of disease severity, activity, and extent. The implications of complete mucosal healing further confirm the function of endoscopy in the follow-up of IBD patients. The use of therapeutic endoscopy, for example stricture dilatation, can avoid the need for bowel resection. Modalities such as capsule endoscopy, EUS, NBI, CE, and other emerging techniques are likely to have an increasing role in the management of IBD, particularly in the area of dysplasia surveillance and treatment.

  20. [Frequency of celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome coexistance and its influence on the disease course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Galicka-Latała, Danuta; Rozpondek, Piotr; Rudnicka-Sosin, Lucyna; Mach, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent gluten intolerance. Gluten is the main storage protein of wheat, in genetically predisposed individuals. Celiac disease risk in first degree relatives is about 10%. Diarrhea and changes of bowel movement, observed as well in celiac disease as in IBS, may lead to misdiagnosis of IBS basing on the Rome criteria or may be associated with coexistence of both diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the celiac disease prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The study group comprised 200 patients (120 women and 80 men) aged 18-78 years (mean: 46.7 years) with diarrhoeal form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the Rome criteria II. At the beginning and after a three month period anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA tTG) were estimated. Gastroscopy with biopsy where performed in those with IgA tTG titre above 1/200. 40 patients were immunologically positive and 14 of them have histopathologically proven celiac disease. In the group of patients with detected celiac disease, gluten free diet was applied besides the treatment with trimebutin or mebewerin, recommended for IBS. After 6 months the decrease of IgA tTG titre in the serum was observed. In 5 of these patients IgA tTG level was negative. It was associated with the significant decrease of clinical symptoms, such as diarrhea and flatulence. The remaining symptoms, such as abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation demanded continuation of IBS treatment. With regard to often atypical celiac disease symptoms--adult active searching should be performed to differentiate from irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:19689036

  1. CD4CD8αα lymphocytes, a novel human regulatory T cell subset induced by colonic bacteria and deficient in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-04-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  2. Qualidade de vida em pacientes portadores de doença inflamatória intestinal: tradução para o português e validação do questionário "Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire" (IBDQ) Quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: translation to Portuguese language and validation of the "Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire" (IBDQ)

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Meire Albuquerque Pontes; Sender Jankiel Miszputen; Olavo Franco Ferreira-Filho; Cláudio Miranda; Marcos Bosi Ferraz

    2004-01-01

    RACIONAL: A doença de Crohn compõe com a retocolite ulcerativa inespecífica, as doenças inflamatórias intestinais. Têm evolução crônica, gerando repercussões importantes na qualidade de vida dos doentes. Medir esse parâmetro implica na determinação do grau de bem estar subjetivo atribuível à falta de sintomas, ao estado psicológico e atividades que possam ser realizadas, sendo útil como instrumento de avaliação em ensaios clínicos e de programas de saúde. O "Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questio...

  3. Noninvasive methods in evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease: where do we stand now? An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansel Turkay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases, consisting of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and indeterminate colitis, are distinguished by idiopathic and chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. The distinction between inflammatory bowel diseases and functional bowel disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, can be complex because they often present with similar symptoms. Rapid and inexpensive noninvasive tests that are sensitive, specific and simple are needed to prevent patient discomfort, delay in diagnosis, and unnecessary costs. None of the current commercially available serological biomarker tests can be used as a stand-alone diagnostic in clinics. Instead, these are used as an adjunct to endoscopy in diagnosis and prognosis of the disease.Along these lines,, fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin tests seem to be one step further from other tests with larger number of studies, higher sensitivity and specificity and wider availability.

  4. Expression of lymphocyte-endothelial receptor-ligand pairs, α4β7/MAdCAM-1 and OX40/OX40 ligand in the colon and jejunum of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    H. Souza; Elia, C.; Spencer, J; Macdonald, T.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The interaction between leucocytes and vascular endothelial cells is essential for leucocyte migration into inflammatory sites.
AIMS—To study the local expression of the pairs of complementary molecules, α4β7/mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM-1) and OX40/OX40 ligand in the lamina propria of the colon and jejunum of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
METHODS—Ten patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC), nine with active Crohn's disease (CD), and seven irrit...

  5. Small bowel angiodysplasia and novel disease associations: a cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holleran, Grainne

    2013-04-01

    Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias recurrently bleed, accounting for 3-5% of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The advent of small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has led to an increased recognition of small bowel angiodysplasias (SBAs) but little is known about their etiology. Previous small cohorts and case reports suggest an equal gender incidence and associations with cardiovascular disease, renal impairment, and coagulopathies.

  6. Light and sound - emerging imaging techniques for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2016-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are known to have a high demand of recurrent evaluation for therapy and disease activity. Further, the risk of developing cancer during the disease progression is increasing from year to year. New, mostly non-radiant, quick to perform and quantitative methods are challenging, conventional endoscopy with biopsy as gold standard. Especially, new physical imaging approaches utilizing light and sound waves have facilitated the development of advanced functional and molecular modalities. Besides these advantages they hold the promise to predict personalized therapeutic responses and to spare frequent invasive procedures. Within this article we highlight their potential for initial diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and surveillance of cancer development in established techniques and recent advances such as wide-view full-spectrum endoscopy, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence endoscopy, endocytoscopy, confocal laser endoscopy, multiphoton endoscopy, molecular imaging endoscopy, B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, ultrasound molecular imaging, and elastography. PMID:27433080

  7. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the bowel wall can predict disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanini, Laura, E-mail: laura.romanini@libero.it [Department of Radiology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passamonti, Matteo, E-mail: matteopassamonti@gmail.com [Department of Radiology-AO Provincia di Lodi, Via Fissiraga, 15, 26900 Lodi (Italy); Navarria, Mario, E-mail: navarria.mario@tiscali.it [Department of Radiology-ASL Vallecamonica-Sebino, Via Manzoni 142, 25040 Esine, BS (Italy); Lanzarotto, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.lanzarotto@spedalicivili.brescia.it [Department of Gastroenterology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Villanacci, Vincenzo, E-mail: villanac@alice.it [Department of Pathology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Grazioli, Luigi, E-mail: radiologia1@spedalicivili.brescia.it [Department of Radiology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Calliada, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.calliada@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Pavia, Viale Camillo Golgi 19, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Maroldi, Roberto, E-mail: rmaroldi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of quantitative analysis of bowel wall enhancement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) by comparing the results with vascular density in a biopsy sample from the same area of the intestinal tract, and to determine the usefulness of this analysis for the prediction of disease activity. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institute's ethics committee and all patients gave written informed consent. We enrolled 33 consecutive adult patients undergoing colonoscopy and biopsy for IBD. All patients underwent CEUS and the results were quantitatively analyzed. Vessel count per high-power field on biopsy specimens was compared with colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS findings, and with analysis of peak intensity, time to peak, regional blood volume, mean transit time, and regional blood flow. Results in patients with high and low vascular density were compared using Fisher's test, t-test, Pearson's correlation test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Cutoff values were determined using ROC analysis, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: High vascular density (>265 vessels per field) on histological examination was significantly correlated with active disease on colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS (p < .0001). Quantitative analysis showed a higher enhancement peak, a shorter time to peak enhancement, a higher regional blood flow and regional blood volume in patients with high vascular density than in those with low vascular density. Cutoff values to distinguish between active and inactive disease were identified for peak enhancement (>40.5%), and regional blood flow (>54.8 ml/min). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of CEUS data correlates with disease activity as determined by vascular density. Quantitative parameters of CEUS can be used to predict active disease with high sensitivity and

