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Sample records for bovine urothelial tumours

  1. Expression of gap junction protein connexin 43 in bovine urinary bladder tumours.

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    Corteggio, A; Florio, J; Roperto, F; Borzacchiello, G

    2011-01-01

    The aetiopathogenesis of urinary bladder tumours in cattle involves prolonged ingestion of bracken fern and infection by bovine papillomavirus types 1 or 2 (BPV-1/2). The oncogenic activity of BPV is largely associated with the major oncoprotein E5. Gap junctions are the only communicating junctions found in animal tissues and are composed of proteins known as connexins. Alterations in connexin expression have been associated with oncogenesis. The present study investigated biochemically and immunohistochemically the expression of connexin 43 in samples of normal (n=2), dysplastic (n=3) and neoplastic (n=23) bovine urothelium. The tumours included 10 carcinomas in situ, five papillary urothelial carcinomas and eight invasive urothelial carcinomas. Normal and dysplastic urothelium had membrane expression of connexin 43, but this was reduced in samples of carcinoma in situ. Papillary urothelial carcinomas showed moderate cytoplasmic and membrane labelling, while invasive carcinoma showed loss of connexin 43 expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Urothelial Tumours of the Urinary Bladder: A Histopathological Study of Cystoscopic Biopsies

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    Sujan Vaidya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Bladder tumours constitute one of the most common urological conditions. Urothelial (transitional cell carcinoma accounts for 90% of all primary tumours of the bladder. These tumours are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to present the histopathological patterns of urothelial tumours and to determine the grade and stage of these tumours. Methods: This is a 3 year retrospective study of urothelial tumours carried out in the Department of Pathology, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS, Lalitpur, Nepal. Data of all cystoscopic biopsies collected during this period were analyzed. Results: Urothelial (transitional cell tumours accounted for 97.59% (81 cases of all bladder tumours. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC was the most common tumour which was present in 67 cases (80.72%. Of these, 32 (47.76% were low grade TCC while 35 (52.24% were high grade TCC. Maximum number of tumours (70.37% were superficial (pTa and pT1 while (29.63% were muscle invasive (pT2. Sixteen percent of low grade and 76.92% of high grade tumours showed muscle invasion. Detrusor muscle was absent in 23.88% cases (16/67. Conclusion: Transitional cell carcinoma was the most common bladder cancer. Most of these tumours were high grade. A large percentage of high grade carcinomas presented with muscle invasion. Pathological grade and muscle invasion are the most valuable prognostic predictors of survival. The importance of including smooth muscle in the biopsy specimens needs to be emphasized Key words: cancer, high grade, low grade, transitional, tumour, urinary bladder.

  3. Urothelial atypia and survival rate of 500 unselected patients with primary transitional-cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde Olsen, P; Wolf, H; Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    were taken at the initial cystoscopy in 391 patients (78%) to identify urothelial atypia. The over-all cumulative 5 years survival-rate was 48%. Submucosal and muscle invasion had major influence on survival, whereas tumour grade was less important. Patients with urothelial atypia fared significantly...

  4. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 Infection and Microscopic Patterns of Urothelial Tumors of the Urinary Bladder in Water Buffaloes

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    Paola Maiolino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic patterns of thirty-four urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of water buffaloes from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey are here described. All the animals grazed on lands rich in bracken fern. Histological diagnosis was assessed using morphological parameters recently suggested for the urinary bladder tumors of cattle. Papillary carcinoma was the most common neoplastic lesion (22/34 observed in this study, and low-grade carcinoma was more common (seventeen cases than high-grade carcinoma (five cases. Papilloma, papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP, and invasive carcinomas were less frequently seen. Carcinoma in situ (CIS was often detected associated with some papillary and invasive carcinomas. De novo (primary CIS was rare representing 3% of tumors of this series. A peculiar feature of the most urothelial tumors was the presence in the tumor stroma of immune cells anatomically organized in tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs. Bovine papillomavirus type-2 (PV-2 E5 oncoprotein was detected by molecular and immunohistochemistry procedures. Early protein, E2, and late protein, L1, were also detected by immunohistochemical studies. Morphological and molecular findings show that BPV-2 infection contributes to the development of urothelial bladder carcinogenesis also in water buffaloes.

  5. Constructing prognostic model incorporating the 2004 WHO/ISUP classification for patients with non-muscle-invasive urothelial tumours of the urinary bladder.

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    Pan, Chin-Chen; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Chen, Kuang-Kuo; Yu, Hui-Jung; Sun, Chih-Hao; Ho, Donald M T

    2010-10-01

    To construct a prognostic model for recurrence-free survival (RFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for patients who have undergone transurethral resection of non-muscle-invasive (pTa/pT1) urinary bladder urothelial tumours. 1366 patients who had undergone transurethral resection of primary non-muscle-invasive urothelial tumours (pTa, 891 patients; pT1, 475 patients) confined to the bladder were retrospectively studied. Tumours were classified according to the 2004 WHO/International Society of Urologic Pathology grading system. Kaplan-Meier and stepwise Cox regression models were applied, and 200 bootstrap resamples were used to generate survival estimates and 95% CIs. A nomogram was developed that incorporated significant variables predicting survival. RFS, PFS and CSS probabilities for non-muscle-invasive bladder urothelial tumours were calculated. Incorporating salient prognostic factors (tumour grade, pT stage, patient age, status of intravesical instillation), the model satisfactorily predicted PFS (concordance index=0.79) and CSS (concordance index=0.87). Robust nomograms were created to predict PFS and CSS. These data provide an overall perspective of disease outcomes which may aid in developing individualised follow-up programmes.

  6. Microcystic Variant of Urothelial Carcinoma

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    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma is one of the new variants of urothelial carcinoma that was added to the WHO classification in 2004. Aims. To review the literature on microcystic variant of urothelial carcinoma. Methods. Various internet search engines were used to identify reported cases of the tumour. Results. Microscopic features of the tumour include: (i Conspicuous intracellular and intercellular lumina/microcysts encompassed by malignant urothelial or squamous cells. (ii The lumina are usually empty; may contain granular eosinophilic debris, mucin, or necrotic cells. (iii The cysts may be variable in size; round, or oval, up to 2 mm; lined by urothelium which are either flattened cells or low columnar cells however, they do not contain colonic epithelium or goblet cells; are infiltrative; invade the muscularis propria; mimic cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis; occasionally exhibit neuroendocrine differentiation. (iv Elongated and irregular branching spaces are usually seen. About 17 cases of the tumour have been reported with only 2 patients who have survived. The tumour tends to be of high-grade and high-stage. There is no consensus opinion on the best option of treatment of the tumour. Conclusions. It would prove difficult at the moment to be dogmatic regarding its prognosis but it is a highly aggressive tumour. New cases of the tumour should be reported in order to document its biological behaviour.

  7. Alpha-T-catenin (CTNNA3) displays tumour specific monoallelic expression in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

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    Meehan, Maria; Melvin, Audrey; Gallagher, Emma; Smith, James; McGoldrick, Alo; Moss, Catherine; Goossens, Steven; Harrison, Michèle; Kay, Elaine; Fitzpatrick, John; Dervan, Peter; Mc Cann, Amanda

    2007-06-01

    CTNNA3 (alpha-T-catenin) is imprinted with preferential monoallelic expression of the maternal allele in placental tissue. The allelic expression pattern of CTNNA3 in adult human cancer is unknown and warrants investigation as CTNNA3 stabilizes cellular adherence, a feature which if compromised could enable cells to acquire an increased capability to detach and invade. We document the frequency of monoallelic versus biallelic expression of CTNNA3 in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) samples and compare the observed patterns with that found in the paired normal sample. DNA PCR reactions encompassing a transcribable SNP polymorphism within exon 12 of CTNNA3 were sequence analyzed to identify heterozygous cases. A total of 96 samples were analyzed and included 22 paired normal and tumor UCB cases, 38 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) UCB samples consisting of 18 noninvasive pTa tumors and 20 lamina propria invasive pT1 tumors and 14 cell lines of various lineages. RT-PCR analysis of 35 heterozygous samples followed by sequence analysis allowed monoallelic versus biallelic patterns to be assigned. We have provided the first demonstration that CTNNA3 displays differing allelic expression patterns in UCB. Specifically, 35% (7/20) of informative UCB, showed monoallelic expression, a feature confined to the tumor, with normal urothelial samples displaying biallelic expression. Real time RT-PCR analyses, demonstrated a significantly lower (P = 0.00039) level of CTNNA3 in the tumor samples compared with the paired normals, all of which displayed biallelic expression. In conclusion, monoallelic and biallelic CTNNA3 expression patterns are demonstrable in tumor bladder tissue, whereas normal cases show only biallelic expression.

  8. Productive infection of bovine papillomavirus type 2 in the urothelial cells of naturally occurring urinary bladder tumors in cattle and water buffaloes.

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    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Papillomaviruses (PVs are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E and late (L protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. CONCLUSION: This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo.

  9. Productive Infection of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 in the Urothelial Cells of Naturally Occurring Urinary Bladder Tumors in Cattle and Water Buffaloes

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    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Corteggio, Annunziata; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Catoi, Cornel; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita G.; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Ceccarelli, Dora M.; Longo, Michele; Roperto, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E) and late (L) protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. Methods and Findings E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. Conclusion This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo. PMID:23667460

  10. Ureterocele urothelial carcinoma: managing a rare presentation.

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    Astigueta, Juan Carlos; Abad-Licham, Milagros; Silva, Eloy; Alvarez, Víctor; Piccone, Francis; Cruz, Enrique; Redorta, Joan Palou

    2016-01-01

    It is very uncommon for urothelial carcinoma to develop in an ureterocele. It is generally discovered in an imaging study or in connection with haematuria. We found very few reports in the literature. Here, we report on the case of a 71-year-old male who initially presented with haematuria and low back pain and who then underwent transurethral resection for an intraureterocele tumour. Pathology confirmed urothelial carcinoma.

  11. UROTHELIAL CARCINOMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    normal levels (_<_ 4 IUIL) corresponded with non recurrence of tumor and the persistence of ... Table 1: Tumor Grade and Stage in 120 Patients with Human Urothelial Carcinoma. pTa pT1 T2 ..... gonadotropin~like substance secreted by lung.

  12. CD44 and MMP-2 expression in urothelial carcinoma

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    Gülgün ERDOĞAN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: CD44, one of the adhesion molecules, is thought to play an important role in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Matrix metalloproteinases are degradative enzymes that remodel extracellular components. In this study the relation of MMP-2 and CD44 expressions with the histologic classification and the pathologic stage of urothelial carcinoma was revealed using immunohistochemistry.Material and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder were studied. The histological classification was performed according to WHO criteria. Patients were grouped as infiltrating urothelial carcinoma, low grade non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma, and high grade non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma. The pathological staging was done according to the TNM classification. Immunohistochemical staining using CD44 and MMP-2 antibodies was performed on tissue blocks.Results: CD44 immunoreactivity was detected in 77% (30/39 of the tumours which was significantly higher in non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinomas, low grade non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinomas, high grade infiltrating urothelial carcinomas (p≥0.05. MMP-2 expression was observed in 69% (27 of 39 of the tumours. There were no significant differences in MMP-2 expression between various histologic subtypes and noninvasive and infiltrative tumours.Conclusion: In conclusion, higher expression of CD44 is inversely correlated with infiltrative potential of urothelial carcinoma. These results should be supported by further studies.

  13. Growth of Theileria annulata and Theileria parva macroschizont-infected bovine cells in immunodeficient mice: effect of irradiation and tumour load on lymphocyte subsets

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    Fell, A.H.; Preston, P.M. (Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1992-07-01

    Bovine cells infected with macroschizonts of the protozoan parasites Theileria annulata and Theileria parva formed solid tumours when injected into irradiated Balb/c and irradiated Balb/c nude mice. T. annulata tumours grew more vigorously than T. parva tumours, when initiated with similar doses of infected cells in mice exposed to the same doses of gamma-irradiation. In irradiated Balb/c mice, tumours of both species of parasites began to regress 2-3 weeks after injection of cells but grew without regression in irradiated Balb/c nude mice. Haemorrhage and necrosis of tumours, induced by macrophages and neutrophils, were seen in both mouse strains but were insufficient to cause regression in Balb/c nude mice. Theileria-infected bovine cells failed to establish in C57 beige mice, which lack functional natural killer (NK) cells. Flow cytometry, using monoclonal antibodies to murine leukocyte/lymphocyte antigens, showed that the radiation dose required to allow establishment of T. annulata tumours in Balb/c mice caused a severe depletion of splenic lymphocytes. B cells, helper T and cytotoxic T cells showed differing levels of susceptibility to irradiation. (Author).

  14. Mincle, an Innate Immune Receptor, Is Expressed in Urothelial Cancer Cells of Papillomavirus-Associated Urothelial Tumors of Cattle.

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    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available Mincle, macrophage-inducible C-type lectin, is a member of C-type lectin receptors. It plays an important role in anti-mycobacterial and anti-fungal immunity. Furthermore it senses dead cells through its primary ligand SAP130.We examined ten urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of cattle. Eight of them expressed E5 cDNA of bovine papillomaviruses type 2 (BPV-2 and type 13 (BPV-13 that belong to Deltapapillomavirus genus. Two of them were not examined for detection of E5 cDNA. Mincle expression appeared to occur in urothelial neoplastic cells only. No mincle expression was detected in urothelial cells from healthy cattle. Mincle expression was characterized by a membranous pattern in papillary urothelial cancers; isolated and/or clustered urothelial cells showing a strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity were primarily seen in invasive urothelial cancers.This is the first study about the expression of mincle in veterinary oncology and the first report which describes the expression of functional mincle receptor in neoplastic cells in medical literature. As it has been shown that urothelial cancer cells have the ability to function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs, it is conceivable that mincle expression is involved in the presentation of cancer cell antigens to cells of the immune system. Furthermore, since expression of mincle contributes to the control of Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection, this study has exciting clinical implications in comparative medicine keeping in mind that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy is currently the most effective treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in man. Mincle expression in urothelial tumor cells warrants further study to better understand the role, if any, of this receptor in bladder cancer. Future studies will provide insights in the role of mincle receptor of urothelial cancer cells in antitumor immunotherapy.

  15. Alteration of the exDNA profile in blood serum of LLC-bearing mice under the decrease of tumour invasion potential by bovine pancreatic DNase I treatment

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    Brenner, Evgenyi V.; Kurilshikov, Alexander M.; Patutina, Olga A.; Zenkova, Marina A.

    2017-01-01

    Taking into account recently obtained data indicating the participation of circulating extracellular DNA (exDNA) in tumorigenesis, enzymes with deoxyribonucleic activity have again been considered as potential antitumour and antimetastatic drugs. Previously, using murine Lewis lung carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma A1 tumour models, we have shown the antimetastatic activity of bovine DNase I, which correlates with an increase of DNase activity and a decrease of exDNA concentration in the blood serum of tumour-bearing mice. In this work, using next-generation sequencing on the ABS SOLiD™ 5.500 platform, we performed a search for molecular targets of DNase I by comparing the exDNA profiles of healthy animals, untreated animals with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and those with LLC treated with DNase I. We found that upon DNase I treatment of LLC-bearing mice, together with inhibition of metastasis, a number of strong alterations in the patterns of exDNA were observed. The major differences in exDNA profiles between groups were: i) the level of GC-poor sequences increased during tumour development was reduced to that of healthy mice; ii) levels of sequences corresponding to tumour-associated genes Hmga2, Myc and Jun were reduced in the DNase I-treated group in comparison with non-treated mice; iii) 224 types of tandem repeat over-presented in untreated LLC-bearing mice were significantly reduced after DNase I treatment. The most important result obtained in the work is that DNase I decreased the level of B-subfamily repeats having homology to human ALU repeats, known as markers of carcinogenesis, to the level of healthy animals. Thus, the obtained data lead us to suppose that circulating exDNA plays a role in tumour dissemination, and alteration of multiple molecular targets in the bloodstream by DNase I reduces the invasive potential of tumours. PMID:28222152

  16. Challenges in the Diagnosis of Urothelial Carcinoma Variants: Can Emerging Molecular Data Complement Pathology Review?

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    Solomon, James P; Lowenthal, Brett M; Kader, A Karim; Parsons, J Kellogg; Flaig, Thomas W; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Hansel, Donna E

    2016-10-18

    Urothelial carcinoma can exhibit a wide variety of histopathologic phenotypes or variant morphologies, classifications of which have recently been revised in the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Urinary System and Male Genital Organs. Many of these variants not only present diagnostic challenges, but also have clinical implications that affect patient prognosis and treatment strategies. This review will discuss these variant morphologies and their relationship to current understanding of the underlying biology of urothelial carcinoma and molecular classification paradigms.

  17. Combined cytotoxic effect of UV-irradiation and TiO2 microbeads in normal urothelial cells, low-grade and high-grade urothelial cancer cells.

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    Imani, Roghayeh; Veranič, Peter; Iglič, Aleš; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Pazoki, Meysam; Hudoklin, Samo

    2015-03-01

    The differentiation of urothelial cells results in normal terminally differentiated cells or by alternative pathways in low-grade or high-grade urothelial carcinomas. Treatments with traditional surgical and chemotherapeutical approaches are still inadequate and expensive, as bladder tumours are generally highly recurrent. In such situations, alternative approaches, using irradiation of the cells and nanoparticles, are promising. The ways in which urothelial cells, at different differentiation levels, respond to UV-irradiation (photolytic treatment) or to the combination of UV-irradiation and nanoparticles (photocatalytic treatment), are unknown. Here we tested cytotoxicity of UV-irradiation on (i) normal porcine urothelial cells (NPU), (ii) human low-grade urothelial cancer cells (RT4), and (iii) human high-grade urothelial cancer cells (T24). The results have shown that 1 minute of UV-irradiation is enough to kill 90% of the cells in NPU and RT4 cultures, as determined by the live/dead viability assay. On the other hand, the majority of T24 cells survived 1 minute of UV-irradiation. Moreover, even a prolonged UV-irradiation for 30 minutes killed TiO2 microbeads and then UV-irradiated, the viability of these high-grade urothelial cancer cells was reduced to TiO2 photocatalysis. Using electron microscopy, we confirmed that the mesoporous TiO2 microbeads were internalized into T24 cells, and that the cell's ultrastructure was heavily compromised after UV-irradiation. In conclusion, our results show major differences in the sensitivity to UV-irradiation among the urothelial cells with respect to cell differentiation. To achieve an increased cytotoxicity of urothelial cancer cells, the photocatalytic approach is recommended.

  18. The occult urothelial cancer.

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    Ragonese, Mauro; Racioppi, Marco; D'Agostino, Daniele; Di Gianfrancesco, Luca; Lenci, Niccolò; Bientinesi, Riccardo; Palermo, Giuseppe; Sacco, Emilio; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, Pier Francesco

    2016-05-24

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the tumor that most frequently affects the urinary tract. The most common location is in the bladder; the diagnosis, as the follow-up, is based on urine cytology, endoscopic, and radiological examinations. Urinary cytology is an important non invasive tool used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with TCC. A positive urine cytology result is highly predictive of the presence of TCC, even in the presence of normal cystoscopy, because malignant cells may appear in the urine long time before any cystoscopically visible lesion becomes apparent. The presence of a positive urinary cytology, in the absence of clinical or endoscopic evidence of a TCC, can identify an occult urothelial cancer, located in any site of the urinary tract (upper urinary tract, bladder, prostatic urethra). Most of the urothelial tumors of the renal pelvis and ureters are diagnosed by radiological examinations, but we can observe a high rate of false negatives. In order to improve the diagnostic role of urinary cytology and other conventional examinations, numerous molecular markers have been identified; however, the real clinical application remains unclear. Photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging (NBI) cystoscopy increase the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic examinations in the presence of lesions not easily detectable. The aim of this review is to analyze the current diagnostic standards in the presence of occult urothelial cancer.

  19. Pan-urothelial verrucous carcinoma unrelated to schistosomiasis

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    Flores, Marcos Rodrigo Saravia; Ruiz, Mario Roberto Morales; Florian, Roberto Elfidio Orozco; De Leon, Werner; Jose, Luis San

    2009-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a well known histological appearance and clinical behaviour. We present a case of verrucous carcinoma extensively affecting the urothelium of the right renal pelvis, right ureter and urinary bladder over a 3-year period. This pan-urothelial involvement of a verrucous carcinoma has not been previously reported. The potential for regional spread with subsequent urinary tract obstruction by this tumour calls for aggressive local surgical treatment as the main modality of therapy. PMID:21686630

  20. Translating biology into clinic: new insights on prognostic and predictive biomarkers for urothelial bladder carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências da Saúde Urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) represents a significant health problem, as a consequence of its heterogeneous natural history and clinical behavior. Most morbidity and mortality associated with UBC is caused by the muscle-invasive (MI) form of the disease, which represents about 20-30% of all newly diagnosed cases. Moreover, an important proportion of high risk non-muscle invasive (NMI) tumours relapse after transurethral resection and progress...

  1. Unusual manifestations of secondary urothelial carcinoma

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    Chaohui Lisa Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma regularly invades the bladder wall, adjacent prostate, seminal vesicles, ureters, vagina, rectum, retroperitoneum, and regional lymph nodes. In advanced stages, it may disseminate to the liver, lungs, and bone marrow. On rare occasions, unusual metastatic foci like skin have been reported. The incidence of urothelial carcinoma has increased with associated rise in variants of urothelial carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci. It is imperative that urologists and pathologists are aware of the unusual variants and unusual metastatic locations to expedite the diagnostic process. Hereby we report an unusual case of secondary involvement of spinal nerve by conventional urothelial carcinoma. Also a second case of rhabdoid variant of urothelial carcinoma showing synchronous involvement of bladder and subcutaneous tissue of upper extremity is presented.

  2. Pembrolizumab and Docetaxel or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients Urothelial Cancer

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    2016-08-31

    Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma

  3. Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of aggressive and non-aggressive urothelial cell carcinomas in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Kampman, E.; Büchner, F.L.; Aben, K.K.; Egevad, L.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Roswall, N.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Moiros, S.; Kaaks, R.; Teucher, B.; Weikert, S.; Ruesten, A.V.; Trichopoulou, A.; Naska, A.; Benetou, V.; Saieva, C.; Pala, V.; Ricceri, F.; Tumino, R.; Mattiello, A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, van C.H.; Gram, I.T.; Engeset, D.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanazx, E.; Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Many epidemiological studies have examined fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder, but results are inconsistent. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and UCC risk may vary by bladder tumour aggressiven

  4. Fire fighters, combustion products, and urothelial cancer.

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    Golka, Klaus; Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke

    2008-01-01

    Urothelial cancer may be induced by different workplace chemicals, including carcinogenic aromatic amines, coke oven fumes, and cigarette smoking. The general impact of combustion products on urothelial cancer risk of exposed persons is still controversial. This raises the question whether fire fighters may have an increased risk for urothelial cancer. The present review compiles the literature on combustion products, possibly relevant for fire fighters, and the available studies on urinary bladder cancer risk in fire fighters. Chemical analyses of smoke from experimental fires as well as from fires in cities, wildlands, and industry do not indicate a generally elevated risk of bladder cancer in fire fighters. This is supported by studies on bladder cancer in fire fighters. Based on mortality studies, studies on exposures, and cancer incidence, we conclude that an elevated risk of urothelial cancer in fire fighters, in general, is not confirmed. Only in professional fire fighters more severely exposed for decades, having started their career some decades before, occupational exposure might be discussed as causative for urothelial cancer.

  5. Expression of GLUT1 is associated with increasing grade of malignancy in non-invasive and invasive urothelial carcinomas of the bladder

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    REIS, HENNING; TSCHIRDEWAHN, STEPHAN; SZARVAS, TIBOR; RÜBBEN, HERBERT; SCHMID, KURT WERNER; GRABELLUS, FLORIAN

    2011-01-01

    Glucose Transporter 1 (GLUT1) belongs to the expanding mammalian facilitative glucose transporter family. Elevated GLUT1 protein expression has been observed in the majority of urothelial carcinomas, with various effects on clinicopathological parameters. Whereas malignant cells have an accelerated metabolism with increased energy requirements, the membranous expression of GLUTs is amplified. GLUT1 protein expression was evaluated in urothelial tumours of increasing grade of malignancy, supplemented by a tumour proliferation analysis. Particular attention was paid to non-invasive precursors of urothelial carcinoma. A total of 105 paraffin-embedded samples were classified (normal urothelium, low/high-grade papillary carcinoma, carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma). Grading and staging were conducted using the 1998 ISUP/2004 WHO criteria. The staining intensity of GLUT1 was assessed with a standard immunoreactive score (IRS). The Ki-67 index was assessed by counting positive nuclei in representative urothelial hot spots. Results showed that an increased GLUT1-IRS and mean count of Ki-67-positive cells were significantly associated with an increased grade of malignancy (p<0.0001), particularly in non-invasive tumours. GLUT1-IRS was significantly associated with a Ki-67-labelled proliferative fraction (p<0.0001). No significant association regarding tumour grade or stage was observed within the invasive carcinoma group. GLUT1 protein expression was found to be strongly correlated with increased malignant potential, particularly in non-invasive urothelial carcinomas. The increase of GLUT1 expression may reflect a preinvasive metabolic switch in terms of enhanced cell metabolism concomitant to known genetic alterations. A further increase in invasive carcinomas may be related to hypoxic conditions. PMID:22848280

  6. Concomitant Urothelial Cancer and Renal Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheray N. Chin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of coexisting urothelial cancer and renal tuberculosis in the same kidney. The patient is a 72-year-old female with a remote history of treated pulmonary tuberculosis who presented with haematuria, initial investigation of which elucidated no definitive cause. Almost 1 year later, a diagnosis of metastatic urinary tract cancer was made. The patient received chemotherapy for advanced collecting duct type renal cell carcinoma, based on histological features of renal biopsy. Subsequent confirmatory immunostains however led to a revised diagnosis of urothelial cancer, necessitating a change in chemotherapy regimen. A diagnosis of ipsilateral renal tuberculosis was made based on TB-PCR testing of renal biopsy tissue and anti-TB therapy was coadministered with chemotherapy. The patient died 9 months after diagnosis of metastatic urothelial cancer.

  7. [Unusual clinical presentations of tumours of the renal pelvis. Report of two cases ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekak, Hamid; Rabii, Redouane; Moufid, Kamal; Joual, Abdenri; Dahami, Zakaria; el Mrini, Mohammed

    2002-06-01

    Chronic irritation induced by stones and urinary stasis can be responsible for squamous and sometimes glandular metaplasia of the urothelial epithelium with secondary carcinomatous transformation. The authors report two cases of tumour of the renal pelvis associated with stone pyonephrosis in one case and ureteropelvic junction syndrome in the other.

  8. Targeting molecular aberrations in urothelial carcinoma: are we almost there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    Advances in tumor biology and cancer genetics have led to the development of effective targeted therapies in oncology over the past decade. However, targeted drug development for urothelial carcinoma has been slower than for some other malignancies. The path forward in drug development is through a better understanding of the aberrant pathways driving urothelial tumor development. Steady progress has been made in the characterization of genomic alterations in urothelial carcinoma. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project is well underway in the analysis of a large set of urothelial cancer specimens using multiple approaches and technologies. In addition, there are already many well-established mutations and genetic alterations in urothelial carcinoma that likely contribute in an important way to tumor development. In addition, urothelial cancer genome-wide association studies have identified common variants associated with urothelial cancer risk and protein expression that can potentially be therapeutically targeted. Furthermore, the MET pathway has emerged as an exciting target in multiple tumors, including urothelial carcinoma. Our knowledge of how to clinically target many emerging molecular aberrations in urothelial cancer is still in the early stages of development. However, there is much promise in the ongoing research being conducted in urothelial cancer molecular pathogenesis.

  9. Segregation analysis of urothelial cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, K.K.H.; Baglietto, L.; Baffoe-Bonnie, A.B.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.; Trink, B.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Witjes, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A family history of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) confers an almost two-fold increased risk of developing UCC. It is unknown whether (part of) this aggregation of UCC has a Mendelian background. We performed complex segregation analyses on 1193 families ascertained through a proband with UCC of th

  10. Familial aggregation of urothelial cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, K.K.H.; Witjes, J.A.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is not considered to be a familial disease. Familial clustering of UCC was described in several case reports, however, some with an extremely early age at onset suggesting a genetic component. Epidemiological studies yielded inconsistent evidence of familial UCC, poss

  11. uPAR Expression Pattern in Patients with Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Line Hammer; Pappot, Helle; Iversen, Benedikte Richter;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to confirm the expression and localisation pattern of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) focusing on its possible clinical relevance in patients with urothelial neoplasia of the bladder. uPAR is a central molecule in tissue remodelling...... or positive as well as by the actual score. Separate scores were obtained for cancer cells, macrophages and myofibroblasts at the invasive front and in tumour core. We were able to confirm, in an independent patient cohort, the tissue expression and localisation pattern of uPAR as investigated...... investigations have generated new and valuable biological information about the cell types being involved in tumour invasion and progression through the plasminogen activation system....

  12. A STUDY OF P53 EXPRESSION IN UROTHELIAL NEOPLASMS OF URINARY BLADDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sathish Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Urothelial Cell Carcinoma (UCC of urinary bladder is the seventh commonest cancer wordwide.1 At initial diagnosis, 30% of UCC display solid and invasive growth patterns and are locally advanced or metastatic at the time of diagnosis. 70% of tumours are noninvasive papillary UCC confined to the epithelium and subepithelial connective tissue,2 which can be managed by endoscopic resection. A significant number of post-resected cases, progress for recurrence of tumour and infiltration to muscle layers. Invasive bladder cancer has high morbidity and uniform mortality when it is metastatic. There are no effective tools to predict aggressiveness of tumour, so that these cases can be managed more successfully. Mutated Tp53/p53 is the genetic abnormality most frequently associated with UCC and related to cell transformation, malignancy and high recurrence rates.2 MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive study conducted in the departments of urology and pathology and during the period of March 2014 to February 2015. All consecutive cystoscopic biopsies, Trans urethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT and radical cystectomy specimens histopathologically diagnosed as UCC were included in the study. p53 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Positive and negative controls were used. Bivariate analysis was done using Chi-square test in all cases. RESULTS A total of 80 cases were analysed. Significant association of p53 expression was found in higher grades of tumour. Also, noted relation of p53 mutation with tumour size, multifocality, multiplicity, muscle invasion and tumour stage, which were statistically not significant. CONCLUSION Bladder tumour grade shows significant association to p53 expression. Papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP tumours are negative for p53, and in the present study, there was significant difference in p53 over expression low-grade papillary UCC compared with PUNLMP. 90% of low

  13. [Urothelial carcinoma in a pyelocaliceal cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Danilo; Vella, Marco; Alonge, Vincenza; Serretta, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Renal complex cysts are lesions whose nature can be either benign or malignant. Depending on the presence of septa, solid components, enhancement or calcifications, they are distinguished according to the Bosniak classification based on CT findings, as well as MRI and ETG. We report a rare case of urothelial carcinoma, originating over a pyelocalyceal cyst in a 50-year-old man, and classified as Bosniak IIF by CT and MRI investigations.

  14. Urothelial neoplasia of the urinary bladder--comparison of interobserver variability for WHO Classification 1972 with WHO/ISUP Consensus Classification 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoon, Nadira; Iqbal, Muhammad Ashraf; Jamal, Shahid; Luqman, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Classification of urothelial bladder tumours is an important factor in the treatment and prognosis of these lesions. Over the years many classifications have been proposed for this purpose. The objective of this study was to classify urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder using the latest WHO/ISUP Consensus Classification 1998 and WHO Classification 1972 and compare the two regarding interobserver variability. This study included 100 consecutive biopsy specimens of urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder diagnosed at the department of Histopathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi. These were classified according to WHO Classification 1972 and WHO/ISUP Consensus Classification 1998 by 2 groups of pathologists independently. The tumour categories for WHO classification 1972; papilloma, and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) grades I, II and III were compared with the WHO/ISUP Consensus Classification entities of papilloma, papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential, low grade and high grade papillary carcinomas. Kappa statistics were used to evaluate interobserver variability. Chi square test was used to calculate significance. There was agreement on 80 tumours between the two groups of histopathologists when using WHO classification 1972 while there was agreement on 95 tumours using WHO/ISUP consensus classification. The value of Kappa for WHO Classification was 0.68 (good agreement) whereas for WHO/ISUP Consensus Classification it was 0.91 (excellent agreement). The difference between the two systems was statistically significant (pISUP Consensus Classification 1998 showed less interobserver variability than WHO Classification 1972 in the evaluation of bladder tumours. It was found easier to apply by both groups. There was less agreement on the benign and borderline lesions using both the classifications.

  15. Comparative genomic mapping of the bovine Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT tumour suppressor gene: characterization of a 2 Mb BAC contig covering the locus, complete annotation of the gene, analysis of cDNA and of physiological expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussaha Mekki

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Fragile Histidine Triad gene (FHIT is an oncosuppressor implicated in many human cancers, including vesical tumors. FHIT is frequently hit by deletions caused by fragility at FRA3B, the most active of human common fragile sites, where FHIT lays. Vesical tumors affect also cattle, including animals grazing in the wild on bracken fern; compounds released by the fern are known to induce chromosome fragility and may trigger cancer with the interplay of latent Papilloma virus. Results The bovine FHIT was characterized by assembling a contig of 78 BACs. Sequence tags were designed on human exons and introns and used directly to select bovine BACs, or compared with sequence data in the bovine genome database or in the trace archive of the bovine genome sequencing project, and adapted before use. FHIT is split in ten exons like in man, with exons 5 to 9 coding for a 149 amino acids protein. VISTA global alignments between bovine genomic contigs retrieved from the bovine genome database and the human FHIT region were performed. Conservation was extremely high over a 2 Mb region spanning the whole FHIT locus, including the size of introns. Thus, the bovine FHIT covers about 1.6 Mb compared to 1.5 Mb in man. Expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and Northern blot, and was found to be ubiquitous. Four cDNA isoforms were isolated and sequenced, that originate from an alternative usage of three variants of exon 4, revealing a size very close to the major human FHIT cDNAs. Conclusion A comparative genomic approach allowed to assemble a contig of 78 BACs and to completely annotate a 1.6 Mb region spanning the bovine FHIT gene. The findings confirmed the very high level of conservation between human and bovine genomes and the importance of comparative mapping to speed the annotation process of the recently sequenced bovine genome. The detailed knowledge of the genomic FHIT region will allow to study the role of FHIT in bovine cancerogenesis

  16. Review of Topical Treatment of Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

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    Kenneth G. Nepple

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A select group of patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma may be appropriate candidates for minimally invasive management. Organ-preserving endoscopic procedures may be appropriate for patients with an inability to tolerate major surgery, solitary kidney, bilateral disease, poor renal function, small tumor burden, low-grade disease, or carcinoma in situ. We review the published literature on the use of topical treatment for upper tract urothelial carcinoma and provide our approach to treatment in the office setting.

  17. Pericardial Metastasis Induced Tamponade from Urothelial Carcinoma: A Rare Entity

    OpenAIRE

    Rafay Khan; Waqas Jehangir; Sunil Tulpule; Mohamed Osman; Shilpi Singh; Shuvendu Sen

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma in a few cases may result in cardiac metastasis. A rare presentation of this condition is its diagnosis as a result of cardiac tamponade. Tamponade is an unusual entity as a result of urothelial carcinoma and has only been reported in four cases. There have also been only a total of fifteen cases of cardiac metastasis from this form of malignancy. It is through this discussion that we emphasize the importance of early detection and monitoring of cardiac symptoms with the ...

  18. Management of the urethra in urothelial bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kanaroglou, Androniki; Shayegan, Bobby

    2009-01-01

    The standard of care in the management of invasive urothelial cancer of the bladder is radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Although uncommon, recurrence of disease in the retained urethra following cystectomy carries a poor prognosis. The need for assessment of risk of recurrence is greater now than ever with wider adoption of orthotopic bladder substitution. This review will address the contemporary management of the urethra following cystectomy for urothelial cancer.

  19. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  20. Evidence for Bladder Urothelial Pathophysiology in Functional Bladder Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Keay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC, feline interstitial cystitis (FIC, and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB. These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology.

  1. Urothelial cells in smears from cervix uteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Palaoro

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The umbrella cells may be mistaken for dysplastic cells originating in low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions lesions (LSILs due to their nuclear and cytoplasm sizes. Therefore, it is important to know the possibility of their appearance in the cervical smears, especially in post menopausal patients in order to avoid a false diagnosis of an intraepithelial lesion. It is unlikely that deeper cells of urothelium would be confused with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL cells. However, their presence might be a reason of mistake in the diagnosis. TCM is an under-recognized metaplastic phenomenon of the cervix and vagina, which is a mimicker of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The differential characteristic between umbrella cells, cells from TCM and the deeper urothelial cells, and LSIL and HSIL are detailed in the present paper.

  2. Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgeon who first described this type of tumour in 1899. Wilms' tumour .... Open biopsy should be avoided at all costs, as it. 'upstages' the tumour. Survival ... surgeon. No laparoscopic surgery should be done, as the whole abdomen has to be.

  3. Prognonstic impact of renin-angiotensin system blockade in localised upper-tract urothelial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, N; Miyajima, A; Kikuchi, E; Matsumoto, K; Hagiwara, M; Ide, H; Kosaka, T; Masuda, T; Nakamura, S; Oya, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: The potential role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the promotion of tumour growth has been investigated, and the administration of RAS inhibitors, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), may improve disease control in malignancy. We investigated the prognostic impact of RAS inhibitors by analysing data from patients with upper-tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Methods: A total of 279 patients who underwent nephroureterectomy for localised UTUC (pTa-3N0M0) were identified at our three institutions. We retrospectively investigated the prognostic outcomes following nephroureterectomy in patients administered or not administered ACEIs or ARBs. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. RAS inhibitors were administered to 48 patients (17.2%). Multivariate analysis showed that the appearance of pathological T3, positive lymphovascular invasion, and no RAS inhibitor administration (P=0.027 HR=3.14) were independent risk factors for a decrease in subsequent metastasis-free survival. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rate was 93.0% in patients who administered RAS inhibitors, and 72.8% in their counterparts who did not (P=0.008). Conclusion: The absence of RAS inhibitor administration was an independent risk factor for subsequent tumour metastasis in patients with localised UTUC. We propose RAS inhibitors may be a potent choice as an effective treatment following nephroureterectomy. PMID:22187036

  4. Matched-pair analysis of open versus laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmur, James P; Stewart, Grant D; Egong, Eric A; Cutress, Mark L; Tolley, David A; Riddick, Anthony C P; McNeill, S Alan

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU) offers a superior morbidity profile compared with open nephroureterectomy (ONU) in treating upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma. Evidence of oncological equivalence between LNU and ONU is limited. We compare operative and oncological outcomes for LNU and ONU using matched-pair analysis. Of 159 patients who underwent a nephroureterectomy at a single institution between April 1992 and April 2010, 13 pairs of ONU and LNU patients were matched for gender, age, tumour location, tumour grade and stage. Operative details, post-operative characteristics and recurrences were collated and survival rates analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. There was no significant difference in mean operation time between LNU (191 min) and ONU (194 min, p=0.92). There was no significant difference in the 5-year survival rate between LNU and ONU (overall survival 59.1% vs. 73.5%, p=0.18; progression-free survival 24.0% vs. 56.0%, p=0.14; cancer-specific survival 60.9% vs. 73.5%, p=0.56; bladder cancer recurrence-free survival 8.7% vs. 0.0%, p=0.09). Amidst limited RCT and comparative studies, this study presents further evidence of oncological equivalence between LNU and ONU. There was a trend towards poorer outcomes following LNU though, which merits further study. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Histological grading of papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: prognostic value of the 1998 WHO/ISUP classification system and comparison with conventional grading systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, J W A; Schapers, R F M; Janssen-Heijnen, M L G; Pauwels, R P E; Newling, D W; ten Kate, F

    2002-12-01

    To test the prognostic value of the 1998 WHO/ISUP (World Health Organisation/International Society of Urologic Pathology) consensus classification system in Ta papillary urothelial neoplasms of the bladder. The histological slides of 322 patients with a primary Ta tumour were classified according to the consensus classification system, and recurrence free survival (RFS) and progression free survival (PFS) were assessed for a mean follow up period of 79 months. In the same patient group, the RFS and PFS rates for the 1973 WHO grading system and a low grade/high grade system were analysed. Recurrent tumours were seen in all categories of the 1998 WHO/ISUP classification system and five year RFS was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.12). The five year PFS showed a small but significant difference (p = 0.04) between papillary neoplasms of low malignant potential (PNLMP) and high grade papillary urothelial carcinomas (HGPUCs). In the 1973 WHO classification, no significant difference was found in RFS and PFS between the different grades. In the low grade/high grade classification PFS was significantly better for low grade tumours (p = 0.01). The prognostic value of the 1998 WHO/ISUP classification system is limited to predicting PFS, especially between PNLMP and HGPUC. The prognostic value of this system over other grading systems is questionable.

  6. An Epidemiological Study of Cases of Urothelial Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder in a Tertiary Care Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya Basu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in Western world. It is a heterogeneous disease with variable natural history. There is paucity of data in our country. Aims and Objectives: The present study aims to assess the risk factors contributing to urothelial carcinoma of bladder in the southern region of West Bengal and histopathological grading (WHO/ISUP. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study by multivariate analysis of case record proforma(CRP, agreed upon by a team of experts from the departments of Urosurgery and Pathology,CNMC&H, Kolkata from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Total 88 subjects who had at-tended in the department of urosurgery and al-ready been diagnosed either by cystoscopic bi-opsy or Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumour (TURBT, were enrolled. Results: There was male preponderance (86.4 % male vs 13.6% female; the age range being 30-81 years(median 65. Hindus (81.8 % were affected more compared to Muslims (18.2 %. Blood group analysis showed highest incidence in B group (41% followed by O (32%. Tobacco smoking (75% cases revealed a strong relationship with bladder cancer and that was quantity and duration dependant. Less water intake(53.4% and poor socioeconomic status (82%were significant contributory factors. Analysis of occupational factors gave no epidemiological clue. Histopathological Examination (HPErevealed low grade urothelial carcinoma (51cases, high grade (24 cases and papilloma with low malignant potential (13 subjects. Conclusion: Proper epidemiological survey plays a pivotal role in bladder cancer to validate it in the disease control programme.

  7. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression.

  8. Malignant glandular lesions and glandular differentiation in invasive/noninvasive urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzatoğlu, Kemal

    2011-12-01

    Although the lumen of the urinary bladder is covered with only urothelial epithelium, malign glandular lesions (eg, nonurachal adenocarcinoma) and benign lesions (eg, cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis) can also rarely occur in this site due to its characteristic embryologic development. Glandular differentiation is uncommon in urothelial carcinomas and is even less common in noninvasive urothelial cancers. In addition, in situ urothelial carcinomas are more likely to progress in the presence of glandular differentiation toward high-grade urothelial carcinomas and/or aggressive urothelial carcinomas. Pure nonurachal adenocarcinomas and mixed carcinomas (urothelial carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) are very rare, and their pathogenesis is not clear. Most of the nonurachal adenocarcinomas are thought to arise on the grounds of cystitis glandularus with intestinal metaplasia. Here, I present 2 cases with noninvasive urothelial carcinoma with substantial glandular differentiation showing progression to signet ring cell carcinoma and invasive urothelial carcinoma, one case with mixed carcinoma (urothelial carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) and another case with pure adenocarcinoma developing from cystitis glandularis with intestinal metaplasia, and discuss malign glandular lesions in the bladder and invasive/noninvasive urothelial carcinomas with glandular differentiation.

  9. Tumours and tumourous diseases; Tumoren, tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, W. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke) [German] Der vorliegende Band der Reihe Orthopaedie und orthopaedische Chirurgie behandelt das Thema Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen. Der Band teilt sich in zwei Kapitel: 1. Knochentumoren und tumorartige Laesionen und 2. Weichteiltumoren und tumorartige Laesionen. Dargestellt werden Pathologie, Diagnostik, konservative und perioperative Therapie, chirurgische Therapie, Komplikationen nach Resektion, Indikatoren zur Amputation, Nachsorgeempfehlung, Strahlentherapie, Radionuklidtherapie, alternative Therapieverfahren, Therapiekonzepte bei Metastasen, Tissue Engineering und plastisch-chirurgische Massnahmen. (uke)

  10. A Rare Cause of Testicular Metastasis: Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Nesip Manav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic testicular cancers are rare. Primary tumor sources are prostate, lung, and gastrointestinal tract for metastatic testicular cancers. Metastasis of urothelial carcinoma (UC to the testis is extremely rare. Two-thirds of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC is of invasive stage at diagnosis and metastatic sites are the pelvic lymph nodes, liver, lung, and bone. We report a rare case of metastatic UTUC to the testis which has not been reported before, except one case in the literature. Testicular metastasis of UC should be considered in patients with hematuria and testicular swelling.

  11. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas, E-mail: nibrown@cantab.net [St Vincent’s Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Australia); Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming [St Vincent’s Hospital, Department of Urology (Australia); Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu [St Vincent’s Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy.

  12. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-01

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy.

  13. Calpain3 is expressed in a proteolitically active form in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calpain 3 (Capn3, also named p94, is a skeletal muscle tissue-specific protein known to be responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A. Recent experimental studies have hypothesized a pro-apoptotic role of Capn3 in some melanoma cell lines. So far the link between calpain3 and tumors comes from in vitro studies. The objective of this study was to describe Capn3 activation in naturally occurring urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we describe, for the first time in veterinary and comparative oncology, the activation of Capn3 in twelve urothelial tumor cells of the urinary bladder of cattle. Capn3 protein was initially identified with nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS in a co-immunoprecipitation experiment on E2F3, known to be a transcription factor playing a crucial role in bladder carcinogenesis in humans. Capn3 expression was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Finally, the Ca(2+-dependent proteolytic activity of Capn3 was assayed following ion exchange chromatography. Morphologically, Capn3 expression was documented by immunohistochemical methods. In fact numerous tumor cells showed an intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity, which was more rarely evident also at nuclear level. In urothelial tumors, bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 DNA was amplified by PCR and the expression of E5 protein, the major oncogenic protein of BVP-2, was detected by western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. E2F3 overexpression and pRb protein downregulation were shown by western blotting. CONCLUSION: The role of capn3 protein in urothelial cancer of the urinary bladder remains to be elucidated: further studies would be required to determine the precise function of this protease in tumor development and progression. However, we suggest that activated Capn3 may be involved in molecular

  14. Oral Squamomelanocytic Tumour in a Dog: a Unique Biphasic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Avallone, G; Benazzi, C; Sarli, G; Porcellato, I; Brachelente, C; Brunetti, B

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, squamomelanocytic tumour is a malignant cutaneous neoplasm composed of closely intermingled neoplastic squamous cells and melanocytes. A multinodular gingival tumour in a 16-year-old, mixed breed neutered female dog was examined microscopically. Two populations of neoplastic cells, melanocytic and squamous epithelial cells were intermingled. The melanocytic cells were melan-A positive and cytokeratin AE1-AE3 negative and the squamous component was cytokeratin AE1-AE3 positive and melan-A negative. Bovine papillomavirus was not identified by immunohistochemistry or polymerase chain reaction. A diagnosis of squamomelanocytic tumour was made.

  15. Superficial Urothelial Cancer in the Prostatic Urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Kirkali

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is a multifocal disease of the urinary tract that can also involve the prostatic urethra (PU. The exact incidence of superficial involvement of the PU in patients with bladder TCC is not well known. Bladder TCC may involve the prostate in 12—40% of the patients and the degree of involvement can include urethral mucosa, ducts, acini, and stroma of the gland, which has been shown to affect the outcome. Risk factors for superficial urothelial cancer in the PU are high-grade, multifocal bladder TCC and presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS in the bladder. While visible tumors are easy to detect and resect, controversy still exists regarding the optimal technique to identify prostatic involvement by TCC. Prostatic urethral sampling by a transurethral resection biopsy or a cold-cup biopsy, particularly in the high-risk group of bladder cancer patients, has been recommended for detecting prostatic urethral involvement. Management of superficial prostatic involvement by TCC is also unclear. Currently, there is increasing recognition of the value of conservative treatment options with intravesical agents when there is superficial involvement of the PU. Particularly, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG seems to be an effective treatment alternative in the management of superficial involvement of the PU by TCC. Close follow-up by cystoscopy and PU biopsy at 3-month intervals, particularly in intermediate and high-risk patients who respond to intravesical therapy and in whom cystectomy is appropriate, is recommended in order to detect persistent tumor, recurrences, or progression.

  16. Superficial urothelial cancer in the prostatic urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkali, Ziya; Canda, A Erdem

    2006-02-28

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is a multifocal disease of the urinary tract that can also involve the prostatic urethra (PU). The exact incidence of superficial involvement of the PU in patients with bladder TCC is not well known. Bladder TCC may involve the prostate in 12-40% of the patients and the degree of involvement can include urethral mucosa, ducts, acini, and stroma of the gland, which has been shown to affect the outcome. Risk factors for superficial urothelial cancer in the PU are high-grade, multifocal bladder TCC and presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) in the bladder. While visible tumors are easy to detect and resect, controversy still exists regarding the optimal technique to identify prostatic involvement by TCC. Prostatic urethral sampling by a transurethral resection biopsy or a cold-cup biopsy, particularly in the high-risk group of bladder cancer patients, has been recommended for detecting prostatic urethral involvement. Management of superficial prostatic involvement by TCC is also unclear. Currently, there is increasing recognition of the value of conservative treatment options with intravesical agents when there is superficial involvement of the PU. Particularly, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG) seems to be an effective treatment alternative in the management of superficial involvement of the PU by TCC. Close follow-up by cystoscopy and PU biopsy at 3-month intervals, particularly in intermediate and high-risk patients who respond to intravesical therapy and in whom cystectomy is appropriate, is recommended in order to detect persistent tumor, recurrences, or progression.

  17. Epidemiology and risk factors of urothelial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M.; Catto, J.W.; Dalbagni, G.; Grossman, H.B.; Herr, H.; Karakiewicz, P.; Kassouf, W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; La Vecchia, C.; Shariat, S.; Lotan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) is a disease of significant morbidity and mortality. It is important to understand the risk factors of this disease. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence, prevalence, and mortality of UBC and to review and interpret the current evidence on and impact of the r

  18. Targeting tumour Cell Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth D. WILLIAMS

    2009-01-01

    @@ Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of tumour progression and metastasis, particularly in uro-logical carcinomas (bladder and prostate). Tumour cell plasticity, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a cen-tral theme in Dr Williams' work.

  19. Cardiac tumours in children

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    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  20. Mechanical characterization of benign and malignant urothelial cells from voided urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei-Baghini, Ehsan; Zheng, Yi; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Geddie, William B.; Sun, Yu

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates whether mechanical differences exist between benign and malignant urothelial cells in voided urine. The Young's modulus of individual cells was measured using the micropipette aspiration technique. Malignant urothelial cells showed significantly lower Young's modulus values compared to benign urothelial cells. The results indicate that Young's modulus as a biomechanical marker could possibly provide additional information to conventional urinary cytology. We hope that these preliminary results could evoke attention to mechanical characterization of urine cells and spark interest in the development of biomechanical approaches to enhance non-invasive urothelial carcinoma detection.

  1. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Conditional Survival in de novo Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanta Kumar Pal

    Full Text Available Second-line therapy is frequently utilized for metastatic urothelial carcinoma, but there are limited data to guide this approach. While an assessment of overall survival based on registry data may not capture the impact of second- and third-line therapies on clinical outcome, this may be reflected in relative conditional survival (RCS.Patients with stage IV urothelial carcinoma diagnosed from 1990-2010 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER dataset. The association of clinicopathologic variables with disease specific survival (DSS was explored through univariate and multivariate analyses. DSS in subgroups divided by time period (1990-2000 v 2001-2010 was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. One-year RCS at annual landmarks up to 5 years was compared in subgroups divided by time period.Of 261,987 patients diagnosed with urothelial carcinoma from 1990-2010, 3,110 patients met criteria for the current analysis. Characteristics of patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2000 (n = 810 and 2001 to 2010 (n = 2,300 were similar and there was no significant difference in DSS between the two groups. On multivariate analysis, older age (age ≥ 80 was associated with shorter DSS (HR 1.79, 95%CI 1.48-2.15, but no association was found between time period of diagnosis and outcome. One-year RCS improved substantially through successive annual landmarks up to 5 years, but no differences were seen in subgroups divided by time of diagnosis.No difference in RCS was observed amongst patients with stage IV urothelial carcinoma diagnosed from 1990-2000 and 2001-2010. A lack of difference in RCS (more so than cumulative DSS may reflect a lack of progress in salvage therapies for the disease.

