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  1. Traveling with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Home > Resources > Traveling With IBD Go Back Traveling With IBD Email Print + Share Don't avoid ... the States, these tips will come in handy. Travel Tips for Vacation Time Locating A Doctor Ask ...

  2. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  3. [Nutrition and IBD-Consensus of the Austrian Working Group of IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Diseases) of the ÖGGH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchssteiner, H; Nigl, K; Mayer, A; Kristensen, B; Platzer, R; Brunner, B; Weiß, I; Haas, T; Benedikt, M; Gröchenig, H P; Eisenberger, A; Hillebrand, P; Reinisch, W; Vogelsang, H

    2014-04-01

    This is a consensus of the Austrian working group of IBD (inflammatory bowel diseases) of the ÖGGH on nutrition in IBD. Malnutrition should be assessed in case of IBD (in 20 - 70 % of Crohn's patients) and weight loss(> 5 % within 3 months) or nutritional deficiencies or after extensive bowel resection and afterwards also treated. Malnutrition should be treated with medical therapy of IBD and also adequate - as far as possible - with oral nutritional therapy particularly because of reduced life quality, risk of opportunistic infections, osteopenia/osteoporosis, longer hospitalisations and higher mortality. Iron homeostasis, serum levels of Vitamin B12- and folic acid, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and zinc should be checked. Therapy with enteral liquid diets is only indicated as therapy of first choice in children and adolescents, but only in rare situations in adults with IBD. There is - up to now - no proven oral diet for maintenance of remission in IBD. Probiotics as E. coli Nissle could be used as alternative to mesalazine for maintenance of remission in patients with ulcerative colitis. A specific dietary counselling is mandatory in patients with ileostoma or short bowel syndrome. Malnutrition of short bowel patients is particularly dependent on the function and length of the remaining bowel, therefore the most effective medical therapy should be administered. PMID:24718944

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Hispanics: The University of Puerto Rico IBD Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Esther A.; Abdiel Cruz; Mariola Monagas; Marina Bernal; Yadira Correa; Rafael Cordero; Carlo, Víctor L.

    2011-01-01

    A registry of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), was created at the University of Puerto Rico in 1995. Subjects with a documented diagnosis of IBD by clinical, radiologic, endoscopic, and/or pathologic criteria were recruited from the IBD clinics, support groups, and community practices, and demogr...

  5. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) regulate intestinal immunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; LaCasse, Eric C; Seidelin, Jakob B;

    2014-01-01

    -linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP2), in which 20% of patients develop severe intestinal inflammation. In addition, 4% of males with early-onset IBD also have inactivating mutations in XIAP. Therefore, the IAPs play a greater role in gut homeostasis, immunity and IBD development than previously suspected, and...... (NOD)1/NOD2 and other intracellular NOD-like receptors in response to bacterial pathogens. These pathways are important to the pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inactivating mutations in the X-chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP) gene causes an immunodeficiency syndrome, X...

  6. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - critical discussion of etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the most frequent inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with a prevalence of approximately one out of 500.Cytokine research opened new and potent treatment options and thus stimulated clinical and basic research.However, the IBD still remain a challenge for patients and physicians,demanding close cooperation between gastroenterologists,radiologists and surgeons.The basic understanding of IBD,which is necessary for efficient diagnostic and therapeutic concepts is reviewed. Based upon recent publications and our clinical experience we discuss aspects of etiology,pathogenesis,diagnostics,and therapy of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A genetically influenced, exaggerated and sustained immune response against the own gut flora seems to be one of the most important factors in the pathogenesis of IBD.Not less important are environmental influences.For instance, cigarette smoking had been judged to have some negative influence on the natural course of Crohn's disease.Now,however, recent studies show that smoking is even a significant independent risk factor in the pathogenesis of IBD. Since IBD and especially Crohn's disease can effect the whole body, detailed analysis of inflammatory organ involvement is necessary before therapy.For instance, the MRIenteroclysis technique adds a necessary diagnostic tool for the exploration of those parts of the small bowel that cannot been reached by routine endoscopy like the upper ileum and the lower jejunum. In terms of therapy, a change of paradigms can be observed: patients will no longer be treated only when symptoms arise, but will early be integrated into a therapeutic concept, which is determined by site and extent of the disease and adapted to the abilities and needs of the patient.Furthermore,immunosuppressive agents like azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine will establish as central concept in the medical treatment of IBD.Discussion IBD-therapy should rather be adapted to the

  7. IBD5 polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease: Association with response to infliximab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena Urcelay; Juan Luis Mendoza; Alfonso Martínez; Laura Fernández; Carlos Taxonera; Manuel Díaz-Rubio; Emilio G.de la Concha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are multifactorial pathologies of unknown etiology. One susceptibility locus,IBD5, has been mapped to chromosome 5q31. We analyzed our Spanish cohorts of Crohn's disease (CD)and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients to determine whether this locus is associated with IBD, and to ascertain the main clinical phenotype influenced by this risk factor. The kind of interaction, either genetic heterogeneity or epistasis, between this IBD5 susceptibility region and the NOD2/CARD15 gene mutations was studied as well.Finally, ve assessed whether this locus can predict response to infliximab therapy.METHODS: A case control study was performed with 274CD and 211 UC patients recruited from a single center and 511 healthy ethnically matched controls. Two polymorphisms were genotyped in the IBD5 locus and three in the CARD15/NOD2 gene.RESULTS: Our results evidence association only with CD especially with the fistulizing phenotype and in the absence of NOD2/CARD15 variants (mutant allele frequency in patients vscontrols: OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.35-3.06,P<0.01). The frequency of the IBD5 homozygous mutant genotype significantly increased in CD patients lacking response to infliximab (RR = 3.88, 95% CI = 1.18-12.0,P<0.05). UC patients overall do not show association with 5q31 polymorphisms, although a similar trend to the one observed in CD is found within the worse prognosis group.CONCLUSION: The IBD5 variants may enhance an individual carrier's risk for CD, mainly in the absence of the NOD2/CARD15 mutations and in fistulizing patients.The data presented suggest the potential role of the 5q31polymorphisms as markers of response to infiiximab.

  8. A Case-Control study of the prevalence of neurological diseases in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Aquino Gondim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients, but their exact prevalence is unknown. Method We prospectively evaluated the presence of neurological disorders in 121 patients with IBD [51 with Crohn's disease (CD and 70 with ulcerative colitis (UC] and 50 controls (gastritis and dyspepsia over 3 years. Results Our standard neurological evaluation (that included electrodiagnostic testing revealed that CD patients were 7.4 times more likely to develop large-fiber neuropathy than controls (p = 0.045, 7.1 times more likely to develop any type of neuromuscular condition (p = 0.001 and 5.1 times more likely to develop autonomic complaints (p = 0.027. UC patients were 5 times more likely to develop large-fiber neuropathy (p = 0.027 and 3.1 times more likely to develop any type of neuromuscular condition (p = 0.015. Conclusion In summary, this is the first study to prospectively establish that both CD and UC patients are more prone to neuromuscular diseases than patients with gastritis and dyspepsia.

  9. Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease - bench to bedside and nationwide : a detailed analysis of Scottish children with IBD

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are a group of chronic conditions affecting the gastrointestinal tract, often presenting with non-specific clinical features such as abdominal pain, weight loss and diarrhoea. Approximately 25% of patients are diagnosed with IBD in childhood. For epidemiological studies, previously collected (1990-1995) and original (2003-2008) Scottish incidence data were used to determine national trends in newly diagnosed paediatric IBD (PIBD). A sma...

  10. In-Silico Analysis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) GWAS Loci to Novel Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah-Uddin, Md.; Elango, Ramu; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for many complex diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), produced hundreds of disease-associated loci—the majority of which are noncoding. The number of GWAS loci is increasing very rapidly, but the process of translating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from these loci to genomic medicine is lagging. In this study, we investigated 4,734 variants from 152 IBD associated GWAS loci (IBD associated 152 lead noncoding SNPs identified from pooled GWAS results + 4,582 variants in strong linkage-disequilibrium (LD) (r2 ≥0.8) for EUR population of 1K Genomes Project) using four publicly available bioinformatics tools, e.g. dbPSHP, CADD, GWAVA, and RegulomeDB, to annotate and prioritize putative regulatory variants. Of the 152 lead noncoding SNPs, around 11% are under strong negative selection (GERP++ RS ≥2); and ~30% are under balancing selection (Tajima’s D score >2) in CEU population (1K Genomes Project)—though these regions are positively selected (GERP++ RS <0) in mammalian evolution. The analysis of 4,734 variants using three integrative annotation tools produced 929 putative functional SNPs, of which 18 SNPs (from 15 GWAS loci) are in concordance with all three classifiers. These prioritized noncoding SNPs may contribute to IBD pathogenesis by dysregulating the expression of nearby genes. This study showed the usefulness of integrative annotation for prioritizing fewer functional variants from a large number of GWAS markers. PMID:25786114

  11. In-silico analysis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD GWAS loci to novel connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mesbah-Uddin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs for many complex diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, produced hundreds of disease-associated loci-the majority of which are noncoding. The number of GWAS loci is increasing very rapidly, but the process of translating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from these loci to genomic medicine is lagging. In this study, we investigated 4,734 variants from 152 IBD associated GWAS loci (IBD associated 152 lead noncoding SNPs identified from pooled GWAS results + 4,582 variants in strong linkage-disequilibrium (LD (r2 ≥0.8 for EUR population of 1K Genomes Project using four publicly available bioinformatics tools, e.g. dbPSHP, CADD, GWAVA, and RegulomeDB, to annotate and prioritize putative regulatory variants. Of the 152 lead noncoding SNPs, around 11% are under strong negative selection (GERP++ RS ≥2; and ~30% are under balancing selection (Tajima's D score >2 in CEU population (1K Genomes Project--though these regions are positively selected (GERP++ RS <0 in mammalian evolution. The analysis of 4,734 variants using three integrative annotation tools produced 929 putative functional SNPs, of which 18 SNPs (from 15 GWAS loci are in concordance with all three classifiers. These prioritized noncoding SNPs may contribute to IBD pathogenesis by dysregulating the expression of nearby genes. This study showed the usefulness of integrative annotation for prioritizing fewer functional variants from a large number of GWAS markers.

  12. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD: Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort.

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    Fabian Schnitzler

    Full Text Available Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort.Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31 between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment.4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC and 0.84% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10(-6, UC vs. CD. 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4% required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2% heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%. After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT. 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR: 10.29; 95% CI 1.26-84.06. Four patients (13.0% needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%.SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated.

  13. Co-designing inflammatory bowel disease (Ibd) services in Scotland: findings from a nationwide survey

    OpenAIRE

    Schoultz, Mariyana; Macaden, Leah; Watson, Angus J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Scottish Government’s ambition is to ensure that health services are co-designed with the communities they serve. Crohn’s and Colitis UK and the Scottish Government acknowledged the need to review and update the current IBD care model. An online survey was conducted asking IBD patients about their experiences of the NHS care they receive. This survey was the first step of co-designing and developing a national strategy for IBD service improvement in Scotland. Aim: To explore IB...

  14. [Evidence-based and consented pathways for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspe, H; Conrad, S; Muche-Borowski, C

    2009-06-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are diseases characterized by remission and relapse, an early age of onset and restrictions on activities and participation. IBD patients need a comprehensive, easily accessible and problem-oriented health care. This requires the integration and coordination of different health care sectors, medical and non-medical professionals, social and health care facilities and funding agencies. The pathways to guide patients through integrated health care were based on clinical considerations, interviews with patients and specialists, systematically searched evidence and results of a questionnaire survey. Within a systematic assessment-assignment approach relevant problems were identified and subsequently related to different medical and non-medical professionals, health care services and medical sectors. The pathways further imply (1) medical care according to evidence-based guideline recommendations, (2) patient education programs to foster shared decision making and self-management and (3) suggestions for further research. The pathways were consented in a consensus conference using nominal group process methods. Their feasibility and effect will be evaluated within a regional implementation project. PMID:19533545

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... epidemiology of IBD....

  16. Utility of fecal calprotectin in differentiating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: It often is difficult to differentiate IBD from RAP in children. Fecal calprotectin concentration has been proposed as a marker to identify gastrointestinal inflammation and it may be useful in distinguishing organic disease (i.e., IBD) from normals. However, there are scant data regardi...

  17. Urinary Metabolic Phenotyping Reveals Differences in the Metabolic Status of Healthy and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD Children in Relation to Growth and Disease Activity

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    Francois-Pierre Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growth failure and delayed puberty are well known features of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, in addition to the chronic course of the disease. Urinary metabonomics was applied in order to better understand metabolic changes between healthy and IBD children. Methods: 21 Pediatric patients with IBD (mean age 14.8 years, 8 males were enrolled from the Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic over two years. Clinical and biological data were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. 27 healthy children (mean age 12.9 years, 16 males were assessed at baseline. Urine samples were collected at each visit and subjected to 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Results: Using 1H NMR metabonomics, we determined that urine metabolic profiles of IBD children differ significantly from healthy controls. Metabolic differences include central energy metabolism, amino acid, and gut microbial metabolic pathways. The analysis described that combined urinary urea and phenylacetylglutamine—two readouts of nitrogen metabolism—may be relevant to monitor metabolic status in the course of disease. Conclusion: Non-invasive sampling of urine followed by metabonomic profiling can elucidate and monitor the metabolic status of children in relation to disease status. Further developments of omic-approaches in pediatric research might deliver novel nutritional and metabolic hypotheses.

  18. Comparing the efficacy of a web-assisted calprotectin-based treatment algorithm (IBD-live) with usual practices in teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Anke; Dijkstra, Alie; Groen, Henk; Muller Kobold, Alie; Verkade, Henkjan; van Rheenen, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: To prevent clinical relapse in teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) there is a need to monitor disease activity continuously. Timely optimisation of medical treatment may nip a preclinical relapse in the bud and change the natural course of IBD. Traditionally, disease monitori

  19. Frequency and Nature of Incidental Extra-Enteric Lesions Found on Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MR-E) in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD)

    OpenAIRE

    Herfarth, Hans H.; Grunert, Michael; Klebl, Frank; Strauch, Ulrike; Feuerbach, Stefan; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Rogler, Gerhard; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of extra-enteric findings in a large cohort of patients undergoing magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E) and to classify the clinical significance of these findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 1154 MR-E performed in 1006 patients referred to our radiological department between 1999–2005. The reasons for referral were suspected or proven inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (n = 710), further diagnostic work-...

  20. 99mTc-HMPAO-leucocyte scintigraphy in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Prognostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: 99mTc-HMPAO leukocyte scintigraphy (LS) is a well established method in the evaluation of IBD. Nevertheless, its utility in the follow-up of the disease is controversial. The aim of this work was to analyse the prognostic value of LS performed during an acute attack of IBD. Materials and Methods: 17 patients (mean age 33 ±10 years) admitted for an acute attack of IBD who had not received any treatment have been prospectively studied (6 ulcerative colitis and 11 Crohn's disease). 99mTc-HMPAO leukocyte anterior and caudo-craneal scintigrams were obtained in basal conditions (without therapy) and following 3 weeks of steroid treatment. In all scans, the previously described scintigraphic activity index (SAI) was calculated. CDAI in Crohn's disease and Truelove index in ulcerative colitis were calculated. Patients were followed up for 1 year. At this time the patient evolution was classified as : good evolution, when the patient responded to initial treatment, or bad evolution if the patient had new IBD attacks or required additional therapy (steroids, immuno-suppression or surgery). Results: All patients with UC and 3 patients with CD showed a SAI decrease > 50 % at 3 weeks and all had a good clinical evolution. Only 2 out of the 8 patients with CD showing a SAI decrease 50% at 3 weeks of steroid treatment indicates a good clinical evolution and makes unlikely the appearance of new IBD attacks. (author)

  1. Frequency and nature of incidental extra-enteric lesions found on magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans H Herfarth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of extra-enteric findings in a large cohort of patients undergoing magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E and to classify the clinical significance of these findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 1154 MR-E performed in 1006 patients referred to our radiological department between 1999-2005. The reasons for referral were suspected or proven inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD (n = 710, further diagnostic work-up for small bowel disease because of non-specific abdominal symptoms (SBD; n = 182 or suspected small bowel malignancies (SBM; n = 114. All extra-enteric findings were reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist and were classified as having high, moderate, or low significance for further diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. RESULTS: The average age of all patients was 40+/-16 (Mean+/-SD years (y (IBD 35+/-13 y; SBD 49+/-16 y; SBM 57+/-15 y. A total of 1113 extra-enteric findings were detected in 600 of 1006 patients (59.6%. Of these findings 180 (16.2% were judged as having a high, 212 (19.0% a moderate and 721 (64.8% a low significance. On a per group basis in patients with IBD 12.0% of the findings were of major clinical significance compared to 13.7% and 33.3% in patients with SBD and SBM, respectively. The most common major findings were abscesses (69.9% in the IBD group and extraintestinal tumors, metastases or masses in the SBD and SBM groups (41.9% and 74.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: MR-E reveals a substantial number of extra-enteric findings, supporting the role of a cross-sectional imaging method for the evaluation of the small bowel.

  2. Frequency and Nature of Incidental Extra-Enteric Lesions Found on Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MR-E) in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfarth, Hans H.; Grunert, Michael; Klebl, Frank; Strauch, Ulrike; Feuerbach, Stefan; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Rogler, Gerhard; Schreyer, Andreas G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of extra-enteric findings in a large cohort of patients undergoing magnetic resonance enterography (MR-E) and to classify the clinical significance of these findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 1154 MR-E performed in 1006 patients referred to our radiological department between 1999–2005. The reasons for referral were suspected or proven inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (n = 710), further diagnostic work-up for small bowel disease because of non-specific abdominal symptoms (SBD; n = 182) or suspected small bowel malignancies (SBM; n = 114). All extra-enteric findings were reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist and were classified as having high, moderate, or low significance for further diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results The average age of all patients was 40±16 (Mean±SD) years (y) (IBD 35±13 y; SBD 49±16 y; SBM 57±15 y). A total of 1113 extra-enteric findings were detected in 600 of 1006 patients (59.6%). Of these findings 180 (16.2%) were judged as having a high, 212 (19.0%) a moderate and 721 (64.8%) a low significance. On a per group basis in patients with IBD 12.0% of the findings were of major clinical significance compared to 13.7% and 33.3% in patients with SBD and SBM, respectively. The most common major findings were abscesses (69.9%) in the IBD group and extraintestinal tumors, metastases or masses in the SBD and SBM groups (41.9% and 74.2%, respectively). Conclusions MR-E reveals a substantial number of extra-enteric findings, supporting the role of a cross-sectional imaging method for the evaluation of the small bowel. PMID:19337373

  3. Epidemiology of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (IBD) What is IBD? Addressing IBD Epidemiology Epidemiology of the IBD Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 5:1424-9. 2 Loftus EV, Jr. Clinical epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease: Incidence, prevalence, and environmental ...

  4. [Assessment of disease severity and outcome of dietary, antibiotic, and immunosuppressive interventions by use of the canine IBD activity index in 21 dogs with chronic inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster, Michael; Hörauf, Angelika; Bilzer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI) was developed for evaluation of the severity of illness, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy of therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the severity of illness and the therapeutic strategy in dogs with IBD by the use of CIBDAI, serum albumin concentration, and histologic score (HPEG). Furthermore the use of CIBDAI and the efficacy of therapy in a prospective study during a 3 month treatment period were evaluated. Twentyone dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and enterocolitis) were examined in this study. In 11 dogs with IBD the severity of illness was assessed as low, according to CIBDAI and HPEG (CIBDAI score 4 or between 5 and 10 with HPEG score between 1 and 1.5). Six dogs were treated with hypoallergenic diet (Group D), five dogs were treated with hypoallergenic diet and metronidazole (15.6-22,3 mg/kg/day) (Group M). In 10 dogs with IBD the severity of illness was assessed as high (CIBDAI azathioprine (n=5; 0.9-2.3 mg/kg/day), sulfasalazine (n=4; 18.2-25 mg/kg/day) and hypoallergenic diet (n=10). Efficacy of therapy was evaluated prospectively 3 times in a 12 weeks treatment period. Remission (CIBDAI score or =4) indicated poor therapeutic response. Age, CIBDAI score and HPEG score were significantly different in IBD dogs with low severity of illness (age: median 60 months; CIBDAI score: median 5; HPEG score: median (1) and IBD dogs with high severity of illness (age: median 90 months; CIBDAI score: median 9.5; HPEG score: median 2.25) (p = 0.0101 and p = 0.0099, respectively). The presence of hypoalbuminemia was not significantly different between these two groups (p = 0.3108). There was no significant correlation between CIBDAI score and serum albumin concentration (r = 0.0394; p = 0.0802) or between CIBDAI score and HPEG score (r = 0.2587; p = 0.2574). In the treatment groups, HPEG score was only significantly different between D-group and group I (p 0.05). All

  5. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D; D'Inca, R; Gionchetti, P; Panelli, M R; Ardizzone, S; Sanroman, A L; Gisbert, J P; Arena, I; Riegler, G; Marrollo, M; Valpiani, D; Corbellini, A; Segato, S; Castiglione, F; Munkholm, P

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  6. Effects of Bacillus subtilis 'PB6' (ATCC - PTA 6737 on Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea (CDAD and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peys

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The administration of probiotic bacteria is emerging as a potential means of preventing the onset or recurrence of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD and of attenuating inflammatory activity and preventing relapses in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. We evaluated the efficacy of Bacillus subtilis ‘PB6’ (ATCC – PTA 6737 in a hamster model of antibiotic-induced CDAD and in a rat model of IBD. CDAD was induced in male Golden Syrian hamsters using C. difficile and clindamycin. These hamsters received either nothing or, by gavage, vancomycin (5 days or PB6 (low, middle and high dose, 6 days. Diarrhea, body weight loss and mortality were observed in all groups in which CDAD was induced. Intensity of diarrhea and body weight loss was least in the groups treated with vancomycin or with the highest dose of PB6. At the end of the treatment period, vancomycin and the highest dose of PB6 were equally efficient in preventing mortality in this hamster model of CDAD. No adverse effects of PB6 treatment were observed in healthy animals. In male Wistar rats, colitis was induced using a single intrarectal administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS. Treatments consisted of PB6 (low, middle and high dose, Saccharomyces boulardii, mesalazine, infliximab, or no treatment. A possible benefit of the prophylactic use of PB6 was also tested. At the end of the treatment period significant differences in body weight gain, in colon inflammatory edema and in gross morphology of the colon intestinal lining were observed between groups. The groups treated with high dose PB6 could not be distincted from the colitis-free negative control group nor from the group treated with mesalazine. The data presented are suggestive of possible therapeutic effectiveness of PB6 in CDAD and IBD in humans.

  7. The Faroese IBD study – Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases across 54 years of population-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Turið; Nielsen, KR; Munkholm, Pia;

    2016-01-01

    [European Standard Population, ESP]. The present study assessed the long-term time trends in IBD incidence in the Faroese population. METHODS: In this population-based study, data were retrieved from the National Hospital of the Faroe Islands and included all incident cases of CD, UC, and IBDU diagnosed...

  8. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - critical discussion of etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and therapy; Chronisch entzuendliche Darmerkrankungen - Kritische Diskussion von Aetiologie, Pathogenese, Diagnostik und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochsenkuehn, T.; Sackmann, M.; Goeke, B. [Medizinische Klinik II, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen-Grosshadern (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Aims Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the most frequent inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with a prevalence of approximately one out of 500.Cytokine research opened new and potent treatment options and thus stimulated clinical and basic research.However, the IBD still remain a challenge for patients and physicians,demanding close cooperation between gastroenterologists,radiologists and surgeons.The basic understanding of IBD,which is necessary for efficient diagnostic and therapeutic concepts is reviewed. Based upon recent publications and our clinical experience we discuss aspects of etiology,pathogenesis,diagnostics,and therapy of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A genetically influenced, exaggerated and sustained immune response against the own gut flora seems to be one of the most important factors in the pathogenesis of IBD.Not less important are environmental influences.For instance, cigarette smoking had been judged to have some negative influence on the natural course of Crohn's disease.Now,however, recent studies show that smoking is even a significant independent risk factor in the pathogenesis of IBD. Since IBD and especially Crohn's disease can effect the whole body, detailed analysis of inflammatory organ involvement is necessary before therapy.For instance, the MRIenteroclysis technique adds a necessary diagnostic tool for the exploration of those parts of the small bowel that cannot been reached by routine endoscopy like the upper ileum and the lower jejunum. In terms of therapy, a change of paradigms can be observed: patients will no longer be treated only when symptoms arise, but will early be integrated into a therapeutic concept, which is determined by site and extent of the disease and adapted to the abilities and needs of the patient.Furthermore,immunosuppressive agents like azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine will establish as central concept in the medical treatment of IBD.Discussion IBD-therapy should

  9. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disac...

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. IBD (which is not the same thing as irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS), can cause more serious problems than ...

  11. Toll-like receptors -2, -4 and CD14 in human intestinal mucosa from patients with inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolová, Lenka; Drastich, P.; Klimešová, Klára; Rossmann, Pavel; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Prague : Verlag, 2006, s. 80-80. [Meeting of the European Mucosal Immunology Group /5./. Prague (CZ), 05.10.2006-07.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/03/H147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : crohns disease * ulcerative colitis * toll-like receptors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  12. Detection of galectin-3 in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: new serum marker of active forms of IBD?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolová, Lenka; Smetana, K. , Jr.; Borovská, Dana; Kitanovičová, Andrea; Klimešová, Klára; Janatková, I.; Malíčková, K.; Lukáš, M.; Drastich, P.; Beneš, Z.; Tučková, Ludmila; Manning, J. C.; André, S.; Gabius, H. J.; Tlaskalová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2009), s. 503-512. ISSN 1023-3830 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA303/06/0974; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA MŠk 2B06155; GA MZd NR8963 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : crohn's disease * galectin-3 * mucosal immunity Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.586, year: 2009

  13. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Walsham NE; Sherwood RA

    2016-01-01

    Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Acc...

  14. [Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pregnant women in their characteristics do not differ from general population, unless they had operations on the pelvic organs. Women with a first pregnancy, regardless of the activity of IBD have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy and high risk births. Most treatment methods are compatible with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Women affected by IBD should discuss their plans for pregnancy with the doctor first in order to know the possible dangers. Every patient in the IBD during pregnancy must be observed by a gastroenterologist, accoucheur and pediatrician to ensure peace of mother and child. PMID:22830229

  15. Comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio López San Román; Fernando Mu(n)oz

    2011-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be affected by other unrelated diseases. These are called comorbid conditions, and can include any secondary health problem that affects a person suffering from a primary or main disease, and which is neither linked physiopathologically to the primary condition, nor is it due to the treatments used for the primary condition or to its long-term anatomical or physiological consequences.Different comorbid conditions, as well as their influence on IBD, are discussed.

  16. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune...

  17. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  18. Steroid allergy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M

    2007-11-01

    Background: Contact allergy to a steroid enema leading to worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has recently been reported. This study was designed to look for evidence of steroid allergy in patients with IBD.

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Tezel; Muzaffer Demir

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a group of chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal system. In these cases, findings are detected in extraintestinal systems also. There is a tendency for thrombotic events in IBD, as in the other inflammatory processes. The pathogenesis of this thrombotic tendency is multidimensional, including lack of natural anticoagulants, prothrombotic media induced via the inflammatory process, long-term sedentary life style, steroid use, s...

  20. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  1. Arthritic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, C. H.; Lee, C H; Lee, J.; Song, C. H.; Lee, C.W.; Kim, W. H.; S.K. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is commonly associated with arthritic manifestations. They are divided into three clinical categories; peripheral arthritis, spondylitis, and sacroiliitis. To evaluate the incidence of arthritis associated with IBD in Korea, we retrospectively reviewed one hundred and twenty-nine patients with IBD, 77 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 52 with Crohn's disease (CD). Arthritis occurred in twenty-two patients (17.1%); 15 with UC(19.6%), 7 with CD (13.5%). Patients ...

  2. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  3. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. PMID:26869808

  4. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD and a...

  5. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  6. Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease - A population based study 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Paerregaard, Anders; Munkholm, Pia;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children...

  7. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism and arterial cardiovascular events in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    This focused review describes the current knowledge of the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and as well as venous thromboembolism this disease shares inflammatory mechanisms with IBD. Patients...

  8. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfarht, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD in......OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD...... pronounced in relatives of CD cases. IRRs increased with two or more IBD-affected relatives and were modified by age, with the highest family-related IRR observed in early life. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of IBD is significantly increased in first -, second-, and third-degree relatives of IBD-affected cases, with...

  9. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  10. ENTERAL NUTRITION SUPPORT TO TREAT MALNUTRITION IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Altomare; Giuseppe Damiano; Alida Abruzzo; Vincenzo Davide Palumbo; Giovanni Tomasello; Salvatore Buscemi; Attilio Ignazio Lo Monte

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diet has an important role in the management of IBD, as it prevents and corrects malnutrition. It is well known that diet may be implicated in the aetiology of IBD and that it plays a central role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal-tract disease. Often oral nutrition alone is not sufficient in the management of IBD patients, especially in children or the elderly, and must be combined with oral supplementation or r...

  11. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in the pregnant patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flavio M Habal; Nikila C Ravindran

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disorder affecting young adults in their reproductive years.Many young women with IBD express concern about the effect their disease will have on fertility,pregnancy course and fetal development This article presents an approach to management of IBD in the pregnant patient,including counseling and investigation,and summarizes existing data on the safety of medications used to treat IBD in pregnancy and breastfeeding.

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children, an Evolving Problem in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Wafa′a A Al-Qabandi; Eman K Buhamrah; Khaled A Hamadi; Al-Osaimi, Suad A.; Al-Ruwayeh, Ahlam A.; JohnPatrick Madda

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was previously thought a rare disease among children in Kuwait since most diarrhea cases were attributed to infections. In the past few years we observed an increase in the number of patients presenting with IBD. In this study we aimed to determine the epidemiology of IBD among children in the State of Kuwait. Patients and Methods: The charts of all children with IBD who were referred to the pediatric gastroenterology unit during the period Fe...

  13. PPARγ in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Annese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is member of a family of nuclear receptors that interacts with nuclear proteins acting as coactivators and corepressors. The colon is a major tissue which expresses PPARγ in epithelial cells and, to a lesser degree, in macrophages and lymphocytes and plays a role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Indeed, both natural and synthetic PPARγ ligands have beneficial effects in different models of experimental colitis, with possible implication in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. This paper will specifically focus on potential role of PPARγ in the predisposition and physiopathology of IBD and will analyze its possible role in medical therapy.

  14. Importance of nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfredo José Lucendo; Livia Cristina De Rezende

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from the interaction between an individual's immune response and precipitant environmental factors, which generate an anomalous chronic inflammatory response in those who are genetically predisposed. Various feeding practices have been implicated in the origin of IBD based on epidemiological observations in developed countries, but we do not have solid evidence for the etiological role played by specific food types. IBD is associated with frequent nutritional deficiencies, the pattern and severity of which depends on the extent, duration and activity of the inflammation. Nutritional support allows these deficiencies in calories, macro and micronutrients to be rectified. Enteral nutrition is also a primary therapy for IBD, especially for Crohn's disease, as it allows the inflammatory activity to be controlled, kept in remission, and prevents or delays the need for surgery. Nutritional support is especially important in childhood IBD as an alternative to pharmacological t reatment . This repor t discusses the complex relationship between diet and IBD.

  15. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course of...... period, stool specimens for C. difficile toxins analysis were collected from 112 children with celiac disease as controls. RESULTS: Clostridium difficile occurrence was significantly higher in patients with IBD compared with patients with celiac disease (7.5% versus 0.8%; P = 0.008). Clostridium...... C. difficile infected patients. METHODS: In this prospective, comparative, multicenter study, 211 pediatric patients with IBD were enrolled from October 2010 to October 2011 and tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins A and B in their stools at 0, 6, and 12 months. During the same study...

  16. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most import...

  17. Environment and the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G; on behalf of the Alberta IBD Consortium

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  18. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Richard N Fedorak; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gas-trointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the presen...

  19. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Comito, Donatella; Cascio, Antonio; Romano, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes.

  20. Somatostatin in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Bergeijk, J D; Wilson, J H P

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is controlled by various immunomodulating cells, interacting by molecular mediators. Neuropeptides, released by enteric nerve cells and neuroendocrine mucosa cells, are able to affect several aspects of the general and intestinal immune system, with both pro- as well as anti-inflammatory activities. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) there is both morphological as well as experimental evidence for involvement of neuropeptides in the pathogenesis. Somatostatin is the m...

  1. NATURAL AGENTS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Darji Vinay Chhanalal; Bariya Aditi Hemrajbhai; Deshpande Shrikalp Shrikant

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract. It comprises the two conditions, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by chronic recurrent ulceration of the bowel. Conventional drugs for colitis treatment include aminosalicylate, corticosteroids,antibiotics & immunomodulators. 5- Amino salicylic acid having side effects in 30% of the patients. Systemic corticosteroids producing incidence of complication is 4.3%. Antibiotic therapy...

  2. The use of biosimilars in immune-mediated disease: A joint Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR), Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST), and Italian Group of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD) position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Gionata; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Lapadula, Giovanni; Orlando, Ambrogio; Danese, Silvio; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2014-07-01

    Biological agents are widely used in rheumatology, dermatology and inflammatory bowel disease. Evidence about their efficacy and safety has been strengthened for all those therapeutic indications over the last decade. Biosimilar agents are monoclonal antibodies similar to previously approved biologics. In the European Union, they have been approved for all the indications in the management of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs), although data only in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis are currently available. Direct evidence on efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of biosimilars is mandatory in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease, as well as in children. Based on the current evidence in the literature, we present the joint official position of the Italian Societies of Rheumatology, Dermatology and Inflammatory Bowel Disease on the use of biosimilars in IMIDs. PMID:24657898

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Changing Associations to Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click, Benjamin; Whitcomb, David C

    2016-01-01

    Managing the health of individual patients suffering from complex disorders is a challenge and is costly. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a prototypic complex disorder of the small and large intestines. Susceptibility is complex, severity is variable, and response to treatment is unpredictable. Di Narzo et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e177; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.34) bring diverse teams of physicians and scientists together to break down the mechanisms of IBD by linking pathogenic genetic variants with altered gene expression in specific cell types causing IBD. Framing new findings in the context of other complex diseases provides a roadmap for predictive medicine. PMID:27607898

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene; Frisch, Morten; Langholz, Ebbe; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR...

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  6. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa; Conti, Lucia; Gessani, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  7. Immunogenetic Susceptibilities in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rotter, Jerome I

    1990-01-01

    It is now clear that the major identified risk factor for the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is a positive family history. Furthermore, the available data in spouses and twins indicate that the genetic susceptibility is due in large measure to shared familial predisposition. This emphasizes the importance of identifying the actual familial susceptibilities. Given the data for immunopathogenetic etiologies in the genesis of IBD, the logical candidate genes are those that involve the immune...

  8. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsham NE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natalie E Walsham,1 Roy A Sherwood2 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. Keywords: calprotectin, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation 

  9. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based on...... the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (n=8,295,773). Through a unique personal identification number assigned to each Danish citizen, sex, date and location of birth, identity of parents, and information on vital status and emigration were available. This information was used to establish...... kinship in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall...

  10. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  11. Environment and the inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, Alexandra; Dieleman, Levinus A; Barkema, Herman W; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Fedorak, Richard N; Madsen, Karen; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2013-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which consists of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. In genetically susceptible individuals, the interaction between environmental factors and normal intestinal commensal flora is believed to lead to an inappropriate immune response that results in chronic inflammation. The incidence of IBD have increased in the past century in developed and developing countries. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge of the association between environmental risk factors and IBD. A number of environmental risk factors were investigated including smoking, hygiene, microorganisms, oral contraceptives, antibiotics, diet, breastfeeding, geographical factors, pollution and stress. Inconsistent findings among the studies highlight the complex pathogenesis of IBD. Additional studies are necessary to identify and elucidate the role of environmental factors in IBD etiology. PMID:23516681

  12. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlin Xie; Steven H Itzkowitz

    2008-01-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Many of the molecular alterations responsible for sporadic colorectal cancer, namely chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation, also play a role in colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of CRC and degree of inflammation of the bowel. Chemoprevention includes aminosalicylates, ursodeoxycholic acid, and possibly folic acid and statins. To reduce CRC mortality in IBD, colonoscopic surveillance with random biopsies remains the major way to detect early mucosal dysplasia. When dysplasia is confirmed, proctocolectomy is considered for these patients. Patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease are at increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis patients with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal- anastomosis have a rather low risk of dysplasia in the ileal pouch, but the anal transition zone should be monitored periodically. Other extra intestinal cancers, such as hepatobiliary and hematopoietic cancer, have shown variable incidence rates. New endoscopic and molecular screening approaches may further refine our current surveillance guidelines and our understanding of the natural history of dysplasia.

  13. Role of Rho kinase signal pathway in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yuan; Xiao, Shiyu; Jiang, Quanhang

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is nonspecific inflammation in the intestinal track, including Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). The incidence of IBD has increased significantly, with its numerous rising up to five million globally, more than 1,700,000 in China. Pathological character of IBD is the inflammation of intestinal mucosa and intestinal fibrosis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease has not yet been fully clarified, some evidence suggests that excessive intestin...

  14. Self-reported disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease largely determined by disease activity and illness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A; van der Valk, Mirthe E; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Clemens, Cees H M; Jansen, Jeroen M; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direc

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S;

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These new...

  16. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences. PMID:26648465

  17. Current trends in inflammatory bowel disease: the natural history

    OpenAIRE

    Langholz, Ebbe

    2010-01-01

    The description of the prognosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is based on systematic follow-up of population-based cohorts. A steady increase in incidence of IBD has occurred. The distribution of ulcerative colitis (UC) is fairly uniform with a preponderance of left-sided disease. One-third of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients present with colonic disease, one-third with ileocolonic disease and one-third with small bowel disease. IBD is associated with extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-08-15

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  20. Recent advances using immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Herfarth, Hans;

    2013-01-01

    Use of the immunomodulators thiopurines and methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC), is considered to be good clinical practice. However, despite being administered to a considerable number of IBD patients over...

  1. Mitogen activated protein kinases: a role in inflammatory bowel disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broom, O J; Widjaya, B; Troelsen, J;

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery more than 15 years ago, the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been implicated in an ever-increasingly diverse array of pathways, including inflammatory signalling cascades. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are...... their related signalling proteins in influencing the progression of IBD....

  2. The Economic Impact of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Longobardi and colleagues examined the effect of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on employment, using data from 10,891 respondents aged 20 to 64 years from the 1998 cycle of the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS) (1). This sample included 187 (1.7%) subjects who self-reported IBD or a similar bowel disorder. A significantly greater proportion of IBD than non-IBD respondents reported that they were not in the labour force (28.9% versus 18.5%). Even after adjusting for other fac...

  3. Age at diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease influences early development of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease patients: A nationwide, long-term survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Baars (Judith); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. van Haastert (M.); J.J. Nicolai (Jan); A.C. Poen (Alexander); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data on clinical characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related colorectal cancer (CRC) are scarce and mainly originate from tertiary referral centres. We studied patient and disease characteristics of IBD-related CRC in a nationwide IBD cohort in g

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Skin Cancer: An Assessment of Patient Risk Factors, Knowledge, and Skin Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmel, Jessica N.; Taft, Tiffany H.; Laurie Keefer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk from skin cancer. Aims include assessing IBD patients' risk factors and knowledge of skin cancer and current skin protection practices to identify gaps in patient education regarding skin cancer prevention in IBD. Methods. IBD patients ≥ 18 years were recruited to complete an online survey. Results. 164 patients (mean age 43.5 years, 63% female) with IBD (67% Crohn's disease, 31% ulcerative colitis, and 2% indeter...

  5. Bacteria Associated With Colitis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jingxiao

    2009-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal (GI) tract inhabits huge amount of microorganisms which contribute to the immune response in the gut. An immune system disorder disease inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was believed to be associated with several factors including gut bacteria, immunological responses, and genetic characteristic. Yet, the etiology of the IBD is not clear. Experiments on animal models and human samples had supported that commensal bacteria play an important role in the IBD pathogenesis. T...