  8. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the bowel wall can predict disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of quantitative analysis of bowel wall enhancement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) by comparing the results with vascular density in a biopsy sample from the same area of the intestinal tract, and to determine the usefulness of this analysis for the prediction of disease activity. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institute's ethics committee and all patients gave written informed consent. We enrolled 33 consecutive adult patients undergoing colonoscopy and biopsy for IBD. All patients underwent CEUS and the results were quantitatively analyzed. Vessel count per high-power field on biopsy specimens was compared with colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS findings, and with analysis of peak intensity, time to peak, regional blood volume, mean transit time, and regional blood flow. Results in patients with high and low vascular density were compared using Fisher's test, t-test, Pearson's correlation test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Cutoff values were determined using ROC analysis, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: High vascular density (>265 vessels per field) on histological examination was significantly correlated with active disease on colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS (p < .0001). Quantitative analysis showed a higher enhancement peak, a shorter time to peak enhancement, a higher regional blood flow and regional blood volume in patients with high vascular density than in those with low vascular density. Cutoff values to distinguish between active and inactive disease were identified for peak enhancement (>40.5%), and regional blood flow (>54.8 ml/min). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of CEUS data correlates with disease activity as determined by vascular density. Quantitative parameters of CEUS can be used to predict active disease with high sensitivity and

  9. Steroid dependency and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease in the era of immunomodulators-A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Munkholm, Pia Susanne; Paerregaard, Anders; Wewer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The aim was to investigate the impact of systemic steroid treatment (SST) and immunomodulators (IM) on disease course in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS:: All IBD patients in eastern Denmark...

  10. CARD15 Gene 3020insC Mutation with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhami Gok

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: This study is to investigate a relation between CARD15/NOD2 3020insC frameshift mutation and in patients with IBD in the Turkish Population. C-insertion frameshift mutation is a major contributor to the susceptibility to both CD and UC, but it is not specific to patients with CD in Turkish population.

  11. Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by an altered composition of the intestinal microbiota, which may contribute to their development and maintenance in susceptible hosts. The involvement of bacteria in the inflammation has provided the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the gut flora through the use of antibiotics. However, the role of antibiotics has not been clearly demonstrated and their long-term employment is often restricted by an elevated number of adverse events. The use of rifaximin, which is characterised by an excellent safety profile thanks to its negligible intestinal absorption, appears to have some promise. Study results suggest that rifaximin could be useful in Crohn's disease, and a new gastroresistant formulation (rifaximin-extended intestinal release) has recently shown its efficacy in patients with moderate Crohn's disease. Less consistent data support the use of rifaximin in ulcerative colitis and in pouchitis, although the results of some studies have been encouraging. Further large controlled trials are warranted to confirm the role of rifaximin in inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:26202194

  12. Retrospective analysis of old-age colitis in the Dutch inflammatory bowel disease population

    OpenAIRE

    Hadithi, M. al; Cazemier, M.; Meijer, G. A.; Bloemena, E.; Felt-Bersma, R.J.F.; Mulder, C. J. J.; Meuwissen, S G M; Pena, A S; Bodegraven, van, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To describe the characteristics of Dutch patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) first diagnosed above 60 years of age-a disease also known as old-age colitis (OAC) and to highlight a condition that has a similar appearance to IBD, namely segmental colitis associated with diverticular disease (SCAD).

  13. Limitations in assessment of mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    An emerging parameter to define the effectiveness of new therapeutic agents in clinical trials,and by extension,for use in day-to-day clinical practice has been labeled mucosal healing.It has been hypothesized that complete healing of the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases should result in reduced disease complications,reduced hospitalization and reduced surgical treatment.By implication,the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease might then be altered. Measurement of mucosal healing,how...

  14. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    OpenAIRE

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury...

  15. Fecal lactoferrin in discriminating inflammatory bowel disease from Irritable bowel syndrome: a diagnostic meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xing-lu; Xu, Wen; Tang, Xiao-xiao; Luo, Lai-sheng; Tu, Jiang-feng; Zhang, Chen-jing; Xu, Xiang; Wu, Qin-dong; Pan, Wen-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background To perform a meta-analysis evaluating the diagnostic ability of fecal lactoferrin (FL) to distinguish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods The Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane library and CNKI databases were systematically searched for studies that used FL concentrations to distinguish between IBD and IBS. The sensitivity, specificity, and other diagnostic indexes of FL were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Seven studies...

  16. Oral Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Manoela Seadi; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are known as chronic inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, represented mainly by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Among the main oral manifestations of IBD are cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, labial swellings with vertical fissures, pyostomatitis vegetans, angular cheilitis, perioral erythema, and glossitis. In this sense, understanding these nosological entities by dentists would help reach early and differential diagnosis. Thus, two case reports are presented and discussed based on theoretical references obtained by a literature review. The first case report refers to an adult patient whose IBD diagnosis was established after stomatological assessment. The second case was a patient with CD diagnosed in childhood with characteristic oral lesions. PMID:26864508

  17. Toll-like receptors -2, -4 and CD14 in human intestinal mucosa from patients with inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolová, Lenka; Drastich, P.; Klimešová, Klára; Rossmann, Pavel; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Prague : Verlag, 2006, s. 80-80. [Meeting of the European Mucosal Immunology Group /5./. Prague (CZ), 05.10.2006-07.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/03/H147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : crohns disease * ulcerative colitis * toll-like receptors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  18. Fertility and Contraception in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jason; Kane, Sunanda V; Feagins, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) carries a high burden in women during their reproductive years, and family planning issues are often a significant cause of concern. Fertility is normal in women with nonsurgically treated ulcerative colitis and similar or slightly reduced in women with Crohn's disease. Women who undergo ileal pouch anastomosis have reduced fertility. Fertility is likely worsened by disease activity but unaffected by medications used to treat IBD. Infertile patients with IBD respond as well as non-IBD patients to in vitro fertilization (IVF). Despite normal fertility, patients with IBD have fewer children due to concerns regarding infertility, disease inheritance, congenital abnormalities, and disease-related sexual dysfunction. Patients rarely discuss these issues with a physician. When discussion does occur, it may lead to changes in decision-making. Contraceptives are an important part of family planning, particularly during times of high disease activity. All forms of contraceptives are acceptable in patients with IBD, although there are specific considerations. The risks of combined oral contraceptives outweigh the benefits in patients with active disease and patients with prior or high risk for thromboembolism. Oral contraceptives and IBD are independently associated with an increased risk for thromboembolism, although it is not known whether this effect is compounding. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection should be avoided in patients with or at risk for osteopenia. Intrauterine devices and implants are the most effective form of contraception and should be a first-line recommendation. The use of oral contraceptives is associated with the development of IBD, although there is no increased risk of disease relapse with the use of any form of contraceptive. PMID:27182211

  19. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:26446683

  20. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M; Seidelin, J B; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder, be dis...