  3. Systemic Immunotherapy for Urothelial Cancer: Current Trends and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shilpa; Gill, David; Poole, Austin; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2017-01-27

    Urothelial cancer of the bladder, renal pelvis, ureter, and other urinary organs is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and systemic platinum-based chemotherapy remains the standard of care for first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). Until recently, there were very limited options for patients who are refractory to chemotherapy, or do not tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities and overall outcomes have remained very poor. While the role of immunotherapy was first established in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in the 1970s, no systemic immunotherapy was approved for advanced disease until the recent approval of a programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) inhibitor, atezolizumab, in patients with advanced/metastatic UC who have progressed on platinum-containing regimens. This represents a significant milestone in this disease after a void of over 30 years. In addition to atezolizumab, a variety of checkpoint inhibitors have shown a significant activity in advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma and are expected to gain Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in the near future. The introduction of novel immunotherapy agents has led to rapid changes in the field of urothelial carcinoma. Numerous checkpoint inhibitors are being tested alone or in combination in the first and subsequent-line therapies of metastatic disease, as well as neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. They are also being studied in combination with radiation therapy and for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer refractory to BCG. Furthermore, immunotherapy is being utilized for those ineligible for firstline platinum-based chemotherapy. This review outlines the novel immunotherapy agents which have either been approved, or are currently being investigated in clinical trials in UC.

  4. Systemic Immunotherapy for Urothelial Cancer: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial cancer of the bladder, renal pelvis, ureter, and other urinary organs is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and systemic platinum-based chemotherapy remains the standard of care for first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC. Until recently, there were very limited options for patients who are refractory to chemotherapy, or do not tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities and overall outcomes have remained very poor. While the role of immunotherapy was first established in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in the 1970s, no systemic immunotherapy was approved for advanced disease until the recent approval of a programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 inhibitor, atezolizumab, in patients with advanced/metastatic UC who have progressed on platinum-containing regimens. This represents a significant milestone in this disease after a void of over 30 years. In addition to atezolizumab, a variety of checkpoint inhibitors have shown a significant activity in advanced/metastatic urothelial carcinoma and are expected to gain Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval in the near future. The introduction of novel immunotherapy agents has led to rapid changes in the field of urothelial carcinoma. Numerous checkpoint inhibitors are being tested alone or in combination in the first and subsequent-line therapies of metastatic disease, as well as neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. They are also being studied in combination with radiation therapy and for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer refractory to BCG. Furthermore, immunotherapy is being utilized for those ineligible for firstline platinum-based chemotherapy. This review outlines the novel immunotherapy agents which have either been approved, or are currently being investigated in clinical trials in UC.

  5. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zardawi, Ibrahim; Chong, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  6. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardawi, Ibrahim; Chong, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  7. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Zardawi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  8. Parapharyngeal space primary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Gianluigi; Suarez, Vanessa; Muñoz, María Gabriela; Costales, María; Llorente, José Luis

    The aim of this study is to present our experience with the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for parapharyngeal space tumours. This study is a retrospective review of 90 patients diagnosed with tumours of the parapharyngeal space and treated surgically between 1984 and 2015. Patients whose tumours were not primary but invaded the parapharyngeal space expanding from another region, tumours originating in the deep lobe of the parotid gland and head and neck metastasis were excluded from this study. 74% percent of the parapharyngeal space neoplasms were benign and 26% were malignant. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common neoplasm (27%), followed by paragangliomas (25%), miscellaneous malignant tumours (16%), neurogenic tumours (12%), miscellaneous benign tumours (10%), and malignant salivary gland tumours (10%). The transcervical approach was used in 56 cases, cervical-transparotid approach in 15 cases, type A infratemporal fossa approach in 13 cases, transmandibular approach in 4 cases and transoral approach in 2 cases. The most common complications were those deriving from nervous injuries. Most parapharyngeal space tumours can be removed surgically with a low rate of complications and recurrence. The transcervical approach is the most frequently used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  9. Laparoscopic vs open radical nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial cancer: oncological outcomes and 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Francesco; Wagner, Sigrid; Hoda, Rashid M; Hamza, Amir; Fornara, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    To compare the oncological outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy (LNU) vs open NU (ONU) for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Between July 1999 and January 2003, we performed 70 LNUs and 70 ONUs for TCC of the upper urinary tract. ONU was reserved for patients with previous abdominal surgery or with severe cardiac and/or pulmonary problems. Demographic data, tumour staging and histological grading and rates of metastasis were recorded and compared. For LNU and ONU the mean operative durations were 240 min and 190 min, respectively. The definitive pathology showed a high incidence of tumour stage pT2 G2 in both LNU and ONU groups. The median follow-up was 60 months. In the LNU group, the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 75%: 100% for pTa, 88% for pT1, 78% for pT2, and 35% for pT3 (P ONU group, the 5-year DFS was 73% (LNU vs ONU, P = 0.037): 100% for pTa, 89% for pT1, 75% for pT2 and 31% for pT3 (P ONU in the therapy of upper urinary tract urothelial cancer.

  10. Isolated cardiac metastasis from plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

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    Peck Joshua R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 57-year-old male with a history of hypertension presented with shortness of breath, intermittent substernal chest pain, subjective fevers, and a 30-pound weight loss. He was found to have a bladder mass four months prior to presentation, for which he underwent cystoscopy and surgical removal. Pathology demonstrated high-grade superficial plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma extending into the submucosa but not the muscularis propria. Given the superficial nature of his bladder cancer, a cystectomy was deferred. He was subsequently lost to follow-up care. On arrival, physical exam was notable for tachycardia, tachypnea, and distant heart sounds. An ECG showed an incomplete right bundle branch block and sinus tachycardia. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed a three-cm pericardial effusion. Transthoracic echocardiography confirmed this finding and revealed a mass in the right ventricle (RV extending into the outflow tract and infiltrating the free wall. The RV was dilated with an estimated RV systolic pressure of 37 mmHg. Pericardiocentesis yielded nearly one liter of serosanguinous fluid with non-diagnostic cytology. Partial median sternotomy with biopsy showed pathologic findings consistent with metastatic urothelial carcinoma, plasmacytoid variant. A PET scan showed increased uptake exclusively in the heart. The oncology team discussed options with the patient including chemotherapy and palliative care. The patient decided to withhold further therapy and went home with hospice care. He died two months later. Discussion Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men in the United States. Most patients (69% with metastatic bladder cancer have multiple organs involved; conversely, our patient had a PET scan indicating his disease was localized to the heart. Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma is a rare subtype of bladder cancer, and is estimated to make up less than three percent of all invasive bladder carcinomas. At

  11. WHO/ISUP classification of the urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder

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    Zdenka Ovčak

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The authors present the current classification of urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder. The classification of urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of 1973 was despite some imperfection relatively successfuly used for more than thirty years. The three grade classification of papillary urothelial tumors without invasion has been based on evaluation of variations in architecture of covering epithelium and tumor cell anaplasia. As reccomended by the International Society of Urological Pathologists (ISUP, the World Health Organisation (WHO accepted the new WHO/ ISUP classification in 1998 that was revised in 2002 and finally published in 2004. With intention to avoid unnecessary diagnosis of cancer in patients having papillary urothelial tumors with rare invasive or metastastatic growth, this classification introduced a new entity, the papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential (PUNLMP. The additional change in classification was the division of invasive urothelial neoplasms only to low and high grade urothelial carcinomas.Conclusions: The authors’ opinion is that although the old classification is not recommended for use anymore the new one is not solving the elementary reproaches to previous classification such as terminological unsuitability and insufficient scientific reasoning. Our proposed solution in classification of papillary urothelial neoplasms would be the application of criteria analogous to that used in diagnostics of papillary noninvasive tumors of the head and neck or alimentary tract.

  12. Low Grade Lymphoma Mimicking Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: When Do We Need Further Histologic Staging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azka Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder often present with metastases to regional lymph nodes, with lymphadenopathy on physical examination or radiographic imaging. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 73-year-old Caucasian man with presumed metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder to regional pelvic and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. He underwent systemic chemotherapy for treatment of urothelial carcinoma and was discovered on restaging to have findings suggestive of disease progression but ultimately was found to have a concurrent secondary malignancy. Conclusion. Our case suggests that in patients with urothelial carcinoma, the concurrent presentation of regional lymphadenopathy may not be metastatic urothelial carcinoma and may warrant further investigation.

  13. Biochemistry of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2007-03-01

    Several circulating or urinary tumour markers can be used for the diagnosis and follow-up of functioning and clinically non-functioning neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreatic islet cells and intestinal tract. Among the specific tumour markers are serotonin and its metabolites--e.g. 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)--in carcinoid tumours and the carcinoid syndrome, insulin and its precursors or breakdown products in insulinoma, and gastrin in gastrinoma. Plasma vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) determinations have been used in the diagnosis of VIPoma, plasma glucagon for glucagonoma, and serum somatostatin for somatostatinoma. Among the tumour-non-specific markers are: chromogranins, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), alpha-subunits of the glycoprotein hormones, catecholamines, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), ghrelin and adrenomedullin.

  14. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF UROTHELIAL BLADDER CANCERS

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    Katarina Bevizova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant cancers of urinary bladder are the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract and the fourth most common malignancy in general, especially in men. The aim of this study was a retrospective analysis of selected markers (p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin of urinary bladder cancers from the Department of Urology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic between years 2007 and 2009. We analysed 244 patients (202 males, 42 females with diagnosed bladder cancer via cystoscopy and subsequent transurethral resection. Patients’ age varied from 36 to 98 years. Obtained samples were fixed by 10% buffered formalin for 24 to 48 h. Subsequently, they were dehydrated in ascending ethanol series and embedded in paraffin. The parafin sections of 5 µm were prepared by microtome and they were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The antibodies against to p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin were used in immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical evaluation was performed via SPSS using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test and p values<0.05 were considered statistically significant. No significant differences in the expression of selected markers were found between genders. Expression of p53 and Ki-67, in G1 and G2 of low grade tumours was lower in comparison to their expression in G3 tumors. Expression of E-cadherin was the opposite in this case. The expression of p53 and Ki-67 positively correlated with tumor’s depth of invasion, while the expression of E-cadherin significantly decreased. In case of T4 tumors, the expression of all markers exhibited consistently high values. When analysing tumor multiplicity, the expression of p53 and Ki-67 significantly decreased, while the expression of E-cadherin significantly increased. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the analysis of p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin expression is essential for diagnostics and prognostics of bladder cancer and should be routinely used in daily practise together with

  15. Does urothelial cancer of bladder behave differently in young patients?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hua; LI You-yuan; HU Zhi-quan; ZHU Hui; ZHUANG Qian-yuan; QI Yong; YE Zhang-qun

    2012-01-01

    Background Bladder urothelial cancer has been diagnosed at an increasing rate among young adults in China while the clinical outcomes remain highly controversial.To optimize the management of young patients with bladder cancer,we examined whether bladder urothelial cancer in young patients behaved differently from that in the elder patients.Methods From 1994 to 2008,a database of bladder urothelial cancer patients at a major tertiary medical center was retrospectively reviewed.The clinical and pathological parameters of patients who were less than 40 years of age and a series of patients older than 40 years of age as the control group during the same period were compared.A survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test,and Cox regression was performed to identify clinical parameters that affected the clinic outcomes.Results Young bladder cancer patients had a lower male-to-female ratio and were less likely to have advanced stages and high-grade cancers at the initial diagnosis.Tumors in young bladder cancer patients tended to be less multifocal at diagnosis.In addition,young patients had a lower recurrence rate and longer recurrence interval than older patients.The Kaplan-Meier curve and Log-rank test showed that young patients had significantly better cancer specific survival than old patients.The univariats and multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that tumor grade is the sole predictor for tumor recurrence in young patients.Conclusions Young patients with bladder cancer have favorable pathological features and clinical outcomes than older patients.These findings argue for more conservative management approaches for young patients with bladder cancer.

  16. Contemporary Evaluation and Management of Upper Tract Urothelial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalapu, Rao S; Matin, Surena F

    2016-08-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy with en bloc bladder cuff excision and regional lymphadenectomy is the gold standard for the management of high-grade and high-risk upper tract urothelial carcinomas. There are a few prospective randomized controlled studies in this uncommon and often aggressive disease to support level-1 management guidelines. However, recent developments in imaging, minimally invasive techniques, lymphatic dissemination, and bladder cancer prevention raise the hope for improved risk stratification and treatments without compromising, and hopefully improving, oncological outcomes. Multimodality approaches in terms of neoadjuvant, adjuvant topical, and systemic chemotherapeutic regimens are promising, with 2 prospective trials either open or in development.

  17. Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinomas in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Relationship with Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could prove useful for the detection and staging of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Renal ultrasound can detect hydronephrosis caused by upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients but cannot visualize the carcinomas themselves. High detection rates for upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients have recently been demonstrated using computed tomography urography, which appears to be a promising tool. To detect carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients as early as possible, regular screening in asymptomatic patients and diagnostic work-up in symptomatic patients should be performed using a combination of urological and imaging methods. Careful assessment of subsequent recurrence within the contralateral upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder is necessary for dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with upper tract urothelial carcinomas.

  18. Clonal, self-renewing and differentiating human and porcine urothelial cells, a novel stem cell population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans M Larsson

    Full Text Available Although urothelial progenitor-like cells have been described in the human urinary tract, the existence of stem cells remains to be proven. Using a culture system that favors clonogenic epithelial cell growth, we evaluated and characterized clonal human urothelial cells. We isolated human urothelial cells that were clonogenic, capable of self-renewal and could develop into fully differentiated urothelium once re-implanted into the subcapsular space of nude mice. In addition to final urothelial cell differentiation, spontaneous formation of bladder-like microstructures was observed. By examining an epithelial stem cell signature marker, we found p63 to correlate with the self-renewal capacity of the isolated human urothelial clonal populations. Since a clinically relevant, long-term model for functional reconstitution of human cells does not exist, we sought to establish a culture method for porcine urothelial cells in a clinically relevant porcine model. We isolated cells from porcine ureter, urethra and bladder that were clonogenic and capable of self-renewal and differentiation into fully mature urothelium. In conclusion, we could isolate human and porcine cell populations, behaving as urothelial stem cells and showing clonogenicity, self-renewal and, once re-implanted, morphological differentiation.

  19. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease: relationship with diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Shen-Yang; Teh, Bin Tean; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Nortier, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could prove useful for the detection and staging of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Renal ultrasound can detect hydronephrosis caused by upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients but cannot visualize the carcinomas themselves. High detection rates for upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients have recently been demonstrated using computed tomography urography, which appears to be a promising tool. To detect carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients as early as possible, regular screening in asymptomatic patients and diagnostic work-up in symptomatic patients should be performed using a combination of urological and imaging methods. Careful assessment of subsequent recurrence within the contralateral upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder is necessary for dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with upper tract urothelial carcinomas.

  20. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'psychiatric' indicators of possible brain tumour are sudden ... found to have weakness and/or loss of sensation in the lower extremities. Even when there is no clear weakness or hearing impairment, they may respond poorly, or not at all,.

  1. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  2. Deficiency of pRb family proteins and p53 in invasive urothelial tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng; Mo, Lan; Zheng, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Changkun; Lepor, Herbert; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2009-12-15

    Defects in pRb tumor suppressor pathway occur in approximately 50% of the deadly muscle-invasive urothelial carcinomas in humans and urothelial carcinoma is the most prevalent epithelial cancer in long-term survivors of hereditary retinoblastomas caused by loss-of-function RB1 mutations. Here, we show that conditional inactivation of both RB1 alleles in mouse urothelium failed to accelerate urothelial proliferation. Instead, it profoundly activated the p53 pathway, leading to extensive apoptosis, and selectively induced pRb family member p107. Thus, pRb loss triggered multiple fail-safe mechanisms whereby urothelial cells evade tumorigenesis. Additional loss of p53 in pRb-deficient urothelial cells removed these p53-dependent tumor barriers, resulting in late-onset hyperplasia, umbrella cell nuclear atypia, and rare-occurring low-grade, superficial papillary bladder tumors, without eliciting invasive carcinomas. Importantly, mice deficient in both pRb and p53, but not those deficient in either protein alone, were highly susceptible to subthreshold carcinogen exposure and developed invasive urothelial carcinomas that strongly resembled the human counterparts. The invasive lesions had a marked reduction of p107 but not p130 of the pRb family. Our data provide compelling evidence, indicating that urothelium, one of the slowest cycling epithelia, is remarkably resistant to transformation by pRb or p53 deficiency; that concurrent loss of these two tumor suppressors is necessary but insufficient to initiate urothelial tumorigenesis along the invasive pathway; that p107 may play a critical role in suppressing invasive urothelial tumor formation; and that replacing/restoring the function of pRb, p107, or p53 could be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to block urothelial tumor progression.

  3. Bilateral Malignant Brenner Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser D Choudhary, S.Manzoor Kadri, Ruby Reshi, S. Besina, Mansoor A. Laharwal, Reyaz tasleem, Qurrat A. Chowdhary

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral malignant Brenner tumour ofovary is extremely rate. A case ofmalignant Brenner tumourinvolving both the ovaries with mctastasis to mesentery in a 48 year femalc is presented. Grosslyo'arian masses were firm with soft areas, encapsulated and having bosselated external surfaces.Cut sections showed yellowish white surface with peripheral cysts (in both tumours. Microscopyrevealed transitional cell carcinoma with squamoid differentiation at places. Metastatic deposits werefound in the mesentery. Endometrium showed cystic glandular hyperplasia.

  4. Recurrence of Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma in the Colon Presenting as Hematochezia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzak, Michael; Barakat, Iskandar; Deeb, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with superficial bladder cancers remain clinically indolent after treatment with even a modicum of urologic intervention. However, with more invasive disease, the majority of patients experience recurrence. The conventional route of metastasis and recurrence in primary urothelial cell carcinoma is through lymphatic system, with regional lymph nodes, lungs, liver, brain, and bone being the most common sites. Isolated intraluminal colonic recurrence in the absence of local invasion is extremely rare. We report a unique case of urothelial cell carcinoma presenting with an isolated colonic mass, which unexpectedly, on immunohistostaining, proved to be primarily of urothelial rather than colonic origin.

  5. Cystitis: From Urothelial Cell Biology to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilho Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystitis is a urinary bladder disease with many causes and symptoms. The severity of cystitis ranges from mild lower abdominal discomfort to life-threatening haemorrhagic cystitis. The course of disease is often chronic or recurrent. Although cystitis represents huge economical and medical burden throughout the world and in many cases treatments are ineffective, the mechanisms of its origin and development as well as measures for effective treatment are still poorly understood. However, many studies have demonstrated that urothelial dysfunction plays a crucial role. In the present review we first discuss fundamental issues of urothelial cell biology, which is the core for comprehension of cystitis. Then we focus on many forms of cystitis, its current treatments, and advances in its research. Additionally we review haemorrhagic cystitis with one of the leading causative agents being chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide and summarise its management strategies. At the end we describe an excellent and widely used animal model of cyclophosphamide induced cystitis, which gives researches the opportunity to get a better insight into the mechanisms involved and possibility to develop new therapy approaches.

  6. Telomere instability in papillary bladder urothelial carcinomas: Comparison with grading and risk of recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mucciardi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that TL, TA and TBPs are altered in tumors and non-cancerous mucosa in patients with papillary urothelial NMIBC. Further studies are warranted to identify their suitability as a potential biomarker.

  7. Increased Risks of Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma in Male and Female Chinese Herbalists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Yu Yang

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: The significant risk of urothelial carcinoma noted in male herbalists increases our suspicion that this is an occupational disease that renders regular health assessment of herbalists an urgent necessity.

  8. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Comments on the proposed rule were required to......

  9. Prognostic Value of p53 Expression Intensity in Urothelial Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Samina; Inam, Qazi Adil; Ashraf, Sobia; Khan, M Safdar; Khokhar, M Abbas; Awan, Nukhbatullah

    2017-04-01

    To determine association of immunohistochemical expression intensity of p53 with grade and stage of urothelial cancers. Descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. Pathology Department, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from January to December 2016. Data of transurethral resection/radical cystesctomy urinary bladder biopsies was collected. Clinical, radiological and cystoscopic findings of patients were noted from patients' charts in the Urology Ward. Biopsies were graded histologically according to WHO 2004 grading system. TNM system was used for pathological staging. On selected slides, immunoshistochemistry for p53 was applied. Nuclear immunoreactivity was considered positive if present in >10% of tumor cells and negative if <10% of tumor cells. Intensity was considered weak (less than 15% cells) and strong (more than 15% cells). Data was analyzed by SPSS version 21. Linear-by-linear association was calculated between p53 expression and stage of urothelial tumors, Chi-Square test was used to see association between grade and intensity of p53. Qualitative variables, like grade and stage of carcinoma along with p53 expression, were calculated in terms of frequencies and percentages. P ≤ 0.05 was taken as significant. Out of the 70 patients, 61 (87%) were males and 9 (13%) females. Out of 25 low grade lesions, 4 (16%) cases were p53 positive; and out of 45 high grade lesions, 41 (91%) cases were p53 positive. There was 33% (2/6 cases) positivity in Tis, 55% (16/29 cases) in T1, 72% in T2 (21/29), and 100% in T3a (5/5 cases) and T3b (1/1 case). Strong intensity of p53 staining was noted to be 5.4% (n=25) of low grade and 94.6% (n=45) of high grade tumors. p53 expression was greater and more frequently strong in higher grade and stage of urothelial carcinoma. It can be used as a prognostic marker in predicting higher grade and stage of bladder cancer.

  10. Multicystic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder with gland-like lumina and with signet-ring cells. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes Ondrej

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of 80-year-old male with superficial papillary urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder with striking multicystic architecture with a combination of features of urothelial carcinoma with gland-like lumina, with signet-ring cell differentiation and microcystic pattern. However, the tumor shared the morphologic features of several variants of urothelial carcinoma, the most important differential diagnosis covered so-called florid Brunneriosis, cystitis cystica, and primary adenocarcinomas of the urinary bladder.

  11. Effect of melatonin on apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation of urothelial cells after cyclophosphamide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Dasa; Jezernik, Kristijan; Vidmar, Gaj

    2008-04-01

    Melatonin was recently shown to have protective effects against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) by diminishing bladder oxidative stress. HC is accompanied by destruction of the bladder urothelium and followed by apoptosis and rapid regeneration via proliferation and differentiation of urothelial cells, reaching complete restoration of normal urothelium in three weeks. Therefore, the effect of melatonin on apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation of urothelial cells, during destruction and regeneration of the urothelium three-weeks after a single dose CP treatment, was studied. F344 male rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline (control group) or melatonin (Mel group) or a single dose of CP (100 mg/kg; CP group) or melatonin (10 mg/kg) with CP (Mel + CP group). Melatonin co-treatment with CP significantly reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation of urothelial cells at day 1 and thus prevented extensive loss of cells from the urothelium. However, proliferation indices at days 4 and 7 after melatonin and CP co-treatment suddenly dropped and therefore the development of hyperplasia was prevented. Melatonin co-treatment with CP also resulted in earlier differentiation of superficial urothelial cells. Melatonin seems to have protective effect against CP-induced urothelial damage and a favorable impact on regeneration and restoration of normal urothelium, since it reduces the number of apoptotic and proliferating urothelial cells and results in their earlier differentiation.

  12. Prognostic role of expression of N-cadherin in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abufaraj, Mohammad; Moschini, Marco; Soria, Francesco; Gust, Kilian; Özsoy, Mehmet; Mathieu, Romain; Rouprêt, Morgan; Margulis, Vitaly; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher G; Briganti, Alberto; Bensalah, Karim; Haitel, Andrea; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2017-07-01

    To assess the role of N-cadherin as prognostic biomarker in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) in a large multi-institutional cohort of patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the status of N-cadherin expression in 678 patients with unilateral sporadic UTUC treated with radical nephroureterectomy. N-cadherin was considered positive if any immunoreactivity with membranous staining was detected. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate recurrence-free survival, overall survival and cancer-specific survival. Disease recurrence, overall mortality and cancer-specific mortality probabilities were tested in Cox regression models. Expression of N-cadherin was observed in 292 (43.1%) of patients, and it was associated with advanced tumour stage (p N-cadherin expression was significantly associated with higher probability of recurrence (p = 0.01), but not overall (p = 0.9) or cancer-specific mortality (p = 0.06). When adjusted for the effects of all available confounders, N-cadherin was not associated with any of the survival outcomes. N-cadherin is expressed in approximately 2/5 of UTUs. It is associated with adverse pathologic factors but not with survival outcomes. Its clinical value remains limited.

  13. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  14. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hkitamu@sapmed.ac.jp; Tsukamoto, Taiji [Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South 1 West 16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8543 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  15. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Tsukamoto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  16. Percutaneous renal tumour biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Martignoni, Guido; Srigley, John R; Evans, Andrew J; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The use of percutaneous renal tumour biopsy (RTB) as a diagnostic tool for the histological characterization of renal masses has increased dramatically within the last 30 years. This increased utilization has paralleled advances in imaging techniques and an evolving knowledge of the clinical value of nephron sparing surgery. Improved biopsy techniques using image guidance, coupled with the use of smaller gauge needles has led to a decrease in complication rates. Reports from series containing a large number of cases have shown the non-diagnostic rate of RTB to range from 4% to 21%. Re-biopsy has been shown to reduce this rate, while the use of molecular markers further improves diagnostic sensitivity. In parallel with refinements of the biopsy procedure, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of renal cell neoplasia. The 2013 Vancouver Classification is the current classification for renal tumours, and contains five additional entities recognized as novel forms of renal malignancy. The diagnosis of tumour morphotype on RTB is usually achievable on routine histology; however, immunohistochemical studies may be of assistance in difficult cases. The morphology of the main tumour subtypes, based upon the Vancouver Classification, is described and differentiating features are discussed.

  17. cell tumours of childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neuron-specific-enolase, vimentin and neurofilament us- .... ated on a 4-point scale based on the number of positive cells: Negative staining (—) = no tumour cell stained. Minimal .... the same laboratory, have been shown previously to be.

  18. Utility of MRI features in differentiation of central renal cell carcinoma and renal pelvic urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, Natasha E; Kim, Min Ju; Matza, Brent W; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the utility of various morphologic and quantitative MRI features in differentiating central renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from renal pelvic urothelial carcinoma. Sixty patients (39 men and 21 women; mean [± SD] age, 65 ± 14 years; 48 with central RCC and 12 with renal pelvic urothelial carcinoma) who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (b values, 0, 400, and 800 s/mm(2)) and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, before histopathologic confirmation were included. Tumor T2 signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured and normalized to muscle and CSF (hereafter referred to as normalized T2 signal and normalized ADC, respectively) and then were compared using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Also, two blinded radiologists independently assessed all tumors for various qualitative features, which were compared with the Fisher exact test and unpaired Student t test. Urothelial carcinoma exhibited significantly lower normalized ADC than did RCC (p = 0.008), but no significant difference was seen in ADC or normalized T2 signal intensity (p = 0.247-0.773). Normalized ADC had the highest area under the curve (0.757); normalized ADC below an optimal threshold of 0.451 was associated with sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% for diagnosing urothelial carcinoma. Features that were significantly more prevalent in urothelial carcinoma included global impression of urothelial carcinoma, location centered within the collecting system, collecting system defect, extension to the ureteropelvic junction, preserved renal shape, absence of cystic or necrotic areas, absence of hemorrhage, homogeneous enhancement, and hypovascularity (all p features ranged from 61.7% to 98.3%. In addition to various qualitative MRI parameters, normalized ADC has utility in differentiating central RCC from renal pelvic urothelial carcinoma. Such differentiation may assist decisions regarding possible biopsy

  19. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  20. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  1. Non-invasive papillary urothelial neoplasms: the 2004 WHO/ISUP classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Miller, Jeremy S; Fajardo, Daniel A; Lee, Thomas K; Netto, George J; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2010-01-01

    The classification and grading of papillary urothelial neoplasms has been a long-standing subject of controversy. Previously, numerous diverse grading schemes for bladder tumor, including the 1973 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, existed whereby one of the major limitations was poor inter-observer reproducibility among pathologists. The WHO/International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus classification system of urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder was developed in 1998 and was revised most recently in 2003 (published in 2004). Importantly, the current classification system provides detailed histological criteria for papillary urothelial lesions and allows for designation of a lesion (papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential) with a negligible risk of progression. Thus, the latest system is designed to be a universally acceptable one for bladder tumors that not only could be effectively used by pathologists, urologists, and oncologists, but also stratifies the tumors into prognostically significant categories. This article outlines the 2004 WHO/ISUP classification system regarding the specific histological criteria for non-invasive papillary urothelial neoplasms and the clinical significance of each category.

  2. DDR2 overexpression in urothelial carcinoma indicates an unfavorable prognosis: a large cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Chen; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Chun-Nung; Ke, Hung-Lung; Li, Ching-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Chan, Ti-Chun; Liang, Peir-In; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Lim, Sher-Wei; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-11-29

    The migration ability of urothelial carcinoma corresponding to dismal prognosis had not been fully investigated. The interaction of extracellular collagen with a unique transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), was selected by data mining. We arranged real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to evaluate the transcript levels in 26 urinary tract urothelial carcinoma and 26 urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma specimens, showing significantly increase corresponding to advanced primary stage (p = 0.003 and p DDR2 expression in 340 urinary tract urothelial carcinoma and 295 urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma. Assessments of the correlation to clinicopathologic features, disease-specific survival, and metastasis-free survival were conducted. The transcript levels in advanced stage were higher than those in early stage and were correlated with poor prognosis. The higher expression was positively correlated to higher pT status (p DDR2 resulted in a depletion of cellular viability, migratory, and invasive ability, supporting the oncogenic function of DDR2.

  3. Significance of a minor high-grade component in a low-grade noninvasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Leonardo O; Taheri, Diana; Chaux, Alcides; Guner, Gunes; Mendoza Rodriguez, Maria A; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Schoenberg, Mark P; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the clinicopathological features and prognostic significance of the presence of 5% or less high-grade component in otherwise low-grade noninvasive bladder urothelial carcinoma, referred to as mixed-grade (MG) urothelial carcinoma, we reviewed all archival cases with such diagnosis between 2005 and 2014. Clinicopathological and outcome parameters were compared to those in our previously reported low- and high-grade noninvasive bladder urothelial carcinoma cohorts (LGUC and HGUC, respectively). The study included 31 MG urothelial carcinomas. Mean patient age was 67.6 years, and mean follow-up was 39.7 months. Intravesical treatment was administered in 15 patients (48.4%). Recurrence occurred in 14 cases (45.2%): 10 as LGUC and 4 as HGUC; there was no stage progression. Mean time to progression was 9 months (5-17 months), and there was no death of disease. MG urothelial carcinoma stage progression and dead of disease rates were comparable to that of LGUC. MG urothelial carcinoma stage progression was significantly lower than that of HGUC, P = .002, using Pearson χ(2) test. MG urothelial carcinoma patients with no intravesical treatment had higher incidence rate of grade progression (25%) compared to LGUC patients (7.9%); however, the difference was not statistically significant. MG urothelial carcinoma had a prognosis closer to "pure" LGUC than "pure" HGUC. Untreated MG urothelial carcinoma may have a higher rate of grade progression than LGUC, although more data are needed before this issue can be definitively addressed. Until such data are available, it is reasonable to keep MG urothelial carcinoma as a distinct grade category with potential management implications.

  4. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  5. Study of the reproducibility of the 2004 World Health Organization classification of urothelial neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate urinary bladder biopsies showing papillary urothelial neoplastic lesions based on the 2004 WHO/ISUP classification of Urothelial Neoplasms of the Urinary Bladder, to assess the reproducibility of the bladder carcinoma grade. Fifty consecutive transurethral tumor resection biopsies were evaluated by four pathologists independently. The final diagnoses of each pathologist were subjected to statistical analysis to assess the degree of interobserver variability and reproducibility of this classification. Significant interobserver variation was found in the reporting of urothelial neoplasms. In 22 instances there was difference in opinion between PUNLMP and low-grade carcinoma, and in 59 instances between low and high grade carcinoma. The 4 observers never unanimously agreed on the diagnosis of PUNLMP.

  6. Etiology of Balkan endemic nephropathy and associated urothelial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovic, V.; Toncheva, D.; Atanasova, S.; Polenakovic, M. [Inst. of Nephrology and Hemodialysis, Nish (Serbia Montenegro)

    2006-07-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) is a familial chronic tubulointerstitial disease with insidious onset and slow progression to terminal renal failure. Evidence has accumulated that BEN is an environmentally induced disease. There are three actual theories attempting to explain the environmental cause of this disease: (1) the aristolochic acid hypothesis, which considers that the disease is produced by chronic intoxication with Aristolochia, (2) the mycotoxin hypothesis, which considers that BEN is produced by ochratoxin A, and (3) the Pliocene lignite hypothesis, which proposes that the disease is caused by long-term exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other toxic organic compounds leaching into the well drinking water from low-rank coals in the vicinity to the endemic settlements. Moreover, it was suggested that BEN risk is influenced by inherited susceptibility. Therefore, it has been expected that molecular biological investigations will discover genetic markers of BEN and associated urothelial cancer, permitting early identification of susceptible individuals who may be at risk of exposure to the environmental agents. Since kidney pathophysiology is complex, gene expression analysis and highly throughput proteomic technology can identify candidate genes, proteins and molecule networks that eventually could play a role in BEN development. Investigation of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions could be the content of further studies determining the precise risk for BEN.

  7. Clinical significance of urothelial carcinoma associated 1 in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kun; Yang, Jing; Hu, Yuemei; Sun, Yaohua; Tan, Zhenyu; Duan, Jinglin; Zhang, Feng; Yan, Hongli; Deng, Anmei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1) in cancer tissues and plasma of colon cancer patients, and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of UCA1 in 80 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissues, plasma samples from 20 healthy controls, 20 colon cancer patients before and after tumor removal. The relationships between UCA1 expression and clinical features and overall survival were analyzed. Compared with adjacent normal tissues, UCA1 was significantly upregulated in colon cancer tissues, especially in cases with LNM and advanced TNM stages (P TNM stages (P colon cancer patients were significantly higher than those of controls (P = 0.016). There was significant difference in plasma level of UCA1 between samples taken before and after surgery (P = 0.048). In conclusion, tissue expression of UCA1 is related to prognosis in colon cancer. Plasma UCA1 may serve as a potential biomarker for early diagnosis and disease monitoring of colon cancer patients.

  8. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  9. Low grade urothelial carcinoma mimicking basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia in needle prostate biopsy

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    Julian Arista-Nasr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The vast majority of urothelial carcinomas infiltrating the bladder are consistent with high-grade tumors that can be easily recognized as malignant in needle prostatic biopsies. In contrast, the histological changes of low-grade urothelial carcinomas in this kind of biopsy have not been studied. Materials and Methods We describe the clinicopathologic features of two patients with low-grade bladder carcinomas infiltrating the prostate. They reported dysuria and hematuria. Both had a slight elevation of the prostate specific antigen and induration of the prostatic lobes. Needle biopsies were performed. At endoscopy bladder tumors were found in both cases. Results Both biopsies showed nests of basophilic cells and cells with perinuclear clearing and slight atypia infiltrating acini and small prostatic ducts. The stroma exhibited extensive desmoplasia and chronic inflammation. The original diagnosis was basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia. The bladder tumors also showed low-grade urothelial carcinoma. In one case, the neoplasm infiltrated the lamina propria, and in another, the muscle layer. In both, a transurethral resection was performed for obstructive urinary symptoms. The neoplasms were positive for high molecular weight keratin (34BetaE12 and thrombomodulin. No metastases were found in either of the patients, and one of them has survived for five years. Conclusions The diagnosis of low-grade urothelial carcinoma in prostate needle biopsies is difficult and may simulate benign prostate lesions including basal cell hyperplasia and urothelial metaplasia. It is crucial to recognize low-grade urothelial carcinoma in needle biopsies because only an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can improve the prognosis for these patients.

  10. Diagnostic utility of p53 and CK20 immunohistochemical expression grading urothelial malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current grading system in application by WHO/ISUP divides urothelial malignancies in low and high grade by morphologic criteria while strict segregation may become cumbersome in limited tissue specimens. As grading these carcinomas are of utmost prognostic significance after depth of invasion, therefore we evaluated the role of immunohistochemical expression of p53 and cytokeratin 20 as an adjuctive tool in grading urothelial carcinoma. Methods The study was conducted in Aga khan university hospital, Histopathology section from December 2010 till June 2011 for duration of six months. It involved 95 cases of urothelial carcinomas diagnosed on trans-uretheral resection specimens of bladder growth. Immunohistochemical expression of p53 and cytokeratin 20 was performed according to standard protocols and correlated with grade and depth of invasion. Results There were 48 cases (50.5%) of low grade and 47 cases (49.5%) of high grade urothelial carcinoma included in the study. Male to female ratio was 4.3:1. Majority of patients (80%) were seen in 45 to 90 years age group. Diffuse positive expression of cytokerain 20 was noted in 33 cases (68.8%) of high grade and 19 (40.4%) low grade tumors. Strong positive expression of p53 was seen in 35 cases (72.9%) of high grade while only 17 cases (36.2%) of low grade tumors showed strong p53 expression. Conclusion Significant difference in expression of Cytokeratin 20 and p53 was found between low and high grade urothelial carcinoma. Therefore we suggest combined use of these markers may be helpful in assigning grade to urothelial carcinoma especially when histologic features are borderline. PMID:25089155

  11. Vascular permeability in a human tumour xenograft: molecular charge dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellian, M; Yuan, F; Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Jain, R K

    2000-05-01

    Molecular charge is one of the main determinants of transvascular transport. There are, however, no data available on the effect of molecular charge on microvascular permeability of macromolecules in solid tumours. To this end, we measured tumour microvascular permeability to different proteins having similar size but different charge. Measurements were performed in the human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T transplanted in transparent dorsal skinfold chambers in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and IgG were fluorescently labelled and were either cationized by conjugation with hexamethylenediamine or anionized by succinylation. The molecules were injected i.v. and the fluorescence in tumour tissue was quantified by intravital fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence intensity and pharmacokinetic data were used to calculate the microvascular permeability. We found that tumour vascular permeability of cationized BSA (pI-range: 8.6-9.1) and IgG (pI: 8.6-9.3) was more than two-fold higher (4.25 and 4.65x10(-7) cm s(-1)) than that of the anionized BSA (pI approximately 2.0) and IgG (pI: 3.0-3.9; 1.11 and 1.93x10(-7) cm s(-1), respectively). Our results indicate that positively charged molecules extravasate faster in solid tumours compared to the similar-sized compounds with neutral or negative charges. However, the plasma clearance of cationic molecules was approximately 2x faster than that of anionic ones, indicating that the modification of proteins enhances drug delivery to normal organs as well. Therefore, caution should be exercised when such a strategy is used to improve drug and gene delivery to solid tumours.

  12. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  13. Urothelial Carcinoma in a 22-Year-Old Female with Angelman Syndrome

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    Jessica Pugh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old nulligravid white female with Angelman syndrome was noted to have a 4-month history of premenstrual nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. She had an echogenic focus in her bladder noted on ultrasound. She was diagnosed with low grade urothelial carcinoma after cystoscopic evaluation with biopsy and was sent to urology for further treatment. Urothelial carcinoma is rare in individuals younger than age 40. Patients may present with gross hematuria. There is often a delay in diagnosis in younger individuals with different genetic mutations noted upon diagnosis.

  14. Longitudinal change in renal function after nephroureterectomy in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma

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    Chih-Yuan Chou

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: In this study, it was found that the average renal function of the patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma is not as good as the general population. More than half of the normal renal function patients have new onset chronic kidney disease after surgery. For preventing further deterioration of renal function, the implication of partial nephrectomy or segmental ureterectomy for selected patients with localized urothelial carcinoma should be re-examined. Besides, neoadjuvant chemotherapy should be considered for those who are not good candidates for local treatment.

  15. A histomorphologic and ultrastructural study of the malignant tumours of the renal pelvis.

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    Tyagi N

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried at two different centres. Only 9 cases of primary malignant tumours of the renal pelvis could be collected during the period of 7 years (1984-1990. Renal pelvis malignancies constituted 0.21% of all the malignancies and 12.16% of all the malignant growths of the kidney (9 out of 74 cases. The age of these patients ranged from 24 to 70 years; the mean being 41.7 years. Male/female ratio was 8:1. Common triad of complaints (pain, haematuria and lump was noticed in 22.2% of patients. Individually they were noticed in 77.8%, 66.7% and 44.4% of patients respectively. Transitional cell carcinoma was the commonest, seen in 7 patients (77.8% whereas squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma were noticed in one patient (11.1% each. Hydronephrosis, chronic pyelonephritis and nephrolithiasis were noticed in 66.7%, 44.4% and 22.2% of patients respectively. Ultrastructural study of urothelial tumours revealed tumour cells in various stages of differentiation with loss of intercellular junctions and dense collection of rough endopasmic reticulum fibrils around the nucleus.

  16. Tumours in the Small Bowel

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    N. Kurniawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel tumours are rare and originate from a wide variety of benign and malignant entities. Adenocarcinomas are the most frequent primary malignant small bowel tumours. Submucosal tumours like gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST or neuroendocrine tumours (NET may show a central umbilication, pathologic vessels, bridging folds or an ulceration of the overlying mucosa. These signs help to differentiate them from harmless bulges caused by impression from outside, e.g. from other intestinal loops. Sarcomas of the small bowel are rare neoplasias with mesenchymal origin, sometimes presenting as protruding masses. Benign tumours like lipoma, fibrolipoma, fibroma, myoma, and heterotopias typically present as submucosal masses. They cannot be differentiated endoscopically from those with malignant potential as GIST or NET. Neuroendocrine carcinomas may present with diffuse infiltration, which may resemble other malignant tumours. The endoscopic appearance of small bowel lymphomas has a great variation from mass lesions to diffuse infiltrative changes. Melanoma metastases are the most frequent metastases to the small bowel. They may be hard to distinguish from other tumours when originating from an amelanotic melanoma.

  17. Sarcopenia as a prognostic biomarker of advanced urothelial carcinoma.

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    Hiroshi Fukushima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Sarcopenia, a novel concept reflecting the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, is an objective indicator of cancer cachexia. We investigated its role as a prognostic biomarker in advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC patients. METHODS: This retrospective study consisted of 88 UC patients with cT4 and/or metastases to lymph nodes/distant organs. Skeletal muscle index (SMI, an indicator of whole-body muscle mass, was measured from computed tomography (CT images at the diagnosis. Sarcopenia was defined as SMIs of <43 cm(2/m(2 for males with body mass index (BMI <25 cm(2/m(2, <53 cm(2/m(2 for males with BMI ≥ 25 cm(2/m(2, and <41 cm(2/m(2 for females. Predictors of overall survival (OS were examined using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients (76% died during the median follow-up of 13 months. The median OS rate was 13 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that SMI was a significant and independent predictor of shorter OS (hazard ratio (HR 0.90, P <0.001. In the present cohort, 53 (60% were diagnosed with sarcopenia. The median OS rates were 11 and 31 months for sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients, respectively (P <0.001. On multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was a significant and independent predictor of shorter OS (HR 3.36, P <0.001, along with higher C-reactive protein (CRP (P = 0.001, upper urinary tract cancer (P = 0.007, higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH (P = 0.047, and higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP (P = 0.048. CONCLUSION: Sarcopenia, which is readily evaluated on routine CT scans, is a useful prognostic biomarker of advanced UC. Non-sarcopenic patients can expect long-term survival. Evaluating sarcopenia can be helpful for decision-making processes in the management of advanced UC patients.

  18. Unusual tumours of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E S; Pike, E; Couves, C M

    1983-09-01

    Unusual lung tumors are not simply pathological curiosities. They demonstrate features of major significance in diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Six of these tumours are discussed: (1) Carcinosarcoma is rarely found in the lung. The histogenis of the lesion is unclear and the prognosis is poor. (2) Only three cases of pleomorphic adenoma have previously been described. Differentiation from other "mixed tumours" of the lung is essential. (3) A rare case of bronchial adenoma producing ectopic ACTH is described. Early recognition of these polypeptide hormone-secreting tumours is stressed. (4) Oat cell carcinoma with the myasthenic (Eaton-Lambert) syndrome shows the clinical features which should permit early tumour diagnosis. The hazards of muscle relaxants must be recognized. (5) Prostatic carcinoma with endobronchial metastases is is discussed. The importance of localization of the primary tumour is emphasized. (6) An example of double primary carcinoma is presented. The rarity of this finding may be related to the poor prognosis of patients with bronchogenesis carcinoma.

  19. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  20. Effect of Schistosoma haematobium and N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine on the development of urothelial neoplasia in the baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R M; James, C; Webbe, G

    1980-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether bladder cancer would develop in primates (Papio sp.) infected with S. haematobium and concurrently exposed to low initiating doses of the bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN). To control for the systemic effects of schistosomiasis, 5 baboons were infected with S. mansoni, which does not lay its eggs in the bladder wall; to control for the effect of the carcinogen alone, 5 others were treated with BBN alone at the rate of 5 or 50 mg/kg per week for the duration of the experiment. Five animals were infected with S. haematobium and had no further treatment, and the main experimental group of 10 baboons was infected with S. haematobium and also treated weekly with 5 mg/kg BBN for up to 2½ years. Four of the 10 animals in the last group, but none in the three control groups developed neoplastic disease of the urothelium. Four animals with S. haematobium plus BBN treatment developed in situ carcinoma in the bladder (3 latent adenomatous lesions and 1 more advanced papillary tumour) and 2 of these animals plus 1 other had slightly dysplastic urothelial endophytic papillary growths of the ureter which penetrated the muscle layer. By contrast, none of the control animals developed urothelial carcinomas, though 4/5 of those with S. haematobium infection alone had inflamed bladders with polypoid lesions, and one individual had endophytic papillary hyperplasia of the ureter. The animals were killed after 2½ years while still relatively immature or adolescent, and it is possible that had they been allowed to survive longer some of the BBN-only group would have developed bladder cancer, and more of the latent lesions seen in the BBN + schistosomiasis group would have progressed to invasive carcinoma. It is postulated that, in this model for human bilharzial bladder cancer, schistosomiasis supplies the proliferative stimulus necessary to accelerate cancer growth from latent tumour foci produced by

  1. Overexpression of p16(INK4a in urothelial carcinoma in situ is a marker for MAPK-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition but is not related to human papillomavirus infection.

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    Julie Steinestel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in bladder carcinogenesis remains controversial. Overexpression of p16(INK4a, a surrogate marker for infection with oncogenic HPV in other tumours, has been described for urothelial carcinoma in situ (UCIS. Our goal was therefore to evaluate whether overexpression of p16(INK4a is associated with HPV infection and to identify mechanisms of p16(INK4a upregulation in UCIS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 60 tissue specimens from a total of 45 patients (UCIS and controls, we performed p16(INK4a immunohistochemistry followed by detection and subclassification of HPV DNA. In a subset of samples, we tested for gene amplification of p16(INK4a applying fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. RAS/MAPK signalling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we transfected urothelial carcinoma cells with KRAS and examined the expression of p16(INK4a as well as markers of EMT. RESULTS: We found overexpression of p16(INK4a in 92.6% of UCIS and in all cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN controls. In contrast, we detected high-risk HPV DNA in 80% of CIN, but none in UCIS. There was no gene amplification of p16(INK4a. High levels of phosphorylated kinases and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and loss of membraneous E-cadherin were detected in UCIS. KRAS transfection of urothelial carcinoma cells led to upregulation of p16(INK4a and uPA accompanied by loss of E-cadherin that could be inhibited by application of the kinase-inhibitor Sorafenib. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that overexpression of p16(INK4a in UCIS is neither associated with HPV infection nor p16(INK4a gene amplification but is a consequence of enhanced RAS/MAPK signalling that promotes EMT, possibly due to Sorafenib-sensitive paracrine secretion of the EMT activator uPA. These findings might open a novel therapeutic option for localized but aggressive urothelial cancer.

  2. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  3. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  4. Hypercalcemia in Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Keiko Asao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We here report a patient with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma with hypercalcemia likely due to elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Methods. We present a clinical case and a summary of literature search. Results. A 57-year-old man, recently diagnosed with a left renal mass, for which a core biopsy showed renal cell carcinoma, was admitted for hypercalcemia of 11.0 mg/mL He also had five small right lung nodules with a negative bone scan. Both intact parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide were appropriately low, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was elevated at 118 pg/dL. The patient’s calcium was normalized after hydration, and he underwent radical nephrectomy. On the postoperative day 6, a repeat 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was 24 pg/mL with a calcium of 8.1 mg/dL. Pathology showed a 6 cm high-grade urothelial carcinoma with divergent differentiation. We identified a total of 27 previously reported cases with hypercalcemia and upper tract urothelial carcinoma in English. No cases have a documented elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D level. Conclusion. This clinical course suggests that hypercalcemia in this case is from the patient’s tumor, which was likely producing 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Considering the therapeutic implications, hypercalcemia in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma should be evaluated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

  5. FGFR3 and P53 characterize alternative genetic pathways in the pathogenesis of urothelial cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); A.N. Vis (André); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); E.R. Boeve; A.C. Jobsis; E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractFibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and P53 mutations are frequently observed in bladder cancer. We here describe the distribution of FGFR3 mutations and P53 overexpression in 260 primary urothelial cell carcinomas. FGFR3 mutations were observed in 59% and P53 o

  6. Hypercalcemia in Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Jonathan B.; Miller, David C.; Esfandiari, Nazanene H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We here report a patient with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma with hypercalcemia likely due to elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Methods. We present a clinical case and a summary of literature search. Results. A 57-year-old man, recently diagnosed with a left renal mass, for which a core biopsy showed renal cell carcinoma, was admitted for hypercalcemia of 11.0 mg/mL He also had five small right lung nodules with a negative bone scan. Both intact parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide were appropriately low, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was elevated at 118 pg/dL. The patient's calcium was normalized after hydration, and he underwent radical nephrectomy. On the postoperative day 6, a repeat 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was 24 pg/mL with a calcium of 8.1 mg/dL. Pathology showed a 6 cm high-grade urothelial carcinoma with divergent differentiation. We identified a total of 27 previously reported cases with hypercalcemia and upper tract urothelial carcinoma in English. No cases have a documented elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D level. Conclusion. This clinical course suggests that hypercalcemia in this case is from the patient's tumor, which was likely producing 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Considering the therapeutic implications, hypercalcemia in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma should be evaluated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. PMID:23476827

  7. Immunohistochemical determination of ETS-1 oncoprotein expression in urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Aysegul; Calli, Aylin; Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Altinboga, Aysegul Aksoy; Kara, Cengiz; Dincel, Cetin; Cakalagaoglu, Fulya

    2012-03-01

    ETS-1 protooncogene is an important transcription factor that plays a role in the regulation of physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and differentiation. ETS-1 is thought to be related to the growth of carcinoma cells by its regulation of the transcription of matrix metalloproteinases and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression pattern of ETS-1 oncoprotein in urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder and determine its relationship with histopathologic parameters, including tumor grade and stage. One hundred six specimens of urothelial carcinoma and a total of 14 normal urothelium were analyzed immunohistochemically with anti-ETS-1 monoclonal antibody. The normal urothelium showed positive ETS-1 immunostaining. ETS-1 expression remained high in low-grade and noninvasive tumors, whereas it frequently decreased in high-grade or invasive carcinomas. Interestingly, ETS-1 was highly expressed in the basal cell layer of the noninvasive urothelial carcinomas. ETS-1 expression showed a strong negative correlation with the tumor grade (PETS-1 expression than the muscle-invasive tumors (pT2; PETS-1 expression is significantly associated with high grade and advanced stage in urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder, and that the downregulation of ETS-1 expression may be a marker of the aggressiveness of such malignancies.

  8. CA 19-9 as a serum marker in urothelial carcinoma

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    Mahander Pall

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Serum CA19-9 is a marker of aggressiveness of urothelial carcinoma and is almost invariably raised in patients with metastatic disease. Thus, it may be used as a prognostic marker but not as a screening tool due to its low sensitivity.

  9. The role of circulating tumor cells in urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Beije (Nick); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.L. Boormans (Joost)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPatients with muscle-invasive urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder have a 50 % chance to develop distant metastases despite curative local treatment. Reliable markers that predict the risk of developing metastases or that could be used to determine whether or not perioperative system

  10. Urothelial carcinoma arising within bladder diverticulum—Report of a case and review of the literature

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    Hung-En Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bladder diverticulum is an outpouching of bladder mucosa through the musculature of the bladder wall. The incidence of bladder diverticulum in Taiwan is about 1.7% in children and 23.4% in adults. Intradiverticular carcinoma of urinary bladder is uncommon. It ranges from 0.8% to 14.3%. Here we report a case of urothelial carcinoma within a bladder diverticulum. A 60-year-old male patient had history of BPH under medical treatment and right ureteral stone treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL. He presented with painless gross hematuria about 3 months after ESWL. Intravenous pyelography showed a filling defect within the bladder diverticulum. Histopathological diagnosis of low grade urothelial carcinoma arising from the bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopic biopsy. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence was found not from the previous diverticulum but from another area during regular cystoscopy at the 6-month postoperative follow up. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Pathology revealed a noninvasive, high grade urothelial carcinoma. There was no further bladder tumor recurrence during the 1-year follow-up period. Bladder-sparing surgery with close cystoscopy follow up for intradiverticular urothelial carcinoma can be applied as an alternative treatment modality.