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Owen P. Smith; Nasir Mahmud; Weir, Donald G.; Lesley Mynett-Johnson; Judith Conroy; Livingstone, Wendy J; Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n= 172) and healthy controls (n= 389) for polymorphisms in genes encoding va...

  7. Protein kinases are potential targets to treat inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei; Yang; Yutao; Yan

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), the two main forms of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s dis-ease. In this article, we will review the mechanisms of involvement of protein kinases in the pathogenesis of and intervention against IBD, in terms of their effects on genetics, microbiota, mucous layer and tight junc-tion, and the potential of protein kinases as therapeutic targets against IBD.

  8. Diet and nutritional factors in inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarek, Danuta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Domagała-Rodacka, Renata; Cibor, Dorota; Mach, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development is affected by complex interactions between environmental factors, changes in intestinal flora, various predisposing genetic properties and changes in the immune system. Dietary factors seem to play an underestimated role in the etiopathogenesis and course of the disease. However, research about food and IBD is conflicting. An excessive consumption of sugar, animal fat and linoleic acid is considered a risk factor for IBD development, whereas a hig...

  9. Inflammatory bowel diseases in Finland : epidemiology, malignancies and mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Jussila, Airi

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), CrohnÂŽs disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation and subsequent lesions in the colon or even throughout the gastrointestinal tract with involvement of other organs. They are chronic inflammatory conditions with long-term morbidity and often requiring expensive healthcare. The aetiology of IBD has remained obscure and is thought to be multifactorial. Over the past few years IBD has become a global disea...

  10. The Role of Physical Exercise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bilski; Bartosz Brzozowski; Agnieszka Mazur-Bialy; Zbigniew Sliwowski; Tomasz Brzozowski

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed and analyzed the relationship between physical exercise and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which covers a group of chronic, relapsing, and remitting intestinal disorders including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. The etiology of IBD likely involves a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. Physical training has been suggested to be protective against the onset of IBD, but there are inconsistencies in the findings of the published literat...

  11. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, S; Andoh, A; Bamba, S; Ogawa, A.; Hata, K.; Araki, Y; Bamba, T; Fujiyama, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: Interleukin (IL) 17 is a cytokine which exerts strong proinflammatory activities. In this study we evaluated changes in IL-17 expression in the inflamed mucosa and in the serum of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  12. Diet therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases: The established and the new

    OpenAIRE

    Durchschein, Franziska; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Hammer, Heinz F

    2016-01-01

    Although patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have a strong interest in dietary modifications as part of their therapeutic management, dietary advice plays only a minor part in published guidelines. The scientific literature shows that dietary factors might influence the risk of developing IBD, that dysbiosis induced by nutrition contributes to the pathogenesis of IBD, and that diet may serve as a symptomatic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms in IBD. The role of ...

  13. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  14. Fecal lactoferrin in discriminating inflammatory bowel disease from Irritable bowel syndrome: a diagnostic meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xing-lu; Xu, Wen; Tang, Xiao-xiao; Luo, Lai-sheng; Tu, Jiang-feng; Zhang, Chen-jing; Xu, Xiang; Wu, Qin-dong; Pan, Wen-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background To perform a meta-analysis evaluating the diagnostic ability of fecal lactoferrin (FL) to distinguish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods The Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane library and CNKI databases were systematically searched for studies that used FL concentrations to distinguish between IBD and IBS. The sensitivity, specificity, and other diagnostic indexes of FL were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Seven studies...

  15. Computed Tomography Enterography for Evaluation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography enterography (CTE) has become a main modality for the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It simultaneously offers visualization of the small bowel and extraintestinal status, which is helpful for diagnosing IBD. Crohn disease has long segmental enhancing wall thickening related with the eccentric longitudinal distribution. In addition, mural stratification, fibrofatty proliferation, positive comb sign by increased mesenteric vascularity and internal/perianal f...

  16. Steroid dependency and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease in the era of immunomodulators-A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Munkholm, Pia Susanne; Paerregaard, Anders; Wewer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The aim was to investigate the impact of systemic steroid treatment (SST) and immunomodulators (IM) on disease course in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS:: All IBD patients in eastern Denmark...

  17. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex inter

  18. Perceptions of medication safety among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Garret

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of medication safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients frequently require long-term treatment with potentially toxic medications. Techniques are employed to improve patient awareness of medication safety, but there are sparse data on their effectiveness.

  19. Maintenance Therapy and Prospects for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chang-tai; PAN Bo-rong; GUO Xiue-gan

    2003-01-01

    @@ Introduction Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be considered in several subcategories, and this review is designed to provide selective updates for some of the most important therapeutic entities currently marketed or soon to be available for the medical management of IBD [1-6].

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinical aspects and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhoury M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc Fakhoury,1 Rebecca Negrulj,2 Armin Mooranian,2 Hani Al-Salami2 1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is defined as a chronic intestinal inflammation that results from host-microbial interactions in a genetically susceptible individual. IBDs are a group of autoimmune diseases that are characterized by inflammation of both the small and large intestine, in which elements of the digestive system are attacked by the body's own immune system. This inflammatory condition encompasses two major forms, known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients affected by these diseases experience abdominal symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloody stools, and vomiting. Moreover, defects in intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of patients affected by IBD. In this review, we first describe the types and symptoms of IBD and investigate the role that the epithelial barrier plays in the pathophysiology of IBD as well as the major cytokines involved. We then discuss steps used to diagnose this disease and the treatment options available, and finally provide an overview of the recent research that aims to develop new therapies for such chronic disorders. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, cytokines

  1. Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicer, Zaira; Santiago, Jesus Manuel; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Alonso, Vicent; Antón, Rosario; Bosca, Marta Maia

    2012-01-01

    Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions. Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet’s syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous dise...

  2. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montiel, MP; Casis-Herce, B; Gómez-Gómez, GJ; Masedo-González, A; Yela-San Bernardino, C; Piedracoba, C; Castellano-Tortajada, G

    2015-01-01

    Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with emphasis on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and Cochrane reviews on the management of IBD refractory to corticosteroids. Based on this evidence, we propose algorithms and optimization strategies for use of immunomodulator and biologic therapy in IBD refractory to corticosteroids. PMID:26316792

  3. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Bosani; Sandro Ardizzone; Gabriele Bianchi Porro

    2009-01-01

    Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi PorroChair of Gastroenterology, “L. Sacco” University Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokine...

  4. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ardizzone, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    This paper has been retracted. Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi PorroChair of Gastroenterology, “L. Sacco” University Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD ...

  5. Diagnostic Considerations in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Cuffari, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) first presents in childhood or adolescence, and approximately 10% of the estimated 1.4 million Americans with IBD are under age 17. Diagnosis in pediatric patients may be complicated at presentation due to atypical symptoms and/or extraintestinal manifestations (eg, short stature, chronic anemia, unexplained fever, arthritis, mouth ulcers). Pediatric IBD is traditionally diagnosed using endoscopic evaluations of the upper and lower gas...

  6. Environmental Triggers for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD; Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC)] are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that are due to a dysregulated immune response to intestinal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Despite advances in genetics, the likelihood of occurrence of disease remains incompletely explained and there appears to be a strong role for the environment in mediating risk of disease. Smoking remains the most widely studied and replicated risk factor, contributin...

  7. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract,which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different levels of the inflammatory processes. New therapies are classified as: (1) Anti-TNFα antibodies; (2) Recombinant cytokines; (3) Selective adhesion blockade;(4) Growth factors; (5) Innate immunostimulation; (6) Nucleic acid based therapies; (7) Gene therapy; (8) Autologous bone-marrow transplantation; (9) Helminths and (10) Extracorporeal immunomodulation. All treatments have the potential to provide more effective and safe treatment for IBD.

  8. Genetics and Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2016-05-23

    We are currently in an exciting time when our understanding of genetic underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has undergone a revolution, based in large part on novel genotyping and sequencing technologies. With >160 susceptible loci identified for IBD, the goal is now to understand at a fundamental level the function of these susceptibility alleles. Determining the clinical relevance of how these susceptible genes shape the development of IBD is also a high priority. The main challenge is to understand how the environment and microbiome play a role in triggering disease in genetically susceptible individuals, as the interactions may be complex. To advance the field, novel in vitro and mouse models that are designed to interrogate complex genetics and functionally test hypotheses are needed. Ultimately, the goal of genetics studies will be to translate genetics to patients with IBD and improve their care. PMID:26907531

  9. [Fecal Calprotectin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun

    2016-05-25

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis comprise conditions characterized by chronic, relapsing immune activation and inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract. Objective estimation of intestinal inflammation is the mainstay in the diagnosis and observation of IBD, but is primarily dependent on expensive and invasive procedures such as endoscopy. Therefore, a simple, noninvasive, inexpensive, and accurate test would be extremely important in clinical practice. Fecal calprotectin is a calcium-containing protein released into the lumen that is excreted in feces during acute and chronic inflammation. It is well-researched, noninvasive, and has high sensitivity and specificity for identification of inflammation in IBD. This review will focus on the use of fecal calprotectin to help diagnose, monitor, and determine treatment in IBD. PMID:27206433

  10. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  11. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nynne; Nyboe; Andersen; Tine; Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abundant scientific evidence supporting an association between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and venous thromboembolic events, caused by an IBD related hypercoagulability, is acknowledged and thromboprophylactic treatment strategies are now implemented in the management of IBD patients. In contrary, the risk of arterial thromboembolic disease, as ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular events, and mesenteric ischemia in patients with IBD remains uncertain and the magnitude of a potentially increased risk is continuously debated, with ambiguous risk estimates among studies. The evident role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis forms the basis of a biological plausible link; the chronic systemic inflammation in IBD patients increases the risk of atherosclerosis and thereby the risk of thrombotic events. Further, studies have shown that the burden of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia is lower in IBD populations, thus further strengthen the role of non-traditional risk factors, as chronic inflammation in the linking of the two disease entities. Likewise, mortality from cardiovascular disease in IBD remains questioned. The aim of the current review is to give an up-date on the existing evidence of the possible association between IBD and cardiovascular disease and to discuss traditional and non-traditional risk factors.

  12. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients. PMID:26354428

  13. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Claudio Fiocchi

    2006-01-01

    Theories explaining the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proposed ever since Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were recognized as the two major forms of the disease. Although the exact cause(s) and mechanisms of tissue damage in CD and UC have yet to be completely understood, enough progress has occurred to accept the following hypothesis as valid: IBD is an inappropriate immune response that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals as the result of a complex interaction among environmental factors, microbial factors, and the intestinal immune system. Among an almost endless list of environmental factors, smoking has been identified as a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC. Among microbial factors, no convincing evidence indicates that classical infectious agents cause IBD, while mounting evidence points to an abnormal immune response against the normal enteric flora as being of central importance. Gut inflammation is mediated by cells of the innate as well as adaptive immune systems, with the additional contribution of non-immune cells, such as epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and platelets.

  14. Role of cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Sanchez-Muñoz, Aaron Dominguez-Lopez, Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, which includes Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, represents a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, typically with a relapsing and remitting clinical course. Mucosal macrophages play an important role in the mucosal immune system, and an increase in the number of newly recruited monocytes and activated macrophages has been noted in the inflamed gut of patients with IBD. Activated macrophages are thought to be major contributors to the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gut, and imbalance of cytokines is contributing to the pathogenesis of IBD. The intestinal inflammation in IBD is controlled by a complex interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Cytokines play a key role in IBD that determine T cell differentiation of Th1, Th2, T regulatory and newly described Th17 cells. Cytokines levels in time and space orchestrate the development, recurrence and exacerbation of the inflammatory process in IBD. Therefore, several cytokine therapies have been developed and tested for the treatment of IBD patients.

  15. Case Report: Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a greater risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Patients admitted to the hospital with IBD flares often require insertion of long-term venous access devices, such as peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), to provide access for medications, blood draws, fluid management, and nutrition. PICCs have been associated with an increased risk for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. In this case study analysis, 2 patients with IBD and PICCs who developed VTE are examined. The case report includes a thorough discussion of medical history, symptomology, PICC insertion, and events leading to VTE development. A review of acquired risk factors for IBD patients and a comparison of risk factors that predisposed each to VTE are explored. These cases highlight the need for nurses and physicians to heighten surveillance and engage in proactive strategies to prevent VTE in this population of patients. PMID:27074991

  16. Influenza vaccination coverage in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Klincewicz, Beata; Łazowska-Przeorek, Izabella; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Kąkol, Paulina; Mytyk, Aleksandra; Kofla, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influenza vaccination status among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Poland. This was a questionnaire-based study. 242 patients with IBD and 142 controls were enrolled in the study. Of patients with IBD, 7·8% received an influenza vaccine, compared to 18·3% of controls (P = 0·0013). There were no statistically significant differences in time from IBD diagnosis, disease activity and in drugs, between vaccinated and non-vaccin...

  17. Gastric emptying and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Binnewies, Ulrich; Rösch, Marie;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric emptying (GE) is delayed in a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We have shown before that altered release of gastrointestinal hormones may contribute to GE disturbances, but overall effects of disease activity remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate GE...

  18. The heart in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsianos E.V.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cardiovascular involvement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been occasionally reported, mainly in the form of case reports. Endocardium derangement in IBD involves endocarditis and subendocardial abscess. Endocarditis may occur as a result of septicemia or due to the prolonged use of total parental nutrition (TPN catheters or/and immunosuppression. The cause of endocarditis may be bacterial or fungal and require surgery in several cases. Prophylaxis for endocarditis in selected IBD patients is discussed. Myocarditis or perimyocarditis in IBD is reported as an autoimmune phenomenon during bowel disease excacerbations or as a side-effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA formulations. Ulcerative colitis (UC patients seem to be at a higher risk for this complication compared to Crohn�s disease (CD patients. Myocardial infarctions, selenium deficiency during TPN, the role of prolonged steroid use and the association with giant cell myocarditis are topics which need further analysis. Pericardium involvement seems to be the most frequent type of cardiovascular complication in IBD caused by drugs (5-ASA, azathioprine, cyclosporine, pericardio-colonic fistulas or unknown causes (idiopathic and it may occasionally be the disease presenting symptom. Coronary artery status and other factors for cardiovascular risk, such as smoking, hyperlipidemia and exercise are also discussed. Electrocardiogram and ultrasonographic changes are not so uncommon and cardiogenic sudden death in IBD is reviewed. Intracavitary coagulation abnormalities, amyloidosis, heart failure and aortitis syndrome are topics included and discussed in this review. A list of tables contributes to a more systemic overview of this current knowledge. Key Words: heart, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, Crohn�s diseas

  19. Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie Pierik; Paul Rutgeerts; Robert Vlietinck; Severine Vermeire

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the association between variability in drug response and (or) drug toxicity and polymorphisms in genes. The goal of this field of science is to adapt drugs to a patient's specific genetic background and therefore make them more efficacious and safe. In this article we describe the variants in genes that influence either the efficacy or toxicity of common drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC),and Crohn's disease (CD) including sulfasalazine and mesalazine, azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), methotrexate (MTX), glucocorticosteroids (CSs) and infliximab. Furthermore, difficulties with pharmacogenetic studies in general and more specifically in IBD are described. Although pharmacogenetics is a promising field that already contributed to a better understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms of action of drugs used in IBD, the only discovery translated until now into daily practice is the relation between thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene polymorphisms and hematological toxicity of thiopurine treatment. In the future it is necessary to organize studies in well characterized patient cohorts who have been uniformly treated and systematically evaluated in order to quantitate drug response more objectively. An effort should be made to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials after appropriate informed consent for pharmacogenetic studies.

  20. Danish cohort of monozygotic inflammatory bowel disease twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Frederik Trier; Knudsen, Lina; Harbord, Marcus;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the establishment of a Danish inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) twin cohort with focus on concordance of treatment and inflammatory markers. METHODS: We identified MZ twins, likely to be discordant or concordant for IBD, by merging information from the Danish Twin Register and the......, the IBD diagnosis could be confirmed in 54 pairs. The cohort included 10 concordant pairs, whereof some were discordant for either treatment or surgery. The 10 concordant pairs, where both pairs suffered from IBD, included eight CD/CD pairs, one UC/UC pair and one UC/IBDU pair. The discordant pairs...... comprised 31 UC, 5 IBDU (IBD unclassified), and 8 CD discordant pairs. In the co-twins not affected by IBD, calprotectin was above 100 μg/g in 2 participants, and above 50 μg/g in a further 5 participants. CONCLUSION: The presented IBD twin cohorts are an excellent resource for bioinformatics studies with...

  1. Ferric carboxymaltose prevents recurrence of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evstatiev, Rayko; Alexeeva, Olga; Bokemeyer, Bernd;

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common systemic complication of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Iron-deficiency anemia recurs frequently and rapidly after iron-replacement therapy in patients with IBD. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if administration...... of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) prevents anemia in patients with IBD and low levels of serum ferritin....

  2. Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Skroza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and psoriasis has been investigated by epidemiological studies. It is only starting from the 1990s that genetic and immunological aspects have been focused on. Psoriasis and IBD are strictly related inflammatory diseases. Skin and bowel represent, at the same time, barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. The most important genetic correlations involve the chromosomal loci 6p22, 16q, 1p31, and 5q33 which map several genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. The genetic background represents the substrate to the common immune processes involved in psoriasis and IBD. In the past, psoriasis and IBD were considered Th1-related disorders. Nowadays the role of new T cells populations has been highlighted. A key role is played by Th17 and T-regs cells as by the balance between these two cells types. New cytokines and T cells populations, as IL-17A, IL-22, and Th22 cells, could play an important pathogenetic role in psoriasis and IBD. The therapeutic overlaps further support the hypothesis of a common pathogenesis.

  3. New insights into inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    van Schaik, F.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes new insights into the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD: ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD)) and IBD-associated neoplasia. In the first part, the value of serological markers as predictors of IBD was investigated in a large European cohort of individuals.A combination of serological markers was found to predict the development of IBD in individuals from a low-risk population. Furthermore, the role of pharmacological activation of the nuclear far...

  4. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pichai, Madharasi VA; Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn’s disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied ...

  5. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been accurately established. Using single photon absorptiometry (SPA) and vertebral quantitative computerized tomography (QCT) the authors measured bone mineral content (BMC) in 75 unselected patients with IBD. Osteoporosis was present in 23 (31%). Seven had cortical and trabecular osteoporosis, 11 cortical only and five trabecular only. Three amenorrhoeic premenopausal females had clinically severe osteoporosis and a further 4 had vertebral crush fractures. The median lifetime steroid dose in osteoporotic patients was significantly greater than in patients with normal BMC; most patients with osteoporosis had small bowel IBD with one or more resections. Repeat QCT measurements in 18 patients after one year were unchanged in 12, increased in one and decreased between 10 and 37 mg/ml K2HPO4 in 5 of whom four were receiving steroids. Radial BMC decreased in one patient, increased in one and was unchanged in the remainder. Thus, osteoporosis was present in 30% of these patients, with severe clinical disease in three young females. Rapid spinal trabecular bone loss was demonstrated over the course of one year in some patients. Steroid therapy, amenorrhoe and small bowel IBD with resection appear to be important risk factors

  6. Fluoride: a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin-Arbelet, Benoit; Moum, Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    Although the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and oral hygiene has been noticed before, there has been little research on prolonged fluoride exposure as a possible risk factor. In the presented cases, exposure to fluoride seems indirectly associated with higher incidence of IBD. Fluoride toxicology and epidemiology documents frequent unspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and intestinal inflammation. Efflux genes that confer resistance to environmental fluoride may select for IBD associated gut microbiota and therefore be involved in the pathogenesis. Together these multidisciplinary results argue for further investigation on the hypothesis of fluoride as a risk factor for IBD. PMID:27199224

  7. The Vitamin D Status in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, Lauren Elizabeth; Maranda, Louise; Fong, Jay; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2014-01-01

    Context There is no consensus on the vitamin D status of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To determine the vitamin D status of patients with IBD by comparing their serum 25(OH)D concentration to that of healthy controls. Hypothesis Serum 25(OH)D concentration will be lower in patients with IBD compared to controls. Subjects and Methods A case-controlled retrospective study of subjects with IBD (n = 58) of 2–20 years (male n = 31, age 16.38±2.21 years; female...

  8. Inflammatory bowel diseases and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoszko-Bilska, Agnieszka; Sobkiewicz, Slawomir; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) constitute a group of chronic intestinal diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which typically involve patients of reproductive age and may influence several features of human reproduction. There are many concerns regarding the interactions between the course of IBD, applied treatment (pharmacological or surgical), and fertility, reproductive outcomes, and also neonatal outcomes. To review the literature describing fertility in IBD patients (separately for female and male), and possible infertility treatment in this group of patients, a PubMed search for English only publications (articles and/or abstracts) was conducted. Initially, the titles of publications and their abstracts were screened, and the most appropriate articles were selected and reviewed. Overall, in patients with quiescent IBD, fertility is almost identical to the general population, but particular subgroups of patients (with active disease, on pharmacological treatment, and after pelvic or abdominal surgery) may be affected by reduced fertility. Additionally, patients with IBD have fewer children than the general population, mainly as a result of voluntary childlessness. The main objectives for successful reproductive outcomes in IBD patients are proper guidance and also optimal treatment for achieving and maintaining disease remission. Recently, the European Evidence-Based Consensus on Reproduction and Pregnancy in IBD (the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization Guidelines) has been established to optimize preconceptional counseling and to promote an appropriate clinical management for patients planning to conceive. However, further studies are needed regarding the preservation of fertility in IBD patients and introduction of optimal infertility treatment in this group of patients. PMID:27117378

  9. High Altitude Journeys, Flights and Hypoxia: Any Role for Disease Flares in IBD Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Rogler, Gerhard; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The importance of environmental factors in the pathogenesis including their disease-modifying potential are increasingly recognized in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, largely driven by the perception that the prevalence and incidence of IBD are on the rise within the last few years, especially in non-western countries. One of those factors is believed to be hypoxia. The role of hypoxia as a modifying or even causative factor in the genesis and maintenance of inflammation has been increasingly elucidated in recent years. Hypoxia is believed to be a main inducing factor of inflammation. This has been studied in different animal experiments as well as in humans exposed to hypoxia. In several studies - mainly in mice - animals exposed to short-term hypoxia accumulated inflammatory cells in multiple organs and showed elevated cytokines in the blood. Comparable studies were performed in humans, mainly in healthy mountaineers. Recently, we reported on the association between IBD flare-up episodes and antecedent journeys to high-altitude region and aircraft travels. According to these findings, we concluded that flights and stays at high altitudes of >2,000 mg are a risk factor for increased disease activity in IBD. To evaluate the potential influence of hypoxia on the course of IBD on a biomolecular level and to test the effects of hypoxia under standardized conditions, we initiated a prospective and controlled investigation in both healthy controls and IBD patients in stable remission. The study participants underwent a 3-hour exposure to hypoxic conditions simulating an altitude of 4,000 m above sea level in a hyperbaric pressure chamber and clinical parameters as well as blood and stool samples were collected at several time points. The first results of this study are expected in the near future. PMID:26981864

  10. Familial aggregation in inflammatory bowel disease: Is it genes or environment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiago Nunes; Gionata Fiorino; Silvio Danese; Miquel Sans

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develops in genetically susceptible individuals due to the influence of environmental factors, leading to an abnormal recognition of microbiota antigens by the innate immune system which triggers an exaggerated immune response and subsequent bowel tissue damage. IBD has been more frequently found in families, an observation that could be due to either genetic, environmental or both types of factors present in these families. In addition to expanding our knowledge on IBD pathogenesis, defining the specific contribution to familial IBD of each one of these factors might have also clinical usefulness. We review the available evidence on familial IBD pathogenesis.

  11. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M; Seidelin, J B; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder, be dis...

  12. Prospective study of immunological factors in non-inflammatory bowel disease enterocutaneous fistulas

    OpenAIRE

    Rahbour, Goher; Hart, Ailsa L.; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Ullah, Mohammad R; Gabe, Simon M; Knight, Stella C.; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Vaizey, Carolynne J

    2011-01-01

    Background Enterocutaneous fistulas (ECF) are debilitating and usually result following complex abdominal surgery. While there is an association with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a large number of fistulas occur after surgery not related to IBD. The consequences of ECF include short bowel syndrome and the need for long term parenteral nutrition. ECF can heal spontaneously and in the case of IBD can be cured by medical therapy in some instances. Those that do not resolve spontaneously hav...

  13. Mucosal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease:Key pathogenic players or disease predictors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Franco; Scaldaferrii; Carmen; Correale; Antonio; Gasbarrini; Silvio; Danese

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases(IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders of the bowel,including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.A single etiology has not been identified,but rather the pathogenesis of IBD is very complex and involves several major and minor contributors,employing different inflammatory pathways which have different roles in different patients.Although new and powerful medical treatments are available,many are biological drugs or immunosuppressants,which are associated with significant si...

  14. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna, Cynthia Martínez-Reyes, Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  15. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Schoepfer, Alain; Scharl, Michael; Lakatos, Peter L; Navarini, Alexander; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and may occur before or after IBD diagnosis. EIM may impact the quality of life for patients with IBD significantly requiring specific treatment depending on the affected organ(s). They most frequently affect joints, skin, or eyes, but can also less frequently involve other organs such as liver, lungs, or pancreas. Certain EIM, such as peripheral arthritis, oral aphthous ulcers, episcleritis, or erythema nodosum, are frequently associated with active intestinal inflammation and usually improve by treatment of the intestinal activity. Other EIM, such as uveitis or ankylosing spondylitis, usually occur independent of intestinal inflammatory activity. For other not so rare EIM, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the association with the activity of the underlying IBD is unclear. Successful therapy of EIM is essential for improving quality of life of patients with IBD. Besides other options, tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy is an important therapy for EIM in patients with IBD. PMID:26154136

  16. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Review of Patient-Targeted Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Jason K; Lee, Dale; Lewis, James

    2013-01-01

    Patients have strong beliefs about the role of diet in the cause of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in exacerbating or alleviating ongoing symptoms from IBD. The rapid increase in the incidence and prevalence of IBD in the past several decades strongly suggests an environmental trigger for IBD, one of which may be dietary patterns. There are several pathways where diet may influence intestinal inflammation such as direct dietary antigens, altering the gut microbiome, and affecting gastro...

  17. Clinical relevance of changes in bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pal; Miheller; Katalin; Lrinczy; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density is an established, frequent, but often neglected complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Data regarding the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of low bone mass in IBD has been partially extrapolated from postmenopausal osteoporosis; however, the pathophysiology of bone loss is altered in young patients with IBD. Fracture, a disabling complication, is the most important clinical outcome of low bone mass. Estimation of fracture risk in IBD is difficult. Numerous ...

  18. Older Age and Steroid Use Are Associated with Increasing Polypharmacy and Potential Medication Interactions Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Parian, Alyssa; Ha, Christina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity and polypharmacy, more prevalent among older persons, may impact the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to assess the frequency of polypharmacy and medication interactions within a cohort of older patients with IBD and describe IBD treatment patterns. Methods: Cohort study of 190 patients with IBD 65 years or older followed at a tertiary IBD referral center from 2006 to 2012. Data collected included demographics, IB...

  19. Neuro-glial crosstalk in inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Neunlist, Michel; Van Landeghem, Lien; Bourreille, Arnaud; Savidge, T.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease in which environmental, immune and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis. Although biological therapies (antibodies anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha or anti-integrin) have considerably improved the symptoms and quality of life of IBD patients, some drawbacks have emerged limiting their long-term use. In addition, prevention of relapses and treatment of resistant ulcers remains a clinical challenge. In this context, a bet...

  20. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heikius, B. (Bengt)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been described with varying frequencies. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of pancreatic duct abnormalities, exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, elevated pancreatic enzymes, hepato-biliary disease, coexisting cholangiographic and pancreatographic duct changes, and elevated serum levels of fibrosis markers in IBD, and to correlate the findings with clinical, endoscopic and histologic variable...

  1. Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Klein; Rami Eliakim

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are an immune mediated chronic or relapsing disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. IBD is characterized by a chronic intestinal inflammatory process with various components contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease including environmental factors such as smoking or use of Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS). NSAIDS are among the most commonly used medications for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. The main factor limitin...

  2. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  3. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver transplantatio

  5. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Da...

  6. Role of CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)], E-mail: dregge@mauriziano.it; Neri, Emanuele; Turini, Francesca [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    CT colonography (CTC), or virtual colonoscopy, is a non-invasive imaging method that uses CT data sets combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon. CTC is not used routinely in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, investigating contemporarily the colon, other abdominal organs and the peritoneum with CTC is at times useful in patients with IBD, especially when other diagnostic tools fail. Furthermore, since symptoms of colorectal cancer sometimes superimpose to those of inflammatory disease, it may happen to image patients with IBD incidentally. If clinical signs are suggestive for inflammatory disease, exam technique should be modified accordingly and distinguishing radiological findings searched for.

  7. Role of CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT colonography (CTC), or virtual colonoscopy, is a non-invasive imaging method that uses CT data sets combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon. CTC is not used routinely in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, investigating contemporarily the colon, other abdominal organs and the peritoneum with CTC is at times useful in patients with IBD, especially when other diagnostic tools fail. Furthermore, since symptoms of colorectal cancer sometimes superimpose to those of inflammatory disease, it may happen to image patients with IBD incidentally. If clinical signs are suggestive for inflammatory disease, exam technique should be modified accordingly and distinguishing radiological findings searched for.

  8. The burden of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Jess, Tine; Martinato, Matteo; Lakatos, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorders impacting every aspect of the affected individual's life and account for substantial costs to the health care system and society. New epidemiological data suggest that the incidence and prevalence of the diseases are...... increasing and medical therapy and disease management have changed significantly in the last decade. An estimated 2.5-3million people in Europe are affected by IBD, with a direct healthcare cost of 4.6-5.6bn Euros/year. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the burden of IBD in Europe by...

  9. Genomic and Clinical Effects Associated with a Relaxation Response Mind-Body Intervention in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Braden; Bhasin, Manoj; Jacquart, Jolene; Scult, Matthew A.; Slipp, Lauren; Riklin, Eric Isaac Kagan; Lepoutre, Veronique; Comosa, Nicole; Norton, Beth-Ann; Dassatti, Allison; Rosenblum, Jessica; Thurler, Andrea H.; Surjanhata, Brian C.; Hasheminejad, Nicole N.; Kagan, Leslee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can profoundly affect quality of life and are influenced by stress and resiliency. The impact of mind-body interventions (MBIs) on IBS and IBD patients has not previously been examined. Methods: Nineteen IBS and 29 IBD patients were enrolled in a 9-week relaxation response based mind-body group intervention (RR-MBI), focusing on elicitation of the RR and cognitive skill building. Symptom questionnaires and infla...

  10. Risk factors of work disability in patients with inflammatory bowel disease - A Dutch nationwide web-based survey Work disability in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E.; Mangen, Marie-Josee J.; Leenders, Max; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Fidder, Herma H.; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with high costs to society. Few data on the impact of IBD on work disability and potential predictive factors are available. Aim: To assess the prevalence of and predictive factors for work disability in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative c

  11. Dietary Supplement Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parian, Alyssa; Limketkai, Berkeley N

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed. PMID:26561079

  12. Accumulation of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the gut mucosa and presence of faecal immunoglobulin in severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice with T cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenholt, S; Brimnes, J; Reimann, J; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1998-01-01

    individual colon segments obtained from 20 gut wall- or CD4+ T cell-transplanted diseased scid mice was evaluated by histology and the numbers of infiltrating immunoglobulin-containing cells were determined. In particular, cells positive for IgM, IgA and non-inflammatory immunoglobulin isotypes such as IgG1...... positive for the IgG classes. Faecal extracts of the CD4+ T cell-transplanted scid mice revealed the presence of all six murine immunoglobulin isotypes. Disease progression was accompanied by an increased level of excreted IgM and IgG3 and decreased levels of IgA. It is concluded that locally secreted...... immunoglobulins may play an immunomodulating role in the pathological changes observed in the present model of T cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease....

  13. Risk of inflammatory bowel disease following a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Chad K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD symptoms often overlap. In some IBS cases there are subtle inflammatory changes similar to the immune-mediated pathophysiology of IBD, and the risk of both increases after infectious gastroenteritis (IGE. Methods To evaluate the effect of IBS and IGE on IBD risk utilizing US Department of Defense medical encounter data, active duty personnel with IBS were matched to subjects without IBS. Medical encounter history was analyzed to assess for incident IBD. IGE was identified from documented medical encounters and by self-report. Relative risks were calculated using Poisson regression models. Results We identified 9,341 incident IBS cases and 18,678 matched non-IBS subjects and found an 8.6-fold higher incidence (p p  Conclusions These data reflect a complex interaction between illness presentation and diagnosis of IBS and IBD and suggest intercurrent IGE may increase IBD risk in IBS patients. Additional studies are needed to determine whether IBS lies on the causal pathway for IBD or whether the two are on a pathophysiological spectrum of the same clinical illness. These data suggest consideration of risk reduction interventions for IGE among IBS patients at high disease risk.

  14. Hospital Admissions, Biological Therapy, and Surgery in Familial and Sporadic Cases of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Andersson, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    -related hospitalization, biological treatment, and surgery in familial versus sporadic cases of IBD. RESULTS: A total of 27,886 IBD cases, including 1006 IBD-relative pairs, were followed-up for up to 16 years, totaling 164,979 person-years. We observed no difference in risk of hospital admissions between familial and......BACKGROUND: Easily accessible predictors of disease course in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are scarce, and it remains largely unknown whether a family history of IBD predicts the course of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). We aimed to compare the course of disease in familial...... and sporadic cases of IBD in a nationwide cohort study. METHODS: From national registries, covering a population of 8,295,773 individuals, we obtained information on date and year of diagnosis of IBD cases, gender, age, and family ties. Using Cox regression, we estimated hazard ratios for IBD...

  15. Retrospective analysis of old-age colitis in the Dutch inflammatory bowel disease population

    OpenAIRE

    Hadithi, M. al; Cazemier, M.; Meijer, G. A.; Bloemena, E.; Felt-Bersma, R.J.F.; Mulder, C. J. J.; Meuwissen, S G M; Pena, A S; Bodegraven, van, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To describe the characteristics of Dutch patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) first diagnosed above 60 years of age-a disease also known as old-age colitis (OAC) and to highlight a condition that has a similar appearance to IBD, namely segmental colitis associated with diverticular disease (SCAD).

  16. Patients’ perceptions on the impact of coffee consumption in inflammatory bowel disease: friend or foe? – a patient survey

    OpenAIRE

    Barthel, C; Wiegand, S.; Scharl, S; Scharl, M; Frei, P.; Vavricka, S R; FRIED, M.; Sulz, M.C.; Wiegand, N; Rogler, G; Biedermann, L

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental factors are an integral component in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There is an increasing interest in nutritive components. While the potential disease-modifying role of coffee has been intensively investigated in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, the data on the potential impact on IBD is very limited. We aimed to determine the patients’ perspective on coffee consumption in IBD. Methods We conducted a questionnaire among IBD patients in ...

  17. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. PMID:26671147

  18. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Sebastian; Piotrowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-10

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  19. Dysregulation of mucosal immune response in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiao-rong; Liu, Chang-Qin; Feng, Bai-Sui; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The exact etiology and pathology of IBD remain unknown. Available evidence suggests that an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms in the intestine is responsible for the disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Dysregulation of immune response in the intestine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of IBD, involving a wide range of molecules including cytokines. On the other hand, besides...

  20. Plant-derived compounds in experimental inflammatory bowel disease and colon carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fasolino, Ines

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are widespread intestinal diseases. The link between these two diseases is highlighted by the observation that patients with IBD are at increased risk for CRC. Plants have been traditionally used in folk medicine and are actually practiced in industrialized countries where their use is often integrated into conventional medicine. Most survey agree that digestive tract ailments cure/prevention, including IBD an...

  1. Role of imaging in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease: How much is too much?

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Kelly; Rubesova, Erika; Bass, Dorsey

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a lifelong condition with waxing and waning disease course that requires reassessment of disease status as well as screening for complications throughout a patient’s lifetime. Laboratory testing, endoscopic assessment, and fecal biomarkers are often used in the initial diagnosis and ongoing monitoring of a patient with IBD. Imaging plays an integral role in the diagnosis and evaluation of IBD. Different imaging modalities can be used over the course of a pa...

  2. Usefulness of Measuring Serum Procalcitonin Levels in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Sook Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The relationships between serum procalcitonin, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and intestinal Behçet’s disease (BD) have not been completely determined. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of measuring serum procalcitonin levels to assess disease activity and infection stage in patients with IBD and intestinal BD. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 129 patients with IBD and intestinal BD for whom serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were...

  3. Animal Models of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Illuminating the Pathogenesis of Colitis, Ileitis and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neurath, Markus F

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing diseases of unknown origin. In spite of improved options for therapy, many patients with IBD have an impaired quality of life and require hospitalization or surgery. Animal models of IBD might help to obtain new insights into the pathogenesis of these diseases and may be used to test innovative approaches for therapy. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed. Results: Numerous new animal mod...

  4. Assessment of the validity of a multigene analysis in the diagnostics of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, J T; Nyberg, Caroline; Olsen, J; Nielsen, O H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The findings of a previous multigene study indicated that the expression of a panel of seven specific genes had strong differential power regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) versus non-IBD, as well as ulcerative colitis (UC) versus Crohn's disease (CD). This prospective confirm...... tissue. Thus, a reliable and simple diagnostic tool is still warranted for optimal diagnosis and treatment of patients with IBD, especially the subgroup with unclassified disease....

  5. The Bowel Microbiota and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald W. Tannock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The human bowel contains a large and biodiverse bacterial community known as the microbiota or microbiome. It seems likely that the microbiota, fractions of the microbiota, or specific species comprising the microbiota provide the antigenic fuel that drives the chronic immune inflammation of the bowel mucosa that is characteristic of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. At least twenty years of microbiological research have been expended on analysis of the composition of the bowel microbiota of inflammatory bowel disease patients in comparison to that of control subjects. Despite extensive speculations about the aetiological role of dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases, knowledge that can be easily translated into effective remedies for patients has not eventuated. The causes of this failure may be due to poorly defined and executed bacteriological studies, as well as the overwhelming complexity of a biome that contains hundreds of bacterial species and trillions of bacterial cells.

  6. [Historical evolution and current concepts of surgical treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lei; Wu, Xiaojian; Xie, Minghao; Lan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may require surgical intervention for refractory disease or complications. Prompt surgery and appropriate surgical procedures are critical when surgery is indicatedd. With continuous optimization and innovation of surgical procedures, there have been significant changes in the concepts and operations of IBD in the past century. Learning the evolution of surgical treatment for IBD could help us understand the rationale, indications, and pertinent techniques of surgical procedures. Innovations are emerging in IBD management including the advent of biological agents, laparoscopy, and multi-disciplinary team approach, it is imperative for IBD specialist to learn the state-of-the-art knowledge. PMID:26797834

  7. Comparative genomics of Escherichia coli isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Petersen, Andreas M; Krogfelt, Karen; Klemm, Per

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe a state of idiopathic, chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The two main phenotypes of IBD are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The major cause of IBD-associated mortality is colorectal cancer. Although both host......-genetic and exogenous factors have been found to be involved, the aetiology of IBD is still not well understood. In this study we characterized thirteen Escherichia coli strains from patients with IBD by comparative genomic hybridization employing a microarray based on 31 sequenced E. coli genomes from a wide...

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease: immunodiagnostics, immunotherapeutics, and ecotherapeutics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reflect a continuing shift from empiricism to strategies based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In susceptible individuals, IBD appears to be the result of defective regulation of mucosal immune interactions with the enteric microflora. This has prompted research directed at the interface of the traditional disciplines of immunology, microbiology, and epithelial cell biology. Whereas immunodiagnostics have been of limited clinical value in IBD, assessments of mucosal rather than systemic immune function are promising. Therapeutically, there is an increasing trend toward more aggressive and earlier use of immunomodulatory agents, particularly for prevention of relapse, with cytokine manipulation as a bridge therapy to achieve remission in patients with acute severe disease. Although most drug treatments are directed toward altering the host response, the rationale for manipulating the enteric flora appears sound and will be the basis of additional future therapeutic strategies. Notwithstanding the widening range of options for drug therapy in IBD, other outcome modifiers and well-established principles of managing chronic disease are as important as ever.