  1. A pilot study of transrectal endoscopic ultrasound elastography in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opacic Milorad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using standard diagnostic algorithms it is not always possible to establish the correct phenotype of inflammatory bowel disease which is essential for therapeutical decisions. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography is a new endoscopic procedure which can differentiate the stiffness of normal and pathological tissue by ultrasound. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of transrectal ultrasound elastography in distiction between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Methods A total 30 Crohn's disease, 25 ulcerative colitis, and 28 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls were included. Transrectal ultrasound elastography was performed in all patients and controls. In all ulcerative coltis patients and 80% of Crohn's disease patients endoscopy was performed to assess disease activity in the rectum. Results Significant difference in rectal wall thickness and strain ratio was detected between patients with Crohn's disease and controls (p = 0.0001. CD patients with active disease had higher strain ratio than patients in remission (p = 0.02. In ulcerative colitis group a significant difference in rectal wall thickness was found between controls and patients with active disease (p = 0.03. A significant difference in rectal wall thickness (p = 0.02 and strain ratio (p = 0.0001 was detected between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patient group. Crohn's disease patients with active disease had a significantly higher strain ratio compared to ulcerative colitis patients with active disease (p = 0.0001. Conclusion Transrectal ultrasound elastography seems to be a promising new diagnostic tool in the field of inflammatory bowel disease. Further study on a larger cohort of patients is needed to definitely assess the role of transrectal ultrasound elastography in inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children of Middle Eastern Descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Mai Ying Naidoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are now seen in populations where it was once uncommon. The pattern of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent in Australia has never been reported. This study aimed to investigate the burden of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent at the Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick (SCHR. The SCHR IBD database was used to identify patients of self-reported Middle Eastern ethnicity diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. Demographic, diagnosis, and management data was collected for all Middle Eastern children and an age and gender matched non-Middle Eastern IBD control group. Twenty-four patients of Middle Eastern descent were identified. Middle Eastern Crohn’s disease patients had higher disease activity at diagnosis, higher use of thiopurines, and less restricted colonic disease than controls. Although there were limitations with this dataset, we estimated a higher prevalence of IBD in Middle Eastern children and they had a different disease phenotype and behavior compared to the control group, with less disease restricted to the colon and likely a more active disease course.

  3. Fecal calprotectin use in inflammatory bowel disease and beyond: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrahim, Bashaar; Aljasser, Mohammed I; Salh, Baljinder

    2015-04-01

    Given the number of inflammatory disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract directly and indirectly, coupled with the considerable overlap with functional disorders, it is evident that more useful noninvasive diagnostic tests are required to aid with diagnosis. If these tests can also have some utility for individual patient follow-up in terms of disease activity and response to treatment, as well as providing forewarning of disease relapse, it would be extremely useful information for the clinician. One recently described test that may fulfill several of these attributes is based on leakage of a mononuclear cell cytoplasmic protein, calprotectin, along the intestinal tract, which can then be quantified in feces. This has been used to distinguish patients exhibiting symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome from patients with inflammatory bowel disease, with a measure of success greater than with currently used techniques. The present article summarizes the experience with this test used in inflammatory bowel disease, as well as a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25855880

  4. Tolerability of Shortened Infliximab Infusion Times in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases : A Single-Center Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breynaert, Christine; Ferrante, Marc; Fidder, Herma; Van Steen, Kristel; Noman, Maja; Ballet, Vera; Vermeire, Severine; Rutgeerts, Paul; Van Assche, Gert

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Scheduled maintenance therapy with infliximab decreases the risk of infusion reactions. Many centers have accelerated infusion times to 1 h in selected patients who tolerate 5 mg/kg infliximab infusions. The aim of this study was to compare the tolerability of 1-h and 2-h infliximab infu

  5. Antioxidants and mucosa protectives: realistic therapeutic options in inflammatory bowel disease?

    OpenAIRE

    L. Kruidenier; Verspaget, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in the pathogenic process of idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Although specific intervention in the oxidative cascade showed promising results in animal models and preliminary patient trials, the clinical efficacy of antioxidants still has to be established. Mucosa protection, for example by dietary fatty acids, seems to attenuate the intestinal inflammatory process as well but awaits definite clinical proof for the treatment of inflammatory bowel di...

  6. Diet therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases: The established and the new

    OpenAIRE

    Durchschein, Franziska; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Hammer, Heinz F

    2016-01-01

    Although patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have a strong interest in dietary modifications as part of their therapeutic management, dietary advice plays only a minor part in published guidelines. The scientific literature shows that dietary factors might influence the risk of developing IBD, that dysbiosis induced by nutrition contributes to the pathogenesis of IBD, and that diet may serve as a symptomatic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms in IBD. The role of ...

  7. Clinical outcome and bowel function after surgical treatment in Hirschsprung′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khazdouz; Majid Sezavar; Bahareh Imani; Hossein Akhavan; Alireza Babapour; Gholamreza Khademi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bowel function has been reported to be adversely affected following surgery in cases of Hirschsprung. We retrospectively studied both the clinical outcome and bowel function status following surgery in patients diagnosed with Hirschprung′s disease (HD). 161 cases, who underwent pull-through operations for HD in Sheikh Pediatric Tertiary Centre, Mashhad, Iran. The specified time bracket spanned between 2006 and 2011. Materials and Methods: Data was extracted from Health Information...

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease activity assessed by fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin: correlation with laboratory parameters, clinical, endoscopic and histological indexes

    OpenAIRE

    Rossini Lucio; Steinwurz Flávio; Klug Wilmar; Rolim Ernani; Fang Chia; Vieira Andrea; Candelária Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Research has shown that fecal biomarkers are useful to assess the activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the study is: to evaluate the efficacy of the fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin as indicators of inflammatory activity. Findings A total of 78 patients presenting inflammatory bowel disease were evaluated. Blood tests, the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), Mayo Disease Activity Index (MDAI), and Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS...

  9. Association between tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists and risk of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe Andersen, Nynne; Pasternak, Björn; Basit, Saima;

    2014-01-01

    -α antagonists (1.8%) (median follow-up, 3.7 years [interquartile range, 1.8-6.0]) and 3465 of 51,593 unexposed patients (6.7%) developed cancer, yielding a fully adjusted RR of 1.07 (95% CI, 0.85-1.36). There was no significantly increased risk of cancer in analyses according to time since first TNF...