  11. An in vitro model of intra-epithelial expansion of transformed urothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebel, J.M.J.; Boer, de W.I.; Thijssen, C.D.; Vermey, M.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Kwast, van der T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of normal urothelium by pre-cancerous epithelium may explain the high recurrence rate of human bladder cancer. An in vitro model was designed in order to study the mechanisms of expansion of transformed urothelial cells at the expense of normal urothelium. For this purpose, mouse bladder

  12. Rapid differentiation of superficial urothelial cells after chitosan-induced desquamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veranic, Peter; Erman, Andreja; Kerec-Kos, Mojca; Bogataj, Marija; Mrhar, Ales; Jezernik, Kristijan

    2009-01-01

    Superficial cell desquamation followed by differentiation of newly exposed superficial cells induces regeneration of the urinary bladder epithelium, urothelium. In the present work, chitosan was evaluated as a new inducer of urothelial cell desquamation, in order to study the regeneration of mouse urothelial cells in vivo. Intravesical application of chitosan dispersion caused complete removal of only the superficial layer of cells within 20 min of treatment. Differentiation of the new superficial layer was followed by the appearance and distribution of three urothelial differentiation markers, tight junction protein ZO1, cytokeratin 20 and the maturation of the apical plasma membrane. The arrangement of ZO1 into continuous lines in individual cells of the intermediate layer was already found after 10 min of chitosan application, when desquamation had just started. The appearance of the apical membrane changed from microvillar to typically scalloped within 20 min of regeneration, while complete arrangement of the cytokeratin 20 network took 60 min. These findings provide a new perspective on the rate of the differentiation process in the urothelium and make chitosan a new and a very controllable tool for studies on urothelial regeneration.

  13. Holmium laser fulguration of superficial urothelial carcinoma of the pendulous urethra

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    Michael A Liss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma may occur anywhere in the urinary tract including the pendulous urethra. To prevent urethral stricture after resection and monopolor fulguration we describe the use of the holmium laser to fulgurate recurrent pTa UC from the urethra. The surgical approach was staged and provided excellent long term results for management of superficial UC.

  14. Diagnosis and management of urothelial carcinoma in situ of the lower urinary tract: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casey, R.G.; Catto, J.W.; Cheng, L.; Cookson, M.S.; Herr, H.; Shariat, S.; Witjes, J.A.; Black, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS) has a high propensity for progression. It is usually reported within the heterogeneous context of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) but warrants special consideration. OBJECTIVE: To review the contemporary literature on the diagnosis and managemen

  15. Unlocking the bovine genome

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    Worley Kim C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries.

  16. Pannexin 1 channels play essential roles in urothelial mechanotransduction and intercellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Negoro

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells respond to bladder distension with ATP release, and ATP signaling within the bladder and from the bladder to the CNS is essential for proper bladder function. In other cell types, pannexin 1 (Panx1 channels provide a pathway for mechanically-induced ATP efflux and for ATP-induced ATP release through interaction with P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs. We report that Panx1 and P2X7R are functionally expressed in the bladder mucosa and in immortalized human urothelial cells (TRT-HU1, and participate in urothelial ATP release and signaling. ATP release from isolated rat bladders induced by distention was reduced by the Panx1 channel blocker mefloquine (MFQ and was blunted in mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Hypoosmotic shock induced YoPro dye uptake was inhibited by MFQ and the P2X7R blocker A438079 in TRT-HU1 cells, and was also blunted in primary urothelial cells derived from mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Rinsing-induced mechanical stimulation of TRT-HU1 cells triggered ATP release, which was reduced by MFQ and potentiated in low divalent cation solution (LDPBS, a condition known to enhance P2X7R activation. ATP signaling evaluated as intercellular Ca2+ wave radius was significantly larger in LDPBS, reduced by MFQ and by apyrase (ATP scavenger. These findings indicate that Panx1 participates in urothelial mechanotransduction and signaling by providing a direct pathway for mechanically-induced ATP release and by functionally interacting with P2X7Rs.

  17. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  18. Electron tomography of fusiform vesicles and their organization in urothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Hudoklin

    Full Text Available The formation of fusiform vesicles (FVs is one of the most distinctive features in the urothelium of the urinary bladder. FVs represent compartments for intracellular transport of urothelial plaques, which modulate the surface area of the superficial urothelial (umbrella cells during the distension-contraction cycle. We have analysed the three-dimensional (3D structure of FVs and their organization in umbrella cells of mouse urinary bladders. Compared to chemical fixation, high pressure freezing gave a new insight into the ultrastructure of urothelial cells. Electron tomography on serial sections revealed that mature FVs had a shape of flattened discs, with a diameter of up to 1.2 µm. The lumen between the two opposing asymmetrically thickened membranes was very narrow, ranging from 5 nm to 10 nm. Freeze-fracturing and immunolabelling confirmed that FVs contain two opposing urothelial plaques connected by a hinge region that made an omega shaped curvature. In the central cytoplasm, 4-15 FVs were often organized into stacks. In the subapical cytoplasm, FVs were mainly organized as individual vesicles. Distension-contraction cycles did not affect the shape of mature FVs; however, their orientation changed from parallel in distended to perpendicular in contracted bladder with respect to the apical plasma membrane. In the intermediate cells, shorter and more dilated immature FVs were present. The salient outcome from this research is the first comprehensive, high resolution 3D view of the ultrastructure of FVs and how they are organized differently depending on their location in the cytoplasm of umbrella cells. The shape of mature FVs and their organization into tightly packed stacks makes them a perfect storage compartment, which transports large amounts of urothelial plaques while occupying a small volume of umbrella cell cytoplasm.

  19. Camel and bovine chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langholm Jensen, Jesper; Mølgaard, Anne; Navarro Poulsen, Jens Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Bovine and camel chymosin are aspartic peptidases that are used industrially in cheese production. They cleave the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein κ-casein, releasing its predominantly negatively charged C-terminus, which leads to the separation of the milk into curds and whey. Despite...... having 85% sequence identity, camel chymosin shows a 70% higher milk-clotting activity than bovine chymosin towards bovine milk. The activities, structures, thermal stabilities and glycosylation patterns of bovine and camel chymosin obtained by fermentation in Aspergillus niger have been examined...... interactions arising from variation in the surface charges and the greater malleability both in domain movements and substrate binding contribute to the better milk-clotting activity of camel chymosin towards bovine milk....

  20. Primary vertebral tumours in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Masel, J.; Diard, F.; Ferrari-Ciboldi, F.; Le Dosseur, P.; Labatut, J.

    1984-03-01

    20 cases of primary benign and malignant bone tumours in children were reported. The most common tumours were Ewing's sarcoma, aneurismal bone cyst, benign osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma. Some rare primary bone tumours in children (osteochondroma, chondroblastoma 6F, primary lymphoma of bone and neurofibromatosis with unusual cervical spinal changes) were also reported. The authors believe that radiographic findings together with clinical history and clinical examination may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. Although microscopy is essential in the final diagnosis, the microscopic report should be also accepted with caution.

  1. Fluid intake and the risk of urothelial cell carcinomas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, M.M.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Buchner, F.L.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kampman, E.; Egevad, L.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Roswall, N.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Kaaks, R.; Chang-Claude, J.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, S.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Stasinopulou, G.; Saieva, C.; Krogh, V.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Mattiello, A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Lund, E.; Gram, I.T.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Barricarte, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Molina, E.; Gonzalez, C.; Dorronsoro, M.; Manjer, J.; Ehrnstrom, R.; Ljungberg, B.; Allen, N.E.; Roddam, A.W.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Boffetta, P.; Slimani, N.; Michaud, D.S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Riboli, E.

    2011-01-01

    Results from previous studies investigating the association between fluid intake and urothelial cell carcinomas (UCC) are inconsistent. We evaluated this association among 233,236 subjects in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), who had adequate baseline

  2. Germline single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with response of urothelial carcinoma to platinum-based therapy: the role of the host.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, D J

    2013-09-01

    Variations in urothelial carcinoma (UC) response to platinum chemotherapy are common and frequently attributed to genetic and epigenetic variations of somatic DNA. We hypothesized that variations in germline DNA may contribute to UC chemosensitivity.

  3. The Heidelberg classification of renal cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, G; Akhtar, M; Beckwith, BJ; Bugert, P; Cooper, CS; Delahunt, B; Eble, JN; Fleming, S; Ljungberg, B; Medeiros, LJ; Moch, H; Reuter, VE; Ritz, E; Roos, G; Schmidt, D; Srigley, [No Value; Storkel, S; VandenBerg, E; Zbar, B

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions of a workshop entitled 'Impact of Molecular Genetics on the Classification of Renal Cell Tumours', which was held in Heidelberg in October 1996, The focus on 'renal cell tumours' excludes any discussion of Wilms' tumour and its variants, or of tumours metastatic t

  4. Soft tissue tumours: imaging strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J. [Institute Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Orbach, Daniel [Institute Curie, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Klijanienko, Jerzy [Institute Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Vascular tumours and malformations, fibrous and fibrohistiocytic tumours and pseudotumours are the most common benign soft-tissue masses observed in children, and can be treated conservatively. Rhabdomyosarcomas are the most frequent malignant tumours, accounting for about half of soft tissue sarcomas. A child referred for a soft-tissue mass should ideally be managed by a multidisciplinary team and primary excision should be proscribed until a definite diagnosis has been established. Clinical examination, conventional radiography and US with Doppler represent the first-line examinations and are sometimes sufficient to make a diagnosis. In all other situations, MRI is mandatory to establish the aggressiveness and extension of the tumour. This technique provides the relevant data to guide the decision regarding tissue sampling. (orig.)

  5. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown

  6. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiol

  7. The Clinical Use of the Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) in Urothelial Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioni, Michele; Primiceri, Giulia; Ingrosso, Manuela; Filograna, Roberta; Castellan, Pietro; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Schips, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an inflammatory index that has been considered as a potential prognostic factor in human cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the available evidence regarding the NLR as a prognostic value in patients affected by urothelial cancer. This literature review, including papers on NLR in urothelial cancers, was done on PubMed/Medline and Cochrane libraries in November 2015. The selection of the articles followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses process. Twenty-three of 99 articles fulfilled all the inclusion criteria, including data on 6240 patients affected by urothelial cancers. Overall, cancer-specific, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated as the main oncological outcomes. There was significant heterogeneity among studies, and the majority of studies were of poor quality. Overall, NLR was considered as a prognostic marker in 87.5%, 80%, and 60% of the studies on upper tract urothelial cancer, urothelial bladder cancer, and metastatic and advanced disease, respectively. The NLR cut-off value ranged between 2 and 5. A high NLR was associated with worse overall, cancer-specific, and recurrence-free survival. NLR is a widely available, easy-to-collect, costless, prognostic marker in urothelial cancers. Its clinical use still remains under investigation, especially for the need for cut-off values, particularly in different subsets of patients.

  8. Tumour markers in gastrointestinal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamerz, R.

    1988-02-01

    For non-endocrine gastrointestinal tumours the following tumour markers are of clinical interest: For esophageal cancer CEA (sensitivity, s: 40-60%) and SCC (squamous cell carcinoma antigen, x: 20-50%); for gastric cancer CEA (s: 30-40%) as well as CA 19-9 (s: 30-40%) because of complementary results (additive s: 50-60); for hepatocellular cancer AFP (first choice, s: 70-90%; second choice CA 19-9, s: 50-70%); for cholangiocellular cancer CA 19-9 (s: 40-70%); for secondary liver cancer in general CEA; for biliary tract cancer CA 19-9 (s: 40-70%) as well as for excretory pancreatic cancer (s: 70-90%); for colorectal cancer CEA (s: 40-70%) as a first choice marker, and CA 19-9 (s: 20-60%) as a second choice marker, and for anal cancer SCC. The frequency of tumour marker determinations depends on follow-up care recommendations for different tumour diseases (e.g. 1-3 monthly during the 1st and 2nd postoperative year, following chemotherapy courses, on change of therapy, on restaging and at unclear alteration of the clinical state). Tumour markers are only valuable adjuncts to the medical care of tumour patients and therefore useless as solitary findings or on missing therapeutic consequence.

  9. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.]|[Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital (China); Wang, C.C.; Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  10. Loss of aquaporin 3 protein expression constitutes an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival: an immunohistochemical study on stage pT1 urothelial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of patients with stage pT1 urothelial bladder cancer (UBC continues to be a challenge due to its unpredictable clinical course. Reliable molecular markers that help to determine appropriate individual treatment are still lacking. Loss of aquaporin (AQP 3 protein expression has previously been shown in muscle-invasive UBC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of AQP3 protein expression with regard to the prognosis of stage pT1 UBC. Method AQP 3 protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in specimens of 87 stage T1 UBC patients, who were diagnosed by transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB and subsequent second resection at a high-volume urological centre between 2002 and 2009. Patients underwent adjuvant instillation therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG. Loss of AQP3 protein expression was defined as complete absence of the protein within the whole tumour. Expression status was correlated retrospectively with clinicopathological and follow-up data (median: 31 months. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess the value of AQP3 tumour expression with regard to recurrence-free (RFS, progression-free (PFS and cancer-specific survival (CSS. RFS, PFS and CSS were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Log rank test. Results 59% of patients were shown to exhibit AQP3-positive tumours, whereas 41% of tumours did not express the marker. Loss of AQP3 protein expression was associated with a statistically significantly worse PFS (20% vs. 72%, p=0.020. This finding was confirmed by multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR 7.58, CI 1.29 – 44.68; p=0.025. Conclusions Loss of AQP3 protein expression in pT1 UBC appears to play a key role in disease progression and is associated with worse PFS. Considering its potential prognostic value, assessment of AQP3 protein expression could be used to help stratify the behavior of patients with pT1 UBC.

  11. Discrimination of bladder cancer cells from normal urothelial cells with high specificity and sensitivity: combined application of atomic force microscopy and modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Riches, Andrew; Borger, Eva; Herrington, Simon; Dholakia, Kishan; Adya, Ashok K

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated Raman spectroscopy (MRS) were used to discriminate between living normal human urothelial cells (SV-HUC-1) and bladder tumour cells (MGH-U1) with high specificity and sensitivity. MGH-U1 cells were 1.5-fold smaller, 1.7-fold thicker and 1.4-fold rougher than normal SV-HUC-1 cells. The adhesion energy was 2.6-fold higher in the MGH-U1 cells compared to normal SV-HUC-1 cells, which possibly indicates that bladder tumour cells are more deformable than normal cells. The elastic modulus of MGH-U1 cells was 12-fold lower than SV-HUC-1 cells, suggesting a higher elasticity of the bladder cancer cell membranes. The biochemical fingerprints of cancer cells displayed a higher DNA and lipid content, probably due to an increase in the nuclear to cytoplasm ratio. Normal cells were characterized by higher protein contents. AFM studies revealed a decrease in the lateral dimensions and an increase in thickness of cancer cells compared to normal cells; these studies authenticate the observations from MRS. Nanostructural, nanomechanical and biochemical profiles of bladder cells provide qualitative and quantitative markers to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells at the single cellular level. AFM and MRS allow discrimination between adhesion energy, elasticity and Raman spectra of SV-HUC-1 and MGH-U1 cells with high specificity (83, 98 and 95%) and sensitivity (97, 93 and 98%). Such single-cell-level studies could have a pivotal impact on the development of AFM-Raman combined methodologies for cancer profiling and screening with translational significance.

  12. A Pilot Study Investigating the Potential of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound to Treat Tumours Rapidly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Jonathan M.; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail; Kennedy, James

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the possibility of rapid tumour destruction by a novel method of treating the periphery of a tumour and inducing ischemia by impeding the blood supply. Ex vivo experiments were initially carried out in bovine liver to determine the optimum conditions for focal depth, gantry transducer speed circle diameter and intensity of the ultrasound beam. In vivo experiments were then performed in PGV rat livers implanted with a HSN fibrosarcoma cell line. The tumours were treated by novel technique of creating an annular lesion around the perimeter of the tumour. Macroscopic and microscopic examination of the lesion at post mortem was performed. In addition histological examination of the untreated tumour which was within the annular circle of treatment was examined. This showed evidence of karyolytic nuclei a week after treatment suggesting death by infarction within this area. There was also some evidence of endothelial damage in the blood vessels with fragmented nuclei visible in the lumen. The work presented here adds to our understanding of how high intensity focused ultrasound may be used to treat tumours in as faster and more efficient way. Further work in this area will facilitate the design of future therapeutic interventions in the medical and veterinary world.

  13. WILMS’ TUMOUR IN YOUNG ADULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilvel Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilms’ tumour also called as nephroblastoma is a malignant renal neoplasm of childhood that arises from remnant of immature kidney. About 80% of Wilms’ tumour cases occur before age 5 with a median age of 3.5 years. But adult Wilms’ tumour can occur at any age from 16 to 70 years, the median age in young adult is around 24. CASE REPORT A 16-year-old girl came with history of mass right abdomen, which she noticed for 1 week duration; no urinary symptoms. Her recent blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg. Per abdomen a 10 x 9 cm mass palpable in the right lumbar region, surface smooth, firmto-hard in consistency, non-tender, well defined, no bruit. Urine routine examination was normal; urine culture was sterile; renal and liver function tests were within normal limits; Sr. calcium 9.5 mg/dL. CT abdomen plain and contrast showed a 10 x 9 cm heterodense lesion equivocal with renal cell carcinoma and angiomyolipoma. MR angiogram was done. It showed well-defined encapsulated heterointense mass of size 12 x 8 x 7cm, IVC and bilateral renal vein normal. Since findings were inconclusive, we did a CT-guided biopsy and report came as feature positive for small round cell tumour. Hence, proceeded with right radical nephrectomy. The final histopathology report came as Wilms’ tumour spindle cell variant. Margins clear and ureter not involved. She was then started on adjuvant chemotherapy Inj. Vincristine 2 mg weekly for 27 weeks. She is on regular followup now. CONCLUSION Wilms’ tumour should be considered in a patient who presents with a renal mass with or without loin pain, haematuria especially in young adults. Every attempt should be made to differentiate it from renal cell carcinoma. The outcome for adult Wilms’ tumour is steadily improving with current multimodality treatment approach.

  14. A Case with Significant Proteinuria Caused by Secreted Protein from Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Sakakima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 58-year-old female was admitted to our hospital complaining isolated proteinuria of 1.7 g/day. Abdominal echography showed right-sided unilateral hydronephrosis, and computed tomography pointed out a tumor of the right renal pelvis, suggesting cancer of renal pelvis. The right nephroureterectomy was carried out. Pathological diagnosis was urothelial carcinoma. Renal tissue revealed no apparent glomerulopathy with tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and mildly-to-moderately interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration. Immunofluorescence study showed no deposition of immunoreactanct, and electron microscopy showed almost normal glomerulus without electron dense deposit. Proteinuria disappeared within 6 days after the operation. Moderate amount of proteinuria in our patient was probably caused by secreted protein from urothelial carcinoma. This condition is rare but should be taken into account in patients with even moderate amount of proteinuria.

  15. Biscoumarin derivatives: Synthesis, crystal structure, theoretical studies and induced apoptosis activity on bladder urothelial cancer cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jia-jia; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zi-dan; Hu, Xing-bin; Li, Ming-kai

    2015-03-01

    In this study, five new biscoumarin derivatives (1-5) were synthesized and compound 4 inhibited the proliferation of the bladder urothelial cells (J82 cell line) obviously after 48 h treatment at different concentration (1, 5 and 10 μmol/L), and J82 cells were predominantly induced to apoptotic cell death after compound 4 treatment. Morphologic changes of bladder urothelial cancer cells were also observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after compound 4 treatment. In addition, compound 4 had much less toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. To explore the possible anti-cancer mechanism of compound 4, two classical intramolecular Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (HBs) in their structures and the corresponding HB energies were performed with the density functional theory (DFT) [B3LYP/6-31G∗] method. Anti-bladder cancer activity of compound 4 is possible due to the intramolecular weakest HB energies.

  16. Urothelial-Type adenocarcinoma of the prostate mimicking metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Adley

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma arising in urinary bladder or prostatic urethra is uncommon. When they occur, the tumor can be mistaken for metastatic lesions, especially from the colon. Here we report the fifth case of a primary urothelial-type adenocarcinoma arising in the prostate which showed enteric differentiation. The patient was a 55 year-old male whose prostatic needle core biopsy showed a high grade adenocarcinoma which was initially thought to be metastatic colon cancer. A follow-up colonoscopy was unremarkable. Subsequent prostatectomy revealed a high grade adenocarcinoma which was positive for cytokeratins 7 and 20, carcinoembryonic antigen, CDX2, and high molecular weight cytokeratin, and negative for prostate specific antigen, prostate specific acid phosphatase and AMACR. A diagnosis of urothelial-type adenocarcinoma of the prostate was rendered. We review the literature regarding this entity, and discuss the differential diagnosis, emphasizing utility of immunohistochemistry in making the diagnosis. Finally, we speculate on the behavior of these rare tumors.

  17. Delayed Ureterectomy after Incomplete Nephroureterectomy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: Pathologic Findings and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jason Abel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To evaluate the pathologic findings and outcomes after distal ureterectomy for a retained ureteral segment following incomplete nephroureterectomy for urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis or ureter. Materials and Methods After IRB approval, an institutional database identified patients who underwent distal ureterectomy for a retained ureteral segment after assumed complete nephroureterectomy for urothelial carcinoma of the upper ureter or renal pelvis. Clinical and pathologic variables were analyzed. Results From January 1993 to July 2007, 12 patients were identified with median age at the time of ureterectomy of 60.5 years (41-85 years. Initial approach to surgery was open in 9 patients and laparoscopic in 3 patients. The median time from nephroureterectomy to distal ureterectomy was 23.5 months (range 2-66. At the time of initial surgery, pathologic stage was Ta, T1, T2, and T3 in 3,4,1, and 4 patients respectively. Initial pathology was urothelial carcinoma; grade 2 in 6 patients and grade 3 in six patients. Pathology from the subsequent surgery demonstrated urothelial carcinoma in the retained ureteral segment in 8 patients, dysplasia or atypia in 3 patients, and 1 patient with chronic inflammation. Local recurrence in 2 patients was present in a segment of ureter discontinuous with the bladder after laparoscopic nephroureterectomy. Three patients (25%, all with initial grade 3 renal pelvis lesions, developed metastatic disease. Conclusions Tumor recurrence in a retained ureteral segment after incomplete nephroureterectomy is a significant problem and may contribute to intravesical recurrence or metastatic disease. Complete, en bloc resection is imperative to minimize these risks.

  18. Urothelial neoplasm of the bladder in childhood and adolescence: a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haci Polat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Bladder tumors are rare in children and adolescents. For this reason, the diagnosis is sometimes delayed in pediatric patients. We aimed to describe the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up methods of bladder urothelial neoplasms in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective multicenter study involving patients who were treated between 2008 and 2014. Eleven patients aged younger than 18 years were enrolled in the study. In all the patients, a bladder tumor was diagnosed using ultrasonography and was treated through transurethral resection of the bladder (TURBT. Results: Nine of the 11 patients (82% were admitted with gross hematuria. The average delay in diagnosis was 3 months (range, 0–16 months until the ultrasonographic diagnosis was performed from the first episodes of macroscopic hematuria. A single exophytic tumor (1–4cm was present in each patient. The pathology of all patients was reported as superficial urothelial neoplasm: two with papilloma, one with papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP, four with low grade pTa, and four with low grade pT1. No recurrence was observed during regular cystoscopic and ultrasonographic follow-up. Conclusions: Regardless of the presence of hematuria, bladder tumors in children are usually not considered because urothelial carcinoma in this population is extremely rare, which causes a delay in diagnosis. Fortunately, the disease has a good prognosis and recurrences are infrequent. Cystoscopy may be unnecessary in the follow-up of children with bladder tumors. We believe that ultrasonography is sufficient in follow-up.

  19. Urothelial cultures support intracellular bacterial community formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth E; Klumpp, David J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2009-07-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) causes most community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTI). In a mouse model of UTI, UPEC invades superficial bladder cells and proliferates rapidly, forming biofilm-like structures called intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). Using a gentamicin protection assay and fluorescence microscopy, we developed an in vitro model for studying UPEC proliferation within immortalized human urothelial cells. By pharmacologic manipulation of urothelial cells with the cholesterol-sequestering drug filipin, numbers of intracellular UPEC CFU increased 8 h and 24 h postinfection relative to untreated cultures. Enhanced UPEC intracellular proliferation required that the urothelial cells, but not the bacteria, be filipin treated prior to infection. However, neither UPEC frequency of invasion nor early intracellular trafficking events to a Lamp1-positive compartment were modulated by filipin. Upon inspection by fluorescence microscopy, cultures with enhanced UPEC intracellular proliferation exhibited large, dense bacterial aggregates within cells that resembled IBCs but were contained with Lamp1-positive vacuoles. While an isogenic fimH mutant was capable of forming these IBC-like structures, the mutant formed significantly fewer than wild-type UPEC. Similar to IBCs, expression of E. coli iron acquisition systems was upregulated by intracellular UPEC. Expression of other putative virulence factors, including hlyA, cnf1, fliC, kpsD, and the biofilm adhesin yfaL also increased, while expression of fimA decreased and that of flu did not change. These results indicate that UPEC differentially regulates virulence factors in the intracellular environment. Thus, immortalized urothelial cultures that recapitulate IBC formation in vitro represent a novel system for the molecular and biochemical characterization of the UPEC intracellular life cycle.

  20. Spontaneous rupture of renal pelvis secondary to ureteral obstruction by urothelial tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Daniel Alvarenga; Palma, Ana Laura Gatti; Kido, Ricardo Yoshio Zanetti; Barros, Ricardo Hoelz de Oliveira; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Penachim, Thiago Jose; Caserta, Nelson Marcio Gomes, E-mail: daniel_alvafer@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: daniel_alvafer@icloud.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2014-09-15

    Partial spontaneous rupture of the upper urinary tract is rare and usually associated with nephrolithiasis. Other reported causes, apart from instrumentation and trauma, involve obstructive ureteral tumor in the pelvic cavity, retroperitoneal fibrosis, fluid overload, and pregnancy. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of renal pelvis secondary to ureteral obstruction caused by urothelial tumor, clinically suspected and evaluated by CT scans and MRIs, discussing the relevant findings for diagnosis.(author)

  1. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiology. Due to the high number of unknown causes of clinical mastitis, studies were undertaken to gain more insight into the role of viruses in this important disease. For the first time, we found tha...

  2. Tumour banking: the Spanish design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morente, M M; de Alava, E; Fernandez, P L

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade the technical advances in high throughput techniques to analyze DNA, RNA and proteins have had a potential major impact on prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many human diseases. Key pieces in this process, mainly thinking about the future, are tumour banks and tumour bank networks. To face these challenges, diverse suitable models and designs can be developed. The current article presents the development of a nationwide design of tumour banks in Spain based on a network of networks, specially focusing on its harmonization efforts mainly regarding technical procedures, ethical requirements, unified quality control policy and unique sample identification. We also describe our most important goals for the next years. This model does not correspond to a central tumour bank, but to a cooperative and coordinated network of national and regional networks. Independently from the network in which it is included, sample collections reside in their original institution, where it can be used for further clinical diagnosis, teaching and research activities of each independent hospital. The herein described 'network of networks' functional model could be useful for other countries and/or international tumour bank activities.

  3. Increased CYP1A1 expression in human exfoliated urothelial cells of cigarette smokers compared to non-smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerrenhaus, Angelika; Roos, Peter H. [Institute for Occupational Physiology at the University Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Mueller, Tina [Institute for Occupational Physiology at the University Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); University Dortmund, Department of Statistics, Mathematical Statistics with Applications in Biometrics, Dortmund (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arylamines and nitrosamines, constituents of cigarette smoke, are known inducers of bladder cancer. The biochemical response of the target tissue, the bladder urothelium, following inhalation of cigarette smoke has not been studied so far. We used exfoliated transitional urothelial cells from human urine samples to analyze effects of smoking on induction of the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1A1. Samples of 40 subjects, including male and female smokers and non-smokers, were examined. A prerequisite for the immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of the cells was the enrichment of the urothelial cell population. This was achieved by a new method which is based on magnetic cell sorting exploiting specific binding of immobilized Griffonia simplicifolia lectin to the surface of urothelial cells. Immunostaining of the final cell preparation with a monoclonal antibody to CYP1A1 showed that about 6% of the urothelial cells of non-smokers stained positive for CYP1A1. However, this fraction of positive cells was more than 44% of the urothelial cells in samples from cigarette smokers. In spite of the individual variation, the difference was statistically significant. There were no gender-related differences in the portion of CYP1A1 expressing urothelial cells of smokers and non-smokers. In essence, we show for the first time that human urothelial cells respond to cigarette smoking by induction of CYP1A1. The approach opens new fields of mechanistic and biomarker research with respect to the pathogenetic processes of cancer development in the human bladder. (orig.)

  4. Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma: Cytologic features in a retrospective series of urine specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas John Heymann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The micropapillary variant of urothelial carcinoma (uPC is a rare variant of urothelial carcinoma that carries a poor prognosis. Definitive surgery may represent optimal management of low stage tumors. Urine cytology is indispensable in the screening and follow-up of urinary tract cancer. However, cytopathological criteria for diagnosis of uPC and its differentiation from conventional urothelial carcinoma (CUC are not well-defined. Materials and Methods : Twenty-five cases of histologically confirmed micropapillary uPC from 21 patients were compared to 25 cases of histologically confirmed high-grade CUC. Results : In uPC cases, cell clusters were identified in 13 of 25 specimens from 10 patients. Six of the 13 specimens containing cell clusters corresponded to surgical pathology specimens in which micropapillary carcinoma accounted for at least 50% of total carcinoma. In contrast, only 1 of the 12 urine specimens devoid of cell clusters corresponded to surgical specimens in which micropapillary carcinoma accounted for at least 50% of total carcinoma. Cytomorphologic features of urinary specimens from patients with histologically confirmed micropapillary carcinoma were generally similar to those from patients with high-grade CUC, making it difficult to distinguish these entities in exfoliative urine specimens. Conclusions and Summary : Further investigation of the core cytopathological characteristics of uPC is warranted to refine its diagnostic criteria by exfoliative urine cytology.

  5. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Cobalt in Human Urothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Rachel M; The, Therry; Xie, Hong; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-03-21

    Cobalt use is increasing particularly due to its use as one of the primary metals in cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal prosthetics. CoCrMo is a high-strength, wear-resistant alloy with reduced risk for prosthetic loosening and device fracture. More than 500,000 people receive hip implants each year in the USA which puts them at potential risk for exposure to metal ions and particles released by the prosthetic implants. Data show cobalt ions released from prosthetics reach the bloodstream and accumulate in the bladder. As patients with failed hip implants show increased urinary and blood cobalt levels, no studies have considered the effects of cobalt on human urothelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of particulate and soluble cobalt in urothelial cells. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ions. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found, when compared to particulate cobalt, soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic, but induced similar levels of genotoxicity. Interestingly, at similar intracellular cobalt ion concentrations, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by a lack of metaphases not observed after particulate cobalt treatment. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human urothelial cells and solubility may play a key role in cobalt-induced toxicity.

  6. Urothelial Superior Vena Cava Syndrome with Limited Response to Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Nishan; Wallace Iii, H James; Monterroso, Joanne; Verschraegen, Claire; Waters, Brenda L; Anker, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for cases of superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome secondary to metastatic adenopathy. Histologies vary in radiosensitivity and response time, making alternative therapies such as chemotherapy and/or intravenous stenting preferable alternative options for certain diagnoses. Metastatic urothelial carcinoma is a particularly rare cause of SVC syndrome with only 3 cases reported in the literature. Consequently, optimal management remains challenging, particularly in cases of high tumor burden. Here we present a case of highly advanced metastatic urothelial cancer with SVC syndrome and tracheal compression. The patient started urgent RT but expired midway through her treatment course due to systemic progression of disease, requiring SVC and tracheal stenting. The authors review the literature including discussion of the few other known cases of SVC syndrome due to urothelial carcinoma and a review of this histology's response to RT. This experience suggests, that in cases of SVC syndrome with widespread advanced disease, stenting and chemotherapy with or without RT may be the most important initial treatment plan, depending on goals of care.

  7. Urothelial Superior Vena Cava Syndrome with Limited Response to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishan Bingham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT is the standard of care for cases of superior vena cava (SVC syndrome secondary to metastatic adenopathy. Histologies vary in radiosensitivity and response time, making alternative therapies such as chemotherapy and/or intravenous stenting preferable alternative options for certain diagnoses. Metastatic urothelial carcinoma is a particularly rare cause of SVC syndrome with only 3 cases reported in the literature. Consequently, optimal management remains challenging, particularly in cases of high tumor burden. Here we present a case of highly advanced metastatic urothelial cancer with SVC syndrome and tracheal compression. The patient started urgent RT but expired midway through her treatment course due to systemic progression of disease, requiring SVC and tracheal stenting. The authors review the literature including discussion of the few other known cases of SVC syndrome due to urothelial carcinoma and a review of this histology’s response to RT. This experience suggests, that in cases of SVC syndrome with widespread advanced disease, stenting and chemotherapy with or without RT may be the most important initial treatment plan, depending on goals of care.

  8. Immunohistochemical Investigation of HER/AKT/mTOR Pathway and Cellular Adhesion Molecules in Urothelial Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Koletsas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several investigators have suggested the possibility that the expression of both EGFR and HER2 could be utilized for molecularly targeted therapy in urinary bladder cancer. We tried to evaluate the expression of HER2 and EGFR and activation of the AKT/PTEN/mTOR pathway in urothelial carcinomas and if there is any association between them and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one paraffin-embedded urothelial cancer tissue blocks were collected. Immunostains for HER2, EGFR, MIB1, phospho-AKT, PTEN, phospho-mTOR, e-cadherin, p-cadherin, and b-catenin were performed on tissue microarrays sections. The immunohistochemical results were correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Results. The overexpression of HER2 was found in 19.6% of the cases and it was associated with high grade tumors with a high mitotic index and phosphorylation of AKT and mTOR. Muscle-invasive tumors presented both cytoplasmic and nuclear losses of PTEN expression. There was no association between HER/AKT/mTOR pathway activation and CAM expression. Although cadherins were often coexpressed, only p-cadherin immunoreactivity was associated with tumor grade and high proliferative index. Conclusions. HER2 overexpression is found in a respective proportion of urothelial carcinomas. P-cadherin expression is associated with high grade UCs but it is not affected by HER2 overexpression or by activation of HER/AKT/mTOR pathway.

  9. Intravesical application of rebamipide promotes urothelial healing in a rat cystitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshida, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Takai, Shun; Gotoh, Momokazu

    2014-12-01

    Rebamipide is used as a topical therapeutic agent for various organs. We examined the healing effects of intravesical rebamipide on damaged urothelium in a rat model of chemically induced cystitis. Hydrochloride was injected in the bladder of female Sprague Dawley® rats to induce cystitis. On days 1 and 4 rebamipide (1 or 10 mM) or vehicle was administered in the bladder and maintained for 1 hour. Histopathology, urothelial permeability, cystometrogram and nociceptive behaviors were evaluated on day 7. Also, tissue rebamipide concentrations after the 1-hour bladder instillation were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Intravesically administered rebamipide permeated the bladder, particularly in hydrochloride treated rats, and the pharmacologically effective tissue dose remained for greater than 6 hours. Bladder histological evaluation revealed polymorphological inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased positive staining for uroplakin 3A in hydrochloride treated rats. Scanning electron microscopy showed damaged tight junctions in the hydrochloride group. Evans blue absorption in the bladder wall was increased in hydrochloride treated rats. These findings, which were associated with urothelial injury and increased permeability, were dependently suppressed by the rebamipide treatment dose. Cystometrogram demonstrated that the intercontraction interval was shorter in hydrochloride treated rats but prolonged by rebamipide. The increased nociceptive behaviors observed after intravesical resiniferatoxin administration were also suppressed by rebamipide. Intravesical rebamipide accelerated the repair of damaged urothelium, protected urothelial barrier function and suppressed bladder overactivity and nociception. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-11-09

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC.

  11. Luminal DMSO: Effects on Detrusor and Urothelial/Lamina Propria Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DMSO is used as a treatment for interstitial cystitis and this study examined the effects of luminal DMSO treatment on bladder function and histology. Porcine bladder was incubated without (controls or with DMSO (50% applied to the luminal surface and the release of ATP, acetylcholine, and LDH assessed during incubation and in tissues strips after DMSO incubation. Luminally applied DMSO caused ATP, Ach, and LDH release from the urothelial surface during treatment, with loss of urothelial layers also evident histologically. In strips of urothelium/lamina propria from DMSO pretreated bladders the release of both ATP and Ach was depressed, while contractile responses to carbachol were enhanced. Detrusor muscle contractile responses to carbachol were not affected by DMSO pretreatment, but neurogenic responses to electrical field stimulation were enhanced. The presence of an intact urothelium/lamina propria inhibited detrusor contraction to carbachol by 53% and this inhibition was significantly reduced in DMSO pretreated tissues. Detection of LDH in the treatment medium suggests that DMSO permeabilised urothelial membranes causing leakage of cytosolic contents including ATP and Ach rather than enhancing release of these mediators. The increase in contractile response and high levels of ATP are consistent with initial flare up in IC/PBS symptoms after DMSO treatment.

  12. Bladder Cancer and Urothelial Impairment: The Role of TRPV1 as Potential Drug Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mistretta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelium, in addition to its primary function of barrier, is now understood to act as a complex system of cell communication that exhibits specialized sensory properties in the regulation of physiological or pathological stimuli. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that bladder inflammation and neoplastic cell growth, the two most representative pathological conditions of the lower urinary tract, may arise from a primary defective urothelial lining. Transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 1 (TRPV1, a receptor widely distributed in lower urinary tract structures and involved in the physiological micturition reflex, was described to have a pathophysiological role in inflammatory conditions and in the genesis and development of urothelial cancer. In our opinion new compounds, such as curcumin, the major component of turmeric Curcuma longa, reported to potentiate the effects of the chemotherapeutic agents used in the management of recurrent urothelial cancer in vitro and also identified as one of several compounds to own the vanillyl structure required to work like a TRPV1 agonist, could be thought as complementary in the clinical management of both the recurrences and the inflammatory effects caused by the endoscopic resection or intravesical chemotherapy administration or could be combined with adjuvant agents to potentiate their antitumoral effect.

  13. Elevating the Horizon: Emerging Molecular and Genomic Targets in the Treatment of Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtoglu, Metin; Davarpanah, Nicole N; Qin, Rui; Powles, Thomas; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Apolo, Andrea B

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent advances in the identification of genomic alterations that lead to urothelial oncogenesis in vitro, patients with advanced urothelial carcinomas continue to have poor clinical outcomes. In the present review, we focus on targeted therapies that have yielded the most promising results alone or combined with traditional chemotherapy, including the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab, the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 antibody trastuzumab, and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib. We also describe ongoing and developing clinical trials that use innovative approaches, including dose-dense scheduling of singular chemotherapy combinations, prospective screening of tumor tissues for mutational targets and biomarkers to predict chemosensitivity before the determination of the therapeutic regimen, and novel agents that target proteins in the immune checkpoint regulation pathway (programmed cell death protein 1 [PD-1] and anti-PD-ligand 1) that have shown significant potential in preclinical models and early clinical trials. New agents and targeted therapies, alone or combined with traditional chemotherapy, will only be validated through accrual to developing clinical trials that aim to translate these therapies into individualized treatments and improved survival rates in urothelial carcinoma.

  14. Clinical significance of the reduction of UT-B expression in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Xue, Haogang; Lei, Yanming; Zhu, Jianqiang; Yang, Baoxue; Gai, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Urea transporter B (UT-B) is a membrane protein and plays an important role in regulating urea concentration in bladder urothelial cells. It has been reported that UT-B gene mutations were related to bladder carcinogenesis, and UT-B deletion could induce DNA damage and apoptosis in bladder urothelium. However, the functions and clinical significance of UT-B in human bladder cancer remain unknown. The most common type of bladder cancer is urothelial carcinoma (UC). We hypothesized that UT-B expression was related to bladder UC progress. In this study, UT-B was detected using immunohistochemistry in 52 paraffin-embedded specimens of bladder UC and 10 normal urothelium specimens. The results showed that UT-B protein expression in UC tumor cells was significantly lower as compared with normal urothelial cells (P = 0.021). UT-B protein expression was significantly reduced with increasing histological grade (P = 0.010). UT-B protein expression in muscle-invasive stage was significantly lower than in non-muscle-invasive stage (P = 0.014). Taken together, our data suggest that the reduction or loss of UT-B expression may be related to the incidence, progression and invasiveness of bladder UC. UT-B may be a novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarker, as well as a potential therapeutic target in UC of the bladder.

  15. Detection of intracellular bacteria in exfoliated urothelial cells from women with urge incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuoran; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Mukerjee, Chinmoy; Varettas, Kerry; Mansfield, Kylie J; Schembri, Mark A; Moore, Kate H

    2016-10-01

    The role of subclinical infection in patients with urge incontinence has been largely ignored. The aim of this study was to test for the presence of intracellular bacteria in exfoliated urothelial cells obtained from the urine of patients with detrusor overactivity or mixed incontinence +/- a history of UTI, and compare this to a control group of patients with stress incontinence and no history of infection. Bacterial cystitis was assessed by routine microbiology and compared to microscopic analysis of urine by Wright staining. Subsequent analysis of urothelial cells by confocal microscopy was performed to determine the existence of intracellular bacteria. Bacterial cystitis was seen in 13% of patients based on routine microbiology. Wright staining of concentrated urothelial cells demonstrated the presence of bacteria in 72% of samples. Filamentous bacterial cells were observed in 51% of patients and were significantly more common in patients with detrusor overactivity. Intracellular Escherichia coli were observed by confocal microscopy. This study supports the possibility that a subset of patients with urge incontinence may have unrecognised chronic bacterial colonisation, maintained via an intracellular reservoir. In patients with negative routine microbiology, application of the techniques used in this study revealed evidence of infection, providing further insights into the aetiology of urge incontinence.

  16. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  17. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  18. Preoperative shunts in thalamic tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one patients with thalamic glioma underwent a pre-tumour resection shunt surgery. The procedure was uneventful in 23 patients with relief from symptoms of increased intracranial pressure. Eight patients worsened after the procedure. The level of sensorium worsened from excessively drowsy state to unconsciousness in seven patients. Three patients developed hemiparesis, 4 developed paresis of extra-ocular muscles and altered pupillary reflexes, and 1 developed incontinence of urine and persistent vomiting. Alteration in the delicately balanced intracranial pressure and movements in the tumour and vital adjacent brain areas could be the probable cause of the worsening in the neurological state in these 8 patients. On the basis of these observations and on review of literature, it is postulated that the ventricular dilatation following an obstruction in the path of the cerebrospinal fluid flow by a tumour could be a natural defense phenomenon of the brain.

  19. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  20. Cardiac tumours in intrauterine life.

    OpenAIRE

    Groves, A.M.; Fagg, N. L.; Cook, A C; Allan, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1980, 11 examples of cardiac tumour have been detected in the fetus out of a total of 794 congenital cardiac malformations. Patients were referred because of fetal hydrops in two, a family history of tuberous sclerosis in two, and because of the detection of a tumour mass during a scan at the local hospital in seven. The gestational age range at presentation was from 20-34 weeks. Of eight fetuses where death occurred, the histological type was rhabdomyoma in seven and teratoma in one. I...

  1. Oncologic Outcomes of Kidney-sparing Surgery Versus Radical Nephroureterectomy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: A Systematic Review by the EAU Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisen, Thomas; Peyronnet, Benoit; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose Luis; Bruins, Harman M; Yuan, Cathy Yuhong; Babjuk, Marko; Böhle, Andreas; Burger, Maximilian; Compérat, Eva M; Cowan, Nigel C; Kaasinen, Eero; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Sylvester, Richard J; Zigeuner, Richard; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2016-12-01

    There is uncertainty regarding the oncologic effectiveness of kidney-sparing surgery (KSS) compared with radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). To systematically review the current literature comparing oncologic outcomes of KSS versus RNU for UTUC. A computerised bibliographic search of the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed for all studies reporting comparative oncologic outcomes of KSS versus RNU. Approaches considered for KSS were segmental ureterectomy (SU) and ureteroscopic (URS) or percutaneous (PC) management. Using the methodology recommended by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis guidelines, we identified 22 nonrandomised comparative retrospective studies published between 1999 and 2015 that were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. A narrative review and risk-of-bias (RoB) assessment were performed using cancer-specific survival (CSS) as the primary end point. Seven studies compared KSS overall (n=547) versus RNU (n=1376). Information on the comparison of SU (n=586) versus RNU (n=3692), URS (n=162) versus RNU (n=367), and PC (n=66) versus RNU (n=114) was available in 10, 5, and 2 studies, respectively. No significant difference was found between SU and RNU in terms of CSS or any other oncologic outcomes. Only patients with low-grade and noninvasive tumours experienced similar CSS after URS or PC when compared with RNU, despite an increased risk of local recurrence following endoscopic management of UTUC. The RoB assessment revealed, however, that the analyses were subject to a selection bias favouring KSS. Our systematic review suggests similar survival after KSS versus RNU only for low-grade and noninvasive UTUC when using URS or PC. However, selected patients with high-grade and invasive UTUC could safely benefit from SU when feasible. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the risk of selection bias. We reviewed the studies that

  2. Sexing Bovine Embryos Using PCR Amplification of Bovine SRY Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾溢滔; 张美兰; 陈美珏; 周霞娣; 黄英; 任兆瑞; 黄淑帧; 胡明信; 吴学清; 高建明; 张斌; 徐慧如

    1994-01-01

    This study analyses the bovine SRY DNA sequence by direct sequencing procedure, followed by the designation of the PCR primers specific for bovine SRY. Using PCR amplification of bovine SRY gene, the embryo sex was determined. The results of the embryo sex identification were confirmed after the embryo transfer and pregnancies.

  3. Denovo urothelial carcinoma of the upper and lower urinary tract in kidney--transplant patients with end-stage analgesic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, W F; Kliem, V; Truss, M C; Anton, P; Kuczyk, M; Stief, C G; Brunkhorst, R

    1995-01-01

    Patients with end-stage analgesic nephropathy bear a higher risk for urothelial cancer than do patients with other renal diseases. In a retrospective study in patients with analgesic nephropathy and kidney transplants we analyzed the prevalence and clinical course of de novo urothelial cancer. Diagnosis of analgesic nephropathy was based on the patients' history and clinical data. Only patients under cyclosporine treatment were included. Between 1968 and 1993, 2,371 kidney transplants were performed on 2,072 patients in the Department of Abdominal and Transplant Surgery. The prevalence of analgesic nephropathy was 3.1%. Of 65 patients with analgesic nephropathy and kidney transplants, 10 (15.4%) developed urothelial carcinoma; 10.8%, bladder cancer; and 9.1%, renal pelvic cancer. The mean age at diagnosis was 56.1 years. Urothelial cancer occurred on average at 33.6 months posttransplantation. On average, 6 of 10 patients with urothelial cancer died of the disease at 16.9 months after the diagnosis. All patients with urothelial bladder cancer had a muscle-infiltrating tumor of moderate or high grade. Since urothelial renal pelvic cancer occurred in 9.1% of our patients with analgesic nephropathy and urological screening is insufficient in patients on dialysis, we suggest that prophylactic nephroureterectomy be performed on one side before transplantation and on the contralateral side at 3-6 months after transplantation. An aggressive approach is indicated in patients with urothelial cancer of the bladder.

  4. Follicular infundibulum tumour presenting as cutaneous horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraman M

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour of follicular infundibulum is an organoid tumour with a plate like growth attached to the epidermis with connection from the follicular epithelium. We are reporting such a case unusually presenting as cutaneous horn.

  5. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  6. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  7. Intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Hille, JJ; Singh, S

    2001-01-01

    A case of an intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour of the dorsum of the tongue in a 73-year-old Caucasian male is reported. This case describes the oldest patient with this pathology to date. Immunoperoxidase staining for neuronspecific enolase (NSE) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) expression d

  8. Intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Hille, JJ; Singh, S

    2001-01-01

    A case of an intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour of the dorsum of the tongue in a 73-year-old Caucasian male is reported. This case describes the oldest patient with this pathology to date. Immunoperoxidase staining for neuronspecific enolase (NSE) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) expression d

  9. PET imaging in endocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Lloyd, C; Szyszko, T; Win, Z; Rubello, D; Al-Nahhas, A

    2008-06-01

    The role of PET in the assessment of endocrine tumours has been, until recently, restricted to the use of (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). Being a marker of metabolically active lesions that show high grading and low differentiation, FDG is not ideal for this purpose since the majority of endocrine tumours are slow growing and highly differentiated. It is however useful when dedifferentiation takes place and provides excellent prognostic information. A number of hormone precursors and amino acids are labelled with (11)C and used successfully in the management of parathyroid, adrenal and pituitary tumours. However, the short half-life of (11)C radiopharmaceuticals restricts their use to centres with access to an on-site cyclotron, while the high cost of production may limit their use to research purposes. A promising new positron-emission tomography (PET) tracer is Gallium-68 obtained by elution from a long shelf-life generator that makes it economic and cyclotron-independent. Its short half-life and flexible labelling ability to a wide range of peptides and antibodies makes it ideal for PET imaging. In addition to imaging GEP-NETs and phaeochromocytoma, it has the potential to be used in a wider range of endocrine tumours.

  10. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus

    OpenAIRE

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri; Alice Fernandes Alfieri; Luis Álvaro Leuzzi Junior

    2004-01-01

    All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profila...

  11. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorhan, C.; Soto-Ares, G.; Pruvo, J.P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille, Lille (France); Ruchoux, M.M. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France); Blond, S. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France)

    2001-11-01

    We describe CT and MR findings in a 23-month-old infant with a melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal gland. The tumour has been stereotactically biopsied and surgically resected. The pathological diagnosis was made on the resected piece. Embryology of the pineal gland and the histology of melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy are discussed. (orig.)

  12. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierckx, Rudi Andre; de Wiele, Christophe Van

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceutic

  13. Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, T.J.M.; Jong, K.P. de; Ijzermans, J.N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Resection should still be considered the gold standard for many liver tumours. There is, however, growing interest in the use of radiofrequency (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumours. By RFA, tumour tissue can be destructed selectively without significant damage to vascular structures in the

  14. Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, TJM; de Jong, KP; Ijzermans, JNM

    2005-01-01

    Resection should still be considered the gold standard for many liver tumours. There is, however, growing interest in the use of radiofrequency (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumours. By RFA, tumour tissue can be destructed selectively without significant damage to vascular structures in the

  15. Imaging of salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.Y.P.; Wong, K.T.; King, A.D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: aniltahuja@cuhk.edu.hk

    2008-06-15

    Salivary gland neoplasms account for <3% of all tumors. Most of them are benign and parotid gland is the commonest site. As a general rule, the smaller the involved salivary gland, the higher is the possibility of the tumor being malignant. The role of imaging in assessment of salivary gland tumour is to define intra-glandular vs. extra-glandular location, detect malignant features, assess local extension and invasion, detect nodal metastases and systemic involvement. Image guided fine needle aspiration cytology provides a safe means to obtain cytological confirmation. For lesions in the superficial parotid and submandibular gland, ultrasound is an ideal tool for initial assessment. These are superficial structures accessible by high resolution ultrasound and FNAC which provides excellent resolution and tissue characterization without a radiation hazard. Nodal involvement can also be assessed. If deep tissue extension is suspected or malignancy confirmed on cytology, an MRI or CT is mandatory to evaluate tumour extent, local invasion and perineural spread. For all tumours in the sublingual gland, MRI should be performed as the risk of malignancy is high. For lesions of the deep lobe of parotid gland and the minor salivary glands, MRI and CT are the modalities of choice. Ultrasound has limited visualization of the deep lobe of parotid gland which is obscured by the mandible. Minor salivary gland lesions in the mucosa of oral cavity, pharynx and tracheo-bronchial tree, are also not accessible by conventional ultrasound. Recent study suggests that MR spectroscopy may differentiate malignant and benign salivary gland tumours as well as distinguishing Warthin's tumor from pleomorphic adenoma. However, its role in clinical practice is not well established. Similarly, the role of nuclear medicine and PET scan, in imaging of parotid masses is limited. Sialography is used to delineate the salivary ductal system and has limited role in assessment of tumour extent.

  16. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Producing Infiltrating Urothelial Carcinoma of the Left Renal Pelvis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Horiuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF producing infiltrating urothelial carcinoma of the left renal pelvis. The patient was referred to our hospital for fever and anorexia. Blood tests showed elevated level of leukocytosis without any infectious diseases. The serum concentration of G-CSF was remarkably elevated. Abdominal computed tomography (CT revealed a huge mass in the left renal pelvis and para-aortic lymph node enlargement. He was underwent left nephroureterectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. The histological examination revealed infiltrating urothelial carcinoma with positive staining for G-CSF antibody. The postoperative course was smooth and the leukocyte count became normalized within a week postoperatively. However, multiple lung metastasis and leukocytosis were revealed about 2 months after the operation. G-CSF producing infiltrating urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis is reported to have a significantly poor prognosis, so it is very important to monitor closely after the operation.