  9. Endoscopic assessment of inflammatory bowel disease: colonoscopy/esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Grace

    2012-06-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the initial diagnosis of IBD, including the evaluation of disease severity, activity, and extent. The implications of complete mucosal healing further confirm the function of endoscopy in the follow-up of IBD patients. The use of therapeutic endoscopy, for example stricture dilatation, can avoid the need for bowel resection. Modalities such as capsule endoscopy, EUS, NBI, CE, and other emerging techniques are likely to have an increasing role in the management of IBD, particularly in the area of dysplasia surveillance and treatment.

  10. Role of endoscopy in predicting the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthieu; Allez; Marc; Lémann

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopy provides a direct evaluation of mucosal lesions in inflammatory bowel disease(IBD),permitting the description of elementary lesions,their surface extent and severity.The severity of mucosal lesions directly reflects disease activity and may help to identify an aggressive behavior of the disease.Several studies have recently pointed out the potential role of endoscopy in the prediction of IBD outcome.Indeed,severe endoscopic lesions in Crohn's disease(CD) patients,defined by deep and extensive ulce...

  11. Role of endoscopy in predicting the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Allez, Matthieu; Lémann, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopy provides a direct evaluation of mucosal lesions in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), permitting the description of elementary lesions, their surface extent and severity. The severity of mucosal lesions directly reflects disease activity and may help to identify an aggressive behavior of the disease. Several studies have recently pointed out the potential role of endoscopy in the prediction of IBD outcome. Indeed, severe endoscopic lesions in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients, defined by...

  12. Cordyceps pruinosa for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Cui

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nTo date, there have been no curative drugs for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Conventional drugs and biologic agents are not always effective and may cause serious side effects. Therefore, it is still challenging to develop effective and safe novel drugs for IBD. Although the exact etiology of IBD remains elusive, it is generally accepted that the immune system of the gut plays a central role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Recently, the nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB has been identified as the pivotal elements in the regulation of the increased inflammatory activity. Moreover, recent studies have shown that Cordyceps pruinosa extract is a inhibitor of NF- κB activation and can enhance weak immune functions. Based on these facts, I hypothesize that Cordyceps pruinosa extract may thus exert its therapeutic effect on IBD by regulating NF-κB activity and improving impaired immune functions.

  13. Acceptable short-term outcome of laparoscopic subtotal colectomy for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, Natalie Lassen; Bulut, Orhan; Pachler, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic colectomy for both benign and malignant disease, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has recently been shown to have many advantages compared with open surgery. This study aimed to compare the effect of laparoscopic versus open subtotal colectomy (STC) for IBD on overall...

  14. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madharasi VA Pichai; Lynnette R Ferguson

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn's disease are highly debilitating.There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications,failures in adequate drug delivery,and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD.This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics.This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine,studied so far in animal andin vitro models,before comprehensive clinical testing in humans.The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy.We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models,aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis,in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans.

  15. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichai, Madharasi V A; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-06-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn's disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied so far in animal and in vitro models, before comprehensive clinical testing in humans. The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy. We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models, aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis, in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans. PMID:22736912

  16. Therapeutic Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Implication of Human Pregnane X Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Yatrik M. Shah; Ma, Xiaochao; Pang, Xiaoyan; Tanaka, Toshiya; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Frank J. Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a human PXR activator, is in clinical trials for treatment of IBD and has demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease and active ulcerative colitis. In the current study, the protective and therapeutic role of rifaximin in IBD and its respective mechanism were investigated. PXR-humanized (hPXR), wild-type, and Pxr-null mice were treated with rifaximin in the dextran sulfate sod...

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease in children, an evolving problem in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa′a A Al-Qabandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD was previously thought a rare disease among children in Kuwait since most diarrhea cases were attributed to infections. In the past few years we observed an increase in the number of patients presenting with IBD. In this study we aimed to determine the epidemiology of IBD among children in the State of Kuwait. Patients and Methods: The charts of all children with IBD who were referred to the pediatric gastroenterology unit during the period February 1998 to January 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Out of a total of 130 children with IBD, 92 (71% had Crohn′s disease, 36 (28% had ulcerative colitis and two (1% had indeterminate colitis. The estimated annual incidence for IBD was 2.16/10 5 /year. The age range was nine months-15 years (median: 11 years. Fifty-three percent of all patients were females and 77% were Kuwaiti nationals. Positive family history was found in 23%. The commonest presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (87% and diarrhea (82%. Failure to thrive was detected in 35% and short stature in 20% at presentation. The ileocolonic region was the most common presentation site affected in Crohn′s patients and pancolitis was the commonest in ulcerative colitis. Conclusion: Inflammatory bowel disease is not uncommon in our children. We found no differences regarding disease presentation and clinical features compared to the Western world.

  18. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. PMID:24969296

  19. Prevalence and Incidence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Organisms among Hospitalized Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Vaisman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD experience frequent hospitalizations and use of immunosuppressive medications, which may predispose them to colonization with antimicrobial-resistant organisms (ARO.

  20. Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruemmele, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is steadily in the rise in Western as well as in developing countries paralleling the increase of westernized diets, characterized by high protein and fat as well as excessive sugar intake, with less vegetables and fiber. An interesting hypothesis is that environmental (food-) triggered changes of the intestinal microbiome might cause a proinflammatory state preceding the development of IBD. Indeed, an intact intestinal epithelial barrier assuring a normal bacterial clearance of the intestinal surface is crucial to guarantee intestinal homeostasis. Any factors affecting the epithelial barrier function directly or indirectly may impact on this homeostasis, as well as any changes of the intestinal microbial composition. It is intriguing to learn that some frequently used food components impact on the quality of the intestinal barrier, as well as on the composition of the intestinal microbiome. This highlights the close interaction between living conditions, hygiene, food habits and food quality with the bacterial composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activation status of the intestinal immune system. There is clear evidence that nutritional therapy is highly successful in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition is well established as induction therapy of CD. New diets, such as a CD exclusion diet or defined diets (specific carbohydrate diets, FODMAP diet, Paleolithic diet) are being discussed as treatment options for IBD. Well-designed clinical trials in IBD are urgently required to define the precise role of each of these diets in the prevention or management of IBD. Up to now, the role of diet in IBD is highly undermined by lay and anecdotal reports without sufficient scientific proof. PMID:27355913

  1. Understanding Endoscopic Disease Activity in IBD: How to Incorporate It into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Britt; Rubin, David T

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic assessment of disease activity is an essential part of clinical practice in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is used for diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring for dysplasia and increasingly for the evaluation of mucosal or endoscopic response to therapy. Recently, mucosal or endoscopic healing has emerged as a key goal of therapy as it has been found that patients who achieve endoscopic remission have improved outcomes compared to those who do not, and this may be independent of their clinical disease activity. However, there is currently no validated definition of mucosal healing and there are numerous endoscopic scoring systems proposed to define endoscopic activity and response to therapy in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. This article will discuss the most common endoscopic scores used to measure endoscopic disease activity in IBD, the pros and cons of each of these scoring systems and proposed definitions for endoscopic response or remission that exist for each. In addition, the role of endoscopy in prognosticating the disease course is discussed and how endoscopy can be utilized as part of a "treat-to-target" treatment strategy where endoscopy results direct decisions regarding medical strategies in clinical practice is highlighted. PMID:26759147

  2. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of...... inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  3. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arvind Batra; Thorsten Stroh; Britta Siegmund

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature.Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease,but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets.

  5. Differentiation of Behcet's disease from inflammatory bowel diseases: Anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is sometimes difficult and challenging. Hereby, we suggested the utility of anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA) and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA) in the differential diagnosis of BD from IBD.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Perineum in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Douglas H.; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis a...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the perineum in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Douglas H.; Shipman, Peter; Jacobson, Kevan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has profoundly changed and improved the investigation of abdominal and pelvic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatrics. Using an imaging modality without ionizing radiation is of particular advantage because the pediatric IBD population is young and often requires repeat evaluation. MRI of the pelvis has become the imaging gold standard for detecting and monitoring perianal disease while bowel-directed imaging techniques (eg, enterography, enteroclysis a...

  8. Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Gil Shitrit, Ariella; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Goldin, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually affects women during their reproductive years and many concerns arise among these young patients. Pre-pregnancy consultation with a multi-disciplinary team is very important. The team should make patients aware of the critical importance of ensuring that conception occurs during a period of disease remission. Conception during an IBD flare-up results in disease activity or even exacerbates disease in two-thirds of women. Exacerbation of the disease is associated with increased frequency of maternal and fetal complications. Drug therapy constitutes a considerable source of patient anxiety but most drugs used for treating IBD are considered safe. Therefore, continuing pharmacological therapy during pregnancy is necessary to maintain disease control. Optimization of pre-conception nutritional status and smoking cessation are also emphasized. The general guideline for most patients, except for active perianal disease patients, is to aim for vaginal delivery in the absence of obstetric contraindications. Consistent, ongoing follow-up, as detailed in this review, should allay the anxieties and fears surrounding continuing immunosuppressive drugs during pregnancy, allowing each patient to attain the optimal conditions for achieving her goal of holding a healthy baby. PMID:27068171

  9. Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Associated with Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction, Stroke and Cardiovascular Death – A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Erichsen, Rune; Jensen, Gunnar Vagn; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chronic inflammatory diseases have been linked to increased risk of atherothrombotic events, but the risk associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We therefore examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cardiovascular death in patients with IBD. Methods In a nationwide Danish population-based setting, a cohort of patients with incident IBD between 1996 and 2009 were identified in national registers. Hospitalizations with IBD as primary diagnosis, ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  11. The impact of helical computed tomography on the diagnosis of unsuspected inflammatory bowel disease in the large bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are diagnoses that can be easily overlooked clinically. The aim of this study was to investigate if CT is able to make a contribution to the identification of previously unsuspected cases of IBD. We retrospectively identified cases in which the possibility of an IBD was raised in CT reports (over a 4-year period), by utilising a keyword search of the radiology database. Cases with a previously known or suspected IBD were rigorously excluded by review of case notes, and endoscopic, radiological, histological and microbiological findings. The CT images of the identified cases were reviewed by a blinded observer to document the extent of bowel wall thickening, the location of lesion(s), and presence of peri-colic fat abnormality, ascites and/or collections. The observer also attempted to corroborate the presence, and to identify the type, of IBD based on the CT appearances alone. Thirty-five cases (out of approximately 19,000 body CTs performed) of clinically unsuspected IBD were identified, of which 27 underwent further investigation. An IBD was confirmed in 48% (13 of 27): Crohn's disease (n=6), ulcerative colitis (n=2), pseudomembranous colitis (n=3) and other (n=2), of which 70% (9 of 13) were correctly typed by the reviewer. Inflammatory bowel disease was not substantiated in the remainder (14 of 27), although 7 of these had other bowel pathologies: diverticular disease (n=4); and carcinoma (n=3). Prospectively determining the presence, and furthermore type, of IBD on CT is challenging largely because of the considerable overlap in the appearances of the individual IBDs and indeed of normality. Nevertheless, CT is able to identify clinically unsuspected cases and radiologists should be alert to this treatable and not infrequently elusive diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. Biomarkers for inflammation and surveillance strategies in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the colonic mucosa, as observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Endoscopic surveillance aimed at the detection of dysplasia and asymptomatic CRC is therefore recommended in order to mitigate t

  13. Smoking and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D T; Hanauer, S B

    2000-08-01

    It is well established that smoking cigarettes is associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and that non-smoking is associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). Furthermore, there is convincing evidence that smoking cigarettes has a negative effect on the course of CD, and that smoking cigarettes may improve the disease severity or have a 'protective' effect in some patients with UC. Despite these well-described associations, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects CD and UC is not known. Researchers have studied the systemic effects, cellular and humoral immune effects, mucosal changes, and the intestinal permeability changes with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and smoking. To date, none of these studies adequately explains the observed clinical patterns. It has been assumed that nicotine is the active agent in these associations, but clinical trials of nicotine chewing gum and transdermal nicotine in UC have shown limited benefit, and have been complicated by significant side-effects. Topical delivery systems for nicotine therapy are currently under development and await future clinical trials. PMID:10958212

  14. Correlation of Cecal Microflora of HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, Andrew B; Richardson, James A.; Hammer, Robert E.; Taurog, Joel D.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic rats with a high level of expression of the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B27 develop chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and arthritis. Assessment of the cecal microflora showed a rise in numbers of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp., corresponding to the presence and severity of IBD in these rats.

  15. Immunosuppression after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis influences activity of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristin Kaasen; Lindström, Lina; Cvancarova, Milada;

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We studied the progression of IBD in patients with PSC who have undergone liver transplantation. We also...

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Subsyndromal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Eva; Kenney, Elyse; Carpenter, Johanna; Hardy, Diana M.; Fairclough, Diane; Bousvaros, Athos; Keljo, David; Weisz, John; Beardslee, William R.; Noll, Robert; DeMaso, David Ray

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the feasibility and efficacy of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing depressive symptomatology in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Primary and Secondary Control Enhancement Therapy-Physical Illness(PASCET-PI) modified for youths with IBD was compared to treatment as usual (TAU), plus…

  17. East-West gradient in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Pedersen, Natalia; Čuković-Čavka, S; Brinar, M; Kaimakliotis, I; Duricova, D; Shonová, O; Vind, Ida; Avnstrøm, S; Thorsgaard, N; Andersen, Vinnie; Krabbe, S; Dahlerup, J F; Salupere, R; Nielsen, K R; Olsen, J; Manninen, P; Collin, P; Tsianos, E V; Katsanos, K H; Ladefoged, K; Lakatos, L; Björnsson, E; Ragnarsson, G; Bailey, Y; Odes, S; Schwartz, D; Martinato, M; Lupinacci, G; Milla, M; De Padova, A; D'Incà, R; Beltrami, M; Kupcinskas, L; Kiudelis, G; Turcan, S; Tighineanu, O; Mihu, I; Magro, F; Barros, L F; Goldis, A; Lazar, D; Belousova, E; Nikulina, I; Hernandez, V; Martinez-Ares, D; Almer, S; Zhulina, Y; Halfvarson, J; Arebi, N; Sebastian, S; Lakatos, P L; Langholz, E; Munkholm, P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe. The reasons for these changes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an East-West gradient in the incidence of IBD in Europe exists. DESIGN: A prospective, uniformly diagnosed, ...

  18. Innate immunity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The human intestinal tract is home to an enormous bacterial flora. The host defense against microorganisms can be divided into innate and adaptive immunity. The former is the most immediate line of response to immunologic challenges presented by bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The mucosal immune system has evolved to balance the need to respond to pathogens while co-existing with commensal bacteria and food antigens. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this hyporesponsiveness or tolerance breaks-down and inflammation supervenes driven by the intestinal microbial flora. Bacteria contain compounds and are recognized by a variety of receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NODs (a family of intracellular bacterial sensors) and are potent stimuli of innate immune responses. Several mutations in these receptors have been associated with development of IBD.

  19. Lymphogranuloma venereum proctosigmoiditis is a mimicker of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marlene Gallegos; Dawn Bradly; Shriram Jakate; Ali Keshavarzian

    2012-01-01

    There has been an increasing prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) or Chlamydia trachomatis (C.trachomatis) cases among the men who have sex with men (MSM) population,particularly in Europe and North America.These cases may present with an incomplete or undisclosed history and proctosigmoiditis without characteristic adenopathy syndrome.During the initial evaluation and colonoscopy,there is a strong clinical and endoscopic suspicion of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by virtue of presentation and endoscopic and histological findings.The diagnosis of IBD is subsequently modified to LGV proctosigmoiditis when one or more of the following transpire:(1) there is failure of response to IBD therapy; (2) additional components of history (MSM/travel) may be identified; (3) return of initially performed Chlamydia antibody test is positive;and (4) response to antibiotics effective against Chlamydia.We describe three such cases initially suspected to be an inflammatory bowel disease and subsequently identified as C.trachomatis proctosigmoiditis.

  20. Overcoming challenges of treating inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Jill K J; Kane, Sunanda V

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently diagnosed before or during the peak reproductive years. Overall management of inflammatory bowel disease is becoming more complex given the nuances involved with multiple mechanisms of action of the current treatment and need for therapeutic monitoring for safety and efficacy; another layer of complexity is added in the setting of a pregnancy. In this review, we have identified several key challenges that health care providers face when caring for patients with IBD during pregnancy. The goal of this review is to provide the most up-to-date evidence and provide our expert recommendations so that providers can more comfortably address patients' questions about pregnancy in IBD and the associated risks as well as optimize their care to ensure the best outcomes possible. PMID:26981845

  1. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, an...

  2. Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease among an indigent multi-ethnic population in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Hoda M. Malaty; Hou, Jason K.; Selvi Thirumurthi

    2010-01-01

    Hoda M Malaty1,2, Jason K Hou1,2, Selvi Thirumurthi11Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas , USA; 2Michael E DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USABackground: Environmental factors, including socioeconomic status, may affect inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There is a paucity of data on the epidemiology of IBD among patients of low socioeconomic status.Aim: To examine the epidemiologic features of IBD among A...

  3. The Technical Quality of Delivered Care for People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz Gastroenterology Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi; Mohammad Hossein Somi; Sima Asghari; Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi; Farid Gharibi; Saeideh Alidoost

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is considered as one of the chronic diseasesrequiring complicated treatment. This study aimed to assess technical quality of providing care for patients with IBD. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 94 people with IBD using interviews and simple random sampling methods in Gastroenterology, Endoscopy and clinic of Imam Reza Hospital and Golgasht Clinic in Tabriz in 2012. The data collection tool was a researcher-desi...

  4. Hygiene hypothesis in inflammatory bowel disease: A critical review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Koloski, Natasha A.; Bret, Laurel; Radford-Smith, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis is thought to be a significant contributor to the growing incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) around the world, although the evidence for specific factors that underlie the hygiene hypothesis in IBD is unclear. We aimed to systematically review the literature to determine which hygiene-related factors are associated with the development of IBD. Publications identified from a broad based MEDLINE and Current Contents search between 1966 and 2007 on key terms rel...

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease in the dog: Differences and similarities with humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cerquetella, Matteo; Spaterna, Andrea; Laus, Fulvio; Tesei, Beniamino; Rossi, Giacomo; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) represent important chronic conditions affecting the gastrointestinal tract in man. However, similar disorders are found in several animal species and the IBD affecting dogs are particularly important. These are encompassed by an umbrella of probably several different entities with common symptoms, some of which seem to share striking similarities with human conditions. This review will focus on the actual knowledge of IBD in dogs, and attempt to identify dif...

  6. Review article: the role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Piechota-Polanczyk, Aleksandra; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer and discuss free radicals and free radical-stimulated pathways as pharmacological targets for anti-IBD drugs. We also suggest novel anti-oxidative agents, which may become effective and less-toxic alternatives in IBD and colitis-associated colorectal cancer treatment. A Medline search was performed to identify relevant bibliography using searc...

  7. Pulse cyclophosphamide therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; László Tóth; Margit Zeher

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We included in our cohort eight patients with (moderate/severe) steroid refractory IBD (4 with ulcerative colitis and 4 with Crohn's disease). They all received 6 cycles of intravenous cyclophosphamide (800mg) per month.RESULTS: Patients entered into remission after the second/third cyclophosphamide pulse. Disease activity decreased. There were no side effects and toxicity. All the patients went into long lasting remission. All Crohn's disease patients and 3 of 4 ulcerative colitis patients achieved complete remission. One patient with ulcerative colitis showed an impressive clinical response but did not enter into remission. For the maintenance, patients with Crohn's disease were treated with methotrexate (15 mg/wk) and patients with ulcerative colitis were treated with azathioprine (2.5 mg/kg body weight/d).CONCLUSION: Remission was maintained in all patients for 6 mo on the average. The drug was well tolerated. These findings suggest that aggressive immunosuppressive therapy may be useful in some refractory patients and further controlled study should be considered in order to fully evaluate this type of treatment as a potential therapy for IBD.

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after...

  9. Non-invasive investigation of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JA Tibble; I Bjarnason

    2001-01-01

    The assessment of inflammatory activity in intestinal disease in man can be done using a variety of different techniques. These range from the use of non - invasive acute phase inflammatory markers measured in plasma such as C reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (both of which give an indirect assessment of disease activity) to the direct assessment of disease activity by intestinal biopsy performed during endoscopy in association with endoscopic scoring systems. Both radiology and endoscopy are conventional for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).However these techniques have severe limitations when it comes to assessing functional components of the disease such as activity and prognosis. Here we briefly review the value of two emerging intestinal function tests. Intestinal permeability, although ideally suited for diagnostic screening for small bowel Crohns disease, appears to give reliable predictive data for imminent relapse of small bowel Crohns disease and it can be used to assess responses to treatment. More significantly it is now clear that single stool assay of neutrophil specific proteins (calprotectin, lactoferrin) give the same quantitative data on intestinal inflammation as the 4 - day faecal excretion of 111lndium labelled white cells. Faecal calprotectin is shown to be increased in over 95% of patients with IBD and correlates with clinical disease activity. It reliably differentiates between patients with IBD and irritable bowel syndrome. More importantly, at a given faecal calprotectin concentration in patients with quiescent IBD,the test has a specificity and sensitivity in excess of 85% in predicting clinical relapse of disease. This suggests that relapse of IBD is closely related to the degree of intestinal inflammation and suggests that targeted treatment at an asymptomatic stage of the disease may be indicated.

  10. Nutrition in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebuterne, Xavier; Filippi, Jerome; Schneider, Stephane M

    2014-01-01

    Seventy five percent of hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease suffer from malnutrition. One third of Crohn's disease patients have a body mass index below 20. Sixty percent of Crohn's disease patients have sarcopenia. However some inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are obese or suffer from sarcopenic-obesity. IBD patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia, which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as metabolic disturbances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases. PMID:25266810

  11. Neutrophilic dermatoses and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, A V; Menicanti, C; Crosti, C; Trevisan, V

    2013-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's Syndrome (SS) are inflammatory skin diseases caused by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin and, rarely, in internal organs, which led to coining the term of neutrophilic dermatoses (ND) to define these conditions. Recently, ND have been included among the autoinflammatory diseases, which are forms due to mutations of genes regulating the innate immune responses. Both PG and SS are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic intestinal disorders which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and whose pathogenesis involves both the innate and adaptive immunity in genetically prone individuals. Patients with IBD develop PG in 1-3% of cases, while SS is rarer. PG presents with deep erythematous-to-violaceous painful ulcers with undermined borders, but bullous, pustular, and vegetative variants can also occur. SS, also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by the abrupt onset of fever, peripheral neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions and a diffuse neutrophilic dermal infiltrate. In this review that will be focused on PG and SS, we will describe also the aseptic abscesses syndrome, a new entity within the spectrum of ND which frequently occurs in association with IBD and is characterized by deep abscesses mainly involving the spleen and skin and by polymorphic cutaneous manifestations including PG- and SS-like lesions. PMID:23588144

  12. Self-reported Disability in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Largely Determined by Disease Activity and Illness Perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Have, Mike; Fidder, Herma H.; Leenders, Max; Kaptein, Ad A.; van der Valk, Mirthe E.; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Dijkstra, Gerard; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Bolwerk, Clemens J. M.; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Background:The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) disability index has recently been introduced to measure patients' physical, psychological, familial, and social limitations associated with IBD. We assessed factors related to self-reported disability and the relationship between disability and direct

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Silvio; Sans, Miquel; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2004-07-01

    Environmental factors are essential components of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and primarily responsible for its growing incidence around the globe. Epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence support an association between IBD and a large number of seemingly unrelated environmental factors, which include smoking, diet, drugs, geographical and social status, stress, microbial agents, intestinal permeability and appendectomy. Data supporting the involvement of each of these factors in predisposing to, triggering, or modulating the course or outcome of IBD vary from strong to tenuous. Smoking and the enteric bacterial flora are the ones for which the most solid evidence is currently available. Smoking increases the risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and worsens its clinical course, but has a protective effect in ulcerative colitis (UC). Presence of enteric bacteria is indispensable to develop gut inflammation in most animal models of IBD, and modulation of the quantity or quality of the flora can be beneficial in patients with IBD. Surprisingly, evidence for a major role of the diet in inducing or modifying IBD is limited, while that for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is more convincing than for oral contraceptives. Northern geographic location, and a high social, economical, educational or occupational status increase the risk of IBD, an observation fitting the hygiene hypothesis for allergic and autoimmune diseases. Stress is also associated with IBD, but more as a modifier than an inducing factor, and its contribution is more obvious in IBD animal models than human IBD. Finally, an increased intestinal permeability may increase the risk for developing CD, whereas an appendectomy lowers the risk of developing UC. PMID:15288007

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children of Middle Eastern Descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Mai Ying Naidoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are now seen in populations where it was once uncommon. The pattern of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent in Australia has never been reported. This study aimed to investigate the burden of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent at the Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick (SCHR. The SCHR IBD database was used to identify patients of self-reported Middle Eastern ethnicity diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. Demographic, diagnosis, and management data was collected for all Middle Eastern children and an age and gender matched non-Middle Eastern IBD control group. Twenty-four patients of Middle Eastern descent were identified. Middle Eastern Crohn’s disease patients had higher disease activity at diagnosis, higher use of thiopurines, and less restricted colonic disease than controls. Although there were limitations with this dataset, we estimated a higher prevalence of IBD in Middle Eastern children and they had a different disease phenotype and behavior compared to the control group, with less disease restricted to the colon and likely a more active disease course.

  15. Cogan's Syndrome in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease - A Case Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Greuter, Thomas; Scharl, Michael; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Shitrit, Ariella B; Filip, Rafal; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Thoeringer, Christoph K; Boldys, Hubert; Wewer, Anne V; Yanai, Henit; Flores, Cristina; Schmidt, Carsten; Kariv, Revital; Rogler, Gerhard; Rahier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cogan's syndrome (CSy) is a very rare autoimmune disorder, mainly affecting the inner ear and the eye, and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This was a European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) retrospective observational study, performed as part of...... the CONFER project. A call to all ECCO members was made to report concomitant CSy and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cases. Clinical data were recorded in a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: This international case series reports on 22 concomitant CSy-IBD cases from 14 large medical centres. Mean...... duration of IBD until diagnosis of CSy was 8.7 years (range 0.0-38.0) and mean age at CSy diagnosis was 44.6 years (range 9.0-67.0). Six patients had underlying ulcerative colitis (UC) and 16 had Crohn's disease. Eleven patients (50%) had active disease at CSy diagnosis. Sixteen patients were under IBD...

  16. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Celestine Wong; Harris, Philip J.; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove ...

  17. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery. (author)

  19. Intestinal microbiota: The explosive mixture at the origin of inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringiotti, Roberto; Ierardi, Enzo; Lovero, Rosa; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Leo, Alfredo; Principi, Mariabeatrice

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), namely Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are lifelong chronic disorders arising from interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors. Although the origin of IBDs is closely linked to immune response alterations, which governs most medical decision-making, recent findings suggest that gut microbiota may be involved in IBD pathogenesis. Epidemiologic evidence and several studies have shown that a dysregulation of gut microbiota (i.e., dysbiosis) may trigger the onset of intestinal disorders such as IBDs. Animal and human investigations focusing on the microbiota-IBD relationship have suggested an altered balance of the intestinal microbial population in the active phase of IBD. Rigorous microbiota typing could, therefore, soon become part of a complete phenotypic analysis of IBD patients. Moreover, individual susceptibility and environmental triggers such as nutrition, medications, age or smoking could modify bacterial strains in the bowel habitat. Pharmacological manipulation of bowel microbiota is somewhat controversial. The employment of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics has been widely addressed in the literature worldwide, with the aim of obtaining positive results in a number of IBD patient settings, and determining the appropriate timing and modality of this intervention. Recently, novel treatments for IBDs, such as fecal microbiota transplantation, when accepted by patients, have shown promising results. Controlled studies are being designed. In the near future, new therapeutic strategies can be expected, with non-pathogenic or modified food organisms that can be genetically modified to exert anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:25400998

  20. Intestinal microbiota: The explosive mixture at the origin of inflammatory bowel disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto; Bringiotti; Enzo; Ierardi; Rosa; Lovero; Giuseppe; Losurdo; Alfredo; Di; Leo; Mariabeatrice; Principi

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases(IBDs), namely Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are lifelong chronic disorders arising from interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors. Although the origin of IBDs is closely linked to immune response alterations, which governs most medical decision-making, recent findings suggest that gut microbiota may be involved in IBD pathogenesis. Epidemiologic evidence and several studies have shown that a dysregulation of gut microbiota(i.e., dysbiosis) may trigger the onset of intestinal disorders such as IBDs. Animal and human investigations focusing on the microbiota-IBD relationship have suggested an altered balance of the intestinal microbial population in the active phase of IBD. Rigorous microbiota typing could, therefore, soon become part of a complete phenotypic analysis of IBD patients. Moreover, individual susceptibility and environmental triggers such as nutrition, medications, age or smoking could modify bacterial strains in the bowel habitat. Pharmacological manipulation of bowel microbiota is somewhat controversial. The employment of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics has been widely addressed in theliterature worldwide, with the aim of obtaining positive results in a number of IBD patient settings, and determining the appropriate timing and modality of this intervention. Recently, novel treatments for IBDs, such as fecal microbiota transplantation, when accepted by patients, have shown promising results. Controlled studies are being designed. In the near future, new therapeutic strategies can be expected, with non-pathogenic or modified food organisms that can be genetically modified to exert anti-inflammatory properties.

  1. Antidepressants and inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Jane M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have suggested a link between the patient's psyche and the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Although pharmacotherapy with antidepressants has not been widely explored, some investigators have proposed that treating psychological co-morbidities with antidepressants may help to control disease activity. To date a systematic analysis of the available studies assessing the efficacy of antidepressants for the control of somatic symptoms in IBD patients has not been performed. Methods We searched electronic databases, without any language restriction. All relevant papers issued after 1990 were examined. Results 12 relevant publications were identified. All of them referred to non-randomised studies. Antidepressants reported in these publications included paroxetine, bupropion, amitriptyline, phenelzine, and mirtazapine. In 10 articles, paroxetine, bupropion, and phenelzine were suggested to be effective for treating both psychological and somatic symptoms in patients suffering from IBD. Amitriptyline was found ineffective for treating somatic symptoms of IBD. Mirtazapine was not recommended for IBD patients. Conclusion Although most of reviewed papers suggest a beneficial effect of treatment with antidepressants in patients with IBD, due to the lack of reliable data, it is impossible to judge the efficacy of antidepressants in IBD. Properly designed trials are justified and needed based upon the available uncontrolled data.

  2. Effects of Resveratrol on Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mee Young Hong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmunedisease characterized by chronic inflammation in the colon and small intestine. IBD produces many symptoms that can cause discomfort and a modified lifestyle. IBD has no cure, only drugs used to suppress its inflammation, which have exhibited harmful side effects. Resveratrol, 3,5,40 -trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, is a natural phenol with anti-inflammatory attributes. Studies have found consistent results showing that resveratrol supplementation in experimental rodent models of IBD can reduce inflammatory biomarkers. This review presents experimental animal models of IBD showing that resveratrol supplementation can down-regulate inflammatory pathways of MAPK and NF-κb, lessen COX-2, modify cytokines, diminish leukocytes, alter intestinal microflora, and decrease clinical symptoms in vivo, all of which contribute to an improved state of the disease. These outcomes, however, have not yet been studiedin naturally occurring IBD in humans. Future research should attempt and refine to determine if resveratrol could be an effective therapy for IBD in humans.

  3. Minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease: Current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri

    2016-05-01

    The surgical management of complicated and recurrent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has remained a challenge. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS), in the form of laparoscopic resections, single port approach and robotic-assisted dissections in the management of IBD, have been examined in several prospective studies. All of them have shown advantages over open surgery in terms of reduction of physical trauma of surgery, recovery time, better cosmetic outcomes and shorter hospitalization. However, it is important to appreciate that not all patients with IBD are suitable for MIS, so a combination of both open and MIS should be adopted to achieve optimum outcomes. A review on this subject performed by Neumann et al in this issue of World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics have provided evidence in support of the contemporary practice of MIS in the management of IBD and the accompanying commentary further critically evaluates their application in clinical practice. PMID:27158536

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease: Current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of complicated and recurrent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has remained a challenge. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS), in the form of laparoscopic resections, single port approach and robotic-assisted dissections in the management of IBD, have been examined in several prospective studies. All of them have shown advantages over open surgery in terms of reduction of physical trauma of surgery, recovery time, better cosmetic outcomes and shorter hospitalization. However, it is important to appreciate that not all patients with IBD are suitable for MIS, so a combination of both open and MIS should be adopted to achieve optimum outcomes. A review on this subject performed by Neumann et al in this issue of World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics have provided evidence in support of the contemporary practice of MIS in the management of IBD and the accompanying commentary further critically evaluates their application in clinical practice. PMID:27158536

  5. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease: is it a primary immunodeficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Erik; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic and relapsing conditions, characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhea, bleeding and malabsorption. IBD has been considered a hyperinflammatory state due to disturbed interactions between the immune system and the commensal bacterial flora of the gut. However, there is evidence that Crohn's disease might be the consequence of a reduced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an impaired acute inflammatory response, thereby suggesting that IBD might be an immunodeficiency rather than an excessive inflammatory reaction. This theory has been supported by observations in patients with primary immunodeficiencies such as the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and IPEX (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome). In contrary, defects in the anti-inflammatory down-regulation of the immune response as they are seen in patients with Mendelian defects in the IL10 signaling pathway support the hyper-inflammatory theory. In this review, we describe and discuss primary immunodeficiencies associated with IBD and show that the bowel is a highly sensitive indicator of dysregulations, making IBD a model disease to study and identify key regulators required to balance the human mucosal immune system. PMID:21997382

  7. Curcumin as a therapeutic agent in the chemoprevention of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, Remya; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), mainly Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic ailments of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by recurrent inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies are based on the mitigation of symptoms, including inflammatory remission and healing of mucosal manifestations. Extensive studies have suggested that continuous oxidative damage can lead to the inflammatory signaling cascade in IBD. Curcumin, a potent modulator of cell signaling, is popular for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and has already been shown remarkable therapeutic results in IBD. Here, we review and discuss the effects of curcumin as a therapeutic agent in the chemoprevention of IBD. PMID:26995272

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  9. Fertility and Contraception in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jason; Kane, Sunanda V; Feagins, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) carries a high burden in women during their reproductive years, and family planning issues are often a significant cause of concern. Fertility is normal in women with nonsurgically treated ulcerative colitis and similar or slightly reduced in women with Crohn's disease. Women who undergo ileal pouch anastomosis have reduced fertility. Fertility is likely worsened by disease activity but unaffected by medications used to treat IBD. Infertile patients with IBD respond as well as non-IBD patients to in vitro fertilization (IVF). Despite normal fertility, patients with IBD have fewer children due to concerns regarding infertility, disease inheritance, congenital abnormalities, and disease-related sexual dysfunction. Patients rarely discuss these issues with a physician. When discussion does occur, it may lead to changes in decision-making. Contraceptives are an important part of family planning, particularly during times of high disease activity. All forms of contraceptives are acceptable in patients with IBD, although there are specific considerations. The risks of combined oral contraceptives outweigh the benefits in patients with active disease and patients with prior or high risk for thromboembolism. Oral contraceptives and IBD are independently associated with an increased risk for thromboembolism, although it is not known whether this effect is compounding. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection should be avoided in patients with or at risk for osteopenia. Intrauterine devices and implants are the most effective form of contraception and should be a first-line recommendation. The use of oral contraceptives is associated with the development of IBD, although there is no increased risk of disease relapse with the use of any form of contraceptive. PMID:27182211

  10. Single-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Emile Rijcken; Rudolf Mennigen; Norbert Senninger; Matthias Bruewer

    2012-01-01

    Background. Single Port Laparoscopic Surgery (SPLS) is being increasingly employed in colorectal surgery for benign and malignant diseases. The particular role for SPLS in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been determined yet. In this review article we summarize technical aspects and short term results of SPLS resections in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Methods. A systematic review of the literature until January 2012 was performed. Publications were assessed for...

  11. Environmental triggers for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD; Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC)] are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that are due to a dysregulated immune response to intestinal flora in a genetically susceptible host. Despite advances in genetics, the likelihood of occurrence of disease remains incompletely explained and there appears to be a strong role for the environment in mediating risk of disease. Smoking remains the most widely studied and replicated risk factor, contributing to increased risk and severity of CD while conferring protection against UC. Recent data has suggested novel risk factors. Lower plasma vitamin D is associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease, and vitamin D supplementation may prevent relapse of disease. Several medications including oral contraceptives, post-menopausal hormone replacement, aspirin, NSAIDs, and antibiotics may increase risk of CD or UC with the mechanisms of effect remaining inadequately defined. There is continuing evidence that depression and psychosocial stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of both CD and UC, while at the same time also increasing risk for disease flares. There is also a growing understanding of the role of diet on IBD, in particular through its effect on the microbiome. Animal protein intake and n-6 fatty acids may increase risk of UC while n-3 fatty acids and dietary fiber may confer protection. The effect of diet on established disease remains poorly studied. There is need for routine measurement of a spectrum of environmental exposures in prospective studies to further our understanding. PMID:23250702

  12. Childhood inflammatory bowel disease: Parental concerns and expectations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AS Day; KE Whitten; TD Bohane

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To document the concerns and expectations of parents of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)within the context of a multidisciplinary IBD clinic, and to highlight the importance of a holistic approach to the care of these children.METHODS: The parents of 60 children with IBD were surveyed by mailed questionnaire. Parents were asked to provide details of their concerns regarding their child's condition and to express their expectations of medical care. In addition, enquiry was made in respect to the respondents' learning about IBD.RESULTS: Forty-six questionnaires (77%) returned. Fiftytwo percent of the patients were male. Patients were aged a mean of 10.9 (±4.1) years and diagnosed at an average age of 2.1 (±1.8) years previously. The most common concerns expressed by the parents related to the side- effects of medications and the future prospects for their child. Overall, parents were satisfied with aspects of care within the IBD clinic but many suggested additional personnel such as counselors or educators should be available. Parents also reported the need for continuing education and easy access to up-to-date information.CONCLUSION: Parents of children and adolescents with IBD have many common concerns regarding their child's condition. On-going attention to holistic care, including psychosocial and educational elements for patients and families, is appropriate in the context of the chronic and unpredictable nature of IBD.

  13. Hypnotherapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Across the Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lifelong relapsing gastrointestinal symptoms and associated with high rates of chronic pain, depression, and anxiety. In this review the author covers the existing literature including randomized controlled studies, open trials, and case reports as well as expert opinion in evaluating how hypnotherapy can be most beneficial in adolescents and adults with IBD. Hypnotherapy evidence for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) is also reviewed as many of the gut-focused hypnotherapy (GHT) approaches used in IBD trials were developed for this latter population. Collectively, the strongest evidence of use of hypnotherapy is its association with reduced IBD-related inflammation and improved health-related quality of life with mixed results in terms of its effects on psychological and pain outcomes in adults with IBD. Studies of hypnotherapy for FGID symptoms show consistently more positive results. Post-operative hypnotherapy may also be helpful based on findings in other surgical samples. Adolescents with IBD have not been as systematically studied but small case series support the use of hypnotherapy to improve inflammation and pain. Future studies are needed to better delineate the specific brain-gut pathways which are most influenced by hypnotherapy in the IBD population and to investigate the longer-term course of the positive short-term findings. PMID:26046718

  14. The Social Construction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Social Media Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Dennis Owen

    2016-11-01

    Many people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sometimes lacking adequate face-to-face sources of support, turn to online communities to meet others with the disease. These online communities are places of support and education, but through the use of social media communication technologies, people with IBD are redefining what it means to live with the disease. This ethnographic study followed 14 online communities to understand how people with IBD used social media technologies to construct their own meanings about living with the disease. The following redefinitions were observed: the refiguring of the body is beautiful; inflammatory bowel disease is serious and deadly; inflammatory bowel disease is humorous; the disease makes one stronger; and the disease is invisible, but needs to be made visible. This study will help health communication scholars understand how technology is appropriated by patients, and will help practitioners understand how their patients conceptualize their disease. PMID:27050670

  15. Utility of faecal calprotectin analysis in adult inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyn A Smith; Daniel R Gaya

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD),Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis,are chronic relapsing,remitting disorders.Diagnosis,along with assessment of disease activity and prognosis present challenges to managing clinicians.Faecal biomarkers,such as faecal calprotectin,are a non-invasive method which can be used to aid these decisions.Calprotectin is a calcium and zinc binding protein found in the cytosol of human neutrophils and macrophages.It is released extracellularly in times of cell stress or damage and can be detected within faeces and thus can be used as a sensitive marker of intestinal inflammation.Faecal calprotectin has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of IBD,correlates with mucosal disease activity and can help to predict response to treatment or relapse.With growing evidence supporting its use,over the last decade this faecal biomarker has significantly changed the way IBD is managed.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nousiainen, Pauliina; Merras-Salmio, Laura; Aalto, Kristiina; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnai...