  10. Detection of galectin-3 in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: new serum marker of active forms of IBD?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolová, Lenka; Smetana, K. , Jr.; Borovská, Dana; Kitanovičová, Andrea; Klimešová, Klára; Janatková, I.; Malíčková, K.; Lukáš, M.; Drastich, P.; Beneš, Z.; Tučková, Ludmila; Manning, J. C.; André, S.; Gabius, H. J.; Tlaskalová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2009), s. 503-512. ISSN 1023-3830 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA303/06/0974; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA MŠk 2B06155; GA MZd NR8963 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : crohn's disease * galectin-3 * mucosal immunity Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.586, year: 2009

  11. The Clinical Features and Predictive Risk Factors for Reoperation in Patients With Perianal Crohn Diseases; A Multi-Center Study of a Korean Inflammatory Bowel Disease Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Bum; Yoon, Seo-Gue; Park, Kyu Joo; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Dae Dong; Yoon, Sang Nam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Perianal lesions are common in Crohn disease, but their clinical course is unpredictable. Nevertheless, predicting the clinical course after surgery for perianal Crohn disease (PCD) is important because repeated operations may decrease patient's quality of life. The aim of this study was to predict the risk of reoperation in patients with PCD. Methods From September 1994 to February 2010, 377 patients with PCD were recruited in twelve major tertiary university-affiliated hospitals and two specialized colorectal hospitals in Korea. Data on the patient's demographics, clinical features, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results Among 377 patients, 227 patients were ultimately included in the study. Among the 227 patients, 64 patients underwent at least one reoperation. The median period of reoperation following the first perianal surgery was 94 months. Overall 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year cumulative rates of reoperation-free individuals were 68.8%, 61.2%, and 50.5%, respectively. In multivariate analysis (Cox-regression hazard model), reoperation was significantly correlated with an age of onset less than 20 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-3.48; P = 0.03), history of abdominal surgery (HR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.08-3.64; P = 0.03), and the type of surgery. Among types of surgery, fistulotomy or fistulectomy was associated with a decreased incidence of reoperation in comparison with incision and drainage (HR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.09-0.42; P < 0.001). Conclusion Young age of onset and a history of abdominal surgery were associated with a high risk of reoperation for PCD, and the risk of reoperation were relatively low in fistulotomy or fistulectomy procedures. PMID:26576395

  12. Clinicians’ Guide to the Use of Fecal Calprotectin to Identify and Monitor Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bressler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Objective monitoring of the severity of inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an essential part of disease management. However, repeat endoscopy to define extent and severity of inflammation is not practical. Fecal calprotectin (FC is a biomarker that can be used as a surrogate test to distinguish inflammatory from noninflammatory gastrointestinal disease.

  13. Stimulating erythropoiesis in inflammatory bowel disease associated anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgia Tsiolakidou; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and is associated with decreased quality of life and increased rate of hospitalization. The primary therapeutic targets of IBDassociated anemia are iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. An important prognostic parameter of the success or failure of therapy is the outcome of the underlying disease. Iron deficiency should be appropriately managed with iron supplementation.However, the use of oral iron therapy is limited by several problems, the most important being gastrointestinal side effects leading occasionally to disease relapse and poor iron absorption. Intravenous iron preparations are more reliable, with iron sucrose demonstrating the best efficacy and tolerability. Treatment with erythropoietin or darbepoetin has been proven to be effective in patients with anemia, who fail to respond to intravenous iron. Patients with ongoing inflammation have anemia of chronic disease and may require combination therapy comprising of intravenous iron sucrose and erythropoietin. After initiating treatment, careful monitoring of hemoglobin levels and iron parameters is needed in order to avoid recurrence of anemia. In conclusion, anemia in the setting of IBD should be aggressively diagnosed, investigated, and treated. Future studies should define the optimal dose and schedule of intravenous iron supplementation and appropriate erythropoietin therapy in these patients.

  14. Hydro-MRI in inflammatory bowel diseases: a comparison with colonoscopy and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare hydro-MRI with colonoscopy and biopsy specimen regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity and the differentiation of inflammatory bowel diseases. Material and methods: After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution and a rectal bowel opacification using 250-500 ml of a 0.9% saline solution, axial and coronal breath-hold sequences ±Gd-DTPA (HASTE-['half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo'] and dynamic FLASH-['fast low angle shot']) were acquired in 27 patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The enhancement of the bowel wall as well as morphological MRI findings were correlated with colonoscopy and biopsy specimens. By means of the MRI findings, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) should be differentiated. Results: In CD, a significant correlation between the contrast enhancement of the inflamed bowel wall (Δ SI) and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be established (r=0.52; p=0.02 and r=0.72; p=0.001). In UC, no correlations between Δ SI and the endoscopic/histopathologic indices could be found. The correct diagnosis of CD and UC by MRI findings was possible in 22/27 patients (81%). Conclusion: Hydro-MRI with dynamic studies is suitable for the assessment of disease activity in CD, but unreliable in UC. Hydro-MRI provides useful information for the differentiation of CD and UC. (orig.)

  15. Computed Tomography Enterography for Evaluation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography enterography (CTE) has become a main modality for the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It simultaneously offers visualization of the small bowel and extraintestinal status, which is helpful for diagnosing IBD. Crohn disease has long segmental enhancing wall thickening related with the eccentric longitudinal distribution. In addition, mural stratification, fibrofatty proliferation, positive comb sign by increased mesenteric vascularity and internal/perianal f...

  16. Monitoring and Safety of Azathioprine Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Jin; Choe, Yon Ho

    2013-01-01

    Azathioprine is the most common drug used to maintain clinical remission in inflammatory bowel disease. This drug is also important as a steroid-sparing agent in steroid-dependent and chronically active inflammatory bowel disease. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine. The dose of azathioprine has to be reduced or the therapy has to be discontinued frequently because of drug-induced toxicity. In this review, we discuss monitoring of thio...

  17. Recent results of laparoscopic surgery in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Hermann; Mudter, Jonas; Hohenberger, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are an ideal indication for the laparoscopic surgical approach as they are basically benign diseases not requiring lymphadenectomy and extended mesenteric excision; well-established surgical procedures are available for the conventional approach. Inflammatory alterations and fragility of the bowel and mesentery, however, may demand a high level of laparoscopic experience. A broad spectrum of operations from the rather easy enterostomy formation for anal Crohn’s dis...

  18. Ultrasound in Crohn’s Disease - bowel wall characteristics and perfusion estimates using microbubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease which often presents early in life and sometimes can be debilitating. The patients need frequent diagnostic work-up to assess disease activity, location, extent and if complications have occurred. This warrants diagnostic tools which are of little nuisance to the patient, available, affordable and objective. Diagnostic ultrasound imaging could potentially fulfil these criteria. A specific problem in patients with CD i...

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nousiainen, Pauliina; Merras-Salmio, Laura; Aalto, Kristiina; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnai...

  20. Fecal immunochemical test as a biomarker for inflammatory bowel diseases: can it rival fecal calprotectin?

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Jun; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Nakarai, Asuka; Takashima, Shiho; Inokuchi, Toshihiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of disease activity is essential for choosing an appropriate treatment and follow-up plan for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Endoscopy is required for accurately evaluating disease activity, but the procedures are sometimes invasive and burdensome to patients. Therefore, alternative non-invasive methods for evaluating or predicting disease activity including mucosal status are desirable. Fecal calprotectin (Fcal) is the most widely used fecal marker for IB...