  17. Total {sup 18}F-dopa PET tumour uptake reflects metabolic endocrine tumour activity in patients with a carcinoid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebrich, Helle-Brit; Walenkamp, Annemiek M.; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de; Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Brouwers, Adrienne H. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim; Links, Thera P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Endocrinology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-dopa) has an excellent sensitivity to detect carcinoid tumour lesions. {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake and the levels of biochemical tumour markers are mediated by tumour endocrine metabolic activity. We evaluated whether total {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake on PET, defined as whole-body metabolic tumour burden (WBMTB), reflects tumour load per patient, as measured with tumour markers. Seventy-seven consecutive carcinoid patients who underwent an {sup 18}F-dopa PET scan in two previously published studies were analysed. For all tumour lesions mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) at 40% of the maximal SUV and tumour volume on {sup 18}F-dopa PET were determined and multiplied to calculate a metabolic burden per lesion. WBMTB was the sum of the metabolic burden of all individual lesions per patient. The 24-h urinary serotonin, urine and plasma 5-hydroxindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), catecholamines (nor)epinephrine, dopamine and their metabolites, measured in urine and plasma, and serum chromogranin A served as tumour markers. All but 1 were evaluable for WBMTB; 74 patients had metastatic disease. {sup 18}F-dopa PET detected 979 lesions. SUV{sub max} on {sup 18}F-dopa PET varied up to 29-fold between individual lesions within the same patients. WBMTB correlated with urinary serotonin (r = 0.51) and urinary and plasma 5-HIAA (r = 0.78 and 0.66). WBMTB also correlated with urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and plasma dopamine, but not with serum chromogranin A. Tumour load per patient measured with {sup 18}F-dopa PET correlates with tumour markers of the serotonin and catecholamine pathway in urine and plasma in carcinoid patients, reflecting metabolic tumour activity. (orig.)

  18. Molecular and epigenetic analysis of the fragile histidine triad tumour suppressor gene in equine sarcoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strazzullo Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoids are peculiar equine benign tumours. Their onset is associated with Bovine Papillomavirus type -1 or -2 (BPV-1/2 infection. Little is known about the molecular interplay between viral infection and neoplastic transformation. The data regarding papillomavirus infections in human species show the inactivation of a number of tumour suppressor genes as basic mechanism of transformation. In this study the putative role of the tumour suppressor gene Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT in sarcoid tumour was investigated in different experimental models. The expression of the oncosuppressor protein was assessed in normal and sarcoid cells and tissue. Results Nine paraffin embedded sarcoids and sarcoid derived cell lines were analysed for the expression of FHIT protein by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence techniques and western blotting. These analyses revealed the absence of signal in seven out of nine sarcoids. The two sarcoid derived cell lines too showed a reduced signal of the protein. To investigate the causes of the altered protein expression, the samples were analysed for the DNA methylation profile of the CpG island associated with the FHIT promoter. The analysis of the 32 CpGs encompassing the region of interest showed no significative differential methylation profile between pathological tissues and cell lines and their normal counterparts. Conclusion This study represent a further evidence of the role of a tumour suppressor gene in equine sarcoids and approaches the epigenetic regulation in this well known equine neoplasm. The data obtained in sarcoid tissues and sarcoid derived cell lines suggest that also in horse, as in humans, there is a possible involvement of the tumour suppressor FHIT gene in BPV induced tumours. DNA methylation seems not to be involved in the gene expression alteration. Further studies are needed to understand the basic molecular mechanisms involved in reduced FHIT expression.

  19. Tumours of the fetal body: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avni, Fred E.; Massez, Anne; Cassart, Marie [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Tumours of the fetal body are rare, but lesions have been reported in all spaces, especially in the mediastinum, the pericardial space, the adrenals, the kidney, and the liver. Lymphangioma and teratoma are the commonest histological types encountered, followed by cardiac rhabdomyoma. Adrenal neuroblastoma is the commonest malignant tumour. Imaging plays an essential role in the detection and work-up of these tumours. In addition to assisting clinicians it also helps in counselling parents. Most tumours are detected by antenatal US, but fetal MRI is increasingly used as it brings significant additional information in terms of tumour extent, composition and complications. (orig.)

  20. Intervet Symposium: bovine neosporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schetters, T.; Dubey, J.P.; Adrianarivo, A.; Frankena, K.; Romero, J.J.; Pérez, E.; Heuer, C.; Nicholson, C.; Russell, D.; Weston, J.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The sy

  1. Intervet Symposium: bovine neosporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schetters, T.; Dubey, J.P.; Adrianarivo, A.; Frankena, K.; Romero, J.J.; Pérez, E.; Heuer, C.; Nicholson, C.; Russell, D.; Weston, J.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The

  2. Bovine milk glycome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, N; DePeters, E J; Freeman, S; German, J B; Grimm, R; Lebrilla, C B

    2008-10-01

    Bovine milk oligosaccharides have several potentially important biological activities including the prevention of pathogen binding to the intestinal epithelial and as nutrients for beneficial bacteria. It has been suggested that milk oligosaccharides are an important source of complex carbohydrates as supplements for the food and the pharmaceutical industries. However, only a small number of structures of bovine milk oligosaccharides (bMO) are known. There have been no systematic studies on bMO. High-performance mass spectrometry and separation methods are used to evaluate bMO, and nearly 40 oligosaccharides are present in bovine milk. Bovine milk oligosaccharides are composed of shorter oligomeric chains than are those in human milk. They are significantly more anionic with nearly 70%, measured abundances, being sialylated. Additionally, bMO are built not only on the lactose core (as are nearly all human milk oligosaccharides), but also on lactose amines. Sialic acid residues include both N-acetyl and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, although the former is significantly more abundant.

  3. Bovine milk exosome proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin and are found in blood, urine, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, as well as human and bovine milk. Exosomes are extracellular organelles important in intracellular communication/signaling, immune function, and biomarkers ...

  4. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  5. A case report of a urothelial carcinoma arising in the renal pelvis with exuberant chondrosarcomatous element associated with adrenal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor that has both malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. We describe a sarcomatoid carcinoma arising in the left renal pelvis of a 49-year-old man. The dominant component of the tumor was chondrosarcomatous, but there were also focal carcinomatous areas. The carcinomatous tumor cells consisted of papillary urothelial carcinoma. Immunohistochemical assay showed that the sarcomatous tumor cells were positive for vimentin and S 100 and negative for cytokeratin. The papillary urothelial carcinoma was positive for cytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The patient underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after downsizing the tumor, radical nephrectomy was performed with excision of the cuff of bladder.

  6. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  7. Increased urothelial cell apoptosis and chronic inflammation are associated with recurrent urinary tract infection in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Chi Chuang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate whether increased urothelial cell apoptosis and chronic inflammation might contribute to recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI in women. METHODS: The bladder biopsy specimens were collected from thirty women with recurrent UTI and ten controls. The bladder biopsies were performed at one to two months after UTI episode had been completely resolved and urine analysis and urine culture all showed negative. Immunofluorescence staining of the adhesive protein E-cadherin, mast cell and TUNEL were performed in all the bladder specimens. In addition, western blots were also performed to analyze the inflammatory proteins (phospho-p38, tryptase and apoptotic protein (Bax in the bladder mucosa specimens between patients with recurrent UTI and controls. RESULTS: Immunofluorescence staining showed significantly lower E-cadherin in the recurrent UTI bladder tissue compared with the controls (25.4±8.9 v 42.4±16.7, p<0.0001. The mast cell expression was significantly stronger in the recurrent UTI bladder tissue compared with the controls (2.5±1.8 v 1.3±1.2, p = 0.046. TUNEL staining revealed a significantly higher numbers of apoptotic cells in the recurrent UTI bladder tissue compared with the control bladder tissue (1.5±1.8 v 0.08±0.3, p<0.0001. Western blot analysis also showed that the expressions of tryptase and Bax increased in five recurrent UTI specimens compared with two normal control specimens. CONCLUSION: Chronic inflammation, urothelial cell apoptosis and impairment of barrier function of urothelial cells might contribute to recurrent UTI in women.

  8. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Enrico; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Faraj, Sheila; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Hicks, Jessica; Meeker, Alan; Nonomura, Norio; Netto, George J

    2013-12-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) accounts for 5% to 10% of all urothelial carcinomas. Despite many shared features, key clinical and molecular genetic differences between upper tract and bladder urothelial carcinomas are becoming apparent. We have previously demonstrated alterations of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in bladder carcinoma with a potential impact on biological behavior. In the current study, we evaluated the expression status and prognostic significance of mTOR pathway members in UTUC. Archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from 99 primary UTUCs were retrieved from one of the authors' institution. Tissue microarrays were constructed with triplicate tumor samples and paired nonneoplastic urothelium. Tissue microarrays were analyzed using immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway members: PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, and related markers p27 and c-MYC; correlation with clinicopathologic parameters and outcome was performed. We found significantly lower expression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, p27, and c-MYC in UTUC compared with paired benign urothelium (P < .0005). We found a strong positive correlation between PTEN and phos-AKT. Moderate correlation was observed between phos-mTOR and phos-S6, PTEN and p27, phos-AKT and p27, phos-S6 and p27, phos-mTOR and c-MYC, phos-S6 and c-MYC, and p27 and c-MYC. None of the evaluated biomarkers were associated with increased hazard ratios for tumor recurrence or for cancer-specific mortality, when adjusting for relevant clinicopathologic variables. Dysregulation of the mTOR pathway was observed in UTUC compared with normal urothelium, implicating a potential pathogenic role in tumor development. In our cohort, expression of the evaluated biomarkers had no prognostic value.

  9. Improvements in culturing exfoliated urothelial cells in vitro from human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, Rouslana; Follmann, Wolfram; Degen, Gisela H; Roos, Peter H; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Knopf, H Jurgen; Golka, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Human bladder cancer is a common malignant tumor that may be produced by factors such as lifestyle, environment and occupation. The aim of this study was to evaluate parameters related to the viability of exfoliated urothelial cells. Exfoliated urothelial cells were obtained from 83 urine samples of 22 healthy participants (20-53 yr). From 67 of these samples, cells were transferred to collagen-coated 24-well plates. Parameters including sample volume, pH, osmolality and participant age and gender were examined on cell viability. In successive cultures, the numbers of cell colonies and cells per cell colony were determined. The number of viable cells in the urinary sediments of males varied from 0 to 6.5 x 10(3) cells per sample (mean 1 x 10(3)). Higher cell numbers in urine samples from females (6 x 10(3)) were due to considerable amounts of exfoliated vaginal cells. Cell numbers in males were positively related to volume, osmolality, and pH of the samples, as well as to the retention time of urine in the bladder. Cell proliferation was achieved in 25 out of 67 samples and was positively related to sample osmolality and pH. Participant age and content of urinary oxalates exerted negative effects on cell proliferation in vitro. The mean number of cell colonies per sample was 1.7. The mean cell number per colony was 11.7 x 10(3). It appears that high variability in individual excretion of urothelial cells able to proliferate is a limiting factor for routine use of these cells for in vitro toxicology.

  10. Urine cytology to evaluate urinary urothelial damage of shock-wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mahmoud; Pancaroglu, Kuddusi

    2011-06-01

    Our aim is to study the prospective trial where urine cytology was used to detect the acute urothelial mucosal damage in patients who undergo extracorporeal shock waves lithotripsy (SWL). The study included 48 consecutive patients (28 male, 20 female) with mean age of 49.02 years (range 18-66) who were treated with SWL due to renal stones (30 patients) or upper ureter stones (18 patients). The mean calculi diameter was 12.44 mm (range 5-20). Urinary cytologic examinations were done for all patients immediately before and after SWL therapy and 10 days latter. The average numbers of transitional cells, red blood cells and myocytes were counted under 40 × magnification. In overall patients the average numbers of transitional cells at the cytologic examinations done immediately before and after SWL therapy were 1.6 and 7.53 cell/field, respectively (p = 0.001). The increment in transitional cells at cytologic examination after SWL was significantly influenced only by number of shock waves applied (p = 0.003). No muscle cell was detected in all cytologic examinations. The cytologic examinations which were done after 10 days of SWL therapy showed recovery from all cytologic abnormalities. The acute increment in number of transitional cells after the SWL is not clinically important and it is a temporary change. Urothelial lesion is limited to mucosal layer and there is no evidence of damage to basal membrane or deeper muscle layer. SWL safety on urothelial and muscular layer was demonstrated. However, evaluation of larger series with use of other lithotripters is necessary before reaching any definitive conclusions.

  11. Lynch syndrome and exposure to aristolochic acid in upper-tract urothelial carcinoma: its clinical impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Pierre; Seisen, Thomas; Mathieu, Romain; Shariat, Sharohkh F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current review was to describe the clinical risk for Lynch syndrome (LS) after exposure to aristolochic acid (AA) in cases of upper urinary-tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). A systematic review of the scientific literature was performed using the Medline database (National Library of Medicine, PubMed) using the following keywords: epidemiology, risk factor, AA, Balkan nephropathy (BNe), LS, hereditary cancer, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), mismatch repair genes, urothelial carcinomas, upper urinary tract, renal pelvis, ureter, Amsterdam criteria, genetic counselling, mismatch repair genes, genetic instability, microsatellite, and Bethesda guidelines. LS is a specific risk for UTUC, which is the third most frequent cancer (in its tumor spectrum) after colon and uterine lesions. Mutation of the MSH2 gene is the most commonly described cause of UTUC in LS. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and is guided by Bethesda and Amsterdam criteria. It is secondarily confirmed by immunohistochemical analyses of the tumor and a search for gene mutations. The presence of LS in patients with UTUC is a favorable prognosis factor for survival during follow-ups. AA is a specific environmental risk factor for UTUC and tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. It has been involved in the development of nephropathies in link with the Balkan disease and intake of Chinese herbal medicine. More broadly, the use of traditional plant medicines from the genus Aristolochia has created worldwide public-health concerns. UTUCs share common risk factors with other urothelial carcinomas such as tobacco or occupational exposure. However, these tumors have also specific risk factors such as AA exposure and LS that clinicians should be aware of because of their clinical implication in further management and follow-up.

  12. Oncologic Results of Retroperitoneoscopic Versus Open Surgery for T2 Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoqing; Sun, Qingnian; Chen, Qihui; Xu, Bo; Hao, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The present study was designed to compare oncologic outcomes of T2 upper tract urothelial carcinoma patients treated with retroperitoneoscopic nephroureterectomy (RNU) or open radical nephroureterectomy (ONU). T2 upper tract urothelial carcinoma patients were treated with RNU (n = 110) or ONU (n = 118) and followed-up for > 5 years. Demographic and clinical data, including preoperative indexes, intraoperative indexes, and oncological outcomes, were retrospectively compared to determine the efficacy of the 2 procedures. The RNU and ONU groups were statistically similar in age, sex, tumor location, and tumor pathologic grade. The original surgery time required for RNU and ONU was statistically similar, but RNU was associated with a significantly smaller volume of intraoperative estimated blood loss and shorter length of postoperative hospital stay. Follow-up (average: 43.2 months; range, 6-72 months) revealed that the estimated 5-year overall survival rate and the estimated 5-year disease-specific survival rate after RNU was slightly worse than after ONU (66.0% vs. 67.1%, and 80.8% vs. 83.8%, respectively), and the estimated 5-year recurrence-free survival rate and the estimated 5-year intravesical recurrence-free survival rates were slightly better than ONU (79.5% vs. 77.9%, and 68.3% vs. 65.6%, respectively). However, none of these differences were statistically significant. The open surgery strategy and the RNU strategy are equally effective for treating T2 upper tract urothelial carcinoma. However, the RNU procedure is safer, less invasive, and requires a shorter duration of postoperative hospitalized care; thus, RNU is recommended as the preferred strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshingkar S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT is a biologically controversial entity that was originally described as non-neoplastic lesion in the lungs and designated initially as inflammatory pseudotumour. The lesion has recently been recognized to occur at various sites but rarely affects head and neck region. Controversies still exist regarding its reactive versus neoplastic nature. The lesion has a potential for recurrence, persistent local growth, progression to frank sarcoma and metastasis. Hence IMT can best be regarded as a low-grade sarcoma. A case of a 30-year-old female with swelling in the right maxilla and associated ophthalmic manifestations is discussed here. Contribution of immunohistochemistry for diagnosis of IMT is emphasized. Additional cytogenetic studies of this highly enigmatic and minimally studied tumour are warranted.

  14. Reconstructive options in pelvic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayilvahanan N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pelvic tumours present a complex problem. It is difficult to choose between limb salvage and hemipelvectomy. Method: Forty three patients of tumours of pelvis underwent limb salvage resection with reconstruction in 32 patients. The majority were chondrosarcomas (20 cases followed by Ewing sarcoma. Stage II B was the most common stage in malignant lesions and all the seven benign lesions were aggressive (B3. Surgical margins achieved were wide in 31 and marginal in 12 cases. Ilium was involved in 51% of cases and periacetabular involvement was seen in 12 patients. The resections done were mostly of types I &II of Enneking′s classification of pelvic resection. Arthrodesis was attempted in 24 patients. Customized Saddle prosthesis was used in seven patients and no reconstruction in 12 patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to all high-grade malignant tumours, combined with radiotherapy in 7 patients. Results: With a mean follow up of 48.5 months and one patient lost to follow up, the recurrence rate among the evaluated cases was 16.6%. Oncologically, 30 patients were continuously disease free with 7 local recurrences and 4 deaths due to disseminated disease and 2 patients died of other causes. During the initial years, satisfactory functional results were achieved with prosthetic replacement. Long-term functional result of 36 patients who were alive at the time of latest follow up was satisfactory in 75% who underwent arthrodesis and in those where no reconstruction was used. We also describe a method of new classification of pelvic resections that clarifies certain shortcomings of the previous systems of classification. Conclusion: Selection of a procedure depends largely on the patient factors, the tumour grade, the resultant defect and the tissue factors. Resection with proper margins gives better functional and oncological results

  15. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, T.H.L. [North District Hospital, Fanling, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Radiology Department; Ong, K.L. [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Accident and Emergency Department; Au, Y.M.C. [Princess Margarete Hospital, Kowloon, (Hong Kong). Department of Radiology

    1998-11-01

    The present report describes a rare case of primary desmoplastic small cell tumour of the recto-sigmoid colon with hepatic metastases and lymphadenopathy. There are no pathognomonic radiological features and often their features overlap with other diseases including lymphoma. Histology is necessary to confirm this diagnosis. Unfortunately despite aggressive therapy, the prognosis for this disease is poor. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 8 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Reference miRNAs for miRNAome analysis of urothelial carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Ratert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR is widely used in microRNA (miRNA expression studies on cancer. To compensate for the analytical variability produced by the multiple steps of the method, relative quantification of the measured miRNAs is required, which is based on normalization to endogenous reference genes. No study has been performed so far on reference miRNAs for normalization of miRNA expression in urothelial carcinoma. The aim of this study was to identify suitable reference miRNAs for miRNA expression studies by RT-qPCR in urothelial carcinoma. METHODS: Candidate reference miRNAs were selected from 24 urothelial carcinoma and normal bladder tissue samples by miRNA microarrays. The usefulness of these candidate reference miRNAs together with the commonly for normalization purposes used small nuclear RNAs RNU6B, RNU48, and Z30 were thereafter validated by RT-qPCR in 58 tissue samples and analyzed by the algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on the miRNA microarray data, a total of 16 miRNAs were identified as putative reference genes. After validation by RT-qPCR, miR-101, miR-125a-5p, miR-148b, miR-151-5p, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-29c, miR-324-3p, miR-424, miR-874, RNU6B, RNU48, and Z30 were used for geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper analyses that gave different combinations of recommended reference genes for normalization. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provided the first systematic analysis for identifying suitable reference miRNAs for miRNA expression studies of urothelial carcinoma by RT-qPCR. Different combinations of reference genes resulted in reliable expression data for both strongly and less strongly altered miRNAs. Notably, RNU6B, which is the most frequently used reference gene for miRNA studies, gave inaccurate normalization. The combination of four (miR-101, miR-125a-5p, miR-148b, and miR-151-5p or three (miR-148b, miR-181b, and miR-874

  17. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  18. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Resnik

    Full Text Available Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD, and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells.

  19. Mycotic bovine nasal granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti Díaz, Ismael Alejandro; Vargas, Roberto; Apolo, Ada; Moraña, José Antonio; Pedrana, Graciela; Cardozo, Elena; Almeida, Edgardo

    2003-01-01

    A case of mycotic bovine nasal granuloma in a 10 year-old Jersey cow, produced by Drechslera halodes is presented. Histopathological sections showed abundant hyaline and pigmented extra and intracellular fungal structures together with a polymorphic cellular granuloma formed by neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasmocytes, histiocytes and giant cells of the Langhans type. It is the first case of mycotic bovine nasal granuloma recognized in Uruguay although this disease seems to be frequent according to the opinion of veterinarian specialists. Another similar clinical case also in a Jersey cow from the same dairy house with an intense cellular infiltrate rich in eosinophils without granulomatous image, together with extracellular hyaline and fuliginous fungal forms, is also referred for comparative purposes. Geotrichum sp. was isolated. The need of an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is stressed.

  20. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye)

    OpenAIRE

    Angelos, JA

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The...

  1. Selenium in bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, S M; Kuzan, F B; Senger, P L

    1981-05-01

    This study investigated the association of selenium with ejaculated bovine spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive selenium-75 was released after 30 min of incubation in 2 X 10(-3) dithiothreitol. Of the selenium-75 released by dithiothreitol, 85% was associated with spermatozoal protein. Protein containing selenium-75 was found predominantly in a single band after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molecular weight was approximately 21,500 daltons.

  2. [Expressions of CD133 and CD82/KAI1 in bladder urothelial carcinoma and their correlation with vasculogenic mimicry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Wu, Shiwu; Zhou, Lei; Song, Wenqing; Wang, Danna

    2013-09-01

    To explore the expressions of CD133 and CD82/KAI1 in bladder urothelial carcinoma, their association with the clinicopathological factors and their roles in vasculogenic mimicry (VM) in the tumor. The expressions of CD133 and CD82/KAI1 and VM were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry in 90 specimens of bladder urothelial carcinoma and 20 specimens of normal bladder epithelium tissue. The positivity rates of CD133, CD82/KAI1 and VM in normal bladder epithelium tissue were 0, 90% and 0, showing significant differences from the rates of 65.6%, 31.1% and 31.1% in urothelial carcinoma, respectively (Page, or tumor numbers (P>0.05). CD133 expression was positively correlated with VM (P=0.487, P<0.05), and CD82/KAI1 expression was negatively correlated with VM (r=-0.452, P<0.01) and CD133 (r=-0.776, P<0.05). The expressions of CD133 and CD82/KAI1 proteins are involved in the occurrence of VM in bladder urothelial carcinoma to contribute to the invasion and relapse of bladder carcinoma.

  3. Combined microsatellite and FGFR3 mutation analysis enables a highly sensitive detection of urothelial cell carcinoma in voided urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); I. Lurkin (Irene); D.K. Chopin; W.J. Kirkels (Wim); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F. Radvanyi (Franois); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations were reported recently at a high frequency in low-grade urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC). We investigated the feasibility of combining microsatellite analysis (MA) and the FGFR3 status for the detection of UC

  4. ProEx C as Diagnostic Marker for Detection of Urothelial Carcinoma in Urinary Samples: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Gerardo; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; La Mantia, Elvira; Montanari, Micaela; Vanacore, Daniela; Rossetti, Sabrina; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Franco, Rossella; Castaldo, Luigi; Ametrano, Gianluca; Cappuccio, Francesca; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Pepe, Maria Filomena; D'Aniello, Carmine; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the detection of urothelial carcinoma is represented by urethro-cystoscopy and biopsy. Both procedures are invasive and expensive and therefore cytology is often used as first approach to investigate on a possible neoplasia, being a safe and cost-effective diagnostic modality of evaluation. Because cytology alone is not highly sensitive for detection of low grade urothelial carcinoma and recurrence of the disease, several adjunct markers and urine based tests for urothelial carcinoma have been developed, which can help in the final diagnosis. In particular, ProEx C is an immunohistochemical cocktail containing antibodies direct against topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) and minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2) proteins. It proved to be a valid biomarker especially in detecting squamous intraepithelial lesions in cervical liquid-based samples and in discerning these lesions from their mimickers, as well as in ovarian, endometrial, vulvar, primary and metastatic melanomas, breast, pancreatic and renal cell carcinomas. This brief review covers the effective utility of ProEx C as adjunct tool in assessing the urothelial lesions in urine cytology, also providing prognostic and therapeutic information to help in clinical decisions.

  5. Pooled analysis of phase II trials evaluating weekly or conventional cisplatin as first-line therapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Syed A;

    2013-01-01

    Weekly gemcitabine with GC every 3-4 weeks is considered conventional first-line chemotherapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC). Weekly split-dose cisplatin with wGC might be less toxic and have similar activity, but has not been compared with GC. We pooled published phase II trials of GC...

  6. Macronutrient intake and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, N.E.; Appleby, P.N.; Key, T.J.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Tjonneland, A.; Roswall, N.; Overvad, K.; Weikert, S.; Boeing, H.; Chang-Claude, J.; Teucher, B.; Panico, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Peeters, P.; Quiros, J.R.; Jakszyn, P.; Molina-Montes, E.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Dorronsoro, M.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Ljungberg, B.; Hallmans, G.; Ehrnstrom, R.; Ericson, U.; Gram, I.T.; Parr, C.L.; Trichopoulou, A.; Karapetyan, T.; Dilis, V.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Fagherrazzi, G.; Romieu, I.; Gunter, M.J.; Riboli, E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may be important in the development of bladder cancer. We examined macronutrient intake in relation to risk of urothelial cell carcinoma among 469,339 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations

  7. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  8. Nuclear morphometry in typing and grading urothelial neoplasms of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KEFELİ

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by using image analyzer, the different diagnostic categories for urinary tumors described in WHO/ISUP 1998 classification were analyzed for the nuclear morphometric features and the data were statistically compared. Fifty six cases of urothelial neoplasia of urinary bladder diagnosed between 2002 and 2006 were selected from the archives of Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Pathology. The cases were re-classified according to WHO/ISUP 1998 criteria. In each case morphometric assessment was performed for average 100-150 tumor cell nuclei and 10 largest tumor cell nuclei on the digitalized image. For each the selected cell, nuclear area (µm2, perimeter (µm, form factor, maximum and minimum diameters (µm were determined. We have found that morphometric analysis and WHO/ISUP 1998 classification show parallelism in the typing/grading of urothelial neoplasia of the urinary bladder. The standard use of nuclear morphometric features as an ancillary method for the classification of urinary neoplasms in difficult cases can be considered, however further studies that will include the prognostic data are needed.

  9. N-Acetyltransferase 2 genotype, exfoliated urothelial cells and benzidine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing-wen; Lin, Guo-fang; Chen, Ji-gang; Guo, Wei-Chao; Qin, Yi-qiu; Golka, Klaus; Shen, Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    Most studies report an association of the slow N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) status with elevated bladder cancer risk. In this study, NAT2 genotypes and the decades-long records of Papanicolaou's grading of exfoliated urothelial cells in a former benzidine-exposed cohort of the Shanghai dyestuff industry (29 bladder cancer patients; 307 non-cancer cohort members, some of them presenting different grades of pre-malignant alterations of exfoliated urothelial cells) were investigated. The cohort members had been enrolled in regular medical surveillance since mid-1980s. No overall increase of slow NAT2 genotypes in the former benzidine-exposed bladder cancer patients was found, compared with non-diseased members of the same cohort. A lower presentation of the homozygous wild genotype NAT2 4/4 was observed in bladder cancer patients, compared with non-diseased members with averaged Papanicolaou's grading (APG)3 II (OR=0.31, 95 percent CI 0.10-0.96, p=0.034) or with APG less than II (OR=0.36,95 percent CI 0.12-1.10, p=0.063). Nevertheless, neither a protective influence of rapid NAT2 genotypes on bladder cancer risk nor on pre-malignant cytological alterations could be confirmed by the present data.

  10. Spectrum of bacterial colonization associated with urothelial cells from patients with chronic lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasriya, Rajvinder; Sathiananthamoorthy, Sanchutha; Ismail, Salim; Kelsey, Michael; Wilson, Mike; Rohn, Jennifer L; Malone-Lee, James

    2013-07-01

    Chronic lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), such as urgency and incontinence, are common, especially among the elderly, but their etiology is often obscure. Recent studies of acute urinary tract infections implicated invasion by Escherichia coli into the cytoplasm of urothelial cells, with persistence of long-term bacterial reservoirs, but the role of infection in chronic LUTS is unknown. We conducted a large prospective study with eligible patients with LUTS and controls over a 3-year period, comparing routine urine cultures of planktonic bacteria with cultures of shed urothelial cells concentrated in centrifuged urinary sediments. This comparison revealed large numbers of bacteria undetected by routine cultures. Next, we typed the bacterial species cultured from patient and control sediments under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we found that the two groups had complex but significantly distinct profiles of bacteria associated with their shed bladder epithelial cells. Strikingly, E. coli, the organism most responsible for acute urinary tract infections, was not the only or even the main offending pathogen in this more-chronic condition. Antibiotic protection assays with shed patient cells and in vitro infection studies using patient-derived strains in cell culture suggested that LUTS-associated bacteria are within or extremely closely associated with shed epithelial cells, which explains how routine cultures might fail to detect them. These data have strong implications for the need to rethink our common diagnoses and treatments of chronic urinary tract symptoms.

  11. Putrescine importer PlaP contributes to swarming motility and urothelial cell invasion in Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Sakai, Yumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Muth, Aaron; Phanstiel, Otto; Rather, Philip N

    2013-05-31

    Previously, we reported that the speA gene, encoding arginine decarboxylase, is required for swarming in the urinary tract pathogen Proteus mirabilis. In addition, this previous study suggested that putrescine may act as a cell-to-cell signaling molecule (Sturgill, G., and Rather, P. N. (2004) Mol. Microbiol. 51, 437-446). In this new study, PlaP, a putative putrescine importer, was characterized in P. mirabilis. In a wild-type background, a plaP null mutation resulted in a modest swarming defect and slightly decreased levels of intracellular putrescine. In a P. mirabilis speA mutant with greatly reduced levels of intracellular putrescine, plaP was required for the putrescine-dependent rescue of swarming motility. When a speA/plaP double mutant was grown in the presence of extracellular putrescine, the intracellular levels of putrescine were greatly reduced compared with the speA mutant alone, indicating that PlaP functioned as the primary putrescine importer. In urothelial cell invasion assays, a speA mutant exhibited a 50% reduction in invasion when compared with wild type, and this defect could be restored by putrescine in a PlaP-dependent manner. The putrescine analog Triamide-44 partially inhibited the uptake of putrescine by PlaP and decreased both putrescine stimulated swarming and urothelial cell invasion in a speA mutant.

  12. Risk stratification for kidney sparing procedure in upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khene, Zine-Eddine; Mathieu, Romain; Kammerer-Jacquet, Solène-Florence; Seisen, Thomas; Roupret, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Peyronnet, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification for kidney sparing procedures (KSP) to treat upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a major issue. A non-systematic Medline/PubMed literature search was performed using the terms “upper tract urothelial carcinoma” with different combinations of keywords to review the current knowledge on this topic. Original articles, reviews and editorials in English language were selected based on their clinical relevance. Available techniques for KSP include segmental ureterectomy and endoscopic resection through a percutaneous or flexible ureteroscopic access. These approaches were traditionally restricted to patients with imperative indications. Current recommendations suggest that selected patients with normal contralateral kidney should also be candidates for such treatments. Modern imaging and endoscopy have improved to accurately stage and grade the tumor while various prognostic clinical factors and biomarkers have been proposed to identify tumor with aggressive features and worse outcomes. Several predictive models using different combinations of such baseline characteristics may help clinicians in clinical decision making. However, risk-adapted based approach that has been proposed in recent guidelines to identify patients who are more likely to benefit from KSP only relies on few clinical and pathological factors. Despite growing understanding of the disease, treatment of UTUC remains challenging. Further efforts and collaborative multicenter studies are mandatory to improve risk stratification to decide and promote optimal KSP in UTUC. These efforts should focus on the integration of promising biomarkers and predictive tools in clinical decision making.

  13. Penile-preserving surgery for primary urothelial carcinoma of male urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoping Tai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary urethral carcinoma is a rare cancer, comprising <1% of all malignancies. The location of this lesion presents a certain dilemma of treatment between efficacy and quality of life. We report an 84-year-old male patient, with a history of chronic hepatitis C, hypertension, and transient ischemic accident, who presented with dysuria and acute urinary retention. The intravenous urography showed mild prostatic enlargement, but no stone or filling defect was noted in the upper urinary tract. On urethrocystoscopy, multiple papillary tumors were found at the pendulous urethra, and the pathology of biopsy confirmed urothelial carcinoma. The patient was admitted, and electroresection with fulguration of urethral tumors was performed owing to the patient's old age and poor performance status. Intraurethral and intravesical chemotherapy with mitomycin C was regularly given at the outpatient clinic. Recurrent urothelial carcinomas were noted twice in the first 2 years of follow up, and repeated transurethral resections were done. Unfortunately, liver cirrhosis with hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed last June, for which he received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. No recurrence of urethral cancer has been found on semiannual cystoscopy in the past 3 years. Penile-preserving surgery is a reasonable surgical option for elderly primary urethral carcinoma patients with acceptable oncological outcome and good quality of life.

  14. Movement disorders caused by brain tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatoe H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are uncommon presenting features of brain tumours. Early recognition of such lesions is important to arrest further deficit. We treated seven patients with movement disorders secondary to brain tumours over a period of seven years. Only two of these were intrinsic thalamic tumours (astrocytomas while the rest were extrinsic tumours. The intrinsic tumours were accompanied by hemichorea. Among the extrinsic tumours, there was one pituitary macroadenoma with hemiballismus and four meningiomas with parkinsonism. Symptoms were unilateral in all patients except one with anterior third falcine meningioma who had bilateral rest tremors. There was relief in movement disorders observed after surgery. Imaging by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is mandatory in the evaluation of movement disorders, especially if the presentation is atypical, unilateral and/or accompanied by long tract signs.

  15. Malignant tumours of the kidney: imaging strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, Anne M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology G1, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kraker, Jan de [Paediatric Oncology-Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    Primitive malignant renal tumours comprise 6% of all childhood cancers. Wilms tumour (WT) or nephroblastoma is the most frequent type accounting for more than 90%. Imaging alone cannot differentiate between these tumours with certainty but it plays an important role in screening, diagnostic workup, assessment of therapy response, preoperative evaluation and follow-up. The outcome of WT after therapy is excellent with an overall survival around 90%. In tumours such as those where the outcome is extremely good, focus can be shifted to a risk-based stratification to maintain excellent outcome in children with low risk tumours while improving quality of life and decreasing toxicity and costs. This review will discuss the imaging issues for WT from the European perspective and briefly discuss the characteristics of other malignant renal tumours occurring in children and new imaging techniques with potential in this matter. (orig.)

  16. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina [British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver (Canada)

    2001-12-01

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined.

  17. Urothelial cancer gene regulatory networks inferred from large-scale RNAseq, Bead and Oligo gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Dalleau, Sabine; Williamson, Kate E; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2015-05-14

    Urothelial pathogenesis is a complex process driven by an underlying network of interconnected genes. The identification of novel genomic target regions and gene targets that drive urothelial carcinogenesis is crucial in order to improve our current limited understanding of urothelial cancer (UC) on the molecular level. The inference of genome-wide gene regulatory networks (GRN) from large-scale gene expression data provides a promising approach for a detailed investigation of the underlying network structure associated to urothelial carcinogenesis. In our study we inferred and compared three GRNs by the application of the BC3Net inference algorithm to large-scale transitional cell carcinoma gene expression data sets from Illumina RNAseq (179 samples), Illumina Bead arrays (165 samples) and Affymetrix Oligo microarrays (188 samples). We investigated the structural and functional properties of GRNs for the identification of molecular targets associated to urothelial cancer. We found that the urothelial cancer (UC) GRNs show a significant enrichment of subnetworks that are associated with known cancer hallmarks including cell cycle, immune response, signaling, differentiation and translation. Interestingly, the most prominent subnetworks of co-located genes were found on chromosome regions 5q31.3 (RNAseq), 8q24.3 (Oligo) and 1q23.3 (Bead), which all represent known genomic regions frequently deregulated or aberated in urothelial cancer and other cancer types. Furthermore, the identified hub genes of the individual GRNs, e.g., HID1/DMC1 (tumor development), RNF17/TDRD4 (cancer antigen) and CYP4A11 (angiogenesis/ metastasis) are known cancer associated markers. The GRNs were highly dataset specific on the interaction level between individual genes, but showed large similarities on the biological function level represented by subnetworks. Remarkably, the RNAseq UC GRN showed twice the proportion of significant functional subnetworks. Based on our analysis of inferential

  18. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  19. An unusual presentation of a glomus tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, N

    2011-02-01

    Glomus tumours are benign, soft tissue tumours, usually of fingertips. Classically they present with severe pain, temperature sensitivity and localised tenderness. The diagnosis is often delayed due to sometimes non-specific symptoms and rarity of the disorder. While usually a clinical diagnosis, imaging may be necessary for diagnosis and localisation. We present a case of glomus tumour of the fingertip with an unusual history.

  20. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  1. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  2. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.J.; Fellows, G.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Wilson, M.; Bell, B.A.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our inter

  3. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.J.; Fellows, G.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Wilson, M.; Bell, B.A.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our inter

  4. Elevated tumour marker: an indication for imaging?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMahon, Colm J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of imaging examinations in patients with elevated tumour markers when (a) the tumour marker is not validated for as a primary diagnostic test; (b) the patient had no personal history of cancer and (c) the patient had no other imaging indication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients without known cancer who had abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA125 and\\/or CA15-3 serology over a one-year period were included. A retrospective medical record review was performed to assess the number of these cases who underwent imaging because of \\'elevated tumour marker\\' in the absence of a clinical indication for imaging. The number and result of these imaging studies were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight hundred and nineteen patients were included. Of those, 25 patients (mean age: 67.8 [range 41-91] y), were imaged to evaluate: \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. They underwent 29 imaging studies (mean [+\\/-standard deviation (SD)] per patient = 1.2 [+\\/-0.4]), and had 42 elevated tumour marker serology tests (mean [+\\/-SD] per patient = 1.7 [+\\/-0.7]). Four patients had >1 imaging test. No patient had an imaging study which diagnosed a malignancy or explained the elevated tumour marker. CONCLUSION: The non-judicious use of tumour markers can prompt further unnecessary investigations including imaging. In this study, there was no positive diagnostic yield for imaging performed for investigation of \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. \\'Elevated tumour marker\\

  5. Prognosis of Brain Tumours with Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The prognosis of 560 patients with a clinical and CT diagnosis of intrinsic supratentorial brain tumour was examined retrospectively at the Department of Neurosciences, Walton Hospital, Liverpool, England.

  6. Diagnostic Value of Liquid-Based Cytology in Urothelial Carcinoma Diagnosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Luo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the value of liquid-based cytology (LBC in the diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma.Diagnostic studies were searched for the diagnostic value of LBC in urothelial carcinoma in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CBM and CNKI. The latest retrieval date was September 2014. The data were extracted and the quality of the included studies was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Stata 13 software was used to perform the statistical analysis. The research was conducted in compliance with the PRISMA statement.Nineteen studies, which included 8293 patients, were evaluated. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the pooled sensitivity and specificity of LBC were 0.58 (0.51-0.65 and 0.96 (0.93-0.98, respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR was 31 (18-56 and the area under the curve (AUC of summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC was 0.83 (0.80-0.86. The post-test probability was 80% when a positive diagnosis was made. Compared with high grade urothelial carcinoma (HGUC, the sensitivity of detecting low-grade urothelial carcinoma (LGUC was significantly lower, risk ratio of sensitivity was 0.54 (0.43-0.66, P<0.001. However, no significant sensitivity improvement was observed with LBC when compared with traditional cytospin cytology, risk ratio was 1.03 (0.94-1.14, P = 0.524.Despite LBC having a pooled 58% positive rate for urothelial carcinoma diagnosis in our meta-analysis, no significant improvement in sensitivity was observed based on the studies evaluated. Further research is needed to validate these findings.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Liquid-Based Cytology in Urothelial Carcinoma Diagnosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, You; She, Dong-Li; Xiong, Hu; Yang, Li; Fu, Sheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the value of liquid-based cytology (LBC) in the diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma. Diagnostic studies were searched for the diagnostic value of LBC in urothelial carcinoma in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CBM and CNKI. The latest retrieval date was September 2014. The data were extracted and the quality of the included studies was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Stata 13 software was used to perform the statistical analysis. The research was conducted in compliance with the PRISMA statement. Nineteen studies, which included 8293 patients, were evaluated. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the pooled sensitivity and specificity of LBC were 0.58 (0.51-0.65) and 0.96 (0.93-0.98), respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 31 (18-56) and the area under the curve (AUC) of summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) was 0.83 (0.80-0.86). The post-test probability was 80% when a positive diagnosis was made. Compared with high grade urothelial carcinoma (HGUC), the sensitivity of detecting low-grade urothelial carcinoma (LGUC) was significantly lower, risk ratio of sensitivity was 0.54 (0.43-0.66), Pcytology, risk ratio was 1.03 (0.94-1.14), P = 0.524. Despite LBC having a pooled 58% positive rate for urothelial carcinoma diagnosis in our meta-analysis, no significant improvement in sensitivity was observed based on the studies evaluated. Further research is needed to validate these findings.

  8. Diagnostic utility of Wilms′ tumour-1 protein (WT-1 immunostaining in paediatric renal tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: WT1 helps to differentiate Wilms′ tumour from other paediatric renal tumours. It may help in differentiating the two subgroups of Wilms′ tumour which have distinct molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour, however, further prospective studies are required for validation of this hypothesis.

  9. Granular cell tumour of the neurohypophysis: a rare sellar tumour with specific radiological and operative features.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Symptomatic granular cell tumours of the neurohypophysis are rare sellar lesions. Preoperative prediction of the diagnosis on the basis of radiological appearance is useful as these tumours carry specific surgical difficulties. This is possible when the tumour arises from the pituitary stalk, rostral to a normal pituitary gland. This has not been emphasized previously.

  10. Evaluation of urine dipstick and cystoscopy in bovine enzootic haematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Pavelski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Enzootic bovine haematuria is mainly caused by the chronic ingestion of bracken fern and is still considered an important cause of economic losses in beef herds, particularly in large metropolitan areas of Brazil that are not suitable for agriculture (weak soil, steep hills.The aim of this paper was evaluate if there is a correlation between the degree of haematuria and the presence of lesions in the urinary bladder of cows with bovine enzootic haematuria (BEH.We evaluated the bladder of twenty Nelore cows with bracken fern intoxication using a flexible endoscope to describe the lesions present and we performed a rapid urine test with a chemical multiple-reagent commercial strips (Combur test Roche® – Swiss to check the degree of haematuria; then we correlated both results with the Spearman statistical test. All cows presented lesions in their bladder walls and the urine was visually reddish and positive for haematuria in the strips. Urine dipstick has shown to correlate with bladder lesion number. In the bladders of the euthanised animals, multiple sub-mucosal reddish nodules and multiple ecchymotic haemorrhages were seen macroscopically, and one bladder had a larger tumour with a 3cm diameter, which was determined to be a haemangioma by analysing the histopathology. We concluded that urine dipstick is a valuable device for bovine enzootic haematuria prognostic purposes and to evaluate the severity of lesions from the urinary bladder. Moreover, cystoscopy is an important diagnostic tool to assess bladder lesions in cattle. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the involvement of papillomaviruses and bladder tumour occurrence in these cows.

  11. Immunohistochemical profile of the penile urethra and differential expression of GATA3 in urothelial versus squamous cell carcinomas of the penile urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Han, Jeong S; Lee, Stephen; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Sharma, Rajni; Burnett, Arthur L; Cubilla, Antonio L; Netto, George J

    2013-12-01

    The penile urethra has a distinctive morphology not yet fully characterized by immunohistochemistry. In addition, both urothelial and squamous cell carcinomas have been reported in the penile urethra, and the distinction between these 2 tumors might be difficult. The purposes of this study are to assess the histology and immunohistochemical profile (CK20, CK7, p63, and GATA3) of the penile urethra and to assess the usefulness of Trans-acting T-cell-specific transcription factor (GATA3) and human papillomavirus detection in distinguishing urothelial versus squamous cell carcinomas. Normal penile urethra was evaluated in 11 total penectomies. The penile urethra was lined by 2 cell layers: a superficial single layer of CK7+, CK20-, and p63- columnar cells and a deep stratified layer of CK7-, CK20-, and p63+ cubical cells. Both layers were GATA3+, supporting urothelial differentiation. In addition, 2 tissue microarrays and 6 surgical specimens of primary tumors of the penile urethra (3 urothelial and 3 squamous cell carcinomas) were evaluated for GATA3 expression. In the tissue microarrays, 22 of 25 upper tract urothelial carcinomas and 0 of 38 penile squamous cell carcinomas were GATA3+. In the surgical specimens, GATA3 was positive in all urothelial carcinomas and negative in all squamous cell carcinomas. Human papillomavirus was detected in 2 of 3 squamous cell carcinomas and in 0 of 3 of the urothelial carcinomas. In conclusion, the penile urethra is covered by epithelial cells that are unique in morphology and immunohistochemical profile. In addition, our study suggests that GATA3 and human papillomavirus detection are useful markers for distinguishing urothelial carcinomas from squamous cell carcinomas of the penile urethra.

  12. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A

    2015-03-01

    As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The discoveries of Mor bovoculi and reports of IBK associated with Mycoplasma spp without concurrent Mor bovis or Mor bovoculi have raised new questions into the roles that other organisms may play in IBK pathogenesis.

  13. Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hoar, Bruce R

    2004-01-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) is a complicated disease to discuss as it can result in a wide variety of disease problems from very mild to very severe. BVD can be one of the most devastating diseases cattle encounter and one of the hardest to get rid of when it attacks a herd. The viruses that cause BVD have been grouped into two genotypes, Type I and Type II. The disease syndrome caused by the two genotypes is basically the same, however disease caused by Type II infection is often more severe...

  14. Third-Line Chemotherapy for Metastatic Urothelial Cancer: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Bellelli, Teresa; Romano, Concetta; Montanaro, Vittorino; Ferro, Matteo; Benincasa, Alfonso; Ribera, Dario; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Sonpavde, Guru; De Placido, Sabino

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced (T3/T4 or N1) and metastatic disease urothelial carcinoma is poor. In this retrospective study, we reviewed data about patients receiving third-line chemotherapy for metastatic disease, in view of the lack of data in this setting.We retrospectively analyzed medical records of patients with a pathologic diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma treated with systemic chemotherapy for metastatic disease at 4 participating Institutions between January, 2010, and January, 2015. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate the association of the chemotherapy agent used versus others with overall survival, adjusted for 5 externally validated prognostic factors in advanced urothelial carcinoma.Of 182 patients that received first-line chemotherapy/adjuvant chemotherapy as defined above, 116 patients (63.73%) received second-line salvage treatment. Fifty-two patients were finally included in this analysis, whereas 9 were excluded due to missing data. Third-line chemotherapy was based on cyclophosphamide, platinum, vinflunine, taxanes, and gemcitabine in 16, 12, 11, 10, and 3 patients, respectively. Median PFS (progression-free survival) and OS (overall survival) of the population were 13 (10-17) and 31 (28-36) weeks. Single-agent cyclophosphamide was associated with a PFS of 18 (13-22) and an OS of 38 (33-41) weeks, whereas platinum-based combinations were associated with a PFS of 5 weeks and an OS of 8 weeks. Multivariate analysis showed improved survival in patients treated with cyclophosphamide (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20-0.89; P = 0.025) and a worse survival in those treated with platinum-based regimens (HR: 4.37; 95% CI = 1.95-9.77; P < 0.01).We observed a significantly longer overall survival in patients receiving single-agent cyclophosphamide, with few grade 3 to 4 toxicities. Further studies should assess the efficacy of metronomic single-agent cyclophosphamide in advanced lines of treatment, as it may

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Bovine Nucleolus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amrutlal K.Patel; Doug Olson; Suresh K. Tikoo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleolus is the most prominent subnuclear structure, which performs a wide variety of functions in the eu-karyotic cellular processes. In order to understand the structural and functional role of the nucleoli in bovine cells,we analyzed the proteomie composition of the bovine nueleoli. The nucleoli were isolated from Madin Darby bo-vine kidney cells and subjected to proteomie analysis by LC-MS/MS after fractionation by SDS-PAGE and strongcation exchange chromatography. Analysis of the data using the Mascot database search and the GPM databasesearch identified 311 proteins in the bovine nucleoli, which contained 22 proteins previously not identified in theproteomic analysis of human nucleoli. Analysis of the identified proteins using the GoMiner software suggestedthat the bovine nueleoli contained proteins involved in ribosomal biogenesis, cell cycle control, transcriptional,translational and post-translational regulation, transport, and structural organization.

  16. Percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, G.F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund

    2013-01-01

    A letter to the editor is presented which is concerned with research which investigated percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours and their complications.......A letter to the editor is presented which is concerned with research which investigated percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours and their complications....

  17. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  18. Thermal resistance in a spontaneous murine tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, J; Urano, M; Rice, L; Suit, H D

    1981-12-01

    Resistance to subsequent hyperthermia as a result of prior heating was investigated using a spontaneous murine tumour implanted into the feet of C3H/Sed mice. Tumours were treated by immersing the tumour-bearing foot into a constant-temperature hot water bath set at 45.5 degrees C and were given single and split doses of heat. Response was assessed using a tumour-growth time assay. Three aspects of thermally-induced resistance were particularly considered: the time course of development and decay; the importance of the magnitude of the priming dose and the influence of the size of the tumour at the time of treatment. Substantial resistance was induced in this tumour by short priming doses at 45.5 degrees C, rising rapidly 1-2 days after the first treatment and then starting to decay. There was no significant difference in the kinetics of thermal resistance induced in tumours treated at 4mm and those treated at 8 mm in size, although the large tumours were more sensitive to single doses of heat. Increasing the magnitude of the priming dose of heat resulted in an increase in the magnitude of resistance to the second dose. The results of this study are compared with results of similar studies in this and other laboratories using murine normal tissues and cells in culture. Possible clinical implications are considered.

  19. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  20. Large benign retroperitoneal tumour in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczi, Csaba; Osvath, Peter; Flasko, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old female was in the 13th week of pregnancy when an abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a large retroperitoneal tumour. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out and the imaging described a 10-cm mass in diameter extending from the right kidney. Given that the patient was in her first trimester and that there was a suspicion of malignancy, further surgical exploration of the tumour was warranted. During the operation, the tumour was removed, but nephrectomy was not necessary. Histologic analysis of the resected tumour showed a mucinous cystic adenoma, and no signs of malignancy were present. Following the surgery, the pregnancy was otherwise uneventful and further complications did not occur. This case illustrates that surgery is recommended in patients with a retroperitoneal tumour early during a pregnancy, when a malignancy cannot be excluded.

  1. The ‘Pantie' Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silada Kanokrungsee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of radiation-associated angiosarcoma. A 67-year-old Thai woman was diagnosed with endometrium carcinoma stage IC and was treated with surgery and radiations. Ten years later, she presented with a gradually enlarging mass on the pubic area, in the shape of a pair of panties. Skin biopsy of lesions confirmed angiosarcoma. The diagnosis was radiation-associated angiosarcoma. She was treated with chemotherapy due to unresectable tumour. The chemotherapy was started with paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 every 2 weeks. After completing the fifth cycle of paclitaxel, the lesion was markedly decreased in size and the symptoms previously described were also completely resolved.

  2. Xp11 Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma: Unusual Variant Masquerading as Upper Tract Urothelial Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Akhavein

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (TRCC is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma characterized by chromosomal translocations involving the TFE3 gene located at the Xp11.2 locus. Initial cases were more common in children, but cases in older adults have begun to accrue and suggest a relatively more aggressive course. We report a case of Xp11 TRCC in a 63-year-old female patient with initial presentation mimicking upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma, with biopsy proving TRCC. She underwent a radical nephrectomy and paracaval lymph node dissection and is followed up with the intent to initiate vascular endothelial growth factor–targeted therapy in case of recurrence.

  3. TRPV2 mediates adrenomedullin stimulation of prostate and urothelial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Oulidi

    Full Text Available Adrenomedullin (AM is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level.

  4. The Role of Structural Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in the modulation of cancer cell invasion. In urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC the role of ECM proteins has been widely studied. The mechanisms, which are involved in the development of invasion, progression and generalization, are complex, depending on the interaction of ECM proteins with each other as well as with cancer cells. The following review will focus on the pathogenetic role and prognostic value of structural proteins, such as laminins, collagens, fi bronectin (FN, tenascin (Tn-C and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 in UC. In addition, the role of integrins mediating the interaction of ECM molecules and cancer cells will be addressed, since integrin-mediated FN, Tn-C and TSP1 interactions seem to play an important role during tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis.