  17. Diagnostic Workup of Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients In Europe: Results of A 5-Year Audit of The EUROKIDS Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bie, Charlotte I; Buderus, Stephan; Sandhu, Bhupinder K; de Ridder, Lissy; Paerregaard, Anders; Veres, Gabor; Dias, Jorge Amil; Escher, Johanna C

    2011-01-01

    . METHODS:: IBD patients (aged 0-18 years) were registered in 44 centres in 18 countries. Data on diagnostic workup were analysed according to year of diagnosis, type of IBD, and centre size. Diagnostic yield of OGD and ileal intubation was evaluated. RESULTS:: Between 2004 and 2009, 2087 newly diagnosed......OBJECTIVES:: In 2005, the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Working Group of ESPGHAN published consensus guidelines on the diagnostic workup of paediatric IBD, the Porto criteria. According to these guidelines, children suspected of IBD should have an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD......), ileocolonoscopy, and (except in cases of definitive ulcerative colitis (UC)) adequate imaging of the small bowel. To audit and evaluate the diagnostic workup of paediatric IBD patients in Europe, the Working Group created EUROKIDS, a prospective, web-based registry of newly diagnosed paediatric IBD patients...

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease in Asia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prideaux, Lani; Kamm, Michael A; De Cruz, Peter P; Chan, Francis K L; Ng, Siew C

    2012-08-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are lower in Asia than in the West. However, across Asia the incidence and prevalence of IBD has increased rapidly over the last two to four decades. These changes may relate to increased contact with the West, westernization of diet, increasing antibiotics use, improved hygiene, vaccinations, or changes in the gut microbiota. Genetic factors also differ between Asians and the Caucasians. In Asia, UC is more prevalent than CD, although CD incidence is rapidly increasing in certain areas. There is a male predominance of CD in Asia, but a trend towards equal sex distribution for UC. IBD is diagnosed at a slightly older age than in the West, and there is rarely a second incidence peak as in the West. A positive family history is much less common than in the West, as are extra-intestinal disease manifestations. There are clear ethnic differences in incidence within countries in Asia, and an increased incidence in IBD in migrants from Asia to the West. Research in Asia, an area of rapidly changing IBD epidemiology, may lead to the discovery of critical etiologic factors that lead to the development of IBD. PMID:22497584

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease: an expanding global health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Koma, Amosy E

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a summary of the global epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). It is now clear that IBD is increasing worldwide and has become a global emergence disease. IBD, which includes Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), has been considered a problem in industrial-urbanized societies and attributed largely to a Westernized lifestyle and other associated environmental factors. Its incidence and prevalence in developing countries is steadily rising and has been attributed to the rapid modernization and Westernization of the population. There is a need to reconcile the most appropriate treatment for these patient populations from the perspectives of both disease presentation and cost. In the West, biological agents are the fastest-growing segment of the prescription drug market. These agents cost thousands of dollars per patient per year. The healthcare systems, and certainly the patients, in developing countries will struggle to afford such expensive treatments. The need for biological therapy will inevitably increase dramatically, and the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare providers, patient advocate groups, governments and non-governmental organizations should come to a consensus on how to handle this problem. The evidence that IBD is now affecting a much younger population presents an additional concern. Meta-analyses conducted in patients acquiring IBD at a young age also reveals a trend for their increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), since the cumulative incidence rates of CRC in IBD-patients diagnosed in childhood are higher than those observed in adults. In addition, IBD-associated CRC has a worse prognosis than sporadic CRC, even when the stage at diagnosis is taken into account. This is consistent with additional evidence that IBD negatively impacts CRC survival. A continuing increase in IBD incidence worldwide associated with childhood-onset of IBD coupled with the diseases' longevity and an increase in

  20. Pre-illness changes in dietary habits and diet as a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease: A case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni; Maconi; Sandro; Ardizzone; Claudia; Cucino; Cristina; Bezzio; Antonio; Giampiero; Russo; Gabriele; Bianchi; Porro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), before diagnosis modify dietary habits, and to investigate the pre-illness diet in patients with recent IBD in comparison with an age-matched healthy control group. METHODS: Overall, 83 new cases of IBD (41 ulcerative colitis, 42 Crohn's disease) and 160 healthy controls were studied. Portions per week of 34 foods and beverages before onset of symptoms were recorded using a validated questionnaire. Duration of symptoms before IBD diagnos...

  1. [Epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouiten-Mekki, Lilia; Serghini, Meriem; Fekih, Monia; Kallel, Lamia; Matri, Samira; Ben Mustapha, Nadia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2013-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the principal inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) which physiopathology is currently poorly elucidated. During these diseases, the participation of the epithelial cell in the installation and the perpetuation of the intestinal inflammation is now clearly implicated. In fact, the intestinal epithelium located at the interface between the internal environment and the intestinal luminal, is key to the homeostatic regulation of the intestinal barrier. This barrier can schematically be regarded as being three barriers in one: a physical, chemical and immune barrier. The barrier function of epithelial cell can be altered by various mechanisms as occurs in IBD. The goal of this article is to review the literature on the role of the epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and its implication in the IBD. PMID:24356146

  2. Growth and body composition in children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Keshtkaran, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Crohn`s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Approximately 25% of cases are diagnosed in childhood and adolescence; affected children suffer from symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloody diarrhoea, fatigue, and poor nutritional state. Poor growth, in terms of both height and weight, precedes diagnosis and further weight may be lost with successive inflammatory exac...

  3. Surgery for inflammatory bowel disease in the era of laparoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sica, Giuseppe S.; Biancone, Livia

    2013-01-01

    During the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), surgery may be needed. Approximately 20% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) will require surgery, whereas up to 80% of Crohn’s disease (CD) patients will undergo an operation during their lifetime. For UC patients requiring surgery, total proctocolectomy and ileoanal pouch anastomosis (IPAA) is the operation of choice as it provides a permanent cure and good quality of life. Nevertheless a permanent stoma is a good option in selecte...

  4. Human Blood and Mucosal Regulatory T Cells Express Activation Markers and Inhibitory Receptors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, James D.; Shows, Donna M.; Chen, Janice; Thirlby, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Background FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for preventing intestinal inflammation. However, FOXP3+ T cells are paradoxically increased in the intestines of patients with the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). We determined whether these FOXP3+ cells in IBD patients share or lack the phenotype of such cells from patients without IBD. Methods We quantified and characterized FOXP3+ Treg populations, as well as FOXP3- CD4+ T cells, in ...

  5. Nutritional status and nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Corina Hartman; Rami Eliakim; Raanan Shamir

    2009-01-01

    Underweight and specific nutrient deficiencies are frequent in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, a significant number of children with IBD, especially Crohn's disease (CD) have impaired linear growth. Nutrition has an important role in the management of IBD. In adults with CD, enteral nutrition (EN) is effective in inducing clinical remission of IBD, although it is less efficient than corticosteroids. Exclusive EN is an established primary therapy for pediatric CD. Limited data suggests that EN is as efficient as corticosteroids for induction of remission. Additional advantages of nutritional therapy are control of inflammation, mucosal healing, positive benefits to growth and overa ll nutritional status with minimal adverse effects. The available evidence suggests that supplementary EN may be effective also for maintenance of remission in CD. More studies are needed to confirm these findings. However, EN supplementation could be considered as an alternative or as an adjunct to maintenance drug therapy in CD. EN does not have a primary therapeutic role in ulcerative colitis. Specific compositions of enteral diets-elemental diets or diets containing specific components-were not shown to have any advantage over standard polymeric diets and their place in the treatment of CD or UC need further evaluation. Recent theories suggest that diet may be implicated in the etiology of IBD, however there are no proven dietary approaches to reduce the risk of developing IBD.

  6. A clinical review of recent findings in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Millie

    2013-01-01

    Alexis Ponder, Millie D LongDepartment of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are disorders of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract marked by episodes of relapse and remission. Over the past several decades, advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology of IBD. The incidence and prevalence of both Crohn’s disease and ulcerati...

  7. A clinical review of recent findings in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ponder A; Long MD

    2013-01-01

    Alexis Ponder, Millie D LongDepartment of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are disorders of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract marked by episodes of relapse and remission. Over the past several decades, advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology of IBD. The incidence and prevalence of both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colit...

  8. Perturbation of the Human Microbiome as a Contributor to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bayan Missaghi; Barkema, Herman W.; Madsen, Karen L; Subrata Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    The human microbiome consist of the composite genome of native flora that have evolved with humanity over millennia and which contains 150-fold more genes than the human genome. A “healthy” microbiome plays an important role in the maintenance of health and prevention of illness, inclusive of autoimmune disease such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is a prevalent spectrum of disorders, most notably defined by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are associated with ...

  9. Effects of Formal Education for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Barbara M; Jensen, Louise; Richard N Fedorak

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suffer physical dysfunction and impaired quality of life (QOL), and need frequent health care. They often lack knowledge about their disease and desire more education. Educational interventions for other chronic diseases have demonstrated reduced health care use and increased knowledge, medication adherence and QOL.METHOD: Sixty-nine participants were randomly assigned to formal IBD education and standard of care (pamphlets and ad hoc...

  10. Bone loss in inflammatory Bowel disease: our multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Geraci

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing disorder in bone and mineral metabolism The study was aimed to determine if inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a risk factor for osteoporosis in 103 adult patients. We included 103 IBD patients, 67 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD and 36 with ulcerative colitis (UC. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We used T score to express bone loss (osteopenia: -2.5 SD <-1 SD, osteoporosis: T <-2.5 SD. Plain x-rays were examined to search for vertebral compression or spontaneous fractures before DEXA. Among the 103 patients, 47.7% exhibited osteopenia of the femoral neck and 62.3% of the lumbar spine, with no significant difference between CD and UC. The prevalence of osteoporosis of the lumbar spine was significantly higher in CD patients (41.2% versus 8.7%. Osteoporosis is frequent in IBD patients, especially in CD patients. Female gender, malnutrition (body mass index <20 kg/m2, disease course (>2 years and active disease would be risk factors of bone mineral loss in IBD.

  11. Intestinal colonization with phylogenetic group B2 Escherichia coli related to inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2015-01-01

    on 163 patients with IBD and 89 controls. Among IBD patients, 57 patients had ulcerative colitis (UC) and 95 Crohn's disease (CD). Random-effects meta-analysis showed that IBD patients were more likely to have B2 E. coli intestinal colonization compared with controls (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Increased numbers of Escherichia coli and, furthermore, specific subtypes of E. coli, such as E. coli of the phylogenetic groups B2 and D have been found in the intestine of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we wanted to evaluate the...... relationship between B2 and D E. coli intestinal colonization and IBD. METHODS: A systematic review with meta-analyses. We included studies comparing colonization with B2 and D E. coli in IBD patients and in controls. Random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses were performed. RESULTS: We included 7 studies...

  12. Detection And Identification Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Electronic Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, J. A.; Ouaret, N.; Gardner, J. W.; Nwokolo, C.; Bardhan, K. D.; Arasaradnam, R. P.

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammation of the lining of the human bowel and a major health issue in Europe. IBD carries with it significant morbidity from toxic treatment, surgery and a risk of developing bowel cancer. Thus there is a need for early identification of the disease using non-invasive tests. Present diagnostic techniques are based around invasive tests (i.e. endoscopy) and laboratory culture; the latter is limited as only 50% of the gut bacteria can be identified. Here we explore the use of an e-nose as a tool to detect and identify two IBDs (i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) & Ulcerative Colitis (UC)) based on headspace analysis from urine samples. We believe that the gut bacterial flora is altered by disease (due to fermentation) that in-turn modulates the gas composition within urine samples. 24 samples (9 CD, 6 UC, 9 controls) were analysed with an in-house e-nose and an Owlstone IMS instrument. Data analysis was performed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA and principal components analysis (PCA). Using the e-nose, LDA separates both disease groups and control, whilst PCA shows a small overlap of classes. The IMS data are more complex but shows some disease/control separation. We are presently collecting further samples for a larger study using more advanced data processing methods.

  13. Biologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardizzone, Sandro; Bianchi Porro, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Despite all of the advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we still do not know its cause. Some of the most recently available data are discussed in this review; however, this field is changing rapidly and it is increasingly becoming accepted that immunogenetics play an important role in the predisposition, modulation and perpetuation of IBD. The role of intestinal milieu, and enteric flora in particular, appears to be of greater significance than previously thought. This complex interplay of genetic, microbial and environmental factors culminates in a sustained activation of the mucosal immune and non-immune response, probably facilitated by defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier and mucosal immune system, resulting in active inflammation and tissue destruction. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of 'controlled' inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interferon [IFN]-gamma, interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-12) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-11). The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may, therefore, be a logical target for IBD therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, T-helper cell (T(h))-1 polarisation, T-cell activation or nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for IBD. In this context, infliximab is currently the only biologic agent approved for the treatment of inflammatory and fistulising Crohn's disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP 571, certolizumab pegol (CDP 870), etanercept, onercept and adalimumab. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanisms involved

  14. Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease: focus on Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siew C

    2014-06-01

    The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is changing globally. Incidence and prevalence may have stabilized in high-incidence areas such as North America and Europe but they continue to rise in previously low-incidence areas such as Eastern Europe, Asia, and much of the developing world. This epidemiological shift likely relates to westernization of lifestyle, changes in diet, and improved hygiene as part of socioeconomic development in developing countries. In Asia, UC is more prevalent than CD, although the UC:CD ratio is narrowing in certain areas. Clinical manifestations of IBD in Asia resemble the Western population, but with some differences, including higher prevalence of males and ileo-colonic CD, less familial clustering, lower surgical rates and extra-intestinal manifestations. These differences may relate to time, genetics and environmental factors. Studying the epidemiology of IBD in an area of rapidly increasing incidence may lead to discovery of important etiologic factors associated with disease development. PMID:24913377

  15. Oral Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Manoela Seadi; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are known as chronic inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, represented mainly by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Among the main oral manifestations of IBD are cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, labial swellings with vertical fissures, pyostomatitis vegetans, angular cheilitis, perioral erythema, and glossitis. In this sense, understanding these nosological entities by dentists would help reach early and differential diagnosis. Thus, two case reports are presented and discussed based on theoretical references obtained by a literature review. The first case report refers to an adult patient whose IBD diagnosis was established after stomatological assessment. The second case was a patient with CD diagnosed in childhood with characteristic oral lesions. PMID:26864508

  16. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Montiel MP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available MP Martínez-Montiel, B Casis-Herce , GJ Gómez-Gómez, A Masedo-González, C Yela-San Bernardino, C Piedracoba, G Castellano-Tortajada Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with emphasis on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and Cochrane reviews on the management of IBD refractory to corticosteroids. Based on this evidence, we propose algorithms and optimization strategies for use of immunomodulator and biologic therapy in IBD refractory to corticosteroids.Keywords: immunomodulators, anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, drug levels, treatment optimization

  17. Faecal S100A12 as a non-invasive marker distinguishing inflammatory bowel disease from irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, T; Langhorst, J; Wittkowski, H; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W; Rueffer, A; Dobos, G J; Roth, J; Foell, D

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: S100A12 is a pro-inflammatory protein that is secreted by granulocytes. S100A12 serum levels increase during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We performed the first study analysing faecal S100A12 in adults with signs of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: Faecal S100A12 was determined by E

  18. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:26446683

  19. Serological markers for inflammatory bowel disease in AIDS patients with evidence of microbial translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupa Kamat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier during chronic HIV infection allows translocation of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS from the gut into the circulation. Microbial translocation also occurs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. IBD serological markers are useful in the diagnosis of IBD and to differentiate between Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. Here, we evaluate detection of IBD serological markers in HIV-infected patients with advanced disease and their relationship to HIV disease markers. METHODS: IBD serological markers (ASCA, pANCA, anti-OmpC, and anti-CBir1 were measured by ELISA in plasma from AIDS patients (n = 26 with low CD4 counts (<300 cells/µl and high plasma LPS levels, and results correlated with clinical data. For meta-analysis, relevant data were abstracted from 20 articles. RESULTS: IBD serological markers were detected in approximately 65% of AIDS patients with evidence of microbial translocation. An antibody pattern consistent with IBD was detected in 46%; of these, 75% had a CD-like pattern. Meta-analysis of data from 20 published studies on IBD serological markers in CD, UC, and non-IBD control subjects indicated that IBD serological markers are detected more frequently in AIDS patients than in non-IBD disease controls and healthy controls, but less frequently than in CD patients. There was no association between IBD serological markers and HIV disease markers (plasma viral load and CD4 counts in the study cohort. CONCLUSIONS: IBD serological markers may provide a non-invasive approach to monitor HIV-related inflammatory gut disease. Further studies to investigate their clinical significance in HIV-infected individuals are warranted.

  20. Comparison of three commercial fecal calprotectin ELISA test kits used in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Bachmann Holmetoft, Ulla; Ingdam Halkjær, Sofie;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fecal calprotectin is a noninvasive marker of intestinal inflammation used to distinguish between functional and organic bowel diseases and to evaluate disease activity among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The goal of this study was to compare three different ELISA tests...... measuring calprotectin in their accuracy to detect IBD and to distinguish between IBD patients with active or inactive disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study includes in total 148 fecal samples, 96 from patients with a previously confirmed IBD diagnosis and 52 from healthy controls, aged from 25 to 86...... tests (EK-CAL, CALPRO and HK325) were performed on fecal specimens and results compared. RESULTS: The CALPRO calprotectin ELISA test was shown to have the best specificity of 96% compared to the HK325 and the EK-CAL calprotectin ELISA tests with 28% specificity and 74% specificity, respectively. A...

  1. Development of quality standards in inflammatory bowel disease management and design of an evaluation tool of nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Torrejón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: nursing management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is highly relevant for patient care and outcomes. However, there is evidence of substantial variability in clinical practices. The objectives of this study were to develop standards of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD and elaborate the evaluation tool "Nursing Care Quality in IBD Assessment" (NCQ-IBD based on these standards. Methods: a 178-item healthcare quality questionnaire was developed based on a systematic review of IBD nursing management literature. The questionnaire was used to perform two 2-round Delphi studies: Delphi A included 27 IBD healthcare professionals and Delphi B involved 12 patients. The NCQ-IBD was developed from the list of items resulting from both Delphi studies combined with the Scientific Committee's expert opinion. Results: the final NCQ-IBD consists of 90 items, organized in 13 sections measuring the following aspects of nursing management of IBD: infrastructure, services, human resources, type of organization, nursing responsibilities, nurse-provided information to the patient, nurses training, annual audits of nursing activities, and nursing research in IBD. Using the NCQ-IBD to evaluate these components allows the rating of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD into 4 categories: A (highest quality through D (lowest quality. Conclusions: the use of the NCQ-IBD tool to evaluate nursing management quality of IBD identifies areas in need of improvement and thus contribute to an enhancement of care quality and reduction in clinical practice variations.

  2. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cury DB

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dídia Bismara Cury,1,2 Alan C Moss,2 Nestor Schor3 1Scope Clinic, Campo Grande, Brazil; 2Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods: Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results: Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both. Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3 disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1 or colonic (L2 disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7. Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02. Conclusion: In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. Keywords: clinical activity indices, Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, nephrolithiasis, ulcerative colitis

  3. Incidence and initial disease course of inflammatory bowel diseases in 2011 in Europe and Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegh, Z; Burisch, J; Pedersen, N; Kaimakliotis, I; Duricova, D; Bortlik, M; Avnstrøm, S; Vinding, K Kofod; Olsen, J; Nielsen, K R; Katsanos, K H; Tsianos, E V; Lakatos, L; Schwartz, D; Odes, S; Lupinacci, G; De Padova, A; Jonaitis, L; Kupcinskas, L; Turcan, S; Tighineanu, O; Mihu, I; Barros, L F; Magro, F; Lazar, D; Goldis, A; Fernandez, A; Hernandez, V; Niewiadomski, O; Bell, S; Langholz, E; Munkholm, P; Lakatos, P L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of the present study was to validate the IBD (inflammatory bowel diseases) incidence reported in the 2010 ECCO-EpiCom (European Crohn's and Colitis Organization-Epidemiological Committee) inception cohort by including a second independent inception cohort from partici...

  4. Initial Disease Course and Treatment in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inception Cohort in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, Silvja; Turk, Niksa; Kaimakliotis, Ioannis; Duricova, Dana; Shonová, Olga; Vind, Ida; Avnstrøm, Søren; Thorsgaard, Niels; Krabbe, Susanne; Andersen, Vibeke; Dahlerup Jens, Frederik; Kjeldsen, Jens; Salupere, Riina; Olsen, Jóngerð; Nielsen, Kári Rubek; Manninen, Pia; Collin, Pekka; Katsanos, Konstantinnos H; Tsianos, Epameinondas V; Ladefoged, Karin; Lakatos, Laszlo; Bailey, Yvonne; O'Morain, Colm; Schwartz, Doron; Odes, Selwyn; Martinato, Matteo; Lombardini, Silvia; Jonaitis, Laimas; Kupcinskas, Limas; Turcan, Svetlana; Barros, Louisa; Magro, Fernando; Lazar, Daniela; Goldis, Adrian; Nikulina, Inna; Belousova, Elena; Fernandez, Alberto; Hernandez, Vicent; Almer, Sven; Zhulina, Yaroslava; Halfvarson, Jonas; Tsai, Her-Hsin; Sebastian, Shaji; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Langholz, Ebbe; Munkholm, Pia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The EpiCom cohort is a prospective, population-based, inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients from 31 European centers covering a background population of 10.1 million. The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome in the EpiCom cohort. METHODS: Patients...

  5. Targeting intestinal microflora in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR In their recent review article[1], Andoh and Fujiyama examined the various therapeutic approaches targeting intestinal microflora in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I would like to provide some additional data to complete and update their comments. First of all, when considering the role of probiotics in 1BD treatment it must be emphasized that, in addition to Bifidobacteria, the Nissle 1917 E. coli strain and cocktails of microorganisms such as VSL # 3 mentioned in the article, other probiotic agents have been tested in the short- and long-term treatment of either ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the results of those studies being reported in major international scientific journals.

  6. Patterns of airway involvement in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilias; Papanikolaou; Konstantinos; Kagouridis; Spyros; A; Papiris

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD). Pulmonary manifestations(PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD. PM are mainly detected by pulmonary function tests and highresolution computed tomography. This review will focus on the involvement of the airways in the context of IBD, especially stenoses of the large airways, tracheo-bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, mucoid impaction, bronchial granulomas, bronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the co-existence of IBD with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis and a1-antitrypsin deficiency.

  7. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... fructose caused marked abdominal distress in patients with demonstrable malabsorption. Ingestion of sucrose in these patients gave less pronounced symptoms of abdominal distress. Malabsorption of a 5-g dose of sorbitol could be detected in 8 of 13 patients. Mixtures of 25 g of fructose and 5 g of sorbitol...... caused significantly increased abdominal distress, and more than additive malabsorption was found in several cases. The present study shows that pronounced gastrointestinal distress may be provoked by malabsorption of small amounts of fructose, sorbitol, and fructose-sorbitol mixtures in patients with...

  8. An Analysis of an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Practise in an Urban Community Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, David; Adam, Jonathan; Price, Howard

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review an individual community gastroenterologist’s experience with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aspects studied were distribution of disease, need for hospital admission, immunosuppressants, systemic steroids, and surgery and its indications. The incidence of cancer was also reviewed.PATIENTS AND METHODS: The charts of all IBD patients (n=373) seen between 1993 and 1996 by an individual gastroenterologist in an urban community hospital were reviewed for the aforementi...

  9. Advances in the Endoscopic Assessment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Cooperation between Endoscopic and Pathologic Evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Cheon, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic assessment has a crucial role in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is particularly useful for the assessment of IBD disease extension, severity, and neoplasia surveillance. Recent advances in endoscopic imaging techniques have been revolutionized over the past decades, progressing from conventional white light endoscopy to novel endoscopic techniques using molecular probes or electronic filter technologies. These new technologies allow for visualization of the ...

  10. Diagnostics of inflammatory bowel disease using fecal microbiota: Diagnostic markers and commercial potential

    OpenAIRE

    Frøyland, Caroline Jevanord

    2010-01-01

    Establishing the diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) with its two main sub forms Crohn‟s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative colitis (UC) are based on medical history, clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, endoscopy, radiology and histology. However no gold standard exists. The lack of appropriate diagnostic tools leads to delayed and incorrect treatment of IBD patients. A substantial amount of patients diagnosed as CD are later reclassified as UC and opposite. Also the...

  11. Rifaximin in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a role in promoting and maintaining inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), hence the rationale for the use of antibiotics in the treatment of those disorders. Antibiotics, however, may induce untoward effects, especially during long-term therapy. Rifaximin α polymer is an antibacterial agent that is virtually unabsorbed after oral administration and is devoid of systemic side effects. Rifaximin has provided promising results in inducing remission of Crohn’...

  12. Intestinal microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: Friend of foe?

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Francesca; Danese, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises from disruption of immune tolerance to the gut commensal microbiota, leading to chronic intestinal inflammation and mucosal damage in genetically predisposed hosts. In healthy individuals the intestinal microbiota have a symbiotic relationship with the host organism and possess important and unique functions, including a metabolic function (i.e. digestion of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, fermentation of undigestible carbohydrates with production of...

  13. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Montiel MP; Casis-Herce B; Gómez-Gómez GJ; Masedo-González A; Yela-San Bernardino C; Piedracoba C; Castellano-Tortajada G

    2015-01-01

    MP Martínez-Montiel, B Casis-Herce , GJ Gómez-Gómez, A Masedo-González, C Yela-San Bernardino, C Piedracoba, G Castellano-Tortajada Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with emphasis on random...

  14. Pharmacologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease refractory to steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Montiel, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    MP Martínez-Montiel, B Casis-Herce , GJ Gómez-Gómez, A Masedo-González, C Yela-San Bernardino, C Piedracoba, G Castellano-Tortajada Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Although corticosteroids are an effective treatment for induction of remission in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), many patients are dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids. This review is based on scrutinizing current literature with em...

  15. Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Associated Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mack, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing...

  16. Abnormalities of uterine cervix in women with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jyoti Bhatia; Panayota Kotsali; Oana Vele; Jason Bratcher; Burton Korelitz; Katherine Vakher; Shlomo Mannor; Maria Shevchuk; Gworgia Panagopoulos; Adam Ofer; Ecaterina Tamas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of abnormalities of the uterine cervix in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when compared to healthy controls.METHODS: One hundred and sixteen patients with IBD [64 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 52 with ulcerative colitis (UC)] were matched to 116 healthy controls by age (+/- 2 years) at the time of most recent papanicolaou (Pap) smear. Data collected consisted of age, race, marital status, number of pregnancies,abortions/miscarriages, duration and severity of IBD,Pap smear results within five years of enrollment, and treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. Pap smear results were categorized as normal or abnormal including atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL), and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL). RESULTS: The median age at the time of Pap smear was 46 (range: 17-74) years for the IBD group and matched controls (range: 19-72 years). There were more Caucasian subjects than other ethnicities in the IBD patient group (P = 0.025), as well as fewer abortions (P = 0.008), but there was no significant difference regarding marital status. Eighteen percent of IBD patients had abnormal Pap smears compared to 5% of controls (P = 0.004). Subgroup analysis of the IBD patients revealed no significant differences between CD and UC patients in age, ethnicity, marital status, number of abortions, disease severity, family history of IBD, or disease duration. No significant difference was observed in the number of abnormal Pap smears or the use of immunosuppressive medications between CD and UC patients (P = 0.793). No definitive observation could be made regarding HPV status, as this was not routinely investigated during the timeframe of our study.CONCLUSION: Diagnosis of IBD in women is related to an increased risk of abnormal Pap smear, while type of IBD and exposure to immunosuppressive medications are not. This has significant implications for

  17. Nutritional modulation of the inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease-From the molecular to the integrative to the clinical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both total parenteral and enteral nutrition provide important supportive therapy for IBD patients, but in adults these are not useful for primary therapy. Dietary intervention with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids contained in fish oil may be useful for the care of IBD patients, and recent studies have stressed the role of PPAR on NFκB activity on the potential beneficial effect of dietary lipids on intestinal function.

  18. A clinical review of recent findings in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponder A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alexis Ponder, Millie D LongDepartment of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, including both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are disorders of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract marked by episodes of relapse and remission. Over the past several decades, advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology of IBD. The incidence and prevalence of both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis have been increasing worldwide across pediatric and adult populations. As IBD is thought to be related to a combination of individual genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, and alterations in the gut microbiome that stimulate an inflammatory response, understanding the potentially modifiable environmental risk factors associated with the development or the course of IBD could impact disease rates or management in the future. Current hypotheses as to the development of IBD are reviewed, as are a host of environmental cofactors that have been investigated as both protective and inciting factors for IBD onset. Such environmental factors include breast feeding, gastrointestinal infections, urban versus rural lifestyle, medication exposures, stress, smoking, and diet. The role of these factors in disease course is also reviewed. Looking forward, there is still much to be learned about the etiology of IBD and how specific environmental exposures intimately impact the development of disease and also the potential for relapse.Keywords: clinical epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease, environmental risk factors

  19. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...... before. In this review, we report the current status of the proteomics IBD biomarkers and discuss various emerging proteomic strategies for identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, as well as suggesting future targets for analysis....

  20. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet;

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement...... available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library......, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia...

  1. Mesenchymal stromal cells and chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeri, M; Conforti, A; Pitisci, A; Starc, N; Tomao, L; Bernardo, M E; Locatelli, F

    2015-12-01

    Recent experimental findings have shown the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to home to damaged tissues and to produce paracrine factors with anti-inflammatory properties, potentially resulting in reduction of inflammation and functional recovery of the damaged tissues. Prompted by these intriguing properties and on the basis of encouraging preclinical data, MSCs are currently being studied in several immune-mediated disorders. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) represent a setting in which MSCs-based therapy has been extensively investigated. Phase I and II studies have documented the safety and feasibility of MSCs. However, efficacy results have so far been conflicting. In this review, we will discuss the biologic rationale that makes MSCs a promising therapeutic tool for IBD, and analyze recent experimental and clinical findings, highlighting current limitations and future perspectives of MSCs-related immunotherapy for IBD. PMID:26170204

  2. Vitamin D: new roles and therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raftery, Tara

    2012-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) encompasses 2 independent but related entities: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn\\'s disease. Crohn\\'s disease is characterised by transmural patchy inflammation which can involve any portion of the gastrointestinal tract. UC is characterised by superficial inflammation that begins in the rectum and extends proximally along the colon. In Europe, approximately 2.2 million people have a diagnosis of IBD. The aetiology of IBD is unknown, however, immune, environmental and genetic factors are thought to be involved. Individuals with IBD are at risk of developing osteoporosis. In line with this, there are clear guidelines that recommend vitamin D supplementation for IBD patients to prevent bone disease, especially when undergoing steroid treatment. Despite an established role for vitamin D in IBD, deficiency is common. More novel effects of vitamin D beyond bone are emerging. It is now well established that vitamin D is an important regulator of the immune system which may have implications for the development, severity and management of immune related disorders such as IBD. The efficacy of vitamin D as an immune modulator in IBD remains to be proven. This review aims to evaluate the evidence implicating vitamin D deficiency in IBD pathogenesis, to examine vitamin D\\'s anti-inflammatory mechanisms and to explore its therapeutic potential, optimal serum levels and dietary intakes which may support immune function in this disease.

  3. Clostridium difficile Carriage Rate in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosain Salari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Closteridium difficile is a gram positive, anaerobic and spore-forming bacillus. Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation of the intestinal mucosa in these patients can be as a risk factor for colonization of Clostridium difficile. The purpose of this study was to analysis of Clostridium difficile carriage in the IBD outpatients. Materials and methods: Stool specimens were obtained from 50 outpatients with IBD. Stools were cultured on selective media under anaerobic conditions. Filtered extract of bacteria was exposed to HeLa cell culture for analysis of toxin production after identification of Clostridium difficile isolates. Results: The results showed that 3 IBD patients (6% had stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile. Stool cultures were negative in all patients with Crohn's disease. All 3 patients had ulcerative colitis. Only one isolate was positive for toxin production. Conclusion: The ulcerated colitis than Crohn's patients had higher carriage. In general IBD outpatients carriage rates for Clostridium difficile was low.

  4. How to Diagnose and Treat IBD Mimics in the Refractory IBD Patient Who Does Not Have IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachu, Karen A; Osterman, Mark T

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract and includes both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients with IBD often present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding but may also have a wide variety of other symptoms such as weight loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, and possibly obstruction. Given that the presentation of IBD is not specific, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases, many of which can mimic and/or even coexist with IBD. It is important for physicians to differentiate symptoms due to refractory IBD from symptoms due to IBD mimics when a patient is not responding to standard IBD treatment. Many of the various IBD mimics include infectious etiologies (viral, bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, protozoal, and helminthic infections), vascular causes, other immune causes including autoimmune etiologies, drug-induced processes, radiation-induced, and other etiologies such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, diverticulitis, and bile acid malabsorption. Thoughtful consideration and evaluation of these potential etiologies through patient history and physical examination, as well as appropriate tests, endoscopic evaluation, and cross-sectional imaging is required to evaluate any patient presenting with symptoms consistent with IBD. PMID:26891261

  5. Rapid fecal calprotectin testing to assess for endoscopic disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease: A diagnostic cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasz Kwapisz; Mahmoud Mosli; Nilesh Chande; Brian Yan; Melanie Beaton; Jessica Micsko; Mennill, Pauline W.; William Barnett; Kevin Bax; Terry Ponich; John Howard; Anthony Tirolese; Robert Lannigan; James Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: With increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to identify noninvasive methods of detecting disease activity. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy of fecal rapid calprotectin (FC) testing in the detection of endoscopically active IBD. Patients and Methods: All consecutive patients presenting to outpatient clinics with lower gastrointestinal symptoms were prospectively recruited. Patients provided ...

  6. Diet therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases: The established and the new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durchschein, Franziska; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Hammer, Heinz F

    2016-02-21

    Although patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have a strong interest in dietary modifications as part of their therapeutic management, dietary advice plays only a minor part in published guidelines. The scientific literature shows that dietary factors might influence the risk of developing IBD, that dysbiosis induced by nutrition contributes to the pathogenesis of IBD, and that diet may serve as a symptomatic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms in IBD. The role of nutrition in IBD is underscored by the effect of various dietary therapies. In paediatric patients with Crohn's disease (CD) enteral nutrition (EN) reaches remission rates similar to steroids. In adult patients, however, EN is inferior to corticosteroids. EN is not effective in ulcerative colitis (UC). Total parenteral nutrition in IBD is not superior to steroids or EN. The use of specific probiotics in patients with IBD can be recommended only in special clinical situations. There is no evidence for efficacy of probiotics in CD. By contrast, studies in UC have shown a beneficial effect in selected patients. For patients with pouchitis, antibiotic treatment followed by probiotics, like VSL#3 or Lactobacillus GG, is effective. When probiotics are used, the risk of bacterial translocation and subsequent bacteremia has to be considered. More understanding of the normal intestinal microflora, and better characterization of probiotic strains at the phenotypic and genomic levels is needed as well as clarification of the mechanisms of action in different clinical settings. A FODMAP reduced diet may improve symptoms in IBD. PMID:26900283

  7. Can exercise affect the course of inflammatory bowel disease? Experimental and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilski, Jan; Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka; Brzozowski, Bartosz; Magierowski, Marcin; Zahradnik-Bilska, Janina; Wójcik, Dagmara; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Mach, Tomasz; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are defined as idiopathic, chronic and relapsing intestinal disorders occurring in genetically predisposed individuals exposed to environmental risk factors such as diet and microbiome changes. Since conventional drug therapy is expensive and not fully efficient, there is a need for alternative remedies that can improve the outcome in patients suffering from IBD. Whether exercise, which has been proposed as adjunct therapy in IBD, can be beneficial in patients with IBD remains an intriguing question. In this review, we provide an overview of the effects of exercise on human IBD and experimental colitis in animal models that mimic human disease, although the information on exercise in human IBD are sparse and poorly understood. Moderate exercise can exert a beneficial ameliorating effect on IBD and improve the healing of experimental animal colitis due to the activity of protective myokines such as irisin released from working skeletal muscles. CD patients with higher levels of exercise were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. Moreover, voluntary exercise has been shown to exert a positive effect on IBD patients' mood, weight maintenance and osteoporosis. On the other hand, depending on its intensity and duration, exercise can evoke transient mild systemic inflammation and enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine release, thereby exacerbating the gastrointestinal symptoms. We discuss recent advances in the mechanism of voluntary and strenuous exercise affecting the outcome of IBD in patients and experimental animal models. PMID:27255494

  8. Does pregnancy change the disease course? A study in a European cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, L; Vind, Ida; Politi, P; Wolters, F; Vermeire, S; Tsianos, E; Freitas, J; Mouzas, I; Ruiz Ochoa, V; O'Morain, C; Odes, S; Binder, V; Moum, B; Stockbrugger, R; Langholz, E; Munkholm, P; European Collaborative study group on Inflammatory Bowel disease, NN

    2006-01-01

    %, p = 0.005), whereas elective abortion was not significantly different. 48.6% of the patients took medication at the time of conception and 46.9% during pregnancy. The use of cesarean section increased after IBD diagnosis (8.1% vs 28.7% of pregnancies). CD patients pregnant during the disease course......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often affects patients in their fertile age. The aim of this study was to describe pregnancy outcome in a European cohort of IBD patients. As data are limited regarding the effect of pregnancy on disease course, our second objective was to...... investigate whether pregnancy influences disease course and phenotype in IBD patients. METHODS: In a European cohort of IBD patients, a 10-yr follow-up was performed by scrutinizing patient files and approaching the patients with a questionnaire. The cohort comprised 1,125 patients, of whom 543 were women...

  9. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Vezza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects.

  10. Risk of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease among offspring of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, Marianne; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    ) and Crohn's disease (CD) among first-degree relatives of patients with these diseases. To give more precise risk estimates we conducted a nationwide study using population-based data from the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP). METHODS: All patients from the entire Danish population (5......OBJECTIVE: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) varies among and within countries, but several studies have indicated that genetic factors may play an important role in the etiology of IBD. A Danish regional study has observed an almost 10-fold increased risk for ulcerative colitis (UC...

  11. Etiology of inflammatory bowel disease: A unified hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofa Qin

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD),including both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD),emerged and dramatically increased for about a century.Despite extensive research,its cause remains regarded as unknown.About a decade ago,a series of findings made me suspect that saccharin may be a key causative factor for IBD,through its inhibition on gut bacteria and the resultant impaired inactivation of digestive proteases and over digestion of the mucus layer and gut barrier (the Bacteria-Protease-Mucus-Barrier hypothesis).It explained many puzzles in IBD such as its emergence and temporal changes in last century.Recently I further found evidence suggesting sucralose may be also linked to IBD through a similar mechanism as saccharin and have contributed to the recent worldwide increase of IBD.This new hypothesis suggests that UC and CD are just two symptoms of the same morbidity,rather than two different diseases.They are both caused by a weakening in gut barrier and only differ in that UC is mainly due to increased infiltration of gut bacteria and the resultant recruitment of neutrophils and formation of crypt abscess,while CD is mainly due to increased infiltration of antigens and particles from gut lumen and the resultant recruitment of macrophages and formation of granulomas.It explained the delayed appearance but accelerated increase of CD over UC and many other phenomena.This paper aims to provide a detailed description of a unified hypothesis regarding the etiology of IBD,including the cause and mechanism of IBD,as well as the relationship between UC and CD.