  1. Pitfalls when implementing nurse-led annual telephone calls to replace outpatient visits for Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Dorrit; Bager, Palle; Hentze, Runa

    . Furthermore, consensus regarding the nurse-competences had to be established among the groups of health professionals. Daily scheduled supervision by a gastroenterologist is essential. A high information level needs to be maintained in order to secure continuous commitment among all the health professionals...... the study, during preparation and implementation were monitored and visualised in a PaT Plot. Continuous corrections in the intervention were done. The identified problems and their solutions were the basis of this research. Results: Consensus regarding the eligibility criteria of the IBD patients for...... the intervention was a challenge between the different groups of health professionals. Tools for consistent practice and documentation of the telephone line had to be developed and adjusted. Competences for the involved IBD nurses had to be described, systematised and undergo continuous development...

  2. Accuracy of enteroclysis in Crohn's disease of the small bowel: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of enteroclysis in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small bowel in a group of consecutive patients. From January 1992 to December 1995, 165 patients with suspected Crohn's disease of the small bowel presented to our institution for enteroclysis. In 14 patients up to three enteroclysis exams were performed. Most patients (78 %) underwent colonoscopy and retrograde ileoscopy. In the remaining patients clinical follow-up was used as gold standard. In 79 patients no radiographic abnormalities were found. Sixty-one patients (40 men and 21 women; mean age 34.2 years) had a radiological diagnosis of Crohn's disease. This involved the terminal ileum in 39 patients (64 %) either alone (n = 25) or in association with the pelvic ileum (n = 14). In 12 of these patients retrograde ileoscopy was not feasible. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery. In 4 patients pathology revealed diseases other than Crohn's. These patients had all ileocecal diseases (tuberculosis = 2; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma = 1; adenocarcinoma = 1). One false-negative result was observed. Overall, enteroclysis showed a sensitivity of 98.2 % and a positive predictive value of 93.4 %. Enteroclysis is a sensitive technique in evaluating both the extent and the severity of small bowel involvement in Crohn's disease, although the overlap of radiographic findings may hamper its accuracy when the disease is confined to the ileocecal area. (orig.)

  3. The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    significantly higher among IBD patients. CONCLUSION: In recent years, self-management and patient empowerment, combined with evolving eHealth solutions, has utilized epidemiological knowledge on disease patterns and has been improving compliance and the timing of adjusting therapies, thus optimizing efficacy by...

  4. Crypt abscess-associated microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease and acute self-limited colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry; Sokol; Nadia; Vasquez; Nadia; Hoyeau-Idrissi; Philippe; Seksik; Laurent; Beaugerie; Anne; Lavergne-Slove; Philippe; Pochart; Philippe; Marteau

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether crypt abscesses frominflammatory bowel disease(IBD)patients containbacteria and to establish their nature.METHODS:We studied 17 ulcerative colitis patients,11 Crohn's disease patients,7 patients with acute selflimited colitis(ASLC)and normal colonic biopsies from5 subjects who underwent colonoscopy for colon cancer screening.A fluorescent in situ hybridization techniquewas applied to colonic biopsies to assess the microbiotacomposition of the crypts and crypt abscesses.RESULTS:Crypts...

  5. Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruemmele, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is steadily in the rise in Western as well as in developing countries paralleling the increase of westernized diets, characterized by high protein and fat as well as excessive sugar intake, with less vegetables and fiber. An interesting hypothesis is that environmental (food-) triggered changes of the intestinal microbiome might cause a proinflammatory state preceding the development of IBD. Indeed, an intact intestinal epithelial barrier assuring a normal bacterial clearance of the intestinal surface is crucial to guarantee intestinal homeostasis. Any factors affecting the epithelial barrier function directly or indirectly may impact on this homeostasis, as well as any changes of the intestinal microbial composition. It is intriguing to learn that some frequently used food components impact on the quality of the intestinal barrier, as well as on the composition of the intestinal microbiome. This highlights the close interaction between living conditions, hygiene, food habits and food quality with the bacterial composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activation status of the intestinal immune system. There is clear evidence that nutritional therapy is highly successful in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition is well established as induction therapy of CD. New diets, such as a CD exclusion diet or defined diets (specific carbohydrate diets, FODMAP diet, Paleolithic diet) are being discussed as treatment options for IBD. Well-designed clinical trials in IBD are urgently required to define the precise role of each of these diets in the prevention or management of IBD. Up to now, the role of diet in IBD is highly undermined by lay and anecdotal reports without sufficient scientific proof. PMID:27355913

  6. Biologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardizzone, Sandro; Bianchi Porro, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Despite all of the advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we still do not know its cause. Some of the most recently available data are discussed in this review; however, this field is changing rapidly and it is increasingly becoming accepted that immunogenetics play an important role in the predisposition, modulation and perpetuation of IBD. The role of intestinal milieu, and enteric flora in particular, appears to be of greater significance than previously thought. This complex interplay of genetic, microbial and environmental factors culminates in a sustained activation of the mucosal immune and non-immune response, probably facilitated by defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier and mucosal immune system, resulting in active inflammation and tissue destruction. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of 'controlled' inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interferon [IFN]-gamma, interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-12) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-11). The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may, therefore, be a logical target for IBD therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, T-helper cell (T(h))-1 polarisation, T-cell activation or nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for IBD. In this context, infliximab is currently the only biologic agent approved for the treatment of inflammatory and fistulising Crohn's disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP 571, certolizumab pegol (CDP 870), etanercept, onercept and adalimumab. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanisms involved

  7. Recent developments on the role of Clostridium difficile in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (CD), specifically its toxins, have been implicated as a risk factor for exacerbation of the inflammatory process in up to 5% of patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Typical evidence of colonic changes with CD infection, including pseudomembranous exudate, are often not present; however, a severe clinical course may result, including precipitation of toxic colitis and toxic megacolon. Recently, hypervirulent CD strains have been reported raising concern for a more severe disease process in patients with underlying inflammatory bowel disease. Moreover, small bowel involvement or CD enteritis has been increasingly described, usually in those with a history of a prior colectomy or total proctocolectomy for prior severe and extensive inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, refractory or treatment-resistant pouchitis may occur with CD infection.

  8. Efficacy of small bowel follow-through with oral administration of methylcellulose in the diagnosis of small bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of modified Small Bowel Follow Through (SBFT) with oral administration of methylcellulose in patients with small bowel diseases. Mean transit time was 142 minutes, and the maximum diameter of the jejunum and ileum was 2.9 cm and 2.1 cm respectively: in 45 patients (63%) the examination was concluded within 2 hours. The quality of images was excellent in 29 cases (41%), good in 30 (42%), fair in 8 (11%), and poor in 3 (4%). Images related to the inflammatory and vascular disease were graded as 'good' or 'excellent' in 92% and 89% of cases, respectively, and the image quality of lesions of the jejunum and ileum were graded, respectively, as 'good' or 'excellent' in 96 % and 63% of cases. Using this modified technique, sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 99%, respectively. Modified SBFT with the oral administration of methylcellulose is a simple but highly sensitive method of evaluating small bowel diseases. It is especially valuable in cases of inflammatory and vascular disease of the small intestine and lesions in the jejunum. (author). 15 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  9. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Montiel MP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available MP Martínez-Montiel, B Casis-Herce , GJ Gómez-Gómez, A Masedo-González, C Yela-San Bernardino, C Piedracoba, G Castellano-Tortajada Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with emphasis on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and Cochrane reviews on the management of IBD refractory to corticosteroids. Based on this evidence, we propose algorithms and optimization strategies for use of immunomodulator and biologic therapy in IBD refractory to corticosteroids.Keywords: immunomodulators, anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, drug levels, treatment optimization

  10. Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Mack

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn’s disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials.