  5. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or

  6. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or para

  7. Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 Member, BMI1 Contributes to Urothelial Tumorigenesis through p16-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia E. De Faveri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma (UC causes significant morbidity and remains the most expensive cancer to treat because of the need for repeated resections and lifelong monitoring for patients with non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Novel therapeutics and stratification approaches are needed to improve the outlook for both NMIBC and muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We investigated the expression and effects of B Lymphoma Mo-MLV Insertion Region 1 (BMI1 in UC. BMI1 was found to be overexpressed in most UC cell lines and primary tumors by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In contrast to some previous reports, no association with tumor stage or grade was observed in two independent tumor panels. Furthermore, upregulation of BMI1 was detected in premalignant bladder lesions, suggesting a role early in tumorigenesis. BMI1 is not located within a common region of genomic amplification in UC. The CDKN2A locus (which encodes the p16 tumor suppressor gene is a transcriptional target of BMI1 in some cellular contexts. In UC cell lines and primary tissues, no correlation between BMI1 and p16 expression was observed. Retroviral-mediated overexpression of BMI1 immortalized normal human urothelial cells (NHUC in vitro and was associated with induction of telomerase activity, bypass of senescence, and repression of differentiation. The effects of BMI1 on gene expression were identified by expression microarray analysis of NHUC-BMI1. Metacore analysis of the gene expression profile implicated downstream effects of BMI1 on α4/β1 integrin-mediated adhesion, cytoskeleton remodeling, and CREB1-mediated transcription.

  8. HERV-K and LINE-1 DNA methylation and reexpression in urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eKreimer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in DNA methylation frequently accompany cancer development. One prominent change is an apparently genome-wide decrease in methylcytosine that is often ascribed to DNA hypomethylation at retroelements comprising nearly half the genome. DNA hypomethylation may allow reactivation of retroelements, enabling retrotransposition and causing gene expression disturbances favoring tumor development. However, neither the extent of hypomethylation nor of retroelement reactivation are precisely known. We therefore assessed DNA methylation and expression of three major classes of retroelements (LINE-1, HERV-K and AluY in human urinary bladder cancer tissues and cell lines by pyrosequencing and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, respectively. We found substantial global LINE-1 DNA hypomethylation in bladder cancer going along with a shift towards full-length LINE-1 expression. Thus, pronounced differences in LINE-1 expression were observed, which may be promoted, among others, by LINE-1 hypomethylation. Significant DNA hypomethylation was found at the HERV-K_22q11.23 proviral long terminal repeat (LTR in bladder cancer tissues but without reactivation of its expression. DNA methylation of HERVK17, essentially absent from normal urothelial cells, was elevated in cell lines from invasive bladder cancers. Accordingly, the faint expression of HERVK17 in normal urothelial cells disappeared in such cancer cell lines. Of 16 additional HERV-Ks, expression of 7 could be detected in the bladder, albeit generally at low levels. Unlike in prostate cancers, none of these showed significant expression changes in bladder cancer. In contrast, expression of the AluYb8 but not of the AluYa5 family was significantly increased in bladder cancer tissues. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a remarkable specificity of changes in expression and DNA methylation of retroelements in bladder cancer with a significantly different pattern from that

  9. Distinguishing characteristics of urothelial carcinoma in kidney transplant recipients between China and Western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G M; Fang, Q; Ma, H S; Sun, G; Wang, X C

    2013-01-01

    To identify significant distinctive characteristics of urothelial carcinoma (UC) in kidney transplant recipients between China and Western countries and investigate probable tumor screening and treatment factors contributing to these differences. Renal transplant recipients from 1998 to 2011 in our institution diagnosed with UC were included in this study. Our data on tumor incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcomes were compared with literature reports. Among 2572 renal transplant recipients identified, 24 (0.93%) experienced UC, including 10 men and 14 women of overall mean age of 49.3 ± 11.6 years at transplantation and 53.5 ± 9.5 years at tumor detection. The Chinese traditional herbal intake mainly focused on 2 preparations: Aristolochic acid and rhubarb (the latter was mainly used in patients with chronic renal impairment) in 20 people. There were 21 (87.5%) cases of upper (UTUC) 5 cases of bilateral, and 13 cases of multifocal urinary tract urothelial carcinoma. Four subjects died owing to tumor progression at 4-63 months postoperatively. UC in renal transplant recipients shared notable characteristics in China with widespread herb intake: UTUC predominance; multifocal and bilateral organ involvement; high rates of recurrence, progression, and dissemination, in contrast with bladder tumor dominance in Western countries. As a consequence, we suggest that bilateral nephroureterectomy should be performed prophylactically in high-risk patients, especially those with a long history of Chinese herb intake. The relationship of rhubarb consumption to UC in renal transplant recipients should be noted and evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Does subdivision of the "atypical" urine cytology increase predictive accuracy for urothelial carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, David G; Hossain, Deloar

    2014-12-01

    Urine cytology is routinely used for early diagnosis and monitoring of patients with hematuria or a history of urothelial carcinoma, but its clinical utility is greatly diminished by a high frequency of "atypical" specimens, reportedly around 20% in the literature. We compared our results with double-stained urine cytology specimens (papanicolaou and acid hematoxylin stains) with published results with only a single or double papanicolaou stain. The acid hematoxylin stain enhanced nuclear chromatin staining, eliminated significant background debris, and improved visibility of diagnostic cells in the presence of obscuring blood. Medical records of all urine cytologies received between 2005 and 2012 in our laboratories were reviewed. The study group consisted of all cases with bladder biopsy follow-up within one year of cytology. Of 43,131 urine cytologies diagnosed in our laboratories, biopsy follow-up results were available within one year in 10,473 cases, including 852 for symptoms and 1,461 for follow-up of bladder cancer. An additional 6,427 cases had cystoscopy results in which no biopsy was obtained. Cases were classified as negative (81.6%), atypical, favor reactive (2.9%), atypical, favor neoplastic (7.3%), suspicious (5.7%), and malignant (2.5%), with subsequent frequencies for urothelial cancer on biopsy of 13.3%, 31.1%, 37.6%, 53.6%, and 74.3%, respectively. No significant difference was found if atypical was subdivided into two categories: favor reactive and favor neoplastic. Subdivision of the atypical category did not improve diagnostic accuracy. Addition of the acid hematoxylin stain decreased the incidence of atypical urine cytologies from about 20% to 10.2%.

  11. UPEC biomimickry at the urothelial barrier: lectin-functionalized PLGA microparticles for improved intravesical chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutsch, Lukas; Wambacher, Michael; Wirth, Eva-Maria; Spijker, Sylvia; Kählig, Hanspeter; Wirth, Michael; Gabor, Franz

    2013-06-25

    The urgent demand for more potent treatment schedules in bladder cancer (BCa) therapy calls for a refinement of the intravesical administration modalities. However, progress on drug delivery systems tailored to the penetration-hostile urothelial barrier lags behind the advancements in comparable fields. This study reports on a multimodal, carrier-based delivery concept that combines biorecognitive targeting with modified release strategies for improved intravesical chemotherapy. The plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was immobilized on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (MP) to induce stable cytoadhesion via cellular carbohydrate chains, similar to the specific attachment mechanism utilized by uropathogenic bacteria. A panel of DNA-selective chemotherapeutics with established track record in uro-oncology was screened for physicochemical compatibility with the polymeric carrier formulation. Critical limitations in encapsulation efficiency were found for mitomycin C (MMC), doxorubicin (DOX), and gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM), despite multiparametric optimization of the preparation conditions. In contrast, the amphiphilic 4-(N)-stearoyl prodrug of gemcitabine (GEM-C18) exhibited excellent processability with PLGA. In vitro bioassays on 5637 human BCa cells showed that the enhanced cytoadhesion of WGA-GEM-C18-PGLA-MP traces back to the specific lectin/carbohydrate interaction, and is not easily disrupted by adverse environmental factors. Owing to several synergistic effects, the combined prodrug/targeting approach resulted in strong cytostatic response even when adjusting the exposure scheme to the confined temporal conditions of instillative treatment. Our results highlight the importance of fine-tuning both pharmacokinetic and pharmacologic parameters to gain adequate impact on urothelial cancer cells, and assign promising potential to glycan-targeted delivery concepts for the intravesical route.

  12. Urothelial Defects from Targeted Inactivation of Exocyst Sec10 in Mice Cause Ureteropelvic Junction Obstructions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Fogelgren

    Full Text Available Most cases of congenital obstructive nephropathy are the result of ureteropelvic junction obstructions, and despite their high prevalence, we have a poor understanding of their etiology and scarcity of genetic models. The eight-protein exocyst complex regulates polarized exocytosis of intracellular vesicles in a large variety of cell types. Here we report generation of a conditional knockout mouse for Sec10, a central component of the exocyst, which is the first conditional allele for any exocyst gene. Inactivation of Sec10 in ureteric bud-derived cells using Ksp1.3-Cre mice resulted in severe bilateral hydronephrosis and complete anuria in newborns, with death occurring 6-14 hours after birth. Sec10 FL/FL;Ksp-Cre embryos developed ureteropelvic junction obstructions between E17.5 and E18.5 as a result of degeneration of the urothelium and subsequent overgrowth by surrounding mesenchymal cells. The urothelial cell layer that lines the urinary tract must maintain a hydrophobic luminal barrier again urine while remaining highly stretchable. This barrier is largely established by production of uroplakin proteins that are transported to the apical surface to establish large plaques. By E16.5, Sec10 FL/FL;Ksp-Cre ureter and pelvic urothelium showed decreased uroplakin-3 protein at the luminal surface, and complete absence of uroplakin-3 by E17.5. Affected urothelium at the UPJ showed irregular barriers that exposed the smooth muscle layer to urine, suggesting this may trigger the surrounding mesenchymal cells to overgrow the lumen. Findings from this novel mouse model show Sec10 is critical for the development of the urothelium in ureters, and provides experimental evidence that failure of this urothelial barrier may contribute to human congenital urinary tract obstructions.

  13. Urothelial Defects from Targeted Inactivation of Exocyst Sec10 in Mice Cause Ureteropelvic Junction Obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelgren, Ben; Polgar, Noemi; Lui, Vanessa H; Lee, Amanda J; Tamashiro, Kadee-Kalia A; Napoli, Josephine Andrea; Walton, Chad B; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of congenital obstructive nephropathy are the result of ureteropelvic junction obstructions, and despite their high prevalence, we have a poor understanding of their etiology and scarcity of genetic models. The eight-protein exocyst complex regulates polarized exocytosis of intracellular vesicles in a large variety of cell types. Here we report generation of a conditional knockout mouse for Sec10, a central component of the exocyst, which is the first conditional allele for any exocyst gene. Inactivation of Sec10 in ureteric bud-derived cells using Ksp1.3-Cre mice resulted in severe bilateral hydronephrosis and complete anuria in newborns, with death occurring 6-14 hours after birth. Sec10 FL/FL;Ksp-Cre embryos developed ureteropelvic junction obstructions between E17.5 and E18.5 as a result of degeneration of the urothelium and subsequent overgrowth by surrounding mesenchymal cells. The urothelial cell layer that lines the urinary tract must maintain a hydrophobic luminal barrier again urine while remaining highly stretchable. This barrier is largely established by production of uroplakin proteins that are transported to the apical surface to establish large plaques. By E16.5, Sec10 FL/FL;Ksp-Cre ureter and pelvic urothelium showed decreased uroplakin-3 protein at the luminal surface, and complete absence of uroplakin-3 by E17.5. Affected urothelium at the UPJ showed irregular barriers that exposed the smooth muscle layer to urine, suggesting this may trigger the surrounding mesenchymal cells to overgrow the lumen. Findings from this novel mouse model show Sec10 is critical for the development of the urothelium in ureters, and provides experimental evidence that failure of this urothelial barrier may contribute to human congenital urinary tract obstructions.

  14. Electromagnetic and Electrohydraulic Shock Wave Lithotripsy-Induced Urothelial Damage: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mahmoud; Aburas, Honood; Helo, Fatima M; Qarawi, Lailah

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate and compare the acute effect of electromagnetic and electrohydraulic extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) on the urothelial layers of kidney and ureter. Fifty patients, 29 males (58%) and 21 females (42%), with an average age of 51.68 years (range: 37-70) who underwent SWL application in two different centers were included. Twenty-eight patients (56%) were treated with electrohydraulic and 22 (44%) were treated with electromagnetic lithotripsy. Urinary cytologic examinations were done immediately before and after SWL therapy and 10 days later. The average numbers of epithelial cells, red blood cells (RBC), and myocytes were counted under 40 × magnification. There were significant differences in the number of epithelial cells and RBC before and after immediate application of SWL: 1.66 and 14.9 cells/field, (p = 0.001), 5.44 and 113.45 cells/field, respectively (p = 0.001). The number of RBC was significantly higher in patients treated with electromagnetic lithotripsy than those treated with electrohydraulic: 141.9 and 93.4 cells/field, respectively (p = 0.02). No myocyte or basement membrane elements were detected in any of the cytologic examinations. Cytologic examinations done after 10 days of SWL therapy revealed recovery of all abnormal cytologic findings. The acute increments in the number of epithelial cells and RBC after SWL were statistically significant but it was not permanent. SWL-induced urinary urothelial lesion is limited to the mucosal layer and there was no evidence of damage to the basal membrane or muscle layer. Electromagnetic lithotripsy caused high numbers of RBC than the electrohydraulic device on the postimmediate urine cytologic examination.

  15. Lipid Cell and Micropapillary Variants of Urothelial Carcinoma of the Ureter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Miyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on a case of urothelial carcinoma (UC with lipid cell and micropapillary variants in the ureter. A 64-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. Urinary cytology revealed the presence of atypical urothelial cells. Computed tomography and drip infusion/retrograde pyelography identified a mass-occupying lesion in the left mid-ureter, as well as left hydronephrosis. A clinical diagnosis of left ureteral cancer was given and the patient underwent left nephroureterectomy. Microscopically, the major component of the tumor was a conventional high-grade UC. In the invasive region, however, lipid cell and micropapillary variants of UC were also observed. Upon immunohistochemical analysis, all of the components were diffusely positive for cytokeratin 7 and p53. Intense membranous expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 was also observed in both the lipid cell and micropapillary variants of UC, whereas weak and incomplete staining was observed in most regions of the conventional UC. The pathological stage was pT3 N2. Multiple times, the patient experienced recurrence of the UC in the urinary bladder and urethra. Although the patient underwent total cystectomy and urethrectomy, 52 months following the initial surgery, signs of local recurrence developed, as well as multiple lymph node and bone metastases. The patient died 75 months following the initial surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a lipid cell variant of ureteral UC. The overexpression of HER2 may be associated with both the lipid cell and micropapillary variants of UC.

  16. Outcomes of kidney transplant tourism and risk factors for de novo urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Lin; Chang, Jei-Wen; Wu, Tsai-Hun; King, Kuang-Liang; Yang, Ling-Yu; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Yang, An-Hang; Chang, Fu-Pang; Pan, Chin-Chen; Yang, Wu-Chang; Loong, Che-Chuan

    2014-07-15

    To date, the outcomes of transplant tourism have not been reported extensively. In addition, data about the accuracy of urine cytology for the detection and the role of the BK virus (BKV) in the carcinogenesis of urothelial carcinoma (UC) after renal transplantation are lacking. Three hundred seven patients who received deceased donor kidney transplants between January 2003 and December 2009 were retrospectively studied. The clinical parameters and outcomes between the domestic and tourist groups were compared. We also investigated the risk factors and role of BKV in the carcinogenesis of de novo UC by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The subjects in the tourist group were older at transplantation and had a shorter dialysis time before transplantation. There were significantly higher incidence rates of BKV viruria, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, and malignancy in the tourist group. Graft and patient survival were superior in the domestic group. A total of 43 cancers were identified, and the most common type of malignancy was UC (23 patients, 53.5%). The tourist group had a significantly higher incidence of tumors. The sensitivity and specificity of urine cytology for detecting UC were 73.9% and 94.7%, respectively. Independent predictors of UC included female sex, use of Chinese herbal medicine, and transplant tourism. Only two patients (8.7%) with UC had detectable BKV. Transplant tourism was a risk factor for infection and de novo malignancy. Urothelial carcinoma was the most common malignancy after kidney transplantation. Regular screening for the early detection of UC by urine cytology or periodic sonographic surveys is mandatory, especially for those at high risk.

  17. Rapamycin instead of mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine in treatment of post-renal transplantation urothelial carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-peng; MA Lin-lin; WANG Yong; YIN Hang; WANG Wei; YANG Xiao-yong; ZHANG Xiao-dong

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant tumor is the most common complication occurred in transplant recipients. It is widely recognized that immunosuppressive treatments increase the risk of cancer in transplant recipients. The efficacy and safety of rapamycin (RPM) in combination with low-dose calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) in treating 15 renal allograft recipients which developed urothelial carcinoma were observed. Methods Immunosuppressive regimen in all recipients was altered with rapamycin to replace mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or azathioprine (Aza). The initial loading dosage was 2 mg/d, and the next dosage was 1 mg/d. The dosage of rapamycin was carefully adjusted according to the blood drug level and concentration of the drug was maintained at 4-6 ug/L. In all the 15 patients, the calcineurin inhibitor was reduced down to one third of the original dosage after the rapamycin blood concentration became stable. Surgical treatment and intravesical instillation chemotherapy were carried out in all patients. Recurrence of the tumor was monitored throughout the study. Post-transplant renal function and side effects were also closely monitored. Results Among the 15 patients, 9 had no tumor recurrence in 2 years, 2 had tumor recurrences twice, and 4 had once. There was no acute rejection observed during RPM treatment. Post-transplant renal function in 11 patients was improved, with a decreased creatinine level. Hyperlipoidemia and thrombocytopenia were the most frequent adverse events which responded well to corresponding treatments. Conclusion Among the renal allograft recipients with urothelial carcinoma, combination of rapamycin and low dose calcineurin inhibitor treatment is effective and safe.

  18. MRI of pineal region tumours: relationship between tumours and adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, H. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Uozumi, T. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kiya, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kurisu, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Arita, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sumida, M. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Ikawa, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    A variety of tumours may arise in the pineal region; accurate diagnosis is important in the selection of treatment and prognosis. A retrospective analysis of the MRI studies of 25 patients with pathologically proven pineal region tumours was performed, focused on the relationship between the tumour and neighbouring structures. Compression of the tectal plate was classified as expansive or invasive, and compression of the corpus callosum as inferior, anterior or posterior. In 10 of the 14 patients (71 %) with germ cell tumours tectal compression was of the invasive type; 8 patients (57 %) had multiple tumours and in 13 (93 %) the tumour margins were irregular. Teratomas were readily diagnosed because of characteristic heterogeneous signal intensity. Pineal cell tumours were differentiated from germ cell tumours by their rounded shape, solid nature, sharp margins, and expansive type of tectal compression. Meningiomas were characterised by their falcotentorial attachments, posterior callosal compression, and a low-intensity rim on T2-weighted images. Gd-DTPA injection enabled clear demonstration of the site and extent of tumour spread and was useful in differentiating cystic and solid components. The appearances described, while not pathognomonic, are helpful in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumours, and valuable in planning appropriate treatment. (orig.). With 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinó P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic neoplasms are an uncommon aetiology of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours are a rare subgroup of pancreatic neoplasms. CASE REPORT: We report on three patients having acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, one of them with severe pancreatitis, and review the published cases up to now. Only 22 patients with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours have been reported (including the present cases. Most of these cases were of non-functioning neoplasms and the course of the pancreatitis tended to be mild. In the most recent reports and in the present cases, the initial diagnostic method was CT scan. Less than half had metastases when the tumour was diagnosed and mortality from these neoplasms reached approximately 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours can cause acute pancreatitis even in patients under 50 years of age. On many occasions, the tumours are non-functioning; therefore, acute pancreatitis may be the first clinical symptom. Consequently, faced with acute pancreatitis of unknown origin, a non-functioning neuroendocrine tumour should be ruled out.

  20. Mechanisms of tumour escape from immune surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecka Urszula

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive growth and spread of tumour cells in the form of metastases requires an interaction of healthy host cells, such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and other cells of mesenchymal origin with immune cells taking part in innate and adaptive responses within the tumour lesion and entire body. The host cells interact with tumour cells to create a dynamic tumour microenvironment, in which healthy cells can both positively and negatively influence the growth and spread of the tumour. The balance of cellular homeostasis and the effect of substances they secrete on the tumour microenvironment determine whether the tumour has a tendency to grow or disappear, and whether the cells remain within the lesion or are capable of metastasis to other regions of the body. Intercellular interactions also determine the tumour’s susceptibility to radiation or other types of cancer treatment. They may also be a rational explanation for differences in treatment outcomes, in which some metastases regress and others progress in response to the same treatment method.

  1. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  2. Polyoma (BK) virus associated urothelial carcinoma originating within a renal allograft five years following resolution of polyoma virus nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Steven P; Myers-Gurevitch, Patricia M; Chu, Stacy; Robinson, Brian D; Dadhania, Darshana; Seshan, Surya V

    2016-03-01

    A direct role for BK polyomavirus infection in malignant tumors of renal allografts and urinary tract is emerging. Case reports suggest a link between BK virus (BKV) reactivation and development of malignancy in renal allograft recipients. Herein we describe the first case of BKV positive invasive urothelial carcinoma within the renal allograft, presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss 5 years following resolution of BK viremia/nephropathy (BKVN). Unique to our case was the remote history of BK viremia/BKVN, rising titer of anti-HLA antibody and presence of renal limited urothelial carcinoma with microinvasion of malignant cells staining positive for SV40 large T antigen (T-Ag). These findings suggest that persistence of subclinical BKV infection within the renal allograft may play a role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. Patients with history of BKVN may be at risk for kidney and urinary tract malignancy despite resolution of BK viremia/BKVN.

  3. Clear-cell variant urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Tezval

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell variants of transitional cell carcinomas (TCC of the bladder are extremely rare tumors. Only 6 cases have been reported until now. We report of a 67 year old man who presented with fast growing tumor disease. While initial diagnosis showed localized bladder tumor, final histopathology revealed pT4, G3, L1 urothelial carcinoma with clear cell differentiation. No more than 14 weeks after initial diagnosis the patient died from multi-organ failure after unsuccessful salvage laparotomy which showed massive tumor burden within the pelvis and peritoneal carcinosis. This case demonstrated an extremely fast tumor growth. Therefore, patients with clear cell urothelial carcinoma should be treated vigorously and without time delay. We present a case of clear cell variant of TCC which exhibited an extremely aggressive behavior. To our knowledge this is the fifth report of this rare disease.

  4. Intervet symposium: bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetters, T; Dubey, J P; Adrianarivo, A; Frankena, K; Romero, J J; Pérez, E; Heuer, C; Nicholson, C; Russell, D; Weston, J

    2004-10-28

    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP)held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The symposium was organised by Juan Muñoz-Bielsa,Wicher Holland, Enzo Foccoliand Theo Schetters (chairman). The focus was on the present state of knowledge of the biology, epidemiology(presented by J.P. Dubey) and immunology of Neospora infection (presented by A. Adrianarivo),with special emphasis on the prospects of vaccination of cattle against Neospora-induced abortion (presentations of K. Frankena (Costa Rican trial) and C. Heuer (New Zealand trial)).

  5. Bovine herpesvirus 1 infection and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, abortion, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, and systemic infection in neonates. When animals survive, a life-long latent infection is established in nervous sensory ganglia. Several reactivation stimuli can lead to viral re-excretion, which is responsible for the...

  6. Carcinoid tumour of the middle ear

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baig, Salman

    2012-09-01

    A case of middle ear mass in a young female from Ireland is described, who presented with left ear hearing loss and intermittent bloody discharge from the same ear. Examination under microscope revealed occlusive polyp in the left ear and a biopsy had been taken under general anaesthesia. Histopathology report described an adenoma \\/ carcinoid tumour of the middle ear confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining. CT temporal bones revealed the extension of the disease. The patient underwent left tympanotomy and excision of the tumour. In general, these tumours are regarded as benign but may be mistaken for adenocarcinomas because of their histological heterogenecity.

  7. Pulmonary tumour microembolism clinically mimicking alveolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A W I; Tse, G M K; Chu, W C W; Chan, A B W

    2003-01-01

    A 56 year old man with previously unsuspected recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus presented with dyspnoea. Bronchoscopy and computed tomography suggested bronchopneumonic changes with an infectious cause. He suffered a rapidly deteriorating course and died despite active treatment, including antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. Necropsy revealed a florid pulmonary tumour microembolism mimicking alveolitis. No bronchopneumonia was seen. The emboli arose from loosely attached tumour vegetations in the tricuspid valve. In a patient with known malignancy, tumour microembolism should be considered as an uncommon cause of rapid respiratory failure, refractory to antibiotic treatment. PMID:14600135

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals as probes to characterize tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arshad, Mubarik A.; Nguyen, Quang-De; Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Tumour cells exhibit several properties that allow them to grow and divide. A number of these properties are detectable by nuclear imaging methods. We discuss crucial tumour properties that can be described by current radioprobe technologies, further discuss areas of emerging radioprobe development, and finally articulate need areas that our field should aspire to develop. The review focuses largely on positron emission tomography and draws upon the seminal 'Hallmarks of Cancer' review article by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011 placing into context the present and future roles of radiotracer imaging in characterizing tumours. (orig.)

  9. Urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract diagnosed via FGFR3 mutation detection in urine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverberg Daniel M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper urinary tract cancer is typically diagnosed with urine cytology and imaging techniques. These assays can be limited by sensitivity, specificity, or technical issues making some diagnoses difficult. Case presentation A 73-year old man presented to the clinic with a right renal pelvis filling defect that was detected by a CT-scan performed for unrelated reasons. Urine cytology was negative. Cystoscopy, retrograde pyelogram, and partial ureteroscopy were unable to visualize the lesion resulting in an indeterminate diagnosis. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the renal lesion which appeared to have become larger and was consistent with urothelial carcinoma. A urine based genetic assay was used to test for the presence of urothelial carcinoma. This assay evaluates the presence of mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3. Mutations in FGFR3 are known to be associated with urothelial carcinoma and have a positive predictive value of 95% when detected in patients with no history of TCC. A mutation in exon 10 (Y375C of FGFR3 was identified. Nephroureterectomy was performed and the subsequent pathology confirmed urothelial carcinoma. In addition, PCR analysis on isolated tumor tissue indicated the tumor carried the same FGFR3 mutation as that of the DNA isolated from urine, consistent with the tumor being the origin of the mutant DNA. Conclusion This study indicates that the FGFR3 urine assay, which was originally developed to monitor bladder cancer, is also a useful tool for diagnosing upper urinary tract cancer in a real-life setting.

  10. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Producing Infiltrating Urothelial Carcinoma of the Left Renal Pelvis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing infiltrating urothelial carcinoma of the left renal pelvis. The patient was referred to our hospital for fever and anorexia. Blood tests showed elevated level of leukocytosis without any infectious diseases. The serum concentration of G-CSF was remarkably elevated. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a huge mass in the left renal pelvis and para-aortic lymph node enlargement. He was underwent left nephroureter...

  11. Tumor regression grade of urothelial bladder cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a novel and successful strategy to predict survival.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Achim; Thalmann, George; Perren, Aurel; Seiler,Roland

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic tumor regression grades (TRGs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predict survival in different cancers. In bladder cancer, corresponding studies have not been conducted. Fifty-six patients with advanced invasive urothelial bladder cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before cystectomy and lymphadenectomy. TRGs were defined as follows: TRG1: complete tumor regression; TRG2: >50% tumor regression; TRG3: 50% or less tumor regression. Separate TRGs were assigned for primary tumor...

  12. New miRNA Profiles Accurately Distinguish Renal Cell Carcinomas and Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinomas from the Normal Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolos Zaravinos; George I Lambrou; Nikos Mourmouras; Patroklos Katafygiotis; Gregory Papagregoriou; Krinio Giannikou; Dimitris Delakas; Constantinos Deltas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper tract urothelial carcinomas (UT-UC) can invade the pelvicalyceal system making differential diagnosis of the various histologically distinct renal cell carcinoma (RCC) subtypes and UT-UC, difficult. Correct diagnosis is critical for determining appropriate surgery and post-surgical treatments. We aimed to identify microRNA (miRNA) signatures that can accurately distinguish the most prevalent RCC subtypes and UT-UC form the normal kidney. METHODS AND FINDINGS: miRNA profiling...

  13. Odontogenic ghost cell tumour with clear cell components: clear cell odontogenic ghost cell tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    A case of odontogenic ghost cell tumour (OGCT) with clear cell components was encountered in the mandible of a 63-year-old man. The tumour revealed ameloblastomatous-type epithelial components accompanied by clusters of ghost cells and dentinoid juxtaposed to the odontogenic epithelium. In addition, some areas of the tumour tissue showed sheets and islands of clear, glycogen containing epithelial cells, which were separated by a thin fibrous connective tissue stroma. Both ameloblastic and clear cells exhibited positive immunoreactivities for cytokeratin 19 and AE1/3. It is not known whether this tumour represents a clear cell change of a pre-existing OGCT or a separate and distinct neoplasm derived de novo from the odontogenic epithelium. This tumour was given the term 'clear cell OGCT' because it captures the clear cell components, which is one of the most prominent distinguishing features of the tumour.

  14. Histologic grading of urothelial papillary neoplasms: impact of combined grading (two-numbered grading system) on reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Burçin; Yörükoglu, Kutsal; Düzcan, Ender; Sen, Sait; Nese, Nalan; Sarsık, Banu; Akder, Aysegul; Sayhan, Sehnaz; Mungan, Uğur; Kirkali, Ziya

    2011-06-01

    The clinical management of tumor patients is often strongly influenced by the tumor grade. The presence of heterogeneity is well recognized in a variety of tumors. Overall grade is based on highest grade area identified within a tumor. Urothelial carcinoma often contains different histological grades within the same tumor. This study investigates the impact of a combined grading system on the reproducibility of papillary urothelial neoplasms. A set prepared for an earlier study consisting of ten cases of each category (papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), LGPUC, and HGPUC) was used. Agreement between pairs of pathologists was evaluated using κ statistics for the combined scoring system. Interobserver agreement was fair to substantial as reflected by κ values ranging from 0.24 to 0.74 (mean κ = 0.43). The combined scores of 2 and 3 which included PUNLMP showed the lowest degree of agreement and when this category was excluded from the analysis, interobserver agreement increased significantly (mean κ = 0.65; ranging from 0.43 to 0.92) in terms of combined scores of 4, 5, and 6. PUNLMP has been shown to be the least reproducible component of a combined scoring system even among experienced observers. Exclusion of PUNLMP from grading scheme seems to improve interobserver variability.

  15. Macronutrient intake and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Naomi E; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Ros, Martine M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Tjønneland, Anne; Roswall, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Weikert, Steffen; Boeing, Heiner; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Teucher, Birgit; Panico, Salvatore; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Peeters, Petra; Quirós, Jose Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; Molina-Montes, Esther; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Ljungberg, Börje; Hallmans, Göran; Ehrnström, Roy; Ericson, Ulrika; Gram, Inger Torhild; Parr, Christine L; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Karapetyan, Tina; Dilis, Vardis; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherrazzi, Guy; Romieu, Isabelle; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may be important in the development of bladder cancer. We examined macronutrient intake in relation to risk of urothelial cell carcinoma among 469,339 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations were examined using Cox regression, stratified by sex, age at recruitment and centre and further adjusted for smoking status and duration, body mass index and total energy intake. After an average of 11.3 years of follow-up, 1,416 new cases of urothelial cell carcinoma were identified. After allowing for measurement error, a 3% increase in the consumption of energy intake from animal protein was associated with a 15% higher risk (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3-30%; p(trend) = 0.01) and a 2% increase in energy from plant protein intake was associated with a 23% lower risk (95% CI: 36-7%, p(trend) = 0.006). Dietary intake of fat, carbohydrate, fibre or calcium was not associated with risk. These findings suggest that animal and/or plant protein may affect the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma, and examination of these associations in other studies is needed.

  16. Identification of nine genomic regions of amplification in urothelial carcinoma, correlation with stage, and potential prognostic and therapeutic value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Chekaluk

    Full Text Available We performed a genome wide analysis of 164 urothelial carcinoma samples and 27 bladder cancer cell lines to identify copy number changes associated with disease characteristics, and examined the association of amplification events with stage and grade of disease. Multiplex inversion probe (MIP analysis, a recently developed genomic technique, was used to study 80 urothelial carcinomas to identify mutations and copy number changes. Selected amplification events were then analyzed in a validation cohort of 84 bladder cancers by multiplex ligation-dependent probe assay (MLPA. In the MIP analysis, 44 regions of significant copy number change were identified using GISTIC. Nine gene-containing regions of amplification were selected for validation in the second cohort by MLPA. Amplification events at these 9 genomic regions were found to correlate strongly with stage, being seen in only 2 of 23 (9% Ta grade 1 or 1-2 cancers, in contrast to 31 of 61 (51% Ta grade 3 and T2 grade 2 cancers, p<0.001. These observations suggest that analysis of genomic amplification of these 9 regions might help distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinoma, although further study is required. Both MIP and MLPA methods perform well on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DNA, enhancing their potential clinical use. Furthermore several of the amplified genes identified here (ERBB2, MDM2, CCND1 are potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Phase II trial of ifosfamide, fluorouracil, and folinic acid (FIFO regimen) in relapsed and refractory urothelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, J; Culine, S; Theodore, C; Droz, J P

    1995-01-01

    There is no known effective salvage chemotherapy for patients with refractory or relapsed urothelial tumors after methotrexate/cisplatin-based regimen. We report the results of a phase II trial with the FIFO regimen that includes from day 1 to 5: fluorouracil 350 mg/m2, folinic acid 20 mg/m2, and ifosfamide 1000 mg/m2, Q4W. Fifteen patients with metastatic measurable urothelial cancer were enrolled in this trial. Previous therapy included M-VAC regimen in 11 patients, CMV regimen in 3 patients, and both regimens in 1 patient. Thirty-one courses were delivered. Toxicity was moderate, including encephalopathy grade 2 in 2 patients and hematological toxicity grade 3 in 2 others. However, an early death occurred on day 1 in a patient who progressed rapidly and died from hepatic insufficiency after initial encephalopathy. No objective response was seen. Twelve patients progressed during FIFO therapy and 3 patients experienced a stable disease. Despite almost encouraging results of fluorouracil and ifosfamide in the literature, their combination according to our schedule is not active in urothelial cancer.

  18. Association of urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis with papillary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. A new sporadic neoplastic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Chablé-Montero, Fredy; Córdova-Ramón, Juan Carlos; Henson, Donald E

    2014-10-01

    We describe 2 adult women (72 and 54 years), 1 with a low-grade noninvasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis, who 14 years later developed a papillary carcinoma in 1 thyroid lobe and a medullary carcinoma in the contralateral lobe. Both neoplasms were similar in size and appeared symmetrical. Despite its small size, the medullary carcinoma metastasized in multiple cervical lymph nodes. The second patient had a high-grade invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis that infiltrated the renal parenchyma and metastasized in one of the lungs. Five months later, a papillary carcinoma was discovered in the thyroid gland. The 2 papillary thyroid carcinomas were of the follicular variant. Adjacent to 1 papillary carcinoma, there was a dominant nodule of a colloid and adenomatous goiter. The medullary carcinoma contained stromal amyloid and was immunoreactive for calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen. There was no C-cell hyperplasia (medullary carcinoma in situ). The 2 patients are alive, 1 is living with pulmonary metastasis from the high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Twelve cases of this neoplastic association were registered in the Survey, Epidemiology, and End Results Program from 1980 to 2009. We believe that the combination of these unusual neoplasms in the same patient may represent a new sporadic neoplastic syndrome.

  19. Mucin-Producing Urothelial-Type Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate (a Case Report and Review of the Literature)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Niu; Guang Sun; Jiwu Chang; Yibing Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report clinical and pathologic findings of one case of mucin-producing urothelial-type adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and to discuss the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease.METHODS The patient was a 60-year-old man who had an 8-month history of urinary frequency and dysuria culminating in an aggravating condition for 10-days. Laboratory results were tPSA 3.0 and fPSA 0.4. An ultrasound and digital rectal exam showed no abnormal findings, so he was diagnosed as having benign prostatic hyperplasia, and underwent a transurethral prostate resection.RESULTS The findings during the operation resembled benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), whereas the pathological exam showed that the prostatic construction was deranged in the tumor infiltrating region, with many mucin lakes and signet ring cell in the cancer tissue. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the cancer tissue was negative for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and postive for carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA). Final diagnosis: mucin-producing urothelial-type adenocarcinoma of the prostate.After 50 Gy radiotherapy, the patient was free of recurrent signs and metastasis up to 8 months after operation.CONCLUSION Mucin-producing urothelial-type adenocarcinoma of the prostate is extremely rare. Its differential diagnosis mainly includes conventional prostatic adenocarcinoma with mucin production and secondary adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis and treatment of this disease should be further investigated.

  20. Symptoms and time to diagnosis in children with brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Nielsen, Rine; Illum, Niels Ove;

    2011-01-01

    Clinical symptoms in brain tumours in children are variable at onset and diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms were investigated with regard to brain tumour localisation, prediagnostic symptomatic intervals and malignancy.......Clinical symptoms in brain tumours in children are variable at onset and diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms were investigated with regard to brain tumour localisation, prediagnostic symptomatic intervals and malignancy....

  1. Interactions of human monocytes with TMVs (tumour-derived microvesicles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jarosław; Szatanek, Rafał; Mytar, Bożenna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2013-02-01

    The tumour microenvironment represents a dynamic complex milieu, which includes tumour cells, cells of the immune system and other (cellular and non-cellular) components. The role of these particular 'puzzle pieces' may change substantially due to their mutual interactions. The present review concerns different opinions on interactions that occur between monocytes, tumour cells and TMVs (tumour-derived microvesicles).

  2. Neutron kerma coefficient: Reference tissue for tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, L., E-mail: lydia.paredes@inin.gob.m [National Institute of Nuclear Research (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Basic Sciences Division, Autonomous Metropolitan University (Mexico); Balcazar, M. [National Institute of Nuclear Research (Mexico); Francois, J.L. [Engineering Faculty, Autonomous National University of Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    Neutron kerma coefficients were calculated in different media: 4 malignant tumours, 5 normal tissues and 3 tissue substitute in the range 11 eV-29 MeV. The objective was to identify which is the material that better reproduces the behavior of these tumours and tissues. These tissues have clinical interest in interstitial brachytherapy applications with fast neutron source (Cf-252). The small differences of elemental composition among these tissues produce variation in the neutron kerma coefficients. The results show that the neutron kerma coefficients for malignant tumours are smaller than soft tissue from 6% to 9%. Also, the muscle is the tissue that best represents the dosimetric behavior for the tumours and tissues analyzed in this paper for neutron energies >1 keV, where this coefficients show minor variation.

  3. Simulating tumour removal in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetzky, A; Rudolph, M

    2001-12-01

    In this article the software system ROBO-SIM is described. ROBO-SIM is a planning and simulation tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery. Different to the most other simulation tools, ROBO-SIM is able to use actual patient's datasets for simulation. Same as in real neurosurgery a planning step, which provides more functionality as up-to-date planning systems on the market, is performed before undergoing the simulated operation. The planning steps include the definition of the trepanation point for entry into the skull and the target point within the depth of the brain, checking the surgical track and doing virtual trepanations (virtual craniotomy). For use with an intra-operative active manipulator, which is guided by the surgeon during real surgery (robotic surgery), go- and non-go-areas can be defined. During operation, the robot restricts the surgeon from leaving these go-areas. After planning, an additional simulation system, which is understood as an extension to the planning step, is used to simulate whole surgical interventions directly on the patient's anatomy basing on the planning data and by using the same instruments as for the real intervention. First tests with ROBO-SIM are performed on a phantom developed for this purpose and on actual patient's datasets with ventricular tumours.

  4. Pineal anlage tumour - a rare entity with divergent histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Sharma, B S; Garg, Ajay

    2011-06-01

    Pineal anlage tumour is a rare tumour of the pineal gland that is not listed in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Pineal anlage has been defined as a primary pineal tumour with both neuroepithelial and ectomesenchymal differentiation but without endodermal differentiation. We report a pineal anlage tumour in a 4-month-old boy, the youngest patient reported with this rare tumour, with a brief review of the literature. Clinicians and neuropathologists should be aware of this entity as it is likely to be misdiagnosed as a teratoma or a melanocytic tumour of the central nervous system.

  5. 'Pseudo-Alzheimer's' and primary brain tumour.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Mahony, D; Walsh, J. B.; Coakley, D.

    1992-01-01

    Primary brain tumour may present in the elderly purely as a dementing illness before the onset or detection of sensorimotor neurological symptoms or signs. Although neurological examination may indicate no definite signs, close attention to accepted DSM-IIIR and NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria for primary degenerative dementia and 'probable' Alzheimer's disease respectively will suggest a process other than a degenerative one. This was the case in two patients with primary brain tumour prese...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabaksblat, Elizaveta Mitkina; Langer, Seppo W; Knigge, Ulrich;

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumours (BP-NET) are a heterogeneous population of neoplasms with different pathology, clinical behaviour and prognosis compared to the more common lung cancers. The management of BP-NET patients is largely based on studies with a low level of evidence and extrapol...... and extrapolation of data obtained from more common types of neuroendocrine tumours. This review reflects our view of the current state of the art of diagnosis and treatment of patients with BP-NET....

  7. Serum tumour markers in malignant mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Pallavi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma is a rare malignancy of the body cavities with dismal prognosis. It has been a diagnostic dilemma for years with many clinical and pathological mimics. Discovery of a reliable tumour marker will definitely be of value in screening individuals with a history of asbestos exposure, diagnosis, treatment and follow up of malignant mesothelioma. Many tumour markers have been studied and speculatively associated with the malignant mesothelioma, but much still needs to be proven.

  8. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  9. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP.

  10. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  11. Perfusion imaging of parotid gland tumours: usefulness of arterial spin labeling for differentiating Warthin's tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Haruo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro [Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu (Japan); Okuaki, Tomoyuki [Philips Healthcare, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    To assess prospectively the efficacy of arterial spin labelling (ASL) against conventional and diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging for differentiating parotid gland tumours. We included 10 pleomorphic adenomas, 12 Warthin's tumours, and nine malignant tumours of the parotid glands. Only tumours larger than 10 mm were included in this study. All parotid gland tumours underwent T1-weighted, T2-weighted, DW, and ASL imaging. Tumour-to-parotid gland signal intensity ratios (SIRs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of solid components were correlated with these pathologies. SIRs on T2-weighted images and ADCs were higher in pleomorphic adenomas than in Warthin's tumours (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.01). SIRs on ASL were higher in Warthin's tumours than in pleomorphic adenomas (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.05). Az value of SIRs on ASL for differentiating Warthin's tumours from the other pathologies was 0.982. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of SIRs on ASL for the diagnosis of Warthin's tumours at an optimal SIR threshold of over 8.70 were 91.7 %, 94.7 %, and 93.5 %, respectively. ASL with SIR measurements could non-invasively evaluate tumour blood flow of parotid gland tumours and differentiate Warthin's tumours from pleomorphic adenomas and malignant tumours. (orig.)

  12. Urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder occurring in young adult and pediatric patients: a comprehensive review of literature with implications for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paner, Gladell P; Zehnder, Pascal; Amin, Anmol M; Husain, Aliya N; Desai, Mihir M

    2011-01-01

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma is typically a disease of older individuals and rarely occurs below the age of 40 years. There is debate and uncertainty in the literature regarding the clinicopathologic characteristics of bladder urothelial neoplasms in younger patients compared with older patients, although no consistent age criteria have been used to define "younger" age group categories. Use of the World Health Organization 2004/International Society of Urological Pathology 1998 grading nomenclature and recent molecular studies highlight certain unique features of bladder urothelial neoplasms in young patients, particularly in patients below 20 years of age. In this meta-analysis and review, the clinical, pathologic, and molecular features and risk factors of bladder urothelial neoplasms in patients 40 years or less are presented and analyzed according to decades of presentation. Similar to older patients, bladder urothelial neoplasms in patients 40 years or younger occur more common in male patients, present mainly with gross painless hematuria, and are more commonly located at bladder trigone/ureteral orifices, but in contrast have a greater chance for unifocality. Delay in diagnosis of bladder urothelial neoplasms seems not to be uncommon in younger patients probably because of its relative rarity and the predominance of benign causes of hematuria in this age group causing hesitancy for an aggressive work-up. Most tumors in patients younger than 40 years were low grade. The incidence of low-grade tumors was the lowest in the first 2 decades of life, with incremental increase of the percentage of high-grade tumors with increasing age decades. Classification according to the World Health Organization 2004/International Society of Urological Pathology grading system identified papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential to be relatively frequent among bladder tumors of young patients particularly in the teenage years. Similar to grade, there was

  13. [EAU guidelines on non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, the 2011 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babjuk, M; Oosterlinck, W; Sylvester, R; Kaasinen, E; Böhle, A; Palou-Redorta, J; Rouprêt, M

    2012-01-01

    To present the 2011 European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Literature published between 2004 and 2010 on the diagnosis and treatment of NMIBC was systematically reviewed. Previous guidelines were updated, and the level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. Tumours staged as Ta, T1, or carcinoma in situ (CIS) are grouped as NMIBC. Diagnosis depends on cystoscopy and histologic evaluation of the tissue obtained by transurethral resection (TUR) in papillary tumours or by multiple bladder biopsies in CIS. In papillary lesions, a complete TUR is essential for the patient's prognosis. Where the initial resection is incomplete or where a high-grade or T1 tumour is detected, a second TUR should be performed within 2-6 wk. In papillary tumours, the risks of both recurrence and progression may be estimated for individual patients using the scoring system and risk tables. The stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups (separately for recurrence and progression) is pivotal to recommending adjuvant treatment. For patients with a low risk of tumour recurrence and progression, one immediate instillation of chemotherapy is recommended. Patients with an intermediate or high risk of recurrence and an intermediate risk of progression should receive one immediate instillation of chemotherapy followed by a minimum of 1 yr of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical immunotherapy or further instillations of chemotherapy. Papillary tumours with a high risk of progression and CIS should receive intravesical BCG for 1 yr. Cystectomy may be offered to the highest risk patients, and it is at least recommended in BCG failure patients. These abridged EAU guidelines present updated information on the diagnosis and treatment of NMIBC for incorporation into clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 AEU. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. EAU guidelines on non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, the 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babjuk, Marko; Oosterlinck, Willem; Sylvester, Richard; Kaasinen, Eero; Böhle, Andreas; Palou-Redorta, Juan; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2011-06-01

    To present the 2011 European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Literature published between 2004 and 2010 on the diagnosis and treatment of NMIBC was systematically reviewed. Previous guidelines were updated, and the level of evidence (LE) and grade of recommendation (GR) were assigned. Tumours staged as Ta, T1, or carcinoma in situ (CIS) are grouped as NMIBC. Diagnosis depends on cystoscopy and histologic evaluation of the tissue obtained by transurethral resection (TUR) in papillary tumours or by multiple bladder biopsies in CIS. In papillary lesions, a complete TUR is essential for the patient's prognosis. Where the initial resection is incomplete or where a high-grade or T1 tumour is detected, a second TUR should be performed within 2-6 wk. In papillary tumours, the risks of both recurrence and progression may be estimated for individual patients using the scoring system and risk tables. The stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups-separately for recurrence and progression-is pivotal to recommending adjuvant treatment. For patients with a low risk of tumour recurrence and progression, one immediate instillation of chemotherapy is recommended. Patients with an intermediate or high risk of recurrence and an intermediate risk of progression should receive one immediate instillation of chemotherapy followed by a minimum of 1 yr of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical immunotherapy or further instillations of chemotherapy. Papillary tumours with a high risk of progression and CIS should receive intravesical BCG for 1 yr. Cystectomy may be offered to the highest risk patients, and it is at least recommended in BCG failure patients. The long version of the guidelines is available from the EAU Web site (www.uroweb.org). These abridged EAU guidelines present updated information on the diagnosis and treatment of NMIBC for incorporation into clinical practice. Copyright © 2011

  15. Exophytic benign mixed epithelial stromal tumour of the kidney: case report of a rare tumour entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Küster Jens

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mixed epithelial and stromal tumour (MEST represents a recently described benign composite neoplasm of the kidney, which predominantly affects perimenopausal females. Most tumours are benign, although rare malignant cases have been observed. Case report A 47-year-old postmenopausal female presented to the urologist with flank pain. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a 30-mm-in-diameter uniform mass adjacent to the pelvis of the left kidney. Surgical exploration showed a tumour arising from the lower anterior hilus of the left kidney. The tumour could be excised by preserving the kidney. By intraoperative frozen section the tumour showed characteristic features of MEST with epithelial-covered cysts embedded in an "ovarian-like" stroma. Additional immunohistochemistry investigations showed expression for hormone receptors by the stromal component of the tumour. Discussion MEST typically presents in perimenopausal women as a primarily cystic mass. Commonly, the tumour arises from the renal parenchyma or pelvis. The tumour is composed of an admixture of cystic and sometimes more solid areas. The stromal cells typically demonstrate an ovarian-type stroma showing expression for the estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conclusion MEST represents a distinctive benign tumour entity of the kidney, which affects perimenopausal woman. The tumour should be distinguished from other cystic renal neoplasms. By imaging studies it is difficult to distinguish between a benign or malignant nature of the tumour. Thus, intraoperative frozen section is necessary for conservative surgery, since the overall prognosis is favourable and renal function can be preserved in most cases.

  16. EAU guidelines on non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: update 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babjuk, Marko; Burger, Maximilian; Zigeuner, Richard; Shariat, Shahrokh F; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Compérat, Eva; Sylvester, Richard J; Kaasinen, Eero; Böhle, Andreas; Palou Redorta, Joan; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2013-10-01

    The first European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on bladder cancer were published in 2002 [1]. Since then, the guidelines have been continuously updated. To present the 2013 EAU guidelines on non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Literature published between 2010 and 2012 on the diagnosis and treatment of NMIBC was systematically reviewed. Previous guidelines were updated, and the levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were assigned. Tumours staged as Ta, T1, or carcinoma in situ (CIS) are grouped as NMIBC. Diagnosis depends on cystoscopy and histologic evaluation of the tissue obtained by transurethral resection (TUR) in papillary tumours or by multiple bladder biopsies in CIS. In papillary lesions, a complete TUR is essential for the patient's prognosis. Where the initial resection is incomplete, where there is no muscle in the specimen, or where a high-grade or T1 tumour is detected, a second TUR should be performed within 2-6 wk. The risks of both recurrence and progression may be estimated for individual patients using the EORTC scoring system and risk tables. The stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups is pivotal to recommending adjuvant treatment. For patients with a low-risk tumour, one immediate instillation of chemotherapy is recommended. Patients with an intermediate-risk tumour should receive one immediate instillation of chemotherapy followed by 1 yr of full-dose bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical immunotherapy or by further instillations of chemotherapy for a maximum of 1 yr. In patients with high-risk tumours, full-dose intravesical BCG for 1-3 yr is indicated. In patients at highest risk of tumour progression, immediate radical cystectomy should be considered. Cystectomy is recommended in BCG-refractory tumours. The long version of the guidelines is available from the EAU Web site: http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/. These abridged EAU guidelines present updated information on the

  17. EAU Guidelines on Non-Muscle-invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder: Update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babjuk, Marko; Böhle, Andreas; Burger, Maximilian; Capoun, Otakar; Cohen, Daniel; Compérat, Eva M; Hernández, Virginia; Kaasinen, Eero; Palou, Joan; Rouprêt, Morgan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Soukup, Viktor; Sylvester, Richard J; Zigeuner, Richard

    2017-03-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) panel on Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC) released an updated version of the guidelines on Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer. To present the 2016 EAU guidelines on NMIBC. A broad and comprehensive scoping exercise covering all areas of the NMIBC guidelines published between April 1, 2014, and May 31, 2015, was performed. Databases covered by the search included Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Libraries. Previous guidelines were updated, and levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were assigned. Tumours staged as TaT1 or carcinoma in situ (CIS) are grouped as NMIBC. Diagnosis depends on cystoscopy and histologic evaluation of the tissue obtained by transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) in papillary tumours or by multiple bladder biopsies in CIS. In papillary lesions, a complete TURB is essential for the patient's prognosis. If the initial resection is incomplete, there is no muscle in the specimen, or a high-grade or T1 tumour is detected, a second TURB should be performed within 2-6 wk. The risks of both recurrence and progression may be estimated for individual patients using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system and risk tables. The stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups is pivotal to recommending adjuvant treatment. For patients with a low-risk tumour and intermediate-risk patients at a lower risk of recurrence, one immediate instillation of chemotherapy is recommended. Patients with an intermediate-risk tumour should receive 1 yr of full-dose bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical immunotherapy or instillations of chemotherapy for a maximum of 1 yr. In patients with high-risk tumours, full-dose intravesical BCG for 1-3 yr is indicated. In patients at highest risk of tumour progression, immediate radical cystectomy (RC) should be considered. RC is recommended in BCG-refractory tumours. The long version of

  18. Identification of key pathways and genes influencing prognosis in bladder urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning X

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xin Ning, Yaoliang Deng Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Province, People’s Republic of China Background: Genomic profiling can be used to identify the predictive effect of genomic subsets for determining prognosis in bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC after radical cystectomy. This study aimed to investigate potential gene and pathway markers associated with prognosis in BUC.Methods: A microarray dataset of BUC was obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified by DESeq of the R platform. Kaplan–Meier analysis was applied for prognostic markers. Key pathways and genes were identified using bioinformatics tools, such as gene set enrichment analysis, gene ontology, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, gene multiple association network integration algorithm (GeneMANIA, Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins, and Molecular Complex Detection.Results: A comparative gene set enrichment analysis of tumor and adjacent normal tissues suggested BUC tumorigenesis resulted mainly from enrichment of cell cycle and DNA damage and repair-related biological processes and pathways, including TP53 and mitotic recombination. Two hundred and fifty-six genes were identified as potential prognosis-related DEGs. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses showed that the potential prognosis-related DEGs were enriched in angiogenesis, including the cyclic adenosine monophosphate biosynthetic process, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase G, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Rap1, and phosphoinositide-3-kinase-AKT signaling pathway. Nine hub genes, TAGLN, ACTA2, MYH11, CALD1, MYLK, GEM, PRELP, TPM2, and OGN, were identified from the intersection of protein–protein interaction and GeneMANIA networks. Module analysis of protein–protein interaction and GeneMANIA networks mainly showed

  19. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (including bronchopulmonary and thymic neoplasms). Part II-specific NE tumour types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberg, Kjell; Astrup, Lone Bording; Eriksson, Barbro;

    2004-01-01

    Part II of the guidelines contains a description of epidemiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, treatment, and survival for each type of neuroendocrine tumour. We are not only including gastroenteropancreatic tumours but also bronchopulmonary and thymic neuroendocrine...... tumours. These guidelines essentially cover basic knowledge in the diagnosis and management of the different forms of neuroendocrine tumour. We have, however, tried to give more updated information about the epidemiology and histopathology, which is essential for the clinical management of these tumours....