  12. Genome-wide peripheral blood leukocyte DNA methylation microarrays identified a single association with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, R Alan; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Pedersen, Natalia; Opekun, Antone; Bronsky, Jiri; Munkholm, Pia; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Andersen, PaalSkytt; Melegh, Bela; Ferry, George; Jess, Tine; Kellermayer, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance rates and epidemiologic data implicate that environmental changes and epigenetic factors may play a pathogenic role in IBD. DNA methylation (the methylation of ...... cytosines within CpG dinucleotides) is an epigenetic modification, which can respond to environmental influences. We investigated whether DNA methylation might be connected with IBD in peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) DNA by utilizing genome-wide microarrays.......Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance rates and epidemiologic data implicate that environmental changes and epigenetic factors may play a pathogenic role in IBD. DNA methylation (the methylation of...

  13. The vitamin D status in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Elizabeth Veit

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: There is no consensus on the vitamin D status of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. AIM: To determine the vitamin D status of patients with IBD by comparing their serum 25(OHD concentration to that of healthy controls. HYPOTHESIS: Serum 25(OHD concentration will be lower in patients with IBD compared to controls. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A case-controlled retrospective study of subjects with IBD (n = 58 of 2-20 years (male n = 31, age 16.38±2.21 years; female n = 27, age 16.56±2.08 years and healthy controls (n = 116; male n = 49, age 13.90±4.59 years; female n = 67, age 15.04±4.12 years. Study subject inclusion criteria: diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OHD of (<20 ng/mL (<50 nmol/L, overweight as BMI of ≥85th but <95th percentile, and obesity as BMI ≥95th percentile. Data were expressed as mean ± SD. RESULTS: Patients with CD, UC, and their controls had mean serum 25(OHD concentrations of 61.69±24.43 nmol/L, 53.26±25.51, and 65.32±27.97 respectively (ANOVA, p = 0.196. The overweight/obese controls had significantly lower 25(OHD concentration compared to the normal-weight controls (p = 0.031; whereas 25(OHD concentration was similar between the normal-weight and overweight/obese IBD patients (p = 0.883. There was no difference in 25(OHD between patients with UC and CD, or between subjects with active IBD and controls. However, IBD subjects with elevated ESR had significantly lower 25(OHD than IBD subjects with normal ESR (p = 0.025, as well as controls (65.3±28.0 nmol/L vs. 49.5±25.23, p = 0.045. CONCLUSION: There is no difference in mean serum 25(OHD concentration between children and adolescents with IBD and controls. However, IBD subjects with elevated ESR have significantly lower 25(OHD than controls. Therefore, IBD subjects with elevated ESR should be monitored for vitamin D

  14. Nanoparticle-based imaging of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingwei; Briley, Karen; Tao, Xiaofeng

    2016-03-01

    Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been extensively studied, the pathogenesis is still not completely understood. As a result, the treatment options remain unsatisfactory and nonspecific. With the rapid advancement of diagnostic imaging techniques, imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are playing a more important role in IBD diagnosis and evaluation. Recent developments in nanotechnology utilize an interdisciplinary approach to specifically target molecular or cellular IBD pathological process thereby generating nanoparticles (NPs) with high specificity and diagnostic and/or therapeutic efficacy. Nano-based imaging, which incorporates nanotechnology and imaging modalities, may allow for the early detection of IBD, the monitoring of disease activity, and may be used to monitor the therapeutic response at cellular and/or molecular level. In this review, we highlight issues related to nano-based imaging and its application in IBD field. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:300-315. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1357 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26371464

  15. Risk factors for osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carla; Andrade; Lima; Andre; Castro; Lyra; Raquel; Rocha; Genoile; Oliveira; Santana

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) patients exhibit higher risk for bone loss than the general population. The chronic inflammation causes a reduction in bone mineral density(BMD), which leads to osteopenia and osteoporosis. This article reviewed each risk factor for osteoporosis in IBD patients. Inflammation is one of the factors that contribute to osteoporosis in IBD patients, and the main system that is involved in bone loss is likely RANK/RANKL/osteoprotegerin. Smoking is a risk factor for bone loss and fractures, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain this loss. Body composition also interferes in bone metabolism and increasing muscle mass may positively affect BMD. IBD patients frequently use corticosteroids, which stimulates osteoclastogenesis. IBD patients are also associated with vitamin D deficiency, which contributes to bone loss. However, infliximab therapy is associated with improvements in bone metabolism, but it is not clear whether the effects are because of inflammation improvement or infliximab use. Ulcerative colitis patients with proctocolectomy and ileal pouches and Crohn’s disease patients with ostomy are also at risk for bone loss, and these patients should be closely monitored.

  16. Host-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K;

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate phenot...

  17. Risk factors and gene polymorphisms of inflammatory bowel disease in population of Zhejiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Wei Wang; Feng Ji; Wei-Jun Teng; Xiao-Gang Yuan; Xiao-Ming Ye

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To identify the risk factors and three single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)of NOD2 /CARD15 gene in inflammatory bowel disease(IBD)of the population in Zhejiang,China.METHODS:A case-control study was conducted using recall questionnaire to collect data on demographic,socioeconomic,lifestyle characteristics and dietary behaviors from 136 determined IBD patients and 136 paired healthy controls.COX regression method was used to screen the statistically significant risk factors for IBD.The polymorphisms of NOD2 /CARD15 gene Arg702Trp ,Gly908Arg and Leu1007fsinsC were genotyped and further compared between 60 patients with IBD and 60 healthy controls by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism.RESULTS:IBD occurred primarily in young and middle- aged people.The mean age for IBD patients was 42.6 years.The ratio of males to females was 1.23:1.COX regression indicated a higher statistical significance in milk,fried food and stress compared with the other postulated risk factors for IBD.None of the patients with IBD and healthy controls had heterozygous or homozygous SNPs variants.CONCLUSION:Milk,fried food and stress are associated with increased risk of IBD.The common variants in NOD2 /CARD15 gene are not associated with IBD in China's Zhejiang population.

  18. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile diarrhea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ramos-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the growing incidence of Clostridium difficile diarrhea (CCD in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, little is known about the associated risk factors. Method: A retrospective study comparing cases of CCD in patients with IBD to IBD carriers who did not develop CCD. A comparison was also made with patients who developed CCD but did not suffer IBD. Results: Three cases (20 % with IBD and CCD had received antibiotics during the previous three months versus none of the controls (IBD without CCD, p = 0.22. Ten cases (67 % received treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs versus 2 (13 % in the control group (IBD without CCD, p = 0.001. Seven cases underwent colonoscopy and pseudomembranes were seen in one (14 %. Fourteen (93 % patients demonstrated a favourable response to metronidazole. Patients with IBD and CCD presented with younger age (36 ± 10 years, a higher degree of community-acquired infection (13 patients, 87 %, immunosuppressive treatment (7 patients, 47 % and less patients had received previous antibiotic treatment (3 patients, 20 % than those with CCD without IBD. The proportion of patients who received treatment with PPIs was similar (66 % and 80 %, respectively p = 0.266. Conclusions: CCD in IBD carriers affects younger patients, the majority are community acquired (less nosocomial and it is more related to previous treatment with PPIs than with the antibiotic treatment. Clinical evolution is also favourable.

  19. Emerging Biomarkers for the Diagnosis and Monitoring of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubières, Anet A; Poullis, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    There is currently no single test available to confidently diagnose cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Physicians rely on a number of diagnostic tools, including clinical evaluation, serum testing, and imaging, which are used on conjunction with endoscopic evaluation. It is often difficult to determine whether patients with abdominal pain and change in bowel habit have functional bowel symptoms or whether they have a true diagnosis of IBD. Even once a diagnosis of IBD has been made, a significant proportion of patients are labeled with the term "indeterminate colitis" where histological sampling cannot confidently subclassify patients as either Crohn's or ulcerative colitis. Colonoscopy is an inconvenient and uncomfortable test for most patients. In addition, it is not without serious risks of perforation, as well as risks which can be associated with sedation and analgesia given during the procedure. The use of biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis, subclassification, and monitoring of IBD is an ever expanding area. In this review, we have concentrated on noninvasive biomarkers of IBD, because these are more acceptable to patients and easier to perform in everyday clinical practice. We will first touch on those biomarkers currently well established and in wide clinical use, such as C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Faecal calprotectin and their use in the diagnosis of IBD. Following on, we will review more novel biomarkers and their use in subclassification and monitoring of IBD, including a variety of antibodies, genetics, and microRNAs, as well as touching on metabolomics. PMID:27416044

  20. Vitamin D as a novel therapy in inflammatory bowel disease: new hope or false dawn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Maria

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing scientific interest in the field of vitamin D research, moving the focus beyond bone health to other disease processes. Low circulating vitamin D levels have been reported as a risk factor for several pathophysiologically divergent diseases, including cancers, diabetes, CVD, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). But, therein, remains the challenge: can any single nutrient contribute to multiple complex disease mechanisms and, ultimately, have therapeutic potential? The aim of this review is to critically evaluate several strands of scientific evidence surrounding vitamin D and inflammation, primarily focusing on IBD. Epidemiological studies suggest an increased incidence of IBD and rheumatoid arthritis in countries of more northern latitudes, mirroring sunlight patterns. A considerable body of evidence supports the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin D, at least in animal models of IBD. Although it is accepted that suboptimal vitamin D status is common in IBD, some studies suggest that this associates with more severe disease. With regard to treatment, the data are only beginning to emerge from randomised controlled trials to suggest that people with IBD may remain in remission longer when treated with oral vitamin D. In conclusion, several strands of evidence suggest that vitamin D may modify the immune response in IBD. There is a continued need for large well-designed clinical trials and mechanistic studies to determine if, and how, this emerging promise translates into tangible clinical benefits for people with chronic debilitating diseases such as IBD. PMID:25490986

  1. Molecular strategies for the detection of measles virus in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Hypotheses. i) Atypical exposure to measles virus is a factor in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). ii) Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination is a factor in the aetiology of autistic enteropathy. Aims. i) To compare a range of molecular techniques for measles RNA amplification. ii) To develop a sensitive and robust method for the detection of measles RNA. iii) To analyse clinical samples from IBD patients for the presence of measles RNA. iv) To analyse...

  2. IBDsite: a Galaxy-interacting, integrative database for supporting inflammatory bowel disease high throughput data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) refer to a group of inflammatory conditions concerning colon and small intestine, which cause socially uncomfortable symptoms and often are associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. IBD are complex disorders, which rely on genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, deregulation of the immune system, and host relationship with commensal microbiota. The complexity of these pathologies makes difficult to clearly understand the mechanisms ...

  3. Insufficient Knowledge of Korean Gastroenterologists Regarding the Vaccination of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Park, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims There is an increased risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to develop infections due to the use of immunomodulators and biologics. Several infections are preventable by immunizations. This study investigated the knowledge and awareness of Korean gastroenterologists regarding the vaccination of patients with IBD. Methods A self-reported questionnaire was sent by e-mail to the faculty members of tertiary hospitals. Gastroenterologists were asked ten questions regar...

  4. Feasibility of an optimized MR enterography protocol in the evaluation of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bosemani, T; Ozturk, A.; Tekes, A.; Hemker, MO; Huisman, TAGM

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging forms an important alternative and complimentary tool to endoscopy in aiding the clinician with diagnosis and management of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of an optimized Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MRE) protocol in the evaluation of patients with suspected IBD. 31 children (18 boys and 13 girls) were evaluated by a pediatric gastroenterologist prior to MRE and given a grading for clinical sever...

  5. Pharmacogenetics of azathioprine in inflammatory bowel disease: A role for glutathione-S-transferase?

    OpenAIRE

    Stocco, Gabriele; Pelin, Marco; Franca, Raffaella; De Iudicibus, Sara; Cuzzoni, Eva; Favretto, Diego; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Decorti, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Azathioprine is a purine antimetabolite drug commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vivo it is active after reaction with reduced glutathione (GSH) and conversion to mercaptopurine. Although this reaction may occur spontaneously, the presence of isoforms M and A of the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) may increase its speed. Indeed, in pediatric patients with IBD, deletion of GST-M1, which determines reduced enzymatic activity, was recently associated with reduced s...

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease: a paradigm for the link between coagulation and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Hideo; Granger, D. Neil

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with platelet activation and an increased risk for thromboembolism. While the mechanisms that underlie the altered platelet function and hypercoagulable state in IBD remain poorly understood, emerging evidence indicates that inflammation and coagulation are inter-dependent processes that can initiate a vicious cycle wherein each process propagates and intensifies the other. This review addresses the mechanisms that may account for the mutual ac...

  7. Diet and nutritional factors in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarek, Danuta; Rodacki, Tomasz; Domagała-Rodacka, Renata; Cibor, Dorota; Mach, Tomasz

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) development is affected by complex interactions between environmental factors, changes in intestinal flora, various predisposing genetic properties and changes in the immune system. Dietary factors seem to play an underestimated role in the etiopathogenesis and course of the disease. However, research about food and IBD is conflicting. An excessive consumption of sugar, animal fat and linoleic acid is considered a risk factor for IBD development, whereas a high fiber diet and citrus fruit consumption may play a protective role. Also, appropriate nutrition in particular periods of the disease may facilitate achieving or prolonging remissions and most of all, improve the quality of life for patients. During disease exacerbation, a low fiber diet is recommended for most patients. In the remission time, an excessive consumption of alcohol and sulfur products may have a negative effect on the disease course. Attempts are also made at employing diets composed in detail in order to supplement IBD therapy. A diet with a modified carbohydrate composition, a semi-vegetarian diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols are under investigation. Due to chronic inflammation as well as side effects of chronically used medications, patients with IBD are also at increased risk of nutritional factor deficiencies, including iron, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium and vitamin A. It should also be remembered that there is no single common diet suitable for all IBD patients; each of them is unique and dietary recommendations must be individually developed for each patient, depending on the course of the disease, past surgical procedures and type of pharmacotherapy. PMID:26811635

  8. Inflammatory bowel diseases: Current problems and future tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni; C; Actis; Floriano; Rosina; Rinaldo; Pellicano

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge on inflammatory bowel disease(IBD)is mainly endorsed by controlled trials and epidemiologic studies. Yet,we seldom look at the messages from real-world practice. Among a patient population followed since2008,we looked at an unselected sample of 64 IBD patients [26 Crohn’s disease(CD) and 38 ulcerative colitis(UC)] who had been seen as out-patients in the last year.Inducing remission,mesalamines(86% for UC/69% for CD/33%-16% as MMX formulation) prevailed as prescrip-tions; steroids(55%/19% for UC/CD) ranked second.Prescription of third-party drugs(antibiotics,NSAIDs,biologics) and adherence,were issues in the maintenance.34% of CD,and 23% of UC patients showed accompany-ing immunologic diseases: CD-associated familiar psoriasis(4:9) ranked first. Main Message. The association between IBD(CD mainly) and psoriasis,now found in our practice,matches current basic science gathering IBD together with psoriasis(and perhaps chronic respiratory disease) under the comprehensive term "barrier organ disease" wherein an epithelial surface with sensor system srules contacts between outer antigens and a reactive underneath tissue,with the balance between inflammation and quiescence kept at any time by mucosal permeability.IBD is thus viewed as a polyfactorial/polygenic/syndromic disorder,embedded into a galaxy of immune conditions offering multiple points of attack. This mindset of splitting the IBDs into pathogenic categories may allow overcoming the uniformly targeting of a single cytokine by biological drugs,in favor of demarcating the boundaries between different disease-subtype-specific indications,and paving the way to future personalized strategies.

  9. Inflammatory bowel diseases: Current problems and future tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Giovanni C; Pellicano, Rinaldo; Rosina, Floriano

    2014-08-01

    Current knowledge on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is mainly endorsed by controlled trials and epidemiologic studies. Yet, we seldom look at the messages from real-world practice. Among a patient population followed since 2008, we looked at an unselected sample of 64 IBD patients [26 Crohn's disease (CD) and 38 ulcerative colitis (UC)] who had been seen as out-patients in the last year. Inducing remission, mesalamines (86% for UC/69% for CD/33%-16% as MMX formulation) prevailed as prescriptions; steroids (55%/19% for UC/CD) ranked second. Prescription of third-party drugs (antibiotics, NSAIDs, biologics) and adherence, were issues in the maintenance. 34% of CD, and 23% of UC patients showed accompanying immunologic diseases: CD-associated familiar psoriasis (4:9) ranked first. Main Message. The association between IBD (CD mainly) and psoriasis, now found in our practice, matches current basic science gathering IBD together with psoriasis (and perhaps chronic respiratory disease) under the comprehensive term "barrier organ disease" wherein an epithelial surface with sensor systems rules contacts between outer antigens and a reactive underneath tissue, with the balance between inflammation and quiescence kept at any time by mucosal permeability. IBD is thus viewed as a polyfactorial/polygenic/syndromic disorder, embedded into a galaxy of immune conditions offering multiple points of attack. This mindset of splitting the IBDs into pathogenic categories may allow overcoming the uniformly targeting of a single cytokine by biological drugs, in favor of demarcating the boundaries between different disease-subtype-specific indications, and paving the way to future personalized strategies. PMID:25133045

  10. Increased prevalence of Methanosphaera stadtmanae in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Blais Lecours

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gut microbiota is associated with the modulation of mucosal immunity and the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Previous studies focused on the impact of bacterial species on IBD but seldom suspected archaea, which can be a major constituent of intestinal microbiota, to be implicated in the diseases. Recent evidence supports that two main archaeal species found in the digestive system of humans, Methanobrevibacter smithii (MBS and Methanosphaera stadtmanae (MSS can have differential immunogenic properties in lungs of mice; with MSS but not MBS being a strong inducer of the inflammatory response. We thus aimed at documenting the immunogenic potential of MBS and MSS in humans and to explore their association with IBD. METHODS: To validate the immunogenicity of MBS and MSS in humans, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects were stimulated with these two microorganisms and the production of inflammatory cytokine TNF was measured by ELISA. To verify MBS and MSS prevalence in IBD, stool samples from 29 healthy control subjects and 29 patients suffering from IBD were collected for DNA extraction. Plasma was also collected from these subjects to measure antigen-specific IgGs by ELISA. Quantitative PCR was used for bacteria, methanogens, MBS and MSS quantification. RESULTS: Mononuclear cells stimulated with MSS produced higher concentrations of TNF (39.5 ng/ml compared to MBS stimulation (9.1 ng/ml. Bacterial concentrations and frequency of MBS-containing stools were similar in both groups. However, the number of stool samples positive for the inflammatory archaea MSS was higher in patients than in controls (47% vs 20%. Importantly, only IBD patients developed a significant anti-MSS IgG response. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of MSS is increased in IBD patients and is associated with an antigen-specific IgG response.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease in the 21(st) century in China: turning challenges into opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qin; Xue, Lin Yun

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been an international hot spot for research for a long period of time. In China, the prevalence of IBD is rapidly increasing in recent years, mimicking the same fast growing footsteps of the developed world. Chinese literature of the 20(th) century shows that the total number of IBD cases increased by approximately 2.5-fold over the previous decade, in particular a 15.7-fold in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Articles on basic research have increased 4.3-fold, with a particular 9.9-fold increase on immunological mechanisms. The predominantly Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) related clinical trials implied tendency to use a combination of Western Medicine and TCM in the management of Chinese IBD patients. IBD research and collaborations overseas have been markedly promoted since the Chinese Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (COIBD) was founded at the beginning of the 21(st) century. From the second decade of the century onwards, we need to focus on the research hot spots to catch up with the rapid advances worldwide. Big challenges and present achievements provide us with great opportunities for further developments of the study on IBD. The development of some novel target pathogenic factors of the disease will provide us with more effective roll for modern management and optimistic treatment of IBD during this century. PMID:22435503

  12. Role of imaging in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease: How much is too much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kelly; Rubesova, Erika; Bass, Dorsey

    2016-02-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a lifelong condition with waxing and waning disease course that requires reassessment of disease status as well as screening for complications throughout a patient's lifetime. Laboratory testing, endoscopic assessment, and fecal biomarkers are often used in the initial diagnosis and ongoing monitoring of a patient with IBD. Imaging plays an integral role in the diagnosis and evaluation of IBD. Different imaging modalities can be used over the course of a patient's lifetime, from the initial screening and diagnosis of IBD, to determining the extent of intestinal involvement, monitoring for disease activity, and evaluating for complications of uncontrolled IBD. The various imaging modalities available to the provider each have a unique set of risks and benefits when considering cost, radiation exposure, need for anesthesia, and image quality. In this article we review the imaging techniques available for the evaluation of IBD including fluoroscopic small bowel follow-through, computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and transabdominal ultrasound with particular focus on the judicious use of imaging and the risks and benefits of each option. We also review the risks of ionizing radiation, strategies to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, and current imaging guidelines among pediatric and adult patient with IBD. PMID:26981221

  13. Clinical outcomes at 12 months and risk of inflammatory bowel disease in patients with an intermediate raised fecal calprotectin: a ‘real-world’ view

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Michael; Chambers, Samantha; Malik, Ahmad; Lee, Bee; Sung, Edmond; Nwokolo, Chuka; Waugh, Norman; Arasaradnam, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A recent systematic review confirmed the usefulness of fecal calprotectin (FC) in distinguishing organic (inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) from non-organic gastrointestinal disease (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)). FC levels 92% to exclude organic gastrointestinal (GI) disease. Levels >250 μg/g correlate with endoscopic IBD disease activity; sensitivity 90%. We aimed to determine clinical outcomes in intermediate raised FC results (50–250 μg/g). Setting Primary care general practi...

  14. Thrombosis and inflammatory bowel disease-the role of genetic risk factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgia Tsiolakidou; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2008-01-01

    Thromboembolism is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel dis-ease (IBD). Recent data suggest thromboembolism as a disease-specific extraintestinal manifestation of IBD,which is developed as the result of multiple interac-tions between acquired and genetic risk factors. There is evidence indicating an imbalance of procoagulant,anticoagulant and fibrinolitic factors predisposing in thrombosis in patients with IBD. The genetic factors that have been suggested to interfere in the thrombotic manifestations of IBD include factor V Leiden, factor Ⅱ (prothrombin, G20210A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation (MTHFR, 6777T), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) gene mutation and fac-tor ⅩⅢ (va1341eu). In this article we review the current data and future prospects on the role of genetic risk factors in the development of thromboembolism in IBD.

  15. Role of the intracellular receptor domain of gp130 (exon 17) in human inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph J. Auernhammer; Thomas Ochsenkühn; Kathrin Zitzmann; Fabian Schnitzler; Julia Seiderer; Peter Lohse; George Vlotides; Dieter Engelhardt; Michael Sackmann; Burkhard G(o)ke

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of the intracellular receptor domain of gp130 in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We amplified and sequenced the complete exon 17 of the human gp130 gene in 146 patients with IBD. According to clinical and histopathological signs,the 146 patients with IBD were classified as having Crohn's disease (n = 73) or ulcerative colitis (n = 63),or as indeterminate status (n = 10).RESULTS: No mutations in exon 17 of the gp130 gene could be detected in any of the 146 patients with IBD examined.CONCLUSION: There is no evidence that mutations in exon 17 of the gp130 gene are involved in the pathogenesis of human IBD.

  16. Current roles of specific bacteria in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy McMullen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of alterations in gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD remains unclear. Currently there is conflicting evidence with regards to the roles of specific bacterial species. Escherichia coli (particularly the adherent invasive strain are more prevalent in those with IBD and are associated with higher risk of IBD. However, the organisms are also present in healthy individuals and colonisation does not correlate with the degree of inflammation in IBD. Campylobacter concisus is more prevalent in those with IBD and higher levels of C. concisus specific IgG antibodies are found in the serum of those with IBD compared to healthy controls. Further, C. concisus has immunogenic properties that stimulate an antibody response suggesting the bacteria might trigger or exacerbate disease. Conversely most mycobacteria are unlikely to be causative as they are not presentin microbial stool cultures early in disease. In various studies,Mycobacterium aviumparatuberculosishas been detected both more frequently and not at all in individuals with Crohn's disease. Similar conflict exists with respect to Yersinia enterocolitica,Bacteroidesvulgatus and Helicobacter hepaticus, which are also more prevalent in IBD. However, these organisms appear more likely to contribute to disease persistence than initial disease development. This review aims to summarise the current understanding of key bacterial species implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  17. Clinicians’ Guide to the Use of Fecal Calprotectin to Identify and Monitor Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bressler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Objective monitoring of the severity of inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an essential part of disease management. However, repeat endoscopy to define extent and severity of inflammation is not practical. Fecal calprotectin (FC is a biomarker that can be used as a surrogate test to distinguish inflammatory from noninflammatory gastrointestinal disease.

  18. Isotretinoin exposure and risk of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtak, Shadi; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Pittelkow, Mark R; Larson, Joseph J; Lahr, Brian D; Murray, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Isotretinoin is the standard treatment for refractory severe nodulocystic acne.A true association between prior isotretinoin use and development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is uncertain. Addressing the reality of this association is important in decision making for both the clinician and the patient when isotretinoin treatment is indicated.OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of IBD mainly in patients with acne with and without isotretinoin exposure.DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In this retrospective, single-center study, the electronic medical records of patients who were primarily seeking acne treatment were reviewed for isotretinoin exposure. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes were used to search for IBD diagnosis. participants included 1078 patients from 1995 to 2011,with isotretinoin referenced in their medical records, and who had ongoing local medical care defined as having had a serum sample collected between 2006 to 2011 for any reason while an Olmsted County, Minnesota, resident at the time of serum sample collection.EXPOSURES The exposed group included the patients with confirmed prior isotretinoin exposure (n = 576), and the nonexposed group were defined as patients who never received isotretinoin or received it after the diagnosis of IBD (n = 502).MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Risk of IBD among isotretinoin-exposed vs non exposed patients.RESULTS Both groups were comparable by race, prior systemic antibiotic use, and systemic tetracycline use. Inflammatory bowel disease developed less frequently in the isotretinoin-exposed group vs the nonexposed group (0.9%vs 2.6%; P = .03; unadjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.33; 95%CI, 0.12-0.93; P = .04). The negative association between isotretinoin exposure and IBD remained after adjusting for sex (OR, 0.28; 95%CI, 0.10-0.80;P = .02) and for sex and non acne indication (OR, 0.28; 95%CI, 0.10-0.79; P = .02).CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our study did not show an increased risk

  19. Vitamin D and gastrointestinal diseases: inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Raman, Maitreyi; Milestone, Andrew N.; Walters, Julian R.F.; Hart, Ailsa L.; Ghosh, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a rapid resurgence of interest in vitamin D outside of its traditional role in metabolic bone disease. Some nontraditional roles ascribed to vitamin D include anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects. These effects have led to possible implications in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated diseases including multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to higher rates of cancers inclu...

  20. Review article: the role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechota-Polanczyk, Aleksandra; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-07-01

    In this review, we focus on the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer and discuss free radicals and free radical-stimulated pathways as pharmacological targets for anti-IBD drugs. We also suggest novel anti-oxidative agents, which may become effective and less-toxic alternatives in IBD and colitis-associated colorectal cancer treatment. A Medline search was performed to identify relevant bibliography using search terms including: 'free radicals,' 'antioxidants,' 'oxidative stress,' 'colon cancer,' 'ulcerative colitis,' 'Crohn's disease,' 'inflammatory bowel disease.' Several therapeutics commonly used in IBD treatment, among which are immunosuppressants, corticosteroids and anti-TNF-α antibodies, could also affect the IBD progression by interfering with cellular oxidative stress and cytokine production. Experimental data shows that these drugs may effectively scavenge free radicals, increase anti-oxidative capacity of cells, influence multiple signalling pathways, e.g. MAPK and NF-kB, and inhibit pro-oxidative enzyme and cytokine concentration. However, their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effectiveness still needs further investigation. A highly specific antioxidative activity may be important for the clinical treatment and relapse of IBD. In the future, a combination of currently used pharmaceutics, together with natural and synthetic anti-oxidative compounds, like lipoic acid or curcumine, could be taken into account in the design of novel anti-IBD therapies. PMID:24798211

  1. Colorectal cancer and dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman, Timothy L; Rubin, David T

    2008-05-01

    Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease carry an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Established risk factors for cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include the younger age at diagnosis, greater extent and duration of disease, increased severity of inflammation, family history of colorectal cancer and coexisting primary sclerosing cholangitis. Recent evidence suggests that current medical therapies and surgical techniques for inflammatory bowel disease may be reducing the incidence of this complication. Nonetheless heightened vigilance and a careful, comprehensive approach to prevent or minimize the complications of invasive cancer are warranted in this unique cohort of patients. Current guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cancer in this high risk population are grounded in the concept of an inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. A thorough understanding of the definition and natural history of dysplasia in IBD, as well as the challenges associated with detection and interpretation of dysplasia are fundamental to developing an effective strategy for surveillance and prevention, and understanding the limitations of the current approach to prevention. This article reviews the current consensus guidelines for screening and surveillance of cancer in IBD, as well as presenting the evidence and rationale for chemoprevention of cancer and a discussion of emerging technologies for the detection of dysplasia. PMID:18461651

  2. Colorectal cancer and dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy L Zisman; David T Rubin

    2008-01-01

    Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease carry an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer.Established risk factors for cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include the younger age at diagnosis,greater extent and duration of disease,increased severity of inflammation,family history of colorectal cancer and coexisting primary sclerosing cholangitis.Recent evidence suggests that current medical therapies and surgical techniques for inflammatory bowel disease may be reducing the incidence of this complication.Nonetheless heightened vigilance and a careful,comprehensive approach to prevent or minimize the complications of invasive cancer are warranted in this unique cohort of patients.Current guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cancer in this high risk population are grounded in the concept of an inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence.A thorough understanding of the definition and natural history of dysplasia in IBD,as well as the challenges associated with detection and interpretation of dysplasia are fundamental to developing an effective strategy for surveillance and prevention,and understanding the limitations of the current approach to prevention.This article reviews the current consensus guidelines for screening and surveillance of cancer in IBD,as well as presenting the evidence and rationale for chemoprevention of cancer and a discussion of emerging technologies for the detection of dysplasia.

  3. Prospective study of immunological factors in non-inflammatory bowel disease enterocutaneous fistulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warusavitarne Janindra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterocutaneous fistulas (ECF are debilitating and usually result following complex abdominal surgery. While there is an association with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, a large number of fistulas occur after surgery not related to IBD. The consequences of ECF include short bowel syndrome and the need for long term parenteral nutrition. ECF can heal spontaneously and in the case of IBD can be cured by medical therapy in some instances. Those that do not resolve spontaneously have to be cured by surgery which is complex and associated with a high morbidity. It is not considered traditional treatment to use the same medical therapy as in IBD to cure ECF caused by other conditions. A small case series has reported three patients with persistent ECF not related to IBD to have healed following use of Infliximab which is the treatment commonly used for ECF caused by IBD. Infliximab acts by inhibiting the activity of the inflammatory cytokine TNF- alpha. It is not known if this cytokine is present in ECF tissue in the absence of IBD. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the presence of inflammatory markers in tissue surrounding non-IBD ECF and in particular to quantify the presence of the cytokine TNF- alpha. We hypothesise that TNF - alpha levels are raised in non-IBD ECF. Methods/Design Tissue and serum from ECF of IBD and non-IBD patients will be prospectively collected at St. Mark's Hospital Intestinal Failure Unit. The control group will consist of patients undergoing colonoscopy for bowel cancer screening, with normal findings. Biopsies of the terminal ileum will be obtained from this group during colonoscopy. The fistula tract and serum cytokine profiles of interleukins (IL-1a, IL-1b, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF- alpha, IFN-y, MCP-1, EGF and VEGF will be assessed. Discussion This study aims to assess the presence or absence of TNF- alpha expression in the ECF tissue in non-IBD origin. If our hypothesis is correct

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease in children--clinical, endoscopic, radiologic and histopathologic investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, J. K.; Yeon, K. M.; Chi, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews our five years' clinical experience (1987 to 1991) of 22 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There were 12 patients with Crohn's disease and 10 patients with ulcerative colitis. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.7 years (2 to 14 years). Clinical impressions before referral were chronic diarrhea in 11, irritable bowel syndrome in 5, colon polyp in 4, lymphoma in 3, intestinal tuberculosis in 2, amoebic colitis in 2, ulcerative colitis in 2 children and other diseas...

  5. Risk of inflammatory bowel disease according to self-rated health, pregnancy course, and pregnancy complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Frisch, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Poor self-rated health (SRH) has been connected to immunological changes, and pregnancy complications have been suggested in the etiology of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We evaluated the impact of self-rated pre-pregnancy health and pregnancy course, hyperemesis...

  6. Safely ruling out inflammatory bowel disease in children and teenagers without referral for endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vijver, Els; Schreuder, Andrea Bertilde; Cnossen, Wybrich Riemke; Kobold, Anna Caecilia Muller; van Rheenen, Patrick Ferry

    2012-01-01

    Background Up to 70% of children and teenagers referred to a paediatric gastroenterology centre with suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) do not have the disease. Objective To evaluate whether faecal calprotectin as an 'add-on test' improves the specificity of the clinical case definition for

  7. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosani, Matteo; Ardizzone, Sandro; Porro, Gabriele Bianchi

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of "controlled" inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor [TNF-alpha], interferon-gamma [IFN-gamma], interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, IL-12 and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10, IL-11). The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may therefore be a logical target for inflammatory bowel disease therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, Th1 polarization, T cell activation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this context, infliximab and adalimumab are currently the only biologic agents approved in Europe for the treatment of inflammatory Crohn's disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP571, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, onercept. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanism involved in the inflammatory process. Lymphocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by adhesion molecules are important in leukocyte migration and recruitment to sites of inflammation, and selective blockade of these adhesion molecules is a novel and promising strategy to treat Crohn's disease. Therapeutics agents to inhibit leukocyte trafficking

  8. Is the prevalence of colonic neuroendocrine tumors increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Vierdag, Wouter-Michiel A M; Kievit, Wietske; Bosch, Steven; Hoentjen, Frank; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients may bear an increased neuroendocrine tumor (NET) risk. These tumors are mostly reported as coincidental findings during surgery. We aimed to determine the prevalence of colonic NET in a Dutch nationwide IBD cohort and calculate the prevalence rate ratios (PRR) compared with the general Dutch population. Our second aim was to investigate whether a high bowel surgery rate in IBD could result in a high PRR for NET. The Dutch Pathology Registry (PALGA) was searched to identify all IBD patients with colonic NET in The Netherlands between 1991 and 2011. We determined the prevalence and PRR of colonic NET in a 20-year period. For our second aim, we compared NET prevalence in colonic resection specimens between IBD cases and non-IBD controls (diverticulitis and ischemia). We identified 51 IBD patients who developed colonic NET resulting in a prevalence of 60.4-89.3 per 100,000 patients in a 20-year period with a PRR of 2.8-4.1. However, adjusted for resection type, sex and age, a higher NET prevalence was shown in diverticulitis (OR 5.52, 95% CI 3.47-8.78) and ischemia (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.09-3.58) compared with IBD. Our key finding is that NET are more prevalent in IBD patients compared with the general population (PRR 2.8-4.1). This might be attributed to a high rate of incidental NET as IBD patients frequently undergo intestinal surgery. A lower adjusted NET prevalence in colonic resection specimens for IBD compared to ischemia and diverticulitis supports this hypothesis. PMID:26992110

  9. Smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases: Good, bad or ugly?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), having different effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). A recent meta-analysis partially confirmed previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after onset of the disease, might improve its course,decreasing the need for colectomy. However,smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and worsens its course, increasing the need for steroids, immunosuppressants and re-operations.Smoking cessation aggravates ulcerative colitis and improves Crohn's disease. Data are however, largely conflictive as well as the potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are still unknown. In this review article, the authors review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. The Search for Causative Environmental Factors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Gerhard; Zeitz, Jonas; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has become a 'prototype disease' for chronic auto-inflammatory disorders with a polygenic background and important multifaceted environmental trigger components. The environmental factors contribute both to pathogenesis and disease flares. Thus, IBD is a disease par excellence to study the interactions between host genetics, environmental factors (such as infections or smoking) and 'in-vironmental' factors - for example, our intestinal microbiota. Longitudinal intercurrent events, including the impact of long-term medication on disease progression or stabilization, can exemplarily be studied in this disease group. Whilst alterations in the human genome coding relevant variant protein products have most likely not emerged significantly over the last 50 years, the incidence of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has dramatically increased in Western countries and more recently in the Asia Pacific area. An interesting concept indicates that 'Western lifestyle factors' trigger chronic intestinal inflammation or disease flares in a genetically susceptible host. To understand the disease pathogenesis as well as triggers for flares or determinants of disease courses, we must further investigate potential en(in)vironmental factors. As environmental conditions, in contrast to genetic risk factors, can be influenced, knowledge on those risk factors becomes crucial to modulate disease incidence, disease course or clinical presentation. It is obvious that prevention of environmentally triggered disease flares would be a goal most relevant for IBD patients. An increased prevalence of IBD in urban environment has been documented in Switzerland by the Swiss IBD cohort study. Several studies have attempted to identify such factors; however, only a few have been validated. The best investigated environmental factor identified in IBD cohort analyses is smoking. Other environmental factors that have been associated with clinical presentation or

  11. DYSMICROBISM, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND THYROIDITIS: ANALYSIS OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, G; Tralongo, P; Amoroso, F; Damiani, P; Sinagra, E; Noto, M; Arculeo, V M; Jurjus Zein, R; Saad, W; Jurjus, A; Gerbino, A; Leone, A

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a large number of microbes that are collectively referred to as the microbiota. They interact with the hosting organism and some do contribute to the physiological maintenance of the general good health thru regulation of some metabolic processes while some others are essential for the synthesis of vitamins and short-chain fatty acids. The abnormal variation, in the quality and/or quantity of individual bacterial species residing in the gastro-intestinal tract, is called “dysmicrobism”. The immune system of the host will respond to these changes at the intestinal mucosa level which could lead to Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). This inflammatory immune response could subsequently extend to other organs and systems outside the digestive tract such as the thyroid, culminating in thyroiditis. The goal of the present study is to review and analyze data reported in the literature about thyroiditis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s Disease (CD). It was reported that similarities of some molecular bacterial components with molecular components of the host are considered among the factors causing IBD through an autoimmune reaction which could involve other non-immune cell types. The axis dysmicrobism-IBD-autoimmune reaction will be investigated as a possible etiopathogenic mechanism to Autoimmune Thyroiditis. If such is the case, then the employment of specific probiotic strains may represent a useful approach to moderate the immune system. PMID:26122213

  12. Low Risk of Unemployment, Sick Leave, and Work Disability Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Vind, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study...... underscores the need for the early identification of risk factors. A multidisciplinary approach to secure IBD patients' participation in the labor market is recommended....... rates between patients with IBD and controls (P = 0.23). The risk of SL was significantly increased in patients with IBD (hazard ratio 2.0; 95% confidence interval 1.7-2.4). Patients with IBD showed a higher risk of WD (hazard ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.8), particularly male patients older...

  13. Current view of the immunopathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease and its implications for therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Torres; A Rios

    2008-01-01

    Although the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unknown, the pathogenesis is gradually being unravelled, seeming to be the result of a combination of environmental, genetic, and immunological factors in which an uncontrolled immune response within the intestinal lumen leads to inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Multifactorial evidence suggests that a defect of innate immune response to microbial agents is involved in IBD. This editorial outlines the immunopathogenesis of IBD and their current and future therapy. We present IBD as a result of dysregulated mucosal response in the intestinal wall facilitated by defects in epithelial barrier function and the mucosal immune system with excessive production of cytokines growth factors, adhesion molecules, and reactive oxygen metabolites, resulting in tissue injury. Established and evolving therapies are discussed in the second part of this editorial and at the end of this section we review new therapies to modulate the immune system in patients with IBD.

  14. Survival in Danish patients with breast cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: A nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Pedersen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Incidences of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and of breast cancer have increased over the last decades. The influence of IBD on breast cancer prognosis, however, is unknown. We therefore examined the impact of IBD on treatment receipt and survival in breast cancer patients...... colitis (UC). Patients with CD had more advanced stage and received radiotherapy less, and chemotherapy more, frequently than patients without IBD. In the adjusted analyses there was no substantial survival difference in breast cancer patients with and without IBD (MRR(CD) = 1.22; 95% confidence interval...... [CI] = 0.85-1.75; MRR(UC) = 1.09; 95% CI = 0.86-1.38). In a stratified analysis, chemotherapy was associated with poorer survival in patients with CD (MRR(CD) = 1.93; 95% CI = 1.00-3.72).Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with UC receive the same treatment and have similar survival to breast cancer...