  11. Probiotics in inflammatory bowel diseases and associated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, David R

    2011-02-01

    A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn's disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials. PMID:22254095

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Hispanics: The University of Puerto Rico IBD Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Esther A.; Abdiel Cruz; Mariola Monagas; Marina Bernal; Yadira Correa; Rafael Cordero; Carlo, Víctor L.

    2011-01-01

    A registry of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), was created at the University of Puerto Rico in 1995. Subjects with a documented diagnosis of IBD by clinical, radiologic, endoscopic, and/or pathologic criteria were recruited from the IBD clinics, support groups, and community practices, and demogr...

  13. Association between thiopurine S-methyltransferase polymorphisms and thiopurine-induced adverse drug reactions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available Thiopurine drugs are well established treatments in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, but their use is limited by significant adverse drug reactions (ADRs. Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT is an important enzyme involved in thiopurine metabolism. Several clinical guidelines recommend determining TPMT genotype or phenotype before initiating thiopurine therapy. Although several studies have investigated the association between TPMT polymorphisms and thiopurine-induced ADRs, the results are inconsistent. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether there is an association between TPMT polymorphisms and thiopurine-induced ADRs using meta-analysis.We explored PubMed, Web of Science and Embase for articles on TPMT polymorphisms and thiopurine-induced ADRs. Studies that compared TPMT polymorphisms with-ADRs and without-ADRs in IBD patients were included. Relevant outcome data from all the included articles were extracted and the pooled odds ratio (OR with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Revman 5.3 software.Fourteen published studies, with a total of 2,206 IBD patients, which investigated associations between TPMT polymorphisms and thiopurine-induced ADRs were included this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that TPMT polymorphisms were significantly associated with thiopurine-induced overall ADRs and bone marrow toxicity; pooled ORs were 3.36 (95%CI: 1.82-6.19 and 6.67 (95%CI: 3.88-11.47, respectively. TPMT polymorphisms were not associated with the development of other ADRs including hepatotoxicity, pancreatitis, gastric intolerance, flu-like symptoms and skin reactions; the corresponding pooled ORs were 1.27 (95%CI: 0.60-2.71, 0.97 (95%CI: 0.38-2.48, 1.82 (95%CI: 0.93-3.53, 1.28 (95%CI: 0.47-3.46 and 2.32 (95%CI: 0.86-6.25, respectively.Our meta-analysis demonstrated an association of TPMT polymorphisms with overall thiopurine-induced ADRs and bone marrow toxicity, but not with

  14. Clostridium difficile Carriage Rate in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosain Salari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Closteridium difficile is a gram positive, anaerobic and spore-forming bacillus. Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation of the intestinal mucosa in these patients can be as a risk factor for colonization of Clostridium difficile. The purpose of this study was to analysis of Clostridium difficile carriage in the IBD outpatients. Materials and methods: Stool specimens were obtained from 50 outpatients with IBD. Stools were cultured on selective media under anaerobic conditions. Filtered extract of bacteria was exposed to HeLa cell culture for analysis of toxin production after identification of Clostridium difficile isolates. Results: The results showed that 3 IBD patients (6% had stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile. Stool cultures were negative in all patients with Crohn's disease. All 3 patients had ulcerative colitis. Only one isolate was positive for toxin production. Conclusion: The ulcerated colitis than Crohn's patients had higher carriage. In general IBD outpatients carriage rates for Clostridium difficile was low.

  15. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet;

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement...... available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library......, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia...

  16. Role of interleukin 1 in inflammatory bowel disease--enhanced production during active disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Ligumsky, M; Simon, P L; Karmeli, F; Rachmilewitz, D

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 1 is a polypeptide cytokine produced by various cell types and has been shown to have a major role in inflammatory and immunological responses. In experimental colitis it proved to be a dominant mediator and a reliable marker of inflammation. The aim of the present study was to determine in vitro the extent of production and release of interleukin 1 from colonic mucosa of patients with active untreated inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained duri...

  17. Etiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease--environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andus, T; Gross, V

    2000-01-01

    Environmental factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. There is a strong and consistent association between smoking and Crohn's disease, and between nonsmoking and ulcerative colitis. Despite extensive research, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms for these associations remain unclear. In spite of this, some clinical trials with nicotine-patches showed beneficial effects for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Associations of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with other environmental factors are weaker like the association with use of oral contraceptives or those less well investigated such as the association with childhood hygiene. Most studies suggesting a potential pathogenetic role of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis or an effect of tuberculostatic therapy in Crohn's disease could not be reproduced by others. Perinatal or childhood infections by viruses like measles are heavily debated, but not proven to be causal for inflammatory bowel disease. Coagulation disorders have been described as protecting from inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting hypercoagulability to be a pathogenetic factor. Some studies described that appendectomy may prevent the onset of ulcerative colitis in man and mice. Other environmental factors such as hydrogen sulfide, tonsillectomy, diet, blood transfusions, and Listeria also require confirmation. There are, however, convincing data from genetic animal models and twin studies that environmental factors as the intestinal bacterial flora interact with susceptible hosts to cause inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel diseases have multifactorial etiologies, which require a differentiated approach for treatment and prevention. PMID:10690583

  18. The diagnostic value of small bowel wall vascularity after sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubble injection in patients with Crohn's disease. Correlation with the therapeutic effectiveness of specific anti-inflammatory treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the value of small bowel wall vascularity after microbubble contrast agent injection in evaluating the therapeutic effectiveness of specific anti-inflammatory treatment in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients (7 male and 8 female; mean age ± SD, 40 years ± 6) with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of Crohn's disease - Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) > 150 (n = 12 patients) or 5 mm) were included. In each patient the terminal loop was scanned by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) after sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubble injection before and after 6-month anti-inflammatory treatment. The vascularity of the terminal loop was quantified in gray-scale levels (0-255) by a manually drawn ROI encompassing the thickened bowel wall and it was correlated with CDAI. Result: Before the beginning of the specific treatment all patients revealed diffuse transparietal contrast enhancement after microbubble injection, except for 3 patients who revealed contrast enhancement limited to the submucosa. In 13 patients the slope of the first ascending tract and the area under the enhancement curve were significantly lower after anti-inflammatory treatment (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon test) with a significant correlation with the CDAI score (ρ = 0.85, P < 0.05). In 2 patients no significant vascularity changes were found even though a mild reduction of CDAI score was identified (from 200 to 150 gray-scale levels). Conclusion: CEUS is a useful method to assess the therapeutic effectiveness of specific medical anti-inflammatory treatment in patients with Crohn's disease.