  20. Influence of tumours on protective anti-tumour immunity and the effects of irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Ann Foulds

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in the development and progression of cancer and it is becoming apparent that tumours can influence the induction of potentially protective responses in a number of ways. The prevalence of immunoregulatory T cell populations in the circulation and tumours of patients with cancer is increased, and the presence of these cells appears to present a major barrier to the induction of tumour immunity. One aspect of tumour-mediated immunoregulation which has received comparatively little attention is that which is directed towards natural killer (NK cells, although evidence that the phenotype and function of NK cell populations are modified in patients with cancer is accumulating.Although the precise mechanisms underlying these localised and systemic immunoregulatory effects remain unclear, tumour-derived factors appear, in part at least, to be involved. The effects could be manifested by an altered function and/or via an influence on the migratory properties of individual cell subsets. A better insight into endogenous immunoregulatory mechanisms and the capacity of tumours to modify the phenotype and function of innate and adaptive immune cells might assist the development of new immunotherapeutic approaches and improve the management of patients with cancer.This article reviews current knowledge relating to the influence of tumours on protective anti-tumour immunity and considers the potential influence that radiation-induced effects might have on the prevalence, phenotype and function of innate and adaptive immune cells in patients with cancer.

  1. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

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    Neha Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs, are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools.

  2. Loss of the tumour suppressor gene AIP mediates the browning of human brown fat tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Linda; Hansen, Nils; Saba, Karim H; Nilsson, Jenny; Fioretos, Thoas; Rissler, Pehr; Nord, Karolin H

    2017-10-01

    Human brown fat tumours (hibernomas) show concomitant loss of the tumour suppressor genes MEN1 and AIP. We hypothesized that the brown fat phenotype is attributable to these mutations. Accordingly, in this study, we demonstrate that silencing of AIP in human brown preadipocytic and white fat cell lines results in the induction of the brown fat marker UCP1. In human adipocytic tumours, loss of MEN1 was found both in white (one of 51 lipomas) and in brown fat tumours. In contrast, concurrent loss of AIP was always accompanied by a brown fat morphology. We conclude that this white-to-brown phenotype switch in brown fat tumours is mediated by the loss of AIP. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

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    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  4. Bovine trophectoderm cell lines induced from bovine fibroblasts with reprogramming factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine trophectoderm (TE) cells were induced [induced bovine trophectoderm-like (iBT)] from bovine fetal liver-derived fibroblasts, and other bovine fetal fibroblasts, after viral-vector transduction with either four or six reprogramming factors (RF), including POU5F1, KLF4, SOX2, C-MYC, SV40 large ...

  5. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  6. Synergic anti-tumour effect of B7.1 gene modified tumour vaccine combined with allicin for murine bladder tumour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LIN Li-guo; LIU Jian-jun; LIU Xin-guang; HE Cheng-wei; HE Hui-juan; WU ping; HUANG Ping-ping; CHEN Xiao-wen; DONG Zhong; WU Xiu-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ In the previous study, we found that B7.1 gene transduction failed to induce sufficient anti-tumour response when it is used as a tumour vaccine. It is necessary to develop immunity by a combination of appropriate cytokines to stimulate effective tumour immunity in a therapeutic setting.

  7. Testosterone regulates cell proliferation in aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumour)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, H; Nadesan, P; Poon, R; Alman, B A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumour) is a locally invasive tumour caused by mutations resulting in β-catenin protein stabilisation. Apc1638N mice are predisposed to developing aggressive fibromatosis tumours, and male mice develop greater numbers of tumours than female mice, suggesting a role for androgens in this tumour type. Methods: Human aggressive fibromatosis tumours were examined for the expression of the androgen receptor, and primary human tumour cell cultures were treated with testosterone. Orchidectomised Apc1638N mice were investigated for the development of tumours, and were treated with testosterone to study the effect of tumour formation and the level of β-catenin. Results: Androgen receptors are universally expressed in human aggressive fibromatosis tumours. Testosterone increased the proliferation rate and β-catenin protein level in a dose-dependent manner in human aggressive fibromatosis tumours. Orchiectomy reduced the number and size of tumours that formed in male Apc1638N mice to a similar level as observed in female mice. Testosterone treatment increased the number of tumours that formed in orchidectomised male mice, and resulted in a marked increase in β-catenin protein levels. Conclusion: Testosterone regulates β-catenin protein level and proliferation rate in this mesenchymal tumour. This work identifies the therapeutic use of testosterone blockade in aggressive fibromatosis as an area for further investigation. PMID:21468052

  8. Relationship of cytokeratin 20 and CD44 protein expression with WHO/ISUP grade in pTa and pT1 papillary urothelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S; Lim, S D; Jimenez, R E; Chun, T; Keane, T E; McKenney, J K; Zavala-Pompa, A; Cohen, C; Young, R H; Amin, M B

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of immunoreactivity of cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and CD44 across the spectrum of urothelial neoplasia using the WHO/ISUP consensus classification. A total of 120 papillary urothelial pTa and pT1 tumors (8 papillomas, 8 neoplasms of low malignant potential, and 42 low-grade and 62 high-grade carcinomas) were immunostained by using CK20 and CD44 antibodies. The relationships of tumor grade, pathologic stage, recurrences, and progression in stage with CK20 and CD44 immunoreactivity were assessed. WHO/ISUP grade correlated with tumor stage (P ISUP grade and to each other, and our data suggest their potential combined utility in predicting biologic behavior in patients with papillary urothelial pTa and pT1 neoplasms.

  9. Impacts of CA9 gene polymorphisms on urothelial cell carcinoma susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan.

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    Shian-Shiang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC and the clinicopathological status. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05 than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638 had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204-18.746 increased risk of invasive cancer. CONCLUSION: The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan.

  10. Urothelial carcinoma with oncocytic features: an extremely rare case presenting a diagnostic challenge in urine cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing histological variants in urothelial carcinoma (UC) is important because some may be associated with different clinical outcomes and/or therapeutic approaches; being aware of unusual histological variants may also be crucial in preventing diagnostic misinterpretations. Histological variants based on cytoplasmic features, such as clear-cell, plasmacytoid, rhabdoid, and lipoid-rich variants, are described in invasive UC; however, these cytoplasmic features are not formally defined and not usually encountered in non-invasive UC. Oncocytic cytoplasm has not been well described in either invasive or non-invasive UC. Herein, we report an exceedingly rare case of UC with oncocytic features arising in the right renal pelvis, which presented a diagnostic challenge in urine cytology due to the relatively low nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio; however, it could definitively be diagnosed using histological specimens. UC diagnosis is based on the presence of papillary architecture and widespread p53 nuclear accumulation, suggesting malignancy. An oncocytic tumor is generally considered to be not actively dividing, as shown by the low Ki-67 labeling index in this case. In spite of the low proliferative activity, the possibility of intravesicle recurrence (IVR) should be considered since positive preoperative cytology of upper tract UC is a risk factor for IVR after nephroureterectomy.

  11. A contemporary review of management and prognostic factors of upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Jeffrey J; Orsola, Anna; Chang, Steven L; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2015-04-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) accounts for management and potentially improve outcomes. This article systematically reviews current literature on prognostic factors and management options for UTUC. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify all studies examining prognostic factors and management options for UTUC. The search included the Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, and abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings up to November 2014. An updated systematic review was performed. Preoperative prognostic factors for UTUC patients include age, race, performance status, obesity, smoking status, elevated fibrinogen levels, hydronephrosis, tumor size, multi-focality, location, clinical grade and previous/synchronous bladder cancer. Postoperative variables include tumor stage/grade, multifocality, nodal involvement, lympho-vascular invasion, initial ureteral location, necrosis, sessile architecture, variant histologies and presence of tissue ALDH1 and SOX2. Curative treatment of choice is NU, with lymphadenectomy conferring survival benefits. Minimally invasive surgery has equivalent oncologic and better peri-operative outcomes compared to open surgery. Conservative therapy includes adjuvant BCG and intravesical mitomycin C. Two randomized trials investigating postoperative instillation of mitomycin C suggest bladder recurrence benefits. Adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy may be useful for patients with advanced T3/4 and/or N+ disease. Gold-standard treatment for UTUC remains NU, increasingly performed using minimally invasive surgery. Nomograms including pre- and post-operative variables can aid prognostication and guide further therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of "tumor-associated" nucleolar antigens in human urothelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Pietro, T; Jurco, S; Scardino, P T

    1987-09-01

    Nucleoli isolated from HeLa S3 cells were used to produce rabbit antisera capable of binding nucleoli of transitional cell carcinomas (TCCa) of the bladder. Cross-reactivity of the rabbit antiserum with normal nucleoli was reduced by absorption with fetal calf serum, normal human serum, and human placental nucleoli. This antinucleolar antiserum exhibited strong reactivity in immunoperoxidase assays performed on specimens of human bladder cancer. In frozen tissue sections of 24 patients with TCCa and eight individuals without tumor, nucleolar staining was observed in all malignant specimens, but was not observed in seven of the normal specimens. Cytologic examination of bladder washing specimens from 47 normal individuals showed absence of nucleolar staining in 43 (91%) of 47 normal specimens while 12 (86%) of 14 specimens from patients with TCCa were positive. These results suggest that there are antigens associated with the nucleoli of HeLa cells and transitional cell carcinomas which are generally absent (or in low concentration) in normal human urothelial cells, and that antisera to these antigens may be useful in the cytologic diagnosis of human transitional cell carcinoma.

  13. Intravesical therapy for urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher C. Chade

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB is a challenge for physicians and patients alike. This is largely due to the heterogeneous natural history of this disease, in which tumors range from indolent to rapidly progressive and eventually fatal. Moreover, the high rate of recurrence and progression cause significant morbidity, expense, and detriment to quality of life. The advent of effective and safe intravesical therapies has improved the management of non-muscle-invasive UCB. Nevertheless, despite over 30 years of research and clinical experience, the mechanism, risks, benefits, and optimal regimens and treatment algorithms remain unclear. Although immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG has been the mainstay of intravesical treatment and represents a significant advance in the interaction of immunology and oncology, its clinical effectiveness is accompanied by a wide range of adverse events. Here, we review the literature on intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy with the aim of evaluating the clinical utility of the different treatments and providing recommendations. Many studies over the years have compared efficacy and toxicities of different agents and regimens, and certain conclusions are now well supported by high-level evidence. Future perspectives and promising advances in drug development are discussed and areas of improvement are identified in order to promote better cancer control and decrease the rate and severity of side-effects.

  14. Pro- and Antiapoptotic Markers in Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma Associated with Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic-Velickovic, Ljubinka; Stojnev, Slavica; Ristic-Petrovic, Ana; Dolicanin, Zana; Hattori, Takanori; Mukaisho, Kenichi; Stojanovic, Mariola; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2011-01-01

    The role of aristolochic acid in the etiology of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and associated upper-tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) has been recently confirmed. The aim of this study was to determine apoptosis-related marker(s) specific for BEN-associated UTUC. Present investigation included 105 patients with UTUC, 44 from BEN region and 61 control tumors. Altered expression of Survivin was more often present in BEN UTUC with high grade and solid growth (P < 0.005; P < 0.05) than in control tumors. Significantly lower expression of proapoptotic marker Bax was found in BEN tumors with high grade, high stage, necrosis, and without metaplastic change (P < 0.05; 0.05; 0.05; 0.05) compared to control tumors with the same features. Group (BEN-related/control), stage, growth pattern, and caspase 3 activity were significantly associated with the expression of Bax (P = 0.002, 0.034, 0.047, 0.028, resp.,). This investigation identifies Bax as specific marker of BEN-associated UTUC. Decrease of pro-apoptotic protein Bax together with alteration of Survivin may be indicative for specific disturbances of intrinsic apoptotic pathway in UTUC arising in endemic areas. PMID:22125429

  15. Maintenance of bladder urothelia integrity and successful urothelialization of various tissue-engineered mesenchymes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhout, Sara; Tremblay, Julie; Bolduc, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    Tissue-engineering offers the opportunity to produce hybrid tissues in vitro. The induction of bladder urothelial cells (BUCs) differentiation in vitro has been assessed by several research groups to build bladder models for fundamental studies and clinical applications. However, BUC induction of advanced differentiation in culture remains a challenging task. To reach this goal, optimal culture conditions are required, notably the use of specific additives as well as proper mesenchymal support. The best positive control for BUCs functional state monitoring is native urothelium collected from healthy bladder samples. In order to establish the best culture conditions to maintain and promote BUC differentiated state, native urothelia were cultured on various mesenchymes. Native bladder mesenchymes were used as controls for the maintenance of native urothelia. Histological and ultrastructural analyses showed the necessity to have a cellularized mesenchyme for rapid formation of a pseudostratified urothelium, allowing apical membrane rearrangement of the superficial cells in culture. Taken together, the results strongly suggest that it is possible to conserve the integrity of urothelia in vitro and, thus, potentially use them for eventual clinical applications and pharmacological investigations.

  16. Parafibromin Staining Characteristics in Urothelial Carcinomas and Relationship with Prognostic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Serap; Yaman, Banu; Ozturk, Hakan; Kumbaraci, Banu Sarsik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Parafibromin is a recently defined tumor suppressor gene. The aim of our study was to determine the relationships of parafibromin expression in urothelial carcinomas (UCs) with prognostic parameters and to evaluate the use of parafibromin as a potential marker of UC. Methods: Parafibromin expression was assessed in 49 UC specimens using immunohistochemistry. The correlations between parafibromin expression and clinical and pathologic parameters were investigated. Results: Of the patients, 42 (85.7%) were male, and the mean age was 69.6 ± 8.2 years (range, 54 to 88 years). Morphologically, the UCs were divided into two groups: papillary (n = 27) and non-papillary (n = 22). There were seven low-grade (14.3%) and 42 high-grade (85.7%) tumors. Parafibromin was negative in 13 tumors (26.5%), partially positive in 19 tumors (38.8%), and positive in 17 tumors (34.7%). Parafibromin expression was more negative in UCs from upper urinary locations (n=17) and with muscularis propria invasion (n=28), which was statistically significant (p = .009 and p = .007, respectively). There was no statistically significant relationship between parafibromin expression and gender, age, tumor grade, survival, or disease-free survival. Conclusions: We found that UC cases with parafibromin positivity had less of a tendency to show muscularis propria invasion and were more commonly located in the lower urinary system. These results need to be confirmed with studies based on larger case series. PMID:26395176

  17. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Provide Significant Prognostic Information in Urothelial Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna M Boström

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important feature of carcinogenesis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs can be associated with either poor or improved prognosis, depending on their properties and polarization. Current knowledge of the prognostic significance of TAMs in bladder cancer is limited and was investigated in this study. We analyzed 184 urothelial bladder cancer patients undergoing transurethral resection of a bladder tumor or radical cystectomy. CD68 (pan-macrophage marker, MAC387 (polarized towards type 1 macrophages, and CLEVER-1/Stabilin-1 (type 2 macrophages and lymphatic/blood vessels were detected immunohistochemically. The median follow-up time was 6.0 years. High macrophage counts associated with a higher pT category and grade. Among patients undergoing transurethral resection, all studied markers apart from CLEVER-1/Stabilin-1 were associated with increased risk of progression and poorer disease-specific and overall survival in univariate analyses. High levels of two macrophage markers (CD68/MAC387+/+ or CD68/CLEVER-1+/+ groups had an independent prognostic role after transurethral resection in multivariate analyses. In the cystectomy cohort, MAC387, alone and in combination with CD68, was associated with poorer survival in univariate analyses, but none of the markers were independent predictors of outcome in multivariate analyses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that macrophage phenotypes provide significant independent prognostic information, particularly in bladder cancers undergoing transurethral resection.

  18. Characterization of HGF/Met Signaling in Cell Lines Derived From Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

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    Lee, Young H. [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Agarwal, Piyush K.; Bottaro, Donald P., E-mail: dbottaro@helix.nih.gov [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2014-11-25

    There is mounting evidence of oncogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. The effects of three kinase inhibitors, cabozantinib, crizotinib and EMD1214063, on HGF-driven signaling and cell growth, invasion and tumorigenicity were analyzed in cultured UC cell lines. SW780 xenograft growth in SCID and human HGF knock-in SCID (hHGF/SCID) mice treated with cabozantinib or vehicle, as well as tumor levels of Met and pMet, were also determined. Met content was robust in most UC-derived cell lines. Basal pMet content and effector activation state in quiescent cells were low, but significantly enhanced by added HGF, as were cell invasion, proliferation and anchorage independent growth. These HGF-driven effects were reversed by Met inhibitor treatment. Tumor xenograft growth was significantly higher in hHGF/SCID mice vs. SCID mice and significantly inhibited by cabozantinib, as was tumor phospho-Met content. These studies indicate the prevalence and functionality of the HGF/Met signaling pathway in UC cells, suggest that paracrine HGF may contribute to UC tumor growth and progression, and that support further preclinical investigation of Met inhibitors for the treatment of UC is warranted.

  19. Characterization of HGF/Met Signaling in Cell Lines Derived From Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young H. Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence of oncogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/Met signaling in urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder. The effects of three kinase inhibitors, cabozantinib, crizotinib and EMD1214063, on HGF-driven signaling and cell growth, invasion and tumorigenicity were analyzed in cultured UC cell lines. SW780 xenograft growth in SCID and human HGF knock-in SCID (hHGF/SCID mice treated with cabozantinib or vehicle, as well as tumor levels of Met and pMet, were also determined. Met content was robust in most UC-derived cell lines. Basal pMet content and effector activation state in quiescent cells were low, but significantly enhanced by added HGF, as were cell invasion, proliferation and anchorage independent growth. These HGF-driven effects were reversed by Met inhibitor treatment. Tumor xenograft growth was significantly higher in hHGF/SCID mice vs. SCID mice and significantly inhibited by cabozantinib, as was tumor phospho-Met content. These studies indicate the prevalence and functionality of the HGF/Met signaling pathway in UC cells, suggest that paracrine HGF may contribute to UC tumor growth and progression, and that support further preclinical investigation of Met inhibitors for the treatment of UC is warranted.

  20. Characterization of HGF/Met Signaling in Cell Lines Derived From Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young H; Apolo, Andrea B; Agarwal, Piyush K; Bottaro, Donald P

    2014-11-25

    There is mounting evidence of oncogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. The effects of three kinase inhibitors, cabozantinib, crizotinib and EMD1214063, on HGF-driven signaling and cell growth, invasion and tumorigenicity were analyzed in cultured UC cell lines. SW780 xenograft growth in SCID and human HGF knock-in SCID (hHGF/SCID) mice treated with cabozantinib or vehicle, as well as tumor levels of Met and pMet, were also determined. Met content was robust in most UC-derived cell lines. Basal pMet content and effector activation state in quiescent cells were low, but significantly enhanced by added HGF, as were cell invasion, proliferation and anchorage independent growth. These HGF-driven effects were reversed by Met inhibitor treatment. Tumor xenograft growth was significantly higher in hHGF/SCID mice vs. SCID mice and significantly inhibited by cabozantinib, as was tumor phospho-Met content. These studies indicate the prevalence and functionality of the HGF/Met signaling pathway in UC cells, suggest that paracrine HGF may contribute to UC tumor growth and progression, and that support further preclinical investigation of Met inhibitors for the treatment of UC is warranted.

  1. Artificial neural network in diagnosis of urothelial cell carcinoma in urine cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidaran, Chandrasekaran; Dey, Pranab; Nijhawan, Raje; Kakkar, Nandita

    2015-06-01

    To build up an artificial neural network (ANN) model in the diagnosis of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) in urine cytology smears. We randomly selected a total of 115 urine cytology samples, out of which 59 were histopathology proven UCC cases and remaining 56 were benign cases from routine cytology samples. All the carcinoma cases were proven on histopathology. Image morphometric analysis was performed on Papanicolaou's stained smears to study nuclear area, diameter, perimeter, standard deviation of nuclear area, and integrated gray density. Detailed cytological features were also studied in each case by two independent observers and were semi-quantitatively graded. The back propagation ANN model was designed as 17-11-3 with the help of heuristic search. The cases were randomly partitioned as training, validation, and testing sets by the program. There were 79 cases for training set, 18 cases for validation set and 18 cases for test set. In the training set, ANN was able to diagnose all the malignant and benign cases. In the test set, all the benign and malignant cases were diagnosed correctly. However, one of the low grade cases was diagnosed as high grade UCC by ANN model. We successfully built an ANN model in urine from the visual and morphometric data to identify the benign and malignant cases. In addition, the system can also identify the low grade and high grade UCC cases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Utilization and Outcomes of Nephroureterectomy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma by Surgical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Joseph F; Packiam, Vignesh T; Boysen, William R; Johnson, Scott C; Smith, Zachary L; Smith, Norm D; Shalhav, Arieh L; Steinberg, Gary D

    2017-07-01

    To compare outcomes and survival of open-, robotic-, and laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (ONU, RNU, LNU) using population-based data. Using the National Cancer Database, we identified patients who underwent nephroureterectomy for localized upper tract urothelial carcinoma between 2010 and 2013. Demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were compared among the three operative approaches. Multivariate regression analyses were used to determine the impact of approach on performance of lymphadenectomy (LND), positive surgical margins (PSM), and overall survival (OS). In total, there were 9401 cases identified for analysis, including 3199 ONU (34%), 2098 RNU (22%), and 4104 LNU (44%). From 2010 to 2013, utilization of RNU increased from 14% to 30%. On multivariate analysis, LND was more likely in RNU (odds ratio [OR] 1.52; p ONU. RNU was associated with decreased PSM compared with ONU (OR = 0.73; p = 0.04). After adjusting for other factors, OS was not significantly associated with surgical approach. RNU utilization doubled over the study period. While RNU was associated with greater likelihood of LND performance as well as lower PSM rates when compared with ONU and LNU, surgical approach did not independently affect OS.

  3. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  4. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. K.; Gupta, S.; Yoon, C.; Han, I.; Kim, H-S.; Choi, H.; Hong, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. Methods We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. Results The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137–143. PMID:28258117

  5. Hepatic mitochondrial function and brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliquen, Daniel L

    2007-07-01

    Therapeutic advances remain modest for patients with malignant brain tumours, due in part to inadequate ability of in-vitro models to mimic the consequences of tumour progression in vivo, which include profound immunosuppression, cytokine dysregulation and microvascular proliferation. This review summarizes recent findings on the wasting consequences of glioma growth, including changes in hepatic metabolism caused by the tumour. Release of proinflammatory cytokines by gliomas leads to anorexia, a sensation of tiredness and fatigue associated with sleep deprivation. The cachexia and associated decrease in relative liver mass that are observed in rats with the most aggressive gliomas may be accounted for by increased activity of the Cori cycle, with the intermediary metabolism of the glioma-influenced liver being directed toward energy utilization rather than energy storage. In these conditions, liver mitochondria exhibit abnormal biogenesis, together with modifications to water dynamics and ion content. Improved patient care will result from better understanding of the interactions between brain tumour cells and the immune system, and use of nutritional metabolic therapy to protect tumour-influenced hepatocytes and their mitochondria may improve outcomes.

  6. Imaging tumours of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, Asif [Department of Radiology, The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Brockley Hill, HA7 4LP, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Tumours of the brachial plexus are rare lesions and may be classified as benign or malignant. Within each of these groups, they are further subdivided into those that are neurogenic in origin (schwannoma, neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour) and those that are non-neurogenic. Careful pre-operative diagnosis and staging is essential to the successful management of these lesions. Benign neurogenic tumours are well characterized with pre-operative MRI, appearing as well-defined, oval soft-tissue masses, which are typically isointense on T1-weighted images and show the ''target sign'' on T2-weighted images. Differentiation between schwannoma and neurofibroma can often be made by assessing the relationship of the lesion to the nerve of origin. Many benign non-neurogenic tumours, such as lipoma and fibromatosis, are also well characterized by MRI. This article reviews the imaging features of brachial plexus tumours, with particular emphasis on the value of MRI in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Tumour-host dynamics under radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placeres Jimenez, Rolando, E-mail: rpjcu@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil); Ortiz Hernandez, Eloy [Centre of Medicine and Complexity, Medical University Carlos J. Finlay, Carretera Central s/n, Camagueey (Cuba)

    2011-09-15

    Highlight: > Tumour-host interaction is modelled by Lotka-Volterra equations. > A brief review of the motion integral and analysis of linear stability is presented. > Radiotherapy is introduced into the model, using a periodic Dirac delta function. > A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model. > It is shown that tumour can be controlled by a correct selection of therapy strategy. - Abstract: Tumour-host interaction is modelled by the Lotka-Volterra equations. Qualitative analysis and simulations show that this model reproduces all known states of development for tumours. Radiotherapy effect is introduced into the model by means of the linear-quadratic model and the periodic Dirac delta function. The evolution of the system under the action of radiotherapy is simulated and parameter space is obtained, from which certain threshold of effectiveness values for the frequency and applied doses are derived. A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model and used to simulate the effectiveness of radiotherapy in different regimens of tumour development. The results show the possibility of achieving a successful treatment in each individual case by employing the correct therapeutic strategy.

  8. TUMOUR CASE IN KOI CARP (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Sholichah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A case study of tumour in koi carp (Cyprinus carpio was observed in rearing periode. This tumour occurs solitary, large, pale red, fleshy masses under the lips and dental plates on the outside, and by reason of its size, may prevent closure the mouth. Moreover, this tumour goes through into the inside of the mouth. At necropsy, there were two soft, firm, small mass at inside of the mouth and the bigger mass at outside the mouth. Samples of this tumour were fixed in 10% formalin were used for histology analysis. The clinical course of the tumour is one of relatively slow but progressive growth. The proliferative stage of the neoplastic process is preceded and accompanied by a striking vascular reaction. Intensed hyperemia invariably occurs in that region of the mucosal surface which later becomes the site of neoplastic proliferation. Neoplastic cells lied around lamina propria and submucosal. These cells were joined together to make vacuolization and the other cells become pleiomorphism with hyperchromatic nucleus and N/C ratio cells are 1:1. In some area, there were many empty holes, around the holes there were debris cells, inflammation cells, and erythrocytes.

  9. A STUDY OF PITUITARY GLAND TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rame

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pituitary gland is known as the “Master Gland” of the body as it controls majority of the endocrine glands of the body. Embryologically, they are formed by two parts. There are two types of malignancies encountered namely adenomas and carcinomas. Vast majority of the neoplasms located in the sella turcica are benign pituitary adenomas derived from adenohypophyseal cells. The aim is to study the pituitary malignancies. METHODS The sample size included 100 cases of intra-cranial neoplasms that turned in the Department of Medicine in KVG Medical College, Sullia and different local private hospitals of Sullia and Mangalore. RESULTS Pituitary tumours comprised 6(6% of all the tumour studies. They occurred maximally in the age above 14 years. Tumours showed a male predominance. All the tumours were located in pituitary fossa. Principal presenting complaint was visual disturbance. Microscopically, the tumour was composed of small polyhedral to round cells with a uniform darkly staining round nucleus and scant eosinophilic cytoplasm. The cells formed papillary structures or were arranged in a trabecular pattern. CONCLUSION There is a male predominance in this study and the percentage of cases was found to be less in this region of Karnataka

  10. [Tumours of the upper cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández García, Borja Jesús; Isla Guerrero, Alberto; Castaño, Ana; Alvarez Ruiz, Fernando; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral tumours arising in the upper cervical spine are rare. We present our experience in managing these neoplasms. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of patients treated at our institution between January 2000 and June 2011. There were 9 patients with tumours in C1-C2-C3: 2metastases, 3chordomas, 2plasmocytomas, 1chondrosarcoma and 1osteochondroma. All patients complained of neck pain at the time of diagnosis. Three patients underwent an anterior and posterior approach, 3 an exclusively posterior approach and 3 an exclusively anterior surgical approach. Tumour resection was intralesional in 7 cases. Chemo-radiotherapy was used as adjuvant therapy in patients with malignant tumours. Vertebral tumours in the upper cervical spine are usually malignant. Achieving en bloc resection is particularly challenging and is technically unfeasible in many cases. This worsens the prognosis and makes adjuvant treatment very important. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. A STUDY OF OVARIAN TUMOURS : CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Devi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study incidence age distribution of benign and malignant ovarian tu mours in general population. METHODS AND MATERIAL : To study 120 patients with ovarian tumours in Govt . general hospital during June 2003 and June 2005. RESULTS: Clinical and pathological evaluation of all ovarian tumours was done and incidence, age distrib ution of various benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms were tabulated and compared with other studies. CONCLUSIONS: Most common ovarian tumours are benign tumours and serous cystadenoma is the commonest benign tumour and S erous cystadeno carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour.

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking Klatskin tumour on radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Sohail, Abdul Malik Amir Humza; Haider, Zishan

    2015-04-09

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is categorised into two distinct types, AIP type 1 and 2. Although there can be multisystem involvement, rarely, the cholangitis associated with AIP can present radiologically in a manner similar to that of Klatskin tumour. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who was almost misdiagnosed with a Klatskin tumour because of the similarity in radiological features of the two aforementioned clinical entities. The patient presented with a history of jaundice, pruritus and abdominal pain, and work up showed deranged liver function tests, elevated cancer antigen 19-9 levels and positive antinuclear antibodies. CT scan of the abdomen showed findings suggestive of Klatskin tumour but due to diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding low-attenuation halo found on a closer review, a diagnosis of AIP was performed. The patient was started on standard corticosteroid therapy and responded well, with complete resolution of the radiological findings.

  13. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Uozumi, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Kiya, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Mukada, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Arita, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Kurisu, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Sugiyama, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Onda, J. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Satoh, H. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Ikawa, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Migita, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  14. [Pigmented ciliary body tumours: benign or malignant?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Vicente, E; Saornil-Álvarez, M A; López-Lara, F; García-Álvarez, C; de Frutos-Baraja, J M; Díez-Andino, P

    2013-12-01

    We report the cases of 2 women with a pigmented tumour in the ciliary body, one a melanocytoma and the other a melanoma, with different clinical manifestations. The first one presented with decreased visual acuity associated with recent growth of the tumour, as well as sectorial opacities of the lens and subluxation. The second one is asymptomatic and has been kept under observation for more than 30 years. Although the definitive diagnosis of a pigmented tumour of the ciliary body is only achieved by the histopathology study, the group of clinical features is a determining factor when a conservative treatment is indicated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M;

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival.......The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  16. A case of a sporadic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the urinary bladder with concomitant in situ urothelial carcinoma treated by transuretheral resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Sari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST of the urinary bladder is a very rare clinical entity. The association of such a tumor with urothelial carcinoma is even more unusual. Differential diagnosis between coexisting two distinct primary tumors and carcinosarcoma of the urinary bladder is very important as both the treatment and prognosis vary widely. Herein, we report a case of an MPNST with a concomitant in situ urothelial carcinoma in a 53-year-old man. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of MPNST of the bladder that is treated by transuretheral resection which is in contrast with the previous reports that used cystectomy.

  17. Material Properties of Inorganic Bovine Cancellous Bovine: Nukbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, Cristina; Palma, Benito; Munguía, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    In this work, inorganic cancellous bovine bone implants prepared in the Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales — UNAM were characterized. Elementary chemical analysis was made, toxic elements concentration were measured and the content of organic matter also. These implants fulfill all the requirements of the ASTM standards, and therefore it is possible their use in medical applications.

  18. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our interpretation of HRMAS data and the translation of NMR tumour biomarkers to in-vivo studies. Results 1D and 2D 1H HRMAS NMR was used to determine that 29 small molecule metabolites, along with 8 macromolecule signals, account for the majority of the HRMAS spectrum of the main types of brain tumour (astrocytoma grade II, grade III gliomas, glioblastomas, metastases, meningiomas and also lymphomas. Differences in concentration of 20 of these metabolites were statistically significant between these brain tumour types. During the course of an extended 2D data acquisition the HRMAS technique itself affects sample analysis: glycine, glutathione and glycerophosphocholine all showed small concentration changes; analysis of the sample after HRMAS indicated structural damage that may affect subsequent histopathological analysis. Conclusions A number of small molecule metabolites have been identified as potential biomarkers of tumour type that may enable development of more selective in-vivo 1H NMR acquisition methods for diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumours.

  19. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  20. High dose radiotherapy for pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, K.W. (Queensland Radium Inst., Herston (Australia))

    1981-11-01

    The results of treatment of 120 pituitary tumours are presented. Based on this experience operable chromophobe adenomas are now treated with 5,000 rads in 4 weeks and inoperable ones receive an additional central dose to 7,500 rads. Pituitary Cushing's tumours are given 10,000 rads in 5 weeks using small fields and acromegalics 5,000 rads to the whole sella and 7,500 to its lower half. The absence of complications at these dose levels is attributed to the use of small fields and the precise application of treatment.

  1. How to express tumours using membrane systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miguel A. Gutiérrez-Naranjo; Mario J. Pérez-Jiménez; Agustín Riscos-Nú(n)ez; Francisco J. Romero-Campero

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the potential usefulness of membrane systems as tools for modelling tumours. The approach is followed both from a macroscopic and a microscopic point of view. In the first case, one considers the tumour as a growing mass of cells,focusing on its external shape. In the second case, one descends to the microscopic level, studying molecular signalling pathways that are crucial to determine if a cell is cancerous or not. In each of these approaches we work with appropriate variants of membrane systems.

  2. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  3. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bremmer Felix

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP, human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA, and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335

  4. Cytokeratin 15 marks basal epithelia in developing ureters and is upregulated in a subset of urothelial cell carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangping Tai

    Full Text Available The mammalian ureter contains a water-tight epithelium surrounded by smooth muscle. Key molecules have been defined which regulate ureteric bud initiation and drive the differentiation of ureteric mesenchyme into peristaltic smooth muscle. Less is known about mechanisms underlying the developmental patterning of the multilayered epithelium characterising the mature ureter. In skin, which also contains a multilayered epithelium, cytokeratin 15 (CK15, an acidic intermediate filament protein, marks cells whose progeny contribute to epidermal regeneration following wounding. Moreover, CK15+ precursor cells in skin can give rise to basal cell carcinomas. In the current study, using transcriptome microarrays of embryonic wild type mouse ureters, Krt15, coding for CK15, was detected. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses confirmed the initial finding and demonstrated that Krt15 levels increased during the fetal period when the ureteric epithelium becomes multilayered. CK15 protein was undetectable in the ureteric bud, the rudiment from which the ureter grows. Nevertheless, later in fetal development, CK15 was immunodetected in a subset of basal urothelial cells in the ureteric stalk. Superficial epithelial cells, including those positive for the differentiation marker uroplakin III, were CK15-. Transformation-related protein 63 (P63 has been implicated in epithelial differentiation in murine fetal urinary bladders. In wild type fetal ureters, CK15+ cells were positive for P63, and p63 homozygous null mutant ureters lacked CK15+ cells. In these mutant ureters, sections of the urothelium were monolayered versus the uniform multilayering found in wild type littermates. Human urothelial cell carcinomas account for considerable morbidity and mortality. CK15 was upregulated in a subset of invasive ureteric and urinary bladder cancers. Thus, in ureter development, the absence of CK15 is associated with a structurally simplified urothelium whereas

  5. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in plasmacytoid variant of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda D; Chaux, Alcides; Al-Hussain, Turki; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Bezerra, Stephania Martins; Hicks, Jessica; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2013-04-01

    Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma is a rare but aggressive variant of bladder cancer with no clear therapeutic guidelines. Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been linked to oncogenesis in conventional bladder cancer. Several antineoplastic agents targeting mTOR pathway are currently available. This study assesses mTOR pathway status as well as c-myc and p27 expression. We retrieved 19 archival cases of plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma from two institutions. Whole tissue sections were evaluated for immunoexpression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), phosphorylated mTOR, phosphorylated protein kinase B (AKT), phosphorylated S6, c-myc, and p27. We evaluated intensity (0 to 3+) and extent (0%-100%) of expression for all markers. An H score was calculated as the sum of products of intensity and extent for each marker and used during analysis. In addition, PTEN loss was defined as absence of expression in >10% of tumor cells. We encountered PTEN loss in 28%. Higher H score for nuclear phosphorylated AKT and a lower H score for phosphorylated S6 was encountered in muscle invasive tumors compared to non-muscle invasive tumors (P = .007 and P = .009, respectively). Although a trend for negative prognostic impact on overall survival for higher phosphorylated mTOR expression was noted (P = .051), markers expression levels failed to predict survival in our cohort. We found dysregulation of mTOR pathway members in urinary bladder plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma, suggesting that the use of mTOR pathway inhibitors might be beneficial for patients with this aggressive tumor.

  6. Coupled modeling of tumour angiogenesis, tumour growth,and blood perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a more realistic mathematical simulation method to investigate the dynamic process of tumour angio-genesis by fully coupling the vessel growth,tumour growth and associated blood perfusion.The tumour growth and angiogenesis are coupled by the chemical microenvironment and the cell-matrix interaction.The haemodynamic calculation is carried out on the new vasculature,and an estimation of vessel collapse is made according to the wall shear stress criterion.The results are consistent with phy...

  7. Phenotypic impact of deregulated expression of class I histone deacetylases in urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira-Neto, Susana; Vieira, Filipa Q; Montezuma, Diana; Costa, Natália R; Antunes, Luís; Baptista, Tiago; Oliveira, Ana Isabel; Graça, Inês; Rodrigues, Ângelo; Magalhães, José S; Oliveira, Jorge; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Deregulated expression of histone deacetylases (HDACs) has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Herein, we investigated class I HDACs expression in bladder urothelial cell carcinoma (BUCC), its prognostic value and biological significance. Significantly increased transcript levels of all HDACs were found in BUCC compared to 20 normal mucosas, and these were higher in lower grade and stage tumors. Increased HDAC3 levels were associated with improved patient survival. SiRNA experiments showed decrease cell viability and motility, and increased apoptosis. We concluded that class I HDACs play an important role in bladder carcinogenesis through deregulation of proliferation, migration and apoptosis, constituting putative therapeutic targets.

  8. [Clinical use of the ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) tests for urothelial carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodde, Michele; Mian, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades years, we have witnessed the propagation and marketing of numerous diagnostic tests capable of detecting, in the urine of patients, the presence of urothelial tumor markers. Among None of the different markers studied to date , no one has been able to meet all the requirements of the ideal marker. We present and discuss below we discuss the results reported in the literature of about two tests approved by the Food and Drug Administration [ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH)], which have been and commercially available for about 10 years., ImmunoCyt/uCyt + and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH).

  9. Evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall obtained by transurethral intravesical echotomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Radovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the most frequent tumor of the bladder and represents 95−98% of blader neoplasams and 2−3% of all carcinomas in the body. In urogenital oncology more frequent is only prostatic cancer. Evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall represents the clinical base in treatment planning and prognosis. Clinical investigation and convential radiological procedures have a low level of accuracy in estimating the local growth of the tumor. The aims of our investigation were to determine the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall in the investigated group of patients by transurethral intravesical echotomography (TIE and computerised tomography (CT scan and to compare results obtained by both methods with pathohistological (PH results, and, based on the difference of the results determine which method was more accurate in the evaluation of the depth of infiltration of urothelial carcinoma in the vesical wall. Methods. Thirty patients with TCC of the bladder both genders, aged 51−81 years were involved in our investigation. In all of these patients, radical cystectomy (RC was performed. This was neccessary to provide the defintive PH result. Transurethral intravesical echotomography was performed by ultrasound scanner type 1846 Bruel and Kjaer, sond type 1850, and the CT scan was perfomed by Pace plus, General Electric, U.S.A. The specimen for the definitive PH result obtained by RC includes all standards of the TNM classification. Results. Using CT scan, the most frequent was T1 stage (17 patients or 56.68%. Using TIE, the most frequent was T2 stage (22 patients or 73.33%. After RC the most frequent was T2 stage (21 patients or 70%. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, showed a high significant difference between the results obtained using CT and definitive PH results after RC. The same test showed no statistically significant difference between

  10. Diprosopia em bovino Bovine diprosopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.T. Rotta

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a malformation in one newborn female bovine, with two faces and two skull fused, showing one single head. Duplications of the nasal and oral structures, tetraofthalmy, two brains, one single cerebellum, and pons were observed. The right thyroid was hypertrophic and the other organs had normal morphology. Every change observed in this case was compatibles with diprosopus.

  11. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Somerville, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep has not been identified under natural conditions at the time of writing and remains a hypothetical issue. However, rumours about the possible finding of a BSE-like isolate in sheep have led to great unrest within the sheep industry, among the general p

  12. tumours and cancers in graeco-roman times 1. introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Graeco-Roman times all tumours (Greek: onkoi, abnormal swellings) were consi- dered to be of ... of tumours is a more recent concept, barely two centuries old. In Hippocratic litera- ..... Ancient and medieval chemotherapy for cancer.

  13. Ovarian hilus-cell tumour: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, T N; Valkov, I M; Dokumov, S I

    1980-01-01

    A case of hilus-cell tumour of the ovary, associated with polycystic ovarian disease is reported. The authors discuss the data from hormonal investigations, the morphological picture and the genesis of the tumour.

  14. Carcinoid Klatskin tumour: A rare cause of obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Suhail; Rashid, Arshad; Bali, Rajandeep Singh; Mushtaque, Majid; Khuroo, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours of the extrahepatic biliary ducts represent an extremely rare cause of bile duct obstruction. We report a case of obstructive jaundice secondary to carcinoid tumour arising at the hilar confluence. Resection of the primary tumour was done and the patient is doing well on follow-up. This case demonstrated that surgery offers the only potential cure for biliary carcinoid and aggressive surgical therapy should be the preferred treatment in cases of potentially resectable biliary tumours.

  15. [Biotherapy of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.P.; Knigge, U.

    2008-01-01

    Biotherapy of hormonal symptoms and tumour growth is a mainstay in the therapy of metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Symptomatic relief can be achieved by somatostatin analogues and interferon, either alone or in combination. The effect on tumour growth...... is less convincing although a stabilization of disease is recorded in almost 50% of patients. Interferon treatment should mainly be considered for tumours with a low proliferation index Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  16. PHOSPHATURIC MESENCHYMAL TUMOUR ASSOCIATED WITH OSTEOMALACIA : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour is a tumour that can involve bone or soft tissue. This is a rare tumour and is known to be associated with osteomalasia. This is caused by tumour induced expression of fibroblastic growth factor (FGF23. We present a case of PMT in a 72 year old female patient who was diagnosed with osteomalasia due to nutritional deficiency of vitamin D and was appropriately treated but later presented with a mass in her foot.

  17. Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein, Sarah Linéa; Coupland, Sarah E; Briscoe, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    of the lacrimal gland, displacement of the eyeball, reduced eye motility and diplopia. Pain and symptoms of short duration before the first ophthalmic consultation are characteristic of malignant tumours. The histological diagnosis determines the subsequent treatment regimen and provides important clues regarding...

  18. Platinum compounds with anti-tumour activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plooy, A.C.M.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Ten platinum (Pt) coordination complexes with different ligands, comprising both Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes of which the cis-compounds all possessed at least some anti-tumour activity and the trans-compounds were inactive, were tested as to their effect on cell survival and the induction and repair

  19. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as gastroduodenal intussusception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2012-08-01

    Gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumour is a very rare cause for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and intermittent. This article reports a case where the diagnosis was made preoperatively with abdominal imaging and was treated by a combination of endoscopic reduction and laparoscopic resection.

  1. Childhood ovarian juvenile granulosa cell tumour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-05-12

    May 12, 2012 ... years old of age. We describe a case ... Juvenile granulosa cell tumour a subtype of ovarian stro- mal cell ... A more serious estrogen effects can occur in various end ... usually behave in a benign manner despite having histo-.

  2. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohle, PNM; Wurzer, HAL; Seelen, PJ; Kingma, LM; Go, KG

    1999-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural schwannom

  3. Bone scintigraphy (B S) in testicle tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, F.J.H.N.; Arbex, M.A.; Souza, J.F.; Haddad, J. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Testicle tumours are not very frequent and radiotherapy has an important role in the cure of many patients. The detection of metastases is not an easy task and we do not know any study concerning B S in the search for bone metastases in such cases. We studied 28 patients (8-52 years old) with proven testicle tumours by means of 99 m Tc-M D P (750 MBq intravenously). Images were obtained 2 h after. B S was normal in 21 studies. In 7 evaluations the only abnormality we found was variable but diffuse involvement of the iliac bone on the same side as the affected testicle. Five out of these patients showed important uptake of M D P (4 seminoma and 1 epididymoma) and the 2 others showed moderate uptake of the radio pharmaceutical (2 seminoma). Metastases were confirmed by biopsy. Testicle tumour metastases are known to occur through the lymphatic drainage which goes to the iliac lymph node chain and this makes our findings very logical. The scintigraphic aspect of the affected iliac bone is characteristic and makes it possible to imagine an `iliac sign` for such cases. Early detection of metastases is very important because of radiotherapy efficacy and B S may play an important role in such cases. Testicle tumour metastases should be thought of when this scintigraphic aspect is seen. Differential diagnosis is Paget`s Disease

  4. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P;

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) wer...

  5. Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Terkivatan (Türkan); M. Kliffen (Mike); J.H.W. de Wilt (Johannes); A.N. van Geel (Albert); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); C. Verhoef (Kees)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm that most frequently affects the pleura, although it has been reported with increasing frequency in various other sites such as in the peritoneum, pericardium and in non-serosal sites such as lung parenchyma,

  6. Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Tavares, Anthony J.; Dai, Qin; Ohta, Seiichi; Audet, Julie; Dvorak, Harold F.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to malignant tissues for improved diagnosis and therapy is a popular concept. However, after surveying the literature from the past 10 years, only 0.7% (median) of the administered nanoparticle dose is found to be delivered to a solid tumour. This has negative consequences on the translation of nanotechnology for human use with respect to manufacturing, cost, toxicity, and imaging and therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we conduct a multivariate analysis on the compiled data to reveal the contributions of nanoparticle physicochemical parameters, tumour models and cancer types on the low delivery efficiency. We explore the potential causes of the poor delivery efficiency from the perspectives of tumour biology (intercellular versus transcellular transport, enhanced permeability and retention effect, and physicochemical-dependent nanoparticle transport through the tumour stroma) as well as competing organs (mononuclear phagocytic and renal systems) and present a 30-year research strategy to overcome this fundamental limitation. Solving the nanoparticle delivery problem will accelerate the clinical translation of nanomedicine.

  7. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  8. The role of methylation in urological tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.G. van der

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation have been described in human cancer for more than thirty years now. Since the last decade DNA methylation gets more and more important in cancer research. In this review the different alterations of DNA methylation are discussed in testicular germ cell tumours, Wilms't

  9. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  10. Granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph von Klot

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With only 16 cases reported in the literature, the mostly benign granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder is exceptionally rare. We present the case of a 68-year old patient with one of these lesions demonstrating our histological findings including several immunohistochemical stainings used to differentiate between other more common entities.

  11. ARID1A immunohistochemistry improves outcome prediction in invasive urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Sheila F; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Munari, Enrico; Ellis, Carla; Driscoll, Tina; Schoenberg, Mark P; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Shih, Ie-Ming; Netto, George J

    2014-11-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is tumor suppressor gene that interacts with BRG1 adenosine triphosphatase to form a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling protein complex. Inactivation of ARID1A has been described in several neoplasms, including epithelial ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, and has been correlated with prognosis. In the current study, ARID1A expression in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder and its association with clinicopathological parameters and outcome are addressed. Five tissue microarrays were constructed from 136 cystectomy specimens performed for UC at our institution. Nuclear ARID1A staining was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. An H-score was calculated as the sum of the products of intensity (0-3) multiplied by extent of expression (0%-100%). Average H-score per case was used for statistical analysis. ARID1A expression was categorized in low and high using Youden index to define the cut point. ARID1A expression significantly increased from normal to noninvasive UC to invasive UC. For both tumor progression and cancer death, Youden index yielded an H-score of 288 as the optimal cut point for ARID1A expression. Low ARID1A expression showed a tendency for lower risk of tumor progression and cancer mortality. Adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features offers a better model for predicting outcome than pathologic features alone. Low ARID1A expression was more frequently seen in earlier stage disease. There was a tendency for low ARID1A expression to predict better outcome. More importantly, the findings indicate that adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features increases the goodness of fit of the predictive model.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of hTERT in urothelial lesions: a potential adjunct to urine cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalbuss Walid

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urine cytology has a critical role in evaluation for bladder carcinoma. Due to the low sensitivity of this technique, ancillary modalities such as the detection of markers of malignancy by immunochemistry are desirable. Promising factors in this context are components of the human telomerase enzyme complex. Telomerase repairs and extend telomeres, which when eroded beyond a critical limit trigger a senescence checkpoint. Accordingly, while absent in normal somatic cells, telomerase activity has been detected in the great majority of malignant tumor specimens tested, and so has potential value for the recognition of malignant cells in clinical specimens. Methods In this study, we investigated whether the immunohistochemical detection of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT can aid cytology in the diagnosis of bladder lesions. Findings from the retrospective evaluation of over 100 cell blocks, including urine sediments from confirmed malignant and benign conditions, were compared with routine urine cytology data. Results The presence of hTERT protein was indicative of the transformation of urothelia to a malignant phenotype. Nucleolar hTERT was expressed in 27 (93% of 29 samples obtained from patients with confirmed primary bladder cancer. Conversely, hTERT was detectable in only 3 (0.8% of 39 samples from benign conditions. The hTERT assay showed higher diagnostic sensitivity (84.8% than published urine cytology data (~65% for confirmed bladder carcinoma, however, the hTERT assay was less specific than cytology (65.2% vs. ~95% respectively. Conclusion As a highly sensitive marker, immunohistochemical hTERT detection in urine sediments represents a reliable adjunct to cytology in the accurate diagnosis of urothelial neoplasms.

  13. Influence of positive surgical margin status after radical nephroureterectomy on upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Pierre; Ouzzane, Adil; Yates, David R; Audenet, François; François, Audenet; Pignot, Géraldine; Arvin-Berod, Alexis; Merigot de Treigny, Olivier; Laurent, Guy; Valeri, Antoine; Irani, Jacques; Jacques, Irani; Saint, Fabien; Gardic, Solène; Gres, Pascal; Rozet, François; Neuzillet, Yann; Ruffion, Alain; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2012-10-01

    The influence of a positive surgical margin (PSM) on survival outcome of post radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUT-UC) is unclear. The objectives of this study were to determine the significance of PSM on cancer-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and metastasis-free survival (MFS) post RNU. From a multicenter collaborative database, data on SM status, stage, grade, lymph node status, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), tumor location, follow-up, and survival was retrieved for 472 patients. Patients underwent open RNU with bladder cuff excision. Clinicopathological features were compared using χ(2) or Fisher exact test and unpaired t test for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were calculated. Median follow-up was 27.5 months (12.1-49.3 months). PSM was identified in 44 patients (9.3%) and correlated with pT stage (p = 0.002), grade (p < 0.001), LVI (p < 0.001), and location (p < 0.001). Univariate analyses revealed that PSM was a poor prognostic factor for CSS, RFS, and MFS (p = 0.003, 0.04, and <0.001, respectively). The 5-yr CSS and MFS for PSM was 59.1 and 51.6%, respectively, compared with 83.3 and 79.3% for patients with negative SM. Multivariate analyses revealed that SM status was an independent predictor of MFS [hazard ratio 2.7; p = 0.001). PSM after RNU is an important prognostic factor for developing UUT-UC metastases. The status of the surgical margin should be systematically reported on the pathological report and may be a useful variable to include in nomogram risk prediction tools.