  15. MicroRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease--pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict;

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex and largely unknown. Until recently, research has focused on the study of protein regulators in inflammation to reveal the cellular and molecular networks in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, in the last few years, new and promising...... insights have been generated from studies describing an association between an altered expression of a specific class of non-coding RNAs, called microRNAs (miRs or miRNAs) and IBD. The short (approximately 22 nucleotides), endogenous, single-stranded RNAs are evolutionary conserved in animals and plants...... the early diagnosis of IBD, and in the development of personalized therapies. Here, we provide a short review of the current state-of-the-art of miRNAs in IBD pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapeutics....

  16. The vexed relationship between Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease: an assessment of carriage in an outpatient setting among patients in remission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clayton, Evelyn M

    2009-05-01

    Comorbidity with Clostridium difficile may cause diagnostic delay in newly presenting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, trigger relapse in established disease, confound therapies, and serve as an indicator of an underlying defect in innate immunity. Retrospective analyses have suggested community acquisition; to address this we conducted a prospective analysis of C. difficile carriage in IBD patients using molecular methods specifically in an outpatient setting.

  17. Genetic factors associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are complex polygenic disorders, characterized by several genes together with environmental factors contributing to the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent advances in research on genetic susceptibility have allowed the identification of diverse genes at different levels: (1) Innate immunity; (2) Antigen presentation molecules; (3) Epithelial integrity; (4) Drug transporter; (5) Cell adhesion. The application of genetic testing into clinical practice is close and all genetic markers may have several clinical implications: prediction of disease phenotype, molecular classification, prevention of complications, and prognosis.

  18. Social Media Use in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling; Reich, Jason; Groshek, Jacob; Farraye, Francis A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have been more keen to utilize the Internet and in particular, social media to obtain patient educational information in recent years. It is important for the gastroenterologist to be aware of these modalities and how they might affect information exchange and ultimately, disease management. This article addresses the current prevalence of social media use, advent of mobile health applications, social media usage in patients with chronic conditions, usage amongst providers, and most notably, the usage and preferences in IBD patients. Over the last decade there has been an increasing desire from patients to receive educational material about their disease through social media. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of IBD-related information on social media. Given the disparity of information available on the Internet, we remark on the quality of this information and stress the need for further research to assess the validity of IBD information posted on social media. PMID:26894839

  19. Role of Smad7 in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Monteleone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD in man, are complex diseases in which genetic and environmental factors interact to promote an excessive mucosal immune response directed against normal components of the bacterial microflora. There is also evidence that the pathologic process is due to defects in counter-regulatory mechanisms, such as those involving the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF-β1. Indeed, studies in human IBD tissues and murine models of colitis have documented a disruption of TGF-β1 signalling marked by a block in the phosphorylation of Smad3, a signalling molecule associated with the activated TGF-β receptor, due to up-regulation of Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation. Knock-down of Smad7 with a specific antisense oligonucleotide restores TGF-β1/Smad3 signalling, thus resulting in a marked suppression of inflammatory cytokine production and attenuation of murine colitis. These findings together with the demonstration that Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide is not toxic when administered in mice have paved the way for the development of a Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide-based pharmaceutical compound that is now ready to enter the clinics. In this article we review the available data supporting the pathogenic role of Smad7 in IBD and discuss whether and how Smad7 antisense therapy could help dampen the ongoing inflammation in IBD.

  20. The Roles of Cathelicidin LL-37 in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Human cathelicidin LL-37, the only member of the cathelicidin family of host defense peptides expressed in humans, plays a crucial role in host defense against pathogen invasion, as well as in regulating the functions of anti-inflammation, antitumorigenesis, and tissue repair. It is primarily produced by phagocytic leukocytes and epithelial cells, and mediates a wide range of biological responses. Emerging evidence from several studies indicates that LL-37 plays a prominent and complex role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although overexpression of LL-37 has been implicated in the inflamed and noninflamed colon mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis, LL-37 expression was not changed in the inflamed or noninflamed colon or ileal mucosa in patients with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, studies in animal models and human patients further characterized the protective effect of cathelicidins both in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. These data suggest the intricate functions of LL-37 in IBD. They will also create many strategies and opportunities for therapeutic intervention in IBD in the future. This review aims to elucidate the structure and bioactivity of LL-37 and also discuss the recent progress in understanding the relationship between LL-37 and IBD. PMID:27135484

  1. The Role of Physical Exercise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bilski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed and analyzed the relationship between physical exercise and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD which covers a group of chronic, relapsing, and remitting intestinal disorders including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis. The etiology of IBD likely involves a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. Physical training has been suggested to be protective against the onset of IBD, but there are inconsistencies in the findings of the published literature. Hypertrophy of the mesenteric white adipose tissue (mWAT is recognized as a characteristic feature of CD, but its importance for the perpetuation of onset of this intestinal disease is unknown. Adipocytes synthesize proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Hypertrophy of mWAT could play a role as a barrier to the inflammatory process, but recent data suggest that deregulation of adipokine secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of CD. Adipocytokines and macrophage mediators perpetuate the intestinal inflammatory process, leading to mucosal ulcerations along the mesenteric border, a typical feature of CD. Contracting skeletal muscles release biologically active myokines, known to exert the direct anti-inflammatory effects, and inhibit the release of proinflammatory mediators from visceral fat. Further research is required to confirm these observations and establish exercise regimes for IBD patients.

  2. Single-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Rijcken

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Single Port Laparoscopic Surgery (SPLS is being increasingly employed in colorectal surgery for benign and malignant diseases. The particular role for SPLS in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has not been determined yet. In this review article we summarize technical aspects and short term results of SPLS resections in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Methods. A systematic review of the literature until January 2012 was performed. Publications were assessed for operative techniques, equipment, surgical results, hospital stay, and readmissions. Results. 34 articles, published between 2010 and 2012, were identified reporting on 301 patients with IBD that underwent surgical treatment in SPLS technique. Surgical procedures included ileocolic resections, sigmoid resections, colectomies with end ileostomy or ileorectal anastomosis, and restorative proctocolectomies with ileum-pouch reconstruction. There was a wide variety in the surgical technique and the employed equipment. The overall complication profile was similar to reports on standard laparoscopic surgery in IBD. Conclusions. In experienced hands, single port laparoscopic surgery appears to be feasible and safe for the surgical treatment of selected patients with IBD. However, evidence from prospective randomized trials is required in order to clarify whether there is a further benefit apart from the avoidance of additional trocar incisions.

  3. Colorectal cancer surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease: The search continues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anis Ahmadi; Steven Polyak; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Risk factors for the development of CRC in the setting of IBD include disease duration, anatomic extent of disease,age at time of diagnosis, severity of inflammation,family history of colon cancer, and concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis. The current surveillance strategy of surveillance colonoscopy with multiple random biopsies most likely reduces morbidity and mortality associated with IBD-related CRC. Unfortunately,surveillance colonoscopy also has severe limitations including high cost, sampling error at time of biopsy,and interobserver disagreement in histologically grading dysplasia. Furthermore, once dysplasia is detected there is disagreement about its management.Advances in endoscopic imaging techniques are already underway, and may potentially aid in dysplasia detection and improve overall surveillance outcomes.Management of dysplasia depends predominantly on the degree and focality of dysplasia, with the mainstay of management involving either proctocolectomy or continued colonoscopic surveillance. Lastly, continued research into additional chemopreventive agents may increase our arsenal in attempting to reduce the incidence of IBD-associated CRC.

  4. Colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease: What is the real magnitude of the risk?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessica K Dyson; Matthew D Rutter

    2012-01-01

    The association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been recognised since 1925 and still accounts for 10%-15% of deaths in IBD.IBD-associated CRC (IBD-CRC) affects patients at a younger age than sporadic CRC.The prognosis for sporadic CRC and IBD-CRC is similar,with a 5-year survival of approximately 50%.Identifying at risk patients and implementing appropriate surveillance for these patients is central to managing the CRC risk in IBD.The increased risk of colorectal cancer in association with IBD is thought to be due to genetic and acquired factors.The link between inflammation and cancer is well recognised but the molecular biology,immune pathobiology and genetics of IBD-CRC are areas of much ongoing research.This review examines the literature relating to IBD-CRC,focusing on the incidence of IBD-CRC and examining potential risk factors including age at diagnosis,gender,duration and extent of colitis,severity of inflammation,family history of sporadic CRC and co-existent primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Confirmed risk factors for IBD-CRC are duration,severity and extent of colitis,the presence of co-existent PSC and a family history of CRC.There is insufficient evidence currently to support an increased frequency of surveillance for patients diagnosed with IBD at a younger age.Evidence-based guidelines advise surveillance colonoscopy for patients with colitis 8 to 10 years after diagnosis,with the interval for further surveillance guided by risk factors (extent of disease,family history of CRC,post-inflammatory polyps,concomitant PSC,personal history of colonic dysplasia,coIonic strictures).There is a move away from using random colonic biopsies towards targeted biopsies aimed at abnormal areas identified by newer colonoscopic techniques (narrow band imaging,chromoendoscopy,confocal microendoscopy).

  5. Emerging leadership lecture: Inflammatory bowel disease in Asia: emergence of a "Western" disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siew C

    2015-03-01

    More than a decade ago, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rare in Asia. Today, the importance of IBD in Asia is exemplified by its rapidly increasing incidence, complicated disease behavior, and substantial morbidity. In the first large-scale population-based epidemiologic study in Asia, the incidence of IBD varied from 0.60 to 3.44 per 100,000. There has been a twofold to threefold increase in the incidence of IBD in several countries in Asia. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is more prevalent than Crohn's disease (CD), although CD incidence is rapidly increasing. A positive family history is much less common than in the West, as are extra-intestinal disease manifestations. Complicated and penetrating CD are common in Asia. These epidemiologic changes may relate to increased contact with the West, westernization of diet, improved hygiene, increasing antibiotics use, or changes in the gut microbiota. Asian patients with CD have altered gut microbiota compared with their healthy counterparts and Caucasian CD subjects. Mucosa-associated microbiota in IBD may differ geographically. In a population-based case-control study, breast-feeding, having pets, and better sanitary conditions were protective of IBD, suggesting that childhood environment plays an important role in modulating disease development. Genetic factors also differ between Asians and Caucasians. Nucleotide oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) and autophagy variants were not associated with CD, but tumor necrosis factor superfamily gene-15 polymorphisms were strongly associated with CD in East Asians. Research in Asia, an area of rapidly changing IBD epidemiology, may lead to the discovery of critical etiologic factors that lead to the development of IBD. PMID:25469874

  6. Disease activity and cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry Sokol; Jacques Cosnes; Olivier Chazouilleres; Laurent Beaugerie; Emmanuel Tiret; Raoul Poupon; Philippe Seksik

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phenotype of inflammatory bowel disease associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC-IBD).METHODS: Data from 75 PSC-]BD patients evaluated in our tertiary center between 1963 and 2006 were collected and compared to 150 IBD patients without PSC, matched for sex, birth date, IBD diagnosis date and initial disease location regarding ileal, different colonic segments, and rectum, respectively.RESULTS: While PSC-IBD patients received more 5-aminosalicylates (8.7 years/patient vs 2.9 years/patient, P<0.001), they required less immunosuppressors (24% vs 46% at 10 years; P<0.001) and less intestinal resection (10% vs 44% at 10 years, P<0.001). The 25-year cumulative rate of colectomy was 25.1% in PSC-IBD and 37.3% in controls (P=0.004). The 25-year cumulative rate of colorectal cancer was 23.4% in PSC-IBD vs 0% in controls (P=0.002). PSC was the only independent risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer (OR=10.8; 95%CI, 3.7-31.3). Overall survival rate without liver transplantation was reduced in PSC-IBD patients (67% vs 91% in controls at 25 years, P=0.001).CONCLUSION: This study confirms that patients with PSC-IBD have a particular disease phenotype independent of the initial disease location. Although their disease is less active and they use more 5-aminosalicylates, they present a higher risk of colorectal cancer.

  7. May you never forget what is worth remembering: the relation between recall of medical information and medication adherence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, A.J.; Dijk, L. van; Smit, E.G.; Jansen, J.; Weert, J.C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nurses play an important role in educating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) about immunosuppressive or biological therapy during prescribing consultations. The education for immunosuppressive or biological therapy often contains complex information. Poor medication intake b

  8. Recent advances in biological therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtovic, Jelica; Segal, Isidor

    2004-01-01

    Immune system is a major determinant of pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and cytokines are well known mediators of immune system. Recently, informations on pro-inflammatory cytokines and their role in IBD have led to development of potential therapeutic approach to manipulate these cytokines and there by inhibiting inflammation in IBD. These therapeutic approaches include inhibitors of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha lymphocyte trafficking, type 1 T helper (Th1) cell polarization and nuclear factor type beta; immunoregulatory cytokines and various growth factors. Studies on these therapies have documented variable results and the outcomes of many clinical trials are awaited. However, these potential therapies, if become real may revolutionise approach in patients with IBD. Analysis of the inflammed mucosa from patients with Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have shown increased expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and TNF-alpha. The latter is important in the recruitment of neutrophils into inflammed tissue, a process which results from three physiological steps: (i) rolling, (ii) adhesion, and (iii) transendothelial migration. Understanding of the biology of chronic inflammation has expanded the therapies available for IBD and particularly CD. At present, the biological therapies that are being used in clinical practice or investigated for the treatment of IBD are predominantly proteins, usually delivered intravenously or subcutaneously. The therapies used include: 1. TNF-alpha inhibitors: infliximab, CDP 571, etanercept, onercept, CNI- 1493 and thalidomide. 2. Inhibitors of lymphocyte trafficking: natalizumab, LPD-02 and ICAM-1. 3. Inhibitors of Th1 polarization: monoclonal antibodies for IL-12, interferon (IFN)-gamma and anti IFN-gamma. 4. Immunoregulatory cytokines: IL-10 and IL-11. 5. Inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa (beta NF-kbeta.) 6. Growth factors

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Major, Giles; Robin C. Spiller

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response,...

  10. Probiotics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Mack

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn’s disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials.

  11. Rifaximin in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a role in promoting and maintaining inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), hence the rationale for the use of antibiotics in the treatment of those disorders. Antibiotics, however, may induce untoward effects, especially during longterm therapy. Rifaximin a polymer is an antibacterial agent that is virtually unabsorbed after oral administration and is devoid of systemic side effects. Rifaximin has provided promising results in inducing remission of Crohn's disease (up to 69% in open studies and significantly higher rates than placebo in double blind trials) and ulcerative colitis (76% in open studies and significantly higher rates than placebo in controlled studies) and might also have a role in maintaining remission of ulcerative colitis and pouchitis. The potential therapeutic activity of rifaximin in IBD deserves to be further investigated and confirmed in larger, controlled studies. The optimal dosage still needs to be better defined.

  12. Adenosine: An immune modulator of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeff Huaqing Ye; Vazhaikkurichi M Rajendran

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common and lifelong disabling gastrointestinal disease. Emerging treatments are being developed to target inflammatory cytokines which initiate and perpetuate the immune response. Adenosine is an important modulator of inflammation and its anti-inflammatory effects have been well established in humans as well as in animal models. High extracellular adenosine suppresses and resolves chronic inflammation in IBD models. High extracellular adenosine levels could be achieved by enhanced adenosine absorption and increased de novo synthesis. Increased adenosine concentration leads to activation of the A2a receptor on the cell surface of immune and epithelial cells that would be a potential therapeutic target for chronic intestinal inflammation. Adenosine is transported via concentrative nucleoside transporter and equilibrative nucleoside transporter transporters that are localized in apical and basolateral membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. Increased extracellular adenosine levels activate the A2a receptor, which would reduce cytokines responsible for chronic inflammation.

  13. Probiotics in inflammatory bowel diseases and associated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, David R

    2011-02-01

    A complex set of interactions between the human genes encoding innate protective functions and immune defenses and the environment of the intestinal mucosa with its microbiota is currently considered key to the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Probiotics offer a method to potentially alter the intestinal microbiome exogenously or may provide an option to deliver microbial metabolic products to alter the chronicity of intestinal mucosal inflammation characterizing IBD. At present, there is little evidence for the benefit of currently used probiotic microbes in Crohn's disease or associated conditions affecting extra-intestinal organs. However, clinical practice guidelines are now including a probiotic as an option for recurrent and relapsing antibiotic sensitive pouchitis and the use of probiotics in mild ulcerative colitis is provocative and suggests potential for benefit in select patients but concerns remain about proof from trials. PMID:22254095

  14. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  15. Thrombospondin-1 and VEGF in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Alkim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is an important process in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. We aimed to study the angiogeneic balance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by evaluating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 on colonic epithelial cells, together with the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS.Twenty-one ulcerative colitis (UC, 14 Crohn's disease (CD, 11 colorectal cancer patients, and 11 healthy controls colonic biopsy samples were evaluated immunohistochemically.The expressions of TSP-1, VEGF, and iNOS in UC and CD groups were higher than expression in healthy control group, all with statistical significance. However, in colorectal cancer group, VEGF and iNOS expressions were increased importantly, but TSP-1 expression was not statistically different from healthy control group's expression. Both TSP-1 and VEGF expressions were correlated with iNOS expression distinctly but did not correlate with each other.Both pro-angiogeneic VEGF and antiangiogeneic TSP-1 expressions were found increased in our IBD groups, but in colorectal cancer group, only VEGF expression was increased. TSP-1 increases in IBD patients as a response to inflammatory condition, but this increase was not enough to suppress pathologic angiogenesis and inflammation in IBD.

  16. Probiotics and prebiotics in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia B Ewaschuk; Levinus A Dieleman

    2006-01-01

    The prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells of the colon exist in a highly complex, but harmonious relationship.Disturbances in this remarkable symbiosis can result in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).Although the etiology of IBD is not entirely understood,it is known that the chronic inflammation of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and chronic pouchitis are a result of an overly aggressive immune response to the commensal intestinal flora in genetically susceptible hosts. Recent studies have enhanced our ability to understand the interaction between the host and its intestinal microflora and the role the microflora plays in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. As we begin to understand the benefits conferred to the intestine by the microflora, the notion of modifying the composition of the bacterial load to improve human health has arisen.A significant body of research now exists investigating the role of probiotics and prebiotics in ameliorating chronic intestinal inflammation. This article will begin with an overview of the role of the commensal microflora in maintaining mucosal immune homeostasis, and how a dysregulated immune response to the intestinal microflora results in IBD. This will be followed by a summary of the use of probiotics and prebiotics in experimental and human IBD.

  17. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  18. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations occur rather frequently in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), e.g. ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The present paper provides an overview of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, and management of rheumatic...... the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (cut-off date October 2009). The search terms 'Crohn's disease', 'inflammatory bowel disease', or 'ulcerative colitis' were combined with the terms 'adalimumab', 'anemia', 'arthritis...... evidence of treatment was difficult to obtain, and epidemiologic data on the rarer forms of extraintestinal manifestations are scarce. However, updates on the pathophysiology and treatment regimens are given for each of these disorders. This paper offers a current review of original research papers and...

  19. Critical Situations in Daily Life as Experienced by Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hjortswang, Henrik; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2016-01-01

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result "The bowels rule life." The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career. PMID:26870902

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated with Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally divided into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is a relapsing non-transmural chronic inflammatory disease that is restricted to the colon and during flares the disease...... system and influence of the gastrointestinal microbiota. The gut microbiota of IBD patients contributes to initiation and/ or maintaining the inflammatory state by providing antigens or co-stimulatory factors that drive the immune response in a misdirection in these genetically susceptible hosts...

  1. Mucosal antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease are directed against intestinal bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Macpherson, A.; Khoo, U Y; Forgacs, I; Philpott-Howard, J.; Bjarnason, I

    1996-01-01

    In contrast with normal subjects where IgA is the main immunoglobulin in the intestine, patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) produce high concentrations of IgG from intestinal lymphocytes, but the antigens at which these antibodies are directed are unknown. To investigate the specificities of these antibodies mucosal immunoglobulins were isolated from washings taken at endoscopy from 21 control patients with irritable bowel syndrome, 10 control patients with intestinal inflam...

  2. Enteropathic spondyloarthropathy:A common genetic background with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabetta Colombo; Anna Latiano; Orazio Palmieri; Fabrizio Bossa; Angelo Andriulli; Vito Annese

    2009-01-01

    The association between spondyloarthropathy and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is largely established, although prevalence is variable because of different population selection and diagnostic methodologies. Most studies indicate that as many as 10%-15% of cases of IBD are complicated by ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or other forms of spondylarthritis (SpA). Of note, ileal in - flammation resembling IBD has been reported in up to two thirds of cases of SpA, and it has been suggested that the presence of ileitis is associated with the chronicity of articular complications. Although this observation is of interest to unravel the pathophysiology of the disease,systematic screening of patients with SpA by ileocolonoscopy is not indicated in the absence of gut symptoms,as only a small proportion of patients with subclinical gut inflammation will develop overt IBD over time. The existence of familial clustering of both IBD and AS, the coexistence of both conditions in a patient, the evidence of an increased risk ratio among first- and second-degree relatives of affected AS or IBD patients and finally, the increased cross-risk ratios between AS and IBD, strongly suggest a shared genetic background. So far, however, IL23R is the only identified susceptibility gene shared by both IBD and AS. Although functional studies are still needed to better understand its pathogenic role, great effort is being spent therapeutically targeting this pathway that may prove effective for both disorders.

  3. Hygiene hypothesis in inflammatory bowel disease: A critical review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natasha A Koloski; Laurel Bret; Graham Radford-Smith

    2008-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis is thought to be a significant contributor to the growing incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) around the world, although the evidence for specific factors that underlie the hygiene hypothesis in IBD is unclear. We aimed to systematically review the literature to determine which hygiene-related factors are associated with the development of IBD.Publications identified from a broad based NEDLINE and Current Contents search between 1966 and 2007 on key terms relevant to the 'hygiene hypothesis'and IBD including H pylori exposure, helminths, cold chain hypothesis, measles infection and vaccination,antibiotic use, breastfeeding, family size, sibship, urban upbringing, day care attendance and domestic hygiene were reviewed. The literature suggests that the hygiene hypothesis and its association with decreased microbial exposure in childhood probably plays an important role in the development of IBD, although the strength of the supporting data for each of the factors varies considerably. The most promising factors that may potentially be associated with development of IBD include H pylori exposure, helminths, breastfeeding and sibship. However, the vast majority of studies in this area are plagued by serious methodological shortcomings, particularly the reliance on retrospective recall of information making it difficult to truly ascertain the importance of a 'hygiene hypothesis' in IBD. The 'hygiene hypothesis' in IBD is an important area of research that may give clues to the aetiology of this disease. Directions for future research are recommended.

  4. Fatigue Severity and Factors Associated with High Fatigue Levels in Korean Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Suhyeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often complain of fatigue. To date, only a few studies in Western countries have focused on fatigue related to IBD, and fatigue has never been specifically studied in Asian IBD patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the fatigue level and fatigue-related factors among Korean IBD patients. Methods Patients in remission or with mild to moderate IBD were included. Fatigue was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue and the Brief Fatigue Inventory. Corresponding healthy controls (HCs) also completed both fatigue questionnaires. Results Sixty patients with Crohn disease and 68 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) were eligible for analysis. The comparison group consisted of 92 HCs. Compared with the HCs, both IBD groups were associated with greater levels of fatigue (p<0.001). Factors influencing the fatigue score in UC patients included anemia and a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Conclusions Greater levels of fatigue were detected in Korean IBD patients compared with HCs. Anemia and ESR were determinants of fatigue in UC patients. Physicians need to be aware of fatigue as one of the important symptoms of IBD to better understand the impact of fatigue on health-related quality of life. PMID:24672655

  5. A method for detecting IBD regions simultaneously in multiple individuals--with applications to disease genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltke, Ida; Albrechtsen, Anders; Hansen, Thomas V O; Nielsen, Finn C; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2011-07-01

    All individuals in a finite population are related if traced back long enough and will, therefore, share regions of their genomes identical by descent (IBD). Detection of such regions has several important applications-from answering questions about human evolution to locating regions in the human genome containing disease-causing variants. However, IBD regions can be difficult to detect, especially in the common case where no pedigree information is available. In particular, all existing non-pedigree based methods can only infer IBD sharing between two individuals. Here, we present a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for detection of IBD regions, which does not rely on any pedigree information. It is based on a probabilistic model applicable to unphased SNP data. It can take inbreeding, allele frequencies, genotyping errors, and genomic distances into account. And most importantly, it can simultaneously infer IBD sharing among multiple individuals. Through simulations, we show that the simultaneous modeling of multiple individuals makes the method more powerful and accurate than several other non-pedigree based methods. We illustrate the potential of the method by applying it to data from individuals with breast and/or ovarian cancer, and show that a known disease-causing mutation can be mapped to a 2.2-Mb region using SNP data from only five seemingly unrelated affected individuals. This would not be possible using classical linkage mapping or association mapping. PMID:21493780

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease activity assessed by fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin: correlation with laboratory parameters, clinical, endoscopic and histological indexes

    OpenAIRE

    Rossini Lucio; Steinwurz Flávio; Klug Wilmar; Rolim Ernani; Fang Chia; Vieira Andrea; Candelária Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Research has shown that fecal biomarkers are useful to assess the activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the study is: to evaluate the efficacy of the fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin as indicators of inflammatory activity. Findings A total of 78 patients presenting inflammatory bowel disease were evaluated. Blood tests, the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), Mayo Disease Activity Index (MDAI), and Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS...

  7. A phylogenetic group of Escherichia coli associated with active left-sided inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas M; Nielsen, Eva M; Litrup, Eva;

    2009-01-01

    positive ExPEC gene among different groups, 86% were found positive among active IBD patients, significantly more than 13% among inactive IBD patients (p < 0.05), and 11% among healthy controls (p < 0.05). The B2 phylogenetic group was found in a specific cluster based on MLST, but no further separation......BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli have been found in increased numbers in tissues from patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and adherent-invasive E. coli have been found in resected ileum from patients with Crohn's disease. This study aimed to characterize possible differences in phylogenetic...... 10 healthy controls. Disease activity was evaluated by sigmoidoscopy. Interestingly, E. coli strains of the phylogenetic group B2 were cultured from 60% of patients with IBD compared to 11% of healthy controls (p < 0.05). Furthermore, when comparing the number of E. coli B2 strains with at least one...

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease: Traditional knowledge holds the seeds for the future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni; C; Actis; Rinaldo; Pellicano; Floriano; Rosina

    2015-01-01

    Despite the level of sophistication they have reached nowadays, the available tools for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) can at best chronicize the disease but not cure it. Chances to make leap forward from this hold-back may include designs to reach personalized treatment strategies taking advantage of modern genome associated studies, and shift resources towards unfolding inciting pathogenetic steps rather than continuing to develop drugs that address down-stream phenomena. We have arbitrarily chosen to scrutinize a few projects that may make their way in 2015 and mark the history of IBD research. The list includes: the role of appendix as a regulating factor in pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis/proctitis; the reappraisal of(auto)immune phenomena in the era of microbiome; projects to treat IBD by stem cell infusion; recognition of the crucial pathogenetic role of gut microbiome, and attempts to modify it to treat enteric diseases, from clostridium difficile infection to IBD.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease: Moving toward a stem cell-based therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giacomo Lanzoni; Giulia Roda; Andrea Belluzzi; Enrico Roda; Gian Paolo Bagnara

    2008-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of Crohn's disease(CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), are rising in western countries. The modern hygienic lifestyle is probably at the root of a disease where, in genetically susceptible hosts, the intestinal commensal flora triggers dysregulated immune and inflammatory responses. Current therapies ranging from anti-inflammatory drugs to immunosuppressive regimens,remain inadequate. Advances in our understanding of the cell populations involved in the pathogeneticprocesses and recent findings on the regenerative,trophic and immunoregulatory potential of stem cellsopen new paths in IBD therapy. Hematopoietic andmesenchymal stem cells are catalyzing the attention of IBD investigators. This review highlights the pivotal findings for stem cell-based approaches to IBD therapy and collects the encouraging results coming in from clinical trials.

  10. Small bowel neoplasia in coeliac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rampertab, S D; Forde, K A; Green, P. H. R.

    2003-01-01

    There is an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with coeliac disease compared with the normal population. It has been suggested that adenocarcinoma of the small intestine in coeliac disease arises through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but there has been only one reported case of a small bowel adenoma in a patient with coeliac disease. We report three additional cases of a small bowel adenoma in the setting of coeliac disease. In addition, four cases of small bowel adenoca...

  11. Environmental factors in a population-based inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, S;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior ...

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed as...... production or to increased cleavage by proteases other than MMP-9....

  13. Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease following Bacille Calmette-Guérin and Smallpox Vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie; Jess, Tine; Sørup, Signe; Ravn, Henrik; Sturegård, Erik; Benn, Christine Stabell; Aaby, Peter; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin

    2013-01-01

    Childhood immunology has been suggested to play a role in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) based on the studies of childhood vaccinations, infections, and treatment with antibiotics. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and smallpox vaccinations were gradually phased-out in Denmark for...

  14. Family planning and inflammatory bowel disease: the patient and the practitioner.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Desmond

    2013-02-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are commonly in their child-bearing years. Maintainance medication, as recommended by international guidelines, is an emotive topic and an anxiety source. This study measures the awareness of patients and primary practitioners of the issues involved.

  15. Polymorphisms in NF-kappa B, PXR, LXR, PPAR gamma and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Christensen, Jane; Ernst, Anja;

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the contribution of polymorphisms in nuclear receptors to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: Genotypes of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B (NFKB1) NF kappa B -94ins/del (rs28362491); peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma (PPAR gamma) PPAR gamma Pro...

  16. Basic and clinical aspects of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Low bone mineral density and the increased risk of fracture in gastrointestinal diseases have a multifactorial pathogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and osteopenia and epidemiologic studies have reported an increased prevalence of low bone mass in patients with IBD. Certainly, genetics play an important role,along with other factors such as systemic inflammation,malnutrition, hypogonadism, glucocorticoid therapy in IBD and other lifestyle factors. At a molecular level the proinflammatory cytokines that contribute to the intestinal immune response in IBD are known to enhance bone resorption. There are genes influencing osteoblast function and it is likely that LRP5 may be involved in the skeletal development. Also the identification of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) and some of its polymorphisms have led to consider the possible relationships between them and some autoimmune diseases and may be involved in the pathogenesis through the exertion of its immunomodulatory effects during inflammation. Trying to explain the physiopathology we have found that there is increasing evidence for the integration between systemic inflammation and bone loss likely mediated via receptor for activated nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK),RANK-ligand, and osteoprotegerin, proteins that can affect both osteoclastogenesis and T-cell activation.Although glucocorticoids can reduce mucosal and systemic inflammation, they have intrinsic qualities that negatively impact on bone mass. It is still controversial if all IBD patients should be screened, especially in patients with preexisting risk factors for bone disease. Available methods to measure BMD include single energy x-ray absorptiometry, DXA, quantitative computed tomography (QCT), radiographic absorptiometry, and ultrasound.DXA is the establish method to determine BMD, and routinely is measured in the hip and the lumbar spine.There are several treatments options that have

  17. Dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tamboli, C P; Neut, C; Desreumaux, P; Colombel, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Abundant data have incriminated intestinal bacteria in the initiation and amplification stages of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the precise role of intestinal bacteria remains elusive. One theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of “protective” versus “harmful” intestinal bacteria—this concept has been termed “dysbiosis”. Arguments in support of this concept are discussed.

  18. The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Northern China: a prospective population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    Full Text Available AIMS & BACKGROUNDS: Although inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are emerging and increasing in China, epidemiologic data are rarely available. This study was to investigate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of IBD in Northern China. METHODS: This is a prospective, population-based study of incidence of IBD in Daqing, Heilongjiang province of Northern China from March 1, 2012 to February 28, 2013. All incident patients with IBD were clinically identified by IBD specialist group from five main General Hospitals covering the healthcare service for 1,343,364 residents in the urban areas of Daqing. IBD cases included in this study were followed-up for three months for diagnosis confirmation. RESULTS: A total of 27 new IBD cases including 25 cases of ulcerative colitis (UC and 2 cases of Crohn's disease (CD were identified. The population at risk was 1,343,364 person years. Age-adjusted incidence for total IBD, CD and UC were 1.77, 0.13, and 1.64 per 100,000 population, respectively. A male predominance was found in CD patients (male to female ratio was 2 ∶ 0. In contrast, no obvious gender predominance was found in UC patients (male to female ratio was 1 ∶ 1.1. CD patients were diagnosed at an average age of 39.5 years. The main disease phenotypes of UC were distal colitis with a 24% of proctitis and 56% of left-sided colitis. The mean diagnostic age of UC patients was 48.9 years. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on the incidence of IBD in the Northern Chinese population. A lower incidence of IBD, similar male predominance for CD, similar disease phenotype of UC, and lower disease activity was observed in Daqing compared to that in Southern China.

  19. Effect of fruit extract of Fragaria vesca L. on experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease in albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lalit Kanodia; Mondita Borgohain; Swranamoni Das

    2011-01-01

    Aim : Ulcerative colitis and Crohn′s disease are chronic recurrent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of unknown origin. Oxidative stress is believed to be a key factor in the pathogenesis and perpetuation of the mucosal damage in IBD. Materials and Methods : Ethanolic extract of Fragaria vesca (EFFV) fruits was prepared by percolation method and subjected to oral toxicity testing using OECD guidelines. Albino rats were pretreated orally for 5 days with 3% gum acacia in control, EFFV 500 mg...

  20. Next-Generation Therapeutics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulai, Parambir S; Sandborn, William J

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists are the cornerstone of therapy for moderately to severely active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although our understanding of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and treatment optimization for these agents has evolved considerably over the past decade, a substantial majority of individuals fail to respond or lose response to TNF-antagonists over time. A need therefore remains for efficacious treatment options in these patients. Alternative immunological targets have now been identified, and several novel therapeutic agents are in development for IBD. In this review article, we discuss these novel therapeutic agents, with a particular focus on those demonstrated to be efficacious in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials. We further discuss considerations to be made when integrating these agents into routine practice over the next decade. PMID:27461274

  1. Role of STAT3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken Sugimoto

    2008-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3(STAT3)play an important role in various autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease(IBD).Recent studies have revealed that STAT3 activation plays distinctly difierent roles between innate immune responses and acquired immune responses in colitis.STAT3-mediated activation of acquired immune re-sponses plays a pathogenic role in colitis by enhancing the survival of pathogenic T cells.In contrast,STAT3-mediated activation of innate responses contributes to the suppression of colitis.This review will summarize the current understanding of the roles of STAT3 in IBD and the potential of targeting STAT3 for the treatment of BD,emphasizing recent observations.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  2. JAK inhibition using tofacitinib for inflammatory bowel disease treatment: a hub for multiple inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Silvio; Grisham, Matthew; Hodge, Jennifer; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-02-01

    The inflammatory diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease constitute the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). They are characterized by chronic, relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, significantly impacting on patient quality of life and often requiring prolonged treatment. Existing therapies for IBD are not effective for all patients, and an unmet need exists for additional therapies to induce and maintain remission. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, tofacitinib, for the treatment of IBD and the effect of JAK inhibition on the chronic cycle of inflammation that is characteristic of the disease. The pathogenesis of IBD involves a dysfunctional response from the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in overexpression of multiple inflammatory cytokines, many of which signal through JAKs. Thus JAK inhibition allows multiple cytokine signaling pathways to be targeted and is expected to modulate the innate and adaptive immune response in IBD, thereby interrupting the cycle of inflammation. Tofacitinib is an oral, small molecule JAK inhibitor that is being investigated as a targeted immunomodulator for IBD. Clinical development of tofacitinib and other JAK inhibitors is ongoing, with the aspiration of providing new treatment options for IBD that have the potential to deliver prolonged efficacy and clinically meaningful patient benefits. PMID:26608188

  3. Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenfield, C.; Aguilar Ramirez, J R; Pounder, R E; Williams, T.; Danvers, M; Marper, S R; Noone, P

    1983-01-01

    Stools from 109 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (13.4%) contained Clostridium difficile or its toxin, an incidence similar to the stools of 99 control patients with diarrhoea (11.9%), but significantly higher than the stools of 77 control patients with a normal bowel habit (1.4%). Sixty-six per cent of the diarrhoea controls, but only 11% of the inflammatory bowel disease patients, reported recent antibiotic use: however, 67% of inflammatory bowel disease patients were taking sulphas...

  4. Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated E. coli with Ciprofloxacin and E. coli Nissle in the Streptomycin-Treated Mouse Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Schjørring, Susanne; Gerstrøm, Sarah Choi; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2011-01-01

    Background E. coli belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Studies have shown that antimicrobials have some effect in the treatment of IBD, and it has been demonstrated that E. coli Nissle has prophylactic abilities comparable to 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy in ulcerative colitis. The objective of this study was to test if ciprofloxacin and/or E. coli Nissle could eradicate IBD associated E. coli in the streptomycin-treated mouse intesti...

  5. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease associated E. coli with ciprofloxacin and E. coli Nissle in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Schjørring, Susanne; Gerstrøm, Sarah Choi;

    2011-01-01

    E. coli belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Studies have shown that antimicrobials have some effect in the treatment of IBD, and it has been demonstrated that E. coli Nissle has prophylactic abilities comparable to 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA......) therapy in ulcerative colitis. The objective of this study was to test if ciprofloxacin and/or E. coli Nissle could eradicate IBD associated E. coli in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine....

  6. Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated E. coli with Ciprofloxacin and E. coli Nissle in the Streptomycin-Treated Mouse Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Munk Petersen; Susanne Schjørring; Sarah Choi Gerstrøm; Karen Angeliki Krogfelt

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: E. coli belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Studies have shown that antimicrobials have some effect in the treatment of IBD, and it has been demonstrated that E. coli Nissle has prophylactic abilities comparable to 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy in ulcerative colitis. The objective of this study was to test if ciprofloxacin and/or E. coli Nissle could eradicate IBD associated E. coli in the streptomycin-treated mouse intest...

  7. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Celestine; Harris, Philip J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove to exert beneficial outcomes for IBD. Postulated mechanisms include direct interactions with the gut mucosa through immunomodulation, or indirectly through the microbiome. Component species of the microbiome may degrade dietary-fibre polysaccharides and ferment the products to form short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Prebiotic dietary fibres may also act more directly by altering the composition of the microbiome. Longer term benefits in reducing the risk of more aggressive disease or colorectal cancer may require other dietary fibre sources such as wheat bran or psyllium. By critically examining clinical trials that have used dietary fibre supplements or dietary patterns containing specific types or amounts of dietary fibres, it may be possible to assess whether varying the intake of specific dietary fibres may offer an efficient treatment for IBD patients. PMID:27314323

  8. Potential Benefits of Dietary Fibre Intervention in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestine Wong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to be an important cause of disease progression and the gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Inflammation appears to be a major contributor in perpetuating a dysregulated gut microbiota. Although current drug therapies can significantly induce and maintain disease remission, there is no cure for these diseases. Nevertheless, ongoing human studies investigating dietary fibre interventions may potentially prove to exert beneficial outcomes for IBD. Postulated mechanisms include direct interactions with the gut mucosa through immunomodulation, or indirectly through the microbiome. Component species of the microbiome may degrade dietary-fibre polysaccharides and ferment the products to form short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Prebiotic dietary fibres may also act more directly by altering the composition of the microbiome. Longer term benefits in reducing the risk of more aggressive disease or colorectal cancer may require other dietary fibre sources such as wheat bran or psyllium. By critically examining clinical trials that have used dietary fibre supplements or dietary patterns containing specific types or amounts of dietary fibres, it may be possible to assess whether varying the intake of specific dietary fibres may offer an efficient treatment for IBD patients.

  9. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations...

  10. A systematic review of the psychological correlates of adjustment outcomes in adults with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Cheryl; Sin, Jacqueline; Fear, Nicola T; Chalder, Trudie

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic long term condition which poses significant psychosocial adjustment challenges. The purpose of this review was to systematically identify psychological factors related to adjustment in adults with IBD with the aim of suggesting evidence based targets that may be modifiable though psychological intervention. Twenty five studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review and a narrative synthesis was conducted. A wide range of psychological variables were addressed covering six broad categories; personality traits, interpersonal traits, stress and coping, emotions and emotional control, IBD related cognitions and non IBD related cognitions. The most consistent relationship was found between certain emotion focused coping strategies and worse adjustment outcomes in IBD. Some evidence also hi-lighted a relationship between personality traits (such as neuroticism,) perceived stress, emotions and emotional control (such as alexithymia) and IBD related cognitions (such as illness perceptions) and negative adjustment outcomes. The results of this review suggest that interventions to improve adjustment in IBD may benefit from a focus on coping strategies, perceived stress and IBD related cognitions. PMID:27318795

  11. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    OpenAIRE

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury...