  19. Immunosuppression after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis influences activity of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristin Kaasen; Lindström, Lina; Cvancarova, Milada;

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We studied the progression of IBD in patients with PSC who have undergone liver transplantation. We also...

  20. Quality of life of patients with irritable bowel syndrome before and after education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa B. Joć

    2015-08-01

    1. Quality of life of patients with irritable bowel syndrome is substantially reduced in all the examined spheres. 2. Education of patients with IBS resulted in enhanced quality of life and reduced disease-related complaints. 3. Education of patients with IBS plays a significant role in the entire therapeutic process.

  1. Osteoporosis y enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Osteoporosis and inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menchén

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal es una entidad crónica de etiología desconocida en cuyo desarrollo influyen múltiples variables, como son la susceptibilidad individual, genética e inmunológica, así como diferentes factores ambientales. Sus manifestaciones clínicas son muy variadas y pueden afectar a otros órganos diferentes del tracto digestivo, convirtiéndose por tanto en una enfermedad multisistémica. En los últimos años existe un interés creciente por una de estas manifestaciones, la osteoporosis y la osteopenia, que puede afectar hasta al 42% de los pacientes y condiciona un importante aumento de la morbilidad. La inactividad, el tratamiento corticoideo prolongado, las deficiencias nutricionales y la propia enfermedad pueden favorecer el desarrollo de esta complicación. En esta revisión se repasan aspectos clínicos y etiológicos de la osteoporosis asociada a la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal y se ofrecen pautas para su diagnóstico y tratamiento.Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic disease with an unknown ethiology although multiple factors intervene such as individual, genetic and immunologic susceptibility, as well as different environmental factors. Like other multisystemic diseases, its clinical manifestations are diverse and it may affect other organs besides the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few years there is a growing interest for one of these extraintestinal manifestations, osteoporosis and osteopenia that may affect up to 42% of patients and can condition an important increase in morbility. Inactivity, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, nutritional deficiencies and the disease per se have an important role in the development of this complication. This article reviews clinical and ethiological aspects of inflammatory bowel disease associated osteoporosis and offers a strategy for diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Is safety infliximab during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease? ¿El tratamiento con infliximab es seguro durante el embarazo en pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: in most cases, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD debuts at reproductive age. The data available in the literature show infliximab (IFX to be a safe drug during pregnancy but there is very little evidence about the activity of the disease following drug withdrawal during pregnancy. Aims: determine the drug´s safety in pregnant women in our setting and assess its effect on the foetus, drawing on the experience of several hospitals. Secondly, observe the effect of treatment withdrawal on disease activity during pregnancy. Material and methods: a retrospective study was conducted of women with IBD who had received IFX treatment during pregnancy in five hospitals in Spain. Disease activity was assessed using Crohn´s Disease Activity Index, while UC was assessed using the Truelove-Witts Index in each trimester of pregnancy. Gestational age, weight and diseases in the foetus were determined at birth. Results: the study included 12 women with a mean age of 29 years; 4 had ulcerative colitis and 8 Crohn´s disease, with mean disease duration of 7 years. All but one, who was diagnosed during pregnancy, was receiving IFX treatment at conception. Six patients received uninterrupted treatment throughout the pregnancy, 2 requested voluntary interruption and in 3 cases treatment was interrupted in the third trimester as a precaution. They received a mean IFX dose of 400 mg every 8 weeks. Of the 6 patients who received continuous treatment, in 50% disease was held in remission. The 6 remaining patients suspended treatment for different reasons, presenting disease recurrence in all but one case (83.3%. Eight deliveries were vaginal and 4 by caesarean section. Newborns presented no congenital anomalies, intrauterine growth retardation or low birth weight and there was only one premature delivery. Conclusions: although cases included in the stduy are not significant, in our experience, IFX during pregnancy is a safe treatment for the mother and the

  3. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  4. Temsirolimus therapy and small bowel perforation in a pediatric patient with Clostridium septicum bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Anne Herrin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temsirolimus has been demonstrated to result in significant disease stabilization in children with high-grade glioma, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. While mucositis has been reported as a common adverse effect of temsirolimus therapy in adult and pediatric patients, bowel perforation is an infrequent and life-threatening side effect of temsirolimus in adults and has not previously been reported in children. We present a child treated with temsirolimus for recurrent metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma who underwent ileocecectomy and small bowel resection for perforation with frank necrosis. His presentation was complicated by Clostridium septicum infection, a rare, frequently fatal, gastrointestinal pathogen associated with malignancy and bowel ischemia.

  5. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa; Conti, Lucia; Gessani, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  7. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Celestine; Harris, Philip J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove to exert beneficial outcomes for IBD. Postulated mechanisms include direct interactions with the gut mucosa through immunomodulation, or indirectly through the microbiome. Component species of the microbiome may degrade dietary-fibre polysaccharides and ferment the products to form short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Prebiotic dietary fibres may also act more directly by altering the composition of the microbiome. Longer term benefits in reducing the risk of more aggressive disease or colorectal cancer may require other dietary fibre sources such as wheat bran or psyllium. By critically examining clinical trials that have used dietary fibre supplements or dietary patterns containing specific types or amounts of dietary fibres, it may be possible to assess whether varying the intake of specific dietary fibres may offer an efficient treatment for IBD patients. PMID:27314323

  8. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestine Wong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove to exert beneficial outcomes for IBD. Postulated mechanisms include direct interactions with the gut mucosa through immunomodulation, or indirectly through the microbiome. Component species of the microbiome may degrade dietary-fibre polysaccharides and ferment the products to form short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Prebiotic dietary fibres may also act more directly by altering the composition of the microbiome. Longer term benefits in reducing the risk of more aggressive disease or colorectal cancer may require other dietary fibre sources such as wheat bran or psyllium. By critically examining clinical trials that have used dietary fibre supplements or dietary patterns containing specific types or amounts of dietary fibres, it may be possible to assess whether varying the intake of specific dietary fibres may offer an efficient treatment for IBD patients.

  9. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; de Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity. PMID:25387503

  10. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença de; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity. PMID:25387503

  11. Rapid fecal calprotectin testing to assess for endoscopic disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease: A diagnostic cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasz Kwapisz; Mahmoud Mosli; Nilesh Chande; Brian Yan; Melanie Beaton; Jessica Micsko; Mennill, Pauline W.; William Barnett; Kevin Bax; Terry Ponich; John Howard; Anthony Tirolese; Robert Lannigan; James Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: With increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to identify noninvasive methods of detecting disease activity. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy of fecal rapid calprotectin (FC) testing in the detection of endoscopically active IBD. Patients and Methods: All consecutive patients presenting to outpatient clinics with lower gastrointestinal symptoms were prospectively recruited. Patients provided ...