  14. Dose-Dependent Response to 3-Nitrobenzanthrone Exposure in Human Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Mario; Verma, Nisha; Zerries, Anna; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2017-09-28

    A product of incomplete combustion of diesel fuel, 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), has been classified as a cancer-causing substance. It first gained attention as a potential urinary bladder carcinogen due to the presence of its metabolite in urine and formation of DNA adducts. The aim of the present study was to characterize the dose-response relationship of 3-NBA in human urothelial cancer cell line (RT4) exposed to concentrations ranging from 0.0003 μM (environmentally relevant) to 80 μM by utilizing toxicological and metabolomic approaches. We observed that the RT4 cells were capable of bioactivation of 3-NBA within 30 min of exposure. Activity measurements of various enzymes involved in the conversion of 3-NBA in RT4 cells demonstrated NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) as the main contributor for its bioactivation. Moreover, cytotoxicity assessment exhibited an initiation of adaptive mechanisms at low dosages, which diminished at higher doses, indicating that the capacity of these mechanisms no longer suffices, resulting in increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, reduced proliferation, and hyperpolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane. To characterize the underlying mechanisms of this cellular response, the metabolism of 3-NBA and metabolomic changes in the cells were analyzed. The metabolomic analysis of the cells (0.0003, 0.01, 0.08, 10, and 80 μM 3-NBA) showed elevated levels of various antioxidants at low concentrations of 3-NBA. However, at higher exposure concentrations, it appeared that the cells reprogrammed their metabolism to maintain the cell homeostasis via activation of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP).

  15. Tissue engineering of urethra using human vascular endothelial growth factor gene-modified bladder urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yong; Ou, Lailiang; Hu, Gang; Wang, Hongjun; Xu, Yong; Chen, Jiatong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Yaoting; Kong, Deling

    2008-02-01

    Acquired or congenital abnormalities may lead to urethral damage or loss, often requiring surgical reconstruction. Urethrocutaneous fistula and strictures are common complications, due to inadequate blood supply. Thus, adequate blood supply is a key factor for successful urethral tissue reconstruction. In this study, urethral grafts were prepared by seeding rabbit bladder urothelial cells (UCs) modified with human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF(165)) gene in the decellularized artery matrix. A retroviral pMSCV-VEGF(165)-GFP vector was cloned by insertion of VEGF open reading frame into the vector pMSCV-GFP (murine stem cell virus [MSCV]; green fluorescent protein [GFP]). Retrovirus was generated using package cell line 293T. Rabbit UCs were expanded ex vivo and modified with either MSCV-VEGF(165)-GFP or control MSCV-GFP retrovirus. Transduction efficiency was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The expression of VEGF(165) was examined by immunofluorescence, reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Decellularized rabbit artery matrix was seeded with genetically modified UCs and was subsequently cultured for 1 week prior to subcutaneous implantation into nude mice. Four weeks after implantation, the implants were harvested and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, and by histologic and immunohistochemical staining. Ex vivo transduction efficiency of UCs was greater than 50% when concentrated retrovirus was used. The modified cells expressed both VEGF and GFP protein. Furthermore, the VEGF-modified UCs secreted VEGF in a time-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy and histochemical analysis of cross sections of the cultured urethral grafts showed that the seeded cells were attached and proliferated on the luminal surface of the decellularized artery matrix. In the subcutaneously implanted vessels, VEGF-modified cells significantly enhanced neovascularization and the

  16. Metabolic coupling in urothelial bladder cancer compartments and its correlation to tumor aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L.; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    abstract Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are vital for intracellular pH homeostasis by extruding lactate from highly glycolytic cells. These molecules are key players of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, and evidence indicates a potential contribution in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) aggressiveness and chemoresistance. However, the specific role of MCTs in the metabolic compartmentalization within bladder tumors, namely their preponderance on the tumor stroma, remains to be elucidated. Thus, we evaluated the immunoexpression of MCTs in the different compartments of UBC tissue samples (n = 111), assessing the correlations among them and with the clinical and prognostic parameters. A significant decrease in positivity for MCT1 and MCT4 occurred from normoxic toward hypoxic regions. Significant associations were found between the expression of MCT4 in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma. MCT1 staining in normoxic tumor areas, and MCT4 staining in hypoxic regions, in the tumor stroma and in the blood vessels were significantly associated with UBC aggressiveness. MCT4 concomitant positivity in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma, as well as positivity in each of these regions concomitant with MCT1 positivity in normoxic tumor cells, was significantly associated with an unfavourable clinicopathological profile, and predicted lower overall survival rates among patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Our results point to the existence of a multi-compartment metabolic model in UBC, providing evidence of a metabolic coupling between catabolic stromal and cancer cells’ compartments, and the anabolic cancer cells. It is urgent to further explore the involvement of this metabolic coupling in UBC progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26636903

  17. Sunitinib in urothelial cancer: clinical, pharmacokinetic, and immunohistochemical study of predictors of response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, David J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Sunitinib has activity in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer (UC), but most patients do not respond. OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of response to sunitinib. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-seven patients with advanced UC received sunitinib on one of two schedules at a single institution. Blood pressure (BP), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and pharmacokinetic (PK) results were correlated with response to sunitinib. MEASUREMENTS: BP was assessed on day 1 and 28 of each cycle and on day 14 of cycle 1. IHC was performed on 55 samples from 38 cases using mammalian target of rapamycin and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway marker antibodies. Blood samples for PK analysis were collected from 15 patients at three time points. Response was assessed using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Sunitinib-induced hypertension predicted improved response when hypertension was categorized as a discrete (p = 0.02) or continuous variable (p = 0.005 [systolic BP] and p = 0.007 [diastolic BP]). The odds ratio of response was 12.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.95-246.8) for grade 3\\/4 hypertension compared with grade 0. Response was associated with low HIF-1alpha expression in primary (p = 0.07) tissue. A nonstatistically significant trend was seen for an association between greater drug concentration and best response. A correlation between expression markers within the same pathways was identified, phosphorylated-4EBP1 and phosphorylated-S6 (p = 6.5 x 10(-9)), and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and HIF-1alpha (p = 0.008). Results are limited by small numbers. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical and molecular biomarkers of response to sunitinib may have clinical relevance and require prospective validation. There is an urgent need for predictive biomarkers to guide the management of UC.

  18. Prognostic implications of preoperative anemia in urothelial carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fei; Wang, Ya-Shen; Su, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Sun, Hong-Hong; Li, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic significance of preoperative anemia (PA) has been identified in various malignancies. However, its predictive role in urothelial carcinoma (UC) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of PA in UC patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the association between PA and survival outcome in UC patients. Electronic databases were searched up to June 30, 2016. Study characteristics and prognostic data were extracted from each included study. Cancer-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were pooled using hazard ratio (HR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Herein, 12 studies comprising 3815 patients were included in the meta-analysis. There were 1593 (41.76%) patients in the PA group and 2222 (58.24%) in the control group. The overall pooled HRs of PA for CSS, RFS, and OS were significant at 2.21, (95% CI: 1.83–2.65, Pheterogeneity = 0.49, I2 = 0%), 1.87 (95% CI: 1.59–2.20, Pheterogeneity = 0.22, I2 = 28%), and 2.04(95% CI: 1.76–2.37, Pheterogeneity = 0.36, I2 = 9%) respectively. Stratified analyses indicated that PA was a predictor of poor prognosis based on ethnicity, sample size, tumor T stage, G grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), concomitant carcinoma in situ (CIS), and follow-up values. Our findings show that PA has negative prognostic effects on the survival outcome (CSS, RFS, and OS) in UC patients and can serve as a useful and cost-effective marker to aid prognosis prediction. PMID:28182725

  19. [Oncological outcomes of laparoscopic and open treatment (nephroureterectomy) for urothelial tumors of the upper urinary tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrecchiano, Giuseppe; Delle Cave, Aldo; Tripodi, Vincenzo; De Fortuna, Enrico; Quaranta, Antonio; Attanasi, Franco; Salzano, Luigi

    2012-12-30

    Currently, the treatment of choice in urothelial tumors of the upper urinary tract is nephroureterectomy (NU) as an Open procedure (ONU), though the laparoscopic treatment is now routinely performed as a minimally invasive therapy (LNU). LNU has demonstrated oncologic safety at least equivalent to open, but some issues dealing with cancer still remain. We retrospectively analyzed data from 36 LNU performed between 2006 and 2010, compared with data of 32 ONU performed in 2002-2005 (pre-laparoscopy era). The mean follow-up was 23 months in patients undergoing LNU and 42 months for those treated with ONU. In particular, we evaluated cancer recurrence, the site of recurrence and survival rates. We had local recurrence in 3 patients (8.3%) after LNU and 2 after ONU (6.25%). 2 patients who underwent LNU (5.5%) died of metastatic disease at 9 and 12 months; 3 patients who underwent ONU (9.3%) died of metastasis at 12, 16 and 23 months, respectively. Bladder recurrence was observed in 3 patients after ONU and in 4 after LNU. The most frequent sites of cancer recurrence were: local recurrence (3 LUN, 2 ONU), 1 laparoscopic port recurrence, 3 regional lymph node recurrences (2 LNU, 1ONU), bladder recurrences (3 LNU, 4 ONU). There were no significant differences in disease recurrence and even survival rates at 1 and 3 years were not very different between the two techniques. The grade and stage of cancer affecting the incidence of metastatic disease, as well as the localization of early disease (pelvis-ureter-both) is a negative prognostic factor, rather than the surgical technique used. Therefore, there is no evidence that the control is compromised in cancer patients treated with LNU rather than with ONU.

  20. Cytomorphological characteristics of low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma for differential diagnosis from benign papillary urothelial lesions: logistic regression analysis in SurePath(™) liquid-based voided urine cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y R; Won, J K; Park, I A; Moon, K C; Chung, S Y; Lee, K; Ryu, H S

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma (LGPUC) in urine cytology specimens is challenging because of its subtle, minimally atypical findings. Furthermore, as SurePath(™) liquid-based cytology (LBC) is becoming a widely used method in urine cytology, the inevitable cytomorphological alterations resulting from this technique call for new morphological diagnostic criteria in LGPUC. Logistic regression analysis was carried out on SurePath slides from surgically proven voided urine specimens. The study was designed to include a test set (n = 141) and a validation set (n = 61), and evaluated significant discriminative parameters between LGPUC and benign papillary urothelial neoplasm (BPUN). Of the seven cytological findings that were found to have statistical significance in univariate analysis, five were found to be independent variables: loss of polarity of papillaroid clusters, irregular contours, absence of columnar cells, hobnail features and hyperchromasia. These independent variables had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.781. The distinctive cytological criteria identified above may prove to be helpful in cases in which other conventional criteria for LGPUC are insufficient for diagnosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Tumour and tumour-like lesions of the patella - a multicentre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.; James, S.L.; Davies, A.M. [The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kroon, H.M. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, C-2-S, P. O Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Anderson, S.E. [Knochentumor- Referenzzentrum der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft fuer Pathologie, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    Fifty-nine cases of lesions presenting in the patella were identified after review of the databases of four European bone tumour registries. Of the 59 cases, 46% were non neoplastic, 39% were benign and 15% were malignant. The commonest benign neoplasm was giant cell tumour (GCT) (11 cases). Younger patients were more likely to have a benign neoplasm. Lesions in patients less than 40 years of age included giant cell tumour, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), osteomyelitis, osteoid osteoma and solitary bone cyst. In patients older than 40 years, the following were common lesions: intra-osseous gout, metastasis and intra-osseous ganglion. Expansion of the patella with thinning of cortex was seen more commonly in GCT and brown tumour in hyperparathyroidism. There was associated soft tissue extension in gout and malignant lesions. (orig.)

  2. The mechanical microenvironment in cancer: How physics affects tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Rowan, Alan E; Span, Paul N

    2015-12-01

    The tumour microenvironment contributes greatly to the response of tumour cells. It consists of chemical gradients, for example of oxygen and nutrients. However, a physical environment is also present. Apart from chemical input, cells also receive physical signals. Tumours display unique mechanical properties: they are a lot stiffer than normal tissue. This may be either a cause or a consequence of cancer, but literature suggests it has a major impact on tumour cells as will be described in this review. The mechanical microenvironment may cause malignant transformation, possibly through activation of oncogenic pathways and inhibition of tumour suppressor genes. In addition, the mechanical microenvironment may promote tumour progression by influencing processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing cell survival through autophagy, but also affects sensitivity of tumour cells to therapeutics. Furthermore, multiple intracellular signalling pathways prove sensitive to the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. It appears the increased stiffness is unlikely to be caused by increased stiffness of the tumour cells themselves. However, there are indications that tumours display a higher cell density, making them more rigid. In addition, increased matrix deposition in the tumour, as well as increased interstitial fluid pressure may account for the increased stiffness of tumours. Overall, tumour mechanics are significantly different from normal tissue. Therefore, this feature should be further explored for use in cancer prevention, detection and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relevance of high-dose chemotherapy in solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; de Vries, EGE; Mulder, NH; van der Graaf, WTA

    2005-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of solid tumours. Based on a steep dose-response relationship for especially alkylating agents on tumour cell survival, high-dose chemotherapy was considered of interest for the treatment of solid tumours. Results of phase 1 and 2 studies with high

  4. [Malignant germinal tumours of the mediastinum: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarié, E

    2004-11-01

    Mediastinal germinal tumours are composed of tissues resembling those that follow one another during embryo development, by differentiation of the primordial and extraembryonic layers. Such practice separates the mature teratomas (benign), seminomas and non-seminomatous germinal tumours (NSGT). Platin-based chemotherapy has shattered the prognosis of such tumours.

  5. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...

  6. Improved classification, diagnosis and prognosis of canine round cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cangul, Taci

    2001-01-01

    As the name suggests, canine round cell tumour (RCTs) are composed of cells with a round morphology. There is some discrepancy amongst authors as to which tumours belong to this category, but most designate lymphomas, melanomas, plasmacytomas, transmissible venereal tumours (TVTs), histiocytomas, an

  7. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors.

  8. 77 FR 15847 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... more than 150 tissue and bodily fluid samples are collected from each animal and analyzed by... been fed ruminant protein, other than milk protein, during their lifetime; The bovines from which the... from animals that are not known to have been fed ruminant protein, other than milk protein,...

  9. Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in patients with brain tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, P.A. [Depts. of Oncology and Clinical Neurosciences, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Weaver, S. [Depts. of Neurology and Medicine, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York (United States); Fulton, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and Dept. of Medicine/Neurology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    We conducted a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants in brain tumour patients (without prior seizures) reduced seizure frequency. We stopped accrual at 100 patients on the basis of the interim analysis. One hundred newly diagnosed brain tumour patients received anticonvulsants (AC Group) or not (No AC Group) in this prospective randomized unblinded study. Sixty patients had metastatic, and 40 had primary brain tumours. Forty-six (46%) patients were randomized to the AC Group and 54 (54%) to the No AC Group. Median follow-up was 5.44 months (range 0.13 -30.1 months). Seizures occurred in 26 (26%) patients, eleven in the AC Group and 15 in the No AC Group. Seizure-free survivals were not different; at three months 87% of the AC Group and 90% of the No AC Group were seizure-free (log rank test, p=0.98). Seventy patients died (unrelated to seizures) and survival rates were equivalent in both groups (median survival = 6.8 months versus 5.6 months, respectively; log rank test, p=0.50). We then terminated accrual at 100 patients because seizure and survival rates were much lower than expected; we would need {>=}900 patients to have a suitably powered study. These data should be used by individuals contemplating a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants are effective in subsets of brain tumour patients (e.g. only anaplastic astrocytomas). When taken together with the results of a similar randomized trial, prophylactic anticonvulsants are unlikely to be effective or useful in brain tumour patients who have not had a seizure. (author)

  10. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H P M Habets

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects.

  11. RNF43 is a tumour suppressor gene mutated in mucinous tumours of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Georgina L; Hunter, Sally M; Doyle, Maria A; Rowley, Simone M; Christie, Michael; Allan, Prue E; Bowtell, David D L; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2013-02-01

    Mucinous carcinomas represent a distinct morphological subtype which can arise from several organ sites, including the ovary, and their genetic characteristics are largely under-described. Exome sequencing of 12 primary mucinous ovarian tumours identified RNF43 as the most frequently somatically mutated novel gene, secondary to KRAS and mutated at a frequency equal to that of TP53 and BRAF. Further screening of RNF43 in a larger cohort of ovarian tumours identified additional mutations, with a total frequency of 2/22 (9%) in mucinous ovarian borderline tumours and 6/29 (21%) in mucinous ovarian carcinomas. Seven mutations were predicted to truncate the protein and one missense mutation was predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. Six tumours had allelic imbalance at the RNF43 locus, with loss of the wild-type allele. The mutation spectrum strongly suggests that RNF43 is an important tumour suppressor gene in mucinous ovarian tumours, similar to its reported role in mucinous pancreatic precancerous cysts.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of tumour cell proliferation and intratumoural microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sennazli Gulbin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between different histological types and grades of canine malignant mammary tumours, tumour cell proliferation and their angiogenic activity using immunohistochemical markers. Mammary tissue samples from 47 bitches with mammary cancer were evaluated. The expression of cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 and endothelial marker Von Willebrand’s factor (vWF were immunohistochemically demonstrated. The tumours with the highest Ki-67 and vWF expressions were found to share similar histomorphological features. Simple solid carcinoma had the highest levels of Ki-67, vWF, and higher histological grade while complex carcinomas, osteosarcomas, and carcinosarcomas had the lowest ones. The differences between the expressions of Ki-67 and vWF in different tumour types were considered to be of great importance in determination of biological behaviour and prognosis of these tumours. This study is one of the few studies that evaluate these differences among the subtypes of malignant canine mammary tumours

  13. Loss of FOXA1 Drives Sexually Dimorphic Changes in Urothelial Differentiation and Is an Independent Predictor of Poor Prognosis in Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Opal L; Cates, Justin M; Gellert, Lan L;

    2015-01-01

    We previously found loss of forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) expression to be associated with aggressive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, as well as increased tumor proliferation and invasion. These initial findings were substantiated by The Cancer Genome Atlas, which identified FOXA1 mutations...

  14. Genome-wide methylation profiling and the PI3K-AKT pathway analysis associated with smoking in urothelial cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brait, Mariana; Munari, Enrico; LeBron, Cynthia; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Begum, Shahnaz; Michailidi, Christina; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Maldonado, Leonel; Sen, Tanusree; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Cope, Leslie; Parrella, Paola; Fazio, VitoMichele; Ha, Patrick K.; Netto, George J.; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad O.

    2013-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is the second most common genitourinary malignant disease in the USA, and tobacco smoking is the major known risk factor for UCC development. Exposure to carcinogens, such as those contained in tobacco smoke, is known to directly or indirectly damage DNA, causing muta

  15. Can we improve the biopsy quality of upper urinary tract urothelial tumors? Single-center preliminary results of a new biopsy forceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Saeed M; Legraverend, Dorian; Gil-Diez de Medina, Sixtina; Sibony, Mathilde; Traxer, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the biopsy quality of upper urinary tract urothelial transitional cell carcinoma with a new biopsy forceps (BIGopsy®, Cook Medical) compared to a classic biopsy forceps (Piranha®, Boston Scientific). From December 2009 to December 2011, 20 patients with upper urinary tract urothelial transitional cell carcinoma underwent conservative treatment endoscopically. All lesions were evaluated and biopsied with 3 Fr cup forceps using both types of forceps (BIGopsy and Piranha). A single pathologist blindly analyzed the specimens in order to determine the optimal biopsy for each patient. Specimen histopathology results were graded; however, they were staged if the lamina propria was not invaded (T1) or if the tumor was detected at the lamina propria (T1+). Of the 20 upper urinary tract lesions, 12 (60%) were in the renal pelvis, 3 (15%) in the upper calyx, 1 (5%) in the middle calyx, 1 (5%) in the lower calyx, 1 (5%) in the upper third of the ureter and 2 (10%) in the middle third of the ureter. We did not detect T1 in all biopsies. One patient had no valid biopsies by both forceps. A diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma was made in 17 BIGopsy biopsies compared to 7 Piranha biopsies. Despite the limited number of cases, our study demonstrated the advantage of the new forceps (BIGopsy) in obtaining a valid biopsy of upper urinary tract urothelial tumors. Therefore, we recommend it in evaluating this pathology for optimal treatment. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The genetic difference between Western and Chinese urothelial cell carcinomas: infrequent FGFR3 mutation in Han Chinese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Liu, Tiantian; Ge, Nan; Kong, Feng; Yang, Liu; Björkholm, Magnus; Fan, Yidong; Zhao, Shengtian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) includes urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), renal pelvic carcinoma (RPC) and ureter carcinoma (UC), and its incidence varies dependent on geographical areas and tumor locations, which indicates different oncogenic mechanisms and/or different genetic susceptibility/environment exposure. The activating mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent genetic events in UCCs. These mutations have clinical utilities in UCC initial diagnostics, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and management. However, the vast majority of the results are obtained from studies of UCC patients in Western countries, and little has been known about these in Han Chinese patients. In the present study, we screened the FGFR3 gene and TERT promoter for mutations in 116 UBC, 91 RPC and 115 UC tumors from Han Chinese patients by using Sanger Sequencing. TERT promoter mutations occurred at a high frequency in these UCC patients, comparable with that seen in Western patients, however, the FGFR3 mutation was surprisingly lower, only 9.4% for UBCs, 8.8% for RPCs and 2.6% for UCs, respectively. Taken together, the FGFR3 gene is an infrequent target in the pathogenesis of Han Chinese UCCs, and its mutation detection and targeted therapy have limited clinical utility in these patients. Our results underscore the need for extensive characterization of cancer genomes from diverse patient populations, thereby contributing to precision medicine for cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:27029078

  17. Multi-Detector row CT urography on a 16-row CT scanner in the evaluation of urothelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsili, A.C. [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Clinical Radiology, Ioannina (Greece); University of Ioannina, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Efremidis, S.C.; Tsampoulas, C. [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Clinical Radiology, Ioannina (Greece); Kalef-Ezra, J. [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Medical Physics, Ioannina (Greece); Giannakis, D.; Sofikitis, N. [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Urology, Ioannina (Greece); Alamanos, Y. [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of multi-detector row CT urography (MDCTU), on a 16-row CT scanner in the evaluation of patients with painless hematuria, with emphasis placed in the detection of urothelial tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the MDCT urographies of 75 patients, referred for painless hematuria. The CT protocol included unenhanced images, obtained with a detector configuration of 16 x 1.5 mm and pitch of 1.2, nephrographic and excretory-phase images, obtained with a detector collimation of 16 x 0.75 mm and pitch of 1.2. Axial and coronal reformatted images were evaluated. Three-dimensional reformation of the excretory-phase images was performed using the volume-rendering technique. The standard of reference included clinical and imaging follow-up, cystoscopic, surgical and histologic findings. In 55 (73%) of 75 patients, the cause of hematuria was identified on MDCTU; the most common cause was urothelial cancer, including seven tumors with a diameter equal or smaller than 0.5 cm in diameter. Sixteen-row MDCTU provided satisfactory results in the investigation of patients with painless hematuria. The main advantage of the technique is its ability to detect uroepithelial malignancies. (orig.)

  18. Increased urothelial cell detection in the primary bladder smooth muscle cell cultures with dual MACS/qRT-PCR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheimer, Chistopher W; Guthrie, Kelly I; Shokes, Jacob E; Bruce, Andrew T; Quinlan, Sarah F; Sangha, Namrata; Ilagan, Roger M; Basu, Joydeep; Burnette, Teresa; Ludlow, John W

    2011-03-01

    Bladder tissue has been regenerated in humans with neurogenic bladder using an implant produced from autologous urothelial (UC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) expanded from bladder biopsies seeded onto a biodegradable synthetic scaffold. As the majority of bladder cancers are urothelial carcinomas (aka, transitional cell carcinoma), this 2-cell type autologous sourcing strategy presents significant challenges to product development. Entire bladders have been regenerated in cystectomized animals using a single-cell-type sourcing strategy: implants were seeded with bladder-derived SMC-only. Applying the bladder SMC-only sourcing strategy to produce clinical implants for bladder replacement or urinary diversion in bladder cancer patients requires methods for screening SMC cultures for the presence of potentially cancerous UC cells to provide evidence of SMC culture purity before seeding the scaffold. In this report, we show a 10-fold to 100-fold improvement in the sensitivity of qualitative and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)-based assays for detecting UC positive for Cytokeratin 5 (CK5) in mixed SMC/UC cultures when the cell population was first subjected to magnetic activated cell sorting to enrich for cells expressing the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (known as EPCAM or CD326), a marker known to be present in normal UC and upregulated in the cancerous UC.

  19. Geographic Variation of Chronic Kidney Disease Prevalence: Correlation with the Incidence of Renal Cell Carcinoma or Urothelial Carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yit-Sheung Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD exist and are associated with incidence rates of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC, or lower tract urothelial carcinoma (LTUC. Methods. Prevalence rates of late-stage CKD for 366 townships (n>30 in Taiwan were calculated for 1,518,241 and 1,645,151 subjects aged 40 years or older in years 2010 and 2009, respectively. Late-stage CKD prevalence in year 2010 was used as a training set and its age-adjusted standardized morbidity rates (ASMR were divided into three groups as defined <1.76%, 1.76% ≤ ASMR < 2.64%, and ≥2.64%, respectively. Year 2009, defined as the validation set, was used to validate the results. Results. The ASMR of late-stage CKD in years 2010 and 2009 were 1.76%, and 2.09%, respectively. Geographic variations were observed, with notably higher rates of disease in areas of the central, southwestern mountainside, and southeastern seaboard. There were no significant differences among different combined risk groups of RCC, UTUC, and LTUC incidence. Conclusion. The substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage CKD exist, but are not correlated with RCC, UTUC, or LTUC incidence.

  20. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nicolas, E-mail: simplissimus@gmx.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Goeke, Friederike, E-mail: Friederike.goeke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Splittstoesser, Vera, E-mail: Veri.sp@web.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte, E-mail: Lankatbu@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Internal Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); Mueller, Stefan C., E-mail: Stefan.mueller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Ellinger, Joerg, E-mail: Joerg.ellinger@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2-T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  1. Pulmonary tumours in the Netherlands : focus on temporal trends in histology and stage and on rare tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, W. K.; Schaapveld, M.; Blaauwgeers, J. L. G.; Groen, H. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent temporal trends in histology and stage of pulmonary tumours in the Netherlands were studied. The incidence of rare pulmonary tumours was determined. Methods: All tumours originating from the trachea, bronchus and lung recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry were included. Base

  2. Differences in the epigenetic regulation of MT-3 gene expression between parental and Cd+2 or As+3 transformed human urothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajjimaporn Amornpan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that metallothionein 3 (MT-3 is not expressed in normal urothelium or in the UROtsa cell line, but is expressed in urothelial cancer and in tumors generated from the UROtsa cells that have been transformed by cadmium (Cd+2 or arsenite (As+3.The present study had two major goals. One, to determine if epigenetic modifications control urothelial MT-3 gene expression and if regulation is altered by malignant transformation by Cd+2 or As+3. Two, to determine if MT-3 expression might translate clinically as a biomarker for malignant urothelial cells released into the urine. Results The histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 induced MT-3 mRNA expression in both parental UROtsa cells and their transformed counterparts. The demethylating agent, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZC had no effect on MT-3 mRNA expression. ChIP analysis showed that metal-responsive transformation factor-1 (MTF-1 binding to metal response elements (MRE elements of the MT-3 promoter was restricted in parental UROtsa cells, but MTF-1 binding to the MREs was unrestricted in the transformed cell lines. Histone modifications at acetyl H4, trimethyl H3K4, trimethyl H3K27, and trimethyl H3K9 were compared between the parental and transformed cell lines in the presence and absence of MS-275. The pattern of histone modifications suggested that the MT-3 promoter in the Cd+2 and As+3 transformed cells has gained bivalent chromatin structure, having elements of being "transcriptionally repressed" and "transcription ready", when compared to parental cells. An analysis of MT-3 staining in urinary cytologies showed that a subset of both active and non-active patients with urothelial cancer shed positive cells in their urine, but that control patients only rarely shed MT-3 positive cells. Conclusion The MT-3 gene is silenced in non-transformed urothelial cells by a mechanism involving histone modification of the MT-3 promoter. In contrast, transformation of the

  3. Carotid body tumours. A 20-year single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalainas, Ilias; Nano, Giovanni; Casana, Renato; Bianchi, Paolo; Stegher, Silvia; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this single-institution retrospective study was to review the surgical outcomes of resection of carotid body tumours over the last 20 years in our hospital. From January 1985 to December 2004, 17 patients were admitted to our institution with carotid body tumours. All patients were treated by surgical resection of the tumour. No perioperative deaths occurred. Perioperative comorbidities were more frequent in patients with large carotid body tumours intimately associated with the carotid vessels. Surgical excision of carotid body tumours is safe and effective even in the long term.

  4. Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumour: Correlation of Histopathology with Clinicopathologic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian steroid cell tumours (not otherwise specified are rare neoplasms of the ovary and are classified under lipid cell tumours. Their diagnosis can be considered as one of exclusion. Histopathologically, the tumour should carefully be evaluated for microscopic features of malignancy, but it is essential for the clinician and the pathologist to remember that in these tumours, pathologically benign histomorphology does not exclude the possibility of clinically malignant behaviour. Our case study focuses on the comparative findings in a postmenopausal female diagnosed with an ovarian steroid tumour (not otherwise specified. A careful correlation between clinical and surgical evaluation and microscopic analysis is necessary, as is a regular followup.

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression on urothelial and inflammatory cells of cystoscopic biopsies and urine cytology as a possible predictive marker for bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mona; Omran, Zeinab; Nosseir, Mona; Lotfy, Abeya; Swellam, Tarek

    2009-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key inducible enzyme involved in the production of prostaglandins. It contributes to human carcinogenesis by various mechanisms. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the possible involvement of COX-2 in human bladder carcinoma by examining its expression on both urothelial and inflammatory cells in tissue biopsies and urine cytology samples of different urinary bladder lesions. A total of 65 patients were included in the study and were selected from cases admitted to Urology Department, Theodor Bilharz Research Institute (TBRI), Giza, Egypt. They represented seven control cases with almost normal-looking bladder tissue; pure chronic cystitis (n=12); premalignant lesions (18) in the form of squamous metaplasia (n=8) or urothelial dysplasia (n=10) as well as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) (n=18), and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) (n=10). Immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections and urine cytology samples was performed for all cases using COX-2 (H-62): sc-7951, a rabbit polyclonal antibody. The study revealed positive COX-2 expression on the urothelial and inflammatory cells of cystoscopic biopsies from all cases of pure chronic cystitis, squamous metaplasia and SqCC compared with 42.8% and 71.4% of normal controls, respectively. The score of urothelial COX-2 expression was sequentially up-regulated from normal to chronic cystitis (either pure or associated with premalignant changes) (pUrine cytology samples were positive for COX-2 in a comparable manner to that observed in cystoscopic biopsies. Accordingly, the results of the current study have provided new information in two aspects: First, is the possibility of using the differential COX-2 expression on both inflammatory and urothelial cells as markers for premalignant or malignant transformation; second, besides cystoscopy, urine cytology was found to have a high sensitivity for COX-2 expression and hence proved to be valuable in

  6. Long-term exposure to cigarette smoke extract induces hypomethylation at the RUNX3 and IGF2-H19 loci in immortalized human urothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is the single most important epidemiological risk factor for bladder cancer but it is not known whether exposure of urothelial cells to the systemic soluble contents of cigarette smoke is directly causative to bladder cancer and the associated epigenetic changes such as tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation. We undertook this study to investigate if long-term treatment of human urothelial cells with cigarette smoke extract (CSE results in tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation, a phenotype that was previously associated with long-term constant CSE treatment of airway epithelial cells. We chronically treated an immortalized human urothelial cell line UROtsa with CSE using a cyclic daily regimen but the cells were cultured in CSE-free medium between daily treatments. Bisulfite sequencing and real-time PCR array-based methylation profiling were employed to evaluate methylation changes at tumor suppressor gene loci in the chronically CSE-treated cells versus the passage-matched untreated control cells. The RUNX3 tumor suppressor gene promoter was hypomethylated with a significant increase in proportion of the completely unmethylated haplotype after the long-term CSE treatment; whereas RUNX3 promoter hypermethylation was previously reported for bladder cancers of smokers. Hypomethylation induced by the long-term CSE treatment was also observed for the IGF2-H19 locus. The methylation status at the PRSS8/prostasin and 16 additional loci however, was unaffected by the chronic CSE treatment. Transient CSE treatment over 1 daily regimen resulted in transcriptional down-regulation of RUNX3 and H19, but only the H19 transcription was down-regulated in the chronically CSE-treated urothelial cells. Transcription of a key enzyme in one-carbon metabolism, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR was greatly reduced by the long-term CSE treatment, potentially serving as a mechanism for the hypomethylation phenotype via a reduced supply of methyl donor

  7. Bovine cysticercosis situation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Augusto Marques Rossi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The taeniasis-cysticercosis complex is a long known zoonotic parasitosis characteristic of underdeveloped countries. In addition to its public health significance, this parasitosis is cause of economic losses to the beef production chain, and synonymous of technical inadequacy in relation to the adoption of Good Agricultural Practices. The occurrences of both human teniasis and bovine cysticercosis could and should be controlled with basic sanitary measures. However, there is much variation in the occurrence of the disease in cattle, characterizing a low rate of technical development as well as problems related to the adoption of basic sanitation measures. This review describes, in details, the causative agent and its epidemiological chain, besides raising current information about the occurrence of bovine cysticercosis in different regions of Brazil, aiming at the adoption of prophylactic measures by different segments responsible.

  8. Oral and maxillofacial tumours in children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Tanaka, N; Sato, T; Amagasa, T

    1997-04-01

    This retrospective review presents our experience of oral and maxillofacial tumours in children. The subjects were 250 children under the age of 15 years (out of a total of 2747 patients with oral and maxillofacial tumours), who were treated after histopathological confirmation of their diagnoses during the 28 years 1965-92. Diagnosis, incidence, and age at presentation were the main outcome measures and the results showed that 232 patients (93%) had benign tumours and 18 (7%) were malignant. The most common benign tumour was haemangioma (n = 69) and the most common malignant tumour sarcoma (n = 14). The most common odontogenic tumour was odontoma (n = 47) and non-odontogenic tumour ossifying fibroma (n = 5). The most common site of soft tissue tumours was the tongue (n = 65) and of bony tumours the mandible (n = 62). About a third of the tumours developed in patients between the ages of 6 and 11 years. Most of the angiomas developed in patients less than 6 years old, and most of the ameloblastomas in those over 12 years of age. Children accounted for 55% of patients with lymphangoma, 41% of those with odontoma, and 22% of those with haemangioma. It is concluded that most of these lesions were probably developmental malformations rather than neoplasms, and that the definition of oral and maxillofacial tumours in children should be reconsidered.

  9. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour.

  10. Tumour microvesicles contain retrotransposon elements and amplified oncogene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaj, Leonora; Lessard, Ryan; Dai, Lixin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells release an abundance of microvesicles containing a selected set of proteins and RNAs. Here, we show that tumour microvesicles also carry DNA, which reflects the genetic status of the tumour, including amplification of the oncogene c-Myc. We also find amplified c-Myc in serum microvesicles from tumour-bearing mice. Further, we find remarkably high levels of retrotransposon RNA transcripts, especially for some human endogenous retroviruses, such as LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposon elements, in tumour microvesicles and these transposable elements could be transferred to normal cells. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of tumour microvesicles to include: elevated levels of specific coding and non-coding RNA and DNA, mutated and amplified oncogene sequences and transposable elements. Thus, tumour microvesicles contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer. PMID:21285958

  11. Perinatal tumours: the contribution of radiology to management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, Veronica; Ryan, Stephanie; Twomey, Eilish [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-06-15

    A formal classification does not exist and they are probably best classified by their location. Overall the most common neoplasms are - Extracranial teratoma - Neuroblastoma - Soft-tissue tumours - Brain tumours - Leukaemia - Renal tumours - Liver tumours - Retinoblastoma. The prognosis is generally poor, although there are some exceptions such as congenital neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma. These tumours have a tendency to regress and have a benign clinical course despite a clear malignant histological picture. Other tumours, though histologically benign, may be fatal because of their size and location. Large benign masses may cause airway or cardiovascular compromise and death. Others may cause significant mass effect preventing normal organ development. As normal embryonic cells have a high mitotic rate it is not surprising that perinatal tumours may have a rapid growth rate and become enormous in size. (orig.)

  12. Primary Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour of Pleura: First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumours of pleura are the most common malignant tumours causing malignant pleural effusion. Lungs are the most common primary sites. Primary pleural tumours are rarely seen and diffuse malignant mesothelioma is the most common malignant tumour of pleura. Primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura is not reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare case of primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura in a fifty-two-year-old, nonsmoker female who presented with right-sided pleural effusion and ipsilateral, dull aching chest pain. Clinical presentations of inflammatory lesions like tuberculous pleuritis and benign and malignant neoplasms of pleura are indistinguishable; hence, fluid cytology, pleural biopsy, and immunohistochemistry are necessary for exact tissue diagnosis of the tumours, which is mandatory for correct treatment and prognostic assessment.

  13. Enhanced thermal stability of lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase in parenchymal cells of tumour bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, L; Lipari, M; Lombardi, D; Zicari, A; Dotta, A; Pontieri, G M

    1986-12-01

    The thermal stability of the enzyme beta-D-galactosidase varies among different organs in normal C57Bl/6 mice, and increases in the same organs in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma. Thermal stability of this enzyme is also increased by treatment of the mice with cell-free extracts of tumour cells or with inflammatory compounds such as carrageenan or orosomucoid. After desialylation, orosomucoid more effectively increases the heat stability of the enzyme. By contrast talc, which has no galactosyl groups, is without effect on the stability of the enzyme in vivo. Macrophages of tumour bearing mice release into the culture medium a more heat resistant enzyme than macrophages from control mice. In both cases the heat resistance of the secreted enzyme is higher when fetal calf serum is present in the culture medium. Bovine serum does not modify the thermal stability of beta-D-galactosidase in this system. Incubation of lysosomal fractions of various organs with the synthetic beta-D-galactosidase substrate, p-nitrophenyl-galactopyranoside, also strongly increases the heat resistance of the enzyme. The results suggest that one factor influencing the heat resistance of this enzyme may be complex formation between the enzyme and its substrates, an example of substrate protection of the enzyme. This may not be the only factor involved in enzyme stabilization in vivo.

  14. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M H; Brightman, A H; Fenwick, B W; Rider, M A

    1998-01-01

    The economic impact of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) warrants continued investigation of the mechanisms by which Moraxella bovis survives on and colonizes the corneal surface. Virulent strains of M bovis produce hemolysin and exhibit different plasmid profiles than nonvirulent strains. Interactions among host, environment, vector, season, and concurrent infection influence the prevalence of IBK. Mycoplasma sp. or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus may enhance or hasten the disease process. The manifestations of IBK may range from mild conjunctivitis to severe ulceration, corneal perforation, and blindness. Treatment of IBK is dictated by economic considerations, intended animal use, and feasibility of administration. Antibiotic therapy is aimed at achieving drug concentrations in tears to meet or exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration for prolonged periods. At present, IBK is not a preventable disease. Affected animals must be separated from the herd and vector control vigorously instituted. Carrier animals must be identified and removed from the herd. Vaccination trials have been unsuccessful because of pili antigen cross-reactivity, variable strains, and uncontrolled environmental factors. Recent investigations have determined that M bovis may utilize host iron sources via iron-repressible outer membrane proteins and siderophores for growth. Elucidation of normal defense mechanisms of the bovine eye may lead to new strategies to enhance the immune response against M bovis.

  15. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies.

  16. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  17. Endometrial stromal sarcoma: a rare tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Pal Kaur

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS are rare endometrial tumours arising from stroma of endometrium i.e. connective tissue of endometrium rather than glands. Usually a pre-operative diagnosis is difficult. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is main line of treatment. Adjuvant hormone therapy in the form of progesterones, GnRH analogues, aromatase inhibitors are effective for prevention of recurrences as these tumours are invariably positive for oestrogen & progesterone receptors. Surgical excision, radiotherapy, hormone therapy are recommended for recurrences. We report a 52 yrs widow with undifferentiated endometrial stromal sarcoma weighing 3.75 kg with a short history of 3 months diagnosed only after histopathology. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(1.000: 276-278

  18. Electrochemotherapy for rat implanted liver tumour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The most common interventional therapies for liver cancer at present include transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization (TACE),1 percutaneous ethanol injection2 and radiofrequency ablation,3 but all these therapies have some intrinsic disadvantages. Since the advent of electrochemo- therapy (EChT), it has been accepted as a safe and effective therapy for malignant tumors4,5 There are only a few experimental studies reporting the use of EChT in the treatment of liver cancer in the foreign medical literature.6-8 However, there have been some clinical studies, and even fewer reports of experimental studies on EChT for liver cancer in China. We used a rat implanted liver cancer animal model to monitor changes in tumour size, tumour necrosis, cellular apoptosis, expression of peripheral immunological markers (IL-2, sIL-2R, IL-6 and TNF-α) and survival.

  19. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, J; Madan, R; Singh, L; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Roy, S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare variety of soft tissue sarcoma that originates from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of neural crest origin. They have historically been difficult tumours to diagnose and treat. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with a goal to achieve negative margins. Despite aggressive surgery and adjuvant therapy, the prognosis of patients with MPNST remains poor. MPNST arising from penis is a very rare entity; thus, it presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present a case of penile MPNST in a 38-year-old man in the absence of neurofibromatosis treated with surgery followed by post-operative radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions and adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and adriamycin.

  20. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented as cavernous sinus tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moona, Mohammad Shafi; Mehdi, Itrat

    2011-12-01

    A 32 year Libyan male presented with the complaints of headache and diplopia. He was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma on the basis of MRI findings but no initial biopsy was taken. Depending on the radiologic diagnosis the patient was treated with gamma knife surgery twice, abroad. During follow up he developed left ear deafness and left cervical lymph adenopathy. An ENT evaluation with biopsy from the nasopharynx and cervical lymph node was taken. The histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumour showed a nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis (poorly differentiated lympho-epithelial carcinoma). The cavernous sinus tumour which was initially treated as a meningioma was in fact metastasis from the nasopharyngeal carcinoma, making this an interesting and rare occurrence.

  1. SPECT/CT and tumour imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abikhzer, Gad [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    Scintigraphic techniques are sensitive imaging modalities in the diagnosis and follow-up of cancer patients providing the functional and metabolic activity characteristics of the tumour. Hybrid SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic accuracy of these well-established imaging techniques by precise anatomical localization and characterization of morphological findings, differentiation between foci of physiological and pathological tracer uptake, resulting in a significant impact on patient management and more definitive interpretations. The use of SPECT/CT has been studied in a variety of applications in tumour imaging which are reviewed in this article. By combining functional and anatomical information in a single imaging session, SPECT/CT has become a one-stop cancer imaging modality. (orig.)

  2. Tumour Debulking for Esophageal Cancer - Thermal Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fleischer

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer usually is discovered at a late stage and curative therapy seldom is possible. The prognosis is poor and most therapy is palliative. Endoscopic therapy commonly is employed; two common treatments involve thermal modalities. The Nd:YAG laser has been employed for 10 years and is effective in relieving obstruction in approximately 90% of cases. Re-ohstruction usually occurs in two to three months and repeat treatment may be necessary. Limitations to laser use include the fact that equipment is expensive and there are technical restrictions. An alternative thermal modality is the bipolar coagulation tumour probe which employs bipolar electrocoagulation. It is less expensive and, if the tumour is circumferential, tends to be easier to use. (It should not be used if the cancer is noncircumferential. The advantages and limitations of each modality are addressed.

  3. The hypoxic tumour microenvironment and metastatic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subarsky, Patrick; Hill, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumours contains regions of poor oxygenation and high acidity. Growing evidence from clinical and experimental studies points to a fundamental role for hypoxia in metastatic progression. Prolonged hypoxia increases genomic instability, genomic heterogeneity, and may act as a selective pressure for tumour cell variants. Hypoxia can also act in an epigenetic fashion, altering the expression of genes. Hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression alter non-specific stress responses, anaerobic metabolism, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cell-cell contacts. Experimental studies have demonstrated that inhibition of proteins involved in these processes can modify metastasis formation, suggesting a causal role in metastatic progression. Recent advances in high-throughput screening techniques have allowed identification of many hypoxia-induced genes that are involved in the processes associated with metastasis. Here we review the epigenetic control of gene expression by the hypoxic microenvironment and its potential contribution to metastatic progression.

  4. COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, D P

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.

  5. [De novo tumours of renal transplants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hétet, J F; Rigaud, J; Dorel-Le Théo, M; Láuté, F; Karam, G; Blanchet, P

    2007-12-01

    Kidney cancer occurs rarely and late in renal transplants. The lack of grafts and the increasing age of the cadaver donors are likely to result in an increasing number of such cancers. To date, the treatment of choice is the transplant removal. Nevertheless partial nephrectomy may be discussed in selected cases. Ultrasonographic screening should allow detection of low volume tumours suitable for partial nephrectomy. Alternative techniques (radiofrequency, cryoablation) are to be assessed in such patients.

  6. Bovine Chymosin: A Computational Study of Recognition and Binding of Bovine κ-Casein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, David S.; Christensen, Anders Uhrenholt; Sørensen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Bovine chymosin is an aspartic protease that selectively cleaves the milk protein κ-casein. The enzyme is widely used to promote milk clotting in cheese manufacturing. We have developed models of residues 97-112 of bovine κ-casein complexed with bovine chymosin, using ligand docking, conformational...

  7. Influence of urothelial or suburothelial cholinergic receptors on bladder reflexes in chronic spinal cord injured cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Timothy D; Kim, Kyoungeun A; Daugherty, Stephanie L; Roppolo, James R; Tai, Changfeng; de Groat, William C

    2016-11-01

    The effects of intravesical administration of a muscarinic receptor agonist (oxotremorine-M, OXO-M) and antagonist (atropine methyl nitrate, AMN) and of a nicotinic receptor agonist (nicotine) and antagonist (hexamethonium, C6) on reflex bladder activity were investigated in conscious female chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) cats using cystometry. OXO-M (50μM) decreased bladder capacity (BC) for triggering micturition contractions, increased maximal micturition pressure (MMP), increased frequency and area under the curve of pre-micturition contractions (PMC-AUC). Nicotine (250μM) decreased BC, increased MMP, but did not alter PMC-AUC. The effects of OXO-M on BC and PMC-AUC were suppressed by intravesical administration of AMN (50-100μM), and the effects of nicotine were blocked by hexamethonium (1mM). Antagonists infused intravesically alone did not alter reflex bladder activity. However, AMN (0.2mg/kg, subcutaneously) decreased PMC-AUC. 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg, s.c.), a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, suppressed the OXO-M-induced decrease in BC but not the enhancement of PMC-AUC. These results indicate that activation of cholinergic receptors located near the lumenal surface of the bladder modulates two types of reflex bladder activity (i.e., micturition and pre-micturition contractions). The effects may be mediated by activation of receptors on suburothelial afferent nerves or receptors on urothelial cells which release transmitters that can in turn alter afferent excitability. The selective action of nicotine on BC, while OXO-M affects both BC and PMC-AUC, suggests that micturition reflexes and PMCs are activated by different populations of afferent nerves. The selective suppression of the OXO-M effect on BC by 8-OH-DPAT without altering the effect on PMCs supports this hypothesis. The failure of intravesical administration of either AMN or hexamethonium alone to alter bladder activity indicates that cholinergic receptors located near the lumenal surface do not

  8. Trends in the utilization of imaging for upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anand; Vemana, Goutham; Bhayani, Sam; Baty, Jack; Vetter, Joel; Strope, Seth A

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the changes in use of the different imaging modalities for diagnosing upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and assess how these changes have affected tumor stage at the time of surgery. We assessed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and linked Medicare claims data (1992-2009) for 5377 patients who underwent surgery for UTUC. We utilized International Classification of Disease-Oncology 3 codes to identify UTUC. International Classification of Disease, ninth Revision, Clinical Modification and Current Procedure Terminology codes identified surgical treatment and imaging modalities. We assessed for use of intravenous pyelography, retrograde pyelography (RGP), computed tomography urography (CTU), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and endoscopy. For each modality, patients were categorized as having received the modality at least once or not at all. Patient characteristics were compared using chi-squared tests. Usage of imaging modalities and tumor stage was trended using Cochran-Armitage tests. We stratified our data into 2 multivariate logistic regression models to determine the effect of imaging modalities on tumor stage: 1992 to 1999 with all modalities except MRU, and 2000 to 2009 with all modalities. Our patient population was predominantly White males of more than 70 years old. Intravenous pyelography and RGP declined in use (62% and 72% in 1992 vs. 6% and 58% in 2009, respectively) while computed tomography urography, MRU, and endoscopy increased in use (2%, 0%, and 37% in 1992 vs. 44%, 6%, and 66% in 2009, respectively). In both regression analyses, endoscopy was associated with lower-stage tumors. In the 2000 to 2009 model, RGP was associated with lower-stage tumors, and MRU was associated with higher-stage tumors. Finally, our data showed an increasing number of modalities utilized for each patient (1% receiving 4 modalities in 1992 vs. 20% in 2009). We found trends toward the utilization of newer imaging

  9. Polymorphism of inflammatory genes and arsenic methylation capacity are associated with urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical University—Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Kai [School of Oral Hygiene, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University and Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiue, Horng-Sheng [Department of Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lai, Li-An [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ying-Chin [Department of Family Medicine, Shung Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Health Examination, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic can generate reactive oxidative species, which can induce certain proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of various cancers, including bladder cancer. This study aimed to investigate the joint effect of the polymorphism of TNF-α − 308 G/A, IL-6 − 174 G/C, IL-8 − 251 T/A and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. This study evaluated 300 pathologically-confirmed cases of UC and 594 cancer-free controls. Urinary arsenic species were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. The polymorphism of TNF-α − 308 G/A, IL-6 − 174 G/C and IL-8 − 251 T/A was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The joint effects on UC risk were estimated by odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using unconditional logistic regression. We found that the TNF-α − 308 A/A and IL-8 − 251 T/T polymorphisms were significantly associated with UC. Moreover, significant dose–response joint effect of TNF-α − 308 A/A or IL-8 − 251 T/T genotypes and arsenic methylation indices were seen to affect UC risk. The present results also showed a significant increase in UC risk in subjects with the IL-8 − 251 T/T genotype for each SD increase in urinary total arsenic and MMA%. In contrast, a significant decrease in UC risk was found in subjects who carried the IL-8 − 251 T/T genotype for each SD increase in DMA%. - Highlights: • Joint effect of the TNF-α -308 A/A genotype and urinary total arsenic affected UC. • Joint effect of the IL-8 -251 T/T genotype and urinary total arsenic affected UC. • Urinary total arsenic level, TNF-α -308 A/A and IL-8 -251 T/T genotype affected UC.