  12. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research. PMID:24759680

  13. Current application of proteomics in biomarker discovery for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Py; Wasinger, Valerie C; Leong, Rupert W

    2016-02-15

    Recently, the field of proteomics has rapidly expanded in its application towards clinical research with objectives ranging from elucidating disease pathogenesis to discovering clinical biomarkers. As proteins govern and/or reflect underlying cellular processes, the study of proteomics provides an attractive avenue for research as it allows for the rapid identification of protein profiles in a biological sample. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) encompasses several heterogeneous and chronic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Proteomic technology provides a powerful means of addressing major challenges in IBD today, especially for identifying biomarkers to improve its diagnosis and management. This review will examine the current state of IBD proteomics research and its use in biomarker research. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges of translating proteomic research into clinically relevant tools. The potential application of this growing field is enormous and is likely to provide significant insights towards improving our future understanding and management of IBD. PMID:26909226

  14. Immunoregulatory Role of Myeloid-derived Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Marcelo Cerf; Däbritz, Jan

    2015-12-01

    As the frontiers of immunological research expand, new insights into the pathogenesis of long poorly understood diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are opening up new possible avenues for treatment. Myeloid-derived cells (i.e., monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells), long believed to be effector cells driving the initiation of inflammation, have been increasingly shown to have immunoregulatory effects previously underappreciated. Dysfunction in the immunoregulatory roles of these cells may play a part in the pathogenesis of a subset of patients with IBD. The role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, initially described in cancer, have been shown to play an important role in the balancing of effector and regulatory T cells in inflammation as well, and their role in IBD is also explored. The potential for future cell-based therapies for IBD is enhanced by the advances being made in the understanding of the innate immune system in the intestine. PMID:26244650

  15. Development, validation and clinical assessment of a short questionnaire to assess disease-related knowledge in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Denise

    2013-02-01

    Only two inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) knowledge scales are available, both primarily aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of clinical education programs. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short knowledge questionnaire for clinical and academic research purposes.

  16. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Roxana Georgescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nodosum and pyodermagangrenosum. The pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood but it seems that related mechanisms are involved in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment should be aimed at both the cutaneous manifestations and the bowel inflammation

  17. Defining Disease Severity in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Current and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Panés, Julián; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Danese, Silvio; Feagan, Brian G; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Hanauer, Stephen B; Rycroft, Beth

    2016-03-01

    Although most treatment algorithms in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) begin with classifying patients according to disease severity, no formal validated or consensus definitions of mild, moderate, or severe IBD currently exist. There are 3 main domains relevant to the evaluation of disease severity in IBD: impact of the disease on the patient, disease burden, and disease course. These measures are not mutually exclusive and the correlations and interactions between them are not necessarily proportionate. A comprehensive literature search was performed regarding current definitions of disease severity in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and the ability to categorize disease severity in a particular patient. Although numerous assessment tools for symptoms, quality of life, patient-reported outcomes, fatigue, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging, and histology (in ulcerative colitis) were identified, few have validated thresholds for categorizing disease activity or severity. Moving forward, we propose a preliminary set of criteria that could be used to classify IBD disease severity. These are grouped by the 3 domains of disease severity: impact of the disease on the patient (clinical symptoms, quality of life, fatigue, and disability); measurable inflammatory burden (C-reactive protein, mucosal lesions, upper gastrointestinal involvement, and disease extent), and disease course (including structural damage, history/extension of intestinal resection, perianal disease, number of flares, and extraintestinal manifestations). We further suggest that a disease severity classification should be developed and validated by an international group to develop a pragmatic means of identifying patients with severe disease. This is increasingly important to guide current therapeutic strategies for IBD and to develop treatment algorithms for clinical practice. PMID:26071941

  18. Vitamin D, Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cantorna, Margherita T.

    2011-01-01

    It has now been more than 20 years since the vitamin D receptor was identified in cells of the immune system. The immune system has now been established as an important target of vitamin D. Vitamin D receptor knockout and vitamin D deficient mice have a surplus of effector T cells that have been implicated in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The active form of vitamin D directly and indirectly suppresses the function of these pathogenic T cells wh...

  19. Peripheral Blood Based Discrimination of Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease from Non-IBD Colitis by Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenc Sipos; Orsolya Galamb; Barnabás Wichmann; Tibor Krenács; Kinga Tóth; Katalin Leiszter; Györgyi Műzes; Tamás Zágoni; Zsolt Tulassay; Béla Molnár

    2011-01-01

    A molecular diagnostic assay using easily accessible peripheral blood would greatly assist in the screening and diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Transcriptional profiles in blood/biopsy samples from 12 UC (6/12), 9 CD (5/9), 6 non-inflammatory bowel disease (non-IBD) colitis (6/0), and 11 healthy (11/11) patients were assessed by Affymetrix HGU133Plus2.0 microarrays. Prediction analysis of microarrays, discriminant and ROC analyses were performed, the results wer...

  20. Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis and Therapy: Is It All About Diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Daniela Elena

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and unclassified IBD, continues to cause significant morbidity. While its incidence is increasing, no clear etiology and no cure have yet been discovered. Recent findings suggest that IBD may have a multifactorial etiology, where complex interactions between genetics, epigenetics, environmental factors (including diet but also infections, antibiotics, and sanitation), and host immune system lead to abnormal immune responses and chronic inflammation. Over the past years, the role of altered gut microbiota (in both composition and function) in IBD pathogenesis has emerged as an outstanding area of interest. According to new findings, gut dysbiosis may appear as a key element in initiation of inflammation in IBD and its complications. Moreover, complex metagenomic studies provide possibilities to distinguish between IBD types and appreciate severity and prognosis of the disease, as well as response to therapy. This review provides an updated knowledge of recent findings linking altered bacterial composition and functions, viruses, and fungi to IBD pathogenesis. It also highlights the complex genetic, epigenetic, immune, and microbial interactions in relation to environmental factors (including diet). We overview the actual options to manipulate the altered microbiota, such as modified diet, probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and fecal transplantation. Future possible therapies are also included. Targeting altered microbiota could be the next therapeutic personalized approach, but more research and well-designed comparative prospective studies are required to formulate adequate directions for prevention and therapy. PMID:26452390

  1. Economic burden of inflammatory bowel disease: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luces, Carlvin; Bodger, Keith

    2006-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic, relapsing conditions that have no permanent drug cure, may occur for the first time in early life and have the potential to produce long-term morbidity. In the era of emerging biological drug therapies, the costs associated with IBD have attracted increased attention. This review considers the available information on the macroeconomics of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. In relation to direct medical costs, the consistent findings are: hospital (in-patient) costs are incurred by a minority of sufferers but account for approximately half the total cost; and drug costs contribute less than a quarter of the total healthcare costs. Data for levels of costs associated with lost productivity are more variable, but some studies have estimated that 'indirect' costs falling on society exceed medical expenditures. Lifetime costs for IBD are comparable to a number of major diseases, including heart disease and cancer. Over the next 5-10 years, the contribution of drug costs to the overall profile of cost-of-illness will change significantly as biological therapies play an increasing role. A key economic question is whether the health gains realized from exciting new drugs will also lead to reduced expenditures on hospitalization and surgery. PMID:20528516

  2. Serum metabolomics in a Helicobacter hepaticus mouse model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease reveal important changes in the microbiome, serum peptides, and intermediary metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Kun; Knutson, Charles G.; Wishnok, John S.; Fox, James G.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder of the bowel. The etiology remains unknown, but IBD is immune-driven and multiple factors including genetic, environmental, and microbiological components play a role. Recombinase-activating gene-2-deficient (Rag2−/−) mice infected with Helicobacter hepaticus (H. hepaticus) have been developed as an animal model to imitate naturally occurring inflammatory events and associated key features of chronic inflammatory re...

  3. Intestinal microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: Friend of foe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesca Fava; Silvio Danese

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises from disruption of immune tolerance to the gut commensal microbiota,leading to chronic intestinal inflammation and mucosal damage in genetically predisposed hosts. In healthy individuals the intestinal microbiota have a symbiotic relationship with the host organism and possess important and unique functions, including a metabolic function (i.e.digestion of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, fermentation of undigestible carbohydrates with production of short chain fatty acids), a mucosal barrier function (i.e. by inhibiting pathogen invasion and strengthening epithelial barrier integrity), and an immune modulatory function (i.e. mucosal immune system priming and maintenance of intestinal epithelium homeostasis). A fine balance regulates the mechanism that allows coexistence of mammals with their commensal bacteria.In IBD this mechanism of immune tolerance is impaired because of several potential causative factors. The gut microbiota composition and activity of IBD patients are abnormal, with a decreased prevalence of dominant members of the human commensal microbiota (i.e.Clostridium Ⅸa and Ⅳ groups, Bacteroides , bifidobacteria)and a concomitant increase in detrimental bacteria (i.e. sulphate-reducing bacteria, Escherichia coli ).The observed dysbiosis is concomitant with defective innate immunity and bacterial killing (i.e. reduced mucosal defensins and IgA, malfunctioning phagocytosis)and overaggressive adaptive immune response (due to ineffective regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells), which are considered the basis of IBD pathogenesis.However, we still do not know how the interplay between these parameters causes the disease. Studies looking at gut microbial composition, epithelial integrity and mucosal immune markers in genotyped IBD populations are therefore warranted to shed light on this obscure pathogenesis.

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Overview of Immune Mechanisms and Biological Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rafael Ramos de Mattos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestinal tract associated with an imbalance of the intestinal microbiota. Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are the most widely known types of IBD and have been the focus of attention due to their increasing incidence. Recent studies have pointed out genes associated with IBD susceptibility that, together with environment factors, may contribute to the outcome of the disease. In ulcerative colitis, there are several therapies available, depending on the stage of the disease. Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, and cyclosporine are used to treat mild, moderate, and severe disease, respectively. In Crohn’s disease, drug choices are dependent on both location and behavior of the disease. Nowadays, advances in treatments for IBD have included biological therapies, based mainly on monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins, such as anti-TNF drugs. Notwithstanding the high cost involved, these biological therapies show a high index of remission, enabling a significant reduction in cases of surgery and hospitalization. Furthermore, migration inhibitors and new cytokine blockers are also a promising alternative for treating patients with IBD. In this review, an analysis of literature data on biological treatments for IBD is approached, with the main focus on therapies based on emerging recombinant biomolecules.

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Overview of Immune Mechanisms and Biological Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Bruno Rafael Ramos; Garcia, Maellin Pereira Gracindo; Nogueira, Julia Bier; Paiatto, Lisiery Negrini; Albuquerque, Cassia Galdino; Souza, Caique Lopes; Fernandes, Luís Gustavo Romani; Tamashiro, Wirla Maria da Silva Cunha; Simioni, Patricia Ucelli

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestinal tract associated with an imbalance of the intestinal microbiota. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the most widely known types of IBD and have been the focus of attention due to their increasing incidence. Recent studies have pointed out genes associated with IBD susceptibility that, together with environment factors, may contribute to the outcome of the disease. In ulcerative colitis, there are several therapies available, depending on the stage of the disease. Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, and cyclosporine are used to treat mild, moderate, and severe disease, respectively. In Crohn's disease, drug choices are dependent on both location and behavior of the disease. Nowadays, advances in treatments for IBD have included biological therapies, based mainly on monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins, such as anti-TNF drugs. Notwithstanding the high cost involved, these biological therapies show a high index of remission, enabling a significant reduction in cases of surgery and hospitalization. Furthermore, migration inhibitors and new cytokine blockers are also a promising alternative for treating patients with IBD. In this review, an analysis of literature data on biological treatments for IBD is approached, with the main focus on therapies based on emerging recombinant biomolecules. PMID:26339135

  6. CT enteroclysis in small bowel Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease has changed dramatically over the last decade. The introduction of wireless capsule endoscopy, double balloon endoscopy and the introduction of newer therapeutic agents have changed the role of imaging in the small bowel. Additionally, advances in multidetector CT technology have further changed how radiologic investigations are utilized in the diagnosis and management of small bowel Crohn's disease. This article describes how we perform CT enteroclysis in the investigation of small bowel Crohn's disease and discusses the role of CT enteroclysis in the current management of small bowel Crohn's disease.

  7. Fecal immunochemical test as a biomarker for inflammatory bowel diseases: can it rival fecal calprotectin?

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Jun; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Nakarai, Asuka; Takashima, Shiho; Inokuchi, Toshihiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of disease activity is essential for choosing an appropriate treatment and follow-up plan for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Endoscopy is required for accurately evaluating disease activity, but the procedures are sometimes invasive and burdensome to patients. Therefore, alternative non-invasive methods for evaluating or predicting disease activity including mucosal status are desirable. Fecal calprotectin (Fcal) is the most widely used fecal marker for IB...

  8. Psychosocial Factors Contributing to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity and Health-Related Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Alejandra H.; Halpern, Leslie F.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Cross, Raymond K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the contributions of coping and social constraint to disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and to examine group differences in disease activity and HRQOL between patients with high versus low anxiety or depression symptoms in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: This study was a retrospective analysis in which disease activity was measured with either the Harvey-Bradshaw Index or the Simple Clinical Colitis Activit...

  9. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: an underestimated problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard eRogler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last ten years the understanding of the pathophysiology of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases has increased, new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools with respect to iron metabolism have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated.

  10. Neutropenia, neutrophil dysfunction, and inflammatory bowel disease in glycogen storage disease type Ib : Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Fernandes, J; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Smit, GPA

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence, the severity, and the course of neutropenia, neutrophil dysfunction, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ib. Method: As part of a collaborative European Study on GSD type I, a retrospective registry was established in 1

  11. Key role of mast cells and their major secretory products in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    Hirtoncally, mast cells were known as a key cell type involved in type I hypersensitivity Until last two decades, this cell type was recognized to be widely involved in a number of non-allergic diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Markedly increased numbers of mast cells were observed in the mucosa of the iieum and colon of patients with IBD, which was accompanied by great changes of the content in mart cells such as dramatically increaed expression of TNFα, IL-16 and substance P.The evidence of mast cell degranulation was found in the wall of intestine from patients with IBD with immunohistochemistry technique. The highly elevated histamine and tryptase levels were detected in mucosa of petienta with IBD, strongly suggesting that mast cell degranulation is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD.However, Iittle is known of the actions of histamine, tryptase,chymase and carboxypeptidase in IBD. Over the lart decade,heparin has been used to treat IBD in clinical practice. The low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was effective as adjuvant therapy, and the petienis showed good clinical and laberatory respense with no senous advere effectd. The roles of PGD2, LTC4, PAF and mast cell cytokines in IBD were also discussed. Recently, a series of experiments with dispersed colon mast cells suggested there should be at least two pathways in man for mast colls to amplify their own activationdegranulation signals in an autocrine or paracrine mannec.The hypethesis is that mast cell secretogogues induce mart cell degranulation, release histamine, then stimulate the adjacent mast cells or positively feedback to further stimulate its host mast cells through H1 recepton.Whereas released tryptase acts similarly to hirtamine, but activates mart cells through its receptor PAR-2. The connections between current anti-IBD therapies or potential therapies for IBD with mast cells were discussed, implicating further that mast cell is a key cell type that is involved in the

  12. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial. PMID:26818422

  13. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Q Shih; Stephan R Targan

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing immune mediated disorders that results from an aberrant response to gut luminal antigen in genetically susceptible host. The adaptive immune response that is then triggered was widely considered to be a T-helper-1 mediated condition in Crohn's disease and T-helper-2 mediated condition in ulcerative colitis. Recent studies in animal models, genome wide association, and basic science has provided important insights in in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, one of which was the characterization of the interleukin-23/Th-17 axis.

  14. Telmisartan Attenuates Colon Inflammation, Oxidative Perturbations and Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Experimental Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Hany H.; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad Y.; Abdallah, Dalaal M.; Nassar, Noha N

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated the implication of angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) via its proinflammatory features. Telmisartan (TLM) is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist with marked anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions that mediated its cardio-, reno- and hepatoprotective actions. However, its impact on IBD has not been previously explored. Thus, we aimed to investigate the potential alleviating effects of TLM in tri-nitrobenezene sulphon...

  15. Sonography in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in diagnosing active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is assessed on the basis of a randomized prospective study of 61 patients. Twenty-six of the patients were affected with crohn's disease (CD) and 12 with ulcerative colitis, while the remaining 23 patients were control subjects with no specific chronic IBD. The US signs considered as a significant for active CD and UC were: -visualization of a typical target image, that is a hyperechoic center corresponding to luminal bowel content, surrounded by a hypoechoic ring corresponding to loop walls; -at least 2 of the following: solid abdominal mass, distended loops, luminal narrowing, reduced peristalsis, stiff loops, and accumulation of fluid between the loops. US sensitivity and specificity for CD were 77% and 95.6%, respectively. As for UC, no significant results were obtained. In our experiance, US is a reliable method for detecting alterations and, especially, comlpications typical of CD in its active phase. Considering the young age of patients affected with CD and the number of exams they must undergo, US is considered as a useful tool in disease follow-up

  16. The emerging therapy with probiotics in the management of inflammatory bowel disease: current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD comprises Ulcerative Colitis (UC and Crohn’s Disease (CD with unknown aetiology. Most of the drugs used to treat IBD as standard treatment produce adverse effects during long term therapy. Evidence has suggested a role of intestinal microbiota in IBD. The use of probiotics and prebiotics is the natural approach to treat IBD. The objective of this article was to review the studies on probiotics that cover the therapeutic status in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Appraisal of published articles from peer reviewed journals, search from PubMed and Wiley Blackwell website for English language publications using defined key words according to disease type. Studies have shown that probiotic agents play an important role in IBD and these are VSL#3, Bifido-ferminted milk, Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, Saccharomyces boulardi and “BIO-THREE for inducing remission in patients with active UC, for preventing relapses in inactive UC patients and also in UC patients with ileo-anal pouch anastomosis. Lactobacillllus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillllus johnsonii LA1 can prevent endoscopic recurrences in patients with inactive CD. Probiotic intervention study designs in IBD patients searched were RCT vs Placebo / RCT vs standard treatment . Studies - with uncontrolled design, - with prebiotics intervention and with helminths were also searched. There is a promising role of probiotics and prebiotics in chronic mucosal inflammation that occurs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Sufficient evidence to support the role of probiotics in CD are not available. Well designed RCT studies based on intention -to- treat analyses are required. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(4.000: 360-367

  17. Interplay of genetic and environmental triggers in intestinal inflammation: Genetics and transcriptomics in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Parmar, Amarjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CelD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to disease etiology. Gliadin is the alcohol-soluble fraction of gluten protein which is found in food grains such as wheat, rye and barley. In CelD, gliadin-derived peptides constitute the environmental trigger and genes within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on chromosome six encoding HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 heter...

  18. Toll-like receptor activation by helminths or helminth products to alleviate inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song YanXia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helminth infection may modulate the expression of Toll like receptors (TLR in dendritic cells (DCs and modify the responsiveness of DCs to TLR ligands. This may regulate aberrant intestinal inflammation in humans with helminthes and may thus help alleviate inflammation associated with human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Epidemiological and experimental data provide further evidence that reducing helminth infections increases the incidence rate of such autoimmune diseases. Fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. Thus, the use of antagonists of TLR-signaling and agonists of their negative regulators from helminths or helminth products should be considered for the treatment of IBD.

  19. Meta-omics in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Research: Applications, Challenges, and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles-Colomer, Mireia; Darzi, Youssef; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Falony, Gwen; Raes, Jeroen; Joossens, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Meta-omics [metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics] are rapidly expanding our knowledge of the gut microbiota in health and disease. These technologies are increasingly used in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] research. Yet, meta-omics data analysis, interpretation, and among-study comparison remain challenging. In this review we discuss the role these techniques are playing in IBD research, highlighting their strengths and limitations. We give guidelines on proper sample collection and preparation methods, and on performing the analyses and interpreting the results, reporting available user-friendly tools and pipelines. PMID:26802086

  20. The application of RNAi-based treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Tobias Jarlstad; Gonzalez, Borja Ballarin; Howard, Ken

    2014-01-01

    in which small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediates specific downregulation of key molecular targets of the IBD inflammatory process may offer a precise, potent and safer alternative to conventional treatments. This review describes the aetiology of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and the cellular......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, relapsing, idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract with no permanent cure. Present immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies are often ineffective and associated with severe side effects. An RNA interference (RNAi)-based approach...

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  2. Cutaneous Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Roxana Georgescu; Cristina Iulia Mitran; Madalina Irina Mitran; Monica Costescu; Vasile Benea; Maria Isabela Sarbu; Mircea Tampa

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a high frequency in Europe. They are chronic disorders that evolve with relapses and remissions. Clinical features include the signs of underlying inflammatory bowel disease and also signs of extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous disorders are the most common extraintestinal manifestations associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, which can be dependent on or independent of gastrointestinal disease activity. The main cutaneous disorders are erythema nod...

  3. Pediatric IBD-unclassified Is Less Common than Previously Reported; Results of an 8-Year Audit of the EUROKIDS Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Dwight A; Karolewska-Bochenek, Katarzyna; Lazowska-Przeorek, Izabella; Lionetti, Paolo; Mearin, M Luisa; Chong, Sonny K; Roma-Giannikou, Eleftheria; Maly, Jan; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Shaoul, Ron; Staiano, Annamaria; Damen, Gerard M; de Meij, Tim; Hendriks, Daniëlle; George, Elvira K; Turner, Dan; Escher, Johanna C

    2015-01-01

    plus small bowel radiology was considered complete diagnostic workup. Participating centers reporting IBD-U patients were queried in 2014 for follow-up data. RESULTS: IBD-U was the provisional first diagnosis in 265 of 3461 children (7.7%) (91/158 [58%] with pancolitis; 140 [53%] male), diagnosed more......BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease-unclassified (IBD-U) is diagnosed in ∼10% of pediatric and adolescent onset IBD patients. The EUROKIDS registry (2004) initiated by the Porto IBD working group of ESPGHAN prospectively monitors diagnostic workup of newly diagnosed pediatric and adolescent...... onset IBD patients. We aimed to describe diagnostic workup, phenotype, and change of diagnosis over time in pediatric IBD-U patients. METHODS: Data were collected on children from 52 centers across 20 European countries and Israel, diagnosed with IBD from May 2005 through November 2013. Full endoscopy...

  4. Role of the intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike G Laukoetter; Porfirio Nava; Asma Nusrat

    2008-01-01

    A critical function of the intestinal mucosa is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the interstitium. The single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serves as a dynamic interface between the host and its environment. Cell polarity and structural properties of the epithelium is complex and is important in the development of epithelial barrier function. Epithelial cells associate with each other via a series of intercellular junctions. The apical most intercellular junctional complex referred to as the Apical Junction Complex (AJC) is important in not only cell-cell recognition, but also in the regulation of paracellular movement of fluid and solutes. Defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is now becoming evident that an aberrant epithelial barrier function plays a central role in the pathophysiology of IBD. Thus, a better understanding of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function in healthy and disease states such as IBD will foster new ideas for the development of therapies for such chronic disorders.

  5. An (Anti)-Inflammatory Microbiota: Defining the Role in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, S; Hoedt, E C; Pottenger, S; Mohd-Najman, N-S; Ó Cuív, P; Morrison, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While it is now accepted that the gut microbiota contribute to the genotype-environment-lifestyle interactions triggering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) episodes, efforts to identify the pathogen(s) that cause these diseases have met with limited success. The advent of culture-independent techniques for characterizing the structure and/or function of microbial communities (hereafter referred to as metagenomics) has provided new insights into the events associated with the onset, remission and recurrence of IBD. A large number of observational and/or case-control studies of IBD patients have confirmed substantive changes in gut bacterial profiles (dysbiosis) associated with disease. These types of studies have been augmented by new profiling approaches that support the identification of more 'colitogenic' bacteria from numerically predominant taxa. Evidence of alterations in lesser abundant taxa such as the methanogenic archaea, to favor types that are more immunogenic, has also been forthcoming. Several recent longitudinal studies of patients with Crohn's disease have produced additional insights, including evidence for the role of 'anti-inflammatory' microbiota in providing a protective effect and/or promoting remission. In summation, the implications of dysbiosis and restoration of a 'healthy microbiota' in IBD patients requires definition beyond a taxonomic assessment of the changes in the gut microbiota during disease course. The available evidence does suggest that specific members of the gut microbiota can contribute either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects, and their ecological fitness in the large bowel affects the onset and recurrence of IBD. While metagenomics and related approaches offer the potential to provide novel and important insights into these microbiota and thereby the pathophysiology of IBD, we also need to better understand factors affecting the ecological fitness of these microbes, if new treatment of IBD patients are to be delivered. PMID

  6. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn's disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A(+)B(+) strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  7. Advances in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis: linking host genetics and the microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Knights, Dan; Lassen, Kara G; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the genetics underlying inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have increased our understanding of the pathways involved in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) and focused attention on the role of the microbiome in these diseases. Full understanding of pathogenesis will require a comprehensive grasp of the delicate homeostasis between gut bacteria and the human host. In this review we present current evidence of microbiome-gene interactions in the context of other know...

  8. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public. PMID:26968556

  9. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for the U.S. health care system and frequently complicates the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are more likely to be colonized with C. difficile and develop active infection than the general population. They are also more likely to have severe CDI and develop subsequent complications such as IBD flare, colectomy, or death. Even after successful initial treatment and recovery, recurrent CDI is common. Management of CDI in IBD is fraught with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges because the clinical presentations of CDI and IBD flare have considerable overlap. Fecal microbiota transplantation can be successful in curing recurrent CDI when other treatments have failed, but may also trigger IBD flare and this warrants caution. New experimental treatments including vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile offer promise but are not yet available for clinicians. A better understanding of the complex relationship between the gut microbiota, CDI, and IBD is needed. PMID:27120571

  10. Challenges and strategies of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease: a qualitative examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munk Marla

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to understand the lived experience and elements of quality of life as depicted by children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Methods Eighty participants with IBD, ranging in age from 7 to 19 years, were interviewed about the impact of IBD on their daily lives. Results Findings demonstrated that IBD profoundly affects children and adolescents. These young patients experience concerns and discomfort as a result of IBD symptoms and treatments. They commonly feel, in varying degrees, a sense of vulnerability and diminished control over their lives and future, and perceive themselves as "different" from healthy peers and siblings. Despite these negative impacts, participants also described effective means of coping with IBD, and reported that support from family members and friends contributes to coping. A positive attitude and other strategies were also described as strengths contributing to quality of life. Conclusion Clinical assessments need to consider the experiences and perceptions of children as they manage their IBD. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  11. EFFECT OF PREGNANE XENOBIOTIC RECEPTOR ACTIVATION ON INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE TREATED WITH RIFAXIMIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Y C; Li, T; Han, Y-D; Zhang, H-Y; Lin, H; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The causes and pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are still not clearly understood. This study aims to prove the important role of rifaximin played in inflammatory reaction caused by abnormity of the intestinal mucosal immune system. Intestinal microflora can greatly promote and maintain the inflammatory reaction of IBD, therefore, antibiotics can be used to treat IBD. Rifaximin is a medicine usually used for local intestinal infection. Many clinical and basic studies have shown that both a single application of rifaximin and the joint application with other medicines could achieve a good efficacy. This paper studied the activation of Pregnane Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR) in treating IBD with rifaximin and analyzed its efficacy in IBD when PXR was involved in the transport of medicine and metabolism. The results prove that rifaximin can not only serve as an anti-microbial drug, but can activate PXR and actually weaken the reaction of IBD. Thus it is safe to say that rifaximin has great potential in treating IBD. PMID:26122229

  12. Evaluation of SLC11A1 as an inflammatory bowel disease candidate gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant evidence suggests that a promoter polymorphism withinthe gene SLC11A1 is involved in susceptibility to both autoimmune and infectious disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SLC11A1 has a role in the susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by characterizing a promoter polymorphism within the gene and two short tandem repeat (STR markers in genetic proximity to SLC11A1. Methods The studied population consisted of 484 Caucasians with IBD, 144 population controls, and 348 non-IBD-affected first-degree relatives of IBD patients. IBD subjects were re-categorized at the sub-disease phenotypic level to characterize possible SLC11A1 genotype-phenotype correlations. Polymorphic markers were amplified from germline DNA and typed using gel electrophoresis. Genotype-phenotype correlations were defined using case-control, haplotype, and family-based association studies. Results This study did not provide compelling evidence for SLC11A1 disease association; most significantly, there was no apparent evidence of SLC11A1 promoter allele association in the studied Crohn's disease population. Conclusion Our results therefore refute previous studies that have shown SLC11A1 promoter polymorphisms are involved in susceptibility to this form of IBD.

  13. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlinger, K; Györke, T; Makö, E; Mester, A; Tarján, Z

    2000-09-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in the

  14. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in the

  15. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlinger, Kinga E-mail: karlking@radi.sote.hu; Gyoerke, Tamas; Makoe, Erno; Mester, Adam; Tarjan, Zsolt

    2000-09-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in

  16. Treatment of the Pregnant Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Rachel; Nørgård, Bente M; Friedman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    and on the rates of pregnancy loss and ectopic pregnancies. We do not know how to reliably measure disease activity during pregnancy or the effect of pregnancy on the microbiome. Although immunomodulators and anti-tumor necrosis factor medications are relatively safe during pregnancy, the long......Research regarding fertility, medication safety, and pregnancy outcomes is increasing, but there are still many knowledge gaps in these areas. Women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may have decreased fertility because of voluntary childlessness and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD......) surgery, and women with Crohn's disease may also have decreased ovarian reserve. Initial studies show that in vitro fertilization is a viable option, and laparoscopic ileoanal pouch anastomosis surgery improves fertility rates. Additional research is needed on the effect of disease activity on fertility...

  17. Advanced multimodality imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in 2015: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Emma; Moriarty, Heather K; Cronin, Carmel G

    2016-06-28

    The diagnosis and effective management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) requires a combination clinical, endoscopic, histological, biological, and imaging data. While endoscopy and biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of IBD, imaging plays a central role in the assessment of extra mural disease, in disease surveillance and in the assessment of response to medical treatments, which are often expensive. Imaging is also vital in the detection and diagnosis of disease related complications, both acute and chronic. In this review, we will describe, with illustrative images, the imaging features of IBD in adults, with emphasis on up-to-date imaging techniques focusing predominantly on cross sectional imaging and new magnetic resonance imaging techniques. PMID:27358684

  18. Low fecal calprotectin predicts sustained clinical remission in inflammatory bowel disease patients : a plea for deep remission

    OpenAIRE

    Mooiweer, Erik; Severs, Mirjam; Marguerite E I Schipper; Fidder, Herma H; Siersema, Peter D; Laheij, Robert J F; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal healing has become the treatment goal in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Whether low fecal calprotectin levels and histological healing combined with mucosal healing is associated with a further reduced risk of relapses is unknown. METHODS: Patients with CD, UC or inflammatory bowel disease-unclassified (IBD-U) scheduled for surveillance colonoscopy collected a stool sample prior to bowel cleansing. Only patients with mucosal healin...

  19. Anorexia nervosa complicating inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallett, P; MURCH, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in adolescence and complicated by anorexia nervosa, are presented. The management of the bowel disease with corticosteroids appeared to precipitate the eating disorder in one case whereas covert withdrawal of steroid treatment led to life threatening complications of inflammatory bowel disease in the other. The difficulties of managing two serious conditions, each ideally treated in a specialist centre, are discussed and the dangers of treati...

  20. NKX2-3 and IRGM variants are associated with disease susceptibility to IBD in Eastern European patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Meggyesi, Lajos S Kiss, Magdalena Koszarska, Martin Bortlik, Dana Duricova, Laszlo Lakatos, Tamas Molnar, Martin Leniček, Libor Vítek, Istvan Altorjay, Maria Papp, Zsolt Tulassay, Pal Miheller, Janos Papp, Attila Tordai, Hajnalka Andrikovics, Milan L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate variants of immunity-related GTPase family M (IRGM and NKX2-3 genes and genotype-phenotype in Eastern European patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD.METHODS: We analyzed 1707 Hungarian and Czech subjects with Crohn’s disease (CD (n = 810, age: 37.1 ± 12.6 years, duration: 10.7 ± 8.4 years and ulcerative colitis (UC (n = 428, age: 43.7 ± 15.0 years, duration: 12.6 ± 9.9 years, as well as 469 healthy controls. IRGM rs13361189, NKX2-3 rs10883365 and ECM1 rs13294 polymorphisms were tested by LightCycler allele discrimination. Detailed clinical phenotypes were determined by reviewing the medical charts.RESULTS: NKX2-3 rs10883365 variant allele was associated with increased risk for CD (P = 0.009, OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.06-1.48 and UC (P = 0.001, OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.13-1.63, whereas variant IRGM allele increased risk for CD (P = 0.029, OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.03-1.79. In contrast, ECM1 rs13294 was not associated with either CD or UC. In CD, the variant IRGM allele was associated with a colon-only location (P = 0.02, OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.07-2.44, whereas in UC, the ECM1 variant was associated with cutaneous manifestations (P = 0.002, OR = 3.36, 95% CI = 1.48-7.63. Variant alleles did not predict resistance to steroids or azathioprine, efficacy of infliximab, or need for surgery.CONCLUSION: NKX2-3 and IRGM are susceptibility loci for IBD in Eastern European patients. Further studies are needed to confirm the reported phenotype-genotype associations.

  1. Risk of extra-intestinal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease: meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Eva Natalia G.; Duricova, Dana; Elkjaer, Margarita;

    2010-01-01

    Extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are relatively common, whereas the risk of extra-intestinal cancer (EIC) remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to obtain a reliable estimate of the risk of EIC in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) by perform...

  2. Novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: Selective inhibition of cytokines and adhesion molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiko Nakamura; Kuniomi Honda; Takahiro Mizutani; Hirotada Akiho; Naohiko Harada

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which non-specifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Such recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD created a recent trend of novel biological therapies which specifically inhibit the molecules involved in the inflammatory cascade. Major targets for such treatment are inflammatory cytokines and their receptors, and adhesion molecules. A chimeric anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, infliximab, has become a standard therapy for CD and it is also likely to be beneficial for UC. Several anti-TNF reagents have been developed but most of them seem to not be as efficacious as infliximab. A humanized anti-TNF monoclonal antibody, adalimumab may be useful for the treatment of patients who lost responsiveness or developed intolerance to infliximab.Antibodies against IL-12 p40 and IL-6 receptor could be alternative new anti-cytokine therapies for IBD. Antiinterferon-γ and anti-CD25 therapies were developed,but the benefit of these agents has not yet been established. The selective blocking of migration of leukocytes into intestine seems to be a nice approach.Antibodies against α4 integrin and α4β7 integrin showed benefit for IBD. Antisense oligonucleotide of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) may be efficacious for IBD. Clinical trials of such compounds have been either recently reported or are currently underway. In this article, we review the efficacy and safety of such novel biological therapies for IBD.

  3. An Evaluation of the Correlation between Hepcidin Serum Levels and Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Betül Paköz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. While there are many well-defined serological markers for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, there is limited evidence that they positively affect clinical outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between hepcidin serum levels and disease activity in IBD. Materials and Methods. Eighty-five consecutive IBD patients were enrolled in the study. Hepcidin serum levels were assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and were compared with disease activity as well as the interleukin-6 (IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP levels. Results. The mean hepcidin serum levels in Crohn’s disease (CD patients in remission and in the active phase were 3837±1436 and 3752±1274 pg/mL, respectively P=0.613. The mean hepcidin serum levels in ulcerative colitis (UC patients in remission and in the active phase were 4285±8623 and 3727±1176 pg/mL, respectively P=0.241. Correlation analysis between inflammatory markers and hepcidin serum levels indicated that there was no correlation between hepcidin levels and IL-6 P=0.582 or CRP P=0.783. Conclusion. As an acute-phase protein, hepcidin seems to have a lower efficacy than other parameters in the detection of activation in IBD.

  4. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. PMID:27257963

  5. Genomic and clinical effects associated with a relaxation response mind-body intervention in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braden Kuo

    Full Text Available Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD can profoundly affect quality of life and are influenced by stress and resiliency. The impact of mind-body interventions (MBIs on IBS and IBD patients has not previously been examined.Nineteen IBS and 29 IBD patients were enrolled in a 9-week relaxation response based mind-body group intervention (RR-MBI, focusing on elicitation of the RR and cognitive skill building. Symptom questionnaires and inflammatory markers were assessed pre- and post-intervention, and at short-term follow-up. Peripheral blood transcriptome analysis was performed to identify genomic correlates of the RR-MBI.Pain Catastrophizing Scale scores improved significantly post-intervention for IBD and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD. Trait Anxiety scores, IBS Quality of Life, IBS Symptom Severity Index, and IBD Questionnaire scores improved significantly post-intervention and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD, respectively. RR-MBI altered expression of more genes in IBD (1059 genes than in IBS (119 genes. In IBD, reduced expression of RR-MBI response genes was most significantly linked to inflammatory response, cell growth, proliferation, and oxidative stress-related pathways. In IBS, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage related gene sets were significantly upregulated after RR-MBI. Interactive network analysis of RR-affected pathways identified TNF, AKT and NF-κB as top focus molecules in IBS, while in IBD kinases (e.g. MAPK, P38 MAPK, inflammation (e.g. VEGF-C, NF-κB and cell cycle and proliferation (e.g. UBC, APP related genes emerged as top focus molecules.In this uncontrolled pilot study, participation in an RR-MBI was associated with improvements in disease-specific measures, trait anxiety, and pain catastrophizing in IBS and IBD patients. Moreover, observed gene expression changes suggest that NF-κB is a target focus molecule in both IBS and IBD-and that its regulation may contribute to

  6. Clinicians’ guide to the use of fecal calprotectin to identify and monitor disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Bressler; Remo Panaccione; Richard N Fedorak; Seidman, Ernest G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Objective monitoring of the severity of inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an essential part of disease management. However, repeat endoscopy to define extent and severity of inflammation is not practical. Fecal calprotectin (FC) is a biomarker that can be used as a surrogate test to distinguish inflammatory from noninflammatory gastrointestinal disease.METHODS: A targeted search of the literature regarding FC, focusing primarily on the past three ye...

  7. Curcumin and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Potential and Limits of Innovative Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Vecchi Brumatti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin belongs to the family of natural compounds collectively called curcuminoids and it possesses remarkable beneficial anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and neuroprotective properties. Moreover it is commonly assumed that curcumin has also been suggested as a remedy for digestive diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, a chronic immune disorder affecting the gastrointestinal tract and that can be divided in two major subgroups: Crohn’s disease (CD and Ulcerative Colitis (UC, depending mainly on the intestine tract affected by the inflammatory events. The chronic and intermittent nature of IBD imposes, where applicable, long-term treatments conducted in most of the cases combining different types of drugs. In more severe cases and where there has been no good response to the drugs, a surgery therapy is carried out. Currently, IBD-pharmacological treatments are generally not curative and often present serious side effects; for this reason, being known the relationship between nutrition and IBD, it is worthy of interesting the study and the development of new dietary strategy. The curcumin principal mechanism is the suppression of IBD inflammatory compounds (NF-κB modulating immune response. This review summarizes literature data of curcumin as anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant in IBD, trying to understand the different effects in CD e UC.

  8. Insights from advances in research of chemically induced experimental models of human inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the most important being Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, results from chronic dysregulation of the mucosal immune system in the gastrointestinal tract. Although the pathogenesis of IBD remains unclear, it is widely accepted that genetic, environmental, and immunological factors are involved. Recent studies suggest that intestinal epithelial defenses are important to prevent inflammation by protecting against microbial pathogens and oxidative stresses. To investigate the etiology of IBD, animal models of experimental colitis have been developed and are frequently used to evaluate new anti-inflammatory treatments for IBD. Several models of experimental colitis that demonstrate various pathophysiological aspects of the human disease have been described. In this manuscript, we review the characteristic features of IBD through a discussion of the various chemically induced experimental models of colitis (e.g. dextran sodium sulfate-, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-, oxazolone-, acetic acid-, and indomethacin-induced models). We also summarize some regulatory and pathogenic factors demonstrated by these models that can, hopefully, be exploited to develop future therapeutic strategies against IBD.