  12. Diet and nutritional factors in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarek, Danuta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Domagała-Rodacka, Renata; Cibor, Dorota; Mach, Tomasz

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development is affected by complex interactions between environmental factors, changes in intestinal flora, various predisposing genetic properties and changes in the immune system. Dietary factors seem to play an underestimated role in the etiopathogenesis and course of the disease. However, research about food and IBD is conflicting. An excessive consumption of sugar, animal fat and linoleic acid is considered a risk factor for IBD development, whereas a high fiber diet and citrus fruit consumption may play a protective role. Also, appropriate nutrition in particular periods of the disease may facilitate achieving or prolonging remissions and most of all, improve the quality of life for patients. During disease exacerbation, a low fiber diet is recommended for most patients. In the remission time, an excessive consumption of alcohol and sulfur products may have a negative effect on the disease course. Attempts are also made at employing diets composed in detail in order to supplement IBD therapy. A diet with a modified carbohydrate composition, a semi-vegetarian diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols are under investigation. Due to chronic inflammation as well as side effects of chronically used medications, patients with IBD are also at increased risk of nutritional factor deficiencies, including iron, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium and vitamin A. It should also be remembered that there is no single common diet suitable for all IBD patients; each of them is unique and dietary recommendations must be individually developed for each patient, depending on the course of the disease, past surgical procedures and type of pharmacotherapy. PMID:26811635

  13. Clinical, serological and genetic predictors of inflammatory bowel disease course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurent Beaugerie; Harry Sokol

    2012-01-01

    Patients with extensive or complicated Crohn's disease (CD) at diagnosis should be treated straightaway with immunosuppressive therapy according to the most recent guidelines.In patients with localized and uncomplicated CD at diagnosis,early use of immunosuppressive therapy is debated for preventing disease progression and limiting the disabling clinical impact.In this context,there is a need for predictors of benign or unfavourable subsequent clinical course,in order to avoid over-treating with risky drugs those patients who would have experienced spontaneous mid-term asymptomatic disease without progression towards irreversible intestinal lesions.At diagnosis,an age below 40 years,the presence of perianal lesions and the need for treating the first flare with steroids have been consistently associated with an unfavourable subsequent 5-year or 10-year clinical course.The positive predictive value of unfavourable course in patients with 2 or 3 predictors ranges between 0.75 and 0.95 in population-based and referral centre cohorts.Consequently,the use of these predictors can be integrated into the elements that influence individual decisions.In the CD postoperative context,keeping smoking and history of prior resection are the strongest predictors of disease symptomatic recurrence.However,these clinical predictors alone are not as reliable as severity of early postoperative endoscopic recurrence in clinical practice.In ulcerative colitis (UC),extensive colitis at diagnosis is associated with unfavourable clinical course in the first 5 to 10 years of the disease,and also with long-term colectomy and colorectal inflammation-associated colorectal cancer.In patients with extensive UC at diagnosis,a rapid step-up strategy aiming to achieve sustained deep remission should therefore be considered.At the moment,no reliable serological or genetic predictor of inflammatory bowel disease clinical course has been identified.

  14. Bringing the Inflamed and Fibrotic Bowel into Focus: Imaging in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Jeremy; Stidham, Ryan. W.; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiologic imaging has been a critical aid in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of inflammatory bowel disease since the first description of the disease by Crohn in 1932. Newer techniques, including computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and ultrasound, have entered clinical use for assessing disease activity and complications, and have largely replaced classic barium studies. We review the clinical utility of these imaging modalities and examine several im...

  15. Teduglutide, a novel glucagon-like peptide 2 analog, in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2012-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome results from surgical resection, congenital defect or disease-associated loss of absorption. Parenteral support (PS) is lifesaving in patients with short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Together, the symptoms of short bowel syndrome and the inconvenience and complications in relation to PS (e.g. catheter-related blood steam infections, central thrombosis and intestinal fai...

  16. Antidepressants and inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Jane M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have suggested a link between the patient's psyche and the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Although pharmacotherapy with antidepressants has not been widely explored, some investigators have proposed that treating psychological co-morbidities with antidepressants may help to control disease activity. To date a systematic analysis of the available studies assessing the efficacy of antidepressants for the control of somatic symptoms in IBD patients has not been performed. Methods We searched electronic databases, without any language restriction. All relevant papers issued after 1990 were examined. Results 12 relevant publications were identified. All of them referred to non-randomised studies. Antidepressants reported in these publications included paroxetine, bupropion, amitriptyline, phenelzine, and mirtazapine. In 10 articles, paroxetine, bupropion, and phenelzine were suggested to be effective for treating both psychological and somatic symptoms in patients suffering from IBD. Amitriptyline was found ineffective for treating somatic symptoms of IBD. Mirtazapine was not recommended for IBD patients. Conclusion Although most of reviewed papers suggest a beneficial effect of treatment with antidepressants in patients with IBD, due to the lack of reliable data, it is impossible to judge the efficacy of antidepressants in IBD. Properly designed trials are justified and needed based upon the available uncontrolled data.

  17. Small bowel MR enterography: problem solving in Crohn’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Anderson, Simon; Irving, Peter; Sanderson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is fast becoming the first-line radiological investigation to evaluate the small bowel in patients with Crohn’s disease. It can demonstrate both mural and extramural complications. The lack of ionizing radiation, together with high-contrast resolution, multiplanar capability and cine-imaging make it an attractive imaging modality in such patients who need prolonged follow-up. A key question in the management of such patients is the assessment of disease a...

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease of the Elderly: A Wake-Up Call

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Seymour; Feldstein, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As the baby-boomer generation enters the ranks of the elderly (defined as patients over 60 years of age), the increased burden of managing older inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires recognition of the impact of comorbid disease, polypharmacy, and surgical candidacy criteria. There is a surprisingly positive response to newer therapies and surgery, provided that a distinction is made between “fit elderly” and “frail elderly” patients. The former group should not be denied access ...

  19. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: Do they influence treatment and outcome?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fernando Tavarela Veloso

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that often involve organs other than those of the gastrointestinal tract. Immune-related extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) are usually related to disease activity, but sometimes may take an independent course. Globally, about one third of patients develop these systemic manifestations. Phenotypic classification shows that certain subsets of patients are more susceptible to developing EIMs, which frequently occur simultaneously in the same patient overlapping joints, skin, mouth, and eyes. The clinical spectrum of these manifestations varies from mild transitory to very severe lesions, sometimes more incapacitating than the intestinal disease itself. The great majority of these EIMs accompany the activity of intestinal disease and patients run a higher risk of a severe clinical course. For most of the inflammatory EIMs, the primary therapeutic target remains the bowel. Early aggressive therapy can minimize severe complications and maintenance treatment has the potential to prevent some devastating consequences.

  20. Psychosocial Factors Contributing to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity and Health-Related Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Alejandra H.; Halpern, Leslie F.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Cross, Raymond K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the contributions of coping and social constraint to disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and to examine group differences in disease activity and HRQOL between patients with high versus low anxiety or depression symptoms in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: This study was a retrospective analysis in which disease activity was measured with either the Harvey-Bradshaw Index or the Simple Clinical Colitis Activit...