  10. Urothelial endocytic vesicle recycling and lysosomal degradative pathway regulated by lipid membrane composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, E J; Calderón, R O

    2013-02-01

    The urothelium, a specialized epithelium that covers the mucosa cell surface of the urinary bladder, undergoes dramatic morphological changes during the micturition cycle that involve a membrane apical traffic. This traffic was first described as a lysosomal pathway, in addition to the known endocytosis/exocytosis membrane recycling. In an attempt to understand the role of membrane lipid composition in those effects, we previously described the lipid-dependent leakage of the endocytosed vesicle content. In this work, we demonstrated clear differences in the traffic of both the fluid probe and the membrane-bound probe in urothelial umbrella cells by using spectrofluorometry and/or confocal and epifluorescence microscopy. Different membrane lipid compositions were established by using three diet formulae enriched in oleic acid, linoleic acid and a commercial formula. Between three and five animals for each dietary treatment were used for each analysis. The decreased endocytosis of both fluid and membrane-bound probes (approximately 32 and 49 % lower, respectively) in oleic acid-derived umbrella cells was concomitant with an increased recycling (approximately 4.0 and 3.7 times, respectively) and diminished sorting to the lysosome (approximately 23 and 37 %, respectively) when compared with the control umbrella cells. The higher intravesicular pH and the impairment of the lysosomal pathway of oleic acid diet-derived vesicles compared to linoleic acid diet-derived vesicles and control diet-derived vesicles correlate with our findings of a lower V-ATPase activity previously reported. We integrated the results obtained in the present and previous work to determine the sorting of endocytosed material (fluid and membrane-bound probes) into the different cell compartments. Finally, the weighted average effect of the individual alterations on the intracellular distribution was evaluated. The results shown in this work add evidences for the modulatory role of the membrane

  11. Applying the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay to study treatment approaches in urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Margaretha A; Sathe, Anuja; Romano, Andrea; Hoffmann, Michèle J; Schulz, Wolfgang A; van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Albers, Peter; Nawroth, Roman; Niegisch, Günter

    2017-09-01

    Rapid development of novel treatment options demands valid preclinical screening models for urothelial carcinoma (UC). The translational value of high-throughput drug testing using 2-dimensional (2D) cultures is limited while for xenograft models handling efforts and costs often become prohibitive for larger-scale drug testing. Therefore, we investigated to which extent the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay might provide an alternative model to study antineoplastic treatment approaches for UC. The ability of 8 human UC cell lines (UCCs) to form tumors after implantation on CAMs was investigated. Epithelial-like RT-112 and mesenchymal-like T-24 UCCs in cell culture or as CAM tumors were treated with cisplatin alone or combined with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) romidepsin and suberanilohydroxamic acid. Tumor weight, size, and bioluminescence activity were monitored; tumor specimens were analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction were used to measure protein and mRNA expression. UCCs were reliably implantable on the CAM, but tumor development varied among cell lines. Expression of differentiation markers (E-cadherin, vimentin, CK5, CK18, and CK20) was similar in CAM tumors and 2D cultures. Cellular phenotypes also remained stable after recultivation of CAM tumors in 2D cultures. Bioluminescence images correlated with tumor weight. Cisplatin and HDACi decreased weight and growth of CAM tumors in a dose-dependent manner, but HDACi treatment acted less efficiently as in 2D cultures, especially on its typically associated molecular markers. Synergistic effects of HDACi and subsequent cisplatin treatment on UCCs were neither detected in 2D cultures nor detected in CAM tumors. Our results demonstrate that the CAM assay is a useful tool for studying tumor growth and response to conventional anticancer drugs under 3D conditions, especially cytotoxic drugs as cisplatin. With some

  12. Role of morphometry and proliferative parameters in grading of urothelial neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunita; Kumar, Santosh; Chabbra, Sonia; Sen, Rajeev; Rana, Praveen; Malik, Shivani; Singh, Sonia; Lamba, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mean nuclear area of 10 nuclei (MNA–10), mitotic activity index (MAI) and Ki–67 are highly reproducible and can be routinely used as adjuncts to histopathological grading in classifying tumors. Assays of these biomarkers are non–invasive, rapid, easy to perform, more objective and accurate, with high sensitivity and specificity, and correlate well with tumor grade. Material and methods This study was conducted at the Department of Pathology PGIMS, Rohtak on 50 cases, of which 25 cases were high–grade, 15 low–grade, 6 Papillary Urothelial Neoplasm of Low Malignant Potentialand 4 reactive lesions as per the 2004 ISUP/WHO classification. MNA–10, MAI and Ki–67 immunoquantitation were performed on stained sections. Results The age of the patients varied from 35 to 87 years. Male: female ratio was 3.5:1. The mean MNA–10 (μm2) for High Grade Malignant Potential was 104.52 ±25.64 μm2, which was significantly higher than in PUNLMP (47.64 ±10.23) and LMP (51.57 ±15.66). MAI (/10 HPF) showed an increasing trend from reactive lesions to HMP, with a mean of (3 ±1.16)/10 HPF to (21.36 ±5.31)/10 HPF respectively. Ki–67 labelling index, a proliferative marker, revealed increasing trend lowest with reactive lesions (10 ±2.83%) and highest in high grade tumors (65.96 ±14.44). Spearman's correlation showed maximum correlation between MAI and Ki–67 and the increasing grade of tumor. Conclusions MNA–10 in combination with Ki–67 and MAI was found to be stronger than MNA–10 alone. MAI has high reproducibility in differentiating low and high grade, with simple assessment in paraffin embedded sections allowing adequate histopathological analysis and visualization of proliferating cells simultaneously. This multivariate grading model should be applied in routine grading to overcome interobserver variability and to increase reproducibility of grading. PMID:25914836

  13. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  14. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  15. [Ovarian yolk sac tumour: general review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Caroline; Lhommé, Catherine; Duvillard, Pierre; Morice, Philippe; Balleyguier, Corinne; Pautier, Patricia; Troalen, Frédéric; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault

    2011-08-01

    Ovarian yolk sac tumour (OYST) is a very rare malignancy arising most often in young women. Preoperative clinical, biological (alpha-foetoprotein) and radiological findings should help to establish the diagnosis of OYST, in order to propose adequate surgical treatment. The aim of surgery is to remove the primary tumour, to obtain an accurate histological diagnosis and to assess the disease extent. In young women, fertility-sparing surgery should be performed, in order to preserve the possibility of pregnancy later on. Chemotherapy has substantially modified the prognosis of these tumours, and practically all patients will be cured. The overall 5-year survival rate is 94% when patients are treated with BEP chemotherapy. Depending on the clinical situation, two to four cycles of the BEP regimen should be administered after surgery. Identification of prognostic factors may help to propose risk-adapted treatment in order to increase the cure rate in patients with a poor prognosis and to decrease toxicity in patients with a low risk of relapse. Fertility preservation represents a major objective in women treated for OYSTs.

  16. [Epidemiology and risk factors of testicular tumours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Szumiło, Justyna; Jankiewicz, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2016-04-01

    Testicular tumours are rare neoplasms, which most commonly affects men aged 25 to 35 years. Among young adult males it is the most common cause of testicular swelling. In recent decades, the number of cases of testicular tumours has greatly increased. The most significant predisposing factors are cryptorchidism and some endocrine disorders, especially increased levels of gonadotropins and female sex hormones. Testicular trauma, inguinal hernia, extreme values of body mass index (BMI), high-calorie diet rich in dairy products as well as high social status are also regarded as risk factors. Furthermore, some chromosomal abnormalities like increased number of chromosomes 7, 8. 12, 21 and X, loss of chromosomes 4, 5, 11, 13, 18, or Y, mutation in the gene Xq27; as well as multiplied copy of the gene i(12p) are associated with tumor development. It has been proven that high testosterone levels and regular physical activity may prevent testicular tumours. Since one of the first sign the lesion is often a lump or swelling of the testis and the appearance of abnormal structure in the scrotum routine testicular self-examination seems to be important in early detection. In all suspected cases an immediate ultrasound examination of both testicles is highly recommended. It is also advised to conduct a computerized tomography (CT) and a positron emission tomography (PET) scan for staging of the tumor to select the best mode of treatment.

  17. The natural history of disappearing bone tumours and tumour-like conditions

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    Yanagawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Hideomi; Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Ahmed, Adel Refaat; Shirakura, Kenji; Takagishi, Kenji

    2001-11-01

    We describe 27 cases of bone tumours or tumour-like lesions where there was spontaneous regression. The follow-up period was 2.8-16.7 years (average, 7.0 years). Fourteen of these cases were no longer visible on plain radiographs. Histological diagnosis included exostosis, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrous dysplasia, fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma and bone island. Most cases began to reduce in adolescence or earlier, although sclerotic type lesions showed their regression in older patients. All lesions thought to be eosinophilic granuloma began to regress after periods of less than 3 months, while the duration of the other lesions showed wide variation (1-74 months). As resolution of the lesions took between 2 and 79 months (mean, 25.0 {+-} 20.3 months) we consider that the most likely mechanism was recovery of normal skeletal growth control. In exostosis with fracture, alteration of vascular supply may contribute to growth arrest, but not to subsequent remodelling stage. In inflammatory-related lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, cessation of inflammation may be the mechanism of growth arrest, whilst temporary inflammation may stimulate osteogenic cells engaged in remodeling. In the sclerotic type, growth arrest is a less probable mechanism. Necrosis within the tumour and/or local changes in hormonal control, plus remodelling of the sclerotic area takes longer. Knowledge of the potential for spontaneous resolution may help in management of these tumour and tumour-like lesions of bone. Yanagawa, T. et al. (2001)

  18. Evaluating the agreement between tumour volumetry and the estimated volumes of tumour lesions using an algorithm

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    Laubender, Ruediger P. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lynghjem, Julia; D' Anastasi, Melvin; Graser, Anno [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker; Modest, Dominik P. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Department of Medical Oncology, Munich (Germany); Mansmann, Ulrich R. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); Sartorius, Ute; Schlichting, Michael [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the agreement between tumour volume derived from semiautomated volumetry (SaV) and tumor volume defined by spherical volume using longest lesion diameter (LD) according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or ellipsoid volume using LD and longest orthogonal diameter (LOD) according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Twenty patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the CIOX trial were included. A total of 151 target lesions were defined by baseline computed tomography and followed until disease progression. All assessments were performed by a single reader. A variance component model was used to compare the three volume versions. There was a significant difference between the SaV and RECIST-based tumour volumes. The same model showed no significant difference between the SaV and WHO-based volumes. Scatter plots showed that the RECIST-based volumes overestimate lesion volume. The agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume, evaluated by intraclass correlation, showed nearly perfect agreement. Estimating the volume of metastatic lesions using both the LD and LOD (WHO) is more accurate than those based on LD only (RECIST), which overestimates lesion volume. The good agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume enables a reasonable approximation of three-dimensional tumour burden. (orig.)

  19. Tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV) mimic the effect of tumour cells on monocyte subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jaroslaw; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Szatanek, Rafal; Szaflarska, Anna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2010-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages may be affected by tumour cells via cell-to-cell contact, soluble factors and by tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV). Previous observations indicate that TMV interact with monocytes and alter their immunophenotype and activity. This study was designed to determine interactions of TMV with subpopulations (CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++)) of human monocytes. Engulfment of TMV by subsets of monocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. Moreover cytokine release and production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) by CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++) cells after TMV stimulation was determined. It was found that TMV are engulfed more efficiently by CD14(++)CD16(-) than CD14(+)CD16(++) cells. TMV-activated CD14(++)CD16(-) cells produce more ROI and interleukin -10 (IL-10) than CD14(++)CD16(+). CD14(+)CD16(++) cells following TMV stimulation showed an increased release of tumour necrosis factor alpha, IL-12p40 and RNI. TMV significantly modulate biological activity of monocyte subsets with a pattern similar to tumour cells. Therefore, TMV mimic the activating effect of tumour cells on monocytes as assessed by release of cytokines, ROI and RNI.

  20. ROS generation via NOX4 and its utility in the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kiyohide

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS production via NADPH oxidase (NOX contributes to various types of cancer progression. In the present research, we examined the pathobiological role of NADPH oxidase (NOX4-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in urothelial carcinoma (UC of the urinary bladder, and demonstrated the utility of ROS labeling in urine cytology. Methods NOX4 gene was silenced in vivo and in vitro by NOX4 siRNA transfection with or without atlocollagen. Cell cycle and measurement of ROS were analyzed by flowcytometry. Orthotopic implantation animal model was used in vivo experiment. NOX4 expression in urothelial carcinoma cells was observed by immunohistochemical analysis using surgical specimens of human bladder cancer. Urine cytology was performed after treatment with ROS detection reagents in addition to Papanicolaou staining. Results NOX4 was overexpressed in several UC cell lines and the NOX inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium reduced intracellular ROS and induced p16-dependent cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Moreover, silencing of NOX4 by siRNA significantly reduced cancer cell growth in vivo as assessed in an orthotopic mouse model. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated high expression of NOX4 in low grade/non-invasive and high grade/invasive UC including precancerous lesions such as dysplasia but not in normal urothelium. Then, we assessed the usefulness of cytological analysis of ROS producing cells in urine (ROS-C. Urine samples obtained from UC cases and normal controls were treated with fluorescent reagents labeling the hydrogen peroxide/superoxide anion and cytological atypia of ROS positive cells were analyzed. As a result, the sensitivity for detection of low grade, non-invasive UC was greatly increased (35% in conventional cytology (C-C vs. 75% in ROS-C, and the specificity was 95%. Through ROS-C, we observed robust improvement in the accuracy of follow-up urine cytology for cases with previously

  1. Unambiguous detection of multiple TP53 gene mutations in AAN-associated urothelial cancer in Belgium using laser capture microdissection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Aydin

    Full Text Available In the Balkan and Taiwan, the relationship between exposure to aristolochic acid and risk of urothelial neoplasms was inferred from the A>T genetic hallmark in TP53 gene from malignant cells. This study aimed to characterize the TP53 mutational spectrum in urothelial cancers consecutive to Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy in Belgium. Serial frozen tumor sections from female patients (n=5 exposed to aristolochic acid during weight-loss regimen were alternatively used either for p53 immunostaining or laser microdissection. Tissue areas with at least 60% p53-positive nuclei were selected for microdissecting sections according to p53-positive matching areas. All areas appeared to be carcinoma in situ. After DNA extraction, mutations in the TP53 hot spot region (exons 5-8 were identified using nested-PCR and sequencing. False-negative controls consisted in microdissecting fresh-frozen tumor tissues both from a patient with a Li-Fraumeni syndrome who carried a p53 constitutional mutation, and from KRas mutated adenocarcinomas. To rule out false-positive results potentially generated by microdissection and nested-PCR, a phenacetin-associated urothelial carcinoma and normal fresh ureteral tissues (n=4 were processed with high laser power. No unexpected results being identified, molecular analysis was pursued on malignant tissues, showing at least one mutation in all (six different mutations in two patients, with 13/16 exonic (nonsense, 2; missense, 11 and 3/16 intronic (one splice site mutations. They were distributed as transitions (n=7 or transversions (n=9, with an equal prevalence of A>T and G>T (3/16 each. While current results are in line with A>T prevalence previously reported in Balkan and Taiwan studies, they also demonstrate that multiple mutations in the TP53 hot spot region and a high frequency of G>T transversion appear as a complementary signature reflecting the toxicity of a cumulative dose of aristolochic acid ingested over a short period

  2. Variation, "evolution", immortality and genetic instabilities in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignold, L P

    2007-08-18

    The pathological characteristics of tumour cells often include variation of their histopathological features (i.e. "degrees of de-differentiation") between cases of the same tumour type and between different foci within individual tumours. Usually, only a few cell lines from tumours are immortal. Currently, somatic mutation, replicative infidelity of DNA and aneuploidy are suggested as alternative mechanisms of genomic disturbance underlying tumours. Nevertheless, apart from Hansemann's ideas of "anaplasia" and "de-differentiation" (proposed in the 1890s), and supposed "evolutionary themes" in cancer cell biology, little has been published concerning how histopathologic variation and immortality in tumour cells might arise. This paper reviews applications of the concepts of "variation" to tumours, including concepts of "evolution" and "cellular Darwinism". It is proposed that combinations of somatic mutation, DNA replicative infidelity and aneuploidy may explain the variabilities in tumours, and provide immortality in occasional tumour cells. A possible model involves (i) an initial somatic mutation causing reduced replicative fidelity of DNA, which could be variable in intensity, and thus give rise to variations between cases; (ii) a phase of replicative infidelity of DNA causing daughter cells lines to develop various abnormalities to different degrees, and hence provide for variation between areas of the same tumour. As a last event (iii) occasional asymmetric chromosomal distributions (aneuploidy) might "refresh" the ability of a daughter cell to replicate DNA faithfully causing them to become immortal. Thus extensively mutant and variable, hyperploid, and occasionally immortal cells might arise.

  3. TNM-O: ontology support for staging of malignant tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeker, Martin; França, Fábio; Bronsert, Peter; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-11-14

    Objectives of this work are to (1) present an ontological framework for the TNM classification system, (2) exemplify this framework by an ontology for colon and rectum tumours, and (3) evaluate this ontology by assigning TNM classes to real world pathology data. The TNM ontology uses the Foundational Model of Anatomy for anatomical entities and BioTopLite 2 as a domain top-level ontology. General rules for the TNM classification system and the specific TNM classification for colorectal tumours were axiomatised in description logic. Case-based information was collected from tumour documentation practice in the Comprehensive Cancer Centre of a large university hospital. Based on the ontology, a module was developed that classifies pathology data. TNM was represented as an information artefact, which consists of single representational units. Corresponding to every representational unit, tumours and tumour aggregates were defined. Tumour aggregates consist of the primary tumour and, if existing, of infiltrated regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. TNM codes depend on the location and certain qualities of the primary tumour (T), the infiltrated regional lymph nodes (N) and the existence of distant metastases (M). Tumour data from clinical and pathological documentation were successfully classified with the ontology. A first version of the TNM Ontology represents the TNM system for the description of the anatomical extent of malignant tumours. The present work demonstrates its representational power and completeness as well as its applicability for classification of instance data.

  4. Discrimination of paediatric brain tumours using apparent diffusion coefficient histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, Jonathan G.; Clark, Christopher A. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Saunders, Dawn E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    To determine if histograms of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) can be used to differentiate paediatric brain tumours. Imaging of histologically confirmed tumours with pre-operative ADC maps were reviewed (54 cases, 32 male, mean age 6.1 years; range 0.1-15.8 years) comprising 6 groups. Whole tumour ADC histograms were calculated; normalised for volume. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to differentiate tumour types using histogram metrics, initially for all groups and then for specific subsets. All 6 groups (5 dysembryoplastic neuroectodermal tumours, 22 primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET), 5 ependymomas, 7 choroid plexus papillomas, 4 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRT) and 9 juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas (JPA)) were compared. 74% (40/54) were correctly classified using logistic regression of ADC histogram parameters. In the analysis of posterior fossa tumours, 80% of ependymomas, 100% of astrocytomas and 94% of PNET-medulloblastoma were classified correctly. All PNETs were discriminated from ATRTs (22 PNET and 4 supratentorial ATRTs) (100%). ADC histograms are useful in differentiating paediatric brain tumours, in particular, the common posterior fossa tumours of childhood. PNETs were differentiated from supratentorial ATRTs, in all cases, which has important implications in terms of clinical management. (orig.)

  5. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luize G; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-09-04

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies.

  6. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  7. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing the history of hyperthermia therapy for cancer and introducing methods for inducing local hyperthermia, this review describes different mechanisms by which heating tumours can elicit anti-tumour immune responses, including tumour cell damage, tumour surface molecule changes, heat shock proteins, exosomes, direct effects on immune cells, and changes in the tumour vasculature. We then go over in vivo studies that provide promising results showing that local hyperthermia therapy indeed activates various systemic anti-tumour immune responses that slow growth of untreated tumours. Finally, future research questions that will help bring the use of local hyperthermia as systemic immunotherapy closer to clinical application are discussed.

  8. Prognostic significance of the 2004 WHO/ISUP classification for prediction of recurrence, progression, and cancer-specific mortality of non-muscle-invasive urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic study of 1,515 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chin-Chen; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Chen, Kuang-Kuo; Yu, Hui-Jung; Sun, Chih-Hao; Ho, Donald M T

    2010-05-01

    To verify prognostic significance of the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO)/International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading systems, we retrospectively studied the tumors of 1,515 patients who underwent transurethral resection of primary non-muscle-invasive urothelial tumors (pTa, 1,006 patients; pT1, 509 patients) confined to the bladder. Cases were classified according to the 2004 WHO/ISUP systems as 212 cases of papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), 706 low-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas (LPUCs), and 597 high-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas (HPUCs). PUNLMP showed the statistically significantly lowest recurrence cumulative incidence compared with the other tumor types. There were significant differences and trends for higher progression and cancer-specific mortality cumulative incidence in the following order: PUNLMP, LPUC, pTa HPUC, and pT1 HPUC. No differences of progression and cancer-specific mortality cumulative incidence were found between pTa and pT1 LPUC. Our study validates the usefulness of the 2004 WHO/ISUP system to classify urothelial tumors into prognostically distinct categories that would contribute to the design of therapeutic and monitoring strategies for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder urothelial tumors.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumour presenting as a parasagittal brain tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebuike, K E; Pather, S; Emereole, O; Ndolo, P; Kajee, A; Gopal, R; Naidoo, S

    2012-11-01

    Dural-based brain tumours, apart from meningiomas, are rare. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated smooth muscle tumor (SMT) is a documented but rare disease that occurs in immunocompromized patients. These tumours may be located at unusual sites including the brain. We present a 37-year-old patient, positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), who was admitted after generalized tonic-clonic seizures. MRI and CT scan revealed a dural-based brain tumour, intraoperatively thought to be a meningioma, but with an eventual histological diagnosis of EBV-SMT. Clinically the patient was well postoperatively with a Glasgow coma scale score of 15/15 and no focal neurologic deficit. This case confirms the association between EBV and SMT in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It also highlights the need to include EBV-SMT in the differential diagnosis of intracranial mass lesions in patients with HIV/AIDS.

  10. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in tumour suppressor genes in benign and malignant mixed odontogenic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Clarice F; Gomes, Carolina C; Diniz, Marina G; Vargas, Pablo A; de Paula, Alfredo M B; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Loyola, Adriano M; Gomez, Ricardo S

    2012-05-01

    Although molecular alterations are reported in different types of odontogenic tumours, their pathogenesis remains to be established. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies allow the identification of minimal regions of deletions of known or putative tumour suppressor genes, the losses of which may promote neoplastic growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate LOH in a set of odontogenic mixed tumours. Tumour suppressor gene loci on 3p, 9p, 11p, 11q and 17p chromosomes were analysed in five samples of ameloblastic fibroma (AF), three samples of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO) and three samples of ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AFS). The most frequently lost genetic loci were p53 (17p13, 62%) and CHRNB1 (17p13, 55%). LOH at the chromosome regions 3p24.3, 9p22 and 9p22-p21 was identified only in AFS. No sample showed LOH at the chromosomal loci 3p21.2 and 11q13.4. For the region 9p22-p13, LOH occurred in one sample of AFO. The fractional allelic loss (FAL) was calculated for each sample. The mean FAL of the benign lesions (i.e. AF and AFO) was 22%, whereas the mean FAL of the malignant lesions (i.e. AFS) was 74.6%. In conclusion, our results show a higher FAL in AFS compared to its benign counterparts and reveal a different pattern of LOH of tumour suppressor genes in AFS, which may regulate changes in tumour behaviour. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Ciro BS

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170. These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT and B16F10 melanoma. Methods Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2, caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained

  12. Severe hypofractionation: Non-homogeneous tumour dose delivery can counteract tumour hypoxia

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    Ruggieri, Ruggero; Naccarato, Stefania (Medical Physics Dept., Inst. Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola, FC (Italy)), E-mail: ruggieri.ruggero@gmail.com; Nahum, Alan E. (Physics Dept., Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington CH63 4JY (United Kingdom))

    2010-11-15

    Background. The current rationale for severely hypofractionated schedules (3-5 fractions) used in stereotactic-body-radiotherapy (SBRT) of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the small size of the irradiated volumes. Being the dose prescribed to the 60-80% isodose line enclosing the PTV, a non-homogeneous tumour-dose-delivery results which might impact on tumour hypoxia. A comparison between homogeneous and SBRT-like non-homogeneous tumour-dose-delivery is then proposed here, using severe hypofractionation on large tumour volumes where both dose prescription strategies are applicable. Materials and methods. For iso-NTCP hypofractionated schedules (1f/d5d/w) with respect to standard fractionation (d=2Gy), computed from the individual DVHs for lungs, oesophagus, heart and spinal cord (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman NTCP-model), TCP values were calculated (a-averaged Poissonian-LQ model) for homogeneous and SBRT-like non-homogeneous plans both with and without tumour hypoxia. Two different estimates of the oxygen-enhancement-ratio (OER) in combination with two distinct assumptions on the kinetics of reoxygenation were considered. Homogeneous and SBRT-like non-homogeneous plans were finally compared in terms of therapeutic ratio (TR), as the product of TCP and the four (1-NTCPi) values. Results. For severe hypofractionation (3-5 fractions) and for any of the hypotheses on the kinetics of reoxygenation and the OER, there was a significant difference between the computed TRs with or without inclusion of tumour hypoxia (anova, p=0.01) for homogeneous tumour-dose-delivery, but no significant difference for the SBRT-like non-homogeneous one. Further, a significantly increased mean TR for the group of SBRT-like non-homogeneous plans resulted (t-test, p=0.05) with respect to the group with homogeneous target-dose-coverage. Conclusions. SBRT-like dose-boosting seems to counterbalance the loss of reoxygenation within a few fractions. For SBRT it then seems that, in addition to the high

  13. Thoracic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour mimicking a pleural tumour: a rare pedunculated appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, National Kyushu Cancer Centre, 3-1-1 Notame, Minami-ku, Fukuoka 811-1395 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Munakata Medical Association Hospital, 1201-1 Taguma, Munakata 811-3431 (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Kuroiwa, Toshiro [Department of Radiology, National Kyushu Cancer Centre, 3-1-1 Notame, Minami-ku, Fukuoka 811-1395 (Japan); Nagatoshi, Yoshihisa [Department of Paediatrics, National Kyushu Cancer Centre, Fukuoka (Japan); Ichinose, Yukito [Department of Thoracic Surgery, National Kyushu Cancer Centre, Fukuoka (Japan); Hachitanda, Yoichi [Department of Pathology, National Kyushu Cancer Centre, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    A malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) generally occurs in adults and often in patients with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1). We present a rare case of a huge thoracic MPNST arising from the intercostal nerve in a 12-year-old girl without NF-1. In addition to the unusual occurrence in a child without NF-1, MRI demonstrated a unique pedunculated appearance mimicking a pleural tumour. In this report, we present the CT and MRI findings of our case, together with the histopathological findings, and review previous reports. (orig.)

  14. Office-Based Transurethral Devascularisation of Low Grade Non-Invasive Urothelial Cancer Using Diode Laser. A Feasibility Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Gregers G.; Mogensen, Karin; Lindvold, Lars René

    2015-01-01

    Frequent recurrence of non‐muscle invasive bladder tumours (NMIBC) requiring transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TUR‐BT) and lifelong monitoring makes the lifetime cost per patient the highest of all cancers. A new method is proposed for the removal of low grade NMIBCs in an office......‐based setting, without the need for sedation and pain control and where the patient can leave immediately after treatment. An in vitro model was developed to examine the dose/response relationship between laser power, treatment time, and distance between laser fibre and target, using a 980 nm diode laser...... and chicken meat. The relationship between depth and extent of tissue destruction and the laser settings was measured using microscopy and non‐parametric statistical analysis. A patient with low grade stage Ta tumour and multiple comorbidity, and therefore not fit for general anaesthesia, had a tumour...

  15. A small set of extra-embryonic genes defines a new landmark for bovine embryo staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrelle, Séverine A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Heyman, Yvan; Everts, Robin E; Campion, Evelyne; Richard, Christophe; Ducroix-Crépy, Céline; Tian, X Cindy; Lewin, Harris A; Renard, Jean-Paul; Robert-Granié, Christèle; Hue, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Axis specification in mouse is determined by a sequence of reciprocal interactions between embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues so that a few extra-embryonic genes appear as 'patterning' the embryo. Considering these interactions as essential, but lacking in most mammals the genetically driven approaches used in mouse and the corresponding patterning mutants, we examined whether a molecular signature originating from extra-embryonic tissues could relate to the developmental stage of the embryo proper and predict it. To this end, we have profiled bovine extra-embryonic tissues at peri-implantation stages, when gastrulation and early neurulation occur, and analysed the subsequent expression profiles through the use of predictive methods as previously reported for tumour classification. A set of six genes (CALM1, CPA3, CITED1, DLD, HNRNPDL, and TGFB3), half of which had not been previously associated with any extra-embryonic feature, appeared significantly discriminative and mainly dependent on embryonic tissues for its faithful expression. The predictive value of this set of genes for gastrulation and early neurulation stages, as assessed on naive samples, was remarkably high (93%). In silico connected to the bovine orthologues of the mouse patterning genes, this gene set is proposed as a new trait for embryo staging. As such, this will allow saving the bovine embryo proper for molecular or cellular studies. To us, it offers as well new perspectives for developmental phenotyping and modelling of embryonic/extra-embryonic co-differentiation.

  16. Clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic studies on Bovine Papillomatosis in Northern Oases, Egypt in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayez Awadalla Salib 1 and Haithm Ali Farghali 2

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Bovine papillomatosis is a viral disease of cattle characterized clinically by development of multiple benign tumours termed warts. The diagnosis of bovine papillomatosis was confirmed by clinical and pathological examinations of the warts. The prevalence of bovine papillomatosis in Northern Oases was recorded as 4.86%. The prevalence was higher in the females (2.99% than males (1.87%.The prevalence was the highest in cattle less than one year old (2.99%. The infected cattle were examined visually for detection of external parasites and faecal samples were examined for detection of internal parasites. Infestation with ticks was observed in 10 of the 13 confirmed wart infected animals, while fasciola and parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE nematode eggs were demonstrated and quantified in 4 and 5 infected bovids respectively. The statistical correlation between the number of warts and Fasciola eggs, and number of parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE nematode eggs, was 0.6 and 0.89 accordingly. Two therapeutic regimes were evaluated, regimen-I and regimen-II. All cattle treated were completely recovered in days post treatment 15 to 115. We concluded that treatment regimen-I was better than regimen-II when taking into consideration the mean days lapsed for healing and regression of warts of 42 days compared to 83 days for regimen-II. [Veterinary World 2011; 4(2.000: 53-59

  17. Lymphoid tumours and breast cancer in ataxia telangiectasia; substantial protective effect of residual ATM kinase activity against childhood tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, A; Srinivasan, V; Barone, G; Last, J I; Wootton, L L; Davies, E G; Verhagen, M M; Willemsen, M A; Weemaes, C M; Byrd, P J; Izatt, L; Easton, D F; Thompson, D J; Taylor, A M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Immunodeficiency in ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is less severe in patients expressing some mutant or normal ATM kinase activity. We, therefore, determined whether expression of residual ATM kinase activity also protected against tumour development in A-T. Methods: From a total of 296 consecutive genetically confirmed A-T patients from the British Isles and the Netherlands, we identified 66 patients who developed a malignant tumour; 47 lymphoid tumours and 19 non-lymphoid tumours were diagnosed. We determined their ATM mutations, and whether cells from these patients expressed any ATM with residual ATM kinase activity. Results: In childhood, total absence of ATM kinase activity was associated, almost exclusively, with development of lymphoid tumours. There was an overwhelming preponderance of tumours in patients <16 years without kinase activity compared with those with some residual activity, consistent with a substantial protective effect of residual ATM kinase activity against tumour development in childhood. In addition, the presence of eight breast cancers in A-T patients, a 30-fold increased risk, establishes breast cancer as part of the A-T phenotype. Conclusion: Overall, a spectrum of tumour types is associated with A-T, consistent with involvement of ATM in different mechanisms of tumour formation. Tumour type was influenced by ATM allelic heterogeneity, residual ATM kinase activity and age. PMID:21792198

  18. Cytomorphological Effects of Mitomycin C on Urothelial Cells: Eosinophils May Be Clue to The Drug-Induced Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcin Guler Simsek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytomorphological changes of mitomycin C on urothelial cells may be misinterpreted as a neoplastic process. A 60-year old male patient who was given an eight-week course of intravesical mitomycin C due to non-invasive low grade transitional cell carcinoma. During his follow-up care, the findings of a urine cytology exam were as follows: nuclear enlargement of cells, wrinkled nuclear membranes, little hyperchromasia, pleomorphism, abnormal nuclear morphology and disordered orientation of the urothelium. Furthermore, there were eosinophils nearby the atypical cells. This report aimed at reminding the cytomorphologic changes of mitomycin C may be misinterpreted as carcinoma, so the presence of eosinophils is required to predict the drug-induced changes.

  19. Urothelial injury to the rabbit bladder from various alkaline and acidic solutions used to dissolve kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckler, J; Rodman, J S; Jacobs, D; Rotterdam, H; Marion, D; Vaughan, E D

    1986-07-01

    Different irrigating solutions are used clinically to dissolve uric acid, cystine and struvite stones. These studies were undertaken to assess the toxicity to the rabbit bladder epithelium of several commonly used formulations. Test solutions were infused antegrade through a left ureterotomy overnight. Bladders were removed and routine histological sections made. A pH 7.6 solution of NaHCO3 appeared harmless. The same solution with two per cent acetylcysteine produced slight injury. All pH 4 solutions caused significant damage to the urothelium. Hemiacidrin, which contains magnesium, produced less damage than did other pH 4 solutions without that cation. Our data tend to support Suby's conclusions that addition of magnesium reduces urothelial injury even though the presence of magnesium will slow dissolution of struvite.

  20. Chinese herbs containing aristolochic acid associated with renal failure and urothelial carcinoma: a review from epidemiologic observations to causal inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiao-Yu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Herbal remedies containing aristolochic acid (AA) have been designated to be a strong carcinogen. This review summarizes major epidemiologic evidence to argue for the causal association between AA exposure and urothelial carcinoma as well as nephropathy. The exposure scenarios include the following: Belgian women taking slimming pills containing single material Guang Fang Ji, consumptions of mixtures of Chinese herbal products in the general population and patients with chronic renal failure in Taiwan, occupational exposure in Chinese herbalists, and food contamination in farming villages in valleys of the Danube River. Such an association is corroborated by detecting specific DNA adducts in the tumor tissue removed from affected patients. Preventive actions of banning such use and education to the healthcare professionals and public are necessary for the safety of herbal remedies.

  1. [A CASE OF UROTHELIAL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER WITH SQUAMOUS DIFFERENTIATION RESPONDING TO PACLITAXEL AND CARBOPLATIN NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Eri; Nishino, Aki; Nagai, Yasuharu; Yasuda, Muneo; Tahara, Hideo; Kino, Shigeo; Kanno, Norihumi

    2015-07-01

    A 42-year-old man was referred to our hospital for macrohematuria. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right hydronephrosis and a retroperitoneal mass, located next to right side of the bladder. Cystoscopy showed a protruded lesion covered with normal mucosa at the right lateral wall. The patient underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor and biopsies of the bladder wall. Histological examination showed squamous cell carcinoma. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy using paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC) was performed. A total cystectomy, right nephroureterectomy and construction of the ileal conduit were performed after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Histological examination showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous cell differentiation. Unexpectedly, a small amount of CIS was detected only in the vicinity of the TUR scar. The patient received 2 cycles of TC chemotherapy as adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, 11 months later, local recurrence and liver metastasis were detected. He died 17 months after the surgery.

  2. Chinese Herbs Containing Aristolochic Acid Associated with Renal Failure and Urothelial Carcinoma: A Review from Epidemiologic Observations to Causal Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Yu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal remedies containing aristolochic acid (AA have been designated to be a strong carcinogen. This review summarizes major epidemiologic evidence to argue for the causal association between AA exposure and urothelial carcinoma as well as nephropathy. The exposure scenarios include the following: Belgian women taking slimming pills containing single material Guang Fang Ji, consumptions of mixtures of Chinese herbal products in the general population and patients with chronic renal failure in Taiwan, occupational exposure in Chinese herbalists, and food contamination in farming villages in valleys of the Danube River. Such an association is corroborated by detecting specific DNA adducts in the tumor tissue removed from affected patients. Preventive actions of banning such use and education to the healthcare professionals and public are necessary for the safety of herbal remedies.

  3. In vitro production of bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroebech, L.; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard

    2015-01-01

    In vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos has become a widespread technology implemented in cattle breeding and production. The implementation of genomic selection and systems biology adds great dimensions to the impact of bovine IVP. The physical procedures included in the IVP process can still...

  4. In vitro production of bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroebech, L.; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard;

    2015-01-01

    In vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos has become a widespread technology implemented in cattle breeding and production. The implementation of genomic selection and systems biology adds great dimensions to the impact of bovine IVP. The physical procedures included in the IVP process can still...

  5. Pulsation-limited oxygen diffusion in the tumour microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotti, Edoardo; Stella, Sabrina; Chignola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is central to tumour evolution, growth, invasion and metastasis. Mathematical models of hypoxia based on reaction-diffusion equations provide seemingly incomplete descriptions as they fail to predict the measured oxygen concentrations in the tumour microenvironment. In an attempt to explain the discrepancies, we consider both the inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen-consuming cells in solid tumours and the dynamics of blood flow in the tumour microcirculation. We find that the low-frequency oscillations play an important role in the establishment of tumour hypoxia. The oscillations interact with consumption to inhibit oxygen diffusion in the microenvironment. This suggests that alpha-blockers-a class of drugs used to treat hypertension and stress disorders, and known to lower or even abolish low-frequency oscillations of arterial blood flow -may act as adjuvant drugs in the radiotherapy of solid tumours by enhancing the oxygen effect.

  6. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of the Maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man was diagnosed with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla. He was treated with total maxillectomy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a close resection margin. The tumour was of high grade with an MIB-1 labelling index of almost 60%. At six weeks following the surgery, he developed local tumour relapse. The patient succumbed to the disease at five months from the time of diagnosis. The present report underlines the locally aggressive nature of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla which necessitates an early therapeutic intervention. A complete resection with clear margins is the most important prognostic factor for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in the head and neck region. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered to improve the local control. Future research may demarcate the role of targeted therapy for patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  7. Comparison of the FDA and ASCO/CAP Criteria for HER2 Immunohistochemistry in Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gilhyang; Chung, Yul Ri; Kim, Bohyun; Song, Boram; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2016-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the known oncogenes in urothelial carcinoma. However, the association between HER2 and the prognosis of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUTUC) has not yet been fully clarified. The aim of this study was to evaluate HER2 expression using the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) criteria and compare their prognostic significance in UUTUC. HER2 expression was evaluated in 144 cases of UUTUC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using tissue microarrays. We separately analyzed HER2 expression using the FDA and ASCO/CAP criteria. The IHC results were categorized into low (0, 1+) and high (2+, 3+) groups. Using the FDA criteria, 94 cases were negative, 38 cases were 1+, nine cases were 2+, and three cases were 3+. Using the ASCO/CAP criteria, 94 cases were negative, 34 cases were 1+, 13 cases were 2+, and three cases were 3+. Four cases showing 2+ according to the ASCO/CAP criteria were reclassified as 1+ by the FDA criteria. High HER2 expression by both the FDA criteria and ASCO/CAP criteria was significantly associated with International Society of Urological Pathology high grade (p = .001 and p CAP criteria did not show significant differences (p = .161) in cancer-specific survival. HER2 high expression groups were significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival, and our study revealed that the FDA criteria are more suitable for determining HER2 expression in UUTUC.

  8. Prognostic Value of Beta-Tubulin-3 and c-Myc in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Bria, Emilio; Ciccarese, Chiara; Munari, Enrico; Modena, Alessandra; Zambonin, Valentina; Sperduti, Isabella; Artibani, Walter; Cheng, Liang; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo; Brunelli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, putative prognostic biomarkers have shown limited utility from the clinical perspective for bladder urothelial carcinoma. Herein, the expression of beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc was evaluated to determine their prognostic potential. Methods In formalin fixed-paraffin embedded blocks, immunohistochemical expression of c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 was evaluated. H score ranging from 0 to 300 was obtained by multiplying the percentage of positive cells by intensity (0–3); c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 expression was defined: 0: negative, 1: weakly positive, 2: strongly positive. Results beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc immunoexpression was available for 46 cases. At the univariate analysis, node-involvement, beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc overexpression discriminate shorter DFS (HR 2.19, p = 0.043; HR 3.10, p = 0.24 and HR 3.05, p = 0.011, respectively); 2-yrs DFS log-rank analysis according to low versus high level of immunoexpression were statistically significant; beta-tubulin-3, 53% low vs 12.7% high (p = value 0.02) and c-Myc 28 low vs 8 high (p-value 0.007). Patients displaying negative beta-tubulin-3/c-Myc had statistically significant better 2-yrs DFS than those with mixed expression or double positivity (54.5% versus 18.7% versus 0%, log-rank p = 0.006). Conclusions c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 show improvement for prognostic risk stratification in patients with muscle invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma. These molecular pathways may also be candidate to improve predictiveness to targeted therapies. PMID:26046361

  9. Prognostic Value of Beta-Tubulin-3 and c-Myc in Muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Massari

    Full Text Available To date, putative prognostic biomarkers have shown limited utility from the clinical perspective for bladder urothelial carcinoma. Herein, the expression of beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc was evaluated to determine their prognostic potential.In formalin fixed-paraffin embedded blocks, immunohistochemical expression of c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 was evaluated. H score ranging from 0 to 300 was obtained by multiplying the percentage of positive cells by intensity (0-3; c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 expression was defined: 0: negative, 1: weakly positive, 2: strongly positive.beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc immunoexpression was available for 46 cases. At the univariate analysis, node-involvement, beta-tubulin-3 and c-Myc overexpression discriminate shorter DFS (HR 2.19, p = 0.043; HR 3.10, p = 0.24 and HR 3.05, p = 0.011, respectively; 2-yrs DFS log-rank analysis according to low versus high level of immunoexpression were statistically significant; beta-tubulin-3, 53% low vs 12.7% high (p = value 0.02 and c-Myc 28 low vs 8 high (p-value 0.007. Patients displaying negative beta-tubulin-3/c-Myc had statistically significant better 2-yrs DFS than those with mixed expression or double positivity (54.5% versus 18.7% versus 0%, log-rank p = 0.006.c-Myc and beta-tubulin-3 show improvement for prognostic risk stratification in patients with muscle invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma. These molecular pathways may also be candidate to improve predictiveness to targeted therapies.

  10. Expression of pRb, p53, p16 and cyclin D1 and their clinical implications in urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungji; Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Young-Jin; Lee, Kyo Young; Lee, Ahwon

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess immunohistochemical expression of p53, pRb, p16, and cyclin D1, alone or in combination, as prognostic indicators and to investigate their correlation with clinocopathologic features of urothelial carcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining for p53, pRb, p16, and cyclin D1 was performed on a tissue microarray from 103 patients with urothelial carcinoma who underwent radical cystectomy. Of the patient samples analyzed, 36 (35%), 61 (59%), 47 (46%) and 30 (29%) had altered expression of p53, pRb, p16, and cyclin D1, respectively. Abnormal expression of p53 and pRb correlated with depth of invasion (P=0.040 and P=0.044, respectively). Cyclin D1 expression was associated with tumor stage and recurrence (P=0.017 and P=0.036, respectively). Altered pRb was significantly correlated with overall survival (P=0.040). According to the expression pattern of pRb and p53, p53/pRb (altered/normal) had worse survival than p53/pRb (normal/altered) (P=0.022). Alteration of all markers had worse survival than all normal (P=0.029). As determined by multivariate analysis, tumor stage, lymph node metastasis and the combined expression of p53 and pRb are independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, immunohistochemical evaluation of cell cycle regulators, especially the p53/pRb combination, might be useful in planning appropriate treatment strategies.

  11. Bladder extramedullary plasmacytoma and synchronous bladder urothelial transitional cell carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Wadhwa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Karan Wadhwa, Raj Singh, Lemke Z SolomonDepartment of Urology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UKAbstract: A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of macroscopic hematuria. While an ultrasound of the bladder revealed a posterior bladder mass, subsequent flexible cystoscopy demonstrated only an area of irregular urothelium. Initial general anesthetic cytoscopy and biopsy revealed conventional G2/3 T1 TCC. Histology of a further formal resection of this irregular area revealed carcinoma-in-situ and population of atypical cells with enlarged nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and varying quantities of cytoplasm showing plasma cell features. The immunohistochemistry was consistent with a plasmacytoma. There must be a high index of suspicion when ultrasound demonstrates a mass not detected by flexible cystoscopy, and biopsies/resection are advised to exclude extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP as the cause. EMP of the urinary bladder is a rare entity with only 21 cases reported in the literature. In this report we describe a further case of EMP of the bladder associated with synchronous transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urothelium. We also highlight the important histopathological findings and review the current literature to report the outcomes of existing approaches to management of this rare form of bladder cancer. We believe this to be the first case reported in which a patient presented concurrently with bladder EMP and urothelial TCC. EMPs are highly radiosensitive tumors and in the case of head/neck disease, survival at 10 years is in the order of 65% following radical radiotherapy. Given the paucity of reported cases of primary bladder EMP, the optimal treatment regime remains unclear. In keeping with other anatomical sites current treatment is based to the assumed benefit of radical radiotherapy and prognosis appears to be better in those with no evidence of systemic disease.Keywords: bladder cancer, extramedullary plasmacytoma

  12. Artificial intelligence for predicting recurrence-free probability of non-invasive high-grade urothelial bladder cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Conti, Gloria; Nesi, Gabriella; Lorenzini, Matteo; Mondaini, Nicola; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2007-10-01

    The objective of our study was to define a neural network for predicting recurrence and progression-free probability in patients affected by recurrent pTaG3 urothelial bladder cancer to use in everyday clinical practice. Among all patients who had undergone transurethral resection for bladder tumors, 143 were finally selected and enrolled. Four follow-ups for recurrence, progression or survival were performed at 6, 9, 12 and 108 months. The data were analyzed by using the commercially available software program NeuralWorks Predict. These data were compared with univariate and multivariate analysis results. The use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) in recurrent pTaG3 patients showed a sensitivity of 81.67% and specificity of 95.87% in predicting recurrence-free status after transurethral resection of bladder tumor at 12 months follow-up. Statistical and ANN analyses allowed selection of the number of lesions (multiple, HR=3.31, p=0.008) and the previous recurrence rate (>or=2/year, HR=3.14, p=0.003) as the most influential variables affecting the output decision in predicting the natural history of recurrent pTaG3 urothelial bladder cancer. ANN applications also included selection of the previous adjuvant therapy. We demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of ANN applications in everyday clinical practice, reporting a good recurrence predicting performance. The study identified a single subgroup of pTaG3 patients with multiple lesions, >or=2/year recurrence rate and without any response to previous Bacille Calmette-Guérin adjuvant therapy, that seem to be at high risk of recurrence.

  13. Expression of OCT4A: The First Step to the Next Stage of Urothelial Bladder Cancer Progression

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    Wojciech Jóźwicki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor is a transcription factor responsible for maintaining the pluripotent properties of embryonic stem cells. In this paper, we present the results of studies to investigate the role of the OCT4 splicing variant in urothelial bladder cancer and the relationship between the OCT4 phenotype and the morphological parameters of tumor malignancy. Ninety patients who received a cystectomy for bladder cancer were enrolled. The expression of OCT4 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The ratio of OCT4-positive cells was the lowest in pT1 (pathological assessment (p—tumor extent confined to mucosa (T1 tumors and the highest in pTis (non-papillary tumor extent confined to urothelium and pT2 (tumor extent including muscularis propria tumors. Information about the percentage of OCT4A-positive tumor cells could facilitate choosing the treatment mode in borderline pTis–pT1 (crossing the border of the basement membrane; the first stage of progression and pT1–pT2 (crossing the border of the muscularis propria; the second stage of progression cases: a higher percentage of OCT4A-positive cells should support more radical therapy. A significantly higher percentage of cases with moderate OCT4 intensity was found in metastasizing (the third stage of progression cases with >2 positive lymph nodes. The percentage of OCT4-positive cells was significantly higher for cancers with a high grade, higher non-classic differentiation number and greater aggressiveness of invasion. The differentiation, maturation and aggressiveness of tumor invasion appear to depend on the expression of the OCT4 phenotype in cancer cells, similar to the successive stages of malignancy progression in urothelial cancer.

  14. Loss of Sh3gl2/Endophilin A1 Is a Common Event in Urothelial Carcinoma that Promotes Malignant Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyama Majumdar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma (UC causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying urothelial cancer development and tumor progression are still largely unknown. Using informatics analysis, we identified Sh3gl2 (endophilin A1 as a bladder urothelium-enriched transcript. The gene encoding Sh3gl2 is located on chromosome 9p, a region frequently altered in UC. Sh3gl2 is known to regulate endocytosis of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in oncogenesis, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and c-Met. However, its role in UC pathogenesis is unknown. Informatics analysis of expression profiles as well as immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays revealed Sh3gl2 expression to be decreased in UC specimens compared to nontumor tissues. Loss of Sh3gl2 was associated with increasing tumor grade and with muscle invasion, which is a reliable predictor of metastatic disease and cancer-derived mortality. Sh3gl2 expression was undetectable in 19 of 20 human UC cell lines but preserved in the low-grade cell line RT4. Stable silencing of Sh3gl2 in RT4 cells by RNA interference 1 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in vitro, 2 inhibited EGF-induced EGFR internalization and increased EGFR activation, 3 stimulated phosphorylation of Src family kinases and STAT3, and 4 promoted growth of RT4 xenografts in subrenal capsule tissue recombination experiments. Conversely, forced re-expression of Sh3gl2 in T24 cells and silenced RT4 clones attenuated oncogenic behaviors, including growth and migration. Together, these findings identify loss of Sh3gl2 as a frequent event in UC development that promotes disease progression.

  15. Targeting MACC1 by RNA interference inhibits proliferation and invasion of bladder urothelial carcinoma in T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song-Tao; Ding, Xiang; Ni, Qing-Feng; Jin, Shao-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to research on whether MACC1 can serve as a potential target for gene therapy of human bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC). In this study, the expression of MACC1 gene was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) in the T24 cell (human BUC cell). The transcription level of MACC1 was detected by RT-PCR. Activities of MACC1, caspase-3, caspase-8, Bax and Met (mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor) protein were measured by Western blot. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by MTT and flow cytometry. The cell's invasion ability was performed on Matrigel transwell assay. We also detect MMP2 (metalloproteinase-2) proteins by ELISA. The results showed that the level of MACC1 mRNA and protein was significantly reduced after RNAi. MTT assay showed that the proliferation of T24 cell was decreased due to RNA interference. Apoptosis studies also showed that MACC1 gene interference in T24 loses its anti-apoptotic effects. The expression of apoptosis proteins (Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Bax) increased significantly due to the MACC1 RNAi. The level of Met protein was down-regulated obviously due to RNAi. Transwell assay showed that invasion abilities of T24 cells were reduced obviously due to MACC1 RNAi. Further studies showed that the secretion of MMP-2 was reduced by RNAi. It can conclude that the ability of proliferation and invasion in T24 cells can be inhibited by RNAi-targeting MACC1. As a result, MACC1 can serve as a potential target for gene therapy of human bladder urothelial carcinoma.

  16. The challenges of detecting circulating tumour cells in sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tellez-Gabriel, M.; Brown, H K; Young, R.; Heymann, M. F.; Heymann, D

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Sarcomas are a heterogenous group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, many of which have a propensity to develop distant metastases. Cancer cells that have escaped from the primary tumour are able to invade into surrounding tissues, to intravasate into the bloodstream to become Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs), and are responsible for the generation of distant metastases. Due to the rarity of these tumours and the absence of specific markers expressed by sarco...

  17. Acute renal failure in patients with tumour lysis sindrome

    OpenAIRE

    Poskurica Mileta; Petrović Dejan; Poskurica Mina

    2016-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies (leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, et al.), as well as solid tumours (renal, liver, lung, ovarian, etc.), can lead to acute or chronic renal failure. The most common clinical manifestation is acute renal failure within the tumour lysis syndrome (TLS). It is characterized by specific laboratory and clinical criteria in order to prove that kidney disorders result from cytolysis of tumour cells after chemotherapy regimen given, alt...

  18. Stroma and extracellular matrix proteins in canine tumours

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, studies on temporal and spatial changes in stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in canine gastrointestinal (GIT) tumours and canine transmissible venereal (CTVT) tumours are described. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, and ECM changes were investigated. We found that the myofibroblast is the most common stromal cell in canine GIT epithelial tumours and most likely originated from pre-existing fibroblast...

  19. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing t...

  20. B-1 cells and concomitant immunity in Ehrlich tumour progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, M C; Palos, M C; Osugui, L; Laurindo, M F; Masutani, D; Nonogaki, S; Bachi, A L L; Melo, F H M; Mariano, M

    2014-05-01

    Concomitant immunity is a phenomenon in which a tumour-bearing host is resistant to the growth of an implanted secondary tumour. Metastases are considered to be secondary tumours that develop spontaneously during primary tumour growth, suggesting the involvement of concomitant immunity in controlling the rise of metastases. It has been demonstrated that B-1 cells, a subset of B-lymphocytes found predominantly in pleural and peritoneal cavities, not only increase the metastatic development of murine melanoma B16F10, but also are capable of differentiating into mononuclear phagocytes, modulating inflammatory responses in wound healing, in oral tolerance and in Paracoccidiose brasiliensis infections. Here, we studied B-1 cells' participation in concomitant immunity during Ehrlich tumour progression. Our results show that B-1 cells obtained from BALB/c mice previously injected with Ehrlich tumour in the footpad were able to protect BALB/c and BALB/Xid mice against Ehrlich tumour challenge. In addition, it was demonstrated that BALB/Xid show faster tumour growth and have lost concomitant immunity, and that this state can be partially restored by reconstituting these animals with B-1 cells. However, further researches are required to establish the mechanism involving B-1 cells in Ehrlich tumour growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.