  9. Endoscopy-coupled Raman spectroscopy for in vivo discrimination of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, I. J.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Bi, X.; Herline, A. J.; Beaulieu, D. M.; Horst, S. N.; Schwartz, D. A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, A.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's colitis (CC), affects nearly 2 million Americans, and the incidence is increasing worldwide. It has been established that UC and CC are distinct forms of IBD and require different medical care, however the distinction made between UC and CC is based upon inexact clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and pathologic features. A diagnosis of indeterminate colitis occurs in up to 15% of patients when UC and CC features overlap and cannot be differentiated; in these patients, diagnosis relies on long term followup, success or failure of existing treatment, and recurrence of the disease. Thus, there is need for a tool that can improve the sensitivity and specificity for fast, accurate and automated diagnosis of IBD. Here we present colonoscopy-coupled fiber probe-based Raman spectroscopy as a novel in vivo diagnostic tool for IBD. This in vivo study of both healthy control (NC, N=10) and diagnosed IBD patients with UC (N=15) and CC (N=26) aims to characterize spectral signatures of NC, UC, and CC. Samples are correlated with tissue pathology markers and endoscopic evaluation. Optimal collection parameters for detection have been identified based upon the new, application specific instrument design. The collected spectra are processed and analyzed using multivariate statistical techniques to identify spectral markers and discriminate NC, UC, and CC. Development of spectral markers to discriminate disease type is a necessary first step in the development of real-time, accurate and automated in vivo detection of IBD during colonoscopy procedures.

  10. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease: Potential role of molecular biometrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amosy; E; M’Koma

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predominantly colonic inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) is not possible in 30% of patients. For decades, scientists have worked to find a solution to improve diagnostic accuracy for IBD, encompassing Crohn’s colitis and ulcerative colitis. Evaluating protein patterns in surgical pathology colectomy specimens of colonic mucosal and submucosal compartments, individually, has potential for diagnostic medicine by identifying integrally independent, phenotype-specific cellular and molecular characteristics. Mass spectrometry(MS) and imaging(I) MS are analytical technologies that directly measure molecular species in clinical specimens, contributing to the in-depth understanding of biological molecules. The biometric-system complexity and functional diversity is well suited to proteomic and diagnostic studies. The direct analysis of cells and tissues by Matrix-Assisted-Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) MS/IMS has relevant medical diagnostic potential. MALDI-MS/IMS detection generates molecular signatures obtained from specific cell types within tissue sections. Herein discussed is a perspective on the use of MALDI-MS/IMS and bioinformatics technologies for detection of molecular-biometric patterns and identification of differentiating proteins. I also discuss a perspective on the global challenge of transferring technologies to clinical laboratories dealing with IBD issues. The significance of serologic-immunometric advances is also discussed.

  11. Neuroimmunomodulation in the Gut: Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardazzi, Claudio; Pêgo, Beatriz; de Souza, Heitor Siffert P

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal immunity is finely regulated by several concomitant and overlapping mechanisms, in order to efficiently sense external stimuli and mount an adequate response of either tolerance or defense. In this context, a complex interplay between immune and nonimmune cells is responsible for the maintenance of normal homeostasis. However, in certain conditions, the disruption of such an intricate network may result in intestinal inflammation, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors acting in concert with an inappropriate immune response, which in turn interacts with nonimmune cells, including nervous system components. Currently, evidence shows that the interaction between the immune and the nervous system is bidirectional and plays a critical role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Recently, the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis has been shown to be under the reciprocal control of the microbiota by immune mechanisms, whereas intestinal microorganisms can modulate mucosal immunity. Therefore, in addition to presenting the mechanisms underlying the interaction between immune and nervous systems in the gut, here we discuss the role of the microbiota also in the regulation of neuroimmune crosstalk involved in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation, with potential implications to IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27471349

  12. Minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease: Review of current developments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Rijcken, Emile

    2016-05-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprise a population of patients that have a high likelihood of both surgical treatment at a young age and repetitive operative interventions. Therefore surgical procedures need to aim at minimizing operative trauma with best postoperative recovery. Minimally invasive techniques have been one of the major advancements in surgery in the last decades and are nowadays almost routinely performed in colorectal resections irrespective of underlying disease. However due to special disease related characteristics such as bowel stenosis, interenteric fistula, abscesses, malnutrition, repetitive surgeries, or immunosuppressive medications, patients with IBD represent a special cohort with specific needs for surgery. This review summarizes current evidence of minimally invasive surgery for patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and gives an outlook on the future perspective of technical advances in this highly moving field with its latest developments in single port surgery, robotics and trans-anal techniques. PMID:27158537

  13. Phosphotidylserine exposure and neutrophil extracellular traps enhance procoagulant activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhangxiu; Si, Yu; Jiang, Tao; Ma, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yan; Cao, Muhua; Li, Tao; Yao, Zhipeng; Zhao, Lu; Fang, Shaohong; Yu, Bo; Dong, Zengxiang; Thatte, Hemant S; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Yang, Shufen; Piao, Daxun; Hao, Lirong; Zhou, Jin; Shi, Jialan

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated thromboembolic event often lacks precise aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) towards the hypercoagulable state in IBD. We demonstrated that the levels of PS exposed MPs and the sources of MP-origin, platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes and cultured endothelial cells (ECs) were higher in IBD groups than in healthy controls using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Wright-Giemsa and immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the elevated NETs were released by activated IBD neutrophils or by control neutrophils treated with IBD sera obtained from patients with the active disease. MPs and MP-origin cells in IBD groups, especially in active stage, markedly shortened coagulation time and had increased levels of fibrin, thrombin and FXa production as assessed by coagulation function assays. Importantly, we found that on stimulated ECs, PS rich membranes provided binding sites for FXa and FVa, promoting fibrin formation while TNF blockage or IgG depletion attenuated this effect. Treatment of control neutrophils with TNF and isolated IgG from PR3-ANCA-positive active IBD patients also resulted in the release of NETs. Blockade of PS with lactadherin prolonged coagulation time, decreased fibrin formation to control levels, and inhibited the procoagulant enzymes production in the MPs and MP-origin cells. NET cleavage by DNase I partly decreased PCA in IBD or stimulated neutrophils. Our study reveals a previously unrecognised link between hypercoagulable state and PS exposure or NETs, and may further explain the epidemiological association of thrombosis within IBD patients. PMID:26660948

  14. Canine breeds at high risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease in the south-eastern UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathrani, A; Werling, D; Allenspach, K

    2011-12-10

    Genetics are an important factor in the development of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, there is very little information available regarding the role of genetics in canine IBD. The purpose of this study was to gather information about which canine breeds in the south-eastern UK are at a high risk for developing IBD. Determination of such breeds may help further genetic research in this complex disease. The computer medical records at the Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, Royal Veterinary College dating from August 1, 2003 to December 31, 2009 were retrospectively searched for cases diagnosed with IBD. Five hundred and forty-six dogs with IBD were identified, representing 86 different breeds. The comparison group consisted of all dogs from these same 86 breeds without IBD admitted to the hospital during the same period that amounted to 27,463 dogs. The breeds at significantly higher risk of developing IBD compared with mixed-breed dogs consisted of weimaraner (odds ratio [OR]=3.6797, 95 per cent confidence interval [CI]=2.0167 to 6.7141, Pborder collie (OR=1.9936, 95 per cent CI=1.1655 to 3.4101, P=0.0118) and boxer (OR=1.6961, 95 per cent CI=1.0441 to 2.755, P=0.0328). This study demonstrates for the first time canine breeds in the south-eastern UK that are highly susceptible to developing IBD. Identification of such breeds may allow for a more focused investigation of genetic mutations associated with canine IBD. PMID:21896567

  15. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  16. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain. (orig.)

  17. Cytokine and anti-cytokine therapies for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Haruhiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2003-01-01

    Although the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains elusive, it appears that there is chronic activation of the immune and inflammatory cascade in genetically susceptible individuals. Current disease management guidelines have therefore focused on the use of anti-inflammatory agents, aminosalicylates and corticosteroids. These conventional therapies continue to be a first choice in the management of IBD. Immunomodulators, such as azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate or cyclosporin, are demonstrating increasing importance against steroid-resistant and steroid-dependent patients. However, some patients are still refractory to these therapies. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiological conditions of IBD have provided new immune system modulators as therapeutic tools. Other immunosuppressive agents including FK506 and thalidomide have expanded the choice of medical therapies available for certain subgroups of patients. Furthermore, biological therapies have begun to assume a prominent role. Studies with chimeric monoclonal anti-TNF-alpha antibody treatment have been reported with dramatic successes. However, observations in larger numbers of treated patients are needed to explicate fully the safety of or risks posed by this agent such as developing lymphoma, or other malignancies. Another anti-inflammatory cytokine-therapy includes anti anti-IL-6R, anti-IL-12 or toxin-conjugated anti IL-7R, recombinant cytokines (IL-10 or IL-11). Given the diversity of proinflammatory products under its control, NF-kappaB may be viewed as a master switch in lymphocytes and macrophages, regulating inflammation and immunity. Although some of them still need more confirmatory studies, those immune therapies will provide new insights into cell-based and gene-based treatment against IBD in near future. PMID:12769750

  18. Effect of smoking on inflammatory bowel disease: Is it disease or organ specific?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Karban; R Eliakim

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with differing effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Never smoking and formerly smoking increase the risk of UC,whereas smoking exacerbates the course of CD. The potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are yet unknown. A reasonable assumption is that smoking has different effects on the small and large intestine. This assumption is based on animal and human studies that show that the effects of smoking/nicotine on CD and UC depend on the site of inflammation and not on the type of disease.

  19. [Transition from paediatric to adult care: management of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, G; van der Woude, C J; de Ridder, L; van Gaalen, M A C; Escher, J C

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of adolescent patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to adult gastroenterology services is often troublesome. Failed transition can have adverse effects on the course of disease. We present two cases of adolescent IBD patients and their transition process. We identify requirements for successful transition and discuss potential barriers. We illustrate and emphasise that the medical teams on each side (paediatric and adult), as well as the patient and the parents should actively participate in the process of transition. The medical team should, preferably during a local transition clinic, regularly evaluate disease knowledge and self-management skills of the patient and make an individual transition plan to fill the gaps in knowledge and/or skills. Patients should be willing to learn to become more independent and parents should be stimulated to create an environment so that their child can actually try to become more independent. Lastly, we present the Rotterdam model for transition of IBD patients. PMID:27581867

  20. Perturbation of the Human Microbiome as a Contributor to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan Missaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The human microbiome consist of the composite genome of native flora that have evolved with humanity over millennia and which contains 150-fold more genes than the human genome. A “healthy” microbiome plays an important role in the maintenance of health and prevention of illness, inclusive of autoimmune disease such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. IBD is a prevalent spectrum of disorders, most notably defined by Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, which are associated with considerable suffering, morbidity, and cost. This review presents an outline of the loss of a normal microbiome as an etiology of immune dysregulation and IBD pathogenesis initiation. We, furthermore, summarize the knowledge on the role of a healthy microbiome in terms of its diversity and important functional elements and, lastly, conclude with some of the therapeutic interventions and modalities that are now being explored as potential applications of microbiome-host interactions.

  1. Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2008-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.

  2. Review article: remission rates achievable by current therapies for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Lémann, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aim: To review remission rates with current medical treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods We searched MEDLINE (source PUBMED, 1966 to January, 2011). Results Induction and maintenance of remission was observed in 20% (range, 9-29.5%) and 53% (range, 36.8-59.6%) of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients treated with oral 5-ASA derivatives. Induction of remission was noted in 52% (range, 48-58%) of Crohn?s disease (CD) patients and 54% of UC...

  3. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy to assess mucosal angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio; Danese; Gionata; Fiorino; Erika; Angelucci; Stefania; Vetrano; Nico; Pagano; Giacomo; Rando; Antonino; Spinelli; Alberto; Malesci; Alessandro; Repici

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether narrow band imaging (NBI) is a useful tool for the in vivo detection of angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: Conventional and NBI colonoscopy was performed in 14 patients with colonic inflammation (8 ulcerative colitis and 6 Crohn’s disease). Biopsy samples were taken and CD31 expression was assayed immuno- histochemically; microvascular density was assessed by vessel count. RESULTS: In areas that were endoscopically normal but positive on NBI, ther...

  4. Experiences of gay and lesbian patients with inflammatory bowel disease:a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Dibley, Lesley; Norton, Christine; Schaub, Jason; Bassett, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Chronic illness research involving lesbian and gay people typically focuses on HIV/AIDS, cancer, and mental health. The authors extend the evidence with a two-phase mixed methods exploration of gay and lesbian people's experiences with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), collecting demographic, disease history, and outness data from 50 community-based respondents and conducting 22 semi-structured interviews. Of the12 key themes identified, 8 resonate with concerns reported in the heterosexual I...

  5. Analysis of Serum Antibodies in Patients Suspected of Having Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M.; Hill, Harry R.

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the general term used for a heterogeneous group of intestinal disorders, including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Serological markers such as anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and atypical perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (atypical pANCA) have proven useful in the diagnosis and differentiation of CD and UC. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody directed against the outer membrane protein C (OmpC) of Escherichia co...

  6. Optimization of the treatment with immunosuppressants and biologics in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Renna, S; Cottone, M; Orlando, A

    2014-01-01

    Many placebo controlled trials and meta-analyses evaluated the efficacy of different drugs for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including immunosuppressants and biologics. Their use is indicated in moderate to severe disease in non responders to corticosteroids and in steroid-dependent patients, as induction and maintainance treatment. Infliximab, as well as cyclosporine, is considered a second line therapy in the case of severe ulcerative colitis, or non-responders to intra...

  7. Crypt abscess-associated microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease and acute self-limited colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry; Sokol; Nadia; Vasquez; Nadia; Hoyeau-Idrissi; Philippe; Seksik; Laurent; Beaugerie; Anne; Lavergne-Slove; Philippe; Pochart; Philippe; Marteau

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether crypt abscesses frominflammatory bowel disease(IBD)patients containbacteria and to establish their nature.METHODS:We studied 17 ulcerative colitis patients,11 Crohn's disease patients,7 patients with acute selflimited colitis(ASLC)and normal colonic biopsies from5 subjects who underwent colonoscopy for colon cancer screening.A fluorescent in situ hybridization techniquewas applied to colonic biopsies to assess the microbiotacomposition of the crypts and crypt abscesses.RESULTS:Crypts...

  8. Relevance of fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin in the post-operative management of inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Caccaro, Roberta; Angriman, Imerio; D’Incà, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The role of fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin has been extensively studied in many areas of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients’ management. The post-operative setting in both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients has been less investigated although few promising results come from small, cross-sectional studies. Therefore, the current post-operative management still requires endoscopy 6-12 mo after intestinal resection for CD in order to exclude endoscopic recurrenc...

  9. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amph...

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease of the Elderly: A Wake-Up Call

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Seymour; Feldstein, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As the baby-boomer generation enters the ranks of the elderly (defined as patients over 60 years of age), the increased burden of managing older inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires recognition of the impact of comorbid disease, polypharmacy, and surgical candidacy criteria. There is a surprisingly positive response to newer therapies and surgery, provided that a distinction is made between “fit elderly” and “frail elderly” patients. The former group should not be denied access ...

  11. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bosani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi PorroChair of Gastroenterology, “L. Sacco” University Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of “controlled” inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, IL-12 and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10, IL-11. The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may therefore be a logical target for inflammatory bowel disease therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, Th1 polarization, T cell activation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB, and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this context, infliximab and adalimumab are currently the only biologic agents approved in Europe for the treatment of inflammatory Crohn’s disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP571, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, onercept. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanism involved in the inflammatory process. Lymphocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by adhesion molecules are important in leukocyte migration and recruitment to sites of inflammation, and

  12. News from the "5th International Meeting on Inflammatory Bowel Diseases" CAPRI 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Giovanni; Fiocchi, Claudio; Caprili, Renzo

    2010-12-01

    At the "5th International Meeting on Inflammatory Bowel Diseases selected topics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including the environment, genetics, the gut flora, the cell response and immunomodulation were discussed in order to better understand specific clinical and therapeutic aspects. The incidence of IBD continues to rise, both in low and in high-incidence areas. It is believed that factors associated with 'Westernization' may be conditioning the expression of these disorders. The increased incidence of IBD among migrants from low-incidence to high-incidence areas within the same generation suggests a strong environmental influence. The development of genome-wide association scanning (GWAS) technologies has lead to the discovery of more than 100 IBD loci. Some, as the Th 17 pathway genes, are shared between Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), while other are IBD subtype-specific (autophagy genes, epithelial barrier genes). Disease-specific therapies targeting these pathways should be developed. Epigenetic regulation of the inflammatory response also appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of IBD. The importance of gut flora in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation was reinforced, the concepts of eubiosis and dysbiosis were introduced, and some strategies for reverting dysbiosis to a homeostatic state of eubiosis were proposed. The current status of studies on the human gut microbiota metagenome, metaprotome, and metabolome was also presented. The cell response in inflammation, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses, autophagy and inflammasome-dependent events were related to IBD pathogenesis. It was suggested that inflammation-associated ER stress responses may be a common trait in the pathogenesis of various chronic immune and metabolic diseases. How innate and adaptive immunity signaling events can perpetuate chronic inflammation was discussed extensively. Signal transduction pathways provide intracellular

  13. The role of nuclear medicine in inflammatory bowel disease. A review with experiences of aspecific bowel activity using immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) needs a complex diagnostic work-up. Beside verifying the disease itself, it is fundamental to assess disease extent and activity and to detect associated complications, to find the most effective treatment and for follow up. Scintigraphy with radiolabelled leukocytes is able to provide a complete survey of the whole intestinal tract, both the small and large bowel, and detects septic complications successfully with negligible risk. Radionuclide procedures are useful in establishing or ruling out IBD in patients with intestinal complaints, in assessing disease severity, and in the evaluation of extraintestinal septic complications. Widely available radionuclide procedures are discussed, i.e. scintigraphy by 111Indium oxime or 99mTechnetium HMPAO labelled white blood cells and immunoscintigraphy with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies. Advantages and disadvantages of all three methods are stressed out. Patients and methods: The immunoscintigraphies with 99mTc anti-granulocyte antibodies (ANTI-GRANULOCYTE[reg] BW 250/183) of 27 patients with suspicion of IBD were retrospectively analysed. Planar anterior and posterior images were obtained 4 and 24 h postinjection, respectively. The bowel was divided into six segments and the activity was visually graded with reference to bone marrow in each segments. The scans were compared with the results of radiological and endoscopical investigations. The diagnosis of IBD was proved or ruled out by means of enteroclysis, large bowel enema or endoscopy. Results: In the 27 patients, 74 bowel segments with increased activity were detected. In the case of 30 segments in 16 patients, bowel inflammation was revealed by the other methods (true positives). In the case of 44 bowel segments, no underlying bowel inflammation could be verified, and these activities were regarded as aspecific activity. We could not differentiate between true positive and aspecific activity based on scan pattern

  14. Epidemiology of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in Iran and Asia; A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Safarpour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is set to stabilize in Western Europe and North America, as opposed to its increasing trend in developing countries in Asia. The epidemiology of IBDs in areas where the incidence and prevalence are relatively low provides an opportunity for researchers to determine the unknown aspects of them. In this review article, the PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched from 1970 to 2012 and the epidemiological aspects assessed in Iranian articles were compared with identical subjects in other Asian countries. During this period, there were 21 documented articles on IBD epidemiology in Iran and 52 in Asia. According to the present review, CTLA-gene polymorphism and male/female ratio in ulcerative colitis (UC, incidence of extra-intestinal manifestations, extent of intestinal involvement, and family history in both UC and Crohn’s disease (CD seemed to be different between Asia and Iran. In contrast, the incidence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in IBD patients and association between NO2/CARD15 mutation and CD as C3435-T allele and UC were nearly the same. The rate of IBD has increased significantly in Iran, as has that of other Asian countries during the last decade. A thorough, well-designed, population-based, multi-regional epidemiologic study seems mandatory due to the substantial demographic and characteristic variability in IBD patients in our region.

  15. Classical and recent advances in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sales-Campos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are intestinal disorders that comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. These disorders have a significant effect on the quality of life of affected patients and the increasing number of IBD cases worldwide is a growing concern. Because of the overall burden of IBD and its multifactorial etiology, efforts have been made to improve the medical management of these inflammatory conditions. The classical therapeutic strategies aim to control the exacerbated host immune response with aminosalicylates, antibiotics, corticosteroids, thiopurines, methotrexate and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF biological agents. Although successful in the treatment of several CD or UC conditions, these drugs have limited effectiveness, and variable responses may culminate in unpredictable outcomes. The ideal therapy should reduce inflammation without inducing immunosuppression, and remains a challenge to health care personnel. Recently, a number of additional approaches to IBD therapy, such as new target molecules for biological agents and cellular therapy, have shown promising results. A deeper understanding of IBD pathogenesis and the availability of novel therapies are needed to improve therapeutic success. This review describes the overall key features of therapies currently employed in clinical practice as well as novel and future alternative IBD treatment methods.

  16. Fecal immunochemical test as a biomarker for inflammatory bowel diseases: can it rival fecal calprotectin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Jun; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Nakarai, Asuka; Takashima, Shiho; Inokuchi, Toshihiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of disease activity is essential for choosing an appropriate treatment and follow-up plan for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Endoscopy is required for accurately evaluating disease activity, but the procedures are sometimes invasive and burdensome to patients. Therefore, alternative non-invasive methods for evaluating or predicting disease activity including mucosal status are desirable. Fecal calprotectin (Fcal) is the most widely used fecal marker for IBD, and many articles have described the performance of the marker in predicting disease activity, mucosal healing (MH), treatment efficacy, and risk of relapse. Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) can quantify the concentration of hemoglobin in stool and was originally used for the screening of colorectal cancer. We recently reported that FIT is also a useful biomarker for IBD. A direct comparison between the use of Fcal and FIT showed that both methods predicted MH in ulcerative colitis equally well. However, in the case of Crohn's disease, FIT was less sensitive to lesions in the small intestine, compared to Fcal. FIT holds several advantages over Fcal in regards to user-friendliness, including a lower cost, easy and clean handling, and the ability to make rapid measurements by using an automated measurement system. However, there is insufficient data to support the application of FIT in IBD. Further studies into the use of FIT for evaluating the inflammatory status of IBD are warranted. PMID:26884729

  17. Measurement and clinical implications of choroidal thickness in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Koral Onal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Ocular inflammation is a frequent extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and may parallel disease activity. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a choroidal thickness measurement in assessing IBD activity.Methods:A total of 62 eyes of 31 patients with IBD [Crohn's disease (CD, n=10 and ulcerative colitis (UC, n=21] and 104 eyes of 52 healthy blood donors were included in this study. Choroidal thickness was measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. The Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI and the modified Truelove Witts score were used to assess disease activity in CD and UC, respectively.Results:No significant differences in mean subfoveal, nasal 3000 μm, or temporal 3000 μm choroidal thickness measurements (P>0.05 for all were observed between IBD patients and healthy controls. Age, smoking, CD site of involvement (ileal and ileocolonic involvement, CDAI, CD activity, and UC endoscopic activity index were all found to be significantly correlated with choroidal thickness by univariate analysis (P<0.05. Smoking (P<0.05 and the CD site of involvement (P<0.01 were the only independent parameters associated with increased choroidal thickness at all measurement locations.Conclusions:Choroidal thickness is not a useful marker of disease activity in patients with IBD but may be an indicator of ileal involvement in patients with CD.

  18. Restriction of dairy products: a reality in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Brasil Lopes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcium deficiency is considered a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients. Various dietary restrictions, including milk products are reported by these patients. Objective: To evaluate dairy product and dietary calcium intake by IBD patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 65 outpatients with IBD recruited from one reference center for IBD. A semi-structured questionnaire (to collect demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data and a quantitative food frequency questionnaire were administered. With regard to clinical data, we evaluated the anthropometric nutritional status, the disease classification, the disease activity index and the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Selfreported modifications in the use of dairy products were evaluated. Results: The IBD patients´ ages ranged from 20-75 years and 67.0% were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. The majority (64.7% reported restricting dairy products. The frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among the Crohn´s disease patients who restricted dairy products than among those with no restrictions (100% vs 42.9%; p = 0.013; this result was not observed among the UC (ulcerative colitis patients. Disease activity was also more frequent in the IBD patients who restricted dairy products than in those with no restrictions (23.8% vs 4.5%; p = 0.031, and among the UC patients, extensive disease was more common in the patients who restricted dairy products than in those with no restrictions (42.9% vs 20.0%; p = 0.03. Conclusion: Restricting dairy products is common among IBD patients, possibly due to disease activity, the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the extension of the disease.

  19. Changes of the cytokine profile in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gy(o)rgyi Müzes; Béla Molnár; Zsolt Tulassay; Ferenc Sipos

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are indispensable signals of the mucosaassociated immune system for maintaining normal gut homeostasis.An imbalance of their profile in favour of inflammation initiation may lead to disease states,such as that is observed in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).Although Crohn's disease (CD) is often described as a prototype of T-helper 1-type diseases,and ulcerative colitis (UC) is traditionally viewed as a T-helper 2-mediated condition,the classic paradigm,which categorises cytokines into pro-and anti-inflammatory groups,has recently been changed.The inflammation regulatory pathways may not be mutually exclusive as individual cytokines can have diverse and even opposing functions in various clinical and immunological settings.None the less there are many common immunological responses in IBD that are mediated by cytokines.Although they regulate and influence the development,course and recurrence of the inflammatory process,the concrete pathogenic role of these small signaling molecules is sometimes not unambiguous in the subtypes of the disease.Our aim is to review the current information about pro-and anti-inflammatory effects of traditionally studied and recently discovered cytokines in the pathogenesis of UC and CD.The better understanding of their production and functional activity may lead to the development of new therapeutic modalities.

  20. Stimulating erythropoiesis in inflammatory bowel disease associated anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgia Tsiolakidou; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and is associated with decreased quality of life and increased rate of hospitalization. The primary therapeutic targets of IBDassociated anemia are iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. An important prognostic parameter of the success or failure of therapy is the outcome of the underlying disease. Iron deficiency should be appropriately managed with iron supplementation.However, the use of oral iron therapy is limited by several problems, the most important being gastrointestinal side effects leading occasionally to disease relapse and poor iron absorption. Intravenous iron preparations are more reliable, with iron sucrose demonstrating the best efficacy and tolerability. Treatment with erythropoietin or darbepoetin has been proven to be effective in patients with anemia, who fail to respond to intravenous iron. Patients with ongoing inflammation have anemia of chronic disease and may require combination therapy comprising of intravenous iron sucrose and erythropoietin. After initiating treatment, careful monitoring of hemoglobin levels and iron parameters is needed in order to avoid recurrence of anemia. In conclusion, anemia in the setting of IBD should be aggressively diagnosed, investigated, and treated. Future studies should define the optimal dose and schedule of intravenous iron supplementation and appropriate erythropoietin therapy in these patients.

  1. Central endoscopy reads in inflammatory bowel disease clinical trials: The role of the imaging core lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Harris; Berzin, Tyler M; Yu, Hui Jing; Huang, Christopher S; Mishkin, Daniel S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are evolving at a rapid pace by employing central reading for endoscopic mucosal assessment in a field that was, historically, largely based on assessments by local physicians. This transition from local to central reading carries with it numerous technical, operational, and scientific challenges, many of which can be resolved by imaging core laboratories (ICLs), a concept that has a longer history in clinical trials in a number of diseases outside the realm of gastroenterology. For IBD trials, ICLs have the dual goals of providing objective, consistent assessments of endoscopic findings using central-reading paradigms whilst providing important expertise with regard to operational issues and regulatory expectations. This review focuses on current approaches to using ICLs for central endoscopic reading in IBD trials. PMID:24994835

  2. Gene-microbiota interactions contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hiutung; Khosravi, Arya; Kusumawardhani, Indah P; Kwon, Alice H K; Vasconcelos, Anilton C; Cunha, Larissa D; Mayer, Anne E; Shen, Yue; Wu, Wei-Li; Kambal, Amal; Targan, Stephan R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Ernst, Peter B; Green, Douglas R; McGovern, Dermot P B; Virgin, Herbert W; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2016-05-27

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with risk variants in the human genome and dysbiosis of the gut microbiome, though unifying principles for these findings remain largely undescribed. The human commensal Bacteroides fragilis delivers immunomodulatory molecules to immune cells via secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). We reveal that OMVs require IBD-associated genes, ATG16L1 and NOD2, to activate a noncanonical autophagy pathway during protection from colitis. ATG16L1-deficient dendritic cells do not induce regulatory T cells (T(regs)) to suppress mucosal inflammation. Immune cells from human subjects with a major risk variant in ATG16L1 are defective in T(reg) responses to OMVs. We propose that polymorphisms in susceptibility genes promote disease through defects in "sensing" protective signals from the microbiome, defining a potentially critical gene-environment etiology for IBD. PMID:27230380

  3. Botanical Drugs as an Emerging Strategy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M. Elena; Risco, Severiano; Ocete, M. Angeles; Galvez, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most common categories of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that comprises the patients' life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their aetiology is not completely understood, nonfully efficient drugs have been developed and those that show effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. Therefore, many patients try with some botanical drugs, which are safe and efficient after many years of use. However, it is necessary to properly evaluate these therapies to consider a new strategy for human IBD. In this report we have reviewed the main botanical drugs that have been assessed in clinical trials in human IBD and the mechanisms and the active compounds proposed for their beneficial effects. PMID:26576073

  4. Exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors:Fact or fiction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a possible link between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been repeatedly suggested. Recently, a few studies have addressed the issue of a possible,similar effect by selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (COXIBs). The present article reviews the available scientific evidence for this controversial subject.

  5. CD4+ T lymphocytes injected into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice lead to an inflammatory and lethal bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Rudolphi, A; Kofoed, S;

    1996-01-01

    Transfer of 2 x 10(5) congenic or semiallogenic purified TCR alphabeta+ CD4+ T cells to SCID mice leads to an infiltration of the recipient gut lamina propria and epithelium with a donor-derived CD4+ T cell subset which induces a lethal inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the recipients. In contr...

  6. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, S.J.; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora.

  7. Serious events with infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a 9-year cohort study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, H.S. de; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Jong, D.J. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor infliximab is incorporated in the treatment guidelines for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, concerns about serious adverse events such as infections, malignancies and death do exist. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence

  8. Practical strategies for enhancing adherence to treatment regimen in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel N; Kunz, Jennifer H; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A

    2013-06-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  9. Insufficient Knowledge of Korean Gastroenterologists Regarding the Vaccination of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims There is an increased risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to develop infections due to the use of immunomodulators and biologics. Several infections are preventable by immunizations. This study investigated the knowledge and awareness of Korean gastroenterologists regarding the vaccination of patients with IBD. Methods A self-reported questionnaire was sent by e-mail to the faculty members of tertiary hospitals. Gastroenterologists were asked ten questions regarding the immunization of patients with IBD. A total of 56 gastroenterologists completed the questionnaire. Results A majority of gastroenterologists (>60%) had rarely or never recorded an immunization history from their patients with IBD. Moreover, 50% to 70% of the gastroenterologists did not know that live vaccines should be avoided in immunosuppressed patients. The most commonly mentioned resistance to vaccinations was "the lack of concern and knowledge regarding vaccination." Gastroenterologists more frequently asked about the immunization history of influenza, pneumococcal, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B vaccines and recommended these vaccines more often than others. Conclusions Korean gastroenterologists' awareness and knowledge regarding the vaccination of patients with IBD were very poor. Intensive educational programs on immunization guidelines directed toward gastroenterologists who care for patients with IBD are required to ensure that these patients receive the necessary vaccinations. PMID:24827619

  10. Expression of integrin alphavbeta6 in the intestinal epithelial cells of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Sui Feng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is about 0.05% in industrialized countries. The pathogenesis of IBD remains to be further understood. The present study aims to elucidate the expression of integrin αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBD. Materials and Methods: Colonic biopsy was obtained from a group of IBD patients. The expression of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa was detected by Western blotting. Human colonic epithelial cell line T84 cells were stimulated by microbial antigen flagellin. The expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: The levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa were much lower than it in normal control subjects. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO were higher in IBD patients that were negatively correlated with the levels of αvβ6 in the intestinal mucosa. The expression of αvβ6 was detectable in T84 cells at naïve status that could be upregulated by exposure to microbial antigen flagellin. Pretreatment with MPO dramatically suppressed the expression of αvβ6 in T84 cells. Conclusions: We conclude that the expression of αvβ6 was suppressed in IBD intestinal mucosa, which could be resulted from the high levels of MPO.

  11. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine ...

  12. Th17 response and autophagy - main pathways implicated in the development of inflammatory bowel disease by genome-wide association studies: new factors involved in inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Díaz-Peña

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an entity that mainly includes ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD. Improved health care, diet changes, and higher industrialization are associated with an increase in IBD prevalence. This supports the central role of environmental factors in the pathology of this disease. However, IBD also shows a relevant genetic component as shown by high heritability. Classic genetic studies showed relevant associations between IBD susceptibility and genes involved in the immune response. This is consistent with prior theories about IBD development. According to these, contact of the immune system with a high number of harmless antigens from the diet and the bacterial flora should originate tolerance while preserving response against pathogens. Failure to achieve this balance may originate the typical inflammatory response associated with IBD. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWASs have confirmed the implication of the immune system, particularly the Th17 immune response, previously associated to other autoimmune diseases, and of autophagy. In this paper, the mechanisms involved in these two relevant pathways and their potential role in the pathogenesis of IBD are reviewed.

  13. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the bowel wall can predict disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanini, Laura, E-mail: laura.romanini@libero.it [Department of Radiology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passamonti, Matteo, E-mail: matteopassamonti@gmail.com [Department of Radiology-AO Provincia di Lodi, Via Fissiraga, 15, 26900 Lodi (Italy); Navarria, Mario, E-mail: navarria.mario@tiscali.it [Department of Radiology-ASL Vallecamonica-Sebino, Via Manzoni 142, 25040 Esine, BS (Italy); Lanzarotto, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.lanzarotto@spedalicivili.brescia.it [Department of Gastroenterology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Villanacci, Vincenzo, E-mail: villanac@alice.it [Department of Pathology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Grazioli, Luigi, E-mail: radiologia1@spedalicivili.brescia.it [Department of Radiology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Calliada, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.calliada@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Pavia, Viale Camillo Golgi 19, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Maroldi, Roberto, E-mail: rmaroldi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of quantitative analysis of bowel wall enhancement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) by comparing the results with vascular density in a biopsy sample from the same area of the intestinal tract, and to determine the usefulness of this analysis for the prediction of disease activity. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institute's ethics committee and all patients gave written informed consent. We enrolled 33 consecutive adult patients undergoing colonoscopy and biopsy for IBD. All patients underwent CEUS and the results were quantitatively analyzed. Vessel count per high-power field on biopsy specimens was compared with colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS findings, and with analysis of peak intensity, time to peak, regional blood volume, mean transit time, and regional blood flow. Results in patients with high and low vascular density were compared using Fisher's test, t-test, Pearson's correlation test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Cutoff values were determined using ROC analysis, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: High vascular density (>265 vessels per field) on histological examination was significantly correlated with active disease on colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS (p < .0001). Quantitative analysis showed a higher enhancement peak, a shorter time to peak enhancement, a higher regional blood flow and regional blood volume in patients with high vascular density than in those with low vascular density. Cutoff values to distinguish between active and inactive disease were identified for peak enhancement (>40.5%), and regional blood flow (>54.8 ml/min). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of CEUS data correlates with disease activity as determined by vascular density. Quantitative parameters of CEUS can be used to predict active disease with high sensitivity and

  14. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the bowel wall can predict disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of quantitative analysis of bowel wall enhancement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) by comparing the results with vascular density in a biopsy sample from the same area of the intestinal tract, and to determine the usefulness of this analysis for the prediction of disease activity. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institute's ethics committee and all patients gave written informed consent. We enrolled 33 consecutive adult patients undergoing colonoscopy and biopsy for IBD. All patients underwent CEUS and the results were quantitatively analyzed. Vessel count per high-power field on biopsy specimens was compared with colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS findings, and with analysis of peak intensity, time to peak, regional blood volume, mean transit time, and regional blood flow. Results in patients with high and low vascular density were compared using Fisher's test, t-test, Pearson's correlation test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Cutoff values were determined using ROC analysis, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: High vascular density (>265 vessels per field) on histological examination was significantly correlated with active disease on colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS (p < .0001). Quantitative analysis showed a higher enhancement peak, a shorter time to peak enhancement, a higher regional blood flow and regional blood volume in patients with high vascular density than in those with low vascular density. Cutoff values to distinguish between active and inactive disease were identified for peak enhancement (>40.5%), and regional blood flow (>54.8 ml/min). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of CEUS data correlates with disease activity as determined by vascular density. Quantitative parameters of CEUS can be used to predict active disease with high sensitivity and

  15. The prevalence of genetic and serologic markers in an unselected European population-based cohort of IBD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Lene; Vind, Ida; Vermeire, Severine; Wolters, Frank; Katsanos, Kostas; Politi, Patrizia; Freitas, João; Mouzas, Ioannis A; O'Morain, Colm; Ruiz-Ochoa, Victor; Odes, Selwyn; Binder, Vibeke; Munkholm, Pia; Moum, Bjørn; Stockbrügger, Reinhold; Langholz, Ebbe; NN, NN

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but it has become evident that genetic factors are involved in disease susceptibility. Studies have suggested a north-south gradient in the incidence of IBD, raising the question whether this difference is caused by...

  16. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. PMID:26163301

  17. Antibiotics and probiotics in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Gionchetti; Fernando Rizzello; Karen M Lammers; Claudia Morselli; Lucia Sollazzi; Samuel Davies; Rosy Tambasco; Carlo Calabrese; Massimo Campieri

    2006-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical observations suggest that intestinal microflora plays a potential role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Manipulation of the luminal content using antibiotics or probiotics represents a potentially effective therapeutic option. The available studies do not support the use of antibiotics in ulcerative colitis (UC). Antibiotics are effective in treating septic complications of Crohn's disease (CD) but their use as a primary therapy is more controversial, although this approach is frequently and successfully adopted in clinical practice.There is evidence that probiotic therapy may be effective in the prevention and treatment of mild to moderate UC. In contrast, a lack of successful study data at present precludes the widespread use of probiotics in the treatment of CD.Both antibiotics and probiotics appear to play a beneficial role in the treatment and prevention of pouchitis and further trials are warranted to fully quantify their clinical efficacy.

  18. The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    significantly higher among IBD patients. CONCLUSION: In recent years, self-management and patient empowerment, combined with evolving eHealth solutions, has utilized epidemiological knowledge on disease patterns and has been improving compliance and the timing of adjusting therapies, thus optimizing efficacy by...

  19. Self-Management in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Clinical Report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Greenley, Rachel N.; Maddux, Michele Herzer; Gray, Wendy N.; Mackner, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report aims to review key self-management and adherence issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to provide recommendations for health care providers regarding evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to promote optimal self-management. Self-management difficulties in the form of nonadherence to treatment regimens are common in pediatric IBD and are influenced by various disease-related, individual, family, and health-professional relationship factors. ...

  20. Inflammatory bowel diseases: an update of current treatment alternatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrecia Suárez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are characterized for having an unpredictable clinical course with periods of inactivity alternating with relapses, a very variable response to treatment and the constant threat of diverse complications. Management of IBD in children may be of particular complexity, added to the fact that published clinical trials are limited, and scientific evidence seems contradictory, explain in part why to current date there is no international consensus regarding treatment in this age group. A suitable therapy should aim at inducing and maintaining remission for as long as possible, encourage adequate growth and preventing potential complications from appearing. In more recent years, development of new therapeutic agents has allowed a more integrative approach which takes in consideration other aspects of the disease such as nutritional status, psychological welfare and general quality of life. One must also keep in mind that none of these therapeutic resources is exempt of side effects on short and long term basis, consequently, it is imperative to be thoughtful of individual features in order to make accurate clinical decisions and offer a tailored management plan which should be able to modify the disease evolution.